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Sample records for chaperone needle-subunit complex

  1. Regulation of Nod1 by Hsp90 chaperone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2005-08-15

    Nod1 and Nod2 proteins play important roles in mammalian innate immune responses as intracellular sensors for bacterial peptidoglycan. Nod1 and Nod2 share structural homology with many R proteins involved in plant disease resistance. It has been demonstrated that plant Hsp90 and its co-chaperone RAR1 are implicated in R-mediated disease resistance. Here the Chp-1 gene encoding a mammalian homologue of plant RAR1 was identified as a new target for transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), a stress-responsive HSF isoform. In addition, Nod1 is demonstrated to be a client protein of the Hsp90 chaperone complex containing the Chp-1. Chp-1 interacts with the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) and the ATPase domain of Hsp90 via two distinct zinc-binding cysteine and histidine rich domains (CHORDs). These findings suggest a common regulatory mechanism involving the Hsp90 chaperone complex in R-mediated disease resistance in plants and Nod1-mediated innate immune response in mammals.

  2. Molecular functions of the histone acetyltransferase chaperone complex Rtt109-Vps75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndsen, Christopher E; Tsubota, Toshiaki; Lindner, Scott E; Lee, Susan; Holton, James M; Kaufman, Paul D; Keck, James L; Denu, John M [UMASS, MED; (UCB); (UW-MED)

    2010-01-12

    Histone acetylation and nucleosome remodeling regulate DNA damage repair, replication and transcription. Rtt109, a recently discovered histone acetyltransferase (HAT) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, functions with the histone chaperone Asf1 to acetylate lysine K56 on histone H3 (H3K56), a modification associated with newly synthesized histones. In vitro analysis of Rtt109 revealed that Vps75, a Nap1 family histone chaperone, could also stimulate Rtt109-dependent acetylation of H3K56. However, the molecular function of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex remains elusive. Here we have probed the molecular functions of Vps75 and the Rtt109-Vps75 complex through biochemical, structural and genetic means. We find that Vps75 stimulates the kcat of histone acetylation by {approx}100-fold relative to Rtt109 alone and enhances acetylation of K9 in the H3 histone tail. Consistent with the in vitro evidence, cells lacking Vps75 showed a substantial reduction (60%) in H3K9 acetylation during S phase. X-ray structural, biochemical and genetic analyses of Vps75 indicate a unique, structurally dynamic Nap1-like fold that suggests a potential mechanism of Vps75-dependent activation of Rtt109. Together, these data provide evidence for a multifunctional HAT-chaperone complex that acetylates histone H3 and deposits H3-H4 onto DNA, linking histone modification and nucleosome assembly.

  3. Jasmonate signalling in Arabidopsis involves SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves A; Cheng, Zhenyu; Bush, Jenifer; Ausubel, Frederick M

    Plant hormones play pivotal roles in growth, development and stress responses. Although it is essential to our understanding of hormone signalling, how plants maintain a steady state level of hormone receptors is poorly understood. We show that mutation of the Arabidopsis thaliana co-chaperone SGT1b impairs responses to the plant hormones jasmonate, auxin and gibberellic acid, but not brassinolide and abscisic acid, and that SGT1b and its homologue SGT1a are involved in maintaining the steady state levels of the F-box proteins COI1 and TIR1, receptors for jasmonate and auxin, respectively. The association of SGT1b with COI1 is direct and is independent of the Arabidopsis SKP1 protein, ASK1. We further show that COI1 is a client protein of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes and that the complexes function in hormone signalling by stabilizing the COI1 protein. This study extends the SGT1b-HSP90 client protein list and broadens the functional scope of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose regulated protein 170-Pokemon complexes elicit a robust antitumor immune response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bangqing; Xian, Ronghua; Wu, Xianqu; Jing, Junjie; Chen, Kangning; Liu, Guojun; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2012-07-01

    Previous evidence suggested that the stress protein grp170 can function as a highly efficient molecular chaperone, binding to large protein substrates and acting as a potent vaccine against specific tumors when purified from the same tumor. In addition, Pokemon can be found in almost all malignant tumor cells and is regarded to be a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. However, the potential of the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex has not been well described. In the present study, the natural chaperone complex between grp170 and the Pokemon was formed by heat shock, and its immunogenicity was detected by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays in vitro and by tumor bearing models in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex could elicit T cell responses as determined by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays. In addition, immunized C57BL/6 mice were challenged with subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of Lewis cancer cells to induce primary tumors. Treatment of mice with the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex also significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex might represent a powerful approach to tumor immunotherapy and have significant potential for clinical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes are vital contributors to membrane bound replication and movement complexes during plant RNA virus infection.

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    Jeanmarie eVerchot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes play central roles in the formation of positive strand and negative strand RNA virus infection. This article examines the key cellular chaperones and discusses evidence that these factors are diverted from their cellular functions to play alternative roles in virus infection. For most chaperones discussed, their primary role in the cell is to ensure protein quality control. They are system components that drive substrate protein folding, complex assembly or disaggregation. Their activities often depend upon co-chaperones and ATP hydrolysis. During plant virus infection, Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins play central roles in the formation of membrane bound replication complexes for certain members of the tombusvirus, tobamovirus, potyvirus, dianthovirus, potexvirus, and carmovirus genus. There are several co-chaperones, including Yjd1, RME-8 and Hsp40 that associate with the bromovirus replication complex, pomovirus TGB2, and tospovirus Nsm movement proteins. There are also examples of plant viruses that rely on chaperone systems in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to support cell-to-cell movement. TMV relies on calreticulin to promote virus intercellular transport. Calreticulin also resides in the plasmodesmata and plays a role in calcium sequestration as well as glycoprotein folding. The pomovirus TGB2 interacts with RME-8 in the endosome. The potexvirus TGB3 protein stimulates expression of ER resident chaperones via the bZIP60 transcription factor. Upregulating factors involved in protein folding may be essential to handling the load of viral proteins translated along the ER. In addition TGB3 stimulates SKP1 which is a co-factor in proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins. Such chaperones and co-factors are potential targets for antiviral defense.

  6. Differential Regulation of G1 CDK Complexes by the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone System

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    Stephen T. Hallett

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Selective recruitment of protein kinases to the Hsp90 system is mediated by the adaptor co-chaperone Cdc37. We show that assembly of CDK4 and CDK6 into protein complexes is differentially regulated by the Cdc37-Hsp90 system. Like other Hsp90 kinase clients, binding of CDK4/6 to Cdc37 is blocked by ATP-competitive inhibitors. Cdc37-Hsp90 relinquishes CDK6 to D3- and virus-type cyclins and to INK family CDK inhibitors, whereas CDK4 is relinquished to INKs but less readily to cyclins. p21CIP1 and p27KIP1 CDK inhibitors are less potent than the INKs at displacing CDK4 and CDK6 from Cdc37. However, they cooperate with the D-type cyclins to generate CDK4/6-containing ternary complexes that are resistant to cyclin D displacement by Cdc37, suggesting a molecular mechanism to explain the assembly factor activity ascribed to CIP/KIP family members. Overall, our data reveal multiple mechanisms whereby the Hsp90 system may control formation of CDK4- and CDK6-cyclin complexes under different cellular conditions. : Hallett et al. reconstitute CDK4/6 client kinase handover from Cdc37-Hsp90 to CDK regulatory partners and propose a model for the assembly factor activity of CIP/KIP CDK inhibitors. They find that CDK4/6 inhibitors in clinical use can displace G1 CDKs from the Cdc37-Hsp90 chaperone system at submicromolar concentrations. Keywords: Cdc37, CDK, chaperone, CIP/KIP, cyclin D, Hsp90, INK, kinase, palbociclib, ribociclib

  7. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

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    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  8. Structure and Histone Binding Properties of the Vps75-Rtt109 Chaperone-Lysine Acetyltransferase Complex

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    Su, Dan; Hu, Qi; Zhou, Hui; Thompson, James R.; Xu, Rui-Ming; Zhang, Zhiguo; Mer, Georges (Mayo); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2011-11-02

    The histone chaperone Vps75 presents the remarkable property of stimulating the Rtt109-dependent acetylation of several histone H3 lysine residues within (H3-H4){sub 2} tetramers. To investigate this activation mechanism, we determined x-ray structures of full-length Vps75 in complex with full-length Rtt109 in two crystal forms. Both structures show similar asymmetric assemblies of a Vps75 dimer bound to an Rtt109 monomer. In the Vps75-Rtt109 complexes, the catalytic site of Rtt109 is confined to an enclosed space that can accommodate the N-terminal tail of histone H3 in (H3-H4){sub 2}. Investigation of Vps75-Rtt109-(H3-H4)2 and Vps75-(H3-H4)2 complexes by NMR spectroscopy-probed hydrogen/deuterium exchange suggests that Vps75 guides histone H3 in the catalytic enclosure. These findings clarify the basis for the enhanced acetylation of histone H3 tail residues by Vps75-Rtt109.

  9. Proteomics analysis of exported chaperone/co-chaperone complexes of P. falciparum reveals an array of complex protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Przyborski, Jude (Prof. Dr.)

    2016-01-01

    In order to grow and survive the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum synthesizes and exports hundreds of proteins in order to modify the infected red blood cell. In previous studies, our group found that two members of parasite encoded type II Hsp40s (PEF55, PFA660) associate with highly mobile structure in the infected host cell, which are referred to as J-dots. Furthermore, an exported parasite chaperone, PfHsp70x was i...

  10. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the TCP-1 Tubulin Chaperone Complex [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J; Rogala, Kacper B; Deane, Charlotte M; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G

    2015-06-29

    Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies, but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. The histone chaperone complex HIR maintains nucleosome occupancy and counterbalances impaired histone deposition in CAF-1 complex mutants.

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    Duc, Céline; Benoit, Matthias; Le Goff, Samuel; Simon, Lauriane; Poulet, Axel; Cotterell, Sylviane; Tatout, Christophe; Probst, Aline V

    2015-03-01

    Chromatin organization is essential for coordinated gene expression, genome stability, and inheritance of epigenetic information. The main components involved in chromatin assembly are specific complexes such as Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) and Histone Regulator (HIR), which deposit histones in a DNA synthesis-dependent or -independent manner, respectively. Here, we characterize the role of the plant orthologs Histone Regulator A (HIRA), Ubinuclein (UBN) and Calcineurin Binding protein 1 (CABIN1), which constitute the HIR complex. Arabidopsis loss-of-function mutants for the various subunits of the complex are viable, but hira mutants show reduced fertility. We show that loss of HIRA reduces extractable histone H3 protein levels and decreases nucleosome occupancy at both actively transcribed genes and heterochromatic regions. Concomitantly, HIRA contributes to maintenance of silencing of pericentromeric repeats and certain transposons. A genetic analysis based on crosses between mutants deficient in subunits of the CAF-1 and HIR complexes showed that simultaneous loss of both the CAF-1 and HIR histone H3 chaperone complexes severely affects plant survival, growth and reproductive development. Our results suggest that HIRA partially rescues impaired histone deposition in fas mutants to preserve nucleosome occupancy, implying plasticity in histone variant interaction and deposition. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Defining the specificity of cotranslationally acting chaperones by systematic analysis of mRNAs associated with ribosome-nascent chain complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta del Alamo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Polypeptides exiting the ribosome must fold and assemble in the crowded environment of the cell. Chaperones and other protein homeostasis factors interact with newly translated polypeptides to facilitate their folding and correct localization. Despite the extensive efforts, little is known about the specificity of the chaperones and other factors that bind nascent polypeptides. To address this question we present an approach that systematically identifies cotranslational chaperone substrates through the mRNAs associated with ribosome-nascent chain-chaperone complexes. We here focused on two Saccharomyces cerevisiae chaperones: the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP, which acts cotranslationally to target proteins to the ER, and the Nascent chain Associated Complex (NAC, whose function has been elusive. Our results provide new insights into SRP selectivity and reveal that NAC is a general cotranslational chaperone. We found surprising differential substrate specificity for the three subunits of NAC, which appear to recognize distinct features within nascent chains. Our results also revealed a partial overlap between the sets of nascent polypeptides that interact with NAC and SRP, respectively, and showed that NAC modulates SRP specificity and fidelity in vivo. These findings give us new insight into the dynamic interplay of chaperones acting on nascent chains. The strategy we used should be generally applicable to mapping the specificity, interplay, and dynamics of the cotranslational protein homeostasis network.

  13. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  14. Chaperone proteostasis in Parkinson's disease : stabilization of the Hsp70/alpha-synuclein complex by Hip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodveldt, Cintia; Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Andersson, August; van der Goot, Annemieke T.; Hsu, Shang-Te; Fernandez-Montesinos, Rafael; de Jong, Jannie; van Ham, Tjakko J.; Nollen, Ellen A.; Pozo, David; Christodoulou, John; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-dependent protein chaperone heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) displays broad anti-aggregation functions and has a critical function in preventing protein misfolding pathologies. According to in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease (PD), loss of Hsp70 activity is associated with

  15. Structural basis for assembly of Hsp90-Sgt1-CHORD protein complexes: implications for chaperoning of NLR innate immunity receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minghao; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Shirasu, Ken; Pearl, Laurence H

    2010-07-30

    Hsp90-mediated function of NLR receptors in plant and animal innate immunity depends on the cochaperone Sgt1 and, at least in plants, on a cysteine- and histidine-rich domains (CHORD)-containing protein Rar1. Functionally, CHORD domains are associated with CS domains, either within the same protein, as in the mammalian melusin and Chp1, or in separate but interacting proteins, as in the plant Rar1 and Sgt1. Both CHORD and CS domains are independently capable of interacting with the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and can coexist in complexes with Hsp90. We have now determined the structure of an Hsp90-CS-CHORD ternary complex, providing a framework for understanding the dynamic nature of Hsp90-Rar1-Sgt1 complexes. Mutational and biochemical analyses define the architecture of the ternary complex that recruits nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs) by manipulating the structural elements to control the ATPase-dependent conformational cycle of the chaperone. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure of trigger factor binding domain in biologically homologous complex with eubacterial ribosome reveals its chaperone action

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    Baram, David; Pyetan, Erez; Sittner, Assa; Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada (WIS-I)

    2010-07-13

    Trigger factor (TF), the first chaperone in eubacteria to encounter the emerging nascent chain, binds to the large ribosomal subunit in the vicinity of the protein exit tunnel opening and forms a sheltered folding space. Here, we present the 3.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the physiological complex of the large ribosomal subunit from the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with the N-terminal domain of TF (TFa) from the same organism. For anchoring, TFa exploits a small ribosomal surface area in the vicinity of proteins L23 and L29, by using its 'signature motif' as well as additional structural elements. The molecular details of TFa interactions reveal that L23 is essential for the association of TF with the ribosome and may serve as a channel of communication with the nascent chain progressing in the tunnel. L29 appears to induce a conformational change in TFa, which results in the exposure of TFa hydrophobic patches to the opening of the ribosomal exit tunnel, thus increasing its affinity for hydrophobic segments of the emerging nascent polypeptide. This observation implies that, in addition to creating a protected folding space for the emerging nascent chain, TF association with the ribosome prevents aggregation by providing a competing hydrophobic environment and may be critical for attaining the functional conformation necessary for chaperone activity.

  17. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availabili...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  18. Complex formation of CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystal vs. molecular chaperone in aqueous solution by hydrophobic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Hiromi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)]. E-mail: horihiro@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Iwami, Noriya [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tachibana, Fumi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Iizuka, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Zako, Tamotsu [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN - Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oda, Masaru [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yohda, Masafumi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tani, Toshiro [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    Feasibilities to stabilize CdSe/ZnS/trioctylphosphineoxide (TOPO) nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) in aqueous solutions with prefoldin macromolecules in their bioactive states are reported. Prefoldin is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of the group II chaperonins. As a protein folding intermediate is captured within its central cavity, so CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs would also be included within this cavity. It is also found the QDs can be much more dispersed in aqueous solutions and suspended for certain period of time by adding trace amount of t-butanol in the buffer prior to the mixing of the QDs mother solution. While biochemical procedures are evaluated with ordinary fluorescence measurements, possible complex formations are also evaluated with TIRFM single-molecule detection techniques.

  19. Purification of human transcription factors Nanog and Sox2, each in complex with Skp, an Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung Chul; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Jeong, Jin Hee; Huh, Jin Hoe; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2009-10-01

    Nanog and Sox2 are key transcriptional factors involved in self-renewal and pluripotency of stem cells in human and other mammals. Nanog and Sox2 contain homeodomain (HD) and high-mobility group (HMG) DNA-binding domain, respectively, for targeting them to their regulatory regions and the other regions with transactivation function by providing sites for recruiting other transcriptional regulators. To gain insights in the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of the other regions of Nanog and Sox2, we have tried to overproduce and purify full length wild-type human Nanog and Sox2 expressed in Escherichia coli. Interestingly, we found that Nanog and Sox2 were individually stabilized by tight interaction with Skp, an E. coli periplasmic chaperone, thereby enabling stable over-expression and purification of Nanog and Sox2, each in complex with Skp. Purified Skp complexes of Nanog and Sox maintained DNA-binding activity toward its cognate DNA sequence. A similar approach may be applicable for some other mammalian proteins that are unstable or difficult to over-express in E. coli.

  20. Structure of the Yersinia pestis type III secretion chaperone SycH in complex with a stable fragment of YscM2

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    Phan, Jason; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S. (NIH)

    2010-11-16

    Pathogenic Yersinia species use a type III secretion system to inject cytotoxic effector proteins directly into the cytosol of mammalian cells, where they neutralize the innate immune response by interfering with the signal-transduction pathways that control phagocytosis and inflammation. To be exported efficiently, some effectors must transiently associate with cognate cytoplasmic secretion chaperones. SycH is the chaperone for YopH, a potent eukaryotic-like protein tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for virulence. SycH also binds two negative regulators of type III secretion, YscM1 and YscM2, both of which share significant sequence homology with the chaperone-binding domain of YopH. Here, the structure of a complex between SycH and a stable fragment of YscM2 that was designed on the basis of limited proteolysis experiments is presented. The overall fold of SycH is very similar to the structures of other homodimeric secretion chaperones that have been determined to date. YscM2 wraps around SycH in an extended fashion, with some secondary but no tertiary structure, assuming a conformation distinct from the globular fold that it is predicted to adopt in the absence of SycH.

  1. Regulation of Rvb1/Rvb2 by a Domain within the INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Implicates the Yeast Rvbs as Protein Assembly Chaperones

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    Coral Y. Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric AAA+ ATPases Rvb1 and Rvb2 (Rvbs are essential for diverse processes ranging from metabolic signaling to chromatin remodeling, but their functions are unknown. While originally thought to act as helicases, recent proposals suggest that Rvbs act as protein assembly chaperones. However, experimental evidence for chaperone-like behavior is lacking. Here, we identify a potent protein activator of the Rvbs, a domain in the Ino80 ATPase subunit of the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex, termed Ino80INS. Ino80INS stimulates Rvbs’ ATPase activity by 16-fold while concomitantly promoting their dodecamerization. Using mass spectrometry, cryo-EM, and integrative modeling, we find that Ino80INS binds asymmetrically along the dodecamerization interface, resulting in a conformationally flexible dodecamer that collapses into hexamers upon ATP addition. Our results demonstrate the chaperone-like potential of Rvb1/Rvb2 and suggest a model where binding of multiple clients such as Ino80 stimulates ATP-driven cycling between hexamers and dodecamers, providing iterative opportunities for correct subunit assembly.

  2. Stability of the Human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 Chaperone Complex against Nucleotides and Hsp90 Inhibitors, and the Influence of Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sanne H.; Ingles, Donna J.; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P.; Betzi, Stephane; Georg, Gunda I.; Tash, Joseph S.; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in-vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM), while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands. PMID:25608045

  3. Stability of the human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 chaperone complex against nucleotides and Hsp90 inhibitors, and the influence of phosphorylation by casein kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sanne H; Ingles, Donna J; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P; Betzi, Stephane; Georg, Gunda I; Tash, Joseph S; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2015-01-19

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM), while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands.

  4. Stability of the Human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 Chaperone Complex against Nucleotides and Hsp90 Inhibitors, and the Influence of Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne H. Olesen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein–protein interaction (PPI inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2 did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM, while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands.

  5. Detection of changes in gene regulatory patterns, elicited by perturbations of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex, by visualizing multiple experiments with an animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echeverría Pablo C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To make sense out of gene expression profiles, such analyses must be pushed beyond the mere listing of affected genes. For example, if a group of genes persistently display similar changes in expression levels under particular experimental conditions, and the proteins encoded by these genes interact and function in the same cellular compartments, this could be taken as very strong indicators for co-regulated protein complexes. One of the key requirements is having appropriate tools to detect such regulatory patterns. Results We have analyzed the global adaptations in gene expression patterns in the budding yeast when the Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex is perturbed either pharmacologically or genetically. We integrated these results with publicly accessible expression, protein-protein interaction and intracellular localization data. But most importantly, all experimental conditions were simultaneously and dynamically visualized with an animation. This critically facilitated the detection of patterns of gene expression changes that suggested underlying regulatory networks that a standard analysis by pairwise comparison and clustering could not have revealed. Conclusions The results of the animation-assisted detection of changes in gene regulatory patterns make predictions about the potential roles of Hsp90 and its co-chaperone p23 in regulating whole sets of genes. The simultaneous dynamic visualization of microarray experiments, represented in networks built by integrating one's own experimental with publicly accessible data, represents a powerful discovery tool that allows the generation of new interpretations and hypotheses.

  6. Patients' attitudes to chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Roger

    1985-01-01

    In a survey of 200 female patients attending a five-man practice in a health centre, 75 per cent of the respondents stated that they would like to be offered a chaperone at pelvic examinations. Only six per cent would accept the offer if the examination was performed by their own doctor and 17 per cent if a different doctor examined them. Patients expressing a definite wish for a chaperone were significantly younger and were less likely to have had a previous pelvic examination. Those who def...

  7. Single molecule FRET detection in CdSe-QD donor and Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone acceptor complex by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro, E-mail: ttani@cc.tuat.ac.j [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Oda, Masaru [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Araki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi; Yohda, Masafumi [Division of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    We report single molecule spectroscopic evidence of FRET in CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone systems in buffer solutions. Donor QDs are core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on their outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's. As prototype molecular chaperones, we adopt prefoldins (PFDs), on which Cy5's are labeled as acceptors. Donor QDs possess two-fold degenerate emission dipoles perpendicular to the c-axis, due to their Wurtzite crystal structures, while acceptor Cy5's possess linear absorption and emission dipoles. Thus, their combination provides novel features to those in conventional FRET systems. PFDs are jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperones of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portions of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within their central cavities. Hence, PFDs will also capture the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs due to its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. By introducing simple microscope setup for single QD-PFD-Cy5 spectroscopy, we have successfully captured the emission spectra in FRET regime. We also have observed peculiar features in time evolution profiles of single QD emissions conjugated with Cy5-labeled PFDs under polarization modulation measurements. Notable point of our hybrid conjugates is that they are biochemically in living action. We describe our present results in relation to possible protein reactions.

  8. Bacterial proteostasis balances energy and chaperone utilization efficiently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Mantu; Farrell, Daniel W.; Dill, Ken A.

    2017-01-01

    Chaperones are protein complexes that help to fold and disaggregate a cell’s proteins. It is not understood how four major chaperone systems of Escherichia coli work together in proteostasis: the recognition, sorting, folding, and disaggregating of the cell’s many different proteins. Here, we model this machine. We combine extensive data on chaperoning, folding, and aggregation rates with expression levels of proteins and chaperones measured at different growth rates. We find that the proteostasis machine recognizes and sorts a client protein based on two biophysical properties of the client’s misfolded state (M state): its stability and its kinetic accessibility from its unfolded state (U state). The machine is energy-efficient (the sickest proteins use the most ATP-expensive chaperones), comprehensive (it can handle any type of protein), and economical (the chaperone concentrations are just high enough to keep the whole proteome folded and disaggregated but no higher). The cell needs higher chaperone levels in two situations: fast growth (when protein production rates are high) and very slow growth (to mitigate the effects of protein degradation). This type of model complements experimental knowledge by showing how the various chaperones work together to achieve the broad folding and disaggregation needs of the cell. PMID:28292901

  9. The iron chaperone poly(rC)-binding protein 2 forms a metabolon with the heme oxygenase 1/cytochrome P450 reductase complex for heme catabolism and iron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanatori, Izumi; Richardson, Des R; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kishi, Fumio

    2017-08-11

    Mammals incorporate a major proportion of absorbed iron as heme, which is catabolized by the heme oxygenase 1 (HO1)-NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) complex into biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and ferrous iron. Moreover, intestinal iron is incorporated as ferrous iron, which is transported via the iron importer, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). Recently, we demonstrated that the iron chaperone poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) can directly receive ferrous iron from DMT1 or transfer iron to the iron exporter, ferroportin 1. To promote intracellular iron flux, an iron chaperone may be essential for receiving iron generated by heme catabolism, but this hypothesis is untested so far. Herein, we demonstrate that HO1 binds to PCBP2, but not to other PCBP family members, namely PCBP1, PCBP3, or PCBP4. Interestingly, HO1 formed a complex with either CPR or PCBP2, and it was demonstrated that PCBP2 competes with CPR for HO1 binding. Using PCBP2-deletion mutants, we demonstrated that the PCBP2 K homology 3 domain is important for the HO1/PCBP2 interaction. In heme-loaded cells, heme prompted HO1-CPR complex formation and decreased the HO1/PCBP2 interaction. Furthermore, in vitro reconstitution experiments with purified recombinant proteins indicated that HO1 could bind to PCBP2 in the presence of heme, whereas loading of PCBP2 with ferrous iron caused PCBP2 to lose its affinity for HO1. These results indicate that ferrous iron released from heme can be bound by PCBP2 and suggest a model for an integrated heme catabolism and iron transport metabolon. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Chaperone-like properties of tobacco plastid thioredoxins f and m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Barrio, Ruth; Fernández-San Millán, Alicia; Carballeda, Jon; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Seguí-Simarro, José M.; Farran, Inmaculada

    2012-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous disulphide reductases that play important roles in the redox regulation of many cellular processes. However, some redox-independent functions, such as chaperone activity, have also been attributed to Trxs in recent years. The focus of our study is on the putative chaperone function of the well-described plastid Trxs f and m. To that end, the cDNA of both Trxs, designated as NtTrxf and NtTrxm, was isolated from Nicotiana tabacum plants. It was found that bacterially expressed tobacco Trx f and Trx m, in addition to their disulphide reductase activity, possessed chaperone-like properties. In vitro, Trx f and Trx m could both facilitate the reactivation of the cysteine-free form of chemically denatured glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (foldase chaperone activity) and prevent heat-induced malate dehydrogenase aggregation (holdase chaperone activity). Our results led us to infer that the disulphide reductase and foldase chaperone functions prevail when the proteins occur as monomers and the well-conserved non-active cysteine present in Trx f is critical for both functions. By contrast, the holdase chaperone activity of both Trxs depended on their oligomeric status: the proteins were functional only when they were associated with high molecular mass protein complexes. Because the oligomeric status of both Trxs was induced by salt and temperature, our data suggest that plastid Trxs could operate as molecular holdase chaperones upon oxidative stress, acting as a type of small stress protein. PMID:21948853

  11. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a Purported Inhibitor of Chaperone Protein GRP78, as an Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Reyna; Pao, Peng-Wen; Hofman, Florence M.; Chen, Thomas C.; Louie, Stan G.; Pirrung, Michael C.; Schönthal, Axel H.

    2013-01-01

    Verrucosidin (VCD) belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78) expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD’s anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose), but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin). However, VCD’s strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin) might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed. PMID:23755268

  12. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a purported inhibitor of chaperone protein GRP78, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmy Thomas

    Full Text Available Verrucosidin (VCD belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78 expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD's anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin. However, VCD's strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperones and their roles in the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael William Graner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a major site of passage for proteins en route to other organelles, to the cell surface, and to the extracellular space. It is also the transport route for peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome into the ER for loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I molecules for eventual antigen presentation at the cell surface. Chaperones within the ER are critical for many of these processes; however, outside the ER certain of those chaperones may play important and direct roles in immune responses. In some cases, particular ER chaperones have been utilized as vaccines against tumors or infectious disease pathogens when purified from tumor tissue or recombinantly generated and loaded with antigen. In other cases, the cell surface location of ER chaperones has implications for immune responses as well as possible tumor resistance. We have produced heat shock protein/chaperone protein-based cancer vaccines called CRCL (Chaperone-Rich Cell Lysate that are conglomerates of chaperones enriched from solid tumors by an isoelectric focusing technique. These preparations have been effective against numerous murine tumors, as well as in a canine with an advanced lung carcinoma treated with autologous CRCL. We also published extensive proteomic analyses of CRCL prepared from human surgically-resected tumor samples. Of note, these preparations contained at least ten ER chaperones and a number of other residents, along with many other chaperones/heat shock proteins. Gene ontology and network analyses utilizing these proteins essentially recapitulate the antigen presentation pathways and interconnections. In conjunction with our current knowledge of cell surface/extracellular ER chaperones, these data collectively suggest that a systems-level view may provide insight into the potent immune stimulatory activities of CRCL with an emphasis on the roles of ER components in those processes.

  14. From Chaperones to the Membrane with a BAM!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Ashlee M; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-10-01

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) play a central role in the integrity of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Unfolded OMPs (uOMPs) transit across the periplasm, and subsequent folding and assembly are crucial for biogenesis. Chaperones and the essential β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex facilitate these processes. In vitro studies suggest that some chaperones sequester uOMPs in internal cavities during their periplasmic transit to prevent deleterious aggregation. Upon reaching the outer membrane, the BAM complex acts catalytically to accelerate uOMP folding. Complementary in vivo experiments have revealed the localization and activity of the BAM complex in living cells. Completing an understanding of OMP biogenesis will require a holistic view of the interplay among the individual components discussed here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cetinbaş

    Full Text Available Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  16. Insight into the assembly of chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Stegmann, R.; Manakova, E.; Roessle, M.; Hermann, T.; Heumann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Martinsried (Germany); Axmann, S.; Plueckthun, A. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland); Wiedenmann, A. [HMI, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    Chaperones are proteins that help other proteins (substrate proteins) to acquire a `good` conformation. The folding is a dynamic process and involves repetitive binding and release of the chaperone components and of the substrate protein. Small-angle neutron scattering is used to investigate the structural changes that appear to happen during the folding process. (author). 2 refs.

  17. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studieshave reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate coppertrafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in ...

  18. Transcription elongation factor GreA has functional chaperone activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial GreA is an indispensable factor in the RNA polymerase elongation complex. It plays multiple roles in transcriptional elongation, and may be implicated in resistance to various stresses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we show that Escherichia coli GreA inhibits aggregation of several substrate proteins under heat shock condition. GreA can also effectively promote the refolding of denatured proteins. These facts reveal that GreA has chaperone activity. Distinct from many molecular chaperones, GreA does not form stable complexes with unfolded substrates. GreA overexpression confers the host cells with enhanced resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, GreA expression in the greA/greB double mutant could suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and dramatically alleviate the in vivo protein aggregation. The results suggest that bacterial GreA may act as chaperone in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that GreA, in addition to its function as a transcription factor, is involved in protection of cellular proteins against aggregation.

  19. Amyloid-β oligomers are sequestered by both intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priyanka; Meehan, Sarah; Carver, John A; Wilson, Mark R; Dobson, Christopher M; Klenerman, David

    2012-11-20

    The aberrant aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide into β-sheet rich, fibrillar structures proceeds via a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomeric intermediates that have been associated with neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular interest in this context are the mechanisms by which molecular chaperones, part of the primary biological defenses against protein misfolding, influence Aβ aggregation. We have used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to compare the interactions between distinct aggregation states (monomers, oligomers, and amyloid fibrils) of the AD-associated amyloid-β(1-40) peptide, and two molecular chaperones, both of which are upregulated in the brains of patients with AD and have been found colocalized with Aβ in senile plaques. One of the chaperones, αB-crystallin, is primarily found inside cells, while the other, clusterin, is predominantly located in the extracellular environment. We find that both chaperones bind to misfolded oligomeric species and form long-lived complexes, thereby preventing both their further growth into fibrils and their dissociation. From these studies, we conclude that these chaperones have a common mechanism of action based on sequestering Aβ oligomers. This conclusion suggests that these chaperones, both of which are ATP-independent, are able to inhibit potentially pathogenic Aβ oligomer-associated processes whether they occur in the extracellular or intracellular environment.

  20. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric ? ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt C-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the ? ring 1?4 . Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit 5?10 . We report that the base subassembly of the proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by th...

  1. The Role of Co-chaperones in Synaptic Proteostasis and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L. Gorenberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Synapses must be preserved throughout an organism's lifespan to allow for normal brain function and behavior. Synapse maintenance is challenging given the long distances between the termini and the cell body, reliance on axonal transport for delivery of newly synthesized presynaptic proteins, and high rates of synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis. Hence, synapses rely on efficient proteostasis mechanisms to preserve their structure and function. To this end, the synaptic compartment has specific chaperones to support its functions. Without proper synaptic chaperone activity, local proteostasis imbalances lead to neurotransmission deficits, dismantling of synapses, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we address the roles of four synaptic chaperones in the maintenance of the nerve terminal, as well as their genetic links to neurodegenerative disease. Three of these are Hsp40 co-chaperones (DNAJs: Cysteine String Protein alpha (CSPα; DNAJC5, auxilin (DNAJC6, and Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis 8 (RME-8; DNAJC13. These co-chaperones contain a conserved J domain through which they form a complex with heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70, enhancing the chaperone's ATPase activity. CSPα is a synaptic vesicle protein known to chaperone the t-SNARE SNAP-25 and the endocytic GTPase dynamin-1, thereby regulating synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis. Auxilin binds assembled clathrin cages, and through its interactions with Hsc70 leads to the uncoating of clathrin-coated vesicles, a process necessary for the regeneration of synaptic vesicles. RME-8 is a co-chaperone on endosomes and may have a role in clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis on this organelle. These three co-chaperones maintain client function by preserving folding and assembly to prevent client aggregation, but they do not break down aggregates that have already formed. The fourth synaptic chaperone we will discuss is Heat shock protein 110 (Hsp110, which interacts with Hsc70, DNAJAs, and

  2. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  3. Generalized iterative annealing model for the action of RNA chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of the rugged landscape of RNA molecules their folding is described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism according to which only a small fraction (ϕF) reaches the folded state while the remaining fraction of molecules is kinetically trapped in misfolded intermediates. The transition from the misfolded states to the native state can far exceed biologically relevant time. Thus, RNA folding in vivo is often aided by protein cofactors, called RNA chaperones, that can rescue RNAs from a multitude of misfolded structures. We consider two models, based on chemical kinetics and chemical master equation, for describing assisted folding. In the passive model, applicable for class I substrates, transient interactions of misfolded structures with RNA chaperones alone are sufficient to destabilize the misfolded structures, thus entropically lowering the barrier to folding. For this mechanism to be efficient the intermediate ribonucleoprotein complex between collapsed RNA and protein cofactor should have optimal stability. We also introduce an active model (suitable for stringent substrates with small ϕF), which accounts for the recent experimental findings on the action of CYT-19 on the group I intron ribozyme, showing that RNA chaperones do not discriminate between the misfolded and the native states. In the active model, the RNA chaperone system utilizes chemical energy of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to repeatedly bind and release misfolded and folded RNAs, resulting in substantial increase of yield of the native state. The theory outlined here shows, in accord with experiments, that in the steady state the native state does not form with unit probability.

  4. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambre eSala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the Trigger Factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen M. tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin (TA system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria.

  5. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Ambre; Bordes, Patricia; Genevaux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the trigger factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria.

  6. Chaperone-Assisted Formation of Cucurbit[8]uril-Based Molecular Porous Materials with One-Dimensional Channel Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Chen; Lan, Yue; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Gao, Ning; Ji, Jingwei; Li, Guangtao

    2016-09-06

    Exploiting "chaperone molecule" to navigate the successful assembly energy landscapes has been extensively used in biological systems, whereas in artifical supramolecular systems the "chaperone-assisted" assembly strategy to be used for the synthesis of materials with novel structures or the structures to be hardly prepared by "conventional" methods are still far from realizing the potential functions. In this work, we present a new example of small organic molecule acting as "chaperone molecule" in the facile formation of organic molecular porous materials. This porous material is composed of pure cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) macrocycle and possesses a honeycomb-like structure with an isolated and relatively large one-dimensional (1D) nanochannel. Moreover, it has good chemical and thermal stability, and shows a good adsorption capability for large molecule loading. Importantly, with the assistance of chaperone molecules, pure CB[8] could also be recycled even from a complex aqueous solution, demonstrating a powerful purification method of CB[8] from complex systems.

  7. Translational autocontrol of the Escherichia coli hfq RNA chaperone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecerek, Branislav; Moll, Isabella; Bläsi, Udo

    2005-06-01

    The conserved bacterial RNA chaperone Hfq has been shown to play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation. Here, we demonstrate that Hfq synthesis is autoregulated at the translational level. We have mapped two Hfq binding sites in the 5'-untranslated region of hfq mRNA and show that Hfq binding inhibits formation of the translation initiation complex. In vitro translation and in vivo studies further revealed that Hfq binding to both sites is required for efficient translational repression of hfq mRNA.

  8. The Malarial Exported PFA0660w Is an Hsp40 Co-Chaperone of PfHsp70-x.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O Daniyan

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum, the human pathogen responsible for the most dangerous malaria infection, survives and develops in mature erythrocytes through the export of proteins needed for remodelling of the host cell. Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein (Hsp family are prominent members of the exportome, including a number of Hsp40s and a Hsp70. PFA0660w, a type II Hsp40, has been shown to be exported and possibly form a complex with PfHsp70-x in the infected erythrocyte cytosol. However, the chaperone properties of PFA0660w and its interaction with human and parasite Hsp70s are yet to be investigated. Recombinant PFA0660w was found to exist as a monomer in solution, and was able to significantly stimulate the ATPase activity of PfHsp70-x but not that of a second plasmodial Hsp70 (PfHsp70-1 or a human Hsp70 (HSPA1A, indicating a potential specific functional partnership with PfHsp70-x. Protein binding studies in the presence and absence of ATP suggested that the interaction of PFA0660w with PfHsp70-x most likely represented a co-chaperone/chaperone interaction. Also, PFA0660w alone produced a concentration-dependent suppression of rhodanese aggregation, demonstrating its chaperone properties. Overall, we have provided the first biochemical evidence for the possible role of PFA0660w as a chaperone and as co-chaperone of PfHsp70-x. We propose that these chaperones boost the chaperone power of the infected erythrocyte, enabling successful protein trafficking and folding, and thereby making a fundamental contribution to the pathology of malaria.

  9. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the thermal inactivation and chaperone assisted folding of zebrafish dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Charu; Jain, Neha; Rashid, Naira; Chaudhuri Chattopadhyay, Pratima

    2017-11-11

    The maintenance of thermal stability is a major issue in protein engineering as many proteins tend to form inactive aggregates at higher temperatures. Zebrafish DHFR, an essential protein for the survival of cells, shows irreversible thermal unfolding transition. The protein exhibits complete unfolding and loss of activity at 50 °C as monitored by UV-Visible, fluorescence and far UV-CD spectroscopy. The heat induced inactivation of zDHFR follows first-order kinetics and Arrhenius law. The variation in the value of inactivation rate constant, k with increasing temperatures depicts faster inactivation at elevated temperatures. We have attempted to study the chaperoning ability of a shorter variant of GroEL (minichaperone) and compared it with that of conventional GroEL-GroES chaperone system. Both the chaperone system prevented the aggregation and assisted in refolding of zDHFR. The rate of thermal inactivation was significantly retarded in the presence of chaperones which indicate that it enhances the thermal stability of the enzyme. As minichaperone is less complex, and does not require high energy co-factors like ATP, for its function as compared to conventional GroEL-GroES system, it can act as a very good in vitro as well as in vivo chaperone model for monitoring assisted protein folding phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Molecular chaperones: The modular evolution of cellular networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-22

    Mar 22, 2007 ... Molecular chaperones play a prominent role in signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks of the cell. Recent advances uncovered that chaperones act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Chaperones have ...

  12. Effective Chaperone Selection and Training for Enhanced Youth Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily J.; Roop, Kelsey; MacArthur, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    This article identifies key strategies for selecting and training chaperones for youth programs. Although substantial research on volunteer core competencies and training exists, very little has been written to specifically address volunteers who serve in a chaperone capacity. We surveyed chaperones who had participated in an international youth…

  13. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 ...

  14. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Auluck P K, Chan H Y, Trojanowski J Q, Lee V M -Y and Bonini. N M 2002a Chaperone suppression of alpha-synuclein toxicity in a Drosophila model for Parkinson's disease; Science 295. 865–868. Bagatell R and Whitesell L 2004 Altered Hsp90 function in cancer: a unique therapeutic opportunity; Mol.

  15. Chaperone binding at the ribosomal exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Gajhede, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The exit tunnel region of the ribosome is well established as a focal point for interaction between the components that guide the fate of nascent polypeptides. One of these, the chaperone trigger factor (TF), associates with the 50S ribosomal subunit through its N-terminal domain. Targeting of TF...

  16. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.; Li, Huilin; Christie, P. J.

    2016-06-27

    ABSTRACT

    The chaperone/usher pathway is used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble adhesive surface structures known as pili or fimbriae. Uropathogenic strains ofEscherichia coliuse this pathway to assemble P and type 1 pili, which facilitate colonization of the kidney and bladder, respectively. Pilus assembly requires a periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane protein termed the usher. The chaperone allows folding of pilus subunits and escorts the subunits to the usher for polymerization into pili and secretion to the cell surface. Based on previous structures of mutant versions of the P pilus chaperone PapD, it was suggested that the chaperone dimerizes in the periplasm as a self-capping mechanism. Such dimerization is counterintuitive because the chaperone G1 strand, important for chaperone-subunit interaction, is buried at the dimer interface. Here, we show that the wild-type PapD chaperone also forms a dimer in the crystal lattice; however, the dimer interface is different from the previously solved structures. In contrast to the crystal structures, we found that both PapD and the type 1 pilus chaperone, FimC, are monomeric in solution. Our findings indicate that pilus chaperones do not sequester their G1 β-strand by forming a dimer. Instead, the chaperones may expose their G1 strand for facile interaction with pilus subunits. We also found that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, is flexible in solution while in complex with its chaperone, whereas the P pilus adhesin, PapGII, is rigid. Our study clarifies a crucial step in pilus biogenesis and reveals pilus-specific differences that may relate to biological function.

    IMPORTANCEPili are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens. UropathogenicE. colirelies on P and type 1 pili assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway to

  17. Approaches to the isolation and characterization of molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, William S; Boshoff, Aileen; Ludewig, Michael H; Hennessy, Fritha; Jung, Martin; Blatch, Gregory L

    2006-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are integral components of the cellular machinery involved in ensuring correct protein folding and the continued maintenance of protein structure. An understanding of these ubiquitous molecules is key to finding cures to protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jacob diseases. In addition, further understanding of chaperones will enhance our comprehension of the way the body copes with the environmental stresses that humans encounter daily. Our laboratory and our collaborators specialize in the production and characterization of chaperones from a wide variety of sources in order to gain a fuller understanding of how chaperones function in the cell. In this review, we primarily use the Hsp70/Hsp40 chaperone pair as an example to discuss recent advances in technology and reductions in cost that lend themselves to chaperone purification from both native and recombinant sources. Common assays to assess purified chaperone activity are also discussed.

  18. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. © 2015 Madru et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In

  20. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  1. Optimization of overexpression of a chaperone protein of steroid C25 dehydrogenase for biochemical and biophysical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzialkowska, Ewa; Mrugała, Beata; Rugor, Agnieszka; Czub, Mateusz P; Skotnicka, Anna; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Szaleniec, Maciej; Minor, Wladek; Lewiński, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Molybdenum is an essential nutrient for metabolism in plant, bacteria, and animals. Molybdoenzymes are involved in nitrogen assimilation and oxidoreductive detoxification, and bioconversion reactions of environmental, industrial, and pharmaceutical interest. Molybdoenzymes contain a molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which is a pyranopterin heterocyclic compound that binds a molybdenum atom via a dithiolene group. Because Moco is a large and complex compound deeply buried within the protein, molybdoenzymes are accompanied by private chaperone proteins responsible for the cofactor's insertion into the enzyme and the enzyme's maturation. An efficient recombinant expression and purification of both Moco-free and Moco-containing molybdoenzymes and their chaperones is of paramount importance for fundamental and applied research related to molybdoenzymes. In this work, we focused on a D1 protein annotated as a chaperone of steroid C25 dehydrogenase (S25DH) from Sterolibacterium denitrificans Chol-1S. The D1 protein is presumably involved in the maturation of S25DH engaged in oxygen-independent oxidation of sterols. As this chaperone is thought to be a crucial element that ensures the insertion of Moco into the enzyme and consequently, proper folding of S25DH optimization of the chaperon's expression is the first step toward the development of recombinant expression and purification methods for S25DH. We have identified common E. coli strains and conditions for both expression and purification that allow us to selectively produce Moco-containing and Moco-free chaperones. We have also characterized the Moco-containing chaperone by EXAFS and HPLC analysis and identified conditions that stabilize both forms of the protein. The protocols presented here are efficient and result in protein quantities sufficient for biochemical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations in southeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess the opinions, attitude, and preferences of Nigerian women to the presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations. Materials and Methods: A cross‑sectional survey of first time gynecology clinic attendees on their opinions, attitudes, and preferences with respect to the presence of chaperones ...

  3. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  4. Disaggregases, molecular chaperones that resolubilize protein aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Z. Mokry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of folding is a seminal event in the life of a protein, as it is essential for proper protein function and therefore cell physiology. Inappropriate folding, or misfolding, can not only lead to loss of function, but also to the formation of protein aggregates, an insoluble association of polypeptides that harm cell physiology, either by themselves or in the process of formation. Several biological processes have evolved to prevent and eliminate the existence of non-functional and amyloidogenic aggregates, as they are associated with several human pathologies. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins are specialized in controlling the quality of the proteins in the cell, specifically by aiding proper folding, and dissolution and clearance of already formed protein aggregates. The latter is a function of disaggregases, mainly represented by the ClpB/Hsp104 subfamily of molecular chaperones, that are ubiquitous in all organisms but, surprisingly, have no orthologs in the cytosol of metazoan cells. This review aims to describe the characteristics of disaggregases and to discuss the function of yeast Hsp104, a disaggregase that is also involved in prion propagation and inheritance.

  5. Out with the old: Hsp90 finds amino acid residue more useful than co-chaperone protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey D. Zuehlke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Redundant functions maintained from single to multi-cellular organisms have made Saccharomyces cere-visiae an important model for the analysis of con-served com-plex cellular processes. Yeast has been especially useful in understanding the regulation and function of the essential molecular chaperone, Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90. Research focused on Hsp90 has determined that it is highly regulated by both co-chaperones and posttranslational modifications. A recent study per-formed by (Zuehlke et al., 2017 demonstrates that the function of one co-chaperone in yeast is replaced by posttranslational modification (PTM of a single amino acid within Hsp90 in higher eukaryotes.

  6. The Role of System-Specific Molecular Chaperones in the Maturation of Molybdoenzymes in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Neumann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenesis of prokaryotic molybdoenzymes is a complex process with the final step representing the insertion of a matured molybdenum cofactor (Moco into a folded apoenzyme. Usually, specific chaperones of the XdhC family are required for the maturation of molybdoenzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria. Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are characterized to contain an equatorial sulfur ligand at the molybdenum center of Moco. This sulfur ligand is inserted into Moco while bound to the XdhC-like protein and before its insertion into the target enzyme. In addition, enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family bind either the molybdopterin (Mo-MPT form of Moco or the modified molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor (MCD. In both cases, only the matured cofactor is inserted by a proofreading process of XdhC. The roles of these specific XdhC-like chaperones during the biogenesis of enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria are described.

  7. Transthyretin Amyloidosis: Chaperone Concentration Changes and Increased Proteolysis in the Pathway to Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Transthyretin amyloidosis is a conformational pathology characterized by the extracellular formation of amyloid deposits and the progressive impairment of the peripheral nervous system. Point mutations in this tetrameric plasma protein decrease its stability and are linked to disease onset and progression. Since non-mutated transthyretin also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis and some mutation bearers are asymptomatic throughout their lives, non-genetic factors must also be involved in transthyretin amyloidosis. We discovered, using a differential proteomics approach, that extracellular chaperones such as fibrinogen, clusterin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-anti-trypsin and 2-macroglobulin are overrepresented in transthyretin amyloidosis. Our data shows that a complex network of extracellular chaperones are over represented in human plasma and we speculate that they act synergistically to cope with amyloid prone proteins. Proteostasis may thus be as important as point mutations in transthyretin amyloidosis.

  8. COLLABORATIVE ACTION OF CELL CYCLE, MOLECULAR CHAPERONES, AND UBIQUITIN PROTEASOME SYSTEM IN NEUROONCOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravir Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available he striking feature in tumor biology is uncontrolled cell proliferation and growth. Any alteration in the genetic make up may cause cell cycle deregulation that leads to aberrant cell cycle re-entry. These cascades ultimately cause cancerous situation with unwanted cell growth and division. There are several factors in cell cycle events that can lead to cancerous situations, for instance, checkpoint breach, extracellular signals, malfunctioned protein kinases, re-expression of cyclins and cyclin-CDKs complex. A crucial function of cyclinCDK complex is phosphorylation of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene that inhibits its ability to regulate the action of E2F transcription factor, which induces the gene expression and thus cause cell proliferation. To maintain the cellular homeostasis under tumorous condition, a line of protective mechanism is switched on such as availability of molecular chaperones; and if repair work fails, ubiquitin proteasome system comes in action. These regulatory mechanisms are highly conserved and play a critical role in maintaining several molecular events in the brain tumor or any stress situation. Misfolded proteins in tumor tissues are either rectified by chaperone activity upto a certain threshold or follow a degradation pathway by proteolytic activity of ubiquitinproteasome system. In this review, we have highlighted an extensive explorative potential of molecular chaperones in combination with ubiquitin E3 ligase enzymes activities in brain tumors.

  9. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  10. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  11. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  12. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  13. Heat stress response in plants: a complex game with chaperones ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2004-10-27

    Oct 27, 2004 ... The three Hsfs represent examples of striking functional diversification specialized for the three phases of the heat stress (hs) response (triggering, maintenance and recovery). This is best illustrated for the tomato Hsf system: HsfA1a is the master regulator responsible for hs-induced gene expression ...

  14. Atomistic simulations and network-based modeling of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone binding with Cdk4 client protein: A mechanism of chaperoning kinase clients by exploiting weak spots of intrinsically dynamic kinase domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Czemeres

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90 and Cdc37 chaperones in mediating conformational development and activation of diverse protein kinase clients is essential in signal transduction. There has been increasing evidence that the Hsp90-Cdc37 system executes its chaperoning duties by recognizing conformational instability of kinase clients and modulating their folding landscapes. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 kinase complex has provided a framework for dissecting regulatory principles underlying differentiation and recruitment of protein kinase clients to the chaperone machinery. In this work, we have combined atomistic simulations with protein stability and network-based rigidity decomposition analyses to characterize dynamic factors underlying allosteric mechanism of the chaperone-kinase cycle and identify regulatory hotspots that control client recognition. Through comprehensive characterization of conformational dynamics and systematic identification of stabilization centers in the unbound and client- bound Hsp90 forms, we have simulated key stages of the allosteric mechanism, in which Hsp90 binding can induce instability and partial unfolding of Cdk4 client. Conformational landscapes of the Hsp90 and Cdk4 structures suggested that client binding can trigger coordinated dynamic changes and induce global rigidification of the Hsp90 inter-domain regions that is coupled with a concomitant increase in conformational flexibility of the kinase client. This process is allosteric in nature and can involve reciprocal dynamic exchanges that exert global effect on stability of the Hsp90 dimer, while promoting client instability. The network-based rigidity analysis and emulation of thermal unfolding of the Cdk4-cyclin D complex and Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 complex revealed weak spots of kinase instability that are present in the native Cdk4 structure and are targeted by the chaperone during client recruitment. Our findings

  15. Atomistic simulations and network-based modeling of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone binding with Cdk4 client protein: A mechanism of chaperoning kinase clients by exploiting weak spots of intrinsically dynamic kinase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czemeres, Josh; Buse, Kurt; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90 and Cdc37 chaperones in mediating conformational development and activation of diverse protein kinase clients is essential in signal transduction. There has been increasing evidence that the Hsp90-Cdc37 system executes its chaperoning duties by recognizing conformational instability of kinase clients and modulating their folding landscapes. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 kinase complex has provided a framework for dissecting regulatory principles underlying differentiation and recruitment of protein kinase clients to the chaperone machinery. In this work, we have combined atomistic simulations with protein stability and network-based rigidity decomposition analyses to characterize dynamic factors underlying allosteric mechanism of the chaperone-kinase cycle and identify regulatory hotspots that control client recognition. Through comprehensive characterization of conformational dynamics and systematic identification of stabilization centers in the unbound and client- bound Hsp90 forms, we have simulated key stages of the allosteric mechanism, in which Hsp90 binding can induce instability and partial unfolding of Cdk4 client. Conformational landscapes of the Hsp90 and Cdk4 structures suggested that client binding can trigger coordinated dynamic changes and induce global rigidification of the Hsp90 inter-domain regions that is coupled with a concomitant increase in conformational flexibility of the kinase client. This process is allosteric in nature and can involve reciprocal dynamic exchanges that exert global effect on stability of the Hsp90 dimer, while promoting client instability. The network-based rigidity analysis and emulation of thermal unfolding of the Cdk4-cyclin D complex and Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 complex revealed weak spots of kinase instability that are present in the native Cdk4 structure and are targeted by the chaperone during client recruitment. Our findings suggested that this

  16. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel E. Lackie; Rachel E. Lackie; Andrzej Maciejewski; Andrzej Maciejewski; Valeriy G. Ostapchenko; Jose Marques-Lopes; Wing-Yiu Choy; Martin L. Duennwald; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide—either soluble (oligomers) or insoluble (plaques) and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degrada...

  17. Basis of recognition between the NarJ chaperone and the N-terminus of the NarG subunit from Escherichia coli nitrate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakian, Silva; Lafitte, Daniel; Vergnes, Alexandra; Pimentel, Cyril; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Toci, René; Claude, Jean-Baptiste; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Magalon, Axel

    2010-04-01

    A novel class of molecular chaperones co-ordinates the assembly and targeting of complex metalloproteins by binding to an amino-terminal peptide of the cognate substrate. We have previously shown that the NarJ chaperone interacts with the N-terminus of the NarG subunit coming from the nitrate reductase complex, NarGHI. In the present study, NMR structural analysis revealed that the NarG(1-15) peptide adopts an alpha-helical conformation in solution. Moreover, NarJ recognizes and binds the helical NarG(1-15) peptide mostly via hydrophobic interactions as deduced from isothermal titration calorimetry analysis. NMR and differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed a modification of NarJ conformation during complex formation with the NarG(1-15) peptide. Isothermal titration calorimetry and BIAcore experiments support a model whereby the protonated state of the chaperone controls the time dependence of peptide interaction.

  18. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  19. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  20. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  1. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-04

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP-used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor's nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  2. DEAD-box proteins as RNA helicases and chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmoskaite, Inga; Russell, Rick

    2010-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous in RNA-mediated processes and function by coupling cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to changes in affinity for single-stranded RNA. Many DEAD-box proteins use this basic mechanism as the foundation for a version of RNA helicase activity, efficiently separating the strands of short RNA duplexes in a process that involves little or no translocation. This activity, coupled with mechanisms to direct different DEAD-box proteins to their physiological substrates, allows them to promote RNA folding steps and rearrangements and to accelerate remodeling of RNA-protein complexes. This review will describe the properties of DEAD-box proteins as RNA helicases and the current understanding of how the energy from ATPase activity is used to drive the separation of RNA duplex strands. It will then describe how the basic biochemical properties allow some DEAD-box proteins to function as chaperones by promoting RNA folding reactions, with a focus on the self-splicing group I and group II intron RNAs. PMID:21297876

  3. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: From Defective Chaperoning of snRNP Assembly to Neuromuscular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Lanfranco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA is a neuromuscular disorder that results from decreased levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN protein. SMN is part of a multiprotein complex that also includes Gemins 2–8 and Unrip. The SMN-Gemins complex cooperates with the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 complex, whose constituents include WD45, PRMT5 and pICln. Both complexes function as molecular chaperones, interacting with and assisting in the assembly of an Sm protein core onto small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs to generate small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are the operating components of the spliceosome. Molecular and structural studies have refined our knowledge of the key events taking place within the crowded environment of cells and the numerous precautions undertaken to ensure the faithful assembly of snRNPs. Nonetheless, it remains unclear whether a loss of chaperoning in snRNP assembly, considered as a “housekeeping” activity, is responsible for the selective neuromuscular phenotype in SMA. This review thus shines light on in vivo studies that point toward disturbances in snRNP assembly and the consequential transcriptome abnormalities as the primary drivers of the progressive neuromuscular degeneration underpinning the disease. Disruption of U1 snRNP or snRNP assembly factors other than SMN induces phenotypes that mirror aspects of SMN deficiency, and splicing defects, described in numerous SMA models, can lead to a DNA damage and stress response that compromises the survival of the motor system. Restoring the correct chaperoning of snRNP assembly is therefore predicted to enhance the benefit of SMA therapeutic modalities based on augmenting SMN expression.

  4. Comparison of the carboxy-terminal DP-repeat region in the co-chaperones Hop and Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory M; Huffman, Holly; Smith, David F

    2003-01-01

    Functional steroid receptor complexes are assembled and maintained by an ordered pathway of interactions involving multiple components of the cellular chaperone machinery. Two of these components, Hop and Hip, serve as co-chaperones to the major heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, and participate in intermediate stages of receptor assembly. In an effort to better understand the functions of Hop and Hip in the assembly process, we focused on a region of similarity located near the C-terminus of each co-chaperone. Contained within this region is a repeated sequence motif we have termed the DP repeat. Earlier mutagenesis studies implicated the DP repeat of either Hop or Hip in Hsp70 binding and in normal assembly of the co-chaperones with progesterone receptor (PR) complexes. We report here that the DP repeat lies within a protease-resistant domain that extends to or is near the C-terminus of both co-chaperones. Point mutations in the DP repeats render the C-terminal regions hypersensitive to proteolysis. In addition, a Hop DP mutant displays altered proteolytic digestion patterns, which suggest that the DP-repeat region influences the folding of other Hop domains. Although the respective DP regions of Hop and Hip share sequence and structural similarities, they are not functionally interchangeable. Moreover, a double-point mutation within the second DP-repeat unit of Hop that converts this to the sequence found in Hip disrupts Hop function; however, the corresponding mutation in Hip does not alter its function. We conclude that the DP repeats are important structural elements within a C-terminal domain, which is important for Hop and Hip function.

  5. Artificial chaperone-assisted refolding of denatured-reduced lysozyme: modulation of the competition between renaturation and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, D; Gellman, S H

    1996-12-10

    Conditions that promote renaturation of an unfolded protein also promote protein aggregation, in many cases, because these competing intramolecular and intermolecular processes are driven by similar networks of noncovalent interactions. The GroEL/GroES system and related biological chaperones facilitate the renaturation of substrate proteins by minimizing the aggregation pathway. We have devised a two-step method in which small molecules, "artificial chaperones," facilitate protein refolding from a chemically denatured state. In the first step, the protein is captured by a detergent as guanidinium chloride is diluted to a non-denaturing concentration; formation of a protein-detergent complex prevents both protein aggregation and proper refolding. In the second step, a cyclodextrin strips detergent from the protein, allowing the protein to refold. Here we describe the first application of this method to a protein that must form disulfides in the native state. Lysozyme (hen egg white) can be refolded from the Gdm-denatured, DTT-reduced state in good yields at final protein concentrations as high as 1 mg/mL with the artificial chaperone method. Several mechanistic aspects of artificial chaperone-assisted refolding have been probed, and a detailed mechanism for the kinetically controlled stripping step is proposed.

  6. Off-pathway assembly of fimbria subunits is prevented by chaperone CfaA of CFA/I fimbriae from enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rui; Liu, Yang; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2016-12-01

    The assembly of the class 5 colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae of enterotoxigenic E. coli was proposed to proceed via the alternate chaperone-usher pathway. Here, we show that in the absence of the chaperone CfaA, CfaB, the major pilin subunit of CFA/I fimbriae, is able to spontaneously refold and polymerize into cyclic trimers. CfaA kinetically traps CfaB to form a metastable complex that can be stabilized by mutations. Crystal structure of the stabilized complex reveals distinctive interactions provided by CfaA to trap CfaB in an assembly competent state through donor-strand complementation (DSC) and cleft-mediated anchorage. Mutagenesis indicated that DSC controls the stability of the chaperone-subunit complex and the cleft-mediated anchorage of the subunit C-terminus additionally assist in subunit refolding. Surprisingly, over-stabilization of the chaperone-subunit complex led to delayed fimbria assembly, whereas destabilizing the complex resulted in no fimbriation. Thus, CfaA acts predominantly as a kinetic trap by stabilizing subunit to avoid its off-pathway self-polymerization that results in energetically favorable trimers and could serve as a driving force for CFA/I pilus assembly, representing an energetic landscape unique to class 5 fimbria assembly. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Refolding and purification of histidine-tagged protein by artificial chaperone-assisted metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Jun; Sun, Yan

    2009-07-03

    This article has proposed an artificial chaperone-assisted immobilized metal affinity chromatography (AC-IMAC) for on-column refolding and purification of histidine-tagged proteins. Hexahistidine-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and refolded and purified from urea-solubilized inclusion bodies by the strategy. The artificial chaperone system was composed of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). In the refolding process, denatured protein was mixed with CTAB to form a protein-CTAB complex. The mixture was then loaded to IMAC column and the complex was bound via metal chelating to the histidine tag. This was followed by washing with a refolding buffer containing beta-CD that removed CTAB from the bound protein and initiated on-column refolding. The effect of the washing time (i.e., on-column refolding time) on mass and fluorescence recoveries was examined. Extensive studies by comparison with other related refolding techniques have proved the advantages of AC-IMAC. In the on-column refolding, the artificial chaperone system suppressed protein interactions and facilitated protein folding to its native structure. So, the on-column refolding by AC-IMAC led to 99% pure EGFP with a fluorescence recovery of 80%. By comparison at a similar final EGFP concentration (0.6-0.8 mg/mL), this fluorescence recovery value was not only much higher than direct dilution (14%) and AC-assisted refolding (26%) in bulk solutions, but also superior to its partner, IMAC (60%). The operating conditions would be further optimized to improve the refolding efficiency.

  8. PfClpC Is an Essential Clp Chaperone Required for Plastid Integrity and Clp Protease Stability in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentin, Anat; Cobb, David W; Fishburn, Jillian D; Cipriano, Michael J; Kim, Paul S; Fierro, Manuel A; Striepen, Boris; Muralidharan, Vasant

    2017-11-14

    The deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains a nonphotosynthetic plastid, known as the apicoplast, that functions to produce essential metabolites, and drugs that target the apicoplast are clinically effective. Several prokaryotic caseinolytic protease (Clp) genes have been identified in the Plasmodium genome. Using phylogenetic analysis, we focused on the Clp members that may form a regulated proteolytic complex in the apicoplast. We genetically targeted members of this complex and generated conditional mutants of the apicoplast-localized PfClpC chaperone and PfClpP protease. Conditional inhibition of the PfClpC chaperone resulted in growth arrest and apicoplast loss and was rescued by addition of the essential apicoplast-derived metabolite IPP. Using a double-conditional mutant parasite line, we discovered that the chaperone activity is required to stabilize the mature protease, revealing functional interactions. These data demonstrate the essential function of PfClpC in maintaining apicoplast integrity and its role in regulating the proteolytic activity of the Clp complex. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PfClpC Is an Essential Clp Chaperone Required for Plastid Integrity and Clp Protease Stability in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Florentin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains a nonphotosynthetic plastid, known as the apicoplast, that functions to produce essential metabolites, and drugs that target the apicoplast are clinically effective. Several prokaryotic caseinolytic protease (Clp genes have been identified in the Plasmodium genome. Using phylogenetic analysis, we focused on the Clp members that may form a regulated proteolytic complex in the apicoplast. We genetically targeted members of this complex and generated conditional mutants of the apicoplast-localized PfClpC chaperone and PfClpP protease. Conditional inhibition of the PfClpC chaperone resulted in growth arrest and apicoplast loss and was rescued by addition of the essential apicoplast-derived metabolite IPP. Using a double-conditional mutant parasite line, we discovered that the chaperone activity is required to stabilize the mature protease, revealing functional interactions. These data demonstrate the essential function of PfClpC in maintaining apicoplast integrity and its role in regulating the proteolytic activity of the Clp complex.

  10. Energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dots vs. labelled molecular chaperone systems by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Horiuchi, Hiromi; Usukura, Eiji; Sakai, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yohda, Masafumi [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Resonant energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labelled molecular chaperone systems is observed with single molecule imaging technique. Photonic QDs are the core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on the outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's, and prefoldin (PFD) is used as prototype molecular chaperons. PFD is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portion of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within its central cavity. So the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs can also be captured be cause of its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. We have found one possible reaction pathway to get such artificial complex in aqueous solutions with keeping bioactivities of the proteins. Performance of the complex is evaluated by TIRF imaging microscopy. As the proteins are transparent in visible wavelength region, labeling dyes, Cy5, which also work as acceptors, are connected to detect their behaviors microscopically. Foerster type energy transfer is observed from the QD donors to Cy5-labeled PFD acceptors in single molecule level, which can be a distinct evidence for the complex formation. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Chaperone Use by Residents During Pelvic, Breast, Testicular, and Rectal Exams

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrenthal, Deborah B; Farber, Neil J.; Collier, Virginia U; Aboff, Brian M

    2000-01-01

    We designed a questionnaire survey to study internal medicine residents' plans to use a chaperone during the pelvic, breast, rectal, and testicular examinations. We found chaperone use by male and female residents differed markedly, and neither group planned to use chaperones universally. When examining female patients, male residents overall were very likely to use a chaperone during a pelvic exam, but less likely for the breast exam and rectal exam. For the female resident, there was a sign...

  12. The acidocalcisome vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 catalyzes the synthesis of polyphosphate in insect-stages of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Paul N; Lander, Noelia; Kurup, Samarchith P; Reiss, Laura; Brewer, Jessica; Soares Medeiros, Lia C; Miranda, Kildare; Docampo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate is a polymer of inorganic phosphate found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Polyphosphate typically accumulates in acidic, calcium-rich organelles known as acidocalcisomes, and recent research demonstrated that vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 catalyzes its synthesis in yeast. The human pathogens Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi possess vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 homologs. We demonstrate that T. cruzi vacuolar transporter chaperone 4 localizes to acidocalcisomes of epimastigotes by immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy and that the recombinant catalytic region of the T. cruzi enzyme is a polyphosphate kinase. RNA interference of the T. brucei enzyme in procyclic form parasites reduced short chain polyphosphate levels and resulted in accumulation of pyrophosphate. These results suggest that this trypanosome enzyme is an important component of a polyphosphate synthase complex that utilizes ATP to synthesize and translocate polyphosphate to acidocalcisomes in insect stages of these parasites. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  13. The Hsp90 chaperone in action: following the ATP cycle of a molecular machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagoz, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding in the cell is assisted by molecular chaperones. Hsp90 is the most abundant molecular chaperone in the cytosol. It facilitates the folding and activation of mainly signalling molecules. Its chaperoning of regulatory proteins places Hsp90 in the cross road of several important

  14. HspB8 Participates in Protein Quality Control by a Non-chaperone-like Mechanism That Requires eIF2 alpha Phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carra, Serena; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Lambert, Herman; Landry, Jacques; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2009-01-01

    Aggregation of mutated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease. We previously reported that overexpression of the HspB8 . Bag3 chaperone complex suppresses mutated huntingtin aggregation via autophagy. Classically, HspB proteins are thought to act as

  15. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    for variations in the HSPD1 and HSPE1 genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone complex: two patients with multiple mitochondrial enzyme deficiency, 61 sudden infant death syndrome cases (MIM: #272120), and 60 patients presenting with ethylmalonic aciduria carrying non-synonymous susceptibility...

  16. Tsp36, a tapeworm small heat-shock protein with a duplicated alpha-crystallin domain, forms dimers and tetramers with good chaperone-like activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappe, G.; Aquilina, J.A.; Wunderink, L.; Kamps, B.; Robinson, C.V.; Garate, T.; Boelens, W.C.; Jong, W.W.W. de

    2004-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), which range in monomer size between 12 and 42 kDa, are characterized by a conserved C-terminal alpha-crystallin domain of 80-100 residues. They generally form large homo- or heteromeric complexes, and typically have in vitro chaperone-like activity, keeping

  17. The Role of Histidine-Proline-Rich Glycoprotein as Zinc Chaperone for Skeletal Muscle AMP Deaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ranieri-Raggi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metallochaperones function as intracellular shuttles for metal ions. At present, no evidence for the existence of any eukaryotic zinc-chaperone has been provided although metallochaperones could be critical for the physiological functions of Zn2+ metalloenzymes. We propose that the complex formed in skeletal muscle by the Zn2+ metalloenzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD and the metal binding protein histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG acts in this manner. HPRG is a major plasma protein. Recent investigations have reported that skeletal muscle cells do not synthesize HPRG but instead actively internalize plasma HPRG. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS performed on fresh preparations of rabbit skeletal muscle AMPD provided evidence for a dinuclear zinc site in the enzyme compatible with a (μ-aqua(μ-carboxylatodizinc(II core with two histidine residues at each metal site. XAS on HPRG isolated from the AMPD complex showed that zinc is bound to the protein in a dinuclear cluster where each Zn2+ ion is coordinated by three histidine and one heavier ligand, likely sulfur from cysteine. We describe the existence in mammalian HPRG of a specific zinc binding site distinct from the His-Pro-rich region. The participation of HPRG in the assembly and maintenance of skeletal muscle AMPD by acting as a zinc chaperone is also demonstrated.

  18. The Clp chaperones and proteases of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L Y; Artz, Jennifer D; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Goodman, C Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A

    2010-12-03

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  20. Presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations in southeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-12

    Dec 12, 2012 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Oct-Dec 2013 • Vol 16 • Issue 4. Abstract. Objectives: To assess the opinions, attitude, and preferences of Nigerian women to the presence of chaperones during pelvic examinations. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of first time gynecology clinic ...

  1. Treatment of Fabry's Disease with the Pharmacologic Chaperone Migalastat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germain, Dominique P; Hughes, Derralynn A; Nicholls, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry's disease, an X-linked disorder of lysosomal α-galactosidase deficiency, leads to substrate accumulation in multiple organs. Migalastat, an oral pharmacologic chaperone, stabilizes specific mutant forms of α-galactosidase, increasing enzyme trafficking to lysosomes. METHODS: The...

  2. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierling, Elizabeth [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  3. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  4. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their

  5. At the Start of the Sarcomere: A Previously Unrecognized Role for Myosin Chaperones and Associated Proteins during Early Myofibrillogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Layne Myhre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of striated muscle in vertebrates requires the assembly of contractile myofibrils, consisting of highly ordered bundles of protein filaments. Myofibril formation occurs by the stepwise addition of complex proteins, a process that is mediated by a variety of molecular chaperones and quality control factors. Most notably, myosin of the thick filament requires specialized chaperone activity during late myofibrillogenesis, including that of Hsp90 and its cofactor, Unc45b. Unc45b has been proposed to act exclusively as an adaptor molecule, stabilizing interactions between Hsp90 and myosin; however, recent discoveries in zebrafish and C. elegans suggest the possibility of an earlier role for Unc45b during myofibrillogenesis. This role may involve functional control of nonmuscle myosins during the earliest stages of myogenesis, when premyofibril scaffolds are first formed from dynamic cytoskeletal actin. This paper will outline several lines of evidence that converge to build a model for Unc45b activity during early myofibrillogenesis.

  6. Chaperone therapy for neuronopathic lysosomal diseases: competitive inhibitors as chemical chaperones for enhancement of mutant enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Seiichiro; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2009-05-26

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular approach to lysosomal diseases, a group of human genetic diseases causing severe brain damage. We found two valienamine derivatives, N-octyl-4-epi-beta-valienamine (NOEV) and N-octyl-beta-valienamine (NOV), as promising therapeutic agents for human beta-galactosidase deficiency disorders (mainly G(M1)-gangliosidosis) and beta-glucosidase deficiency disorders (Gaucher disease), respectively. We briefly reviewed the historical background of research in carbasugar glycosidase inhibitors. Originally NOEV and NOV had been discovered as competitive inhibitors, and then their paradoxical bioactivities as chaperones were confirmed in cultured fibroblasts from patients with these disorders. Subsequently G(M1)-gangliosidosis model mice were developed and useful for experimental studies. Orally administered NOEV entered the brain through the blood-brain barrier, enhanced beta-galactosidase activity, reduced substrate storage, and improved neurological deterioration clinically. Furthermore, we executed computational analysis for prediction of molecular interactions between beta-galactosidase and NOEV. Some preliminary results of computational analysis of molecular interaction mechanism are presented in this article. NOV also showed the chaperone effect toward several beta-glucosidase gene mutations in Gaucher disease. We hope chaperone therapy will become available for some patients with G(M1)-gangliosidosis, Gaucher disease, and potentially other lysosomal storage diseases with central nervous system involvement.

  7. Chaperones and multitasking proteins in the nucleolus: networking together for survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bański, Piotr; Kodiha, Mohamed; Stochaj, Ursula

    2010-07-01

    The nucleolus has emerged as a key player that regulates cell growth, survival and the recovery from stress. Progress in proteomics made it possible to sequence the nucleolar proteome under different physiological conditions. Together with other research, this work revealed the presence of multiple chaperones and co-chaperones in the nucleolus. Molecular chaperones are components of a larger network that promotes protein homeostasis, thereby providing continuous adaptation to a changing environment. Recent studies suggest that the cellular chaperone network is divided into individual branches which orchestrate specific functions. Input from separate branches is then combined to 'fine-tune' the cellular proteostasis network. Based on the latest developments in nucleolar and chaperone biology, we speculate that a unique network comprising chaperones, co-chaperones and multitasking proteins is located in nucleoli. This network supports and regulates fundamental biological processes, including ribosome biogenesis, cell signaling, and the stress response. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Pasheva, Evdokia, E-mail: eva@bio21.bas.bg [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  9. Clp chaperone-proteases: structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Wolfgang; Maglica, Zeljka; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2009-11-01

    Clp proteases are the most widespread energy-dependent proteases in bacteria. Their two-component architecture of protease core and ATPase rings results in an inventory of several Clp protease complexes that often coexist. Here, we present insights into Clp protease function, from their assembly to substrate recruitment and processing, and how this is coupled to the expense of energy.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum proteins SDF2 and SDF2L1 act as components of the BiP chaperone cycle to prevent protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Tsutomu; Suno, Ryoji; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Wada, Ikuo; Hosokawa, Nobuko

    2017-08-01

    The folding of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is assisted by ER-resident chaperone proteins. BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein), a member of the HSP70 family, plays a central role in protein quality control. The chaperone function of BiP is regulated by its intrinsic ATPase activity, which is stimulated by ER-resident proteins of the HSP40/DnaJ family, including ERdj3. Here, we report that two closely related proteins, SDF2 and SDF2L1, regulate the BiP chaperone cycle. Both are ER-resident, but SDF2 is constitutively expressed, whereas SDF2L1 expression is induced by ER stress. Both luminal proteins formed a stable complex with ERdj3 and potently inhibited the aggregation of different types of misfolded ER cargo. These proteins associated with non-native proteins, thus promoting the BiP-substrate interaction cycle. A dominant-negative ERdj3 mutant that inhibits the interaction between ERdj3 and BiP prevented the dissociation of misfolded cargo from the ERdj3-SDF2L1 complex. Our findings indicate that SDF2 and SDF2L1 associate with ERdj3 and act as components in the BiP chaperone cycle to prevent the aggregation of misfolded proteins, partly explaining the broad folding capabilities of the ER under various physiological conditions. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Importance of electrostatic interactions in the association of intrinsically disordered histone chaperone Chz1 and histone H2A.Z-H2B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    Full Text Available Histone chaperones facilitate assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Understanding the process of how histone chaperones associate and dissociate from the histones can help clarify their roles in chromosome metabolism. Some histone chaperones are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs. Recent studies of IDPs revealed that the recognition of the biomolecules is realized by the flexibility and dynamics, challenging the century-old structure-function paradigm. Here we investigate the binding between intrinsically disordered chaperone Chz1 and histone variant H2A.Z-H2B by developing a structure-based coarse-grained model, in which Debye-Hückel model is implemented for describing electrostatic interactions due to highly charged characteristic of Chz1 and H2A.Z-H2B. We find that major structural changes of Chz1 only occur after the rate-limiting electrostatic dominant transition state and Chz1 undergoes folding coupled binding through two parallel pathways. Interestingly, although the electrostatic interactions stabilize bound complex and facilitate the recognition at first stage, the rate for formation of the complex is not always accelerated due to slow escape of conformations with non-native electrostatic interactions at low salt concentrations. Our studies provide an ionic-strength-controlled binding/folding mechanism, leading to a cooperative mechanism of "local collapse or trapping" and "fly-casting" together and a new understanding of the roles of electrostatic interactions in IDPs' binding.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-11-03

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologues are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residue 16 to 41 and from residue 55 to 76. The helices of PcrG are partially formed, have similar backbone dynamics, and are flexible. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from position 9 to 76 is involved in binding to PcrV. PcrG adds to the growing list of partially folded or unstructured proteins with important roles in type III secretion.

  13. A 21-kDa C-terminal fragment of protein-disulfide isomerase has isomerase, chaperone, and anti-chaperone activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, A; Primm, T P; Surendran, R; Lee, J C; Ballard, K D; Orkiszewski, R S; Makarov, V; Gilbert, H F

    1997-12-26

    A catalyst of disulfide formation and isomerization during protein folding, protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two catalytic sites housed in two domains homologous to thioredoxin, one near the N terminus and the other near the C terminus. The thioredoxin domains, by themselves, can catalyze disulfide formation, but they are unable to catalyze disulfide isomerizations (Darby, N. J. and Creighton, T. E. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 11725-11735). A 21-kDa, C-terminal fragment of PDI (amino acids 308-491), termed weePDI, comprises the C-terminal third of the molecule. The kcat for ribonuclease oxidative folding by weePDI is 0.26 +/- 0.02 min-1, 3-fold lower than the wild-type enzyme but indistinguishable from the activity of a full-length mutant of PDI in which both active site cysteines of the N-terminal thioredoxin domain have been mutated to serine. Eliminating the ability of weePDI to escape easily from covalent complexes with substrate by mutating the active site cysteine nearer the C terminus to serine has a large effect on the isomerase activity of weePDI compared with its effect on the full-length enzyme. weePDI also displays chaperone and anti-chaperone activity characteristic of the full-length molecule. As isolated, weePDI is a disulfide-linked dimer in which the single cysteine (Cys-326) outside active site cross-links two weePDI monomers. The presence of the intermolecular disulfide decreases the activity by more than 2-fold. The results imply that the functions of the core thioredoxin domains of PDI and other members of the thioredoxin superfamily might be modified quite easily by the addition of relatively small accessory domains.

  14. Metal chaperones: a holistic approach to the treatment of AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Anthony Adlard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the burden of proof for the role of metal ion dysregulation in the pathogenesis of multiple CNS disorders grows, it has become important to more precisely identify and differentiate the biological effects of various pharmacological modulators of metal ion homeostasis. This is particularly evident in disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, where the use of metal chaperones (that transport metals, as opposed to chelators (which exclude metals from biological interactions, may prove to be the first truly disease modifying approach for this condition. The purpose of this mini-review is to highlight the emerging notion that metal chaperones, such as PBT2 (Prana Biotechnology, modulate a variety of critical pathways affecting key aspects of the AD cascade to provide a more holistic approach to the treatment of this disease.

  15. Chaperone use during intimate examinations in primary care: postal survey of family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians have long been advised to have a third party present during certain parts of a physical examination; however, little is known about the frequency of chaperone use for those specific intimate examinations regularly performed in primary care. We aimed to determine the frequency of chaperone use among family physicians across a variety of intimate physical examinations for both male and female patients, and also to identify the factors associated with chaperone use. Methods Questionnaires were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 500 Ontario members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Participants were asked about their use of chaperones when performing a variety of intimate examinations, namely female pelvic, breast, and rectal exams and male genital and rectal exams. Results 276 of 500 were returned (56%, of which 257 were useable. Chaperones were more commonly used with female patients than with males (t = 9.09 [df = 249], p Conclusion Clinical practice concerning the use of chaperones during intimate exams continues to be discordant with the recommendations of medical associations and medico-legal societies. Chaperones are used by only a minority of Ontario family physicians. Chaperone use is higher for examinations of female patients than of male patients and is highest for female pelvic exams. The availability of a nurse in the clinic to act as a chaperone is associated with more frequent use of chaperones.

  16. Cloning and molecular characterization of a copper chaperone gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cDNA encoding a copper chaperone, designated as HbCCH1, was isolated from Hevea brasiliensis. HbCC1 was 589 bp long containing a 261 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 86 amino acids, flanked by a 103 bp 5'UTR and a 225 bp 3'UTR. The predicted molecular mass of HbCCH1 was 9.2 kDa, ...

  17. Oxidative stress and expression of chaperones in aging mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanina, Anna V; Sokolova, Inna M; Sukhotin, Alexey A

    2008-05-01

    The mechanisms of aging are not well understood in animals with continuous growth such as fish, reptiles, amphibians and numerous invertebrates, including mollusks. We studied the effects of age on oxidative stress, cellular defense mechanisms (including two major antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase), and molecular chaperones in two mollusks--eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica and hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria. In order to detect the age-related changes in these parameters, correction for the effects of size was performed where appropriate to account for growth-related dilution. Fluorescent age pigments accumulated with age in both species. Protein carbonyls did not change with age or size indicating that they are not a good marker of aging in mollusks possibly due to the fast turnover and degradation of oxidized proteins in growing tissues. SOD did not show a compensatory increase with aging in either species, while catalase significantly decreased with age. Mitochondrial heat shock protein (HSP60) decreased with age in mollusks suggesting an age-related decline in mitochondrial chaperone protection. In contrast, changes in cytosolic chaperones were species-specific. HSP70 increased and HSP90 declined with age in clams, whereas in oysters HSP70 expression did not change, and HSP90 increased with aging.

  18. Ambroxol chaperone therapy for neuronopathic Gaucher disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Aya; Shirai, Kentarou; Itamura, Shinji; Matsuda, Atsue; Ishihara, Akiko; Matsushita, Kumi; Fukuda, Chisako; Kubota, Norika; Takayama, Rumiko; Shigematsu, Hideo; Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Yuge, Kotaro; Watanabe, Yoriko; Kosugi, Saori; Nishida, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yukiko; Endo, Yusuke; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Togawa, Masami; Saito, Yoshiaki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. Although enzyme-replacement and substrate-reduction therapies are available, their efficacies in treating the neurological manifestations of GD are negligible. Pharmacological chaperone therapy is hypothesized to offer a new strategy for treating the neurological manifestations of this disease. Specifically, ambroxol, a commonly used expectorant, has been proposed as a candidate pharmacological chaperone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and neurological efficacy of ambroxol in patients with neuronopathic GD. This open-label pilot study included five patients who received high-dose oral ambroxol in combination with enzyme replacement therapy. Safety was assessed by adverse event query, physical examination, electrocardiography, laboratory studies, and drug concentration. Biochemical efficacy was assessed through evidence of glucocerebrosidase activity in the lymphocytes and glucosylsphingosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Neurological efficacy was evaluated using the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale, Gross Motor Function Measure, Functional Independence Measure, seizure frequency, pupillary light reflex, horizontal saccadic latency, and electrophysiologic studies. High-dose oral ambroxol had good safety and tolerability, significantly increased lymphocyte glucocerebrosidase activity, permeated the blood-brain barrier, and decreased glucosylsphingosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Myoclonus, seizures, and pupillary light reflex dysfunction markedly improved in all patients. Relief from myoclonus led to impressive recovery of gross motor function in two patients, allowing them to walk again. Pharmacological chaperone therapy with high-dose oral ambroxol shows promise in treating neuronopathic GD, necessitating further clinical trials.

  19. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackie, Rachel E.; Maciejewski, Andrzej; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Marques-Lopes, Jose; Choy, Wing-Yiu; Duennwald, Martin L.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide—either soluble (oligomers) or insoluble (plaques) and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degradation, mostly by the proteasome. They form an important line of defense against misfolded proteins and are part of the cellular quality control system. The heat shock protein (Hsp) family, particularly Hsp70 and Hsp90, plays a major part in this process and it is well-known to regulate protein misfolding in a variety of diseases, including tau levels and toxicity in AD. However, the role of Hsp90 in regulating protein misfolding is not yet fully understood. For example, knockdown of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Aβ misfolding leads to increased toxicity. On the other hand, the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in AD mouse models reduces Aβ toxicity, and normalizes synaptic function. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1), an intracellular co-chaperone, mediates the transfer of clients from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Importantly, STI1 has been shown to regulate aggregation of amyloid-like proteins in yeast. In addition to its intracellular function, STI1 can be secreted by diverse cell types, including astrocytes and microglia and function as a neurotrophic ligand by triggering signaling via the cellular prion protein (PrPC). Extracellular STI1 can prevent Aβ toxic signaling by (i) interfering with Aβ binding to PrPC and (ii) triggering pro-survival signaling cascades. Interestingly, decreased levels of STI1 in C. elegans can also increase toxicity in an amyloid model. In this review, we will discuss the role of intracellular and extracellular STI1 and the

  20. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Lackie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptide—either soluble (oligomers or insoluble (plaques and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degradation, mostly by the proteasome. They form an important line of defense against misfolded proteins and are part of the cellular quality control system. The heat shock protein (Hsp family, particularly Hsp70 and Hsp90, plays a major part in this process and it is well-known to regulate protein misfolding in a variety of diseases, including tau levels and toxicity in AD. However, the role of Hsp90 in regulating protein misfolding is not yet fully understood. For example, knockdown of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Aβ misfolding leads to increased toxicity. On the other hand, the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in AD mouse models reduces Aβ toxicity, and normalizes synaptic function. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1, an intracellular co-chaperone, mediates the transfer of clients from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Importantly, STI1 has been shown to regulate aggregation of amyloid-like proteins in yeast. In addition to its intracellular function, STI1 can be secreted by diverse cell types, including astrocytes and microglia and function as a neurotrophic ligand by triggering signaling via the cellular prion protein (PrPC. Extracellular STI1 can prevent Aβ toxic signaling by (i interfering with Aβ binding to PrPC and (ii triggering pro-survival signaling cascades. Interestingly, decreased levels of STI1 in C. elegans can also increase toxicity in an amyloid model. In this review, we will discuss the role of intracellular and extracellular

  1. The Role of Bacterial Chaperones in the Circulative Transmission of Plant Viruses by Insect Vectors

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    Murad Ghanim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent circulative transmission of plant viruses involves complex interactions between the transmitted virus and its insect vector. Several studies have shown that insect vector proteins are involved in the passage and the transmission of the virus. Interestingly, proteins expressed by bacterial endosymbionts that reside in the insect vector, were also shown to influence the transmission of these viruses. Thus far, the transmission of two plant viruses that belong to different virus genera was shown to be facilitated by a bacterial chaperone protein called GroEL. This protein was shown to be implicated in the transmission of Potato leafroll virus (PLRV by the green peach aphid Myzus persicae, and the transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV by the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci. These tri-trophic levels of interactions and their possible evolutionary implications are reviewed.

  2. The role of bacterial chaperones in the circulative transmission of plant viruses by insect vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Adi; Ghanim, Murad

    2013-06-19

    Persistent circulative transmission of plant viruses involves complex interactions between the transmitted virus and its insect vector. Several studies have shown that insect vector proteins are involved in the passage and the transmission of the virus. Interestingly, proteins expressed by bacterial endosymbionts that reside in the insect vector, were also shown to influence the transmission of these viruses. Thus far, the transmission of two plant viruses that belong to different virus genera was shown to be facilitated by a bacterial chaperone protein called GroEL. This protein was shown to be implicated in the transmission of Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) by the green peach aphid Myzus persicae, and the transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci. These tri-trophic levels of interactions and their possible evolutionary implications are reviewed.

  3. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Iltaeg; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Lake, Robert J; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-04-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  4. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iltaeg Cho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  5. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

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    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  6. Chaperone use during intimate examinations in primary care: postal survey of family physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Upshur Ross EG; Tracy C Shawn; Price David H

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Physicians have long been advised to have a third party present during certain parts of a physical examination; however, little is known about the frequency of chaperone use for those specific intimate examinations regularly performed in primary care. We aimed to determine the frequency of chaperone use among family physicians across a variety of intimate physical examinations for both male and female patients, and also to identify the factors associated with chaperone use...

  7. Post-translational modifications of Hsp90 and their contributions to chaperone regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mollapour, Mehdi; Neckers, Len

    2011-01-01

    Molecular chaperones, as the name suggests, are involved in folding, maintenance, intracellular transport, and degradation of proteins as well as in facilitating cell signaling. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential eukaryotic molecular chaperone that carries out these processes in normal and cancer cells. Hsp90 function in vivo is coupled to its ability to hydrolyze ATP and this can be regulated by co-chaperones and post-translational modifications. In this review, we explore the var...

  8. Structural Analysis of the Rubisco-Assembly Chaperone RbcX-II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bracher

    Full Text Available The most prevalent form of the Rubisco enzyme is a complex of eight catalytic large subunits (RbcL and eight regulatory small subunits (RbcS. Rubisco biogenesis depends on the assistance by specific molecular chaperones. The assembly chaperone RbcX stabilizes the RbcL subunits after folding by chaperonin and mediates their assembly to the RbcL8 core complex, from which RbcX is displaced by RbcS to form active holoenzyme. Two isoforms of RbcX are found in eukaryotes, RbcX-I, which is more closely related to cyanobacterial RbcX, and the more distant RbcX-II. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains only RbcX-II isoforms, CrRbcX-IIa and CrRbcX-IIb. Here we solved the crystal structure of CrRbcX-IIa and show that it forms an arc-shaped dimer with a central hydrophobic cleft for binding the C-terminal sequence of RbcL. Like other RbcX proteins, CrRbcX-IIa supports the assembly of cyanobacterial Rubisco in vitro, albeit with reduced activity relative to cyanobacterial RbcX-I. Structural analysis of a fusion protein of CrRbcX-IIa and the C-terminal peptide of RbcL suggests that the peptide binding mode of RbcX-II may differ from that of cyanobacterial RbcX. RbcX homologs appear to have adapted to their cognate Rubisco clients as a result of co-evolution.

  9. Chaperone Use by Residents During Pelvic, Breast, Testicular, and Rectal Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenthal, Deborah B; Farber, Neil J; Collier, Virginia U; Aboff, Brian M

    2000-01-01

    We designed a questionnaire survey to study internal medicine residents' plans to use a chaperone during the pelvic, breast, rectal, and testicular examinations. We found chaperone use by male and female residents differed markedly, and neither group planned to use chaperones universally. When examining female patients, male residents overall were very likely to use a chaperone during a pelvic exam, but less likely for the breast exam and rectal exam. For the female resident, there was a significantly lower likelihood of using chaperones during the pelvic, breast, or rectal exams. There was a much lower rate of chaperone use during the sensitive portions of the male physical examination compared with the female examination, with somewhat higher use by female residents. We concluded that male and female residents differ significantly in their patterns of chaperone use. It would be valuable to develop guidelines for chaperone use to help residents understand the issues involved in the choices, and to protect the residents from the possible medico-legal consequences of forgoing chaperones. PMID:10940150

  10. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  11. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  12. Cloning, expression and crystallisation of SGT1 co-chaperone protein from Glaciozyma antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Nur Athirah; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Beddoe, Travis; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Studies on psycrophiles are now in the limelight of today's post genomic era as they fascinate the research and development industries. The discovery from Glaciozyma antarctica, an extreme cold adapted yeast from Antarctica shows promising future to provide cost effective natural sustainable energy and create wider understanding of the property that permits this organisms to adapt to extreme temperature downshift. In plants and yeast, studies show the interaction between SGT1 and HSP90 are essential for disease resistance and heat stress by activating a number of resistance proteins. Here we report for the first time cloning, expression and crystallization of the recombinant SGT1 protein of G. antarctica (rGa_SGT1), a highly conserved eukaryotic protein that interacts with the molecular chaperones HSP90 (heat shock protein 90) apparently associated in a role of co-chaperone that may play important role in cold adaptation. The sequence analysis of rGa_SGT1 revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of SGT1 protein. In this study, we present the outlines and results of protein structural study of G. antarctica SGT1 protein. We validate this approach by starting with cloning the target insert into Ligation Independent Cloning system proceeded with expression using E. coli system, and crystallisation of the target rGA_SGT1 protein. The work is still on going with the target subunit of the complex proteins yielded crystals. These results, still ongoing, open a platform for better understanding of the uniqueness of this crucial molecular machine function in cold adaptation.

  13. The mitochondrial chaperone protein TRAP1 mitigates α-Synuclein toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K Butler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression or mutation of α-Synuclein is associated with protein aggregation and interferes with a number of cellular processes, including mitochondrial integrity and function. We used a whole-genome screen in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to search for novel genetic modifiers of human [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced neurotoxicity. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein-1 (TRAP1 was found to enhance age-dependent loss of fly head dopamine (DA and DA neuron number resulting from [A53T]α-Synuclein expression. In addition, decreased TRAP1 expression in [A53T]α-Synuclein-expressing flies resulted in enhanced loss of climbing ability and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Overexpression of human TRAP1 was able to rescue these phenotypes. Similarly, human TRAP1 overexpression in rat primary cortical neurons rescued [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced sensitivity to rotenone treatment. In human (nonneuronal cell lines, small interfering RNA directed against TRAP1 enhanced [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced sensitivity to oxidative stress treatment. [A53T]α-Synuclein directly interfered with mitochondrial function, as its expression reduced Complex I activity in HEK293 cells. These effects were blocked by TRAP1 overexpression. Moreover, TRAP1 was able to prevent alteration in mitochondrial morphology caused by [A53T]α-Synuclein overexpression in human SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that [A53T]α-Synuclein toxicity is intimately connected to mitochondrial dysfunction and that toxicity reduction in fly and rat primary neurons and human cell lines can be achieved using overexpression of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1. Interestingly, TRAP1 has previously been shown to be phosphorylated by the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, thus providing a potential link of PINK1 via TRAP1 to α-Synuclein.

  14. The cellular chaperone hsc70 is specifically recruited to reovirus viral factories independently of its chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Susanne; Coffey, Caroline M; Parker, John S L

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses replicate and assemble in the cytosol of infected cells. A viral nonstructural protein, μNS, forms large inclusion-like structures called viral factories (VFs) in which assembling viral particles can be identified. Here we examined the localization of the cellular chaperone Hsc70 and found that it colocalizes with VFs in infected cells and also with viral factory-like structures (VFLs) formed by ectopically expressed μNS. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Hsc70 did not affect the formation or maintenance of VFLs. We further showed that dominant negative mutants of Hsc70 were also recruited to VFLs, indicating that Hsc70 recruitment to VFLs is independent of the chaperone function. In support of this finding, μNS was immunoprecipitated with wild-type Hsc70, with a dominant negative mutant of Hsc70, and with the minimal substrate-binding site of Hsc70 (amino acids 395 to 540). We identified a minimal region of μNS between amino acids 222 and 271 that was sufficient for the interaction with Hsc70. This region of μNS has not been assigned any function previously. However, neither point mutants with alterations in this region nor the complete deletion of this domain abrogated the μNS-Hsc70 interaction, indicating that a second portion of μNS also interacts with Hsc70. Taken together, these findings suggest a specific chaperone function for Hsc70 within viral factories, the sites of reovirus replication and assembly in cells.

  15. Modulation of polyglutamine inclusion formation by the Hsp70 chaperone machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rujano, M. A.; Kampinga, H. H.; Salomons, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Components of the Hsp70 chaperone machine have been implied in protection against polyglutamine (poly-Q) pathologies. Yet, little is known about specific mechanisms and the rate-limiting components that account for this protective effect. Here, we examined the effects of an Hsp70 chaperone family

  16. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Brehme

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN, an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Structure of Spa15, a type III secretion chaperone from Shigella flexneri with broad specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, André van; Hamiaux, Cyril; Pérez, Javier; Parsot, Claude; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2004-01-01

    Type III secretion (TTS) systems are used by many Gram-negative pathogens to inject virulence proteins into the cells of their hosts. Several of these virulence effectors require TTS chaperones that maintain them in a secretion-competent state. Whereas most chaperones bind only one effector, Spa15

  18. A DNAJB Chaperone Subfamily with HDAC-Dependent Activities Suppresses Toxic Protein Aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Jurre; Rujano, Maria A.; van Waarde, Maria A. W. H.; Kakkar, Vaishali; Dirks, Ron P.; Govorukhina, Natalia; Oosterveld-Hut, Henderika M. J.; Lubsen, Nicolette H.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2010-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation are associated with cytotoxicity in several protein folding diseases. A large network of molecular chaperones ensures protein quality control. Here, we show that within the Hsp70, Hsp110, and Hsp40 (DNAJ) chaperone families, members of a subclass of the DNAJB family

  19. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  1. Humanin is an endogenous activator of chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenwei; Tasset, Inmaculada; Diaz, Antonio; Anguiano, Jaime; Tas, Emir; Cui, Lingguang; Kuliawat, Regina; Liu, Honghai; Kühn, Bernhard; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Muzumdar, Radhika

    2017-11-29

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) serves as quality control during stress conditions through selective degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Humanin (HN) is a mitochondria-associated peptide that offers cytoprotective, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate that HN directly activates CMA by increasing substrate binding and translocation into lysosomes. The potent HN analogue HNG protects from stressor-induced cell death in fibroblasts, cardiomyoblasts, neuronal cells, and primary cardiomyocytes. The protective effects are lost in CMA-deficient cells, suggesting that they are mediated through the activation of CMA. We identified that a fraction of endogenous HN is present at the cytosolic side of the lysosomal membrane, where it interacts with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and stabilizes binding of this chaperone to CMA substrates as they bind to the membrane. Inhibition of HSP90 blocks the effect of HNG on substrate translocation and abolishes the cytoprotective effects. Our study provides a novel mechanism by which HN exerts its cardioprotective and neuroprotective effects. © 2018 Gong et al.

  2. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: permeant cations chaperoned by anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-28

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  3. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    ABSTRACT Activity of endogenous enzymes may cause browning of fruits and vegetables. These enzymes can be inactivated, for example by heat treatment, but the response of enzymes to heat treatment depends on many factors. Foods are very complex systems and the stability of enzymes in such an envir......ABSTRACT Activity of endogenous enzymes may cause browning of fruits and vegetables. These enzymes can be inactivated, for example by heat treatment, but the response of enzymes to heat treatment depends on many factors. Foods are very complex systems and the stability of enzymes...... in such an environment can be influenced by other components of the system potentially leading to enhancement of unwanted reactions or reduction of wanted ones. Caseins can potentially enhance the stability of other food proteins, as they were shown to exhibit chaperone-like activity. In this study influence of β...... Agaricus bisporus and equine cytochrome c. Only for the first target β-casein was acting as a molecular chaperone i.e. its presence resulted in higher residual activity (higher degree of the function preservation). β-Casein did not have any influence on the residual activity of tyrosinase. Surprisingly...

  4. Evolutionary Conservation and Emerging Functional Diversity of the Cytosolic Hsp70:J Protein Chaperone Network of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amit K; Diwan, Danish; Raut, Sandeep; Dobriyal, Neha; Brown, Rebecca E; Gowda, Vinita; Hines, Justin K; Sahi, Chandan

    2017-06-07

    Heat shock proteins of 70 kDa (Hsp70s) partner with structurally diverse Hsp40s (J proteins), generating distinct chaperone networks in various cellular compartments that perform myriad housekeeping and stress-associated functions in all organisms. Plants, being sessile, need to constantly maintain their cellular proteostasis in response to external environmental cues. In these situations, the Hsp70:J protein machines may play an important role in fine-tuning cellular protein quality control. Although ubiquitous, the functional specificity and complexity of the plant Hsp70:J protein network has not been studied. Here, we analyzed the J protein network in the cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana and, using yeast genetics, show that the functional specificities of most plant J proteins in fundamental chaperone functions are conserved across long evolutionary timescales. Detailed phylogenetic and functional analysis revealed that increased number, regulatory differences, and neofunctionalization in J proteins together contribute to the emerging functional diversity and complexity in the Hsp70:J protein network in higher plants. Based on the data presented, we propose that higher plants have orchestrated their "chaperome," especially their J protein complement, according to their specialized cellular and physiological stipulations. Copyright © 2017 Verma et al.

  5. The Candida albicans HIR histone chaperone regulates the yeast-to-hyphae transition by controlling the sensitivity to morphogenesis signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenull, Sabrina; Tscherner, Michael; Gulati, Megha; Nobile, Clarissa J; Chauhan, Neeraj; Kuchler, Karl

    2017-08-16

    Morphological plasticity such as the yeast-to-hyphae transition is a key virulence factor of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Hyphal formation is controlled by a multilayer regulatory network composed of environmental sensing, signaling, transcriptional modulators as well as chromatin modifications. Here, we demonstrate a novel role for the replication-independent HIR histone chaperone complex in fungal morphogenesis. HIR operates as a crucial modulator of hyphal development, since genetic ablation of the HIR complex subunit Hir1 decreases sensitivity to morphogenetic stimuli. Strikingly, HIR1-deficient cells display altered transcriptional amplitudes upon hyphal initiation, suggesting that Hir1 affects transcription by establishing transcriptional thresholds required for driving morphogenetic cell-fate decisions. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the transcription factor Ume6, which facilitates hyphal maintenance, rescues filamentation defects of hir1Δ/Δ cells, suggesting that Hir1 impacts the early phase of hyphal initiation. Hence, chromatin chaperone-mediated fine-tuning of transcription is crucial for driving morphogenetic conversions in the fungal pathogen C. albicans.

  6. Molecular chaperone Hsp90 associates with resistance protein N and its signaling proteins SGT1 and Rar1 to modulate an innate immune response in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yule; Burch-Smith, Tessa; Schiff, Michael; Feng, Suhua; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2004-01-16

    SGT1 and Rar1 are important signaling components of resistance (R) gene-mediated plant innate immune responses. Here we report that SGT1 and Rar1 associate with the molecular chaperone Hsp90. In addition, we show that Hsp90 associates with the resistance protein N that confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus. This suggests that Hsp90-SGT1-Rar1 and R proteins might exist in one complex. Suppression of Hsp90 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants shows that it plays an important role in plant growth and development. In addition, Hsp90 suppression in NN plants compromises N-mediated resistance to tobacco mosaic virus. Our results reveal a new role for SGT1- and Rar1-associated chaperone machinery in R gene-mediated defense signaling.

  7. Universal Stress Protein exhibits a redox-dependent chaperone function in Arabidopsis and enhances plant tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung eYoung Jun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although a wide range of physiological information on Universal Stress Proteins (USPs is available from many organisms, their biochemical and molecular functions remain unidentified. The biochemical function of AtUSP (At3g53990 from Arabidopsis thaliana was therefore investigated. Plants over-expressing AtUSP showed a strong resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress, compared with wild-type and Atusp knock-out plants, confirming the crucial role of AtUSP in stress tolerance. AtUSP was present in a variety of structures including monomers, dimers, trimers, and oligomeric complexes, and switched in response to external stresses from low molecular weight (LMW species to high molecular weight (HMW complexes. AtUSP exhibited a strong chaperone function under stress conditions in particular, and this activity was significantly increased by heat treatment. Chaperone activity of AtUSP was critically regulated by the redox status of cells and accompanied by structural changes to the protein. Over-expression of AtUSP conferred a strong tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress upon Arabidopsis, primarily via its chaperone function.

  8. Proteotoxicity is not the reason for the dependence of cancer cells on the major chaperone Hsp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Teresa A; Gabai, Vladimir L; Sherman, Michael Y

    2014-01-01

    Several years ago a hypothesis was proposed that the survival of cancer cells depend on elevated expression of molecular chaperones because these cells are prone to proteotoxic stress. A critical prediction of this hypothesis is that depletion of chaperones in cancer cells should lead to proteotoxicity. Here, using the major chaperone Hsp70 as example, we demonstrate that its depletion does not trigger proteotoxic stress, thus refuting the model. Accordingly, other functions of chaperones, e.g., their role in cell signaling, might define the requirements for chaperones in cancer cells, which is critical for rational targeting Hsp70 in cancer treatment.

  9. Molecular chaperones: guardians of the proteome in normal and disease states [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jeng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure in order to gain functional activity, or must they? An ever-increasing number of intrinsically disordered proteins and amyloid-forming polypeptides challenge this dogma. While molecular chaperones and proteases are traditionally associated with protein quality control inside the cell, it is now apparent that molecular chaperones not only promote protein folding in the “forward” direction by facilitating folding and preventing misfolding and aggregation, but also facilitate protein unfolding and even disaggregation resulting in the recovery of functional protein from aggregates. Here, we review our current understanding of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones that harness the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to fuel their chaperone functions. An emerging theme is that most of these chaperones do not work alone, but instead function together with other chaperone systems to maintain the proteome. Hence, molecular chaperones are the major component of the proteostasis network that guards and protects the proteome from damage. Furthermore, while a decline of this network is detrimental to cell and organismal health, a controlled perturbation of the proteostasis network may offer new therapeutic avenues against human diseases.

  10. Antarctic krill 454 pyrosequencing reveals chaperone and stress transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody S Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp. In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS, providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. CONCLUSIONS: This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical "stress proteins", such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of "stress" genes for studies understanding

  11. Thiol-based copper handling by the copper chaperone Atox1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatori, Yuta; Inouye, Sachiye; Akagi, Reiko

    2017-04-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) plays a crucial role in cellular copper homeostasis. Atox1 captures cytosolic copper for subsequent transfer to copper pumps in trans Golgi network, thereby facilitating copper supply to various copper-dependent oxidereductases matured within the secretory vesicles. Atox1 and other copper chaperones handle cytosolic copper using Cys thiols which are ideal ligands for coordinating Cu(I). Recent studies demonstrated reversible oxidation of these Cys residues in copper chaperones, linking cellular redox state to copper homeostasis. Highlighted in this review are unique redox properties of Atox1 and other copper chaperones. Also, summarized are the redox nodes in the cytosol which potentially play dominant roles in the redox regulation of copper chaperones. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):246-254, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R.; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from 1H-15N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell. PMID:26673727

  13. Drosophila TAP/p32 is a core histone chaperone that cooperates with NAP-1, NLP, and nucleophosmin in sperm chromatin remodeling during fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Alexander V; Rabbani, Joshua; Mehta, Monika; Vershilova, Elena; Keogh, Michael C; Fyodorov, Dmitry V

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear DNA in the male gamete of sexually reproducing animals is organized as sperm chromatin compacted primarily by sperm-specific protamines. Fertilization leads to sperm chromatin remodeling, during which protamines are expelled and replaced by histones. Despite our increased understanding of the factors that mediate nucleosome assembly in the nascent male pronucleus, the machinery for protamine removal remains largely unknown. Here we identify four Drosophila protamine chaperones that mediate the dissociation of protamine-DNA complexes: NAP-1, NLP, and nucleophosmin are previously characterized histone chaperones, and TAP/p32 has no known function in chromatin metabolism. We show that TAP/p32 is required for the removal of Drosophila protamine B in vitro, whereas NAP-1, NLP, and Nph share roles in the removal of protamine A. Embryos from P32-null females show defective formation of the male pronucleus in vivo. TAP/p32, similar to NAP-1, NLP, and Nph, facilitates nucleosome assembly in vitro and is therefore a histone chaperone. Furthermore, mutants of P32, Nlp, and Nph exhibit synthetic-lethal genetic interactions. In summary, we identified factors mediating protamine removal from DNA and reconstituted in a defined system the process of sperm chromatin remodeling that exchanges protamines for histones to form the nucleosome-based chromatin characteristic of somatic cells. © 2014 Emelyanov et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Phosphorylation-mediated control of histone chaperone ASF1 levels by tousled-like kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim Pilyugin; Jeroen Demmers; Peter Verrijzer, C.; Francois Karch; Moshkin, Yuri M.

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHistone chaperones are at the hub of a diverse interaction networks integrating a plethora of chromatin modifying activities. Histone H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 is a target for cell-cycle regulated Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) and both proteins cooperate during chromatin replication. However, the precise role of post-translational modification of ASF1 remained unclear. Here, we identify the TLK phosphorylation sites for both Drosophila and human ASF1 proteins. Loss of TLK- mediated phosp...

  15. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  16. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected residue clusters may be

  17. Interaction specificity between the chaperone and proteolytic components of the cyanobacterial Clp protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryggvesson, Anders; Ståhlberg, Frida M; Mogk, Axel; Zeth, Kornelius; Clarke, Adrian K

    2012-09-01

    The Clp protease is conserved among eubacteria and most eukaryotes, and uses ATP to drive protein substrate unfolding and translocation into a chamber of sequestered proteolytic active sites. In plant chloroplasts and cyanobacteria, the essential constitutive Clp protease consists of the Hsp100/ClpC chaperone partnering a proteolytic core of catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. In the present study, we have examined putative determinants conferring the highly specific association between ClpC and the ClpP3/R core from the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Two conserved sequences in the N-terminus of ClpR (tyrosine and proline motifs) and one in the N-terminus of ClpP3 (MPIG motif) were identified as being crucial for the ClpC-ClpP3/R association. These N-terminal domains also influence the stability of the ClpP3/R core complex itself. A unique C-terminal sequence was also found in plant and cyanobacterial ClpC orthologues just downstream of the P-loop region previously shown in Escherichia coli to be important for Hsp100 association to ClpP. This R motif in Synechococcus ClpC confers specificity for the ClpP3/R core and prevents association with E. coli ClpP; its removal from ClpC reverses this core specificity.

  18. Corticosteroid Receptors, Their Chaperones and Cochaperones: How Do They Modulate Adipogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Toneatto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids are part of the list of hormones that control adipogenesis as well as different aspects of the physiology of the adipose tissue. Their actions are mediated through their binding to the glucocorticoid and the mineralocorticoid receptors (GR and MR, respectively, in complex with heat shock proteins (Hsps and high molecular weight immunophilins (IMMs. Albeit many aspects of the molecular mechanism of the corticosteroid receptors are not fully elucidated yet, it was not until recently that the first evidences of the functional importance of Hsps and IMMs in the process of adipocyte differentiation have been described. Hsp90 and the high molecular weight IMM FKBP51 modulate GR and MR activity at multiple levels, that is, hormone binding affinity, their subcellular distribution, and the transcriptional status, among other aspects of the NR function. Interestingly, it has recently been described that Hsp90 and FKBP51 also participate in the control of PPARγ, a key transcription factor in the control of adipogenesis and the maintenance of the adipocyte phenotype. In addition, novel roles have been uncovered for FKBP51 in the organization of the nuclear architecture through its participation in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina and the control of the subnuclear distribution of GR. Thus, the aim of this review is to integrate and discuss the actual understanding of the role of corticosteroid receptors, their chaperones and cochaperones, in the process of adipocyte differentiation.

  19. Fibroblastic synoviocytes secrete plasma proteins via α2 -macroglobulins serving as intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke-Wei; Murray, Elsa J Brochmann; Murray, Samuel S

    2015-11-01

    Changes in plasma protein levels in synovial fluid (SF) have been implicated in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It was previously thought that the presence of plasma proteins in SF reflected ultrafiltration or extravasation from the vasculature, possibly due to retraction of inflamed endothelial cells. Recent proteomic analyses have confirmed the abundant presence of plasma proteins in SF from control and arthritic patients. Systematic depletion of high-abundance plasma proteins from SF and conditioned media from synoviocytes cultured in serum, and protein analysis under denaturing/reducing conditions have limited our understanding of sources and the native structures of "plasma protein" complexes in SF. Using Western blotting, qPCR, and mass spectrometry, we found that Hig-82 lapine fibroblastic synovicytes cultured under serum-free conditions expressed and secreted plasma proteins, including the cytokine-binding protein secreted phosphoprotein 24 kDa (Spp24) and many of the proteases and protease inhibitors found in SF. Treating synoviocytes with TGF-β1 or BMP-2 for 24 h upregulated the expression of plasma proteins, including Spp24, α2 -HS-glycoprotein, α1 -antitrypsin, IGF-1, and C-reactive protein. Furthermore, many of the plasma proteins of mass <151 kDa were secreted as disulfide-bound complexes with members of the α2 -macroglobulin (A2M) family, which serve as intracellular and extracellular chaperones, not protease inhibitors. Using brefeldin A to block vesicular traffic and protease inhibitors to inhibit endogenous activation of naïve A2M, we demonstrated that the complexes were formed in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and that Ca(2+) cysteine protease-dependent processes are involved. © Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Should a Chaperone Accompany Our Therapeutic Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin L.; Li, Chengyuan

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes that is associated with axonal atrophy, demyelination, blunted regenerative potential, and loss of peripheral nerve fibers. The development and progression of DPN is due in large part to hyperglycemia but is also affected by insulin deficiency and dyslipidemia. Although numerous biochemical mechanisms contribute to DPN, increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction seem intimately associated with nerve dysfunction and diminished regenerative capacity. Despite advances in understanding the etiology of DPN, few approved therapies exist for the pharmacological management of painful or insensate DPN. Therefore, identifying novel therapeutic strategies remains paramount. Because DPN does not develop with either temporal or biochemical uniformity, its therapeutic management may benefit from a multifaceted approach that inhibits pathogenic mechanisms, manages inflammation, and increases cytoprotective responses. Finally, exercise has long been recognized as a part of the therapeutic management of diabetes, and exercise can delay and/or prevent the development of painful DPN. This review presents an overview of existing therapies that target both causal and symptomatic features of DPN and discusses the role of up-regulating cytoprotective pathways via modulating molecular chaperones. Overall, it may be unrealistic to expect that a single pharmacologic entity will suffice to ameliorate the multiple symptoms of human DPN. Thus, combinatorial therapies that target causal mechanisms and enhance endogenous reparative capacity may enhance nerve function and improve regeneration in DPN if they converge to decrease oxidative stress, improve mitochondrial bioenergetics, and increase response to trophic factors. PMID:22885705

  1. Regulation of GPCR Anterograde Trafficking by Molecular Chaperones and Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brent; Wertman, Jaime; Dupré, Denis J

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) make up a superfamily of integral membrane proteins that respond to a wide variety of extracellular stimuli, giving them an important role in cell function and survival. They have also proven to be valuable targets in the fight against various diseases. As such, GPCR signal regulation has received considerable attention over the last few decades. With the amplitude of signaling being determined in large part by receptor density at the plasma membrane, several endogenous mechanisms for modulating GPCR expression at the cell surface have come to light. It has been shown that cell surface expression is determined by both exocytic and endocytic processes. However, the body of knowledge surrounding GPCR trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, commonly known as anterograde trafficking, has considerable room for growth. We focus here on the current paradigms of anterograde GPCR trafficking. We will discuss the regulatory role of both the general and "nonclassical private" chaperone systems in GPCR trafficking as well as conserved motifs that serve as modulators of GPCR export from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Together, these topics summarize some of the known mechanisms by which the cell regulates anterograde GPCR trafficking. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the mechanisms used by promiscuous chaperones to assist protein folding in the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Andrew I.

    There are two popular theories to explain how molecular chaperones boost the yield of folded protein in the cell: According to the Anfinsen cage model, (ACM) chaperonins protect denatured proteins from aggregation. A competing theory, the iterative annealing model (IAM) claims that ATP regulated chaperone binding and release accelerates folding by freeing proteins from long-lived kinetic traps. We present experimental and kinetic evidence to argue that the IAM is not a complete picture of how the GroEL/ES chaperonin works. Surprisingly some substrate proteins experience folding rate enhancements without undergoing multiple rounds of ATP-induced binding and release from the chaperonin. An explanation of this data requires going beyond the ACM and IAM models. Our work uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the folding of a highly frustrated protein within a chaperonin cavity. The chaperonin interior is modeled by a sphere with variable degree of attraction to the protein inside. We demonstrate that this cavity, similar to the weakly hydrophobic interior of the GroEL cavity upon complexion with ATP and GroES, is sufficient to accelerate the folding of a frustrated protein by more than an order of magnitude. Our simulations uncover a novel form of the IAM in which the substrate exhibits spontaneous binding and release from the wall of the chaperonin cage. This mimics the behavior observed in the standard IAM, with the difference that thermal fluctuations, rather than ATP, allow the substrate to unbind from the chaperone. An growing number of smaller cageless chaperones have been discovered that can assist protein folding without the consumption of ATP, including artificial "minichaperones" (fragments of larger chaperones). It is tempting to speculate that the same thermally-driven IAM mechanism could play a role with these chaperones as well. We performed additional simulations of protein folding outside the sphere. We find that in order to accelerate

  3. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Jose M.; Montalvo, Ana M.; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges) for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis. PMID:26167482

  4. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  5. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Requena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis.

  6. Functional adaptations of the bacterial chaperone trigger factor to extreme environmental temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin-Roulling, Amandine; Schmidpeter, Philipp A M; Schmid, Franz X; Feller, Georges

    2015-07-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is the first molecular chaperone interacting cotranslationally with virtually all nascent polypeptides synthesized by the ribosome in bacteria. Thermal adaptation of chaperone function was investigated in TFs from the Antarctic psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, the mesophile Escherichia coli and the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. This series covers nearly all temperatures encountered by bacteria. Although structurally homologous, these TFs display strikingly distinct properties that are related to the bacterial environmental temperature. The hyperthermophilic TF strongly binds model proteins during their folding and protects them from heat-induced misfolding and aggregation. It decreases the folding rate and counteracts the fast folding rate imposed by high temperature. It also functions as a carrier of partially folded proteins for delivery to downstream chaperones ensuring final maturation. By contrast, the psychrophilic TF displays weak chaperone activities, showing that these functions are less important in cold conditions because protein folding, misfolding and aggregation are slowed down at low temperature. It efficiently catalyses prolyl isomerization at low temperature as a result of its increased cellular concentration rather than from an improved activity. Some chaperone properties of the mesophilic TF possibly reflect its function as a cold shock protein in E. coli. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Yeast prions are useful for studying protein chaperones and protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masison, Daniel C; Reidy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein chaperones help proteins adopt and maintain native conformations and play vital roles in cellular processes where proteins are partially folded. They comprise a major part of the cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome. Many disorders are caused when proteins misfold despite this protection. Yeast prions are fibrous amyloid aggregates of misfolded proteins. The normal action of chaperones on yeast prions breaks the fibers into pieces, which results in prion replication. Because this process is necessary for propagation of yeast prions, even small differences in activity of many chaperones noticeably affect prion phenotypes. Several other factors involved in protein processing also influence formation, propagation or elimination of prions in yeast. Thus, in much the same way that the dependency of viruses on cellular functions has allowed us to learn much about cell biology, the dependency of yeast prions on chaperones presents a unique and sensitive way to monitor the functions and interactions of many components of the cell's protein quality control system. Our recent work illustrates the utility of this system for identifying and defining chaperone machinery interactions.

  8. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone chaperone Rtt106 mediates the cell cycle recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Monica E; Flaherty, Kacie; Prochasson, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, three out of the four histone gene pairs (HTA1-HTB1, HHT1-HHF1, and HHT2-HHF2) are regulated by the HIR co-repressor complex. The histone chaperone Rtt106 has recently been shown to be present at these histone gene loci throughout the cell cycle in a HIR- and Asf1-dependent manner and involved in their transcriptional repression. The SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes are both recruited to the HIR-dependent histone genes; SWI/SNF is required for their activation in S phase, whereas RSC is implicated in their repression outside of S phase. Even though their presence at the histone genes is dependent on the HIR complex, their specific recruitment has not been well characterized. In this study we focused on characterizing the role played by the histone chaperone Rtt106 in the cell cycle-dependent recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the histone genes. Using GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we showed that Rtt106 physically interacts with both the SWI/SNF and RSC complexes in vitro and in vivo. We then investigated the function of this interaction with respect to the recruitment of these complexes to HIR-dependent histone genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP), we found that Rtt106 is important for the recruitment of both SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes. Furthermore, using synchronized cell cultures, we showed by ChIP assays that the Rtt106-dependent SWI/SNF recruitment to these histone gene loci is cell cycle regulated and restricted to late G1 phase just before the peak of histone gene expression in S phase. Overall, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between the histone chaperone Rtt106 and both the SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes is important for the cell cycle regulated recruitment of these two complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

  9. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone chaperone Rtt106 mediates the cell cycle recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica E Ferreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, three out of the four histone gene pairs (HTA1-HTB1, HHT1-HHF1, and HHT2-HHF2 are regulated by the HIR co-repressor complex. The histone chaperone Rtt106 has recently been shown to be present at these histone gene loci throughout the cell cycle in a HIR- and Asf1-dependent manner and involved in their transcriptional repression. The SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes are both recruited to the HIR-dependent histone genes; SWI/SNF is required for their activation in S phase, whereas RSC is implicated in their repression outside of S phase. Even though their presence at the histone genes is dependent on the HIR complex, their specific recruitment has not been well characterized. In this study we focused on characterizing the role played by the histone chaperone Rtt106 in the cell cycle-dependent recruitment of SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the histone genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we showed that Rtt106 physically interacts with both the SWI/SNF and RSC complexes in vitro and in vivo. We then investigated the function of this interaction with respect to the recruitment of these complexes to HIR-dependent histone genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP, we found that Rtt106 is important for the recruitment of both SWI/SNF and RSC complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes. Furthermore, using synchronized cell cultures, we showed by ChIP assays that the Rtt106-dependent SWI/SNF recruitment to these histone gene loci is cell cycle regulated and restricted to late G1 phase just before the peak of histone gene expression in S phase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between the histone chaperone Rtt106 and both the SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodeling complexes is important for the cell cycle regulated recruitment of these two complexes to the HIR-dependent histone genes.

  10. The Ddc1-Mec3-Rad17 sliding clamp regulates histone-histone chaperone interactions and DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rebecca J; Han, Junhong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-04-11

    The maintenance of genome integrity is regulated in part by chromatin structure and factors involved in the DNA damage response pathway. Nucleosome assembly is a highly regulated process that restores chromatin structure after DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. During S phase the histone chaperones Asf1, CAF-1, and Rtt106 coordinate to deposit newly synthesized histones H3-H4 onto replicated DNA in budding yeast. Here we describe synthetic genetic interactions between RTT106 and the DDC1-MEC3-RAD17 (9-1-1) complex, a sliding clamp functioning in the S phase DNA damage and replication checkpoint response, upon treatment with DNA damaging agents. The DNA damage sensitivity of rad17Δ rtt106Δ cells depends on the function of Rtt106 in nucleosome assembly. Epistasis analysis reveals that 9-1-1 complex components interact with multiple DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly factors, including Rtt106, CAF-1, and lysine residues of H3-H4. Furthermore, rad17Δ cells exhibit defects in the deposition of newly synthesized H3-H4 onto replicated DNA. Finally, deletion of RAD17 results in increased association of Asf1 with checkpoint kinase Rad53, which may lead to the observed reduction in Asf1-H3 interaction in rad17Δ mutant cells. In addition, we observed that the interaction between histone H3-H4 with histone chaperone CAF-1 or Rtt106 increases in cells lacking Rad17. These results support the idea that the 9-1-1 checkpoint protein regulates DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in part through regulating histone-histone chaperone interactions.

  11. Mis16 Independently Recognizes Histone H4 and the CENP-ACnp1-Specific Chaperone Scm3sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Sojin; Kim, Hanseong; Cho, Uhn-Soo (Michigan-Med)

    2015-09-04

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is required for kinetochore assembly and accurate chromosome segregation. For it to function properly, CENP-A must be specifically localized to centromeres. In fission yeast, Scm3sp and the Mis18 complex, composed of Mis16, Eic1, and Mis18, function as a CENP-ACnp1-specific chaperone and a recruiting factor, respectively, and together ensure accurate delivery of CENP-ACnp1 to centromeres. Although how Scm3sp specifically recognizes CENP-ACnp1 has been revealed recently, the recruiting mechanism of CENP-ACnp1 via the Mis18 complex remains unknown. In this study, we have determined crystal structures of Schizosaccharomyces japonicus Mis16 alone and in complex with the helix 1 of histone H4 (H4α1). Crystal structures followed by mutant analysis and affinity pull-downs have revealed that Mis16 recognizes both H4α1 and Scm3sp independently within the CENP-ACnp1/H4:Scm3sp complex. This observation suggests that Mis16 gains CENP-ACnp1 specificity by recognizing both Scm3sp and histone H4. Our studies provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying specific recruitment of CENP-ACnp1/H4:Scm3sp into centromeres.

  12. Interplay between Molecular Chaperones and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Targeting of Misfolded Proteins for Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    interacting with purified 26S proteasomes, and the subsequent characterization of two novel proteasome interacting proteins. The third study was aimed at analyzing the chaperone-assisted pathway leading to degradation of misfolded kinetochore proteins in S. pombe. In this study chaperones, E2s, E3s and DUBs...

  13. Mechanisms of Translocation of ER Chaperones to the Cell Surface and Immunomodulatory Roles in Cancer and Autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Valerie; Michalak, Marek; Abdullah, Trefa M; Bremer, Edwin; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones (e.g., calreticulin, heat shock proteins, and isomerases) perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g., drugs,

  14. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Spencer M.; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L.; Kapralov, Maxim V.

    2015-01-01

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco’s biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tobAtL plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tobAtL-R1 plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tobAtL-R1 and Arabidopsis leaves at 10–15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8AS8t Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tobAtL-R1 leaves compared with tobAtL, despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tobAtL-R1. Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tobAtL-R1 lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants. PMID:25733857

  15. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  16. Eps8 is recruited to lysosomes and subjected to chaperone-mediated autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Thilo; Younsi, Alexander; Disanza, Andrea; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Scita, Giorgio; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-07-15

    Eps8 controls actin dynamics directly through its barbed end capping and actin-bundling activity, and indirectly by regulating Rac-activation when engaged into a trimeric complex with Eps8-Abi1-Sos1. Recently, Eps8 has been associated with promotion of various solid malignancies, but neither its mechanisms of action nor its regulation in cancer cells have been elucidated. Here, we report a novel association of Eps8 with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, which is independent from actin polymerization and specifically occurs in cancer cells. Endogenous Eps8 localized to large vesicular lysosomal structures in metastatic pancreatic cancer cell lines, such as AsPC-1 and Capan-1 that display high Eps8 levels. Additionally, ectopic expression of Eps8 increased the size of lysosomes. Structure-function analysis revealed that the region encompassing the amino acids 184-535 of Eps8 was sufficient to mediate lysosomal recruitment. Notably, this fragment harbors two KFERQ-like motifs required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Furthermore, Eps8 co-immunoprecipitated with Hsc70 and LAMP-2, which are key elements for the CMA degradative pathway. Consistently, in vitro, a significant fraction of Eps8 bound to (11.9+/-5.1%) and was incorporated into (5.3+/-6.5%) lysosomes. Additionally, Eps8 binding to lysosomes was competed by other known CMA-substrates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that Eps8 recruitment to the lysosomal membrane was highly dynamic. Collectively, these results indicate that Eps8 in certain human cancer cells specifically localizes to lysosomes, and is directed to CMA. These results open a new field for the investigation of how Eps8 is regulated and contributes to tumor promotion in human cancers.

  17. The RNA chaperone Hfq impacts growth, metabolism and production of virulence factors in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kakoschke

    Full Text Available To adapt to changes in environmental conditions, bacteria regulate their gene expression at the transcriptional but also at the post-transcriptional level, e.g. by small RNAs (sRNAs which modulate mRNA stability and translation. The conserved RNA chaperone Hfq mediates the interaction of many sRNAs with their target mRNAs, thereby playing a global role in fine-tuning protein production. In this study, we investigated the significance of Hfq for the enteropathogen Yersina enterocolitica serotype O:8. Hfq facilitated optimal growth in complex and minimal media. Our comparative protein analysis of parental and hfq-negative strains suggested that Hfq promotes lipid metabolism and transport, cell redox homeostasis, mRNA translation and ATP synthesis, and negatively affects carbon and nitrogen metabolism, transport of siderophore and peptides and tRNA synthesis. Accordingly, biochemical tests indicated that Hfq represses ornithine decarboxylase activity, indole production and utilization of glucose, mannitol, inositol and 1,2-propanediol. Moreover, Hfq repressed production of the siderophore yersiniabactin and its outer membrane receptor FyuA. In contrast, hfq mutants exhibited reduced urease production. Finally, strains lacking hfq were more susceptible to acidic pH and oxidative stress. Unlike previous reports in other Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq was dispensable for type III secretion encoded by the virulence plasmid. Using a chromosomally encoded FLAG-tagged Hfq, we observed increased production of Hfq-FLAG in late exponential and stationary phases. Overall, Hfq has a profound effect on metabolism, resistance to stress and modulates the production of two virulence factors in Y. enterocolitica, namely urease and yersiniabactin.

  18. Both Hsp70 chaperone and Clp protease plastidial systems are required for protection against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2017-03-04

    Environmental stress conditions such as high light, extreme temperatures, salinity or drought trigger oxidative stress and eventually protein misfolding in plants. In chloroplasts, chaperone systems refold proteins after stress, while proteases degrade misfolded and aggregated proteins that cannot be refolded. We observed that reduced activity of chloroplast Hsp70 chaperone or Clp protease systems both prevented growth of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings after treatment with the oxidative agent methyl viologen. Besides showing a role for these particular protein quality control components on the protection against oxidative stress, we provide evidence supporting the existence of a yet undiscovered pathway for Clp-mediated degradation of the damaged proteins.

  19. The Chaperone Activity of Clusterin is Dependent on Glycosylation and Redox Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Rohne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Clusterin (CLU, also known as Apolipoprotein J (ApoJ is a highly glycosylated extracellular chaperone. In humans it is expressed from a broad spectrum of tissues and related to a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis and cancer. In its dominant form it is expressed as a secretory protein (secreted CLU, sCLU. During its maturation, the sCLU-precursor is N-glycosylated and cleaved into an α- and a β-chain, which are connected by five symmetrical disulfide bonds. Recently, it has been demonstrated that besides the predominant sCLU, rare intracellular CLU forms are expressed in stressed cells. Since these forms do not enter or complete the secretory pathway, they are not proteolytically modified and show either no or only core glycosylation. Due to their sparsity, these intracellular forms are functionally poorly characterized. To evaluate the function(s of these stress-related intracellular forms, we investigate for the first time the impact of proteolytic cleavage, differential glycosylation and the influence of the redox environment on the chaperone activity of CLU. Methods: Non-cleavable sCLU was generated by expression from a mutant construct of sCLU, in which the furin-like proprotein convertase (PC recognition site was modified. After purification of recombinant uncleaved sCLU from the medium of over-expressing cells, we performed chaperone activity assays to compare the activities of wild-type (cleaved and uncleaved mutant sCLU. Additionally, this approach enabled us to investigate the role of carbohydrates, the proteolytic maturation and reducing conditions on CLU chaperone activity. Further, we characterized the differentially treated CLU forms by using MALDI-TOF, CD-spectroscopy and Western blotting in addition to the functional assay. Results: We show that the PC-cleavage is dispensable for sCLU chaperone activity. Moreover, our data demonstrate that

  20. Protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt5-Mep50 methylates histones H2A and H4 and the histone chaperone nucleoplasmin in Xenopus laevis eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Carola; Chitta, Raghu; Woo, Eileen; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Chait, Brian T; Hunt, Donald F; Shechter, David

    2011-12-09

    Histone proteins carry information contained in post-translational modifications. Eukaryotic cells utilize this histone code to regulate the usage of the underlying DNA. In the maturing oocytes and eggs of the frog Xenopus laevis, histones are synthesized in bulk in preparation for deposition during the rapid early developmental cell cycles. During this key developmental time frame, embryonic pluripotent chromatin is established. In the egg, non-chromatin-bound histones are complexed with storage chaperone proteins, including nucleoplasmin. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a complex of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (Prmt5) and the methylosome protein 50 (Mep50) isolated from Xenopus eggs that specifically methylates predeposition histones H2A/H2A.X-F and H4 and the histone chaperone nucleoplasmin on a conserved motif (GRGXK). We demonstrate that nucleoplasmin (Npm), an exceedingly abundant maternally deposited protein, is a potent substrate for Prmt5-Mep50 and is monomethylated and symmetrically dimethylated at Arg-187. Furthermore, Npm modulates Prmt5-Mep50 activity directed toward histones, consistent with a regulatory role for Npm in vivo. We show that H2A and nucleoplasmin methylation appears late in oogenesis and is most abundant in the laid egg. We hypothesize that these very abundant arginine methylations are constrained to pre-mid blastula transition events in the embryo and therefore may be involved in the global transcriptional repression found in this developmental time frame.

  1. A Toxoplasma gondii Class XIV Myosin, Expressed in Sf9 Cells with a Parasite Co-chaperone, Requires Two Light Chains for Fast Motility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S.; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Ward, Gary E.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:25231988

  2. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  3. Conserved TRAM Domain Functions as an Archaeal Cold Shock Protein via RNA Chaperone Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cold shock proteins (Csps enable organisms to acclimate to and survive in cold environments and the bacterial CspA family exerts the cold protection via its RNA chaperone activity. However, most Archaea do not contain orthologs to the bacterial csp. TRAM, a conserved domain among RNA modification proteins ubiquitously distributed in organisms, occurs as an individual protein in most archaeal phyla and has a structural similarity to Csp proteins, yet its biological functions remain unknown. Through physiological and biochemical studies on four TRAM proteins from a cold adaptive archaeon Methanolobus psychrophilus R15, this work demonstrated that TRAM is an archaeal Csp and exhibits RNA chaperone activity. Three TRAM encoding genes (Mpsy_0643, Mpsy_3043, and Mpsy_3066 exhibited remarkable cold-shock induced transcription and were preferentially translated at lower temperature (18°C, while the fourth (Mpsy_2002 was constitutively expressed. They were all able to complement the cspABGE mutant of Escherichia coli BX04 that does not grow in cold temperatures and showed transcriptional antitermination. TRAM3066 (gene product of Mpsy_3066 and TRAM2002 (gene product of Mpsy_2002 displayed sequence-non-specific RNA but not DNA binding activity, and TRAM3066 assisted RNases in degradation of structured RNA, thus validating the RNA chaperone activity of TRAMs. Given the chaperone activity, TRAM is predicted to function beyond a Csp.

  4. Nucleosome assembly protein-1 is a linker histone chaperone in Xenopus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintomi, Keishi; Iwabuchi, Mari; Saeki, Hideaki; Ura, Kiyoe; Kishimoto, Takeo; Ohsumi, Keita

    2005-06-07

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is primarily packaged into nucleosomes through sequential ordered binding of the core and linker histone proteins. The acidic proteins termed histone chaperones are known to bind to core histones to neutralize their positive charges, thereby facilitating their proper deposition onto DNA to assemble the core of nucleosomes. For linker histones, however, little has been known about the regulatory mechanism for deposition of linker histones onto the linker DNA. Here we report that, in Xenopus eggs, the linker histone is associated with the Xenopus homologue of nucleosome assembly protein-1 (NAP-1), which is known to be a chaperone for the core histones H2A and H2B in Drosophila and mammalian cells [Ito, T., Bulger, M., Kobayashi, R. & Kadonaga, J. T. (1996) Mol. Cell Biol. 16, 3112-3124; Chang, L., Loranger, S. S., Mizzen, C., Ernst, S. G., Allis, C. D. & Annunziato, A. T. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 469-480]. We show that NAP-1 acts as the chaperone for the linker histone in both sperm chromatin remodeling into nucleosomes and linker histone binding to nucleosome core dimers. In the presence of NAP-1, the linker histone is properly deposited onto linker DNA at physiological ionic strength, without formation of nonspecific aggregates. These results strongly suggest that NAP-1 functions as a chaperone for the linker histone in Xenopus eggs.

  5. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  6. Chaperone gelator for the chiral self-assembly of all proteinogenic amino acids and their enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Minghua

    2016-05-04

    A concept of a chaperone gelator that can assist non-gelator molecules to form gels is proposed. Such a new gelator was developed and found to tune all the proteinogenic l-amino acids, as well as their enantiomers into supramolecular gels.

  7. Histone Chaperone NAP1 Mediates Sister Chromatid Resolution by Counteracting Protein Phosphatase 2A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); C.M. Doyen (Cécile); T.W. Kan (Tsung Wai); G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); K. Sap (Karen); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); Z. Özgür (Zeliha); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractChromosome duplication and transmission into daughter cells requires the precisely orchestrated binding and release of cohesin. We found that the Drosophila histone chaperone NAP1 is required for cohesin release and sister chromatid resolution during mitosis. Genome-wide surveys revealed

  8. The Attitudes and Practices of General Practitioners about the Use of Chaperones in Melbourne, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver van Hecke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To consider the use of medical chaperones during certain clinical examinations is important whether one practises as a specialist, nurse, medical student, or generalist. Chaperones have been used by doctors conducting intimate examinations for many years but their true extent remains largely unknown. Until recently, there was no national guidance in Australia. Aim. To explore the attitudes and practices of general practitioners (GP regarding their use of chaperones in urban Melbourne, Australia. Method. Qualitative two focus groups involving seventeen GPs from two locations. Discussions were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed. Results. Common themes and subthemes emerged which were grouped into three main areas: (a practitioner-related, (b patient-related and (c practice related. Discussion. This is the first study from an Australian primary care perspective to gauge the attitudes and experiences of GPs on their use of chaperones. It will provide vital information to inform the next step of extending this research to a national GP audience. From an international perspective, this study provides an excellent template for other primary care clinicians to conduct research in this important field of doctor-patient relationship.

  9. LINE-1 retrotransposition requires the nucleic acid chaperone activity of the ORF1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L; Cruceanu, Margareta; Branciforte, Dan; Wai-Lun Li, Patrick; Kwok, Stanley C; Hodges, Robert S; Williams, Mark C

    2005-05-06

    LINE-1 is a highly successful, non-LTR retrotransposon that has played a leading role in shaping mammalian genomes. These elements move autonomously through an RNA intermediate using target-primed reverse transcription (TPRT). L1 encodes two essential polypeptides for retrotransposition, the products of its two open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2. The exact function of the ORF1 protein (ORF1p) in L1 retrotransposition is unknown, although it is an RNA-binding protein that can act as a nucleic acid chaperone. Here, we investigate the requirements for these two activities in L1 retrotransposition by examining the consequences of mutating two adjacent and highly conserved arginine residues in the ORF1p from mouse L1. Substitution of both arginine residues with alanine strongly reduces the affinity of the protein for single-stranded nucleic acid, whereas substitution of one or both with lysine has only minimal effects on this feature. Rather, the lysine substitutions alter the delicate balance between the ORF1 protein's melting and reannealing activities, thereby reducing its nucleic acid chaperone activity. These findings establish the importance of the nucleic acid chaperone activity of ORF1p to successful L1 retrotransposition, and provide insight into the essential properties of nucleic acid chaperones.

  10. Oral pharmacological chaperone migalastat compared with enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Derralynn A.; Nicholls, Kathleen; Shankar, Suma P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA mutations, resulting in α-galactosidase (α-Gal) deficiency and accumulation of lysosomal substrates. Migalastat, an oral pharmacological chaperone being developed as an alternative to intravenous enzyme replacement t...

  11. The chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on Gaucher cells and normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Zhuo; Li, Linjing; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Kousaku

    2013-04-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), caused by a defect of acid β-glucosidase (β-Glu), is one of the most common sphingolipidoses. Recently, ambroxol, an FDA-approved drug used to treat airway mucus hypersecretion and hyaline membrane disease in newborns, was identified as a chemical chaperone for GD. In the present study, we investigated the chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on both cultured GD patient cells and normal mice. We found that ambroxol treatment significantly increased N370S, F213I, N188S/G193W and R120W mutant β-Glu activities in GD fibroblasts with low cytotoxicity. Additionally, we measured the β-Glu activity in the tissues of normal mice which received water containing increasing concentrations of ambroxol ad libitum for one week. No serious adverse effect was observed during this experiment. Ambroxol significantly increased the β-Glu activity in the spleen, heart and cerebellum of the mice. This result showed its oral availability and wide distribution and chaperone activity in the tissues, including the brain, and its lack of acute toxicity. These characteristics of ambroxol would make it a potential therapeutic chaperone in the treatment of GD with neurological manifestations. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Analytical background and discussion of the chaperone model of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liautard, J P

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that prion infection is due solely to a protein i.e. the protein-only hypothesis. The essential constituent of infectious prions is the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) which is chemically indistinguishable from the normal, cellular protein (PrPC) but exhibits distinct secondary and tertiary structure. This very unusual feature seems to be in contradiction with a major paradigm of present structural biology stated by Anfinsen: a protein folds to the most stable conformation, this means only one structure. In order to reconcile the results obtained on prions with the biophysics of protein folding, a model is proposed. It is based on the hypothesis that a thermodynamically irreversible step is involved in protein folding. The model is then extended to chaperone-assisted protein folding. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the transitory secondary structure formed during the earlier step of folding could interact with chaperone. Analysis shows that chaperone may help the protein to find correct conformation. On the other hand, analysis reveals the possibility that more than one structure may form from a single polypeptide chain. Under these conditions, the behaviour of chaperones resembles the characteristics of prion diseases.

  13. Chaperone-usher fimbriae in a diverse selection of Gallibacterium genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudirkiene, Egle; Bager, Ragnhild Jørgensen; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    encoding a putative major fimbrial subunit, a chaperone, an usher and a fimbrial adhesin. Five fimbrial clusters (Flf-Flf4) and eight conserved domain groups were defined to accommodate the identified fimbriae. Although, the number of different fimbrial clusters in individual Gallibacterium genomes was low...

  14. A conserved co-chaperone is required for virulence in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Libera; López Díaz, Cristina; Turrà, David; Di Pietro, Antonio; Hampel, Martin; Heimel, Kai; Kahmann, Regine

    2016-02-01

    The maize pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis experiences endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress during plant colonization and relies on the unfolded protein response (UPR) to cope with this stress. We identified the U. maydis co-chaperone, designated Dnj1, as part of this conserved cellular response to ER stress. ∆dnj1 cells are sensitive to the ER stressor tunicamycin and display a severe virulence defect in maize infection assays. A dnj1 mutant allele unable to stimulate the ATPase activity of chaperones phenocopies the null allele. A Dnj1-mCherry fusion protein localizes in the ER and interacts with the luminal chaperone Bip1. The Fusarium oxysporum Dnj1 ortholog contributes to the virulence of this fungal pathogen in tomato plants. Unlike the human ortholog, F. oxysporum Dnj1 partially rescues the virulence defect of the Ustilago dnj1 mutant. By enabling the fungus to restore ER homeostasis and maintain a high secretory activity, Dnj1 contributes to the establishment of a compatible interaction with the host. Dnj1 orthologs are present in many filamentous fungi, but are absent in budding and fission yeasts. We postulate a conserved and essential role during virulence for this class of co-chaperones. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Promiscuous histone mis-assembly is actively prevented by chaperones | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    About the Cover Chaperone HJURP drives the proper loading of protein CENP-A to the centromere of a chromosome. The effect of HJURP on CENP-A's structural dynamics are observed and explained using dual-resolution in silico simulations, while in vivo experiments demonstrate how CENP-A mutations influence its specific localization in human cells. Abstract

  16. The story of stolen chaperones: how overexpression of Q/N proteins cures yeast prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkatch, Irina L; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-seeding alternate protein conformations. Most yeast prions contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich domains that promote the formation of amyloid-like prion aggregates. Chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, are required to continually break these aggregates into smaller "seeds." Decreasing aggregate size and increasing the number of growing aggregate ends facilitates both aggregate transmission and growth. Our previous work showed that overexpression of 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains facilitates the de novo aggregation of Sup35 into the [PSI(+)] prion, presumably by a cross-seeding mechanism. We now discuss our recent paper, in which we showed that overexpression of most of these same 11 Q/N-rich proteins, including Pin4C and Cyc8, destabilized pre-existing Q/N rich prions. Overexpression of both Pin4C and Cyc8 caused [PSI(+)] aggregates to enlarge. This is incompatible with a previously proposed "capping" model where the overexpressed Q/N-rich protein poisons, or "caps," the growing aggregate ends. Rather the data match what is expected of a reduction in prion severing by chaperones. Indeed, while Pin4C overexpression does not alter chaperone levels, Pin4C aggregates sequester chaperones away from the prion aggregates. Cyc8 overexpression cures [PSI(+)] by inducing an increase in Hsp104 levels, as excess Hsp104 binds to [PSI(+)] aggregates in a way that blocks their shearing.

  17. Analysis of Chaperone Complexes by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geels, R.B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of methodologies for analyses of noncovalently bound protein assemblies using Fourier transformation ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and quadrupole Time-of-Flight (qToF) mass spectrometry. Specifically, the co-chaperonins GroEL and gp31 are used to perform

  18. Characterization of the cytosolic tuberin-hamartin complex. Tuberin is a cytosolic chaperone for hamartin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. Nellist (Mark); M.A. van Slegtenhorst (Marjon); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); P. van der Sluijs; M.A. Goedbloed (Miriam)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTuberous sclerosis (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a broad phenotypic spectrum that includes seizures, mental retardation, renal dysfunction and dermatological abnormalities. Mutations to either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene are responsible

  19. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picking Wendy L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. Results In this study, we present the 3.3 Å crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155 of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC1-151. Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric "head-to- head" dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC1-151. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II

  20. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2010-10-05

    Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may

  1. The Unfolded Protein Response and Chemical Chaperones Reduce Protein Misfolding and Colitis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAO, STEWART SIYAN; ZIMMERMANN, ELLEN M.; CHUANG, BRANDY–MENGCHIEH; SONG, BENBO; NWOKOYE, ANOSIKE; WILKINSON, J. ERBY; EATON, KATHRYN A.; KAUFMAN, RANDAL J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been associated with development of inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effects of ER stress–induced chaperone response and the orally active chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) and 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), which facilitate protein folding and reduce ER stress, in mice with colitis. METHODS We used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce colitis in mice that do not express the transcription factor ATF6α or the protein chaperone P58IPK. We examined the effects of TUDCA and PBA in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IECs); in wild-type, P58IPK−/−, and Atf6α−/− mice with colitis; and in Il10−/− mice. RESULTS P58IPK−/− and Atf6α−/− mice developed more severe colitis following administration of DSS than wild-type mice. IECs from P58IPK−/− mice had excessive ER stress, and apoptotic signaling was activated in IECs from Atf6α−/− mice. Inflammatory stimuli induced ER stress signals in cultured IECs, which were reduced by incubation with TUDCA or PBA. Oral administration of either PBA or TUDCA reduced features of DSS-induced acute and chronic colitis in wild-type mice, the colitis that develops in Il10−/− mice, and DSS-induced colitis in P58IPK−/− and Atf6α−/− mice. Reduced signs of colonic inflammation in these mice were associated with significantly decreased ER stress in colonic epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS The unfolded protein response induces expression of genes that encode chaperones involved in ER protein folding; these factors prevent induction of colitis in mice. Chemical chaperones such as TUDCA and PBA alleviate different forms of colitis in mice and might be developed for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23336977

  2. [Preparation of anticolon carcinoma vaccine with rich chaperone peptides and study on its anticancer efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Gang; Huang, Chang-Xin; Yang, Guan-Gen; Jin, Jian-Fang; Kang, Yun-Ping; Xia, Da-Jing; Wang, Qing-Qing

    2009-05-01

    To prepare the anticolon carcinoma vaccine with rich chaperone peptide and to examine its anticancer immunological efficacy. CT26 colon carcinoma cells were cultured in 1 mg/L Trichosanthin 1640 medium at different temperatures to induce the chaperone expression and promote the synthesis of antigen peptides. Groups of these cells treated under the different condition were lysed by the sonic disintegration, and the lysates were centrifuged. The rawpurified proteins were obtained from the supernatants by precipitating with saturated ammonium sulfate and removing the molecules below 50,000 and above 300,000 in molecular weight via dialysis. Furthermore, the proteins with the molecular weights in 70,000, 90,000, 95,000, 110,000 and 170,000 were collected through gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. The purified proteins were analysed by Western blotting, and inspected on the anticancer immunological effects including lymphocyte proliferation and the activities of NK and CTL. Major of the chaperone peptides of anticancer effects in CT26 cells, including antigen peptides joining with HSP70, HSP90, gp96, HSP110 and HSP170, was satisfactorily extracted and condensed, and rich chaperone peptide composites were successfully obtained. The composites prepared under various condition could all enhance lymphocyte proliferation and the activities of CTL and NK(P<0.01). The rich chaperone peptide composites are successfully prepared via dialysis, salt fractionation and gel filtration combined with SDS-PAGE. Both the heat stress and Trichosanthin can increase the composites, which treated by 42 centi-degree heat stress and Trichosanthin are found to possess the strongest anticancer efficacy.

  3. Determinants for simultaneous binding of copper and platinum to human chaperone Atox1: hitchhiking not hijacking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Palm-Espling

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is an anticancer agent that has been used for decades to treat a variety of cancers. CisPt treatment causes many side effects due to interactions with proteins that detoxify the drug before reaching the DNA. One key player in CisPt resistance is the cellular copper-transport system involving the uptake protein Ctr1, the cytoplasmic chaperone Atox1 and the secretory path ATP7A/B proteins. CisPt has been shown to bind to ATP7B, resulting in vesicle sequestering of the drug. In addition, we and others showed that the apo-form of Atox1 could interact with CisPt in vitro and in vivo. Since the function of Atox1 is to transport copper (Cu ions, it is important to assess how CisPt binding depends on Cu-loading of Atox1. Surprisingly, we recently found that CisPt interacted with Cu-loaded Atox1 in vitro at a position near the Cu site such that unique spectroscopic features appeared. Here, we identify the binding site for CisPt in the Cu-loaded form of Atox1 using strategic variants and a combination of spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. We directly prove that both metals can bind simultaneously and that the unique spectroscopic signals originate from an Atox1 monomer species. Both Cys in the Cu-site (Cys12, Cys15 are needed to form the di-metal complex, but not Cys41. Removing Met10 in the conserved metal-binding motif makes the loop more floppy and, despite metal binding, there are no metal-metal electronic transitions. In silico geometry minimizations provide an energetically favorable model of a tentative ternary Cu-Pt-Atox1 complex. Finally, we demonstrate that Atox1 can deliver CisPt to the fourth metal binding domain 4 of ATP7B (WD4, indicative of a possible drug detoxification mechanism.

  4. Oxidative stress induces monocyte necrosis with enrichment of cell-bound albumin and overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Tang

    Full Text Available In the present study, monocytes were treated with 5-azacytidine (azacytidine, gossypol or hydrogen peroxide to induce cell death through oxidative stress. A shift from apoptotic to necrotic cell death occurred when monocytes were treated with 100 µM azacytidine for more than 12 hours. Necrotic monocytes exhibited characteristics, including enrichment of cell-bound albumin and up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER- and mitochondrial-specific chaperones to protect mitochondrial integrity, which were not observed in other necrotic cells, including HUH-7, A2780, A549 and HOC1a. Our results show that the cell-bound albumin originates in the culture medium rather than from monocyte-derived hepatocytes, and that HSP60 is a potential binding partner of the cell-bound albumin. Proteomic analysis shows that HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase are the most abundant up-regulated mitochondrial and ER-chaperones, and that both HSP60 and calreticulin are ubiquitinated in necrotic monocytes. In contrast, expression levels of the cytosolic chaperones HSP90 and HSP71 were down-regulated in the azacytidine-treated monocytes, concomitant with an increase in the levels of these chaperones in the cell culture medium. Collectively, our results demonstrates that chaperones from different organelles behave differently in necrotic monocytes, ER- and mitochondrial chaperones being retained and cytosolic and nuclear chaperones being released into the cell culture medium through the ruptured cell membrane. HSP60 may serve as a new target for development of myeloid leukemia treatment.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the interplay between hsc70 and its co-chaperone HspBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Mahboubi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chaperones and their co-factors are components of a cellular network; they collaborate to maintain proteostasis under normal and harmful conditions. In particular, hsp70 family members and their co-chaperones are essential to repair damaged proteins. Co-chaperones are present in different subcellular compartments, where they modulate chaperone activities.Methods and Results. Our studies assessed the relationship between hsc70 and its co-factor HspBP1 in human cancer cells. HspBP1 promotes nucleotide exchange on hsc70, but has also chaperone-independent functions. We characterized the interplay between hsc70 and HspBP1 by quantitative confocal microscopy combined with automated image analyses and statistical evaluation. Stress and the recovery from insult changed significantly the subcellular distribution of hsc70, but had little effect on HspBP1. Single-cell measurements and regression analysis revealed that the links between the chaperone and its co-factor relied on (i the physiological state of the cell and (ii the subcellular compartment. As such, we identified a linear relationship and strong correlation between hsc70 and HspBP1 distribution in control and heat-shocked cells; this correlation changed in a compartment-specific fashion during the recovery from stress. Furthermore, we uncovered significant stress-induced changes in the colocalization between hsc70 and HspBP1 in the nucleus and cytoplasm.Discussion. Our quantitative approach defined novel properties of the co-chaperone HspBP1 as they relate to its interplay with hsc70. We propose that changes in cell physiology promote chaperone redistribution and thereby stimulate chaperone-independent functions of HspBP1.

  6. Selective ribosome profiling as a tool for studying the interaction of chaperones and targeting factors with nascent polypeptide chains and ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Annemarie H; Oh, Eugene; Weissman, Jonathan S; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    A plethora of factors is involved in the maturation of newly synthesized proteins, including chaperones, membrane targeting factors and enzymes. Many factors act co-translationally through association with ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs), but their target specificities and modes of action remain poorly understood. We developed selective ribosome profiling (SeRP) to identify substrate pools and points of RNC engagement of these factors. SeRP is based on sequencing mRNA fragments covered by translating ribosomes (general ribosome profiling (RP)), combined with a procedure to selectively isolate RNCs whose nascent polypeptides are associated with the factor of interest. Factor-RNC interactions are stabilized by cross-linking; the resulting factor-RNC adducts are nuclease-treated to generate monosomes, and then they are affinity purified. The ribosome-extracted mRNA footprints are converted to DNA libraries for deep sequencing. The protocol is specified for general RP and SeRP in bacteria. It was first applied to the chaperone trigger factor (TF) and is readily adaptable to other co-translationally acting factors, including eukaryotic factors. Factor-RNC purification and sequencing library preparation takes 7-8 d, and sequencing and data analysis can be completed in 5-6 d.

  7. Probing Allosteric Inhibition Mechanisms of the Hsp70 Chaperone Proteins Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Analysis of the Residue Interaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2016-08-22

    Although molecular mechanisms of allosteric regulation in the Hsp70 chaperones have been extensively studied at both structural and functional levels, the current understanding of allosteric inhibition of chaperone activities by small molecules is still lacking. In the current study, using a battery of computational approaches, we probed allosteric inhibition mechanisms of E. coli Hsp70 (DnaK) and human Hsp70 proteins by small molecule inhibitors PET-16 and novolactone. Molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis were combined with network-based modeling of residue interactions and allosteric communications to systematically characterize and compare molecular signatures of the apo form, substrate-bound, and inhibitor-bound chaperone complexes. The results suggested a mechanism by which the allosteric inhibitors may leverage binding energy hotspots in the interaction networks to stabilize a specific conformational state and impair the interdomain allosteric control. Using the network-based centrality analysis and community detection, we demonstrated that substrate binding may strengthen the connectivity of local interaction communities, leading to a dense interaction network that can promote an efficient allosteric communication. In contrast, binding of PET-16 to DnaK may induce significant dynamic changes and lead to a fractured interaction network and impaired allosteric communications in the DnaK complex. By using a mechanistic-based analysis of distance fluctuation maps and allosteric propensities of protein residues, we determined that the allosteric network in the PET-16 complex may be small and localized due to the reduced communication and low cooperativity of the substrate binding loops, which may promote the higher rates of substrate dissociation and the decreased substrate affinity. In comparison with the significant effect of PET-16, binding of novolactone to HSPA1A may cause only moderate network changes and preserve allosteric

  8. Determination of the Stoichiometry of the Complete Bacterial Type III Secretion Needle Complex Using a Combined Quantitative Proteomic Approach*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilkenat, Susann; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Galán, Jorge E.; Macek, Boris; Wagner, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Precisely knowing the stoichiometry of their components is critical for investigating structure, assembly, and function of macromolecular machines. This has remained a technical challenge in particular for large, hydrophobic membrane-spanning protein complexes. Here, we determined the stoichiometry of a type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using two complementary protocols of gentle complex purification combined with peptide concatenated standard and synthetic stable isotope-labeled peptide-based mass spectrometry. Bacterial type III secretion systems are cell envelope-spanning effector protein-delivery machines essential for colonization and survival of many Gram-negative pathogens and symbionts. The membrane-embedded core unit of these secretion systems, termed the needle complex, is composed of a base that anchors the machinery to the inner and outer membranes, a hollow filament formed by inner rod and needle subunits that serves as conduit for substrate proteins, and a membrane-embedded export apparatus facilitating substrate translocation. Structural analyses have revealed the stoichiometry of the components of the base, but the stoichiometry of the essential hydrophobic export apparatus components and of the inner rod protein remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the export apparatus of type III secretion systems contains five SpaP, one SpaQ, one SpaR, and one SpaS. We confirmed that the previously suggested stoichiometry of nine InvA is valid for assembled needle complexes and describe a loose association of InvA with other needle complex components that may reflect its function. Furthermore, we present evidence that not more than six PrgJ form the inner rod of the needle complex. Providing this structural information will facilitate efforts to obtain an atomic view of type III secretion systems and foster our understanding of the function of these and related flagellar machines. Given that other virulence

  9. The HSP90 complex of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a highly conserved and essential molecular chaperone involved in maturation and activation of signaling proteins in eukaryotes. HSP90 operates as a dimer in a conformational cycle driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. HSP90 often functions together with co-chaperones that regulate the conformational cycle and/or load a substrate "client" protein onto HSP90. In plants, immune sensing NLR (nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing) proteins are among the few known client proteins of HSP90. In the process of chaperoning NLR proteins, co-chaperones, RAR1 and SGT1 function together with HSP90. Recent structural and functional analyses indicate that RAR1 dynamically controls conformational changes of the HSP90 dimer, allowing SGT1 to bridge the interaction between NLR proteins and HSP90. Here, we discuss the regulation of NLR proteins by HSP90 upon interaction with RAR1 and SGT1, emphasizing the recent progress in our understanding of the structure and function of the complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of chaperone-like and membranolytic activities of major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The HSP-1/2–L-carnitine complex exhibits anti-oxidative behaviour by inhibiting the production ofhydroxyl radicals, suggesting that it can protect other constituents of seminal plasma from damage by hydroxyl radicals. AsHSP-1/2 and L-carnitine share the same spatiotemporal location in the horse reproductive tract, this ...

  11. Histone Chaperone Jun Dimerization Protein 2 (JDP2: Role in Cellular Senescence and Aging

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    Yu-Chang Huang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2 binds directly to histones and DNA, and inhibits p300-mediated acetylation of core histones and reconstituted nucleosomes that contain JDP2-recognition DNA sequences. The region of JDP2 that encompasses its histone-binding domain and DNA-binding region is essential to inhibit histone acetylation by histone acetyltransferases. Moreover, assays of nucleosome assembly in vitro demonstrate that JDP2 also has histone-chaperone activity. The mutation of the region responsible for inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity within JDP2 eliminates repression of transcription from the c-jun promoter by JDP2, as well as JDP2-mediated inhibition of retinoic-acid-induced differentiation. Thus JDP2 plays a key role as a repressor of cell differentiation by regulating the expression of genes with an activator protein 1 (AP-1 site via inhibition of histone acetylation and/or assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Senescent cells show a series of alterations, including flatten and enlarged morphology, increase in nonspecific acidic β-galactosidase activity, chromatin condensation, and changes in gene expression patterns. The onset and maintenance of senescence are regulated by two tumor suppressors, p53 and retinoblastoma proteins. The expression of p53 and retinoblastoma proteins is regulated by two distinct proteins, p16Ink4a and Arf, respectively, which are encoded by cdkn2a. JDP2 inhibits recruitment of the polycomb repressive complexes 1 and 2 (PRC-1 and PRC-2 to the promoter of the gene that encodes p16Ink4a and inhibits the methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27. The PRCs associate with the p16Ink4a/Arf locus in young proliferating cells and dissociate from it in senescent cells. Therefore, it seems that chromatin-remodeling factors that regulate association and dissociation of PRCs, and are controlled by JDP2, might play an important role in the senescence program. The molecular

  12. Review Article A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Apoptosis by Calreticulin, a Molecular Chaperone in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Ihara, Yoshito

    2003-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a Ca"--binding lectin-like molecular chaperone of the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Recently, CRT has been revealed to be a multi-functional molecule related with glycoprotein maturation and chaperone function, Ca" homeostasis, cell adhesion, cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and nuclear transporting mechanisms. CRT is also essential for cardiac and neural development in mice, suggesting an importance in the regulation of cell survival and death during de...

  13. The heat shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Jacob, Pierre

    2016-11-15

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multi-stress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone

  14. Amino acid sequence determinants and molecular chaperones in amyloid fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerelius, Charlotte; Fitzen, Michael; Johansson, Jan

    2010-05-21

    Amyloid consists of cross-beta-sheet fibrils and is associated with about 25 human diseases, including several neurodegenerative diseases, systemic and localized amyloidoses and type II diabetes mellitus. Amyloid-forming proteins differ in structures and sequences, and it is to a large extent unknown what makes them convert from their native conformations into amyloid. In this review, current understanding of amino acid sequence determinants and the effects of molecular chaperones on amyloid formation are discussed. Studies of the nonpolar, transmembrane surfactant protein C (SP-C) have revealed amino acid sequence features that determine its amyloid fibril formation, features that are also found in the amyloid beta-peptide in Alzheimer's disease and the prion protein. Moreover, a proprotein chaperone domain (CTC(Brichos)) that prevents amyloid-like aggregation during proSP-C biosynthesis can prevent fibril formation also of other amyloidogenic proteins. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biochemical characterization and cooperation with co-chaperones of heat shock protein 90 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mari; Tomomari, Taichi; Kanzaki, Taro; Abe, Tetsuya; Oka, Toshihiko; Yohda, Masafumi

    2013-10-01

    The characterization of Hsp90 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was performed. Hsp90 of S. pombe existed as a dimer and exhibited ATP-dependent conformational changes. It captured unfolded proteins in the ATP-free open conformation and protected them from thermal aggregation. Hsp90 of S. pombe was also able to refold thermally denatured firefly luciferase. The co-chaperones Sti1 and Aha1 bound Hsp90 and modulated its activity. Because the affinity of Sti1 was higher than that of Aha1, the effect of Sti1 appeared to dominate when both co-chaperones existed simultaneously. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry (Dupont)

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  17. Metabolic and chaperone gene loss marks the origin of animals: evidence for Hsp104 and Hsp78 chaperones sharing mitochondrial enzymes as clients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J Erives

    Full Text Available The evolution of animals involved acquisition of an emergent gene repertoire for gastrulation. Whether loss of genes also co-evolved with this developmental reprogramming has not yet been addressed. Here, we identify twenty-four genetic functions that are retained in fungi and choanoflagellates but undetectable in animals. These lost genes encode: (i sixteen distinct biosynthetic functions; (ii the two ancestral eukaryotic ClpB disaggregases, Hsp78 and Hsp104, which function in the mitochondria and cytosol, respectively; and (iii six other assorted functions. We present computational and experimental data that are consistent with a joint function for the differentially localized ClpB disaggregases, and with the possibility of a shared client/chaperone relationship between the mitochondrial Fe/S homoaconitase encoded by the lost LYS4 gene and the two ClpBs. Our analyses lead to the hypothesis that the evolution of gastrulation-based multicellularity in animals led to efficient extraction of nutrients from dietary sources, loss of natural selection for maintenance of energetically expensive biosynthetic pathways, and subsequent loss of their attendant ClpB chaperones.

  18. Mechanisms of Translocation of ER Chaperones to the Cell Surface and Immunomodulatory Roles in Cancer and Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Valerie R.; Michalak, Marek; Abdullah, Trefa M.; Bremer, Edwin; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones (e.g., calreticulin, heat shock proteins, and isomerases) perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g., drugs, UV irradiation, and microbial stimuli. Once on the cell surface or in the extracellular space, the ER chaperones can take on immunogenic characteristics, as mostly described in the context of cancer, appearing as damage-associated molecular patterns recognized by the immune system. How ER chaperones relocate to the cell surface and interact with other intracellular proteins appears to influence whether a tumor cell is targeted for cell death. The relocation of ER proteins to the cell surface can be exploited to target cancer cells for elimination by immune mechanism. Here we evaluate the evidence for the different mechanisms of ER protein translocation and binding to the cell surface and how ER protein translocation can act as a signal for cancer cells to undergo killing by immunogenic cell death and other cell death pathways. The release of chaperones can also exacerbate underlying autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and the immunomodulatory role of extracellular chaperones as potential cancer immunotherapies requires cautious monitoring, particularly in cancer patients with underlying autoimmune disease. PMID:25688334

  19. Mechanisms of translocation of ER chaperones to the cell surface and immunomodulatory roles in cancer and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie R. Wiersma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones (e.g. calreticulin, heat shock proteins and isomerases perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g. drugs, UV irradiation and microbial stimuli. Once on the cell surface or in the extracellular space, the ER chaperones can take on immunogenic characteristics, as mostly described in the context of cancer, appearing as damage-associated molecular patterns recognized by the immune system. How ER chaperones relocate to the cell surface and interact with other intracellular proteins appears to influence whether a tumor cell is targeted for cell death. The relocation of ER proteins to the cell surface can be exploited to target cancer cells for elimination by immune mechanism. Here we evaluate the evidence for the different mechanisms of ER protein translocation and binding to the cell surface and how ER protein translocation can act as a signal for cancer cells to undergo killing by immunogenic cell death and other cell death pathways. The release of chaperones can also exacerbate underlying autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and the immunomodulatory role of extracellular chaperones as potential cancer immunotherapies requires cautious monitoring, particularly in cancer patients with underlying autoimmune disease.

  20. Mechanisms of Translocation of ER Chaperones to the Cell Surface and Immunomodulatory Roles in Cancer and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Valerie R; Michalak, Marek; Abdullah, Trefa M; Bremer, Edwin; Eggleton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones (e.g., calreticulin, heat shock proteins, and isomerases) perform a multitude of functions within the ER. However, many of these chaperones can translocate to the cytosol and eventually the surface of cells, particularly during ER stress induced by e.g., drugs, UV irradiation, and microbial stimuli. Once on the cell surface or in the extracellular space, the ER chaperones can take on immunogenic characteristics, as mostly described in the context of cancer, appearing as damage-associated molecular patterns recognized by the immune system. How ER chaperones relocate to the cell surface and interact with other intracellular proteins appears to influence whether a tumor cell is targeted for cell death. The relocation of ER proteins to the cell surface can be exploited to target cancer cells for elimination by immune mechanism. Here we evaluate the evidence for the different mechanisms of ER protein translocation and binding to the cell surface and how ER protein translocation can act as a signal for cancer cells to undergo killing by immunogenic cell death and other cell death pathways. The release of chaperones can also exacerbate underlying autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and the immunomodulatory role of extracellular chaperones as potential cancer immunotherapies requires cautious monitoring, particularly in cancer patients with underlying autoimmune disease.

  1. Enhanced Transport Capabilities via Nanotechnologies: Impacting Bioefficacy, Controlled Release Strategies, and Novel Chaperones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomai Panagiotou

    2011-01-01

    side affects and providing improved therapeutic interventions. Innovative nanotechnology applications, such as simultaneous targeting, imaging and delivery to tumors, are now possible through use of novel chaperones. Other examples include nanoparticles attachment to T-cells, release from novel hydrogel implants, and functionalized encapsulants. Difficult tasks such as drug delivery to the brain via the blood brain barrier and/or the cerebrospinal fluid are now easier to accomplish.

  2. Structural and functional characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CupB chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Cai

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important human pathogen, is estimated to be responsible for ∼10% of nosocomial infections worldwide. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa starts from its colonization in the damaged tissue or medical devices (e.g. catheters, prothesis and implanted heart valve etc. facilitated by several extracellular adhesive factors including fimbrial pili. Several clusters containing fimbrial genes have been previously identified on the P. aeruginosa chromosome and named cup[1]. The assembly of the CupB pili is thought to be coordinated by two chaperones, CupB2 and CupB4. However, due to the lack of structural and biochemical data, their chaperone activities remain speculative. In this study, we report the 2.5 Å crystal structure of P. aeruginosa CupB2. Based on the structure, we further tested the binding specificity of CupB2 and CupB4 towards CupB1 (the presumed major pilus subunit and CupB6 (the putative adhesin using limited trypsin digestion and strep-tactin pull-down assay. The structural and biochemical data suggest that CupB2 and CupB4 might play different, but not redundant, roles in CupB secretion. CupB2 is likely to be the chaperone of CupB1, and CupB4 could be the chaperone of CupB4:CupB5:CupB6, in which the interaction of CupB4 and CupB6 might be mediated via CupB5.

  3. Interactive Domains in the Molecular Chaperone Human ?B Crystallin Modulate Microtubule Assembly and Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Joy G.; Houck, Scott A.; Clark, John I.

    2007-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113)FISREFHR(120) exposed on the ...

  4. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank (Wyeth)

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  5. An Expanding Range of Functions for the Copper Chaperone/Antioxidant Protein Atox1

    OpenAIRE

    Hatori, Yuta; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1 in human cells) is a copper chaperone for the copper export pathway with an essential role in cellular copper distribution. In vitro, Atox1 binds and transfers copper to the copper-transporting ATPases, stimulating their catalytic activity. Inactivation of Atox1 in cells inhibits maturation of secreted cuproenzymes as well as copper export from cells. Recent Advances: Accumulating data suggest that cellular functions of Atox1 are not limited to its c...

  6. Bcl-2 regulates HIF-1alpha protein stabilization in hypoxic melanoma cells via the molecular chaperone HSP90.

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    Daniela Trisciuoglio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1 is a transcription factor that is a critical mediator of the cellular response to hypoxia. Enhanced levels of HIF-1alpha, the oxygen-regulated subunit of HIF-1, is often associated with increased tumour angiogenesis, metastasis, therapeutic resistance and poor prognosis. It is in this context that we previously demonstrated that under hypoxia, bcl-2 protein promotes HIF-1/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF-mediated tumour angiogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using human melanoma cell lines and their stable or transient derivative bcl-2 overexpressing cells, the current study identified HIF-1alpha protein stabilization as a key regulator for the induction of HIF-1 by bcl-2 under hypoxia. We also demonstrated that bcl-2-induced accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein during hypoxia was not due to an increased gene transcription or protein synthesis. In fact, it was related to a modulation of HIF-1alpha protein expression at a post-translational level, indeed its degradation rate was faster in the control lines than in bcl-2 transfectants. The bcl-2-induced HIF-1alpha stabilization in response to low oxygen tension conditions was achieved through the impairment of ubiquitin-dependent HIF-1alpha degradation involving the molecular chaperone HSP90, but it was not dependent on the prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-1alpha protein. We also showed that bcl-2, HIF-1alpha and HSP90 proteins form a tri-complex that may contribute to enhancing the stability of the HIF-1alpha protein in bcl-2 overexpressing clones under hypoxic conditions. Finally, by using genetic and pharmacological approaches we proved that HSP90 is involved in bcl-2-dependent stabilization of HIF-1alpha protein during hypoxia, and in particular the isoform HSP90beta is the main player in this phenomenon. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified the stabilization of HIF-1alpha protein as a mechanism through which bcl-2 induces the

  7. A primate specific extra domain in the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

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    Vishwadeepak Tripathi

    Full Text Available Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90 is an essential molecular chaperone that mediates folding and quality control of client proteins. Many of them such as protein kinases, steroid receptors and transcription factors are involved in cellular signaling processes. Hsp90 undergoes an ATP hydrolysis dependent conformational cycle to assist folding of the client protein. The canonical Hsp90 shows a typical composition of three distinct domains and interacts with individual cochaperone partners such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase that regulate the reaction cycle of the molecular chaperone. A bioinformatic survey identified an additional domain of 122 amino acids in front of the canonical Hsp90 sequence. This extra domain (E domain is specific to the Catarrhini or drooping nose monkeys, a subdivision of the higher primates that includes man, the great apes and the old world monkeys but is absent from all other species. Our biochemical analysis reveals that Hsp103 associates with cochaperone proteins such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 similar to Hsp90. However, the extra domain reduces the ATP hydrolysis rate to about half when compared to Hsp90 thereby acting as a negative regulator of the molecular chaperonés intrinsic ATPase activity.

  8. Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (hop): beyond interactions with chaperones and prion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baindur-Hudson, Swati; Edkins, Adrienne L; Blatch, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop), also known as stress-inducible protein 1 (STI1), has received considerable attention for diverse cellular functions in both healthy and diseased states. There is extensive evidence that intracellular Hop is a co-chaperone of the major chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, playing an important role in the productive folding of Hsp90 client proteins. Consequently, Hop is implicated in a number of key signalling pathways, including aberrant pathways leading to cancer. However, Hop is also secreted and it is now well established that Hop also serves as a receptor for the prion protein, PrP(C). The intracellular and extracellular forms of Hop most likely represent two different isoforms, although the molecular determinants of these divergent functions are yet to be identified. There is also a growing body of research that reports the involvement of Hop in cellular activities that appear independent of either chaperones or PrP(C). While Hop has been shown to have various cellular functions, its biological function remains elusive. However, recent knockout studies in mammals suggest that Hop has an important role in embryonic development. This review provides a critical overview of the latest molecular, cellular and biological research on Hop, critically evaluating its function in healthy systems and how this function is adapted in diseases states.

  9. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

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    Chang-Jin Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs or resistance (R proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells.

  10. Schizosaccharomyces pombe disaggregation machinery chaperones support Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth and prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Michael; Sharma, Ruchika; Masison, Daniel C

    2013-05-01

    Hsp100 chaperones protect microorganisms and plants from environmental stress by cooperating with Hsp70 and its nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) and Hsp40 cochaperones to resolubilize proteins from aggregates. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 (Sc-Hsp104)-based disaggregation machinery also is essential for replication of amyloid-based prions. Escherichia coli ClpB can substitute for Hsp104 to propagate [PSI(+)] prions in yeast, but only if E. coli DnaK and GrpE (Hsp70 and NEF) are coexpressed. Here, we tested if the reported inability of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hsp104 (Sp-Hsp104) to support [PSI(+)] propagation was due to similar species-specific chaperone requirements and find that Sp-Hsp104 alone supported propagation of three different yeast prions. Sp-Hsp70 and Sp-Fes1p (NEF) likewise functioned in place of their Sa. cerevisiae counterparts. Thus, chaperones of these long-diverged species possess conserved activities that function in processes essential for both cell growth and prion propagation, suggesting Sc. pombe can propagate its own prions. We show that curing by Hsp104 overexpression and inactivation can be distinguished and confirm the observation that, unlike Sc-Hsp104, Sp-Hsp104 cannot cure yeast of [PSI(+)] when it is overexpressed. These results are consistent with a view that mechanisms underlying prion replication and elimination are distinct.

  11. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  12. Conformational switching of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 via regulated phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Joanna; Wandinger, Sebastian K; Mäusbacher, Nina; Schreiber, Thiemo; Richter, Klaus; Daub, Henrik; Buchner, Johannes

    2012-02-24

    Hsp90 is an essential molecular chaperone in the eukaryotic cytosol. Its function is modulated by cochaperones and posttranslational modifications. Importantly, the phosphatase Ppt1 is a dedicated regulator of the Hsp90 chaperone system. Little is known about Ppt1-dependent phosphorylation sites and how these affect Hsp90 activity. Here, we identified the major phosphorylation sites of yeast Hsp90 in its middle or the C-terminal domain and determined the subset regulated by Ppt1. In general, phosphorylation decelerates the Hsp90 machinery, reduces chaperone function in vivo, sensitizes yeast cells to Hsp90 inhibition and affects DNA repair processes. Modification of one particular site (S485) is lethal, whereas others modulate Hsp90 activity via distinct mechanisms affecting the ATPase activity, cochaperone binding and manipulating conformational transitions in Hsp90. Our mechanistic analysis reveals that phosphorylation of Hsp90 permits a regulation of the conformational cycle at distinct steps by targeting switch points for the communication of remote regions within Hsp90. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The therapeutic potential of antioxidants, ER chaperones, NO and H2S donors, and statins for treatment of preeclampsia

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    Tereza eCindrova-Davies

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a complex multifactorial disease. Placental oxidative stress, a result of deficient spiral artery remodeling, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Antiangiogenic factors secreted from malperfused placenta are instrumental in mediating maternal endothelial dysfunction and consequent symptoms of preeclampsia; the mechanism is likely to involve increased ET-1 secretion and reduced NO bioavailability. Therapeutic interventions so far remain only experimental and there is no established remedy for the treatment of preeclampsia. This review concentrates on the evidence for the therapeutic potential of antioxidants, ER chaperones, NO and H2S donors, and statins. These compounds display pleitropic antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and pro-angiogenic effects in animal and in vitro studies. Although clinical trials on the use of antioxidant vitamins in pregnancy proved largely unsuccessful, the scope for their use still exists given the beneficial cardioprotective effects of antioxidant-rich Mediterranean diet, periconceptual vitamin use and the synergistic effect of vitamin C and l-arginine. Encouraging clinical evidence exists for the use of NO donors, and a clinical trial is underway testing the effect of statins in treatment of preeclampsia. H2S recently emerged as a novel therapeutic agent for cardiovascular disease, and its beneficial effects were also tested in animal models of preeclampsia. It is risky to prescribe any medication to pregnant women on a large scale, and any future therapeutic intervention has to be well tested and safe. Many of the compounds discussed could be potential candidates.

  14. L-Serine-Mediated Neuroprotection Includes the Upregulation of the ER Stress Chaperone Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, R A; Powell, J T; Metcalf, J S; Guillemin, G J; Cox, P A

    2018-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a highly evolutionarily conserved response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which functions to return cells to homeostasis or send them into apoptosis, depending on the degree of cellular damage. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) has been shown to induce ER stress in a variety of models and has been linked to several types of neurodegenerative disease including Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). L-Serine, an amino acid critical for cellular metabolism and neurological signaling, has been shown to be protective against L-BMAA-induced neurotoxicity in both animal and cell culture models. While the mechanisms of L-BMAA neurotoxicity have been well characterized, less is known about L-serine neuroprotection. We recently reported that L-serine and L-BMAA generate similar differential expression profiles in a human ER stress/UPR array, despite L-serine being neuroprotective and L-BMAA being linked to neurodegenerative disease. Here, we further investigate the mechanism(s) of L-serine-induced UPR dysregulation by examining key genes and proteins in the ER stress/UPR pathways. We report that L-serine selectively increased protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) protein translation, an ER chaperone involved in refolding misfolded proteins, suggesting it may be modulating the UPR to favor recovery from ER stress. This constitutes a new mechanism for L-serine-mediated neuroprotection and has implications for its use as a therapy for neurodegenerative illnesses.

  15. The interplay of Hrd3 and the molecular chaperone system ensures efficient degradation of malfolded secretory proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Martin; Sommermeyer, Franziska; Berger, Maren; Kumar Lakshmipathy, Sathish; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus; Jarosch, Ernst; Sommer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway are extracted from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), polyubiquitylated by a protein complex termed the Hmg-CoA reductase degradation ligase (HRD-ligase), and degraded by cytosolic 26S proteasomes. This process is termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). We previously showed that the membrane protein Der1, which is a subunit of the HRD-ligase, is involved in the export of aberrant polypeptides from the ER. Unexpectedly, we also uncovered a close spatial proximity of Der1 and the substrate receptor Hrd3 in the ER lumen. We report here on a mutant Hrd3KR that is selectively defective for ERAD of soluble proteins. Hrd3KR displays subtle structural changes that affect its positioning toward Der1. Furthermore, increased quantities of the ER-resident Hsp70-type chaperone Kar2 and the Hsp40-type cochaperone Scj1 bind to Hrd3KR. Of note, deletion of SCJ1 impairs ERAD of model substrates and causes the accumulation of client proteins at Hrd3. Our data imply a function of Scj1 in the removal of malfolded proteins from the receptor Hrd3, which facilitates their delivery to downstream-acting components like Der1. PMID:25428985

  16. C-terminal Domain Modulates the Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein via an Electrostatic Mechanism*

    OpenAIRE

    Qualley, Dominic F.; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M.; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retrovir...

  17. Interaction of new antidepressants with sigma-1 receptor chaperones and their potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-03-15

    The sigma-1 receptor chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may be implicated in the mechanistic action of some antidepressants. The present study was undertaken to examine whether new antidepressant drugs interact with the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. First, we examined the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram), serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran), and mirtazapine, a noradrenaline and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), on [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to rat brain membranes. Then, we examined the effects of these drugs on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The order of potency for drugs at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone was as follows: fluvoxamine>sertraline>fluoxetine>escitalopram>citalopram>paroxetine>duoxetine. Venlafaxine, milnacipran, and mirtazapine showed very weak affinity for this chaperone. Furthermore, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and mirtazapine significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in cell assays, and the effects of all these drugs, excluding mirtazapine, were antagonized by NE-100, a selective antagonist of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. Moreover, the effects of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine on neurite outgrowth were also antagonized by sertraline, indicating that sertraline may be an antagonist at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. The effect of mirtazapine on neurite outgrowth was antagonized by the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These findings suggest that activation at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may be involved in the action of some SSRIs, such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast, mirtazapine independently potentiated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, indicating that this beneficial effect may mediate its pharmacological effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  18. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2 in regulating human sperm-egg recognition

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    Brett Nixon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2, as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  19. Characterization of an Hsp90-independent interaction between the co-chaperone p23 and the transcription factor p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiwen; Hyun, Jashil; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Park, Sung Jean; Dyson, Jane

    2018-01-15

    The cancer-suppressing transcription factor p53 is regulated by a wide variety of cellular factors, including many chaperones. The DNA-binding domain (DBD) of p53 is known to interact with the chaperone Hsp90, but the role of other members of the chaperone network, including co-chaperones such as p23 is unknown. Using a combination of NMR titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence anisotropy and native agarose gel electrophoresis, we have identified a direct interaction between the p53 DBD and the Hsp90 co-chaperone p23 that occurs in the absence of Hsp90. The affinity is relatively weak, and largely determined by electrostatic interactions between the acidic C-terminal disordered tail of p23 and the two DNA binding regions of p53 DBD. We show by NMR and native agarose gel electrophoresis that a p53-specific double-stranded DNA sequence competes successfully with p23 for binding to the p53 DBD. The Hsp90-independence of the interaction between p23 and p53 DBD, together with the p23-DNA competition for p53, raise the intriguing possibility that p23, like other small charged proteins, may affect the p53 in hitherto-unknown ways.

  20. Parkinson disease-linked GBA mutation effects reversed by molecular chaperones in human cell and fly models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Beavan, Michelle; Gegg, Matthew E.; Chau, Kai-Yin; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Schapira, Anthony H. V.

    2016-01-01

    GBA gene mutations are the greatest cause of Parkinson disease (PD). GBA encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase) but the mechanisms by which loss of GCase contributes to PD remain unclear. Inhibition of autophagy and the generation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are both implicated. Mutant GCase can unfold in the ER and be degraded via the unfolded protein response, activating ER stress and reducing lysosomal GCase. Small molecule chaperones that cross the blood brain barrier help mutant GCase refold and traffic correctly to lysosomes are putative treatments for PD. We treated fibroblast cells from PD patients with heterozygous GBA mutations and Drosophila expressing human wild-type, N370S and L444P GBA with the molecular chaperones ambroxol and isofagomine. Both chaperones increased GCase levels and activity, but also GBA mRNA, in control and mutant GBA fibroblasts. Expression of mutated GBA in Drosophila resulted in dopaminergic neuronal loss, a progressive locomotor defect, abnormal aggregates in the ER and increased levels of the ER stress reporter Xbp1-EGFP. Treatment with both chaperones lowered ER stress and prevented the loss of motor function, providing proof of principle that small molecule chaperones can reverse mutant GBA-mediated ER stress in vivo and might prove effective for treating PD. PMID:27539639

  1. Human protein-disulfide isomerase is a redox-regulated chaperone activated by oxidation of domain a'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-06

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb'xa'c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a', and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b'xa'. The structure of the reduced bb'xa' reveals for the first time that domain a' packs tightly with both domain b' and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a' releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI.

  2. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  3. The histone chaperone HJURP is a new independent prognostic marker for luminal A breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Berger, Frédérique; Rehman, Haniya; Martel, Elise; Corpet, Armelle; de Koning, Leanne; Vassias, Isabelle; Wilson, Laurence O W; Meseure, Didier; Reyal, Fabien; Savignoni, Alexia; Asselain, Bernard; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with different molecular subtypes that have varying responses to therapy. An ongoing challenge in breast cancer research is to distinguish high-risk patients from good prognosis patients. This is particularly difficult in the low-grade, ER-positive luminal A tumors, where robust diagnostic tools to aid clinical treatment decisions are lacking. Recent data implicating chromatin regulators in cancer initiation and progression offers a promising avenue to develop new tools to help guide clinical decisions. Here we exploit a published transcriptome dataset and an independent validation cohort to correlate the mRNA expression of selected chromatin regulators with respect to the four intrinsic breast cancer molecular subtypes. We then perform univariate and multivariate analyses to compare the prognostic value of a panel of chromatin regulators to Ki67, a currently utilized proliferation marker. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed a gene cluster containing several histone chaperones and histone variants highly-expressed in the proliferative subtypes (basal-like, HER2-positive, luminal B) but not in the luminal A subtype. Several chromatin regulators, including the histone chaperones CAF-1 (subunits p150 and p60), ASF1b, and HJURP, and the centromeric histone variant CENP-A, associated with local and metastatic relapse and poor patient outcome. Importantly, we find that HJURP can discriminate favorable and unfavorable outcome within the luminal A subtype, outperforming the currently utilized proliferation marker Ki67, as an independent prognostic marker for luminal A patients. The integration of chromatin regulators as clinical biomarkers, in particular the histone chaperone HJURP, will help guide patient substratification and treatment options for low-risk luminal A breast carcinoma patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Broadening the functionality of a J-protein/Hsp70 molecular chaperone system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda A Schilke

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available By binding to a multitude of polypeptide substrates, Hsp70-based molecular chaperone systems perform a range of cellular functions. All J-protein co-chaperones play the essential role, via action of their J-domains, of stimulating the ATPase activity of Hsp70, thereby stabilizing its interaction with substrate. In addition, J-proteins drive the functional diversity of Hsp70 chaperone systems through action of regions outside their J-domains. Targeting to specific locations within a cellular compartment and binding of specific substrates for delivery to Hsp70 have been identified as modes of J-protein specialization. To better understand J-protein specialization, we concentrated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIS1, which encodes an essential J-protein of the cytosol/nucleus. We selected suppressors that allowed cells lacking SIS1 to form colonies. Substitutions changing single residues in Ydj1, a J-protein, which, like Sis1, partners with Hsp70 Ssa1, were isolated. These gain-of-function substitutions were located at the end of the J-domain, suggesting that suppression was connected to interaction with its partner Hsp70, rather than substrate binding or subcellular localization. Reasoning that, if YDJ1 suppressors affect Ssa1 function, substitutions in Hsp70 itself might also be able to overcome the cellular requirement for Sis1, we carried out a selection for SSA1 suppressor mutations. Suppressing substitutions were isolated that altered sites in Ssa1 affecting the cycle of substrate interaction. Together, our results point to a third, additional means by which J-proteins can drive Hsp70's ability to function in a wide range of cellular processes-modulating the Hsp70-substrate interaction cycle.

  5. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola (EBOV and Marburg (MARV viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3, a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs, as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA. Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles.

  6. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  7. Broadening the functionality of a J-protein/Hsp70 molecular chaperone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Brenda A; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Kamiya, Erina; Tonelli, Marco; Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Hines, Justin K; Markley, John L; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2017-10-01

    By binding to a multitude of polypeptide substrates, Hsp70-based molecular chaperone systems perform a range of cellular functions. All J-protein co-chaperones play the essential role, via action of their J-domains, of stimulating the ATPase activity of Hsp70, thereby stabilizing its interaction with substrate. In addition, J-proteins drive the functional diversity of Hsp70 chaperone systems through action of regions outside their J-domains. Targeting to specific locations within a cellular compartment and binding of specific substrates for delivery to Hsp70 have been identified as modes of J-protein specialization. To better understand J-protein specialization, we concentrated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIS1, which encodes an essential J-protein of the cytosol/nucleus. We selected suppressors that allowed cells lacking SIS1 to form colonies. Substitutions changing single residues in Ydj1, a J-protein, which, like Sis1, partners with Hsp70 Ssa1, were isolated. These gain-of-function substitutions were located at the end of the J-domain, suggesting that suppression was connected to interaction with its partner Hsp70, rather than substrate binding or subcellular localization. Reasoning that, if YDJ1 suppressors affect Ssa1 function, substitutions in Hsp70 itself might also be able to overcome the cellular requirement for Sis1, we carried out a selection for SSA1 suppressor mutations. Suppressing substitutions were isolated that altered sites in Ssa1 affecting the cycle of substrate interaction. Together, our results point to a third, additional means by which J-proteins can drive Hsp70's ability to function in a wide range of cellular processes-modulating the Hsp70-substrate interaction cycle.

  8. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a matrix scavenger chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chlenski

    Full Text Available Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC is one of the major non-structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM in remodeling tissues. The functional significance of SPARC is emphasized by its origin in the first multicellular organisms and its high degree of evolutionary conservation. Although SPARC has been shown to act as a critical modulator of ECM remodeling with profound effects on tissue physiology and architecture, no plausible molecular mechanism of its action has been proposed. In the present study, we demonstrate that SPARC mediates the disassembly and degradation of ECM networks by functioning as a matricellular chaperone. While it has low affinity to its targets inside the cells where the Ca(2+ concentrations are low, high extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+ activate binding to multiple ECM proteins, including collagens. We demonstrated that in vitro, this leads to the inhibition of collagen I fibrillogenesis and disassembly of pre-formed collagen I fibrils by SPARC at high Ca(2+ concentrations. In cell culture, exogenous SPARC was internalized by the fibroblast cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pulse-chase assay further revealed that internalized SPARC is quickly released outside the cell, demonstrating that SPARC shuttles between the cell and ECM. Fluorescently labeled collagen I, fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminin were co-internalized with SPARC by fibroblasts, and semi-quantitative Western blot showed that SPARC mediates internalization of collagen I. Using a novel 3-dimensional model of fluorescent ECM networks pre-deposited by live fibroblasts, we demonstrated that degradation of ECM depends on the chaperone activity of SPARC. These results indicate that SPARC may represent a new class of scavenger chaperones, which mediate ECM degradation, remodeling and repair by disassembling ECM networks and shuttling ECM proteins into the cell. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide

  9. Functional Conservation and Specialization among Eukaryotic Anti-Silencing Function 1 Histone Chaperones

    OpenAIRE

    Tamburini, Beth A.; Carson, Joshua J.; Adkins, Melissa W.; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2005-01-01

    Chromatin disassembly and reassembly, mediated by histone chaperones such as anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1), are likely to accompany all nuclear processes that occur on the DNA template. In order to gain insight into the functional conservation of Asf1 across eukaryotes, we have replaced the budding yeast Asf1 protein with Drosophila Asf1 (dAsf1) or either of the two human Asf1 (hAsf1a and hAsf1b) counterparts. We found that hAsf1b is best able to rescue the growth defect of Saccharomyces c...

  10. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Kristoffer T.; Bowman, Lisa; Millership, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did...... not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement...... the ClpX chaperone....

  11. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  12. Acid-denatured Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Rosa E; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Ramos, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been widely used in several molecular and cellular biology applications, since it is remarkably stable in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, native GFP is resistant to the most common chemical denaturants; however, a low fluorescence signal has been observed after acid-induced denaturation. Furthermore, this acid-denatured GFP has been used as substrate in studies of the folding activity of some bacterial chaperones and other chaperone-like molecules. Protein disulfide isomerase enzymes, a family of eukaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds in nascent polypeptides, play a key role in protein folding and it could display chaperone activity. However, contrasting results have been reported using different proteins as model substrates. Here, we report the further application of GFP as a model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) enzymes. Since refolding of acid-denatured GFP can be easily and directly monitored, a simple micro-assay was used to study the effect of the molecular participants in protein refolding assisted by PDI. Additionally, the effect of a well-known inhibitor of PDI chaperone activity was also analyzed. Because of the diversity their functional activities, PDI enzymes are potentially interesting drug targets. Since PDI may be implicated in the protection of cells against ER stress, including cancer cells, inhibitors of PDI might be able to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy; furthermore, it has been demonstrated that blocking the reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds of proteins associated with the cell surface markedly reduces the infectivity of the human immunodeficiency virus. Although several high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to test PDI reductase activity have been described, we report here a novel and simple micro-assay to test the chaperone activity of PDI enzymes, which is amenable for HTS of PDI

  13. Delay of diabetic cataract in rats by the antiglycating potential of cumin through modulation of alpha-crystallin chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pasupulati Anil; Reddy, Paduru Yadagiri; Srinivas, P N B S; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2009-07-01

    alpha-Crystallin, a molecular chaperone of the eye lens, plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the lens by preventing the aggregation/inactivation of several proteins and enzymes in addition to its structural role. alpha-Crystallin is a long-lived protein and is susceptible to several posttranslational modifications during aging, more so in certain clinical conditions such as diabetes. Nonenzymatic glycation of lens proteins and decline in the chaperone-like function of alpha-crystallin have been reported in diabetic conditions. Therefore, inhibitors of nonenzymatic protein glycation appear to be a potential target to preserve the chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin and to combat cataract under hyperglycemic conditions. In this study, we investigated the antiglycating potential of cumin in vitro and its ability to modulate the chaperone-like activity of alpha-crystallin vis-à-vis the progression of diabetic cataract in vivo. Aqueous extract of cumin was tested for its antiglycating ability against fructose-induced glycation of goat lens total soluble protein (TSP), alpha-crystallin from goat lens and a nonlenticular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). The antiglycating potential of cumin was also investigated by feeding streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with diet containing 0.5% cumin powder. The aqueous extract of cumin prevented in vitro glycation of TSP, alpha-crystallin and BSA. Slit lamp examination revealed that supplementation of cumin delayed progression and maturation of STZ-induced cataract in rats. Cumin was effective in preventing glycation of TSP and alpha-crystallin in diabetic lens. Interestingly, feeding of cumin to diabetic rats not only prevented loss of chaperone activity but also attenuated the structural changes of alpha-crystallin in lens. These results indicated that cumin has antiglycating properties that may be attributed to the modulation of chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin, thus delaying cataract in

  14. Structural basis for recognition of H3K56-acetylated histone H3-H4 by the chaperone Rtt106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dan; Hu, Qi; Li, Qing; Thompson, James R; Cui, Gaofeng; Fazly, Ahmed; Davies, Brian A; Botuyan, Maria Victoria; Zhang, Zhiguo; Mer, Georges [Mayo

    2013-04-08

    Dynamic variations in the structure of chromatin influence virtually all DNA-related processes in eukaryotes and are controlled in part by post-translational modifications of histones. One such modification, the acetylation of lysine 56 (H3K56ac) in the amino-terminal α-helix (αN) of histone H3, has been implicated in the regulation of nucleosome assembly during DNA replication and repair, and nucleosome disassembly during gene transcription. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 contributes to the deposition of newly synthesized H3K56ac-carrying H3-H4 complex on replicating DNA, but it is unclear how Rtt106 binds H3-H4 and specifically recognizes H3K56ac as there is no apparent acetylated lysine reader domain in Rtt106. Here, we show that two domains of Rtt106 are involved in a combinatorial recognition of H3-H4. An N-terminal domain homodimerizes and interacts with H3-H4 independently of acetylation while a double pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain binds the K56-containing region of H3. Affinity is markedly enhanced upon acetylation of K56, an effect that is probably due to increased conformational entropy of the αN helix of H3. Our data support a mode of interaction where the N-terminal homodimeric domain of Rtt106 intercalates between the two H3-H4 components of the (H3-H4)2 tetramer while two double PH domains in the Rtt106 dimer interact with each of the two H3K56ac sites in (H3-H4)2. We show that the Rtt106-(H3-H4)2 interaction is important for gene silencing and the DNA damage response.

  15. Impact of the lectin chaperone calnexin on the stress response, virulence and proteolytic secretome of the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret V Powers-Fletcher

    Full Text Available Calnexin is a membrane-bound lectin chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER that is part of a quality control system that promotes the accurate folding of glycoproteins entering the secretory pathway. We have previously shown that ER homeostasis is important for virulence of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, but the contribution of calnexin has not been explored. Here, we determined the extent to which A. fumigatus relies on calnexin for growth under conditions of environmental stress and for virulence. The calnexin gene, clxA, was deleted from A. fumigatus and complemented by reconstitution with the wild type gene. Loss of clxA altered the proteolytic secretome of the fungus, but had no impact on growth rates in either minimal or complex media at 37°C. However, the ΔclxA mutant was growth impaired at temperatures above 42°C and was hypersensitive to acute ER stress caused by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. In contrast to wild type A. fumigatus, ΔclxA hyphae were unable to grow when transferred to starvation medium. In addition, depleting the medium of cations by chelation prevented ΔclxA from sustaining polarized hyphal growth, resulting in blunted hyphae with irregular morphology. Despite these abnormal stress responses, the ΔclxA mutant remained virulent in two immunologically distinct models of invasive aspergillosis. These findings demonstrate that calnexin functions are needed for growth under conditions of thermal, ER and nutrient stress, but are dispensable for surviving the stresses encountered in the host environment.

  16. Conformational changes in human Hsp70 induced by high hydrostatic pressure produce oligomers with ATPase activity but without chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Thaís L S; Borges, Julio Cesar; Ramos, Carlos H; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto; Oliveira Júnior, Reinaldo S; Pascutti, Pedro G; Foguel, Debora; Palhano, Fernando L

    2014-05-13

    We investigated the folding of the 70 kDa human cytosolic inducible protein (Hsp70) in vitro using high hydrostatic pressure as a denaturing agent. We followed the structural changes in Hsp70 induced by high hydrostatic pressure using tryptophan fluorescence, molecular dynamics, circular dichroism, high-performance liquid chromatography gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, ATPase activity, and chaperone activity. Although monomeric, Hsp70 is very sensitive to hydrostatic pressure; after pressure had been removed, the protein did not return to its native sate but instead formed oligomeric species that lost chaperone activity but retained ATPase activity.

  17. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase...... for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling...... histones genome wide during DNA replication....

  18. Molecular chaperones-related studies using latent stages of invertebrates exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, O. A.; Alexeev, V. R.; Sychev, V. N.; Okuda, T.; Saigusa, M.

    The latent stages of certain groups of invertebrates such as Artemia and Daphnia cyst Crustacea tuns of water bears Tardigrada are very perspective material for the investigation of the boundaries of the survival of the living organisms in the space environment While the number of authors showed that exposition the space flight causes the alteration in the survivability of the Artemia cysts there is no data about the changes in the stress response on the molecular level after short and long-termed space flight In this report we present preliminary results of the analysis of the expression of hsp90 chaperon in response to the heat shock in the larvae of the Artemia obtained from the cyst exposed to the real space flight onboard ISS for 1 and 6 month in the frame of the Aquarium program 2005-2006 and control ground group The perspectives of the usage of the molecular chaperons hsp in the studies for elucidation of the influence of the open space environment BIORISK and EXPOSE research programs on the immune response end general physiology of the invertebrates in their latent stages are discussed

  19. Gamma-irradiation effects to posttranslational modification and chaperon function of bovine {alpha}-crystalline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroki, K; Matsumoto, S.; Awakura, M. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Science, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, N. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2001-01-01

    The formation of D-asparate (D-Asp) in {alpha}A-crystallin of the aged human eye and the cataract crystalline lens has been reported. Crystalline lens keeps the transparency by forming {alpha}-crystallin which consists of a high order association of {alpha}A-and {alpha}B-crystallin. Bovine {alpha}-crystallin for investigating a chaperone function which protects the crystalline lens from getting to opaque or disordered agglutination with heat or light, is irradiated by gamma-ray (Co-60) at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy, respectively. The irradiated bovine {alpha}-crystallin are analyzed with electrophoresis, gel permeation chromatograph, and UV absorption spectrometer for checking on the agglutination and the isomerization of macromolecules. Oxidation of methionine residues (Met-1) and isomerization of asparagine residues (Asp-151) in the {alpha}A-crystallin are ascertained in molecular levels with reversed phase liquid chromatography. The Met-1 oxidation and the Asp-151 isomerization depend on gamma-irradiation doses. It is thought that OH radical and H radical in water generated by the irradiation lead to the oxidation and the isomerization. Stereoinversion in the {alpha}-crystallin following to such a chemical change are considered to lead to the agglutination of polymer and the reduction of chaperon function. (M. Suetake)

  20. The exported chaperone Hsp70-x supports virulence functions for Plasmodium falciparum blood stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Charnaud

    Full Text Available Malaria is caused by five different Plasmodium spp. in humans each of which modifies the host erythrocyte to survive and replicate. The two main causes of malaria, P. falciparum and P. vivax, differ in their ability to cause severe disease, mainly due to differences in the cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE in the microvasculature. Cytoadhesion of P. falciparum in the brain leads to a large number of deaths each year and is a consequence of exported parasite proteins, some of which modify the erythrocyte cytoskeleton while others such as PfEMP1 project onto the erythrocyte surface where they bind to endothelial cells. Here we investigate the effects of knocking out an exported Hsp70-type chaperone termed Hsp70-x that is present in P. falciparum but not P. vivax. Although the growth of Δhsp70-x parasites was unaffected, the export of PfEMP1 cytoadherence proteins was delayed and Δhsp70-x IE had reduced adhesion. The Δhsp70-x IE were also more rigid than wild-type controls indicating changes in the way the parasites modified their host erythrocyte. To investigate the cause of this, transcriptional and translational changes in exported and chaperone proteins were monitored and some changes were observed. We propose that PfHsp70-x is not essential for survival in vitro, but may be required for the efficient export and functioning of some P. falciparum exported proteins.

  1. Chemical chaperone and inhibitor discovery: potential treatments for protein conformational diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Lin, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Chih-Hung; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ho, Yih; Tsai, Wei-Bor; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2007-12-11

    Protein misfolding and aggregation cause a large number of neurodegenerative diseases in humans due to (i) gain of function as observed in Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Prion's disease or (ii) loss of function as observed in cystic fibrosis and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency. These misfolded proteins could either lead to the formation of harmful amyloids that become toxic for the cells or to be recognized and prematurely degraded by the protein quality control system. An increasing number of studies has indicated that some low-molecular-weight compounds named as chemical chaperones can reverse the mislocalization and/or aggregation of proteins associated with human conformational diseases. These small molecules are thought to non-selectively stabilize proteins and facilitate their folding. In this review, we summarize the probable mechanisms of protein conformational diseases in humans and the use of chemical chaperones and inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents against these diseases. Furthermore, recent advanced experimental and theoretical approaches underlying the detailed mechanisms of protein conformational changes and current structure-based drug designs towards protein conformational diseases are also discussed. It is believed that a better understanding of the mechanisms of conformational changes as well as the biological functions of these proteins will lead to the development and design of potential interfering compounds against amyloid formation associated with protein conformational diseases.

  2. High dose of antibiotic colistin induces oligomerization of molecular chaperone HSP90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Shuntaro; Takahashi, Kyosuke; Tamura, Arisa; Toyota, Ikumi; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Kudo, Ikuru; Sasaki Kudoh, Erina; Okamoto, Tomoya; Haga, Asami; Miyamoto, Asuka; Grave, Ewa; Sugawara, Taku; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Itoh, Hideaki

    2017-07-01

    Colistin is an antimicrobial cationic peptide that belongs to the polymyxin family. Colistin was clinically used for the treatment of gram-negative infections but fell out of favour because of its significant side effects including neurotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. More recently, colistin has been regarded as one of the important options for nosocomial infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria. Mechanisms of both the side effect onset of the drug and the side effect reduction are yet to be elucidated. In this study, we identified the specific binding protein of colistin using an affinity column chromatography. Colistin binds to the molecular chaperone HSP90. Although colistin slightly suppressed the chaperone activity of HSP90, there are no effects on the ATPase activity for a low concentration of colistin. Interestingly, colistin-induced aggregation of HSP90 via the N-domain. As for the cell viability of the SHSY5Y cell, the cell viability decreased to approximately 80% by the colistin 300 μM. However, the cell viability recovered to approximately 100% by adding ATP dosage. The same result was obtained by dot blot assay using anti-HSP90 antibody. Our results may help to understand the side effect mechanism of colistin. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. A Clp/Hsp100 chaperone functions in Myxococcus xanthus sporulation and self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinyuan; Garza, Anthony G; Bradley, Michael D; Welch, Roy D

    2012-04-01

    The Clp/Hsp100 proteins are chaperones that play a role in protein degradation and reactivation. In bacteria, they exhibit a high degree of pleiotropy, affecting both individual and multicellular phenotypes. In this article, we present the first characterization of a Clp/Hsp100 homolog in Myxococcus xanthus (MXAN_4832 gene locus). Deletion of MXAN_4832 causes defects in both swarming and aggregation related to cell motility and the production of fibrils, which are an important component of the extracellular matrix of a swarm. The deletion also affects the formation of myxospores during development, causing them to become sensitive to heat. The protein product of MXAN_4832 can act as a chaperone in vitro, providing biochemical evidence in support of our hypothesis that MXAN_4832 is a functional Clp/Hsp100 homolog. There are a total of 12 Clp/Hsp100 homologs in M. xanthus, including MXAN_4832, and, based on its mutational and biochemical characterization, they may well represent an important group.

  4. Contributions of chaperone and glycosyltransferase activities of O-fucosyltransferase 1 to Notch signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvine Kenneth D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background O-fucosyltransferase1 (OFUT1 is a conserved ER protein essential for Notch signaling. OFUT1 glycosylates EGF domains, which can then be further modified by the N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Fringe. OFUT1 also possesses a chaperone activity that promotes the folding and secretion of Notch. Here, we investigate the respective contributions of these activities to Notch signaling in Drosophila. Results We show that expression of an isoform lacking fucosyltransferase activity, Ofut1R245A, rescues the requirement for Ofut1 in embryonic neurogenesis. Lack of requirement for O-fucosylation is further supported by the absence of embryonic phenotypes in Gmd mutants, which lack all forms of fucosylation. Requirements for O-fucose during imaginal development were evaluated by characterizing clones of cells expressing only Ofut1R245A. These clones phenocopy fringe mutant clones, indicating that the absence of O-fucose is functionally equivalent to the absence of elongated O-fucose. Conclusion Our results establish that Notch does not need to be O-fucosylated for fringe-independent Notch signaling in Drosophila; the chaperone activity of OFUT1 is sufficient for the generation of functional Notch.

  5. Phosphorylation-mediated control of histone chaperone ASF1 levels by Tousled-like kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Pilyugin

    Full Text Available Histone chaperones are at the hub of a diverse interaction networks integrating a plethora of chromatin modifying activities. Histone H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 is a target for cell-cycle regulated Tousled-like kinases (TLKs and both proteins cooperate during chromatin replication. However, the precise role of post-translational modification of ASF1 remained unclear. Here, we identify the TLK phosphorylation sites for both Drosophila and human ASF1 proteins. Loss of TLK-mediated phosphorylation triggers hASF1a and dASF1 degradation by proteasome-dependent and independent mechanisms respectively. Consistent with this notion, introduction of phosphorylation-mimicking mutants inhibits hASF1a and dASF1 degradation. Human hASF1b is also targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation, but its stability is not affected by phosphorylation indicating that other mechanisms are likely to be involved in control of hASF1b levels. Together, these results suggest that ASF1 cellular levels are tightly controlled by distinct pathways and provide a molecular mechanism for post-translational regulation of dASF1 and hASF1a by TLK kinases.

  6. The Cryoelectron Microscopy Structure of the Type 1 Chaperone-Usher Pilus Rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospenthal, Manuela K; Zyla, Dawid; Costa, Tiago R D; Redzej, Adam; Giese, Christoph; Lillington, James; Glockshuber, Rudi; Waksman, Gabriel

    2017-12-05

    Adhesive chaperone-usher pili are long, supramolecular protein fibers displayed on the surface of many bacterial pathogens. The type 1 and P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) play important roles during urinary tract colonization, mediating attachment to the bladder and kidney, respectively. The biomechanical properties of the helical pilus rods allow them to reversibly uncoil in response to flow-induced forces, allowing UPEC to retain a foothold in the unique and hostile environment of the urinary tract. Here we provide the 4.2-Å resolution cryo-EM structure of the type 1 pilus rod, which together with the previous P pilus rod structure rationalizes the remarkable "spring-like" properties of chaperone-usher pili. The cryo-EM structure of the type 1 pilus rod differs in its helical parameters from the structure determined previously by a hybrid approach. We provide evidence that these structural differences originate from different quaternary structures of pili assembled in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. © FASEB.

  8. Transporters, chaperones, and P-type ATPases controlling grapevine copper homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Mu, Qian; Wang, Xiaomin; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Xudong; Shangguan, Lingfei; Fang, Jinggui

    2015-11-01

    With more copper and copper-containing compounds used as bactericides and fungicides in viticulture, copper homeostasis in grapevine (Vitis) has become one of the serious environmental crises with great risk. To better understand the regulation of Cu homeostasis in grapevine, grapevine seedlings cultured in vitro with different levels of Cu were utilized to investigate the tolerance mechanisms of grapevine responding to copper availability at physiological and molecular levels. The results indicated that Cu contents in roots and leaves arose with increasing levels of Cu application. With copper concentration increasing, malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased in roots and leaves and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) increased to protect the plant itself from damage. The expression patterns of 19 genes, encoding transporters, chaperones, and P-type ATPases involved in copper homeostasis in root and leaf of grapevine seedling under various levels of Cu(2+) were further analyzed. The expression patterns indicated that CTr1, CTr2, and CTr8 transporters were significantly upregulated in response both to Cu excess and deficiency. ZIP2 was downregulated in response to Cu excess and upregulated under Cu-deficient conditions, while ZIP4 had an opposite expression pattern under similar conditions. The expression of chaperones and P-type ATPases in response to Cu availability in grapevine were also briefly studied.

  9. Individual and Collective Contributions of Chaperoning and Degradation to Protein Homeostasis in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younhee Cho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The folding fate of a protein in vivo is determined by the interplay between a protein’s folding energy landscape and the actions of the proteostasis network, including molecular chaperones and degradation enzymes. The mechanisms of individual components of the E. coli proteostasis network have been studied extensively, but much less is known about how they function as a system. We used an integrated experimental and computational approach to quantitatively analyze the folding outcomes (native folding versus aggregation versus degradation of three test proteins biosynthesized in E. coli under a variety of conditions. Overexpression of the entire proteostasis network benefited all three test proteins, but the effect of upregulating individual chaperones or the major degradation enzyme, Lon, varied for proteins with different biophysical properties. In sum, the impact of the E. coli proteostasis network is a consequence of concerted action by the Hsp70 system (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE, the Hsp60 system (GroEL/GroES, and Lon.

  10. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M.; Sim, Valerie L.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation.

  11. A prion-like domain in Hsp42 drives chaperone-facilitated aggregation of misfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grousl, Tomas; Ungelenk, Sophia; Miller, Stephanie; Ho, Chi-Ting; Khokhrina, Maria; Mayer, Matthias P; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2018-01-23

    Chaperones with aggregase activity promote and organize the aggregation of misfolded proteins and their deposition at specific intracellular sites. This activity represents a novel cytoprotective strategy of protein quality control systems; however, little is known about its mechanism. In yeast, the small heat shock protein Hsp42 orchestrates the stress-induced sequestration of misfolded proteins into cytosolic aggregates (CytoQ). In this study, we show that Hsp42 harbors a prion-like domain (PrLD) and a canonical intrinsically disordered domain (IDD) that act coordinately to promote and control protein aggregation. Hsp42 PrLD is essential for CytoQ formation and is bifunctional, mediating self-association as well as binding to misfolded proteins. Hsp42 IDD confines chaperone and aggregase activity and affects CytoQ numbers and stability in vivo. Hsp42 PrLD and IDD are both crucial for cellular fitness during heat stress, demonstrating the need for sequestering misfolded proteins in a regulated manner. © 2018 Grousl et al.

  12. Functional Amyloid Protection in the Eye Lens: Retention of α-Crystallin Molecular Chaperone Activity after Modification into Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Megan; Ecroyd, Heath; Ray, Nicholas J; Gerrard, Juliet A; Carver, John A

    2017-09-12

    Amyloid fibril formation occurs from a wide range of peptides and proteins and is typically associated with a loss of protein function and/or a gain of toxic function, as the native structure of the protein undergoes major alteration to form a cross β-sheet array. It is now well recognised that some amyloid fibrils have a biological function, which has led to increased interest in the potential that these so-called functional amyloids may either retain the function of the native protein, or gain function upon adopting a fibrillar structure. Herein, we investigate the molecular chaperone ability of α-crystallin, the predominant eye lens protein which is composed of two related subunits αA- and αB-crystallin, and its capacity to retain and even enhance its chaperone activity after forming aggregate structures under conditions of thermal and chemical stress. We demonstrate that both eye lens α-crystallin and αB-crystallin (which is also found extensively outside the lens) retain, to a significant degree, their molecular chaperone activity under conditions of structural change, including after formation into amyloid fibrils and amorphous aggregates. The results can be related directly to the effects of aging on the structure and chaperone function of α-crystallin in the eye lens, particularly its ability to prevent crystallin protein aggregation and hence lens opacification associated with cataract formation.

  13. Functional Amyloid Protection in the Eye Lens: Retention of α-Crystallin Molecular Chaperone Activity after Modification into Amyloid Fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Garvey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibril formation occurs from a wide range of peptides and proteins and is typically associated with a loss of protein function and/or a gain of toxic function, as the native structure of the protein undergoes major alteration to form a cross β-sheet array. It is now well recognised that some amyloid fibrils have a biological function, which has led to increased interest in the potential that these so-called functional amyloids may either retain the function of the native protein, or gain function upon adopting a fibrillar structure. Herein, we investigate the molecular chaperone ability of α-crystallin, the predominant eye lens protein which is composed of two related subunits αA- and αB-crystallin, and its capacity to retain and even enhance its chaperone activity after forming aggregate structures under conditions of thermal and chemical stress. We demonstrate that both eye lens α-crystallin and αB-crystallin (which is also found extensively outside the lens retain, to a significant degree, their molecular chaperone activity under conditions of structural change, including after formation into amyloid fibrils and amorphous aggregates. The results can be related directly to the effects of aging on the structure and chaperone function of α-crystallin in the eye lens, particularly its ability to prevent crystallin protein aggregation and hence lens opacification associated with cataract formation.

  14. Molecular chaperone assisted expression systems: obtaining pure soluble and active recombinant proteins for structural and therapeutic purposes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makhoba, XH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available during recombinant proteins production in E. coli. Molecular chaperones are proteins that are known to assist the newly synthesized proteins to complete their folding stages. This system has improved various proteins that are difficult to produce in E...

  15. Mimicking the action of folding chaperones in molecular dynamics simulations : Application to the refinement of homology-based protein structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Mark, A.E.

    A novel method for the refinement of misfolded protein structures is proposed in which the properties of the solvent environment are oscillated in order to mimic some aspects of the role of molecular chaperones play in protein folding in vivo. Specifically, the hydrophobicity of the solvent is

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 in macrophages is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anas, Adam A.; de Vos, Alex F.; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H. P.; van Heijst, Jeroen W. J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Li, Zihai; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common Gram-negative bacteria that cause pneumonia. Gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is essential for the trafficking and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To determine the role of gp96 in myeloid cells in host defence during

  17. A Chaperone Enhances Blood α-Glucosidase Activity in Pompe Disease Patients Treated With Enzyme Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Fecarotta, Simona; la Marca, Giancarlo; Rossi, Barbara; Ascione, Serena; Donati, Maria Alice; Morandi, Lucia Ovidia; Ravaglia, Sabrina; Pichiecchio, Anna; Ombrone, Daniela; Sacchini, Michele; Pasanisi, Maria Barbara; De Filippi, Paola; Danesino, Cesare; Della Casa, Roberto; Romano, Alfonso; Mollica, Carmine; Rosa, Margherita; Agovino, Teresa; Nusco, Edoardo; Porto, Caterina; Andria, Generoso

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is currently the only approved treatment for Pompe disease, due to acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Clinical efficacy of this approach is variable, and more effective therapies are needed. We showed in preclinical studies that chaperones stabilize the recombinant enzyme used for enzyme replacement therapy. Here, we evaluated the effects of a combination of enzyme therapy and a chaperone on α-glucosidase activity in Pompe disease patients. α-Glucosidase activity was analyzed by tandem-mass spectrometry in dried blood spots from patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy, either alone or in combination with the chaperone N-butyldeoxynojirimycin given at the time of the enzyme infusion. Thirteen patients with different presentations (3 infantile-onset, 10 late-onset) were enrolled. In 11 patients, the combination treatment resulted in α-glucosidase activities greater than 1.85-fold the activities with enzyme replacement therapy alone. In the whole patient population, α-glucosidase activity was significantly increased at 12 hours (2.19-fold, P = 0.002), 24 hours (6.07-fold, P = 0.001), and 36 hours (3.95-fold, P = 0.003). The areas under the curve were also significantly increased (6.78-fold, P = 0.002). These results suggest improved stability of recombinant α-glucosidase in blood in the presence of the chaperone. PMID:25052852

  18. c-Abl Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Aha1 Activates Its Co-chaperone Function in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Dunn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90 to hydrolyze ATP is essential for its chaperone function. The co-chaperone Aha1 stimulates Hsp90 ATPase activity, tailoring the chaperone function to specific “client” proteins. The intracellular signaling mechanisms directly regulating Aha1 association with Hsp90 remain unknown. Here, we show that c-Abl kinase phosphorylates Y223 in human Aha1 (hAha1, promoting its interaction with Hsp90. This, consequently, results in an increased Hsp90 ATPase activity, enhances Hsp90 interaction with kinase clients, and compromises the chaperoning of non-kinase clients such as glucocorticoid receptor and CFTR. Suggesting a regulatory paradigm, we also find that Y223 phosphorylation leads to ubiquitination and degradation of hAha1 in the proteasome. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of c-Abl prevents hAha1 interaction with Hsp90, thereby hypersensitizing cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors both in vitro and ex vivo.

  19. Biology of the Heat Shock Response and Protein Chaperones: Budding Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Jacob; Abrams, Jennifer; Wang, Yanyu

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The eukaryotic heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved transcriptional program that results in the immediate synthesis of a battery of cytoprotective genes in the presence of thermal and other environmental stresses. Many of these genes encode molecular chaperones, powerful protein remodelers with the capacity to shield, fold, or unfold substrates in a context-dependent manner. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be an invaluable model for driving the discovery of regulatory features of this fundamental stress response. In addition, budding yeast has been an outstanding model system to elucidate the cell biology of protein chaperones and their organization into functional networks. In this review, we evaluate our understanding of the multifaceted response to heat shock. In addition, the chaperone complement of the cytosol is compared to those of mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, organelles with their own unique protein homeostasis milieus. Finally, we examine recent advances in the understanding of the roles of protein chaperones and the heat shock response in pathogenic fungi, which is being accelerated by the wealth of information gained for budding yeast. PMID:22688810

  20. alpha-Crystallin protein cognates in eggs of the moth, Plodia interpunctella: possible chaperones for the follicular epithelium yolk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirk, P D; Broza, R; Hemphill, M; Perera, O P

    1998-03-01

    alpha-Crystallin protein cognates were found in germ cells of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Shirk and Zimowska, 1997). A cDNA clone of 674 bp with a single open reading frame was isolated for a 25,000 molecular weight polypeptide member of this family, alpha CP25, and a single transcript of approximately 700 bp was found in the ovary of vitellogenic females. Both the DNA sequence and predicted amino acid sequence showed considerable homology with the embryonic lethal gene, l(2)efl, in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition to the sequence for l(2)efl, the predicted amino acid sequence for acp25 also showed significant sequence similarly with the alpha-crystallin A chain polypeptides from the lenses of vertebrae eyes. An N-terminal hydrophobic aggregation site and a C-terminal protective binding site common to alpha-crystallin proteins were present in the predicted acp25 and l(2)efl amino acid sequences, while only the C-terminal protective binding site was present in the small heat shock protein sequences from D. melanogaster. This evidence suggests that although the alpha-crystallin protein cognates in P. interpunctella evolved from a gene common with small heat shock protein genes, the amino acid sequence has converged on a structure similar to that of alpha-crystallin proteins. Native immunoblot analysis showed that the alpha-crystallin proteins formed high molecular weight complexes with the follicular epithelium yolk protein (FEYP) but not vitellin in yolk. An electroblot binding assay was used to show that the germ-cell alpha-crystallins of P. interpunctella bind specifically with the FEYP and that the binding was reversible in the presence of ATP or low pH. This evidence in conjunction with the evidence that the alpha-crystallins and FEYP form a stable complex that co-purifies from native egg proteins suggests that the alpha-cystallin cognates function as chaperones for the follicular epithelium yolk proteins in the embryos of P. interpunctella.

  1. Chaperoning HMGA2 Protein Protects Stalled Replication Forks in Stem and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojie Yu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining genome integrity requires the accurate and complete replication of chromosomal DNA. This is of the utmost importance for embryonic stem cells (ESCs, which differentiate into cells of all lineages, including germ cells. However, endogenous and exogenous factors frequently induce stalling of replication forks in every cell cycle, which can trigger mutations and chromosomal instabilities. We show here that the oncofetal, nonhistone chromatin factor HMGA2 equips cells with a highly effective first-line defense mechanism against endonucleolytic collapse of stalled forks. This fork-stabilizing function most likely employs scaffold formation at branched DNA via multiple DNA-binding domains. Moreover, HMGA2 works independently of other human factors in two heterologous cell systems to prevent DNA strand breaks. This fork chaperone function seemingly evolved to preserve ESC genome integrity. It is hijacked by tumor (stem cells to also guard their genomes against DNA-damaging agents widely used to treat cancer patients.

  2. Digital microfluidics and delivery of molecular payloads with magnetic porous silicon chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorvee, Jason R; Sailor, Michael J; Miskelly, Gordon M

    2008-02-14

    Digital microfluidics involves the manipulation of molecules and materials in discrete packages. This paper reviews our work using amphiphilic magnetic microparticles constructed from porous silicon. An individual porous particle can be used to carry a nanomole or smaller quantities of a reagent, and assemblies of the particles can encapsulate and transport microliter droplets of liquid containing inorganic, organic, or biological molecules. The tracking and identification of each particle can be accomplished with spectral labels that are encoded into the particles during their synthesis. When used to chaperone liquid droplets, the labels can identify the separate droplets prior to mixing and also the combined droplets after mixing. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in the porous matrix allow the manipulation of the particles or whole droplet assemblies with a magnetic field, and they also allow heating of the particle's payload by means of an externally applied RF field. Examples of organic, inorganic, and biomolecular addition reactions, catalytic reactions, and thermolysis reactions are described.

  3. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lavado-Roldán

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2 acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation.

  4. Mechanics of Hsp70 chaperones enables differential interaction with client proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Rainer; Erbse, Annette H; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2011-03-01

    Hsp70 chaperones interact with a wide spectrum of substrates ranging from unfolded to natively folded and aggregated proteins. Structural evidence suggests that bound substrates are entirely enclosed in a β-sheet cavity covered by a helical lid, which requires structural rearrangements including lid opening to allow substrate access. We analyzed the mechanics of the lid movement of bacterial DnaK by disulfide fixation of lid elements to the β-sheet and by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using spin labels in the lid and β-sheet. Our results indicate that the lid-forming helix B adopts at least three conformational states and, notably, does not close over bound proteins, implying that DnaK does not only bind to extended peptide stretches of protein substrates but can also accommodate regions with substantial tertiary structure. This flexible binding mechanism provides a basis for the broad spectrum of substrate conformers of Hsp70s.

  5. Clp chaperones and proteases are central in stress survival, virulence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Gerth, Ulf; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    proteins. The ATP-dependent ClpP protease is highly conserved among eubacteria and in the chloroplasts and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. In the serious human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus inactivation of clpP rendered the bacterium avirulent emphasizing the central role of proteolysis in virulence....... The contribution of the Clp proteins to virulence is likely to occur at multiple levels. First of all, both Clp ATPases and the Clp protease are central players in stress responses required to cope with the adverse conditions met in the host. The ClpP protease has a dual role herein, as it both eliminates stress......-damaged proteins as well as ensures the timely degradation of major stress regulators such as Spx, LexA and CtsR. Additionally, as we will summarize in this review, Clp proteases and Clp chaperones impact on such central processes as virulence gene expression, cell wall metabolism, survival in stationary phase...

  6. [Effect of fluoride on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum chaperone in ameloblast of rat incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-qiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Lu; Gu, He-feng; Ma, Lin

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effect of different concentrations of fluoride on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, and to explore the mechanism of dental fluorosis in rat. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of CRT, GRP78, XBP-1 and caspase-12 in rat incisors. Metamorph microscope images analysis system and SPSS 13.0 software package was used to analyze the data. Typical features of dental fluorosis were found in the fluoride group. Results of immunohistochemistry showed that CRT (F=238.6, Pameloblasts and in status of endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase-12 plays an important role during ameloblast apoptosis. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81072245) and Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (20102278).

  7. Functional analysis of propeptide as an intramolecular chaperone for in vivo folding of subtilisin nattokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan; Liu, Hui; Bao, Wei; Weng, Meizhi; Chen, Wei; Cai, Yongjun; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2010-12-01

    Here, we show that during in vivo folding of the precursor, the propeptide of subtilisin nattokinase functions as an intramolecular chaperone (IMC) that organises the in vivo folding of the subtilisin domain. Two residues belonging to β-strands formed by conserved regions of the IMC are crucial for the folding of the subtilisin domain through direct interactions. An identical protease can fold into different conformations in vivo due to the action of a mutated IMC, resulting in different kinetic parameters. Some interfacial changes involving conserved regions, even those induced by the subtilisin domain, blocked subtilisin folding and altered its conformation. Insight into the interaction between the subtilisin and IMC domains is provided by a three-dimensional structural model. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The co-chaperone p23 is degraded by caspases and the proteasome during apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2005-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 co-chaperone p23 has recently been shown to be up-regulated in cancer cells and down-regulated in atheroschlerotic plaques. We found that p23 is degraded during apoptosis induced by several stimuli, including Fas and TNFa-receptor activation as well as staurosporine...... treatment. Caspase inhibition protected p23 from degradation in several cell lines. In addition, recombinant caspase-3 and 8 cleaved p23 at Asp 142 generating a degradation product of 18 kDa as seen in apoptotic cells. Truncated p23 is further degraded in a proteasome dependent process during apoptosis....... Furthermore, we found that the anti-aggregating activity of truncated p23 was reduced compared to full length p23 indicating that caspase mediated p23 degradation contributes to protein destabilisation in apoptosis....

  9. Oral pharmacological chaperone migalastat compared with enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Nicholls, Kathleen; Shankar, Suma P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA mutations, resulting in α-galactosidase (α-Gal) deficiency and accumulation of lysosomal substrates. Migalastat, an oral pharmacological chaperone being developed as an alternative to intravenous enzyme replacement...... therapy (ERT), stabilises specific mutant (amenable) forms of α-Gal to facilitate normal lysosomal trafficking. METHODS: The main objective of the 18-month, randomised, active-controlled ATTRACT study was to assess the effects of migalastat on renal function in patients with Fabry disease previously...... treated with ERT. Effects on heart, disease substrate, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and safety were also assessed. RESULTS: Fifty-seven adults (56% female) receiving ERT (88% had multiorgan disease) were randomised (1.5:1), based on a preliminary cell-based assay of responsiveness to migalastat...

  10. Histone H3 variants and their chaperones during development and disease: contributing to epigenetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipescu, Dan; Müller, Sebastian; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    Within the nucleus, the interplay between lineage-specific transcription factors and chromatin dynamics defines cellular identity. Control of this interplay is necessary to properly balance stability and plasticity during the development and entire life span of multicellular organisms. Here, we present our current knowledge of the contribution of histone H3 variants to chromatin dynamics during development. We review the network of histone chaperones that governs their deposition timing and sites of incorporation and highlight how their distinct distribution impacts genome organization and function. We integrate the importance of H3 variants in the context of nuclear reprogramming and cell differentiation, and, using the centromere as a paradigm, we describe a case in which the identity of a given genomic locus is propagated across different cell types. Finally, we compare development to changes in stress and disease. Both physiological and pathological settings underline the importance of H3 dynamics for genome and chromatin integrity.

  11. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid.

  12. Structural features important for the RNA chaperone activity of zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins from wheat (Triticum avestivum) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Han, Ji Hoon; Kang, Hunseung

    2013-10-01

    Despite the increase in understanding of RNA chaperone activity of zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (RZs) during the cold adaptation process, the structural features relevant to the RNA chaperone activity of RZs still largely remain to be established. To investigate the structural determinants important for the RNA chaperone activity of RZs, domain-swapping and deletion analyses was carried out to assess the contribution of the N-terminal zinc finger RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domain and the C-terminal glycine-rich region of wheat (Triticum avestivum) and rice (Oryza sativa) RZs to RNA chaperone activity. Although the amino acid sequence similarity among wheat TaRZ2, wheat TaRZ3, and rice OsRZ1 was high, only TaRZ2 had RNA chaperone activity as evidenced by complementation ability in cold-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant cell under cold stress and in vivo and in vitro nucleic acid-melting activity. Domain-swapping and deletion analysis demonstrated that the overall folding of RZs governed by the N-terminal RRM domain and the C-terminal glycine-rich region, as well as the size of the disordered C-terminal glycine-rich region, are crucial for the RNA chaperone activity of RZs. Collectively, these results indicate that a specific modular arrangement of RRM domain and the disordered C-terminal region determines the RNA chaperone activity of RZs in cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The crystal structure of the human co-chaperone P58(IPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Svärd

    Full Text Available P58(IPK is one of the endoplasmic reticulum- (ER- localised DnaJ (ERdj proteins which interact with the chaperone BiP, the mammalian ER ortholog of Hsp70, and are thought to contribute to the specificity and regulation of its diverse functions. P58(IPK, expression of which is upregulated in response to ER stress, has been suggested to act as a co-chaperone, binding un- or misfolded proteins and delivering them to BiP. In order to give further insights into the functions of P58(IPK, and the regulation of BiP by ERdj proteins, we have determined the crystal structure of human P58(IPK to 3.0 Å resolution using a combination of molecular replacement and single wavelength anomalous diffraction. The structure shows the human P58(IPK monomer to have a very elongated overall shape. In addition to the conserved J domain, P58(IPK contains nine N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat motifs, divided into three subdomains of three motifs each. The J domain is attached to the C-terminal end via a flexible linker, and the structure shows the conserved Hsp70-binding histidine-proline-aspartate (HPD motif to be situated on the very edge of the elongated protein, 100 Å from the putative binding site for unfolded protein substrates. The residues that comprise the surface surrounding the HPD motif are highly conserved in P58(IPK from other organisms but more varied between the human ERdj proteins, supporting the view that their regulation of different BiP functions is facilitated by differences in BiP-binding.

  14. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualley, Dominic F., E-mail: dqualley@berry.edu; Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  15. The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase HPK-1 preserves protein homeostasis and longevity through master regulatory control of the HSF-1 chaperone network and TORC1-restricted autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Elizabeth A.; Cornwell, Adam B.; Crick, Beresford; Lamitina, Todd; Douglas, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    An extensive proteostatic network comprised of molecular chaperones and protein clearance mechanisms functions collectively to preserve the integrity and resiliency of the proteome. The efficacy of this network deteriorates during aging, coinciding with many clinical manifestations, including protein aggregation diseases of the nervous system. A decline in proteostasis can be delayed through the activation of cytoprotective transcriptional responses, which are sensitive to environmental stress and internal metabolic and physiological cues. The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (hipk) family members are conserved transcriptional co-factors that have been implicated in both genotoxic and metabolic stress responses from yeast to mammals. We demonstrate that constitutive expression of the sole Caenorhabditis elegans Hipk homolog, hpk-1, is sufficient to delay aging, preserve proteostasis, and promote stress resistance, while loss of hpk-1 is deleterious to these phenotypes. We show that HPK-1 preserves proteostasis and extends longevity through distinct but complementary genetic pathways defined by the heat shock transcription factor (HSF-1), and the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1). We demonstrate that HPK-1 antagonizes sumoylation of HSF-1, a post-translational modification associated with reduced transcriptional activity in mammals. We show that inhibition of sumoylation by RNAi enhances HSF-1-dependent transcriptional induction of chaperones in response to heat shock. We find that hpk-1 is required for HSF-1 to induce molecular chaperones after thermal stress and enhances hormetic extension of longevity. We also show that HPK-1 is required in conjunction with HSF-1 for maintenance of proteostasis in the absence of thermal stress, protecting against the formation of polyglutamine (Q35::YFP) protein aggregates and associated locomotory toxicity. These functions of HPK-1/HSF-1 undergo rapid down-regulation once animals reach reproductive maturity. We show

  16. ESAT-6 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis dissociates from its putative chaperone CFP-10 under acidic conditions and exhibits membrane-lysing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Marien I; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Fretz, Marjan M; Romain, Felix; Bottai, Daria; Brodin, Priscille; Honoré, Nadine; Marchal, Gilles; Jiskoot, Wim; England, Patrick; Cole, Stewart T; Brosch, Roland

    2007-08-01

    The 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target ESAT-6 and the 10-kDa culture filtrate protein CFP-10 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are secreted by the ESX-1 system into the host cell and thereby contribute to pathogenicity. Although different studies performed at the organismal and cellular levels have helped to explain ESX-1-associated phenomena, not much is known about how ESAT-6 and CFP-10 contribute to pathogenesis at the molecular level. In this study we describe the interaction of both proteins with lipid bilayers, using biologically relevant liposomal preparations containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol, and cholesterol. Using flotation gradient centrifugation, we demonstrate that ESAT-6 showed strong association with liposomes, and in particular with preparations containing DMPC and cholesterol, whereas the interaction of CFP-10 with membranes appeared to be weaker and less specific. Most importantly, binding to the biomembranes no longer occurred when the proteins were present as a 1:1 ESAT-6.CFP-10 complex. However, lowering of the pH resulted in dissociation of the protein complex and subsequent protein-liposome interaction. Finally, cryoelectron microscopy revealed that ESAT-6 destabilized and lysed liposomes, whereas CFP-10 did not. In conclusion, we propose that one of the main features of ESAT-6 in the infection process of M. tuberculosis is the interaction with biomembranes that occurs after dissociation from its putative chaperone CFP-10 under acidic conditions typically encountered in the phagosome.

  17. The replication-independent histone H3-H4 chaperones HIR, ASF1, and RTT106 co-operate to maintain promoter fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andrea C; Xu, Xiaomeng; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fillingham, Jeffrey; Kislinger, Thomas; Mennella, Thomas A; Keogh, Michael-Christopher

    2012-01-13

    RNA polymerase II initiates from low complexity sequences so cells must reliably distinguish "real" from "cryptic" promoters and maintain fidelity to the former. Further, this must be performed under a range of conditions, including those found within inactive and highly transcribed regions. Here, we used genome-scale screening to identify those factors that regulate the use of a specific cryptic promoter and how this is influenced by the degree of transcription over the element. We show that promoter fidelity is most reliant on histone gene transactivators (Spt10, Spt21) and H3-H4 chaperones (Asf1, HIR complex) from the replication-independent deposition pathway. Mutations of Rtt106 that abrogate its interactions with H3-H4 or dsDNA permit extensive cryptic transcription comparable with replication-independent deposition factor deletions. We propose that nucleosome shielding is the primary means to maintain promoter fidelity, and histone replacement is most efficiently mediated in yeast cells by a HIR/Asf1/H3-H4/Rtt106 pathway.

  18. Investigation of the mechanisms by which the molecular chaperone HSPA2 regulates the expression of sperm surface receptors involved in human sperm-oocyte recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A; Anderson, Amanda L; McLaughlin, Eileen A; O'Bryan, Moira K; Aitken, R John; Nixon, Brett

    2013-03-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian spermatozoa is that, upon ejaculation, they are unable to recognize and bind to an ovulated oocyte. These functional attributes are only realized following the cells' ascent of the female reproductive tract whereupon they undergo a myriad of biochemical and biophysical changes collectively referred to as 'capacitation'. We have previously shown that this functional transformation is, in part, engineered by the modification of the sperm surface architecture leading to the assembly and/or presentation of multimeric sperm-oocyte receptor complexes. In this study, we have extended our findings through the characterization of one such complex containing arylsulfatase A (ARSA), sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) and the molecular chaperone, heat shock 70kDa protein 2 (HSPA2). Through the application of flow cytometry we revealed that this complex undergoes a capacitation-associated translocation to facilitate the repositioning of ARSA to the apical region of the human sperm head, a location compatible with a role in the mediation of sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interactions. Conversely, SPAM1 appears to reorient away from the sperm surface, possibly reflecting its primary role in cumulus matrix dispersal preceding sperm-ZP recognition. The dramatic relocation of the complex was completely abolished by incubation of capacitating spermatozoa in exogenous cholesterol or broad spectrum protein kinase A (PKA) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors suggesting that it may be driven by alterations in membrane fluidity characteristics and concurrently by the activation of a capacitation-associated signal transduction pathway. Collectively these data afford novel insights into the sub-cellular localization and potential functions of multimeric protein complexes in human spermatozoa.

  19. The KdpC subunit of the Escherichia coli K+-transporting KdpB P-type ATPase acts as a catalytic chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irzik, Kristina; Pfrötzschner, Juliane; Goss, Tatjana; Ahnert, Franziska; Haupt, Melina; Greie, Jörg-Christian

    2011-09-01

    In Bacteria and Archaea, high-affinity potassium uptake is mediated by the ATP-driven KdpFABC complex. On the basis of the biochemical properties of the ATP-hydrolyzing subunit KdpB, the transport complex is classified as type IA P-type ATPase. However, the KdpA subunit, which promotes K(+) transport, clearly resembles a potassium channel, such that the KdpFABC complex represents a chimera of ion pumps and ion channels. In the present study, we demonstrate that the blending of these two groups of transporters in KdpFABC also entails a nucleotide-binding mechanism in which the KdpC subunit acts as a catalytic chaperone. This mechanism is found neither in P-type ATPases nor in ion channels, although parallels are found in ABC transporters. In the latter, the ATP nucleotide is coordinated by the LSGGQ signature motif via double hydrogen bonds at a conserved glutamine residue, which is also present in KdpC. High-affinity nucleotide binding to the KdpFABC complex was dependent on the presence of this conserved glutamine residue in KdpC. In addition, both ATP binding to KdpC and ATP hydrolysis activity of KdpFABC were sensitive to the accessibility, presence or absence of the hydroxyl groups at the ribose moiety of the nucleotide. Furthermore, the KdpC subunit was shown to interact with the nucleotide-binding loop of KdpB in an ATP-dependent manner around the ATP-binding pocket, thereby increasing the ATP-binding affinity by the formation of a transient KdpB/KdpC/ATP ternary complex. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  20. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquiza Sablón-Carrazana

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP:NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21:NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the

  1. The CAF-1 and Hir Histone Chaperones Associate with Sites of Meiotic Double-Strand Breaks in Budding Yeast: e0125965

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elsa Brachet; Claire Béneut; Maria-Elisabetta Serrentino; Valérie Borde

    2015-01-01

    ... by stabilizing recombination intermediates. Here we show in budding yeast that nucleosomes flanking a meiotic DSB are transiently lost during recombination, and that specific histone H3 chaperones, CAF-1 and Hir, are mobilized at meiotic DSBs...

  2. Molecular Chaperone Hsp90 Associates with Resistance Protein N and Its Signaling Proteins SGT1 and Rar1 to Modulate an Innate Immune Response in Plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yule Liu; Tessa Burch-Smith; Michael Schiff; Suhua Feng; Savithramma P. Dinesh-Kumar

    2004-01-01

    .... Here we report that SGT1 and Rar1 associate with the molecular chaperone Hsp90. In addition, we show that Hsp90 associates with the resistance protein N that confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus...

  3. In vivo functional expression of a screened P. aeruginosa chaperone-dependent lipase in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiangping

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases particularly Pseudomonas lipases are widely used for biotechnological applications. It is a meaningful work to design experiments to obtain high-level active lipase. There is a limiting factor for functional overexpression of the Pseudomonas lipase that a chaperone is necessary for effective folding. As previously reported, several methods had been used to resolve the problem. In this work, the lipase (LipA and its chaperone (LipB from a screened strain named AB which belongs to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were overexpressed in E. coli with two dual expression plasmid systems to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA without in vitro refolding process. Results In this work, we screened a lipase-produced strain named AB through the screening procedure, which was identified as P. aeruginosa on the basis of 16S rDNA. Genomic DNA obtained from the strain was used to isolate the gene lipA (936 bp and lipase specific foldase gene lipB (1023 bp. One single expression plasmid system E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and two dual expression plasmid systems E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB and E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB were successfully constructed. The lipase activities of the three expression systems were compared to choose the optimal expression method. Under the same cultured condition, the activities of the lipases expressed by E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB were 1300 U/L and 3200 U/L, respectively, while the activity of the lipase expressed by E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB was up to 8500 U/L. The lipase LipA had an optimal temperature of 30°C and an optimal pH of 9 with a strong pH tolerance. The active LipA could catalyze the reaction between fatty alcohols and fatty acids to generate fatty acid alkyl esters, which meant that LipA was able to catalyze esterification reaction. The most suitable fatty acid and alcohol substrates for esterification were octylic acid and hexanol

  4. Interaction between chaperone and protease functions of LON2, and autophagy during the functional transition of peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto-Yamada, Shino; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Shibata, Michitaro; Nishimura, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Functional transition of glyoxysomes to leaf peroxisomes is observed in greening cotyledons. Glyoxysomal proteins are rapidly degraded and leaf-peroxisomal proteins are transported into peroxisomes after cotyledons are exposed to light, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes remain unclear. We recently discovered that two degradation pathways are involved in the functional transition of peroxisomes using Arabidopsis thaliana. Lon protease 2 (LON2) is responsible for the degradation of glyoxysomal proteins inside peroxisomes, and, in parallel, autophagy eliminates damaged or obsolete peroxisomes. A double mutant defective in both the LON2- and autophagy-dependent degradation pathways accumulated glyoxysomal proteins after the cotyledons became green. Our study also demonstrated that the LON2- and autophagy-dependent pathways are interdependent, with the chaperone function of LON2 suppressing autophagic peroxisome degradation. Moreover, the peptidase domain of LON2 interferes with the suppression of autophagy, indicating that autophagy is regulated by intramolecular modulation between the proteolysis and chaperone functions of LON2.

  5. An interaction network predicted from public data as a discovery tool: application to the Hsp90 molecular chaperone machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo C Echeverría

    Full Text Available Understanding the functions of proteins requires information about their protein-protein interactions (PPI. The collective effort of the scientific community generates far more data on any given protein than individual experimental approaches. The latter are often too limited to reveal an interactome comprehensively. We developed a workflow for parallel mining of all major PPI databases, containing data from several model organisms, and to integrate data from the literature for a protein of interest. We applied this novel approach to build the PPI network of the human Hsp90 molecular chaperone machine (Hsp90Int for which previous efforts have yielded limited and poorly overlapping sets of interactors. We demonstrate the power of the Hsp90Int database as a discovery tool by validating the prediction that the Hsp90 co-chaperone Aha1 is involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Thus, we both describe how to build a custom database and introduce a powerful new resource for the scientific community.

  6. The chaperone ClpX stimulates expression of Staphylococcus aureus protein A by rot dependent and independent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Ingmer, Hanne; Valihrach, Lukás

    2010-01-01

    The Clp ATPases (Hsp100) constitute a family of closely related proteins that have protein reactivating and remodelling activities typical of molecular chaperones. In Staphylococcus aureus the ClpX chaperone is essential for virulence and for transcription of spa encoding Protein A. The present...... study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism by which ClpX stimulates expression of Protein A. For this purpose, we prepared antibodies directed against Rot, an activator of spa transcription, and demonstrated that cells devoid of ClpX contain three-fold less Rot than wild-type cells. By varying Rot...... expression from an inducible promoter we showed that expression of Protein A requires a threshold level of Rot. In the absence of ClpX the Rot content is reduced below this threshold level, hence, explaining the substantially reduced Protein A expression in the clpX mutant. Experiments addressed...

  7. Different contributions of HtrA protease and chaperone activities to Campylobacter jejuni stress tolerance and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Skórko-Glonek, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    activity is sufficient for growth at high temperature or oxidative stress, whereas the HtrA protease activity is only essential at conditions close to the growth limit for C. jejuni. However, the protease activity was required to prevent induction of the cytoplasmic heat-shock response even at optimal......, but little is known about how each of these activities contributes to stress tolerance in bacteria. In vitro experiments showed temperature dependent protease and chaperone activities of C. jejuni HtrA. A C. jejuni mutant lacking only the protease activity of HtrA was used to show that the HtrA chaperone...... growth conditions. Interestingly, the requirement of HtrA at high temperatures was found to depend on the oxygen level and our data suggest that HtrA may protect oxidatively damaged proteins. Finally, protease activity stimulates HtrA production and oligomer formation, suggesting that a regulatory role...

  8. Chemical Chaperones Reduce ER Stress and Restore Glucose Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Umut; Yilmaz, Erkan; Özcan, Lale; Furuhashi, Masato; Vaillancourt, Eric; Smith, Ross O.; Görgün, Cem Z.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2006-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key link between obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanistic link can be exploited for therapeutic purposes with orally active chemical chaperones. 4-Phenyl butyric acid and taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid alleviated ER stress in cells and whole animals. Treatment of obese and diabetic mice with these compounds resulted in normalization of hyperglycemia, restoration of systemic insulin sensitivity, resolution of fatty liver disease, and enhancement of insulin action in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues. Our results demonstrate that chemical chaperones enhance the adaptive capacity of the ER and act as potent antidiabetic modalities with potential application in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  9. SigE Is a Chaperone for the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Invasion Protein SigD

    OpenAIRE

    Darwin, K. Heran; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Miller, Virginia L.

    2001-01-01

    SigD is translocated into eucaryotic cells by a type III secretion system. In this work, evidence that the putative chaperone SigE directly interacts with SigD is presented. A bacterial two-hybrid system demonstrated that SigE can interact with itself and SigD. In addition, SigD was specifically copurified with SigE-His6 on a nickel column.

  10. Chaperone-mediated gene therapy with recombinant AAV-PPCA in a new mouse model of type I sialidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, Erik J; Yogalingam, Gouri; Hu, Huimin; Gomero, Elida; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2013-10-01

    The lysosomal storage disease sialidosis is caused by a primary deficiency of the sialidase N-acetyl-α-neuraminidase-1 (NEU1). Patients with type I sialidosis develop an attenuated, non-neuropathic form of the disease also named cherry red spot myoclonus syndrome, with symptoms arising during juvenile/ adult age. NEU1 requires binding to its chaperone, protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA), for lysosomal compartmentalization, stability and catalytic activation. We have generated a new mouse model of type I sialidosis that ubiquitously expresses a NEU1 variant carrying a V54M amino acid substitution identified in an adult patient with type I sialidosis. Mutant mice developed signs of lysosomal disease after 1year of age, predominantly in the kidney, albeit low residual NEU1 activity was detected in most organs and cell types. We demonstrate that the activity of the mutant enzyme could be effectively increased in all systemic tissues by chaperone-mediated gene therapy with a liver-tropic recombinant AAV2/8 vector expressing PPCA. This resulted in clear amelioration of the disease phenotype. These results suggest that at least some of the NEU1 mutations associated with type I sialidosis may respond to PPCA-chaperone-mediated gene therapy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer T. Bæk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipoteichoic acid (LTA is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and a promising target for the development of vaccines and antimicrobial compounds against Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that mutations in the conditionally essential ltaS (LTA synthase gene arise spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement defects of an LTA-depleted strain, while other phenotypes typical of LTA-negative S. aureus mutants, including increased cell size and decreased autolytic activity, are retained. In conclusion, our results indicate that LTA has an essential role in septum placement that can be bypassed by inactivating the ClpX chaperone.

  12. Hsp70A and GlsA interact as partner chaperones to regulate asymmetric division in Volvox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Pappas, Valeria; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M

    2005-10-15

    GlsA, a J-protein chaperone, is required for the asymmetric divisions that set aside germ and somatic cell precursors during embryogenesis in Volvox carteri, and previous evidence indicated that this function requires an intact Hsp70-binding site. To determine if Hsp70A, the only known cytoplasmic Hsp70 in V. carteri, is the chaperone partner of GlsA, we investigated the localization of the two proteins during critical stages of embryogenesis and tested their capacity to interact. We found that a substantial fraction of Hsp70A co-localizes with GlsA, both in interphase and mitotic blastomeres. In addition, Hsp70A coimmunoprecipitated with GlsA, and co-expression of GlsA and Hsp70A variants partially rescued the Gls phenotype of a glsA mutant, whereas neither variant by itself rescued the mutant phenotype. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that GlsA is about equally abundant in all blastomeres at all cleavage stages examined but that Hsp70A is more abundant in anterior (asymmetrically dividing) blastomeres than in posterior (symmetrically dividing) blastomeres during the period of asymmetric division. We conclude that Hsp70A and GlsA function as chaperone partners that regulate asymmetric division and that the relative abundance of Hsp70A in asymmetrically dividing embryos may determine which blastomeres divide asymmetrically and which do not.

  13. The CAF-1 and Hir Histone Chaperones Associate with Sites of Meiotic Double-Strand Breaks in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Brachet

    Full Text Available In the meiotic prophase, programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSB are introduced along chromosomes to promote homolog pairing and recombination. Although meiotic DSBs usually occur in nucleosome-depleted, accessible regions of chromatin, their repair by homologous recombination takes place in a nucleosomal environment. Nucleosomes may represent an obstacle for the recombination machinery and their timely eviction and reincorporation into chromatin may influence the outcome of recombination, for instance by stabilizing recombination intermediates. Here we show in budding yeast that nucleosomes flanking a meiotic DSB are transiently lost during recombination, and that specific histone H3 chaperones, CAF-1 and Hir, are mobilized at meiotic DSBs. However, the absence of these chaperones has no effect on meiotic recombination, suggesting that timely histone reincorporation following their eviction has no influence on the recombination outcome, or that redundant pathways are activated. This study is the first example of the involvement of histone H3 chaperones at naturally occurring, developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks.

  14. The CAF-1 and Hir Histone Chaperones Associate with Sites of Meiotic Double-Strand Breaks in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Elsa; Béneut, Claire; Serrentino, Maria-Elisabetta; Borde, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    In the meiotic prophase, programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are introduced along chromosomes to promote homolog pairing and recombination. Although meiotic DSBs usually occur in nucleosome-depleted, accessible regions of chromatin, their repair by homologous recombination takes place in a nucleosomal environment. Nucleosomes may represent an obstacle for the recombination machinery and their timely eviction and reincorporation into chromatin may influence the outcome of recombination, for instance by stabilizing recombination intermediates. Here we show in budding yeast that nucleosomes flanking a meiotic DSB are transiently lost during recombination, and that specific histone H3 chaperones, CAF-1 and Hir, are mobilized at meiotic DSBs. However, the absence of these chaperones has no effect on meiotic recombination, suggesting that timely histone reincorporation following their eviction has no influence on the recombination outcome, or that redundant pathways are activated. This study is the first example of the involvement of histone H3 chaperones at naturally occurring, developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks.

  15. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3–H4 at replication forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3–H4. Our first structure shows an H3–H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3–H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2–7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3–H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication. PMID:26167883

  16. Structure–function studies of histone H3/H4 tetramer maintenance during transcription by chaperone Spt2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shoudeng; Rufiange, Anne; Huang, Hongda; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Nourani, Amine; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Cells use specific mechanisms such as histone chaperones to abrogate the inherent barrier that the nucleosome poses to transcribing polymerases. The current model postulates that nucleosomes can be transiently disrupted to accommodate passage of RNA polymerases and that histones H3 and H4 possess their own chaperones dedicated to the recovery of nucleosomes. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the conserved C terminus of human Suppressors of Ty insertions 2 (hSpt2C) chaperone bound to an H3/H4 tetramer. The structural studies demonstrate that hSpt2C is bound to the periphery of the H3/H4 tetramer, mimicking the trajectory of nucleosomal-bound DNA. These structural studies have been complemented with in vitro binding and in vivo functional studies on mutants that disrupt key intermolecular contacts involving two acidic patches and hydrophobic residues on Spt2C. We show that contacts between both human and yeast Spt2C with the H3/H4 tetramer are required for the suppression of H3/H4 exchange as measured by H3K56ac and new H3 deposition. These interactions are also crucial for the inhibition of spurious transcription from within coding regions. Together, our data indicate that Spt2 interacts with the periphery of the H3/H4 tetramer and promotes its recycling in the wake of RNA polymerase. PMID:26109053

  17. The Processed Amino-Terminal Fragment of Human TLR7 Acts as a Chaperone To Direct Human TLR7 into Endosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Dawn; Booth, Sarah; Waithe, Dominic; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    TLR7 mediates innate immune responses to viral RNA in endocytic compartments. Mouse and human (h)TLR7 undergo proteolytic cleavage, resulting in the generation of a C-terminal fragment that accumulates in endosomes and associates with the signaling adaptor MyD88 upon receptor triggering by TLR7 agonists. Although mouse TLR7 is cleaved in endosomes by acidic proteases, hTLR7 processing can occur at neutral pH throughout the secretory pathway through the activity of furin-like proprotein convertases. However, the mechanisms by which cleaved hTLR7 reaches the endosomal compartment remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that, after hTLR7 proteolytic processing, the liberated amino (N)-terminal fragment remains bound to the C terminus through disulfide bonds and provides key trafficking information that ensures correct delivery of the complex to endosomal compartments. In the absence of the N-terminal fragment, the C-terminal fragment is redirected to the cell surface, where it is functionally inactive. Our data reveal a novel role for the N terminus of hTLR7 as a molecular chaperone that provides processed hTLR7 with the correct targeting instructions to reach the endosomal compartment, hence ensuring its biological activity and preventing inadvertent cell surface responses to self-RNA. PMID:25917086

  18. A Chaperone Function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Is Required to Maintain Catalase Activity and for Multiple Stress Responses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S.; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity. PMID:25700484

  19. Determination of the Stoichiometry of the Complete Bacterial Type III Secretion Needle Complex Using a Combined Quantitative Proteomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilkenat, Susann; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Galán, Jorge E; Macek, Boris; Wagner, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Precisely knowing the stoichiometry of their components is critical for investigating structure, assembly, and function of macromolecular machines. This has remained a technical challenge in particular for large, hydrophobic membrane-spanning protein complexes. Here, we determined the stoichiometry of a type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using two complementary protocols of gentle complex purification combined with peptide concatenated standard and synthetic stable isotope-labeled peptide-based mass spectrometry. Bacterial type III secretion systems are cell envelope-spanning effector protein-delivery machines essential for colonization and survival of many Gram-negative pathogens and symbionts. The membrane-embedded core unit of these secretion systems, termed the needle complex, is composed of a base that anchors the machinery to the inner and outer membranes, a hollow filament formed by inner rod and needle subunits that serves as conduit for substrate proteins, and a membrane-embedded export apparatus facilitating substrate translocation. Structural analyses have revealed the stoichiometry of the components of the base, but the stoichiometry of the essential hydrophobic export apparatus components and of the inner rod protein remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the export apparatus of type III secretion systems contains five SpaP, one SpaQ, one SpaR, and one SpaS. We confirmed that the previously suggested stoichiometry of nine InvA is valid for assembled needle complexes and describe a loose association of InvA with other needle complex components that may reflect its function. Furthermore, we present evidence that not more than six PrgJ form the inner rod of the needle complex. Providing this structural information will facilitate efforts to obtain an atomic view of type III secretion systems and foster our understanding of the function of these and related flagellar machines. Given that other virulence

  20. Structural insights into a unique Hsp70-Hsp40 interaction in the eukaryotic ribosome-associated complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Felix Alexander; Gumiero, Andrea; Gesé, Genís Valentín; Lapouge, Karine; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-02-01

    Cotranslational chaperones assist de novo folding of nascent polypeptides, prevent them from aggregating and modulate translation. The ribosome-associated complex (RAC) is unique in that the Hsp40 protein Zuo1 and the atypical Hsp70 chaperone Ssz1 form a stable heterodimer, which acts as a cochaperone for the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. Here we present the structure of the Chaetomium thermophilum RAC core comprising Ssz1 and the Zuo1 N terminus. We show how the conserved allostery of Hsp70 proteins is abolished and this Hsp70-Hsp40 pair is molded into a functional unit. Zuo1 stabilizes Ssz1 in trans through interactions that in canonical Hsp70s occur in cis. Ssz1 is catalytically inert and cannot adopt the closed conformation, but the substrate binding domain β is completed by Zuo1. Our study offers insights into the coupling of a special Hsp70-Hsp40 pair, which evolved to link protein folding and translation.

  1. The Role of Chaperone-subunit Usher Domain Interactions in the Mechanism of Bacterial Pilus Biogenesis Revealed by ESI-MS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Bethny; Leney, Aneika C.; Toste Rêgo, Ana; Phan, Gilles; Allen, William J.; Verger, Denis; Waksman, Gabriel; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2012-01-01

    The PapC usher is a β-barrel outer membrane protein essential for assembly and secretion of P pili that are required for adhesion of pathogenic E. coli, which cause the development of pyelonephritis. Multiple protein subunits form the P pilus, the highly specific assembly of which is coordinated by the usher. Despite a wealth of structural knowledge, how the usher catalyzes subunit polymerization and orchestrates a correct and functional order of subunit assembly remain unclear. Here, the ability of the soluble N-terminal (UsherN), C-terminal (UsherC2), and Plug (UsherP) domains of the usher to bind different chaperone-subunit (PapDPapX) complexes is investigated using noncovalent electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The results reveal that each usher domain is able to bind all six PapDPapX complexes, consistent with an active role of all three usher domains in pilus biogenesis. Using collision induced dissociation, combined with competition binding experiments and dissection of the adhesin subunit, PapG, into separate pilin and adhesin domains, the results reveal why PapG has a uniquely high affinity for the usher, which is consistent with this subunit always being displayed at the pilus tip. In addition, we show how the different soluble usher domains cooperate to coordinate and control efficient pilus assembly at the usher platform. As well as providing new information about the protein-protein interactions that determine pilus biogenesis, the results highlight the power of noncovalent MS to interrogate biological mechanisms, especially in complex mixtures of species. PMID:22371487

  2. Activation of sigma-1 receptor chaperone in the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases and its clinical implication

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    Kenji Hashimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER protein sigma-1 receptor represents unique chaperone activity in the central nervous system, and it exerts a potent influence on a number of neurotransmitter systems. Several lines of evidence suggest that activation of sigma-1 receptor plays a role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases, as well as in the mechanisms of some therapeutic drugs and neurosteroids. Preclinical studies showed that some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, excitalopram, donepezil, and ifenprodil act as sigma-1 receptor agonists. Furthermore, sigma-1 receptor agonists could improve the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antagonist phencyclidine (PCP-induced cognitive deficits in mice. A study using positron emission tomography have demonstrated that an oral administration of fluvoxamine or donepezil could bind to sigma-1 receptor in the healthy human brain, suggesting that sigma-1 receptor might be involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of these drugs. Moreover, case reports suggest that sigma-1 receptor agonists, including fluvoxamine, and ifenprodil, may be effective in the treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, delirium in elderly people, and flashbacks in post-traumatic stress disorder. In this review article, the author would like to discuss the clinical implication of sigma-1 receptor agonists, including endogenous neurosteroids, in the neuropsychiatric diseases.

  3. The HSP70 chaperone machines of Chlamydomonas are induced by cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maikova, Anna; Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Lapina, Tatiana; Ermilova, Elena

    2016-10-01

    The responses of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to low temperatures have not been extensively studied compared with other stresses. Like other organisms, this green alga has heat shock protein 70s (HSP70s) that are located in chloroplast, mitochondrion and cytosol. To test whether temperature downshifts affected HSP70s synthesis, we used real-time PCR and protein gel blot analysis. C. reinhardtii cells exposed to cold stress show increased HSP70s mRNA levels. Genes encoding other components of HSP70 chaperone machines (e.g. CGE1, CDJ1, HSP90C and HSP90A) are also up-regulated in response to decreased temperature. We demonstrated that the accumulation of all analyzed mRNA occur more slowly and with reduced amplitude in cells exposed to cold than in cells treated with heat. Furthermore, C. reinhardtii cells display the splicing of the CGE1 transcript that was dependent on low temperature. Finally, the transcription regulator of C. reinhardtii HSF1 is also cold-responsive, suggesting its role in the transcriptional regulation of HSP genes at low temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Clp chaperones and proteases are central in stress survival, virulence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frees, Dorte; Gerth, Ulf; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular proteolysis carried out by energy-dependent proteases is one of the most conserved biological processes. In all cells proteolysis maintains and shapes the cellular proteome by ridding the cell of damaged proteins and by regulating abundance of functional proteins such as regulatory proteins. The ATP-dependent ClpP protease is highly conserved among eubacteria and in the chloroplasts and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. In the serious human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus inactivation of clpP rendered the bacterium avirulent emphasizing the central role of proteolysis in virulence. The contribution of the Clp proteins to virulence is likely to occur at multiple levels. First of all, both Clp ATPases and the Clp protease are central players in stress responses required to cope with the adverse conditions met in the host. The ClpP protease has a dual role herein, as it both eliminates stress-damaged proteins as well as ensures the timely degradation of major stress regulators such as Spx, LexA and CtsR. Additionally, as we will summarize in this review, Clp proteases and Clp chaperones impact on such central processes as virulence gene expression, cell wall metabolism, survival in stationary phase, and cell division. These observations together with recent findings that Clp proteins contribute to adaptation to antibiotics highlights the importance of this interesting proteolytic machinery both for understanding pathogenicity of the organism and for treating staphylococcal infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Histone chaperone HIRA regulates neural progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis via β-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanxin; Jiao, Jianwei

    2017-07-03

    Histone cell cycle regulator (HIRA) is a histone chaperone and has been identified as an epigenetic regulator. Subsequent studies have provided evidence that HIRA plays key roles in embryonic development, but its function during early neurogenesis remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that HIRA is enriched in neural progenitor cells, and HIRA knockdown reduces neural progenitor cell proliferation, increases terminal mitosis and cell cycle exit, and ultimately results in premature neuronal differentiation. Additionally, we demonstrate that HIRA enhances β-catenin expression by recruiting H3K4 trimethyltransferase Setd1A, which increases H3K4me3 levels and heightens the promoter activity of β-catenin. Significantly, overexpression of HIRA, HIRA N-terminal domain, or β-catenin can override neurogenesis abnormities caused by HIRA defects. Collectively, these data implicate that HIRA, cooperating with Setd1A, modulates β-catenin expression and then regulates neurogenesis. This finding represents a novel epigenetic mechanism underlying the histone code and has profound and lasting implications for diseases and neurobiology. © 2017 Li and Jiao.

  6. Nucleic acid chaperons: a theory of an RNA-assisted protein folding

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    Biro Jan C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background Proteins are assumed to contain all the information necessary for unambiguous folding (Anfinsen's principle. However, ab initio structure prediction is often not successful because the amino acid sequence itself is not sufficient to guide between endless folding possibilities. It seems to be a logical to try to find the "missing" information in nucleic acids, in the redundant codon base. Results mRNA energy dot plots and protein residue contact maps were found to be rather similar. The structure of mRNA is also conserved if the protein structure is conserved, even if the sequence similarity is low. These observations led me to suppose that some similarity might exist between nucleic acid and protein folding. I found that amino acid pairs, which are co-located in the protein structure, are preferentially coded by complementary codons. This codon complementarity is not perfect; it is suboptimal where the 1st and 3rd codon residues are complementary to each other in reverse orientation, while the 2nd codon letters may be, but are not necessarily, complementary. Conclusion Partial complementary coding of co-locating amino acids in protein structures suggests that mRNA assists in protein folding and functions not only as a template but even as a chaperon during translation. This function explains the role of wobble bases and answers the mystery of why we have a redundant codon base.

  7. Structure and functions of the chaperone-like p97/CDC48 in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bègue, Hervé; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Blanchard, Cécile; Wendehenne, David; Rosnoblet, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The chaperone-like p97 is a member of the AAA+ ATPase enzyme family that contributes to numerous cellular activities. P97 has been broadly studied in mammals (VCP/p97) and yeasts (CDC48: Cell Division Cycle 48/p97) and numerous investigations highlighted that this protein is post-translationally regulated, is structured in homohexamer and interacts with partners and cofactors that direct it to distinct cellular signalization pathway including protein quality control and degradation, cell cycle regulation, genome stability, vesicular trafficking, autophagy and immunity. p97 is also conserved in plants (CDC48) but its functions are less understood. In the present review we intended to present the state of the art of the structure, regulation and functions of CDC48 in plants. Evidence accumulated underline that CDC48 plays a crucial role in development, cell cycle regulation and protein turnover in plants. Furthermore, its involvement in plant immunity has recently emerged and first interacting partners have been identified, shedding light on its putative cellular activities. Identification of emerging functions of CDC48 in plants opens new roads of research in immunity and provides new insights into the mechanisms of protein quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adipocyte lipid chaperone AP2 is a secreted adipokine regulating hepatic glucose production.

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    Cao, Haiming; Sekiya, Motohiro; Ertunc, Meric Erikci; Burak, M Furkan; Mayers, Jared R; White, Ariel; Inouye, Karen; Rickey, Lisa M; Ercal, Baris C; Furuhashi, Masato; Tuncman, Gürol; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2013-05-07

    Proper control of hepatic glucose production is central to whole-body glucose homeostasis, and its disruption plays a major role in diabetes. Here, we demonstrate that although established as an intracellular lipid chaperone, aP2 is in fact actively secreted from adipocytes to control liver glucose metabolism. Secretion of aP2 from adipocytes is regulated by fasting- and lipolysis-related signals, and circulating aP2 levels are markedly elevated in mouse and human obesity. Recombinant aP2 stimulates glucose production and gluconeogenic activity in primary hepatocytes in vitro and in lean mice in vivo. In contrast, neutralization of secreted aP2 reduces glucose production and corrects the diabetic phenotype of obese mice. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic and pancreatic clamp studies upon aP2 administration or neutralization demonstrated actions of aP2 in liver. We conclude that aP2 is an adipokine linking adipocytes to hepatic glucose production and that neutralizing secreted aP2 may represent an effective therapeutic strategy against diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

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    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  10. Alda-1 is an agonist and chemical chaperone for the common human aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Miller, Samantha; Younus, Hina; Vanam, Ram; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Hurley, Thomas D. (Indiana-Med); (Stanford-MED)

    2010-04-19

    In approximately one billion people, a point mutation inactivates a key detoxifying enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). This mitochondrial enzyme metabolizes toxic biogenic and environmental aldehydes, including the endogenously produced 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and the environmental pollutant acrolein, and also bioactivates nitroglycerin. ALDH2 is best known, however, for its role in ethanol metabolism. The accumulation of acetaldehyde following the consumption of even a single alcoholic beverage leads to the Asian alcohol-induced flushing syndrome in ALDH2*2 homozygotes. The ALDH2*2 allele is semidominant, and heterozygotic individuals show a similar but less severe phenotype. We recently identified a small molecule, Alda-1, that activates wild-type ALDH2 and restores near-wild-type activity to ALDH2*2. The structures of Alda-1 bound to ALDH2 and ALDH2*2 reveal how Alda-1 activates the wild-type enzyme and how it restores the activity of ALDH2*2 by acting as a structural chaperone.

  11. Loss of Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone Promotes Astrocytosis and Enhances the Nrf2 Antioxidant Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tzu-Yu; Hung, Denise T; Su, Tsung-Ping; Tsai, Shang-Yi A

    2017-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) functions as a chaperon that interacts with multiple proteins and lipids and is implicated in neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. Here, we used Sig-1R KO mice to examine brain expression profiles of astrocytes and ubiquitinated proteins, which are both hallmarks of central nervous system (CNS) pathologies. Our results showed that Sig-1R KO induces increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in primary neuron-glia cultures and in the whole brain of fetus mice with concomitantly increased accumulations of ubiquitinated proteins. Astrogliosis was also observed in the neuron-glia culture. Upon proteasome or autophagy inhibitor treatments, the pronounced ubiquitinated proteins were further increased in Sig-1R KO neurons, indicating that the Sig-1R regulates both protein degradation and quality control systems. We found that Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), which functions to overcome the stress condition, was enhanced in the Sig-1R KO systems especially when cells were under stressful conditions. Mutation or deficiency of Sig-1Rs has been observed in neurodegenerative models. Our study identifies the critical roles of Sig-1R in CNS homeostasis and supports the idea that functional complementation pathways are triggered in the Sig-1R KO pathology.

  12. DJ-1 Is a Copper Chaperone Acting on SOD1 Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Stefania; Cendron, Laura; Bisaglia, Marco; Tessari, Isabella; Mammi, Stefano; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Bubacco, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Lack of oxidative stress control is a common and often prime feature observed in many neurodegenerative diseases. Both DJ-1 and SOD1, proteins involved in familial Parkinson disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, respectively, play a protective role against oxidative stress. Impaired activity and modified expression of both proteins have been observed in different neurodegenerative diseases. A potential cooperative action of DJ-1 and SOD1 in the same oxidative stress response pathway may be suggested based on a copper-mediated interaction between the two proteins reported here. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the antioxidative function of DJ-1 in relation to SOD1 activity, we investigated the ability of DJ-1 to bind copper ions. We structurally characterized a novel copper binding site involving Cys-106, and we investigated, using different techniques, the kinetics of DJ-1 binding to copper ions. The copper transfer between the two proteins was also examined using both fluorescence spectroscopy and specific biochemical assays for SOD1 activity. The structural and functional analysis of the novel DJ-1 copper binding site led us to identify a putative role for DJ-1 as a copper chaperone. Alteration of the coordination geometry of the copper ion in DJ-1 may be correlated to the physiological role of the protein, to a potential failure in metal transfer to SOD1, and to successive implications in neurodegenerative etiopathogenesis. PMID:24567322

  13. DJ-1 is a copper chaperone acting on SOD1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Stefania; Cendron, Laura; Bisaglia, Marco; Tessari, Isabella; Mammi, Stefano; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Bubacco, Luigi

    2014-04-11

    Lack of oxidative stress control is a common and often prime feature observed in many neurodegenerative diseases. Both DJ-1 and SOD1, proteins involved in familial Parkinson disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, respectively, play a protective role against oxidative stress. Impaired activity and modified expression of both proteins have been observed in different neurodegenerative diseases. A potential cooperative action of DJ-1 and SOD1 in the same oxidative stress response pathway may be suggested based on a copper-mediated interaction between the two proteins reported here. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the antioxidative function of DJ-1 in relation to SOD1 activity, we investigated the ability of DJ-1 to bind copper ions. We structurally characterized a novel copper binding site involving Cys-106, and we investigated, using different techniques, the kinetics of DJ-1 binding to copper ions. The copper transfer between the two proteins was also examined using both fluorescence spectroscopy and specific biochemical assays for SOD1 activity. The structural and functional analysis of the novel DJ-1 copper binding site led us to identify a putative role for DJ-1 as a copper chaperone. Alteration of the coordination geometry of the copper ion in DJ-1 may be correlated to the physiological role of the protein, to a potential failure in metal transfer to SOD1, and to successive implications in neurodegenerative etiopathogenesis.

  14. The RNA chaperone Hfq enables the environmental stress tolerance super-phenotype of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Calles, Belén; Nikel, Pablo I; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The natural physiological regime of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida involves incessant exposure to endogenous metabolic conflicts and environmental physicochemical insults. Yet, the role of assisted small RNA-mRNA pairing in the stress tolerance super-phenotype that is the trademark of this bacterium has not been accredited. We have thoroughly explored the physiological consequences -in particular those related to exogenous stress - of deleting the hfq gene of P. putida, which encodes the major RNA chaperone that promotes sRNA-target mRNA interactions. While the overall trend was a general weakening of every robustness descriptor of the Δhfq strain, growth parameters and production of central metabolic enzymes were comparatively less affected than other qualities that depend directly on energy status (e.g. motility, DNA repair). The overall catalytic vigour of the mutant decreased to < 20% than the wild-type strain, as estimated from the specific growth rate of cells carrying the catabolic TOL plasmid pWW0 for m-xylene biodegradation. Several loss-of-function phenotypes could be traced to the effect of the Δhfq deletion on the intracellular contents of the stationary sigma factor RpoS. It thus seems that Hfq, while not indispensable for any essential function, contributes to shape the environmental lifestyle of P. putida. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A protective role of HSP90 chaperone in gamma-irradiated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaiev, Oleksandr; Neimash, Volodymyr; Povarchuk, Vasyl

    2015-07-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is required for the maturation and conformational regulation of many regulatory proteins affecting morphogenetic pathways and stress tolerance. The purpose of this work is to disclose a role of HSP90 in radioresistance of seeds. Arabidopsis thaliana (Ler) seeds were exposed to γ-ray irradiation with doses of 0.1-1 kGy using (60)Co source to obtain a viable but polymorphic material. A comet assay of the seeds showed a dose-dependent increase in DNA damage. Phenotypic consequences of irradiation included growth stimulation at doses of 0.1-0.25 kGy and negative growth effects at doses from 0.5 kGy and beyond, along with increasing heterogeneity of seedling growth rate and phenotype. The frequencies of abnormal phenotypes were highly correlated with the degree of DNA damage in seeds. Treatment of seeds with geldanamycin (GDA), an inhibitor of HSP90, stimulated the seedling growth at all radiation doses and, at the same time, enhanced the growth rate and morphological diversity. It was also found that HSP70 induction by γ-rays was increased following GDA treatment (shown at 1 kGy). We suppose that the GDA-induced HSP70 can be involved in elimination of detrimental radiation effects that ultimately results in growth stimulation. On the other hand, the increase in phenotypic variation, when HSP90 function was impaired, confirms the supposition that the chaperone may control the concealment of cryptic genetic alterations and the developmental stability. In general, these results demonstrate that HSP90 may interface the stress response and phenotypic expression of genetic alterations induced by irradiation. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cellular Chaperones As Therapeutic Targets in ALS to Restore Protein Homeostasis and Improve Cellular Function

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    Bernadett Kalmar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps are ubiquitously expressed chaperone proteins that enable cells to cope with environmental stresses that cause misfolding and denaturation of proteins. With aging this protein quality control machinery becomes less effective, reducing the ability of cells to cope with damaging environmental stresses and disease-causing mutations. In neurodegenerative disorders such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, such mutations are known to result in protein misfolding, which in turn results in the formation of intracellular aggregates cellular dysfunction and eventual neuronal death. The exact cellular pathology of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases has been elusive and thus, hindering the development of effective therapies. However, a common scheme has emerged across these “protein misfolding” disorders, in that the mechanism of disease involves one or more aspects of proteostasis; from DNA transcription, RNA translation, to protein folding, transport and degradation via proteosomal and autophagic pathways. Interestingly, members of the Hsp family are involved in each of these steps facilitating normal protein folding, regulating the rate of protein synthesis and degradation. In this short review we summarize the evidence that suggests that ALS is a disease of protein dyshomeostasis in which Hsps may play a key role. Overwhelming evidence now indicates that enabling protein homeostasis to cope with disease-causing mutations might be a successful therapeutic strategy in ALS, as well as other neurodegenerative diseases. Novel small molecule co-inducers of Hsps appear to be able to achieve this aim. Arimoclomol, a hydroxylamine derivative, has shown promising results in cellular and animal models of ALS, as well as other protein misfolding diseases such as Inclusion Body Myositis (IBM. Initial clinical investigations of Arimoclomol have shown promising results. Therefore, it is possible that the long series of

  17. Pilot study using ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone in type 1 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimran, Ari; Altarescu, Gheona; Elstein, Deborah

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot was to assess the tolerability and efficacy of ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone in patients with symptomatic, type 1 Gaucher disease who present with measurable disease parameters but are not receiving enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in order to provide proof of concept and/or ascertain the suitability of ambroxol for a larger clinical trial. The Israeli Ministry of Health Form 29c was employed to prescribe ambroxol for off-label use. Twelve patients were dispensed 2 capsules of 75 mg of ambroxol daily for 6 months. There were 8 females (66.7%). Mean age at entry was 41.1 (range: 24-63) years. Mean body weight at entry was 66.4 (range: 46.5-100) kg. One patient withdrew because of a hypersensitivity reaction, one because of elective splenectomy. No patient experienced clinically relevant deterioration in disease parameters measured. One patient achieved a robust response relative to baseline: +16.2% hemoglobin; +32.9% platelets; -2.8% liver volume; and -14.4% spleen volume. Three patients, including the above one, elected to continue on ambroxol for a further 6 months: hemoglobin levels and liver volumes were relatively stable, but platelet counts further increased in the above patient (+52.6% from baseline) and spleen volumes decreased further in all three patients (-6.4%, -18.6%, and -23.4% from baseline). Thus, ambroxol may be a safe option for Gaucher disease patients with potential disease-specific efficacy and should be expanded into a clinical trial using higher doses and placebo-controlled design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor secretion: don’t leave the cell without a chaperone

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    Laty Adriella Cahoon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Gram-positive bacteria, the secretion of proteins requires translocation of polypeptides across the bacterial membrane into the highly charged environment of the membrane-cell wall interface. Here, proteins must be folded and often further delivered across the matrix of the cell wall. While many aspects of protein secretion have been well studied in Gram-negative bacteria, which possess both an inner and outer membrane, generally less attention has been given to the mechanics of protein secretion across the single cell membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. In this review, we focus on the role of a post-translocation secretion chaperone in Listeria monocytogenes known as PrsA2, and compare what is known regarding PrsA2 with PrsA homologues in other Gram-positive bacteria. PrsA2 is a member of a family of membrane-associated lipoproteins that contribute to the folding and stability of secreted proteins as they cross the bacterial membrane. PrsA2 contributes to the integrity of the L. monocytogenes cell wall as well as swimming motility and bacterial resistance to osmotic stress, however its most critical role may be its requirement for L. monocytogenes virulence and viability within host cells. A better understanding of the role of PrsA2 and PrsA-like homologues will provide insight into the dynamics of protein folding and stability in Gram-positive bacteria and may result in new strategies for optimizing protein secretion as well as inhibiting the production of virulence factors.

  19. Rubredoxin refolding on nanostructured hydrophobic surfaces: evidence for a new type of biomimetic chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriani, Matteo; Iametti, Stefania; Kurtz, Donald M; Bonomi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Rubredoxins (Rds) are small proteins containing a tetrahedral Fe(SCys)4 site. Folded forms of metal free Rds (apoRds) show greatly impaired ability to incorporate iron compared with chaotropically unfolded apoRds. In this study, formation of the Rd holoprotein (holoRd) on addition of iron to a structured, but iron-uptake incompetent apoRd was investigated in the presence of polystyrene nanoparticles (NP). In our rationale, hydrophobic contacts between apoRd and the NP surface would expose protein regions (including ligand cysteines) buried in the structured apoRd, allowing iron incorporation and folding to the native holoRd. Burial of the hydrophobic regions in the folded holoRd would allow its detachment from the NP surface. We found that both rate and yield of holoRd formation increased significantly in the presence of NP and were influenced by the NP concentration and size. Rates and yields had an optimum at "catalytic" NP concentrations (0.2 g/L NP) when using relatively small NP (46 nm diameter). At these optimal conditions, only a fraction of the apoRd was bound to the NP, consistent with the occurrence of turnover events on the NP surface. Lower rates and yields at higher NP concentrations or when using larger NP (200 nm) suggest that steric effects and molecular crowding on the NP surface favor specific "iron-uptake-competent" conformations of apoRd on the NP surface. This bio-mimetic chaperone system may be applicable to other proteins requiring an unfolding step before cofactor-triggered refolding, particularly when over-expressed under limited cofactor accessibility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Role of Sigma-1 Receptor, an Intracellular Chaperone in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penke, Botond; Fülöp, Lívia; Szűcs, Mária; Frecska, Ede

    2017-05-28

    Widespread protein aggregation occurs in the living system under stress or during aging, owing to disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis. Many neurodegenerative diseases may have a common mechanism: the failure of protein homeostasis. Perturbation of ER results in unfolded protein response (UPR). Prolonged chronical UPR may activate apoptotic pathways and cause cell death. ER is associated to mitochondria by the mitochondria-associated ER-membrane, MAM. The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), a well-known ER-chaperone localizes in the MAM. It serves for Ca2+-signaling between the ER and mitochondria, involved in ion channel activities and especially important during neuronal differentiation. Sig-1R acts as central modulator in inter-organelle signaling. Sig-1R helps cell survival by attenuating ER-stress. According to sequence based predictions Sig-1R is a 223 amino acid protein with two transmembrane (2TM) domains. The X-ray structure of the Sig-1R [1] showed a membrane-bound trimeric assembly with one transmembrane (1TM) region. Despite the in vitro determined assembly, the results of in vivo studies are rather consistent with the 2TM structure . The receptor has unique and versatile pharmacological profile. Dimethyl tryptamine (DMT) and neuroactive steroids are endogenous ligands that activate Sig-1R. The receptor has a plethora of interacting client proteins. Sig-1R exists in oligomeric structures (dimer-trimer-octamer-multimer) and this fact may explain interaction with diverse proteins. Sig-1R agonists have been used in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases (AD and PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Utilization of Sig-1R agents early in AD and similar other diseases has remained an overlooked therapeutic opportunity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Involvement of a novel copper chaperone in tyrosinase activity and melanin synthesis in Marinomonas mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Serrano, D; Solano, F; Sanchez-Amat, A

    2007-07-01

    Tyrosinase activity and melanin synthesis in the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea in media with very low copper concentrations are dependent on the presence of a protein (PpoB2) that functions as a chaperone to deliver copper to tyrosinase (PpoB1). Under these conditions, mutants in ppoB2 (such as strain T105) produce PpoB1 as an apoenzyme that can be reconstituted to the active holoenzyme by the addition of cupric ions to cell extracts. To study PpoB2 functionality, a system was developed for genetic complementation in M. mediterranea. Using this approach, melanin synthesis was restored in strain T105 when a wild-type copy of ppoB2 was introduced. PpoB2 is a novel protein since it is believed to be the first to be described that contains several motifs similar to metal binding motifs present separately in other types of copper-related protein. At least three motifs, a His-rich N-terminal region, and the short CxxxC and MxxxMM sequences, are essential for the functionality of PpoB2, since site-directed mutagenesis of these motifs resulted in a non-functional protein. In addition, it was demonstrated that PpoB2 is a membrane copper transporter putatively participating in the delivery of this ion specifically to the tyrosinase of M. mediterranea and not to a second copper oxidase showing laccase activity that this micro-organism also expresses. PpoB2 has similarities with the COG5486 group encoding putative transmembrane metal binding proteins, and is believed to be the first protein in this group to be experimentally characterized. It may constitute the first example of a novel type of protein involved in copper trafficking in bacteria.

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization of SrcA, a multi-cargo type III secretion chaperone in Salmonella required for pathogenic association with a host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Cooper

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2 is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 A revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2 and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  3. The chaperone role of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and its implications for rare diseases involving B6-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Barbara; Montioli, Riccardo; Oppici, Elisa; Astegno, Alessandra; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2014-02-01

    The biologically active form of the B6 vitamers is pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), which plays a coenzymatic role in several distinct enzymatic activities ranging from the synthesis, interconversion and degradation of amino acids to the replenishment of one-carbon units, synthesis and degradation of biogenic amines, synthesis of tetrapyrrolic compounds and metabolism of amino-sugars. In the catalytic process of PLP-dependent enzymes, the substrate amino acid forms a Schiff base with PLP and the electrophilicity of the PLP pyridine ring plays important roles in the subsequent catalytic steps. While the essential role of PLP in the acquisition of biological activity of many proteins is long recognized, the finding that some PLP-enzymes require the coenzyme for refolding in vitro points to an additional role of PLP as a chaperone in the folding process. Mutations in the genes encoding PLP-enzymes are causative of several rare inherited diseases. Patients affected by some of these diseases (AADC deficiency, cystathionuria, homocystinuria, gyrate atrophy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, xanthurenic aciduria, X-linked sideroblastic anaemia) can benefit, although at different degrees, from the administration of pyridoxine, a PLP precursor. The effect of the coenzyme is not limited to mutations that affect the enzyme-coenzyme interaction, but also to those that cause folding defects, reinforcing the idea that PLP could play a chaperone role and improve the folding efficiency of misfolded variants. In this review, recent biochemical and cell biology studies highlighting the chaperoning activity of the coenzyme on folding-defective variants of PLP-enzymes associated with rare diseases are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of Conserved and Species-Specific Functions of the Listeria monocytogenes PrsA2 Secretion Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Laty A.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that relies on the regulated secretion and activity of a variety of proteins that sustain life within diverse environments. PrsA2 has recently been identified as a secreted peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase and chaperone that is dispensable for bacterial growth in broth culture but essential for L. monocytogenes virulence. Following host infection, PrsA2 contributes to the proper folding and activity of secreted proteins that are required for bacterial replication within the host cytosol and for bacterial spread to adjacent cells. PrsA2 is one member of a family of Gram-positive secretion chaperones that appear to play important roles in bacterial physiology; however, it is not known how these proteins recognize their substrate proteins or the degree to which their function is conserved across diverse Gram-positive species. We therefore examined PrsA proteins encoded by a variety of Gram-positive bacteria for functional complementation of L. monocytogenes mutants lacking prsA2. PrsA homologues encoded by Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactococcus lactis were examined for functional complementation of a variety of L. monocytogenes PrsA2-associated phenotypes central to L. monocytogenes pathogenesis and bacterial cell physiology. Our results indicate that while selected aspects of PrsA2 function are broadly conserved among diverse Gram-positive bacteria, PrsA2 exhibits unique specificity for L. monocytogenes target proteins required for pathogenesis. The L. monocytogenes PrsA2 chaperone thus appears evolutionarily optimized for virulence factor secretion within the host cell cytosol while still maintaining aspects of activity relevant to more general features of Gram-positive protein translocation. PMID:26216425

  5. Trigger Factor-Induced Nascent Chain Dynamics Changes Suggest Two Different Chaperone-Nascent Chain Interactions during Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubek, Jiří; Chang, Yi-Che; Yang, Sunny Yao-Chen; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2017-06-02

    Protein biogenesis is poorly understood due to the ribosome that perturbs measurement attempted on the ribosome-bound nascent chain (RNC). Investigating nascent chain dynamics may provide invaluable insight into the co-translational processes such as structure formation or interaction with a chaperone [e.g., the bacterial trigger factor (TF)]. In this study, we aim to establish a platform for studying nascent chain dynamics by exploring the local environment near the fluorescent dye on site-specifically labeled RNCs with time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. To prepare a quantitative model of fluorescence depolarization, we utilized intrinsically disordered protein bound to ribosome, which helped us couple the sub-nanosecond depolarization with the motion of the nascent chain backbone. This was consistent with zinc-finger-domain-containing RNCs, where the extent of sub-nanosecond motion decreased upon the addition of zinc when the fluorophore was in close proximity of the domain. After the characterization of disordered nascent chain dynamics, we investigated the synthesis of a model cytosolic protein, Entner-Doudoroff aldolase, labeled at different sites during various stages of translation. Depending on the stage of translation, the addition of the TF to the nascent chain led to two different responses in the nascent chain dynamics serendipitously, suggesting steric hindrance between the nascent chain and the chaperone as a mechanism for TF dissociation from the ribosome during translation. Overall, our study demonstrates the possible use of site-specific labeling and time-resolved anisotropy to gain insight on chaperone binding event at various stages of translation and hints on TF co-translational mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The hydrophobic region of the DmsA twin-arginine leader peptide determines specificity with chaperone DmsD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstone, Tara M L; Tran, Vy A; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-10-29

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions.

  7. Improved 1, 2, 4-butanetriol production from an engineered Escherichia coli by co-expression of different chaperone proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinyao; He, Shuying; Zong, Hong; Song, Jian; Chen, Wen; Zhuge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    1, 2, 4-Butanetriol (BT) is a high-value non-natural chemical and has important applications in polymers, medical production and military industry. In the constructed BT biosynthesis pathway from xylose in Escherichia coli, the xylose dehydrogenase (Xdh) and the benzoylformate decarboxylase (MdlC) are heterologous enzymes and the activity of MdlC is the key limiting factor for BT production. In this study, six chaperone protein systems were introduced into the engineered E. coli harboring the recombinant BT pathway. The chaperone GroES-GroEL was beneficial to Xdh activity but had a negative effect on MdlC activity and BT titer. The plasmid pTf16 containing the tig gene (trigger factor) was beneficial to Xdh and MdlC activities and improved the BT titer from 0.42 to 0.56 g/l from 20 g/l xylose. However, co-expression of trigger factor and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced the activity of MdlC and had no effect on the BT production. The plasmid pKJE7 harboring dnaK-dnaJ-grpE showed significant negative effects on these enzyme activities and cell growth, leading to completely restrained the BT production. Similarly, co-expression of DnaKJ-GrpPE and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced Xdh and MdlC activities and decreased the BT titer by 45.2 %. The BT production of the engineered E. coli harboring pTf16 was further improved to the highest level at 1.01 g/l under pH control (pH 7). This work showed the potential application of chaperone proteins in microorganism engineering to get high production of target compounds as an effective and valuable tool.

  8. Hsp31, a member of the DJ-1 superfamily, is a multitasking stress responder with chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Kiran; Hazbun, Tony R

    2016-03-03

    Among different types of protein aggregation, amyloids are a biochemically well characterized state of protein aggregation that are associated with a large number of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an insightful model to understand the underlying mechanism of protein aggregation. Many yeast molecular chaperones can modulate aggregation and misfolding of proteins including α-Syn and the Sup35 prion. Hsp31 is a homodimeric protein structurally similar to human DJ-1, a Parkinson's disease-linked protein, and both are members of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily. An emerging view is that Hsp31 and its associated superfamily members each have divergent multitasking functions that have the common theme of responding and managing various types of cellular stress. Hsp31 has several biochemical activities including chaperone and detoxifying enzyme activities that modulate at various points of a stress pathway such as toxicity associated with protein misfolding. However, we have shown the protective role of Hsp31's chaperone activity can operate independent of detoxifying enzyme activities in preventing the early stages of protein aggregate formation and associated cellular toxicities. We provide additional data that collectively supports the multiple functional roles that can be accomplished independent of each other. We present data indicating Hsp31 purified from yeast is more active compared to expression and purification from E. coli suggesting that posttranslational modifications could be important for Hsp31 to be fully active. We also compare the similarities and differences in activities among paralogs of Hsp31 supporting a model in which this protein family has overlapping but diverging roles in responding to various sources of cellular stresses.

  9. Structural insight into the UNC-45–myosin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratev, Filip; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    is mainly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Remarkably, the contact surface area is similar to that of the myosinactin complex. A significant interspecies difference in the myosin binding epitope is observed. Our results reveal the structural basis of MYH7 exons 15–16 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy......The UNC-45 chaperone protein interacts with and affects the folding, stability, and the ATPase activity of myosins. It plays a critical role in the cardiomyopathy development and in the breast cancer tumor growth. Here we propose the first structural model of the UNC-45–myosin complex using various...

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Gp96 in Macrophages is Essential for Protective Immunity during Gram-negative Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Anas, Adam A.; de Vos, Alex F; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H. P.; van Heijst, Jeroen W.J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Li, Zihai; van ’t Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common gram-negative bacteria that cause pneumonia. Gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is essential for the trafficking and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To determine the role of gp96 in myeloid cells in host defence during Klebsiella pneumonia. Mice homozygous for the conditional Hsp90b1 allele encoding gp96 were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under control of the LysM promoter to generate LysMcre-Hsp9...

  11. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    Agaricus bisporus and equine cytochrome c. Only for the first target β-casein was acting as a molecular chaperone i.e. its presence resulted in higher residual activity (higher degree of the function preservation). β-Casein did not have any influence on the residual activity of tyrosinase. Surprisingly....... The negative effect of BSA on enzyme was not observed before. The residual activity of horseradish peroxidase was also improved by the reconstituted skim milk: addition of reconstituted skim milk prior to heat treatment resulted in higher residual activity of HRP compared to no addition (58±3% and 30...

  12. The determinants and engagement patterns of chaperones and chauffeurs by Australian doctors in after-hours house-call services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Onyebuchi Ifediora

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The use of escorts (chauffeurs and chaperones while on duty in after-hours-house-call (AHHC is one key protective option available to doctors in the service, and has been linked to low burnout and increased satisfaction in AHHC. This study aims to explore the patterns of engagement of escorts in Australian AHHC. Method This is a questionnaire-based, electronic survey of all 300 doctors involved in AHHC through the National Home Doctor Service (NHDS, Australia’s largest providers of the service. The survey explored the doctor’s experiences over the 12-month period from October 2013 to September 2014. Results This survey received a total of 168 valid responses, giving a response rate of 56%. Nearly 61% of the doctors involved in AHHC engaged escorts (chauffeurs and chaperones. Of those doctors that engage chauffeurs, three-quarters do so “all or most times”, while only one-quarter engaged chaperones to the same degree of frequency. Hiring escorts is very popular among Brisbane (91.7% and Sydney-based (88.2% practitioners, but is unpopular in the City of Gold Coast (26.1%. There were moderate patronages in Adelaide (52.9% and Melbourne Area (46.4%. Compared to males, females were less likely to drive themselves without escorts (OR 0.20; P < 0.01; CI [0.07–0.57], but more likely to engage chauffeurs (OR 5.87; P = 0.03; CI [1.16–29.77]. Practitioners who were apprehensive were three times more likely to either engage escorts as chauffeurs (OR 3.10; P = 0.04; CI [1.05–9.15] or as an accompanying chaperone if they self-drive (OR 3.03; P = 0.02; CI [1.16–7.89]. Conclusion More needs to be done to increase the engagement of escorts by doctors involved in the Australian AHHC, particularly given their proven benefits in the service. Future studies may be needed to fully explore the real reasons behind the significant associations identified in this study.

  13. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  14. NarJ chaperone binds on two distinct sites of the aponitrate reductase of Escherichia coli to coordinate molybdenum cofactor insertion and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnes, Alexandra; Pommier, Janine; Toci, René; Blasco, Francis; Giordano, Gérard; Magalon, Axel

    2006-01-27

    Understanding when and how metal cofactor insertion occurs into a multisubunit metalloenzyme is of fundamental importance. Molybdenum cofactor insertion is a tightly controlled process that involves specific interactions between the proteins that promote cofactor delivery, enzyme-specific chaperones, and the apoenzyme. In the assembly pathway of the multisubunit molybdoenzyme, membrane-bound nitrate reductase A from Escherichia coli, a NarJ-assisted molybdenum cofactor (Moco) insertion step, must precede membrane anchoring of the apoenzyme. Here, we have shown that the NarJ chaperone interacts at two distinct binding sites of the apoenzyme, one interfering with its membrane anchoring and another one being involved in molybdenum cofactor insertion. The presence of the two NarJ-binding sites within NarG is required to ensure productive formation of active nitrate reductase. Our findings supported the view that enzyme-specific chaperones play a central role in the biogenesis of multisubunit molybdoenzymes by coordinating subunits assembly and molybdenum cofactor insertion.

  15. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Zurdo José I

    2010-03-01

    identified S. meliloti sRNAs co-inmunoprecipitate with a FLAG-epitope tagged Hfq protein. Conclusions Our results support that the S. meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq contributes to the control of central metabolic pathways in free-living bacteria and influences rhizospheric competence, survival of the microsymbiont within the nodule cells and nitrogen fixation during the symbiotic interaction with its legume host alfalfa. The identified S. meliloti Hfq-binding sRNAs are predicted to participate in the Hfq regulatory network.

  16. Generation of human ER chaperone BiP in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Aučynaitė, Agota; Slibinskas, Rimantas

    2014-02-11

    Human BiP is traditionally regarded as a major endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone performing a number of well-described functions in the ER. In recent years it was well established that this molecule can also be located in other cell organelles and compartments, on the cell surface or be secreted. Also novel functions were assigned to this protein. Importantly, BiP protein appears to be involved in cancer and rheumatoid arthritis progression, autoimmune inflammation and tissue damage, and thus could potentially be used for therapeutic purposes. In addition, a growing body of evidence indicates BiP as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing importance of this protein and its involvement in critical human diseases demands new source of high quality native recombinant human BiP for further studies and potential application. Here we introduce yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a host for the generation of human BiP protein. Expression of a full-length human BiP precursor in S. cerevisiae resulted in a high-level secretion of mature recombinant protein into the culture medium. The newly discovered ability of the yeast cells to recognize, correctly process the native signal sequence of human BiP and secrete this protein into the growth media allowed simple one-step purification of highly pure recombinant BiP protein with yields reaching 10 mg/L. Data presented in this study shows that secreted recombinant human BiP possesses native amino acid sequence and structural integrity, is biologically active and without yeast-derived modifications. Strikingly, ATPase activity of yeast-derived human BiP protein exceeded the activity of E. coli-derived recombinant human BiP by a 3-fold. S. cerevisiae is able to correctly process and secrete human BiP protein. Consequently, resulting recombinant BiP protein corresponds accurately to native analogue. The ability to produce large quantities of native recombinant human BiP in yeast

  17. C-terminal domain modulates the nucleic acid chaperone activity of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein via an electrostatic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualley, Dominic F; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retroviral NCs. Increasing the ionic strength of the solution also improves the chaperone activity of full-length HTLV-1 NC. To determine how the CTD negatively modulates the chaperone activity of HTLV-1 NC, we quantified the thermodynamics and kinetics of wild-type and mutant HTLV-1 NC/NA interactions. The wild-type protein exhibits very slow dissociation kinetics, and removal of the CTD or mutations that eliminate acidic residues dramatically increase the protein/DNA interaction kinetics. Taken together, these results suggest that the anionic CTD interacts with the cationic N-terminal domain intramolecularly when HTLV-1 NC is not bound to nucleic acids, and similar interactions occur between neighboring molecules when NC is NA-bound. The intramolecular N-terminal domain-CTD attraction slows down the association of the HTLV-1 NC with NA, whereas the intermolecular interaction leads to multimerization of HTLV-1 NC on the NA. The latter inhibits both NA/NC aggregation and rapid protein dissociation from single-stranded DNA. These features make HTLV-1 NC a poor NA chaperone, despite its robust duplex destabilizing capability.

  18. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu Xing; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone-usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone-usher mediated bioassembly.

  19. Dancing through Life: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Network-Centric Modeling of Allosteric Mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 Chaperone Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones play an important role in regulating cellular processes that involve protein folding and stabilization, which are essential for the integrity of signaling networks. Although many aspects of allosteric regulatory mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones have been extensively studied and significantly advanced in recent experimental studies, the atomistic picture of signal propagation and energetics of dynamics-based communication still remain unresolved. In this work, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and protein stability analysis of the chaperone structures with the network modeling of residue interaction networks to characterize molecular determinants of allosteric mechanisms. We have shown that allosteric mechanisms of Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones may be primarily determined by nucleotide-induced redistribution of local conformational ensembles in the inter-domain regions and the substrate binding domain. Conformational dynamics and energetics of the peptide substrate binding with the Hsp70 structures has been analyzed using free energy calculations, revealing allosteric hotspots that control negative cooperativity between regulatory sites. The results have indicated that cooperative interactions may promote a population-shift mechanism in Hsp70, in which functional residues are organized in a broad and robust allosteric network that can link the nucleotide-binding site and the substrate-binding regions. A smaller allosteric network in Hsp110 structures may elicit an entropy-driven allostery that occurs in the absence of global structural changes. We have found that global mediating residues with high network centrality may be organized in stable local communities that are indispensable for structural stability and efficient allosteric communications. The network-centric analysis of allosteric interactions has also established that centrality of functional residues could correlate with their sensitivity to mutations

  20. Gut microbiota imbalance and chaperoning system malfunction are central to ulcerative colitis pathogenesis and can be counteracted with specifically designed probiotics: a working hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavia, Maurizio; Tomasello, Giovanni; Romeo, Marcello; Damiani, Provvidenza; Lo Monte, Attilio I; Lozio, Luciano; Campanella, Claudia; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Rappa, Francesca; Zummo, Giovanni; Cocchi, Massimo; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we propose that for further studies of the physiopathology and treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases, an integral view of the conditions, including the triad of microbiota-heat shock proteins (HSPs)-probiotics, ought to be considered. Microbiota is the complex microbial flora that resides in the gut, affecting not only gut functions but also the health status of the whole body. Alteration in the microbiota's composition has been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions (e.g., ulcerative colitis, UC), involving both gut and extra-intestinal tissues and organs. Some of these pathologies are also associated with an altered expression of HSPs (chaperones) and this is the reason why they may be considered chaperonopathies. Probiotics, which are live microorganisms able to restore the correct, healthy equilibrium of microbiota composition, can ameliorate symptoms in patients suffering from UC and modulate expression levels of HSPs. However, currently probiotic therapy follows ex-adiuvantibus criteria, i.e., treatments with beneficial effects but whose mechanism of action is unknown, which should be changed so the probiotics needed in each case are predetermined on the basis of the patient's microbiota. Consequently, efforts are necessary to develop diagnostic tools for elucidating levels and distribution of HSPs and the microbiota composition (microbiota fingerprint) of each subject and, thus, guide specific probiotic therapy, tailored to meet the needs of the patient. Microbiota fingerprinting ought to include molecular biology techniques for sequencing highly conserved DNA, e.g., genes encoding 16S RNA, for species identification and, in addition, quantification of each relevant microbe.

  1. Protein Expression and Purification of the Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 Kinase Complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verba, Kliment A; Agard, David A

    2017-10-05

    Interactions between Hsp90, its co-chaperone Cdc37 and kinases have been biochemically studied for over three decades and have been shown to be functionally important in organisms from yeast to humans. However, formation of a stable complex for structural studies has been elusive. In this protocol we describe expression and purification of Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 kinase protein complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing the viral 2A sequences to titrate the three proteins at similar levels.

  2. Impaired autophagy, chaperone expression, and protein synthesis in response to critical illness interventions in porcine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banduseela, Varuna C; Chen, Yi-Wen; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Norman, Holly S; Aare, Sudhakar; Radell, Peter; Eriksson, Lars I; Hoffman, Eric P; Larsson, Lars

    2013-06-17

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is characterized by a preferential loss of the motor protein myosin, muscle wasting, and impaired muscle function in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. CIM is associated with severe morbidity and mortality and has a significant negative socioeconomic effect. Neuromuscular blocking agents, corticosteroids, sepsis, mechanical ventilation, and immobilization have been implicated as important risk factors, but the causal relationship between CIM and the risk factors has not been established. A porcine ICU model has been used to determine the immediate molecular and cellular cascades that may contribute to the pathogenesis prior to myosin loss and extensive muscle wasting. Expression profiles have been compared between pigs exposed to the ICU interventions, i.e., mechanically ventilated, sedated, and immobilized for 5 days, with pigs exposed to critical illness interventions, i.e., neuromuscular blocking agents, corticosteroids, and induced sepsis in addition to the ICU interventions for 5 days. Impaired autophagy as well as impaired chaperone expression and protein synthesis were observed in the skeletal muscle in response to critical illness interventions. A novel finding in this study is impaired core autophagy machinery in response to critical illness interventions, which when in concert with downregulated chaperone expression and protein synthesis may collectively affect the proteostasis in skeletal muscle and may exacerbate the disease progression in CIM.

  3. The Leishmania donovani chaperone cyclophilin 40 is essential for intracellular infection independent of its stage-specific phosphorylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Wai-Lok; Pescher, Pascale; MacDonald, Andrea; Hem, Sonia; Zander, Dorothea; Retzlaff, Silke; Blisnick, Thierry; Rotureau, Brice; Rosenqvist, Heidi; Wiese, Martin; Bastin, Philippe; Clos, Joachim; Späth, Gerald F

    2014-07-01

    During its life cycle, the protozoan pathogen Leishmania donovani is exposed to contrasting environments inside insect vector and vertebrate host, to which the parasite must adapt for extra- and intracellular survival. Combining null mutant analysis with phosphorylation site-specific mutagenesis and functional complementation we genetically tested the requirement of the L. donovani chaperone cyclophilin 40 (LdCyP40) for infection. Targeted replacement of LdCyP40 had no effect on parasite viability, axenic amastigote differentiation, and resistance to various forms of environmental stress in culture, suggesting important functional redundancy to other parasite chaperones. However, ultrastructural analyses and video microscopy of cyp40-/- promastigotes uncovered important defects in cell shape, organization of the subpellicular tubulin network and motility at stationary growth phase. More importantly, cyp40-/- parasites were unable to establish intracellular infection in murine macrophages and were eliminated during the first 24 h post infection. Surprisingly, cyp40-/- infectivity was restored in complemented parasites expressing a CyP40 mutant of the unique S274 phosphorylation site. Together our data reveal non-redundant CyP40 functions in parasite cytoskeletal remodelling relevant for the development of infectious parasites in vitro independent of its phosphorylation status, and provide a framework for the genetic analysis of Leishmania-specific phosphorylation sites and their role in regulating parasite protein function. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone at the ER-mitochondrion interface mediates the mitochondrion-ER-nucleus signaling for cellular survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Teruo; Hayashi, Eri; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a cell forms contacts directly with mitochondria whereby the contact is referred to as the mitochondrion-associated ER membrane or the MAM. Here we found that the MAM regulates cellular survival via an MAM-residing ER chaperone the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) in that the Sig-1R chaperones the ER stress sensor IRE1 to facilitate inter-organelle signaling for survival. IRE1 is found in this study to be enriched at the MAM in CHO cells. We found that IRE1 is stabilized at the MAM by Sig-1Rs when cells are under ER stress. Sig-1Rs stabilize IRE1 and thus allow for conformationally correct IRE1 to dimerize into the long-lasting, activated endonuclease. The IRE1 at the MAM also responds to reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria. Therefore, the ER-mitochondrion interface serves as an important subcellular entity in the regulation of cellular survival by enhancing the stress-responding signaling between mitochondria, ER, and nucleus.

  5. Chaperonin 20 might be an iron chaperone for superoxide dismutase in activating iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2013-02-01

    Activation of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs) is aided by Cu incorporation and disulfide isomerization by Cu chaperone of SOD (CCS). As well, an Fe-S cluster scaffold protein, ISU, might alter the incorporation of Fe or Mn into yeast MnSOD (ySOD2), thus leading to active or inactive ySOD2. However, metallochaperones involved in the activation of FeSODs are unknown. Recently, we found that a chloroplastic chaperonin cofactor, CPN20, could mediate FeSOD activity. To investigate whether Fe incorporation in FeSOD is affected by CPN20, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to analyze the ability of CPN20 to bind Fe. CPN20 could bind Fe, and the Fe binding to FeSOD was increased with CPN20 incubation. Thus, CPN20 might be an Fe chaperone for FeSOD activation, a role independent of its well-known co-chaperonin activity.

  6. The mycobacteriophage Ms6 encodes a chaperone-like protein involved in the endolysin delivery to the peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalão, Maria João; Gil, Filipa; Moniz-Pereira, José; Pimentel, Madalena

    2010-08-01

    Like most double-stranded (ds) DNA phages, mycobacteriophage Ms6 uses the holin-endolysin system to achieve lysis of its host. In addition to endolysin (lysA) and holin (hol) genes, Ms6 encodes three accessory lysis proteins. In this study we investigated the lysis function of Gp1, which is encoded by the gp1 gene that lies immediately upstream of lysA. Escherichia coli lysis was observed after coexpression of LysA and Gp1 in the absence of Ms6 holin. Gp1 does not belong to the holin class of proteins, and we provide evidence that it shares several characteristics with molecular chaperones. We show that Gp1 interacts with LysA, and that this interaction is necessary for LysA delivery to its target. In addition, PhoA fusions showed that, in Mycobacterium smegmatis, LysA is exported to the extracytoplasmic environment in the presence of Gp1. We also show that Gp1 is necessary for efficient M. smegmatis lysis, as Ms6 gp1 deletion results in host lysis defects. We propose that delivery of Ms6 endolysin to the murein layer is assisted by Gp1, a chaperone-like protein, in a holin-independent manner.

  7. Erythrocyte copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase and superoxide dismutase as biomarkers for hepatic copper concentrations in Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, K; Roelen, Y S; van Wolferen, M E; Kruitwagen, H S; Penning, L C; Burgener, I A; Spee, B; Fieten, H

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary hepatic copper accumulation in Labrador retrievers leads to hepatitis with fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis. The development of a non-invasive blood-based biomarker for copper status in dogs could be helpful in identifying dogs at risk and to monitor copper concentrations during treatment. In this study, two cellular copper metabolism proteins, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and its chaperone (copper chaperone for SOD1, CCS) were measured in erythrocytes and tested for association with hepatic copper concentrations in 15 Labrador retrievers with normal or increased hepatic copper concentrations. Antibodies against CCS and SOD1 were applicable for use in canine specimens. This was demonstrated by the loss of immune-reactive bands for CCS and SOD1 in siRNA treated canine bile duct epithelial cells. Erythrocyte CCS and CCS/SOD1 ratios were decreased 2.37 (P Labrador retrievers and could facilitate early diagnosis and treatment monitoring for copper-associated hepatitis in dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fidelity of plus-strand priming requires the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Klara; Kankia, Besik; Gopalakrishnan, Swathi; Yang, Victoria; Cramer, Elizabeth; Saladores, Pilar; Gorelick, Robert J.; Guo, Jianhui; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Levin, Judith G.

    2009-01-01

    During minus-strand DNA synthesis, RNase H degrades viral RNA sequences, generating potential plus-strand DNA primers. However, selection of the 3′ polypurine tract (PPT) as the exclusive primer is required for formation of viral DNA with the correct 5′-end and for subsequent integration. Here we show a new function for the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) in reverse transcription: blocking mispriming by non-PPT RNAs. Three representative 20-nt RNAs from the PPT region were tested for primer extension. Each primer had activity in the absence of NC, but less than the PPT. NC reduced priming by these RNAs to essentially base-line level, whereas PPT priming was unaffected. RNase H cleavage and zinc coordination by NC were required for maximal inhibition of mispriming. Biophysical properties, including thermal stability, helical structure and reverse transcriptase (RT) binding affinity, showed significant differences between PPT and non-PPT duplexes and the trends were generally correlated with the biochemical data. Binding studies in reactions with both NC and RT ruled out a competition binding model to explain NC's observed effects on mispriming efficiency. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NC chaperone activity has a major role in ensuring the fidelity of plus-strand priming. PMID:19158189

  9. A global requirement for the HIR complex in the assembly of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Vishnoi, Nidhi; Prochasson, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Due to its extensive length, DNA is packaged into a protective chromatin structure known as the nucleosome. In order to carry out various cellular functions, nucleosomes must be disassembled, allowing access to the underlying DNA, and subsequently reassembled on completion of these processes. The assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is dependent on the function of histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones. In this review, we discuss the roles of an evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone known as the HIR/HIRA complex. In S. cerevisiae, the HIR complex is made up of the proteins Hir1, Hir2, Hir3 and Hpc2, which collectively act in transcriptional regulation, elongation, gene silencing, cellular senescence and even aging. This review presents an overview of the role of the HIR complex, in yeast as well as other organisms, in each of these processes, in order to give a better understanding of how nucleosome assembly is imperative for cellular homeostasis and genomic integrity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and Chromatin assembly.

  10. Interaction of the molecular chaperone DNAJB6 with growing amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) aggregates leads to sub-stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Månsson, Cecilia; Arosio, Paolo; Hussein, Rasha; Kampinga, Harm H; Hashem, Reem M; Boelens, Wilbert C; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Linse, Sara; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The human molecular chaperone protein DNAJB6 was recently found to inhibit the formation of amyloid fibrils from polyglutamine peptides associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We show in the present study that DNAJB6 also inhibits amyloid formation by an even more

  11. Chaperone role for proteins p618 and p892 in the extracellular tail development of Acidianus two-tailed virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Urte; Erdmann, Susanne; Ungewickell, Ernst J.

    2011-01-01

    , is involved in this process. We propose that an additional chaperone system is required, consisting of a MoxR-type AAA ATPase (p618) and a von Willebrand domain A (VWA)-containing cochaperone, p892. Both proteins are absent from the other known bicaudavirus, STSV1, which develops a single tail intracellularly...

  12. The genes coding for the hsp70(dnaK) molecular chaperone machine occur in the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    of response by hsp70(dnaK), and a similar response by trkA. The data suggest that the moderate thermophile TM-1 has an active Hsp70(DnaK)-chaperone machine in contrast to hyperthermophilic archaea, and that trkA is a stress gene, inasmuch as it responds like classic heat-shock genes to stressors that induce...

  13. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Jens Jacob; Nielsen, Marit Nyholm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Georgopoulos, Costa; Ang, Debbie; Lundemose, Jytte Banner; Niezen-Koning, Klary; Eiberg, Hans; Yang, Huanming; Kolvraa, Steen; Bolund, Lars; Gregersen, Niels

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups for

  14. A single amino acid substitution in ORF1 dramatically decreases L1 retrotransposition and provides insight into nucleic acid chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L; Bushman, Diane; Wang, Fei; Li, Patrick Wai-Lun; Walker, Ann; Cummiskey, Jessica; Branciforte, Dan; Williams, Mark C

    2008-10-01

    L1 is a ubiquitous interspersed repeated sequence in mammals that achieved its high copy number by autonomous retrotransposition. Individual L1 elements within a genome differ in sequence and retrotransposition activity. Retrotransposition requires two L1-encoded proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p. Chimeric elements were used to map a 15-fold difference in retrotransposition efficiency between two L1 variants from the mouse genome, T(FC) and T(Fspa), to a single amino acid substitution in ORF1p, D159H. The steady-state levels of L1 RNA and protein do not differ significantly between these two elements, yet new insertions are detected earlier and at higher frequency in T(FC), indicating that it converts expressed L1 intermediates more effectively into new insertions. The two ORF1 proteins were purified and their nucleic acid binding and chaperone activities were examined in vitro. Although the RNA and DNA oligonucleotide binding affinities of these two ORF1 proteins were largely indistinguishable, D159 was significantly more effective as a nucleic acid chaperone than H159. These findings support a requirement for ORF1p nucleic acid chaperone activity at a late step during L1 retrotransposition, extend the region of ORF1p that is known to be critical for its functional interactions with nucleic acids, and enhance understanding of nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  15. A novel C-terminal homologue of Aha1 co-chaperone binds to heat shock protein 90 and stimulates its ATPase activity in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meetali; Shah, Varun; Tatu, Utpal

    2014-04-17

    Cytosolic heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to be essential for many infectious pathogens and is considered a potential target for drug development. In this study, we have carried out biochemical characterization of Hsp90 from a poorly studied protozoan parasite of clinical importance, Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that Entamoeba Hsp90 can bind to both ATP and its pharmacological inhibitor, 17-AAG (17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin), with Kd values of 365.2 and 10.77 μM, respectively, and it has a weak ATPase activity with a catalytic efficiency of 4.12×10(-4) min(-1) μM(-1). Using inhibitor 17-AAG, we have shown dependence of Entamoeba on Hsp90 for its growth and survival. Hsp90 function is regulated by various co-chaperones. Previous studies suggest a lack of several important co-chaperones in E. histolytica. In this study, we describe the presence of a novel homologue of co-chaperone Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase), EhAha1c, lacking a canonical Aha1 N-terminal domain. We also show that EhAha1c is capable of binding and stimulating ATPase activity of EhHsp90. In addition to highlighting the potential of Hsp90 inhibitors as drugs against amoebiasis, our study highlights the importance of E. histolytica in understanding the evolution of Hsp90 and its co-chaperone repertoire. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-z, an Hsp110 homologue, exhibits independent chaperone activity and interacts with Hsp70-1 in a nucleotide-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zininga, Tawanda; Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Hoppe, Heinrich; Prinsloo, Earl; Dirr, Heini W; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-05-01

    The role of molecular chaperones, among them heat shock proteins (Hsps), in the development of malaria parasites has been well documented. Hsp70s are molecular chaperones that facilitate protein folding. Hsp70 proteins are composed of an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD), which confers them with ATPase activity and a C-terminal substrate binding domain (SBD). In the ADP-bound state, Hsp70 possesses high affinity for substrate and releases the folded substrate when it is bound to ATP. The two domains are connected by a conserved linker segment. Hsp110 proteins possess an extended lid segment, a feature that distinguishes them from canonical Hsp70s. Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-z (PfHsp70-z) is a member of the Hsp110 family of Hsp70-like proteins. PfHsp70-z is essential for survival of malaria parasites and is thought to play an important role as a molecular chaperone and nucleotide exchange factor of its cytosolic canonical Hsp70 counterpart, PfHsp70-1. Unlike PfHsp70-1 whose functions are fairly well established, the structure-function features of PfHsp70-z remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we established that PfHsp70-z possesses independent chaperone activity. In fact, PfHsp70-z appears to be marginally more effective in suppressing protein aggregation than its cytosol-localized partner, PfHsp70-1. Furthermore, based on coimmunoaffinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analyses, PfHsp70-z associated with PfHsp70-1 in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Our findings suggest that besides serving as a molecular chaperone, PfHsp70-z could facilitate the nucleotide exchange function of PfHsp70-1. These dual functions explain why it is essential for parasite survival.

  17. Roles of Intramolecular and Intermolecular Interactions in Functional Regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein Co-Chaperone Sis1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-04-01

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at heir C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways, Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activity with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interactions between the J-domain and glycine-rich region control co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD binding adaptor proteins. These interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.

  18. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  19. Hydroimidazolone modification of the conserved Arg12 in small heat shock proteins: studies on the structure and chaperone function using mutant mimics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram H Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal (MGO is an α-dicarbonyl compound present ubiquitously in the human body. MGO reacts with arginine residues in proteins and forms adducts such as hydroimidazolone and argpyrimidine in vivo. Previously, we showed that MGO-mediated modification of αA-crystallin increased its chaperone function. We identified MGO-modified arginine residues in αA-crystallin and found that replacing such arginine residues with alanine residues mimicked the effects of MGO on the chaperone function. Arginine 12 (R12 is a conserved amino acid residue in Hsp27 as well as αA- and αB-crystallin. When treated with MGO at or near physiological concentrations (2-10 µM, R12 was modified to hydroimidazolone in all three small heat shock proteins. In this study, we determined the effect of arginine substitution with alanine at position 12 (R12A to mimic MGO modification on the structure and chaperone function of these proteins. Among the three proteins, the R12A mutation improved the chaperone function of only αA-crystallin. This enhancement in the chaperone function was accompanied by subtle changes in the tertiary structure, which increased the thermodynamic stability of αA-crystallin. This mutation induced the exposure of additional client protein binding sites on αA-crystallin. Altogether, our data suggest that MGO-modification of the conserved R12 in αA-crystallin to hydroimidazolone may play an important role in reducing protein aggregation in the lens during aging and cataract formation.

  20. Engagement of cellular prion protein with the co-chaperone Hsp70/90 organizing protein regulates the proliferation of glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia, Rebeca Piatniczka; Prado, Mariana Brandão; Cruz, Lilian; Martins, Vilma Regina; Santos, Tiago Góss; Lopes, Marilene Hohmuth

    2017-04-17

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a highly aggressive brain tumor, contains a subpopulation of glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) that play roles in tumor maintenance, invasion, and therapeutic resistance. GSCs are therefore a promising target for GBM treatment. Our group identified the cellular prion protein (PrP C ) and its partner, the co-chaperone Hsp70/90 organizing protein (HOP), as potential target candidates due to their role in GBM tumorigenesis and in neural stem cell maintenance. GSCs expressing different levels of PrP C were cultured as neurospheres with growth factors, and characterized with stem cells markers and adhesion molecules markers through immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. We than evaluated GSC self-renewal and proliferation by clonal density assays and BrdU incorporation, respectively, in front of recombinant HOP treatment, combined or not with a HOP peptide which mimics the PrP C binding site. Stable silencing of HOP was also performed in parental and/or PrP C -depleted cell populations, and proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo were evaluated. Migration assays were performed on laminin-1 pre-coated glass. We observed that, when GBM cells are cultured as neurospheres, they express specific stemness markers such as CD133, CD15, Oct4, and SOX2; PrP C is upregulated compared to monolayer culture and co-localizes with CD133. PrP C silencing downregulates the expression of molecules associated with cancer stem cells, upregulates markers of cell differentiation and affects GSC self-renewal, pointing to a pivotal role for PrP C in the maintenance of GSCs. Exogenous HOP treatment increases proliferation and self-renewal of GSCs in a PrP C -dependent manner while HOP knockdown disturbs the proliferation process. In vivo, PrP C and/or HOP knockdown potently inhibits the growth of subcutaneously implanted glioblastoma cells. In addition, disruption of the PrP C -HOP complex by a HOP peptide, which mimics the PrP C binding site, affects GSC self

  1. Transcription recovery after DNA damage requires chromatin priming by the H3.3 histone chaperone HIRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-09-26

    Understanding how to recover fully functional and transcriptionally active chromatin when its integrity has been challenged by genotoxic stress is a critical issue. Here, by investigating how chromatin dynamics regulate transcriptional activity in response to DNA damage in human cells, we identify a pathway involving the histone chaperone histone regulator A (HIRA) to promote transcription restart after UVC damage. Our mechanistic studies reveal that HIRA accumulates at sites of UVC irradiation upon detection of DNA damage prior to repair and deposits newly synthesized H3.3 histones. This local action of HIRA depends on ubiquitylation events associated with damage recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the early and transient function of HIRA in response to DNA damage primes chromatin for later reactivation of transcription. We propose that HIRA-dependent histone deposition serves as a chromatin bookmarking system to facilitate transcription recovery after genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Kurt

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1, which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired.To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment.HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate and unsaturated (oleate long-chain free fatty acids (FFA. Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α and Type III IFN (IFN-λ was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated.FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ, which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA-treated cell culture

  3. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Ramazan; Chandra, Partha K; Aboulnasr, Fatma; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Ferraris, Pauline; Aydin, Yucel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Wu, Tong; Balart, Luis A; Dash, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α)-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA)-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1), which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired. To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment. HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate) and unsaturated (oleate) long-chain free fatty acids (FFA). Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α) and Type III IFN (IFN-λ) was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated. FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ), which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA-treated cell culture

  4. Induction and adaptation of chaperone-assisted selective autophagy CASA in response to resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Anna; Gehlert, Sebastian; Leciejewski, Barbara; Schiffer, Thorsten; Bloch, Wilhelm; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA) is a tension-induced degradation pathway essential for muscle maintenance. Impairment of CASA causes childhood muscle dystrophy and cardiomyopathy. However, the importance of CASA for muscle function in healthy individuals has remained elusive so far. Here we describe the impact of strength training on CASA in a group of healthy and moderately trained men. We show that strenuous resistance exercise causes an acute induction of CASA in affected muscles to degrade mechanically damaged cytoskeleton proteins. Moreover, repeated resistance exercise during 4 wk of training led to an increased expression of CASA components. In human skeletal muscle, CASA apparently acts as a central adaptation mechanism that responds to acute physical exercise and to repeated mechanical stimulation.

  5. glsA, a Volvox gene required for asymmetric division and germ cell specification, encodes a chaperone-like protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S M; Kirk, D L

    1999-02-01

    The gls genes of Volvox are required for the asymmetric divisions that set apart cells of the germ and somatic lineages during embryogenesis. Here we used transposon tagging to clone glsA, and then showed that it is expressed maximally in asymmetrically dividing embryos, and that it encodes a 748-amino acid protein with two potential protein-binding domains. Site-directed mutagenesis of one of these, the J domain (by which Hsp40-class chaperones bind to and activate specific Hsp70 partners) abolishes the capacity of glsA to rescue mutants. Based on this and other considerations, including the fact that the GlsA protein is associated with the mitotic spindle, we discuss how it might function, in conjunction with an Hsp70-type partner, to shift the division plane in asymmetrically dividing cells.

  6. Exploring geometric properties of gold nanoparticles using TEM images to explain their chaperone like activity for citrate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Vikas; Lahiri, Tapobrata; Singha, Shantiswaroop; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Kumar, Upendra; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Study on geometric properties of nanoparticles and their relation with biomolecular activities, especially protein is quite a new field to explore. This work was carried out towards this direction where images of gold nanoparticles obtained from transmission electron microscopy were processed to extract their size and area profile at different experimental conditions including and excluding a protein, citrate synthase. Since the images were ill-posed, texture of a context-window for each pixel was used as input to a back-propagation network architecture to obtain decision on its membership as nanoparticle. The segmented images were further analysed by k-means clustering to derive geometric properties of individual nanoparticles even from their assembled form. The extracted geometric information was found to be crucial to give a model featuring porous cage like configuration of nanoparticle assembly using which the chaperone like activity of gold nanoparticles can be explained.

  7. Cloning, expression and nuclear localization of human NPM3, a member of the nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin family of nuclear chaperones

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    Ganguly Amit

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies suggest that the related proteins nucleoplasmin and nucleophosmin (also called B23, NO38 or numatrin are nuclear chaperones that mediate the assembly of nucleosomes and ribosomes, respectively, and that these activities are accomplished through the binding of basic proteins via their acidic domains. Recently discovered and less well characterized members of this family of acidic phosphoproteins include mouse nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin 3 (Npm3 and Xenopus NO29. Here we report the cloning and initial characterization of the human ortholog of Npm3. Results Human genomic and cDNA clones of NPM3 were isolated and sequenced. NPM3 lies 5.5 kb upstream of FGF8 and thus maps to chromosome 10q24-26. In addition to amino acid similarities, NPM3 shares many physical characteristics with the nucleophosmin/nucleoplasmin family, including an acidic domain, multiple potential phosphorylation sites and a putative nuclear localization signal. Comparative analyses of 14 members of this family from various metazoans suggest that Xenopus NO29 is a candidate ortholog of human and mouse NPM3, and they further group both proteins closer with the nucleoplasmins than with the nucleophosmins. Northern blot analysis revealed that NPM3 was strongly expressed in all 16 human tissues examined, with especially robust expression in pancreas and testis; lung displayed the lowest level of expression. An analysis of subcellular fractions of NIH3T3 cells expressing epitope-tagged NPM3 revealed that NPM3 protein was localized solely in the nucleus. Conclusions Human NPM3 is an abundant and widely expressed protein with primarily nuclear localization. These biological activities, together with its physical relationship to the chaparones nucleoplasmin and nucleophosmin, are consistent with the proposed function of NPM3 as a molecular chaperone functioning in the nucleus.

  8. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

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    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  9. Exercise training with dietary counselling increases mitochondrial chaperone expression in middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindström Jaana

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance and diabetes are associated with increased oxidative stress and impairment of cellular defence systems. Our purpose was to investigate the interaction between glucose metabolism, antioxidative capacity and heat shock protein (HSP defence in different skeletal muscle phenotypes among middle-aged obese subjects during a long-term exercise and dietary intervention. As a sub-study of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS, 22 persons with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT taking part in the intervention volunteered to give samples from the vastus lateralis muscle. Subjects were divided into two sub-groups (IGTslow and IGTfast on the basis of their baseline myosin heavy chain profile. Glucose metabolism, oxidative stress and HSP expressions were measured before and after the 2-year intervention. Results Exercise training, combined with dietary counselling, increased the expression of mitochondrial chaperones HSP60 and glucose-regulated protein 75 (GRP75 in the vastus lateralis muscle in the IGTslow group and that of HSP60 in the IGTfast group. In cytoplasmic chaperones HSP72 or HSP90 no changes took place. In the IGTslow group, a significant positive correlation between the increased muscle content of HSP60 and the oxygen radical absorbing capacity values and, in the IGTfast group, between the improved VO2max value and the increased protein expression of GRP75 were found. Serum uric acid concentrations decreased in both sub-groups and serum protein carbonyl concentrations decreased in the IGTfast group. Conclusion The 2-year intervention up-regulated mitochondrial HSP expressions in middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. These improvements, however, were not correlated directly with enhanced glucose tolerance.

  10. Augmenting brain metabolism to increase macro- and chaperone-mediated autophagy for decreasing neuronal proteotoxicity and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Ben; Klionsky, Daniel J; Wong, Esther

    2017-09-01

    Accumulation of toxic protein aggregates in the nerve cells is a hallmark of neuronal diseases and brain aging. Mechanisms to enhance neuronal surveillance to improve neuronal proteostasis have a direct impact on promoting neuronal health and forestalling age-related decline in brain function. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway pivotal for neuronal protein quality control. Different types of autophagic mechanisms participate in protein handling in neurons. Macroautophagy targets misfolded and aggregated proteins in autophagic vesicles to the lysosomes for destruction, while chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) degrades specific soluble cytosolic proteins delivered to the lysosomes by chaperones. Dysfunctions in macroautophagy and CMA contribute to proteo- and neuro-toxicity associated with neurodegeneration and aging. Thus, augmenting or preserving both autophagic mechanisms pose significant benefits in delaying physiological and pathological neuronal demises. Recently, life-style interventions that modulate metabolite ketone bodies, energy intake by caloric restriction and energy expenditure by exercise have shown to enhance both autophagy and brain health. However, to what extent these interventions affect neuronal autophagy to promote brain fitness remains largely unclear. Here, we review the functional connections of how macroautophagy and CMA are affected by ketone bodies, caloric restriction and exercise in the context of neurodegeneration. A concomitant assessment of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is performed to reveal the conserved nature of such autophagic responses to substrate perturbations. In doing so, we provide novel insights and integrated evidence for a potential adjuvant therapeutic strategy to intervene in the neuronal decline in neurodegenerative diseases by controlling both macroautophagy and CMA fluxes favorably. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A genome-scale proteomic screen identifies a role for DnaK in chaperoning of polar autotransporters in Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Anuradha; Fixen, Kathryn R; Gray, Andrew N; Niki, Hironori; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2009-10-01

    Autotransporters are outer membrane proteins that are widely distributed among gram-negative bacteria. Like other autotransporters, the Shigella autotransporter IcsA, which is required for actin assembly during infection, is secreted at the bacterial pole. In the bacterial cytoplasm, IcsA localizes to poles and potential cell division sites independent of the cell division protein FtsZ. To identify bacterial proteins involved in the targeting of IcsA to the pole in the bacterial cytoplasm, we screened a genome-scale library of Escherichia coli proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for those that displayed a localization pattern similar to that of IcsA-GFP in cells that lack functional FtsZ using a strain carrying a temperature-sensitive ftsZ allele. For each protein that mimicked the localization of IcsA-GFP, we tested whether IcsA localization was dependent on the presence of the protein. Although these approaches did not identify a polar receptor for IcsA, the cytoplasmic chaperone DnaK both mimicked IcsA localization at elevated temperatures as a GFP fusion and was required for the localization of IcsA to the pole in the cytoplasm of E. coli. DnaK was also required for IcsA secretion at the pole in Shigella flexneri. The localization of DnaK-GFP to poles and potential cell division sites was dependent on elevated growth temperature and independent of the presence of IcsA or functional FtsZ; native DnaK was found to be enhanced at midcell and the poles. A second Shigella autotransporter, SepA, also required DnaK for secretion, consistent with a role of DnaK more generally in the chaperoning of autotransporter proteins in the bacterial cytoplasm.

  12. A copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase that confers three types of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase activity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiung-Chih; Lee, Wen-Chi; Guo, Wen-Yu; Pan, Shu-Mei; Chen, Lih-Jen; Li, Hsou-Min; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2005-09-01

    The copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase (CCS) has been identified as a key factor integrating copper into copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), only one putative CCS gene (AtCCS, At1g12520) has been identified. The predicted AtCCS polypeptide contains three distinct domains: a central domain, flanked by an ATX1-like domain, and a C-terminal domain. The ATX1-like and C-terminal domains contain putative copper-binding motifs. We have investigated the function of this putative AtCCS gene and shown that a cDNA encoding the open reading frame predicted by The Arabidopsis Information Resource complemented only the cytosolic and peroxisomal CuZnSOD activities in the Atccs knockout mutant, which has lost all CuZnSOD activities. However, a longer AtCCS cDNA, as predicted by the Munich Information Centre for Protein Sequences and encoding an extra 66 amino acids at the N terminus, could restore all three, including the chloroplastic CuZnSOD activities in the Atccs mutant. The extra 66 amino acids were shown to direct the import of AtCCS into chloroplasts. Our results indicated that one AtCCS gene was responsible for the activation of all three types of CuZnSOD activity. In addition, a truncated AtCCS, containing only the central and C-terminal domains without the ATX1-like domain failed to restore any CuZnSOD activity in the Atccs mutant. This result indicates that the ATX1-like domain is essential for the copper chaperone function of AtCCS in planta.

  13. A Copper Chaperone for Superoxide Dismutase That Confers Three Types of Copper/Zinc Superoxide Dismutase Activity in Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiung-Chih; Lee, Wen-Chi; Guo, Wen-Yu; Pan, Shu-Mei; Chen, Lih-Jen; Li, Hsou-min; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2005-01-01

    The copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase (CCS) has been identified as a key factor integrating copper into copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), only one putative CCS gene (AtCCS, At1g12520) has been identified. The predicted AtCCS polypeptide contains three distinct domains: a central domain, flanked by an ATX1-like domain, and a C-terminal domain. The ATX1-like and C-terminal domains contain putative copper-binding motifs. We have investigated the function of this putative AtCCS gene and shown that a cDNA encoding the open reading frame predicted by The Arabidopsis Information Resource complemented only the cytosolic and peroxisomal CuZnSOD activities in the Atccs knockout mutant, which has lost all CuZnSOD activities. However, a longer AtCCS cDNA, as predicted by the Munich Information Centre for Protein Sequences and encoding an extra 66 amino acids at the N terminus, could restore all three, including the chloroplastic CuZnSOD activities in the Atccs mutant. The extra 66 amino acids were shown to direct the import of AtCCS into chloroplasts. Our results indicated that one AtCCS gene was responsible for the activation of all three types of CuZnSOD activity. In addition, a truncated AtCCS, containing only the central and C-terminal domains without the ATX1-like domain failed to restore any CuZnSOD activity in the Atccs mutant. This result indicates that the ATX1-like domain is essential for the copper chaperone function of AtCCS in planta. PMID:16126858

  14. Chaperone patterns in vernal keratoconjunctivitis are distinctive of cell and Hsp type and are modified by inflammatory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, A; Tarricone, E; Corrao, S; Alaibac, M; Corso, A J; Zavan, B; Venier, P; Conway de Macario, E; Macario, A J L; Di Stefano, A; Cappello, F; Brun, P

    2016-03-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a severe ocular allergy with pathogenic mechanism poorly understood and no efficacious treatment. The aims of the study were to determine quantities and distribution of Hsp chaperones in the conjunctiva of VKC patients and assess their levels in conjunctival epithelial and fibroblast cultures exposed to inflammatory stimuli. Hsp10, Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, Hsp105, and Hsp110 were determined in conjunctiva biopsies from nine patients and nine healthy age-matched normal subjects, using immunomorphology and qPCR. Conjunctival epithelial cells and fibroblasts were cultured and stimulated with IL-1β, histamine, IL-4, TNF-α, or UV-B irradiation, and changes in Hsp levels were determined by Western blotting. Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90 levels increased in the patients' conjunctiva, whereas Hsp10, Hsp60, Hsp100, and Hsp105 did not. Double immunofluorescence demonstrated colocalization of Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90 with CD68 and tryptase. Testing of cultured conjunctival cells revealed an increase in the levels of Hsp27 in fibroblasts stimulated with IL-4; Hsp40 in epithelial cells stimulated with IL-4 and TNF-α and in fibroblasts stimulated with IL-4, TNF-α, and IL-1β; Hsp70 in epithelial cells stimulated with histamine and IL-4; and Hsp90 in fibroblasts stimulated with IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-4. UV-B did not induce changes. VKC conjunctiva displays distinctive quantitative patterns of Hsps as compared with healthy controls. Cultured conjunctival cells respond to cytokines and inflammatory stimuli with changes in the Hsps quantitative patterns. The data suggest that interaction between the chaperoning and the immune systems drives disease progression. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  16. Methylation-regulated decommissioning of multimeric PP2A complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cheng-Guo; Zheng, Aiping; Jiang, Li; Rowse, Michael; Stanevich, Vitali; Chen, Hui; Li, Yitong; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Johnson, Benjamin; Gu, Ting-Jia; Liu, Zuojia; Xing, Yongna

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic assembly/disassembly of signaling complexes are crucial for cellular functions. Specialized latency and activation chaperones control the biogenesis of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzymes that contain a common scaffold and catalytic subunits and a variable regulatory subunit. Here we show that the butterfly-shaped TIPRL (TOR signaling pathway regulator) makes highly integrative multibranching contacts with the PP2A catalytic subunit, selective for the unmethylated tail and perturbing/inactivating the phosphatase active site. TIPRL also makes unusual wobble contacts with the scaffold subunit, allowing TIPRL, but not the overlapping regulatory subunits, to tolerate disease-associated PP2A mutations, resulting in reduced holoenzyme assembly and enhanced inactivation of mutant PP2A. Strikingly, TIPRL and the latency chaperone, α4, coordinate to disassemble active holoenzymes into latent PP2A, strictly controlled by methylation. Our study reveals a mechanism for methylation-responsive inactivation and holoenzyme disassembly, illustrating the complexity of regulation/signaling, dynamic complex disassembly, and disease mutations in cancer and intellectual disability.

  17. Crystal structure of a TAPBPR–MHC I complex reveals the mechanism of peptide editing in antigen presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiansheng; Natarajan, Kannan; Boyd, Lisa F.; Morozov, Giora I.; Mage, Michael G.; Margulies, David H. (NIH); (Hebrew)

    2017-10-12

    Central to CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity is the recognition of peptide–major histocompatibility complex class I (p–MHC I) proteins displayed by antigen-presenting cells. Chaperone-mediated loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I is a key step in the MHC I antigen presentation pathway. However, the structure of MHC I with a chaperone that facilitates peptide loading has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of MHC I in complex with the peptide editor TAPBPR (TAP-binding protein–related), a tapasin homolog. TAPBPR remodels the peptide-binding groove of MHC I, resulting in the release of low-affinity peptide. Changes include groove relaxation, modifications of key binding pockets, and domain adjustments. This structure captures a peptide-receptive state of MHC I and provides insights into the mechanism of peptide editing by TAPBPR and, by analogy, tapasin.

  18. One out of four: HspL but no other small heat shock protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens acts as efficient virulence-promoting VirB8 chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Long Tsai

    Full Text Available Alpha-crystallin-type small heat shock proteins (sHsps are ubiquitously distributed in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Four sHsp genes named hspL, hspC, hspAT1, and hspAT2 were identified in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a plant pathogenic bacterium capable of unique interkingdom DNA transfer via type IV secretion system (T4SS. HspL is highly expressed in virulence-induced growth condition and functions as a VirB8 chaperone to promote T4SS-mediated DNA transfer. Here, we used genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate the involvement of the other three sHsps in T4SS and discovered the molecular basis underlying the dominant function of HspL in promoting T4SS function. While single deletion of hspL but no other sHsp gene reduced T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis efficiency, additional deletion of other sHsp genes in the hspL deletion background caused synergistic effects in the virulence phenotypes. This is correlated with the high induction of hspL and only modest increase of hspC, hspAT1, and hspAT2 at their mRNA and protein abundance in virulence-induced growth condition. Interestingly, overexpression of any single sHsp gene alone in the quadruple mutant caused increased T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis. Thermal aggregation protecting assays in vitro indicated that all four sHsps exhibit chaperone activity for the model substrate citrate synthase but only HspL functions as efficient chaperone for VirB8. The higher VirB8 chaperone activity of HspL was also demonstrated in vivo, in which lower amounts of HspL than other sHsps were sufficient in maintaining VirB8 homeostasis in A. tumefaciens. Domain swapping between HspL and HspAT2 indicated that N-terminal, central alpha-crystallin, and C-terminal domains of HspL all contribute to HspL function as an efficient VirB8 chaperone. Taken together, we suggest that the dominant role of HspL in promoting T4SS function is based on its higher expression in virulence

  19. A New Glucocerebrosidase Chaperone Reduces α-Synuclein and Glycolipid Levels in iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons from Patients with Gaucher Disease and Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Borger, Daniel K; Moaven, Nima; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Rogers, Steven A; Patnaik, Samarjit; Schoenen, Frank J; Westbroek, Wendy; Zheng, Wei; Sullivan, Patricia; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Khaliq, Zayd M; Lopez, Grisel J; Goldstein, David S; Ory, Daniel S; Marugan, Juan; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-07-13

    Among the known genetic risk factors for Parkinson disease, mutations in GBA1, the gene responsible for the lysosomal disorder Gaucher disease, are the most common. This genetic link has directed attention to the role of the lysosome in the pathogenesis of parkinsonism. To study how glucocerebrosidase impacts parkinsonism and to evaluate new therapeutics, we generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from four patients with Type 1 (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, two with and two without parkinsonism, and one patient with Type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, and differentiated them into macrophages and dopaminergic neurons. These cells exhibited decreased glucocerebrosidase activity and stored the glycolipid substrates glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, demonstrating their similarity to patients with Gaucher disease. Dopaminergic neurons from patients with Type 2 and Type 1 Gaucher disease with parkinsonism had reduced dopamine storage and dopamine transporter reuptake. Levels of α-synuclein, a protein present as aggregates in Parkinson disease and related synucleinopathies, were selectively elevated in neurons from the patients with parkinsonism or Type 2 Gaucher disease. The cells were then treated with NCGC607, a small-molecule noninhibitory chaperone of glucocerebrosidase identified by high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry structure optimization. This compound successfully chaperoned the mutant enzyme, restored glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels, and reduced glycolipid storage in both iPSC-derived macrophages and dopaminergic neurons, indicating its potential for treating neuronopathic Gaucher disease. In addition, NCGC607 reduced α-synuclein levels in dopaminergic neurons from the patients with parkinsonism, suggesting that noninhibitory small-molecule chaperones of glucocerebrosidase may prove useful for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Because GBA1 mutations are the most common genetic risk factor for

  20. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245 gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates. PMID:23441204

  1. Conformational Analysis of a High-Mannose-Type Oligosaccharide Displaying Glucosyl Determinant Recognised by Molecular Chaperones Using NMR-Validated Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Kajino, Megumi; Yanaka, Saeko; Zhu, Tong; Yagi, Hirokazu; Satoh, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kato, Koichi

    2017-02-16

    Exploration of the conformational spaces of flexible oligosaccharides is essential to gain deeper insights into their functional mechanisms. Here we characterised dynamic conformation of a high-mannose-type dodecasaccharide with a terminal glucose residue, a critical determinant recognised by molecular chaperones. The dodecasaccharide was prepared by our developed chemoenzymatic technique, which uses (13) C labelling and lanthanide tagging to detect conformation-dependent paramagnetic effects by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR-validated molecular dynamics simulation produced the dynamic conformational ensemble of the dodecasaccharide. This determined its spatial distribution as well as the glycosidic linkage conformation of the terminal glucose determinant. Moreover, comparison of our results with previously reported crystallographic data indicates that the chaperone binding to its target oligosaccharides involves an induced-fit mechanism. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Rapid preparation of (3R,4S,5R) polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine-based libraries to discover a pharmacological chaperone for treatment of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hon; Yun, Wen-Yi; Li, Huang-Yi; Hu, Jia-Ming

    2017-01-27

    The rapid discovery of a pharmacological chaperone toward human α-Gal A for the treatment of Fabry disease is described. Two polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines with the (3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern underwent rapid substituent diversity by conjugating the primary aminomethyl moiety of each with a variety of carboxylic acids to generate two libraries (2 × 60 members). Our bioevaluation results showed one member with the (2R,3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern and bearing a 5-cyclohexylpentanoyl group as a substituent moiety possessed sufficient chaperoning capability to rescue α-Gal A activity in the lymphocyte of the N215S Fabry patient-derived cell line and other α-Gal A mutants in COS7 cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norais, Cédric [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ecole Polytechnic, Paaiseau (France); Servant, Pascale [Univ. of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); National Center of Scientific Research, Orsay (France); Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire [Univ. of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); National Center of Scientific Research, Orsay (France); Coureux, Pierre-Damien [Ecole Polytechnic, Paaiseau (France); Ithurbide, Solenne [Univ. of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); National Center of Scientific Research, Orsay (France); Vannier, Françoise [Univ. of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); National Center of Scientific Research, Orsay (France); Guerin, Philippe P. [French Alternatives Energy Commission (France); Dulberger, Charles L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Satyshur, Kenneth A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Keck, James L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Armengaud, Jean [French Alternatives Energy Commission (France); Cox, Michael M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sommer, Suzanne [Univ. of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); National Center of Scientific Research, Orsay (France)

    2013-02-18

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates.

  4. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 protein, a DdrB partner homologous to YbjN proteins and reminiscent of type III secretion system chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Norais

    Full Text Available The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245 gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates.

  5. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  6. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paço

    Full Text Available The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials. The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants

  7. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

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    Carmela Garcia-Doval

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala, in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396 consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition.

  8. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition. PMID:26670244

  9. RPS3a over-expressed in HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma enhances the HBx-induced NF-κB signaling via its novel chaperoning function.

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    Keo-Heun Lim

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is one of the major causes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx is known to play a key role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Several cellular proteins have been reported to be over-expressed in HBV-associated HCC tissues, but their role in the HBV-mediated oncogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the effect of the over-expressed cellular protein, a ribosomal protein S3a (RPS3a, on the HBx-induced NF-κB signaling as a critical step for HCC development. The enhancement of HBx-induced NF-κB signaling by RPS3a was investigated by its ability to translocate NF-κB (p65 into the nucleus and the knock-down analysis of RPS3a. Notably, further study revealed that the enhancement of NF-κB by RPS3a is mediated by its novel chaperoning activity toward physiological HBx. The over-expression of RPS3a significantly increased the solubility of highly aggregation-prone HBx. This chaperoning function of RPS3a for HBx is closely correlated with the enhanced NF-κB activity by RPS3a. In addition, the mutational study of RPS3a showed that its N-terminal domain (1-50 amino acids is important for the chaperoning function and interaction with HBx. The results suggest that RPS3a, via extra-ribosomal chaperoning function for HBx, contributes to virally induced oncogenesis by enhancing HBx-induced NF-κB signaling pathway.

  10. Changed distribution pattern of the constitutive rather than the inducible HSP70 chaperone in neuromelanin-containing neurones of the Parkinsonian midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, G; Bol, J G J M; Wang, X; Boekel, A; Bennett, M C; Chase, T N; Drukarch, B

    2006-04-01

    Aberrant protein aggregation has been recognized as an important factor in the degeneration of melanized dopaminergic neurones in Parkinson's disease (PD). The constitutive (HSP73) and (heat)-inducible (HSP72) proteins of the heat shock 70 family form a major defence system against pathological protein aggregation. However, the distribution patterns of these chaperones in nigral neuromelanin-laden neurones are largely unknown. The present study determined the distribution of HSP72 and HSP73 in control and Parkinsonian substantia nigra, using immunohistochemistry. In the neuromelanin-laden neurones of controls, HSP72 was nondetectable, whereas HSP73 was weakly expressed in both the cytosol and the nucleus. Surprisingly, in PD subjects, marked nuclear HSP73, but not HSP72 immunoreactivity was observed, while cytosolic immunoreactivity of the two chaperones resembled the labelling pattern observed in controls. Furthermore, HSP73 immunoreactivity was observed in a subset of the Lewy bodies (LBs) detected in the substantia nigra of PD subjects, whereas only few of these LBs were labelled with HSP72. Interestingly, HSP72 and to a lesser extent HSP73 immunoreactivity was much stronger in nonmelanized neurones as compared with melanized neurones in this area. Thus, we conclude that the distribution pattern of HSP73 rather than HSP72 is changed in the nigral neuromelanin-laden neurones of PD subjects as compared with control subjects. The impaired ability of aged, dopaminergic neurones to express high levels of chaperones, may contribute to the preferential vulnerability of the latter cells in PD.

  11. Characterization and Structure of a Zn[superscript 2+] and [2Fe-2S]-containing Copper Chaperone from Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazinsky, Matthew H.; LeMoine, Benjamin; Orofino, Maria; Davydov, Roman; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Arguello, Jose M.; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (Worcester); (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    Bacterial CopZ proteins deliver copper to P{sub 1B}-type Cu{sup +}-ATPases that are homologous to the human Wilson and Menkes disease proteins. The genome of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus encodes a putative CopZ copper chaperone that contains an unusual cysteine-rich N-terminal domain of 130 amino acids in addition to a C-terminal copper binding domain with a conserved CXXC motif. The N-terminal domain (CopZ-NT) is homologous to proteins found only in extremophiles and is the only such protein that is fused to a copper chaperone. Surprisingly, optical, electron paramagnetic resonance, and x-ray absorption spectroscopic data indicate the presence of a [2Fe-2S] cluster in CopZ-NT. The intact CopZ protein binds two copper ions, one in each domain. The 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of CopZ-NT reveals that the [2Fe-2S] cluster is housed within a novel fold and that the protein also binds a zinc ion at a four-cysteine site. CopZ can deliver Cu{sup +} to the A. fulgidus CopA N-terminal metal binding domain and is capable of reducing Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +}. This unique fusion of a redox-active domain with a CXXC-containing copper chaperone domain is relevant to the evolution of copper homeostatic mechanisms and suggests new models for copper trafficking.

  12. Bag1 Co-chaperone Promotes TRC8 E3 Ligase-dependent Degradation of Misfolded Human Ether a Go-Go-related Gene (hERG) Potassium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantouche, Christine; Williamson, Brittany; Valinsky, William C; Solomon, Joshua; Shrier, Alvin; Young, Jason C

    2017-02-10

    Cardiac long QT syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in the human ether a go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel, many of which cause misfolding and degradation at the endoplasmic reticulum instead of normal trafficking to the cell surface. The Hsc70/Hsp70 chaperones assist the folding of the hERG cytosolic domains. Here, we demonstrate that the Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Bag1 promotes hERG degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system at the endoplasmic reticulum to regulate hERG levels and channel activity. Dissociation of hERG complexes containing Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP requires the interaction of Bag1 with Hsp70, but this does not involve the Bag1 ubiquitin-like domain. The interaction with Bag1 then shifts hERG degradation to the membrane-anchored E3 ligase TRC8 and its E2-conjugating enzyme Ube2g2, as determined by siRNA screening. TRC8 interacts through the transmembrane region with hERG and decreases hERG functional expression. TRC8 also mediates degradation of the misfolded hERG-G601S disease mutant, but pharmacological stabilization of the mutant structure prevents degradation. Our results identify TRC8 as a previously unknown Hsp70-independent quality control E3 ligase for hERG. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  14. Evidence of a Cell Surface Role for Hsp90 Complex Proteins Mediating Neuroblast Migration in the Subventricular Zone

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    Leo M. Miyakoshi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In most mammalian brains, the subventricular zone (SVZ is a germinative layer that maintains neurogenic activity throughout adulthood. Neuronal precursors arising from this region migrate through the rostral migratory stream (RMS and reach the olfactory bulbs where they differentiate and integrate into the local circuitry. Recently, studies have shown that heat shock proteins have an important role in cancer cell migration and blocking Hsp90 function was shown to hinder cell migration in the developing cerebellum. In this work, we hypothesize that chaperone complexes may have an important function regulating migration of neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone. Proteins from the Hsp90 complex are present in the postnatal SVZ as well as in the RMS. Using an in vitro SVZ explant model, we have demonstrated the expression of Hsp90 and Hop/STI1 by migrating neuroblasts. Treatment with antibodies against Hsp90 and co-chaperone Hop/STI1, as well as Hsp90 and Hsp70 inhibitors hinder neuroblast chain migration. Time-lapse videomicroscopy analysis revealed that cell motility and average migratory speed was decreased after exposure to both antibodies and inhibitors. Antibodies recognizing Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hop/STI1 were found bound to the membranes of cells from primary SVZ cultures and biotinylation assays demonstrated that Hsp70 and Hop/STI1 could be found on the external leaflet of neuroblast membranes. The latter could also be detected in conditioned medium samples obtained from cultivated SVZ cells. Our results suggest that chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, and co-chaperone Hop/STI1, components of the Hsp90 complex, regulate SVZ neuroblast migration in a concerted manner through an extracellular mechanism.

  15. The Survival of Motor Neuron Protein Acts as a Molecular Chaperone for mRNP Assembly

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    Paul G. Donlin-Asp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a motor neuron disease caused by reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN protein. SMN is part of a multiprotein complex that facilitates the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. SMN has also been found to associate with mRNA-binding proteins, but the nature of this association was unknown. Here, we have employed a combination of biochemical and advanced imaging methods to demonstrate that SMN promotes the molecular interaction between IMP1 protein and the 3′ UTR zipcode region of β-actin mRNA, leading to assembly of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP complexes that associate with the cytoskeleton to facilitate trafficking. We have identified defects in mRNP assembly in cells and tissues from SMA disease models and patients that depend on the SMN Tudor domain and explain the observed deficiency in mRNA localization and local translation, providing insight into SMA pathogenesis as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP-assembly disorder.

  16. Over-expression of the molecular chaperone Hsp104 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in the malpartition of [PSI+] propagons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Frederique; Cox, Brian S; Wongwigkarn, Jintana; Naeimi, Wesley R; Tuite, Mick F

    2017-04-01

    The ability of a yeast cell to propagate [PSI + ], the prion form of the Sup35 protein, is dependent on the molecular chaperone Hsp104. Inhibition of Hsp104 function in yeast cells leads to a failure to generate new propagons, the molecular entities necessary for [PSI + ] propagation in dividing cells and they get diluted out as cells multiply. Over-expression of Hsp104 also leads to [PSI + ] prion loss and this has been assumed to arise from the complete disaggregation of the Sup35 prion polymers. However, in conditions of Hsp104 over-expression in [PSI + ] cells we find no release of monomers from Sup35 polymers, no monomerization of aggregated Sup35 which is not accounted for by the proportion of prion-free [psi - ] cells present, no change in the molecular weight of Sup35-containing SDS-resistant polymers and no significant decrease in average propagon numbers in the population as a whole. Furthermore, they show that over-expression of Hsp104 does not interfere with the incorporation of newly synthesised Sup35 into polymers, nor with the multiplication of propagons following their depletion in numbers while growing in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride. Rather, they present evidence that over-expression of Hsp104 causes malpartition of [PSI + ] propagons between mother and daughter cells in a sub-population of cells during cell division thereby generating prion-free [psi - ] cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sulforaphane Potentiates the Efficacy of 17-Allylamino 17-Demethoxygeldanamycin Against Pancreatic Cancer Through Enhanced Abrogation of Hsp90 Chaperone Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Tao; Schwartz, Steven J.; Sun, Duxin

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), an essential molecular chaperone that regulates the stability of a wide range of oncogenic proteins, is a promising target for cancer therapeutics. We investigated the combination efficacy and potential mechanisms of sulforaphane, a dietary component from broccoli and broccoli sprouts, and 17-allylamino 17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an Hsp90 inhibitor, in pancreatic cancer. MTS assay demonstrated that sulforaphane sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to 17-AAG in vitro. Caspase-3 was activated to 6.4-fold in response to simultaneous treatment with sulforaphane and 17-AAG, whereas 17-AAG alone induced caspase-3 activity to 2-fold compared to control. ATP binding assay and coimmunoprecipitation revealed that sulforaphane disrupted Hsp90-p50Cdc37 interaction, whereas 17-AAG inhibited ATP binding to Hsp90. Concomitant use of sulforaphane and 17-AAG synergistically downregulated Hsp90 client proteins in Mia Paca-2 cells. Co-administration of sulforaphane and 17-AAG in pancreatic cancer xenograft model led to more than 70% inhibition of the tumor growth, whereas 17-AAG alone only suppressed the tumor growth by 50%. Our data suggest that sulforaphane potentiates the efficacy of 17-AAG against pancreatic cancer through enhanced abrogation of Hsp90 function. These findings provide a rationale for further evaluation of broccoli/broccoli sprout preparations combined with 17-AAG for better efficacy and lower dose-limiting toxicity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21875325

  18. Ric-8A, a G protein chaperone with nucleotide exchange activity induces long-range secondary structure changes in Gα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Zeng, Baisen; Thomas, Celestine J; Bothner, Brian; Sprang, Stephen R

    2016-12-23

    Cytosolic Ric-8A has guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity and is a chaperone for several classes of heterotrimeric G protein α subunits in vertebrates. Using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange-Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS) we show that Ric-8A disrupts the secondary structure of the Gα Ras-like domain that girds the guanine nucleotide-binding site, and destabilizes the interface between the Gαi1 Ras and helical domains, allowing domain separation and nucleotide release. These changes are largely reversed upon binding GTP and dissociation of Ric-8A. HDX-MS identifies a potential Gα interaction site in Ric-8A. Alanine scanning reveals residues crucial for GEF activity within that sequence. HDX confirms that, like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Ric-8A binds the C-terminus of Gα. In contrast to GPCRs, Ric-8A interacts with Switches I and II of Gα and possibly at the Gα domain interface. These extensive interactions provide both allosteric and direct catalysis of GDP unbinding and release and GTP binding.

  19. Redox signaling via the molecular chaperone BiP protects cells against endoplasmic reticulum-derived oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Pareja, Kristeen A; Kaiser, Chris A; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has emerged as a potentially significant source of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies suggest that levels of ROS generated as a byproduct of oxidative folding rival those produced by mitochondrial respiration. Mechanisms that protect cells against oxidant accumulation within the ER have begun to be elucidated yet many questions still remain regarding how cells prevent oxidant-induced damage from ER folding events. Here we report a new role for a central well-characterized player in ER homeostasis as a direct sensor of ER redox imbalance. Specifically we show that a conserved cysteine in the lumenal chaperone BiP is susceptible to oxidation by peroxide, and we demonstrate that oxidation of this conserved cysteine disrupts BiP's ATPase cycle. We propose that alteration of BiP activity upon oxidation helps cells cope with disruption to oxidative folding within the ER during oxidative stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03496.001 PMID:25053742

  20. Degradation of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) is mediated by both chaperone-mediated autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Wang, Pin; Song, Weihong; Sun, Xiulian

    2009-10-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), a gene identified from the critical region of Down syndrome, has been implied in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). RCAN1 expression was shown to be increased in AD brains; however, the mechanism of RCAN1 gene regulation is not well defined. The present study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanism of RCAN1 protein degradation. In addition to being degraded through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, we found that lysosomal inhibition markedly increased RCAN1 protein expression in a time- and dosage-dependent manner. Inhibition of macroautophagy reduced RCAN1 expression, indicating that RCAN1 degradation is not through a macroautophagy pathway. However, disruption of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) increased RCAN1 expression. Two CMA recognition motifs were identified in RCAN1 protein to mediate its degradation through a CMA-lysosome pathway. A promoter assay further demonstrated that inhibition of RCAN1 degradation in cells reduced calcineurin-NFAT activity. Dysfunctions of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, elucidation of RCAN1 degradation by a ubiquitin proteasome pathway and CMA-lysosome pathway in the present study may greatly advance our understanding of AD pathogenesis.

  1. Periplasmic expression of soluble single chain T cell receptors is rescued by the chaperone FkpA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogen Bjarne

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient expression systems exist for antibody (Ab molecules, which allow for characterization of large numbers of individual Ab variants. In contrast, such expression systems have been lacking for soluble T cell receptors (TCRs. Attempts to generate bacterial systems have generally resulted in low yields and material which is prone to aggregation and proteolysis. Here we present an optimized periplasmic bacterial expression system for soluble single chain (sc TCRs. Results The effect of 1 over-expression of the periplasmic chaperon FkpA, 2 culture conditions and 3 molecular design was investigated. Elevated levels of FkpA allowed periplasmic soluble scTCR expression, presumably by preventing premature aggregation and inclusion body formation. Periplasmic expression enables disulphide bond formation, which is a prerequisite for the scTCR to reach its correct fold. It also enables quick and easy recovery of correctly folded protein without the need for time-consuming downstream processing. Expression without IPTG induction further improved the periplasmic expression yield, while addition of sucrose to the growth medium showed little effect. Shaker flask yield of mg levels of active purified material was obtained. The Vαβ domain orientation was far superior to the Vβα domain orientation regarding monomeric yield of functionally folded molecules. Conclusion The general expression regime presented here allows for rapid production of soluble scTCRs and is applicable for 1 high yield recovery sufficient for biophysical characterization and 2 high throughput screening of such molecules following molecular engineering.

  2. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-11-29

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  3. Chemical chaperone 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA) reduces hepatocellular lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity through induction of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissar, Ashraf U; Sharma, Love; Mudasir, Malik A; Nazir, Lone A; Umar, Sheikh A; Sharma, Parduman R; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Tasduq, Sheikh A

    2017-09-01

    Defective autophagy has been linked to lipotoxicity in several cellular models. We aimed to investigate autophagy in lipid-stimulated hepatoma (Huh7) cells and tested whether 4-phenyl butyric acid (4-PBA), a chemical chaperone, has a beneficial role in hepatic fat accumulation and lipotoxicity. We report that long-term (24 h) exposure of hepatocytes to palmitate block autophagic flux that leads to lipid accumulation and cell death. Western blotting analysis showed increased accumulation of SQSTM1/p62, and decreased expression of Beclin1 and Atg7 in palmitate-treated cells. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) in palmitate-treated cells neither increased SQSTMI/p62 accumulation nor cell death, thus suggesting complete blockade of autophagy by palmitate. 4-PBA reduced lipid accumulation and cell death that were associated with restoration of autophagy. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Atg7 and presence of autophagy inhibitors, 3-MA and chloroquine, resulted in the decrease in lipid-lowering effect of 4-PBA, suggesting that 4-PBA mediates its lipid-lowering effect via autophagy. Apoptotic parameters, including altered Bcl2:Bax ratio and PARP1 cleavage induced by palmitate, were improved by 4-PBA. Our results indicate that palmitate impairs autophagy and increases lipid accumulation in Huh7 cells, whereas 4-PBA plays a protective role in lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity through activation of autophagy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. The emerging role of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase chaperones in tau oligomerization, amyloid processing, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Laura J; Baker, Jeremy D; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Dickey, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases), a unique family of molecular chaperones, regulate protein folding at proline residues. These residues are abundant within intrinsically disordered proteins, like the microtubule-associated protein tau. Tau has been shown to become hyperphosphorylated and accumulate as one of the two main pathological hallmarks in Alzheimer's disease, the other being amyloid beta (Ab). PPIases, including Pin1, FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 52, FKBP51, and FKBP12, have been shown to interact with and regulate tau biology. This interaction is particularly important given the numerous proline-directed phosphorylation sites found on tau and the role phosphorylation has been found to play in pathogenesis. This regulation then affects downstream aggregation and oligomerization of tau. However, many PPIases have yet to be explored for their effects on tau biology, despite the high likelihood of interaction based on proline content. Moreover, Pin1, FKBP12, FKBP52, cyclophilin (Cyp) A, CypB, and CypD have been shown to also regulate Ab production or the toxicity associated with Ab pathology. Therefore, PPIases directly and indirectly regulate pathogenic protein multimerization in Alzheimer's disease and represent a family rich in targets for modulating the accumulation and toxicity. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Establishment of a novel fluorescence-based method to evaluate chaperone-mediated autophagy in a single neuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Seki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA is a selective autophagy-lysosome protein degradation pathway. The role of CMA in normal neuronal functions and in neural disease pathogenesis remains unclear, in part because there is no available method to monitor CMA activity at the single-cell level. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sought to establish a single-cell monitoring method by visualizing translocation of CMA substrates from the cytosol to lysosomes using the HaloTag (HT system. GAPDH, a CMA substrate, was fused to HT (GAPDH-HT; this protein accumulated in the lysosomes of HeLa cells and cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs after labeling with fluorescent dye-conjugated HT ligand. Lysosomal accumulation was enhanced by treatments that activate CMA and prevented by siRNA-mediated knockdown of LAMP2A, a lysosomal receptor for CMA, and by treatments that inactivate CMA. These results suggest that lysosomal accumulation of GAPDH-HT reflects CMA activity. Using this method, we revealed that mutant γPKC, which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14, decreased CMA activity in cultured PCs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In the present study, we established a novel fluorescent-based method to evaluate CMA activity in a single neuron. This novel method should be useful and valuable for evaluating the role of CMA in various neuronal functions and neural disease pathogenesis.

  6. Chlamydia pneumoniae exploits adipocyte lipid chaperone FABP4 to facilitate fat mobilization and intracellular growth in murine adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenna, Nirwana Fitriani; Kurihara, Yusuke; Chou, Bin; Ishii, Kazunari; Soejima, Toshinori; Itoh, Ryota; Shimizu, Akinori; Ichinohe, Takeshi; Hiromatsu, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), a cytosolic lipid chaperone predominantly expressed in adipocytes and macrophages, modulates lipid fluxes, trafficking, signaling, and metabolism. Recent studies have demonstrated that FABP4 regulates metabolic and inflammatory pathways, and in mouse models its inhibition can improve type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. However, the role of FABP4 in bacterial infection, metabolic crosstalk between host and pathogen, and bacterial pathogenesis have not been studied. As an obligate intracellular pathogen, Chlamydia pneumoniae needs to obtain nutrients such as ATP and lipids from host cells. Here, we show that C. pneumoniae successfully infects and proliferates in murine adipocytes by inducing hormone sensitive lipase (HSL)-mediated lipolysis. Chemical inhibition or genetic manipulation of HSL significantly abrogated the intracellular growth of C. pneumoniae in adipocytes. Liberated free fatty acids were utilized to generate ATP via β-oxidation, which C. pneumoniae usurped for its replication. Strikingly, chemical inhibition or genetic silencing of FABP4 significantly abrogated C. pneumoniae infection-induced lipolysis and mobilization of liberated FFAs, resulting in reduced bacterial growth in adipocytes. Collectively, these results demonstrate that C. pneumoniae exploits host FABP4 to facilitate fat mobilization and intracellular replication in adipocytes. This work uncovers a novel strategy used by intracellular pathogens for acquiring energy via hijacking of the host lipid metabolism pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The co-chaperone p23 controls root development through the modulation of auxin distribution in the Arabidopsis root meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Stefano; Golin, Serena; Hardtke, Christian S; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Zottini, Michela

    2015-08-01

    Homologues of the p23 co-chaperone of HSP90 are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting conserved functions for this protein throughout evolution. Although p23 has been extensively studied in animal systems, little is known about its function in plants. In the present study, the functional characterization of the two isoforms of p23 in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported, suggesting a key role of p23 in the regulation of root development. Arabidopsis p23 mutants, for either form, show a short root length phenotype with a reduced meristem length. In the root meristem a low auxin level associated with a smaller auxin gradient was observed. A decrease in the expression levels of PIN FORMED PROTEIN (PIN)1, PIN3, and PIN7, contextually to an inefficient polar localization of PIN1, was detected. Collectively these results suggest that both Arabidopsis p23 isoforms are required for root growth, in particular in the maintenance of the root meristem, where the proteins are located. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Binary Supramolecular Gel of Achiral Azobenzene with a Chaperone Gelator: Chirality Transfer, Tuned Morphology, and Chiroptical Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lukang; Ouyang, Guanghui; Liu, Minghua

    2017-10-31

    Binary supramolecular gels based on achiral azobenzene derivatives and a chiral chaperone gelator, long-alkyl-chain-substituted L-Histidine (abbreviated as LHC18) that could assist many nongelling acids in forming gels, were investigated in order to fabricate the chiroptical gel materials in a simple way. It was found that although the carboxylic acid-terminated achiral azobenzene derivatives could not form gels in any solvents, when mixed with LHC18 they formed the co-gels and self-assembled into various morphologies ranging from nanotubes and loose nanotubes to nanosheets, depending on the substituent groups on the azobenzene moiety. The ether linkage and the number of carboxylic acid groups attached to the azobenzene moiety played important roles. Upon gel formation, the localized molecular chirality in LHC18 could be transferred to the azobenzene moiety. Combined with the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene, optically and chiroptically reversible gels were generated. It was found that the gel based on azobenzene with two carboxylic acid groups and ether linkages showed clear optical reversibility but less chiroptical reversibility, whereas the gel based on azobenzene with one carboxylic acid and an ether linkage showed both optical and chiroptical reversibility. Thus, new insights into the relationship among the molecular structures of the azobenzene, self-assembled nanostructures in the gel and the optical and chiroptical reversibility were disclosed.

  9. Inhibition of chaperone-mediated autophagy prevents glucotoxicity in the Caenorhabditis elegans mev-1 mutant by activation of the proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisermann, Dorothé Jenni; Wenzel, Uwe; Fitzenberger, Elena

    2017-02-26

    Chronic hyperglycemia is a hallmark of diabetes mellitus and the main cause of diabetes-associated complications. Increased intracellular glucose levels lead to damaged proteins and in consequence disturb cellular proteostasis. As an important contributor to the maintenance and restoration of proteostasis, autophagy mediates the lysosomal degradation of damaged proteins or entire cellular organelles. In the present study we used the stress-sensitive mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in order to assess the role of lmp-2, a homologue of the lysosome associated membrane protein type 2A, in the context of glucotoxicity, which was achieved by feeding glucose in a liquid medium. Knockdown of lmp-2 by RNA interference completely prevented the survival reduction caused by glucose under heat stress. Those effects were associated with the prevention of (1) increased lysosome formation and (2) reduction of proteasomal activity, which were observed under glucose feeding. Finally, the survival reduction due to knockdown of ubiquitin remained unaffected by the additional lmp-2 knockdown in the absence or presence of glucose. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that lmp-2, a key player in chaperone-mediated autophagy, is functional in C. elegans, too. Inhibition of lmp-2 prevents the reduction of proteasomal activity by glucose and thereby prevents also glucotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Roles of L5-7 loop in the structure and chaperone function of SsHSP14.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Yong-Hua; Yang, Bo; Xie, Ming-Quan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-03-01

    The small heat shock protein SsHSP14.1 from the hyper-thermophilic archeaon, Sulfolobus solfataricus (S. solfataricus) was able to protect proteins from thermal aggregation and prevent enzymes from heat induced inactivation. According to the 3D (dimensional) structural model of SsHSP14.1 developed by us before, the region L5-7 (β5-β7, 68-82 residues) plays an important role for the oligomerization of SsHSP14.1 and its chaperone function. Here, to validate the findings, an in-depth investigation was conducted of both the wild type SsHSP14.1 and its deletion mutant DEL75-79. With E. coli proteins and bromelain as substrate, the deletion mutant DEL75-79 can protect them from thermo-aggregating as effective as the wild protein. Interestingly, unlike the wild protein, DEL75-79 was unable to prevent bromelain and EcoRI from thermo-inactivating. Results of size exclusion HPLC showed that the oligomerization state was changed in mutant protein. This was in accordance with the changed structure and lower hydrophobicity of DEL75-79. These outcomes proved that the L5-7 loop did play a role for the oligomerizing SsHSP14.1, and that the residues 75-79 were indispensable for its function of prevent enzymes from thermo-inactivating.

  11. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone GRP78/BiP Modulates Prion Propagation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Won; Eun Kim, Gyoung; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Lee, Amy S; Hetz, Claudio; Soto, Claudio

    2017-03-23

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting several mammalian species, characterized by the accumulation of the misfolded form of the prion protein, which is followed by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). GRP78, also called BiP, is a master regulator of the UPR, reducing ER stress levels and apoptosis due to an enhancement of the cellular folding capacity. Here, we studied the role of GRP78 in prion diseases using several in vivo and in vitro approaches. Our results show that a reduction in the expression of this molecular chaperone accelerates prion pathogenesis in vivo. In addition, we observed that prion replication in cell culture was inversely related to the levels of expression of GRP78 and that both proteins interact in the cellular context. Finally, incubation of PrP Sc with recombinant GRP78 led to the dose-dependent reduction of protease-resistant PrP Sc in vitro. Our results uncover a novel role of GRP78 in reducing prion pathogenesis, suggesting that modulating its levels/activity may offer a novel opportunity for designing therapeutic approaches for these diseases. These findings may also have implications for other diseases involving the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  12. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone GRP78/BiP Modulates Prion Propagation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Won; Eun Kim, Gyoung; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Lee, Amy S.; Hetz, Claudio; Soto, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting several mammalian species, characterized by the accumulation of the misfolded form of the prion protein, which is followed by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). GRP78, also called BiP, is a master regulator of the UPR, reducing ER stress levels and apoptosis due to an enhancement of the cellular folding capacity. Here, we studied the role of GRP78 in prion diseases using several in vivo and in vitro approaches. Our results show that a reduction in the expression of this molecular chaperone accelerates prion pathogenesis in vivo. In addition, we observed that prion replication in cell culture was inversely related to the levels of expression of GRP78 and that both proteins interact in the cellular context. Finally, incubation of PrPSc with recombinant GRP78 led to the dose-dependent reduction of protease-resistant PrPSc in vitro. Our results uncover a novel role of GRP78 in reducing prion pathogenesis, suggesting that modulating its levels/activity may offer a novel opportunity for designing therapeutic approaches for these diseases. These findings may also have implications for other diseases involving the accumulation of misfolded proteins. PMID:28333162

  13. Changes in macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy, and mitochondrial metabolism in murine skeletal and cardiac muscle during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Chong, Shu Yun; Lim, Andrea; Singh, Brijesh K; Sinha, Rohit A; Salmon, Adam B; Yen, Paul M

    2017-02-26

    Aging causes a general decline in cellular metabolic activity, and function in different tissues and whole body homeostasis. However, the understanding about the metabolomic and autophagy changes in skeletal muscle and heart during aging is still limited. We thus examined markers for macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), mitochondrial quality control, as well as cellular metabolites in skeletal and cardiac muscle from young (5 months old) and aged (27 months old) mice. We found decreased autophagic degradation of p62 and increased ubiquitinated proteins in both tissues from aged mice, suggesting a decline in macroautophagy during aging. In skeletal muscle from aged mice, there also was a decline in LC3B-I conjugation to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) possibly due to decreased protein levels of ATG3 and ATG12-ATG5. The CMA markers, LAMP-2A and Hsc70, and mitochondrial turnover markers, Drp1, PINK1 and PGC1α also were decreased. Metabolomics analysis showed impaired β-oxidation in heart of aged mice, whereas increased branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and ceramide levels were found in skeletal muscle of aged mice that in turn, may contribute to insulin resistance in muscle. Taken together, our studies showed similar declines in macroautophagy but distinct effects on CMA, mitochondrial turnover, and metabolic dysfunction in muscle vs. heart during aging.

  14. Chaperone-like activity of β-casein and its effect on residual in vitro activity of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria; Olsen, Karsten; Sørensen, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    , as similar experiment with bovine serum albumin resulted in residual activity of horseradish peroxidase that was significantly lower than without any addition. The effect of β-casein on HRP disappears when pH is below the isoelectric point of β-casein. It was also proven by light scattering studies that β......In this study, the residual activity horseradish peroxidase was used as a novel marker of chaperone-like activity of β-casein under elevated temperature. It was shown that β-casein does affect residual activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) depending on the concentration and molar ratio between...... proteins. Incubating HRP (0.1 mg mL-1) for 10 min at 72 °C resulted in residual activity of 59 ± 5%, while addition of 1 mg mL-1 β-casein resulted in increase in residual activity up to 85 ± 1%. Increased residual activity is not merely attributed to an effect of higher total protein concentration...

  15. [Influence of cry2A sporulation-dependent promoter and molecular chaperone ORF1-ORF2 from Bacillus thuringiensis on Cry11Aa protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongxia; Zeng, Shaoling; Yuan, Meijin; Sun, Fan; Pang, Yi

    2008-05-01

    To analyze the coordination function of cry2A sporulation-dependent promoter and the enhanced expression of molecular chaperone ORF1-ORF2 to crystal protein Cry11Aa. We constructed three recombinant plasmids pHcy1, pHcy2 and pHcy4 containing cry11Aa gene. pHcy1 carried cry11Aa own promoter and p19 gene, and pHcy2 carried cry2A sporulation-dependent promoter and orf1-orf2 gene. pHcy4 inserted cry2A promoter and orf1-orf2 gene upstream pHcy1 plasmid. The recombinant plasmids were introduced into an acrystalliferous mutant 4Q7 of Bacillus thuringiensis sub sp. israelensis. We performed SDS-PAGE to analyze Cry11Aa protein expression in the recombinant Bt strains and carried out the mosquitocidal bioassay. SDS-PAGE showed that Cry11Aa protein was detected in 4Q7(pHcy1) and 4Q7(pHcy4), but not in 4Q7(pHcy2). The cry11Aa gene could not be regulated under cry2A promoter. Cry11Aa protein had a 1.25 fold expression amount in the equal volume culture of 4Q7(pHcy4) to that of 4Q7(pHcy1), which indicated that molecular chaperone ORF1-ORF2 could enhance Cry11Aa expression amount to a certain extent. Both 4Q7(pHcy1) and 4Q7(pHcy4) formed Cry11Aa crystals in a similar size and shape during sporulation under the transmission electron microscope. Their LC50s against 3rd-instar Culex quinquefasciatus were 59.33 ng/mL and 66.21 ng/mL respectively. Whether crystal protein from B. thuringiensis could successfully express might relate to the type of the used promoter and their coordination. Molecular chaperone ORF1-ORF2 could enhance Cry11Aa expression amount to a certain extent with an unknown mechanism, but did not have an effect on high mosquitocidal toxicity of Cry11Aa protein. This research might play an important role to search the best collocation between ICP promoter or chaperone gene and ICP gene and to construct high-toxic Bacillus thuringiensis engineering strain by chaperone gene.

  16. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Jyoti K.; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba; Dunny, Gary M.

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations inrctBthat reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding. IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication ofVibrio choleraeChr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that

  17. Structural basis of PP2A activation by PTPA, an ATP-dependent activation chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng; Stanevich, Vitali; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Sengupta, Rituparna; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Xing, Yongna

    2013-10-08

    Proper activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit is central for the complex PP2A regulation and is crucial for broad aspects of cellular function. The crystal structure of PP2A bound to PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) and ATPγS reveals that PTPA makes broad contacts with the structural elements surrounding the PP2A active site and the adenine moiety of ATP. PTPA-binding stabilizes the protein fold of apo-PP2A required for activation, and orients ATP phosphoryl groups to bind directly to the PP2A active site. This allows ATP to modulate the metal-binding preferences of the PP2A active site and utilize the PP2A active site for ATP hydrolysis. In vitro, ATP selectively and drastically enhances binding of endogenous catalytic metal ions, which requires ATP hydrolysis and is crucial for acquisition of pSer/Thr-specific phosphatase activity. Furthermore, both PP2A- and ATP-binding are required for PTPA function in cell proliferation and survival. Our results suggest novel mechanisms of PTPA in PP2A activation with structural economy and a unique ATP-binding pocket that could potentially serve as a specific therapeutic target.

  18. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M El Bakkouri; A Pow; A Mulichak; K Cheung; J Artz; M Amani; S Fell; T de Koning-Ward; C Goodman; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The Clpchaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clpchaperones and proteases in the humanmalariaparasitePlasmodiumfalciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clpchaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  19. Systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for production of the chemical chaperone ectoine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Judith; Schäfer, Rudolf; Kohlstedt, Michael; Harder, Björn J; Borchert, Nicole S; Stöveken, Nadine; Bremer, Erhard; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-11-15

    The stabilizing and function-preserving effects of ectoines have attracted considerable biotechnological interest up to industrial scale processes for their production. These rely on the release of ectoines from high-salinity-cultivated microbial producer cells upon an osmotic down-shock in rather complex processor configurations. There is growing interest in uncoupling the production of ectoines from the typical conditions required for their synthesis, and instead design strains that naturally release ectoines into the medium without the need for osmotic changes, since the use of high-salinity media in the fermentation process imposes notable constraints on the costs, design, and durability of fermenter systems. Here, we used a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain as a cellular chassis to establish a microbial cell factory for the biotechnological production of ectoines. The implementation of a mutant aspartokinase enzyme ensured efficient supply of L-aspartate-beta-semialdehyde, the precursor for ectoine biosynthesis. We further engineered the genome of the basic C. glutamicum strain by integrating a codon-optimized synthetic ectABCD gene cluster under expressional control of the strong and constitutive C. glutamicum tuf promoter. The resulting recombinant strain produced ectoine and excreted it into the medium; however, lysine was still found as a by-product. Subsequent inactivation of the L-lysine exporter prevented the undesired excretion of lysine while ectoine was still exported. Using the streamlined cell factory, a fed-batch process was established that allowed the production of ectoine with an overall productivity of 6.7 g L(-1) day(-1) under growth conditions that did not rely on the use of high-salinity media. The present study describes the construction of a stable microbial cell factory for recombinant production of ectoine. We successfully applied metabolic engineering strategies to optimize its synthetic production in the industrial workhorse C

  20. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is required for cell cycle exit in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Jiang, Huaqi; Nickerson, Derek W; Edgar, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite(+) reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis.

  1. The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is required for cell cycle exit in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bandura

    Full Text Available The coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for proper development. In particular, robust mechanisms exist to ensure that cells permanently exit the cell cycle upon terminal differentiation, and these include restraining the activities of both the E2F/DP transcription factor and Cyclin/Cdk kinases. However, the full complement of mechanisms necessary to restrain E2F/DP and Cyclin/Cdk activities in differentiating cells are not known. Here, we have performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster, designed to identify genes required for cell cycle exit. This screen utilized a PCNA-miniwhite(+ reporter that is highly E2F-responsive and results in a darker red eye color when crossed into genetic backgrounds that delay cell cycle exit. Mutation of Hsp83, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Hsp90, results in increased E2F-dependent transcription and ectopic cell proliferation in pupal tissues at a time when neighboring wild-type cells are postmitotic. Further, these Hsp83 mutant cells have increased Cyclin/Cdk activity and accumulate proteins normally targeted for proteolysis by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C, suggesting that APC/C function is inhibited. Indeed, reducing the gene dosage of an inhibitor of Cdh1/Fzr, an activating subunit of the APC/C that is required for timely cell cycle exit, can genetically suppress the Hsp83 cell cycle exit phenotype. Based on these data, we propose that Cdh1/Fzr is a client protein of Hsp83. Our results reveal that Hsp83 plays a heretofore unappreciated role in promoting APC/C function during cell cycle exit and suggest a mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibition could promote genomic instability and carcinogenesis.

  2. Senescent mouse cells fail to overtly regulate the HIRA histone chaperone and do not form robust Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders Greg H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a permanent growth arrest that occurs in response to cellular stressors, such as telomere shortening or activation of oncogenes. Although the process of senescence growth arrest is somewhat conserved between mouse and human cells, there are some critical differences in the molecular pathways of senescence between these two species. Recent studies in human fibroblasts have defined a cell signaling pathway that is initiated by repression of a specific Wnt ligand, Wnt2. This, in turn, activates a histone chaperone HIRA, and culminates in formation of specialized punctate domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence-Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF, that are enriched in the histone variant, macroH2A. SAHF are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. We asked whether this Wnt2-HIRA-SAHF pathway is conserved in mouse fibroblasts. Results We show that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and mouse skin fibroblasts, do not form robust punctate SAHF in response to an activated Ras oncogene or shortened telomeres. However, senescent MEFs do exhibit elevated levels of macroH2A staining throughout the nucleus as a whole. Consistent with their failure to fully activate the SAHF assembly pathway, the Wnt2-HIRA signaling axis is not overtly regulated between proliferating and senescent mouse cells. Conclusions In addition to the previously defined differences between mouse and human cells in the mechanisms and phenotypes associated with senescence, we conclude that senescent mouse and human fibroblasts also differ at the level of chromatin and the signaling pathways used to regulate chromatin. These differences between human and mouse senescence may contribute to the increased propensity of mouse fibroblasts (and perhaps other mouse cell types to become immortalized and transformed, compared to human cells.

  3. The metal chaperone Atox1 regulates the activity of the human copper transporter ATP7B by modulating domain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Yang, Nan; Bothe, Jameson; Tonelli, Marco; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Dolgova, Natalia V; Braiterman, Lelita; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-11-03

    The human transporter ATP7B delivers copper to the biosynthetic pathways and maintains copper homeostasis in the liver. Mutations in ATP7B cause the potentially fatal hepatoneurological disorder Wilson disease. The activity and intracellular localization of ATP7B are regulated by copper, but the molecular mechanism of this regulation is largely unknown. We show that the copper chaperone Atox1, which delivers copper to ATP7B, and the group of the first three metal-binding domains (MBD1-3) are central to the activity regulation of ATP7B. Atox1-Cu binding to ATP7B changes domain dynamics and interactions within the MBD1-3 group and activates ATP hydrolysis. To understand the mechanism linking Atox1-MBD interactions and enzyme activity, we have determined the MBD1-3 conformational space using small angle X-ray scattering and identified changes in MBD dynamics caused by apo-Atox1 and Atox1-Cu by solution NMR. The results show that copper transfer from Atox1 decreases domain interactions within the MBD1-3 group and increases the mobility of the individual domains. The N-terminal segment of MBD1-3 was found to interact with the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B, thus physically coupling the domains involved in copper binding and those involved in ATP hydrolysis. Taken together, the data suggest a regulatory mechanism in which Atox1-mediated copper transfer activates ATP7B by releasing inhibitory constraints through increased freedom of MBD1-3 motions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. The chaperone protein clusterin may serve as a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker for chronic spinal cord disorders in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafie, Intan N F; McLaughlin, Mark; Burchmore, Richard; Lim, Mary Ann A; Montague, Paul; Johnston, Pamela E J; Penderis, Jacques; Anderson, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    Chronic spinal cord dysfunction occurs in dogs as a consequence of diverse aetiologies, including long-standing spinal cord compression and insidious neurodegenerative conditions. One such neurodegenerative condition is canine degenerative myelopathy (DM), which clinically is a challenge to differentiate from other chronic spinal cord conditions. Although the clinical diagnosis of DM can be strengthened by the identification of the Sod1 mutations that are observed in affected dogs, genetic analysis alone is insufficient to provide a definitive diagnosis. There is a requirement to identify biomarkers that can differentiate conditions with a similar clinical presentation, thus facilitating patient diagnostic and management strategies. A comparison of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein gel electrophoresis profile between idiopathic epilepsy (IE) and DM identified a protein band that was more prominent in DM. This band was subsequently found to contain a multifunctional protein clusterin (apolipoprotein J) that is protective against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis, oxidative stress, and also serves as an extracellular chaperone influencing protein aggregation. Western blot analysis of CSF clusterin confirmed elevated levels in DM compared to IE (p < 0.05). Analysis of spinal cord tissue from DM and control material found that clusterin expression was evident in neurons and that the clusterin mRNA levels from tissue extracts were elevated in DM compared to the control. The plasma clusterin levels was comparable between these groups. However, a comparison of clusterin CSF levels in a number of neurological conditions found that clusterin was elevated in both DM and chronic intervertebral disc disease (cIVDD) but not in meningoencephalitis and IE. These findings indicate that clusterin may potentially serve as a marker for chronic spinal cord disease in the dog; however, additional markers are required to differentiate DM from a concurrent

  5. Essential roles of the Kar2/BiP molecular chaperone downstream of the UPR pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Woo Jung

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a central hub where secreted or membrane-bound proteins are maturated and folded properly in eukaryotes. Maintenance of ER homeostasis is particularly important for human fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, which encounter a plethora of host-mediated stresses during infection. Our previous study demonstrated that the unfolded protein response (UPR pathway, composed of the evolutionarily conserved Ire1 kinase and the unique Hxl1 transcription factor, has pleiotropic roles in ER stress response, thermotolerance, antifungal drug resistance, and virulence in C. neoformans. Here, we functionally characterized an ER-resident molecular chaperone, Kar2/BiP, in C. neoformans. Conditional expression of KAR2 by the copper-regulated promoter revealed that Kar2 is essential for the viability of C. neoformans. Constitutive expression of KAR2 by the strong histone H3 promoter partially restores resistance to ER stress, cell wall stress, thermotolerance, and genotoxic stress in ire1Δ and hxl1Δ mutants, suggesting that Kar2 mainly functions downstream of the UPR pathway. Furthermore, Kar2 appears to control azole resistance in C. neoformans downstream of the UPR pathway without regulation of ERG11 or ERG3. Interestingly, we discovered that azole treatment is sensed as ER-stress and subsequently activates the Ire1-dependent Hxl1 splicing event and induction of KAR2 by the UPR pathway. In contrast, the constitutive expression of Kar2 is not sufficient to restore the Ire1-mediated regulation of capsule production in C. neoformans UPR mutants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Kar2 is not only essential for vegetative growth but also required for response and adaptation to the environmental stresses and antifungal drugs downstream of the UPR pathway in C. neoformans.

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Gp96 in Macrophages is Essential for Protective Immunity during Gram-negative Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Adam A.; de Vos, Alex F.; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H.P.; van Heijst, Jeroen W.J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Li, Zihai; van ’t Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common gram-negative bacteria that cause pneumonia. Gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is essential for the trafficking and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To determine the role of gp96 in myeloid cells in host defence during Klebsiella pneumonia. Mice homozygous for the conditional Hsp90b1 allele encoding gp96 were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under control of the LysM promoter to generate LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice showed absence of gp96 protein in macrophages and partial depletion in monocytes and granulocytes. This was accompanied by almost complete absence of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages. Likewise, integrin subunits CD11b and CD18 were not detectable on macrophages, while being only slightly reduced on monocytes and granulocytes. Gp96-deficient macrophages did not release pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to Klebsiella and displayed reduced phagocytic capacity independent of CD18. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice were highly vulnerable to lower airway infection induced by K. pneumoniae, as reflected by an enhanced bacterial growth and a higher mortality rate. The early inflammatory response in Hsp90b1-flox mice was characterized by a strongly impaired recruitment of granulocytes into the lungs, accompanied by an attenuated production of proinflammatory cytokines, while the inflammatory response during late stage pneumonia was not dependent on the presence of gp96. Blocking CD18 did not reproduce the impaired host defence of LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice during Klebsiella pneumonia. These data indicate that macrophage gp96 is essential for protective immunity during gram-negative pneumonia by regulating TLR expression. PMID:26365983

  7. Roles of chaperone/usher pathways of Yersinia pestis in a murine model of plague and adhesion to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatkoff, Matthew; Runco, Lisa M; Pujol, Celine; Jayatilaka, Indralatha; Furie, Martha B; Bliska, James B; Thanassi, David G

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis and many other Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria use the chaperone/usher (CU) pathway to assemble virulence-associated surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae. Y. pestis has two well-characterized CU pathways: the caf genes coding for the F1 capsule and the psa genes coding for the pH 6 antigen. The Y. pestis genome contains additional CU pathways that are capable of assembling pilus fibers, but the roles of these pathways in the pathogenesis of plague are not understood. We constructed deletion mutations in the usher genes for six of the additional Y. pestis CU pathways. The wild-type (WT) and usher deletion strains were compared in the murine bubonic (subcutaneous) and pneumonic (intranasal) plague infection models. Y. pestis strains containing deletions in CU pathways y0348-0352, y1858-1862, and y1869-1873 were attenuated for virulence compared to the WT strain by the intranasal, but not subcutaneous, routes of infection, suggesting specific roles for these pathways during pneumonic plague. We examined binding of the Y. pestis WT and usher deletion strains to A549 human lung epithelial cells, HEp-2 human cervical epithelial cells, and primary human and murine macrophages. Y. pestis CU pathways y0348-0352 and y1858-1862 were found to contribute to adhesion to all host cells tested, whereas pathway y1869-1873 was specific for binding to macrophages. The correlation between the virulence attenuation and host cell binding phenotypes of the usher deletion mutants identifies three of the additional CU pathways of Y. pestis as mediating interactions with host cells that are important for the pathogenesis of plague.

  8. Pharmaceutical Chaperones and Proteostasis Regulators in the Therapy of Lysosomal Storage Disorders: Current Perspective and Future Promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedah E. Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Different approaches have been utilized or proposed for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs including enzyme replacement and hematopoietic stem cell transplant therapies, both aiming to compensate for the enzymatic loss of the underlying mutated lysosomal enzymes. However, these approaches have their own limitations and therefore the vast majority of LSDs are either still untreatable or their treatments are inadequate. Missense mutations affecting enzyme stability, folding and cellular trafficking are common in LSDs resulting often in low protein half-life, premature degradation, aggregation and retention of the mutant proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Small molecular weight compounds such as pharmaceutical chaperones (PCs and proteostasis regulators have been in recent years to be promising approaches for overcoming some of these protein processing defects. These compounds are thought to enhance lysosomal enzyme activity by specific binding to the mutated enzyme or by manipulating components of the proteostasis pathways promoting protein stability, folding and trafficking and thus enhancing and restoring some of the enzymatic activity of the mutated protein in lysosomes. Multiple compounds have already been approved for clinical use to treat multiple LSDs like migalastat in the treatment of Fabry disease and others are currently under research or in clinical trials such as Ambroxol hydrochloride and Pyrimethamine. In this review, we are presenting a general overview of LSDs, their molecular and cellular bases, and focusing on recent advances on targeting and manipulation proteostasis, including the use of PCs and proteostasis regulators, as therapeutic targets for some LSDs. In addition, we present the successes, limitations and future perspectives in this field.

  9. A role for the RNA chaperone Hfq in controlling adherent-invasive Escherichia coli colonization and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina T Simonsen

    Full Text Available Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC has been linked with the onset and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel diseases. The AIEC strain LF82 was originally isolated from an ileal biopsy from a patient with Crohn's disease. The pathogenesis of LF82 results from its abnormal adherence to and subsequent invasion of the intestinal epithelium coupled with its ability to survive phagocytosis by macrophages once it has crossed the intestinal barrier. To gain further insight into AIEC pathogenesis we employed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an in vivo infection model. We demonstrate that AIEC strain LF82 forms a persistent infection in C. elegans, thereby reducing the host lifespan significantly. This host killing phenotype was associated with massive bacterial colonization of the nematode intestine and damage to the intestinal epithelial surface. C. elegans killing was independent of known LF82 virulence determinants but was abolished by deletion of the LF82 hfq gene, which encodes an RNA chaperone involved in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs. This finding reveals that important aspects of LF82 pathogenesis are controlled at the posttranscriptional level by riboregulation. The role of Hfq in LF82 virulence was independent of its function in regulating RpoS and RpoE activity. Further, LF82Δhfq mutants were non-motile, impaired in cell invasion and highly sensitive to various chemical stress conditions, reinforcing the multifaceted function of Hfq in mediating bacterial adaptation. This study highlights the usefulness of simple non-mammalian infection systems for the identification and analysis of bacterial virulence factors.

  10. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  11. Complex Narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.; Buckland, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the opening chapter, "Complex Narratives," Jan Simons brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. He presents an overview of the different concepts - forking path narratives, mind-game films,

  12. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  13. The UNC-45 chaperone is critical for establishing myosin-based myofibrillar organization and cardiac contractility in the Drosophila heart model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish C Melkani

    Full Text Available UNC-45 is a UCS (UNC-45/CRO1/She4P class chaperone necessary for myosin folding and/or accumulation, but its requirement for maintaining cardiac contractility has not been explored. Given the prevalence of myosin mutations in eliciting cardiomyopathy, chaperones like UNC-45 are likely to be equally critical in provoking or modulating myosin-associated cardiomyopathy. Here, we used the Drosophila heart model to examine its role in cardiac physiology, in conjunction with RNAi-mediated gene silencing specifically in the heart in vivo. Analysis of cardiac physiology was carried out using high-speed video recording in conjunction with movement analysis algorithms. unc-45 knockdown resulted in severely compromised cardiac function in adults as evidenced by prolonged diastolic and systolic intervals, and increased incidence of arrhythmias and extreme dilation; the latter was accompanied by a significant reduction in muscle contractility. Structural analysis showed reduced myofibrils, myofibrillar disarray, and greatly decreased cardiac myosin accumulation. Cardiac unc-45 silencing also dramatically reduced life-span. In contrast, third instar larval and young pupal hearts showed mild cardiac abnormalities, as severe cardiac defects only developed during metamorphosis. Furthermore, cardiac unc-45 silencing in the adult heart (after metamorphosis led to less severe phenotypes. This suggests that UNC-45 is mostly required for myosin accumulation/folding during remodeling of the forming adult heart. The cardiac defects, myosin deficit and decreased life-span in flies upon heart-specific unc-45 knockdown were significantly rescued by UNC-45 over-expression. Our results are the first to demonstrate a cardiac-specific requirement of a chaperone in Drosophila, suggestive of a critical role of UNC-45 in cardiomyopathies, including those associated with unfolded proteins in the failing human heart. The dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype associated with UNC-45

  14. The Salmonella type III effector SspH2 specifically exploits the NLR co-chaperone activity of SGT1 to subvert immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit P Bhavsar

    Full Text Available To further its pathogenesis, S. Typhimurium delivers effector proteins into host cells, including the novel E3 ubiquitin ligase (NEL effector SspH2. Using model systems in a cross-kingdom approach we gained further insight into the molecular function of this effector. Here, we show that SspH2 modulates innate immunity in both mammalian and plant cells. In mammalian cell culture, SspH2 significantly enhanced Nod1-mediated IL-8 secretion when transiently expressed or bacterially delivered. In addition, SspH2 also enhanced an Rx-dependent hypersensitive response in planta. In both of these nucleotide-binding leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR model systems, SspH2-mediated phenotypes required its catalytic E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and interaction with the conserved host protein SGT1. SGT1 has an essential cell cycle function and an additional function as an NLR co-chaperone in animal and plant cells. Interaction between SspH2 and SGT1 was restricted to SGT1 proteins that have NLR co-chaperone function and accordingly, SspH2 did not affect SGT1 cell cycle functions. Mechanistic studies revealed that SspH2 interacted with, and ubiquitinated Nod1 and could induce Nod1 activity in an agonist-independent manner if catalytically active. Interestingly, SspH2 in vitro ubiquitination activity and protein stability were enhanced by SGT1. Overall, this work adds to our understanding of the sophisticated mechanisms used by bacterial effectors to co-opt host pathways by demonstrating that SspH2 can subvert immune responses by selectively exploiting the functions of a conserved host co-chaperone.

  15. The Yersinia enterocolitica type three secretion chaperone SycO is integrated into the Yop regulatory network and binds to the Yop secretion protein YscM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heesemann Jürgen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenic yersiniae (Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica share a virulence plasmid encoding a type three secretion system (T3SS. This T3SS comprises more than 40 constituents. Among these are the transport substrates called Yops (Yersinia outer proteins, the specific Yop chaperones (Sycs, and the Ysc (Yop secretion proteins which form the transport machinery. The effectors YopO and YopP are encoded on an operon together with SycO, the chaperone of YopO. The characterization of SycO is the focus of this study. Results We have established the large-scale production of recombinant SycO in its outright form. We confirm that Y. enterocolitica SycO forms homodimers which is typical for Syc chaperones. SycO overproduction in Y. enterocolitica decreases secretion of Yops into the culture supernatant suggesting a regulatory role of SycO in type III secretion. We demonstrate that in vitro SycO interacts with YscM1, a negative regulator of Yop expression in Y. enterocolitica. However, the SycO overproduction phenotype was not mediated by YscM1, YscM2, YopO or YopP as revealed by analysis of isogenic deletion mutants. Conclusion We present evidence that SycO is integrated into the regulatory network of the Yersinia T3SS. Our picture of the Yersinia T3SS interactome is supplemented by identification of the SycO/YscM1 interaction. Further, our results suggest that at least one additional interaction partner of SycO has to be identified.

  16. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julia M; Nguyen, Phil P; Patel, Milan J; Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2014-07-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion functions may have

  17. MiR-17-5p impairs trafficking of H-ERG K+ channel protein by targeting multiple er stress-related chaperones during chronic oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate if microRNAs (miRNAs play a role in regulating h-ERG trafficking in the setting of chronic oxidative stress as a common deleterious factor for many cardiac disorders. METHODS: We treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and HEK293 cells with stable expression of h-ERG with H2O2 for 12 h and 48 h. Expression of miR-17-5p seed miRNAs was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels of chaperones and h-ERG trafficking were measured by Western blot analysis. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to study miRNA and target interactions. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to record h-ERG K(+ current. RESULTS: H-ERG trafficking was impaired by H2O2 after 48 h treatment, accompanied by reciprocal changes of expression between miR-17-5p seed miRNAs and several chaperones (Hsp70, Hsc70, CANX, and Golga2, with the former upregulated and the latter downregulated. We established these chaperones as targets for miR-17-5p. Application miR-17-5p inhibitor rescued H2O2-induced impairment of h-ERG trafficking. Upregulation of endogenous by H2O2 or forced miR-17-5p expression either reduced h-ERG current. Sequestration of AP1 by its decoy molecule eliminated the upregulation of miR-17-5p, and ameliorated impairment of h-ERG trafficking. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, deregulation of the miR-17-5p seed family miRNAs can cause severe impairment of h-ERG trafficking through targeting multiple ER stress-related chaperones, and activation of AP1 likely accounts for the deleterious upregulation of these miRNAs, in the setting of prolonged duration of oxidative stress. These findings revealed the role of miRNAs in h-ERG trafficking, which may contribute to the cardiac electrical disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  18. The C Terminus of the Histone Chaperone Asf1 Cross-Links to Histone H3 in Yeast and Promotes Interaction with Histones H3 and H4

    OpenAIRE

    Dennehey, Briana K; Noone, Seth; Liu, Wallace H.; Smith, Luke; Churchill, Mair E. A.; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2013-01-01

    The central histone H3/H4 chaperone Asf1 comprises a highly conserved globular core and a divergent C-terminal tail. While the function and structure of the Asf1 core are well known, the function of the tail is less well understood. Here, we have explored the role of the yeast (yAsf1) and human (hAsf1a and hAsf1b) Asf1 tails in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show, using a photoreactive, unnatural amino acid, that Asf1 tail residue 210 cross-links to histone H3 in vivo and, furthe...

  19. A conserved domain important for association of eukaryotic J-protein co-chaperones Jjj1 and Zuo1 with the ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    Kaschner, Lindsey A.; Sharma, Ruchika; Shrestha, Om Kumar; Meyer, Alison E.; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    J-proteins, obligate co-chaperones, provide specialization for Hsp70 function in a variety of cellular processes. Two of the 13 J-proteins of the yeast cytosol/nucleus, Zuo1 and Jjj1, are associated with 60S ribosomal subunits. Abundant Zuo1 facilitates folding of nascent polypeptides; Jjj1, of much lower abundance, functions in ribosome biogenesis. However, overexpression of Jjj1 substantially rescues growth defects of cells lacking Zuo1. We analyzed a region held in common by Zuo1 and Jjj1,...

  20. Large-scale preparation of the homogeneous LolA–lipoprotein complex and efficient in vitro transfer of lipoproteins to the outer membrane in a LolB-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Shoji; Oguchi, Yuki; Yokota, Naoko; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli releases lipoproteins destined to the outer membrane from the inner membrane as a complex with a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. Interaction of the LolA–lipoprotein complex with an outer membrane receptor, LolB, then causes localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. As far as examined, formation of the LolA–lipoprotein complex strictly depends on ATP hydrolysis by the LolCDE complex in the presence of LolA. It has be...

  1. Electromagnetic fields at mobile phone frequency induce apoptosis and inactivation of the multi-chaperone complex in human epidermoid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, Michele; Marra, Monica; Mancinelli, Fabrizio; D'Ambrosio, Guglielmo; Massa, Rita; Giordano, Antonio; Budillon, Alfredo; Abbruzzese, Alberto; Bismuto, Ettore

    2005-08-01

    The exposure to non-thermal microwave electromagnetic field (MW-EMF) at 1.95 MHz, a frequency used in mobile communication, affects the refolding kinetics of eukaryotic proteins (Mancinelli et al., 2004). On these basis we have evaluated the in vivo effect of MW-EMF in human epidermoid cancer KB cells. We have found that MW-EMF induces time-dependent apoptosis (45% after 3 h) that is paralleled by an about 2.5-fold decrease of the expression of ras and Raf-1 and of the activity of ras and Erk-1/2. Although also the expression of Akt was reduced its activity was unchanged likely as a consequence of the increased expression of its upstream activator PI3K. In the same experimental conditions an about 2.5-fold increase of the ubiquitination of ras and Raf-1 was also found and the addition for 12 h of proteasome inhibitor lactacystin at 10 microM caused an accumulation of the ubiquitinated isoforms of ras and Raf-1 and counteracted the effects of MW-EMF on ras and Raf-1 expression suggesting an increased proteasome-dependent degradation induced by MW-EMF. The exposure of KB cells to MW-EMF induced a differential activation of stress-dependent pathway with an increase of JNK-1 activity and HSP70 and 27 expression and with a reduction of p38 kinase activity and HSP90 expression. The overexpression of HSP90 induced by transfection of KB cells with a plasmid encoding for the factor completely antagonized the apoptosis and the inactivation of the ras --> Erk-dependent survival signal induced by MW-EMF. Conversely, the inhibition of Erk activity induced by 12 h exposure to 10 mM Mek-1 inhibitor U0126 antagonized the effects induced by HSP90 transfection on apoptosis caused by MW-EMF. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time that MW-EMF induces apoptosis through the inactivation of the ras --> Erk survival signaling due to enhanced degradation of ras and Raf-1 determined by decreased expression of HSP90 and the consequent increase of proteasome dependent degradation. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Evaluation of molecular chaperons Hsp72 and neuropeptide Y as characteristic markers of adaptogenic activity of plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asea, Alexzander; Kaur, Punit; Panossian, Alexander; Wikman, Karl Georg

    2013-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that ADAPT-232, a fixed combination of adaptogenic substances derived from Eleutherococcus senticosus root extract, Schisandra chinensis berry extract, Rhodiola rosea root extract stimulated the expression and release of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and molecular chaperone Hsp72 from isolated human neurolgia cells. Both of these mediators of stress response are known to play an important role in regulation of neuroendocrine system and immune response. We further demonstrated that ADAPT-232 induced release of Hsp70 is mediated by NPY, suggesting an existence of NPY-mediated pathway of activation of Hsp72 release into the blood circulation system. The objective of this study was to determine whether this pathway is common for adaptogens and whether NPY and/or Hsp72 can be considered as necessary specific biomarkers for adaptogenic activity. The release of NPY and Hsp72 from neuroglia cells in response to treatment with various plant extracts (n=23) including selected validated adaptogens, partly validated adaptogens, claimed but negligibly validated adaptogens and some other plant extracts affecting neuroendocrine and immune systems but never considered as adaptogens was measured using high throughput ELISA techniques. We demonstrated that adaptogens, e.g. R. rosea, S. chinensis and E. senticosus stimulate both NPY and Hsp70 release from neuroblastoma cells, while tonics and stimulants have no significant effect on NPY in this in vitro test. In the groups of partly validated adaptogens the effect of Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera was not statistically significant both on NPY and Hsp70 release, while the activating effect of Bryonia alba and Rhaponticum cartamoides was significant only on Hsp70. In contrast, all tested non-adaptogens, such as antiinflammatoty plant extracts Matricaria recutita, Pelargonium sidoides, Hedera helix and Vitis vinifera significantly inhibit Hsp70 release and have no influence on NPY release from neuroblastoma

  3. N-terminal arm of orchardgrass Hsp17.2 (DgHsp17.2) is essential for both in vitro chaperone activity and in vivo thermotolerance in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Seo, Kyung Hye; Choi, Young Jin; Cheong, Mi Sun; Son, Daeyoung

    2016-02-01

    Small heat shock proteins are well-known to function as chaperone in the protection of proteins and subcellular structures against stress-induced denaturation in many cell compartments. Irrespective of such general functional assignment, a proof of function in a living organism is missing. Here, we used heat-induced orchardgrass small Hsp17.2 (DgHsp17.2). Its function in in vitro chaperone properties has shown in protecting the model substrate, malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS). Overexpression of DgHsp17.2 triggering strong chaperone activity enhanced in vivo thermotolerance of yeast cells. To identify the functional domain on DgHsp17.2 and correlationship between in vitro chaperone property and in vivo thermotolerance, we generated truncation mutants of DgHsp17.2 and showed essentiality of the N-terminal arm of DgHsp17.2 for the chaperone function. In addition, beyond for acquisition of thermotolerance irrespective of sequences are diverse among the small Hsps. However, any truncation mutants of DgHsp17.2 did not exhibit strong interaction with orchardgrass heat shock protein 70 (DgHsp70) different from mature DgHsp17.2, indicating that full-length DgHsp17.2 is necessary for cooperating with Hsp70 protein. Our study indicates that the N-terminal arm of DgHsp17.2 is an important region for chaperone activity and thermotolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of conserved, centrosome-targeting ASH domains in TRAPPII complex subunits and TRAPPC8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Morthorst, Stine Kjær; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2014-01-01

    , the Rab8 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabin8, and the transport protein particle (TRAPP) components TRAPPC3, -C9, and -C10, which physically interact with each other and function together with Bardet Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins in ciliary membrane biogenesis. However, despite recent advances...... confer targeting to the centrosome and cilia, and that TRAPPC8 has cilia-related functions. Further, we propose that the yeast TRAPPII complex and its mammalian counterpart are evolutionarily related to the bacterial periplasmic trafficking chaperone PapD of the usher pili assembly machinery....

  5. An In Vitro Assay for Outer Membrane Protein Assembly by the BAM Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Hernandez, Giselle; Bernstein, Harris D

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of a biochemical process it is often essential to reconstitute the reaction in vitro using the minimal set of factors required to drive the reaction to completion. Here, we describe a method to reconstitute the folding and membrane integration of bacterial outer membrane (OM) proteins that have a characteristic β-barrel structure. In this method the BAM complex, a heteroligomer that catalyzes the membrane integration of β-barrel proteins, is first purified and inserted into small lipid vesicles. Denatured OM proteins are then assembled and integrated into the vesicles in the presence of a molecular chaperone called SurA.

  6. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. carbene complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Reaction of oligomeric Cu(I) complexes [Cu{µ-S-C(=NR)(O–Ar–CH3)}]n with Lewis acids gave Cu(I) carbene complexes, which were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Cu(I) car- bene complexes could be directly generated from RNCS, Cu(I)–OAr and Lewis acids; this method can be used to ...

  8. Chloroplastic Hsp100 chaperones ClpC2 and ClpD interact in vitro with a transit peptide only when it is located at the N-terminus of a protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruch Eduardo M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clp/Hsp100 chaperones are involved in protein quality control. They act as independent units or in conjunction with a proteolytic core to degrade irreversibly damaged proteins. Clp chaperones from plant chloroplasts have been also implicated in the process of precursor import, along with Hsp70 chaperones. They are thought to pull the precursors in as the transit peptides enter the organelle. How Clp chaperones identify their substrates and engage in their processing is not known. This information may lie in the position, sequence or structure of the Clp recognition motifs. Results We tested the influence of the position of the transit peptide on the interaction with two chloroplastic Clp chaperones, ClpC2 and ClpD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtClpC2 and AtClpD. The transit peptide of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase was fused to either the N- or C-terminal end of glutathione S-transferase. Another fusion with the transit peptide interleaved between two folded proteins was used to probe if AtClpC2 and AtClpD could recognize tags located in the interior of a polypeptide. We also used a mutated transit peptide that is not targeted by Hsp70 chaperones (TP1234, yet it is imported at a normal rate. The fusions were immobilized on resins and the purified recombinant chaperones were added. After a washing protocol, the amount of bound chaperone was assessed. Both AtClpC2 and AtClpD interacted with the transit peptides when they were located at the N-terminal position of a protein, but not when they were allocated to the C-terminal end or at the interior of a polypeptide. Conclusions AtClpC2 and AtClpD have a positional preference for interacting with a transit peptide. In particular, the localization of the signal sequence at the N-terminal end of a protein seems mandatory for interaction to take place. Our results have implications for the understanding of protein quality control and precursor import in chloroplasts.

  9. A Hypothetical Protein of Alteromonas macleodii AltDE1 (amad1_06475) Predicted to be a Cold-Shock Protein with RNA Chaperone Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Ahmad, Shah Adil Ishtiyaq; Kibria, Km Kaderi; Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin

    2014-01-01

    Alteromonas macleodii AltDE1 is a deep sea protobacteria that is distinct from the surface isolates of the same species. This study was designed to elucidate the biological function of amad1_06475, a hypothetical protein of A. macleodii AltDE1. The 70 residues protein sequence showed considerable homology with cold-shock proteins (CSPs) and RNA chaperones from different organisms. Multiple sequence alignment further supported the presence of conserved csp domain on the protein sequence. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was also determined, and verified by PROCHECK, Verify3D, and QMEAN programs. The predicted structure contained five anti-parallel β-strands and RNA-binding motifs, which are characteristic features of prokaryotic CSPs. Finally, the binding of a thymidine-rich oligonucleotide and a single uracil molecule in the active site of the protein further strengthens our prediction about the function of amad1_06475 as a CSP and thereby acting as a RNA chaperone. The binding was performed by molecular docking tools and was compared with similar binding of 3PF5 (PDB) and 2HAX (PDB), major CSPs of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus caldolyticus, respectively.

  10. Identification of the flagellar chaperone FlgN in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri by its interaction with hook-associated FlgK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Letícia; Alegria, Marcos C; Borin, Paula F L; Santos, Túlio M; Docena, Cássia; Tasic, Ljubica; Farah, Chuck S; Ramos, Carlos H I

    2007-09-01

    Genome annotation of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), identified flagellar genes in a 15.7 kb gene cluster. However, FlgN, a secretion chaperone for hook-associated proteins FlgK and FlgL, was not identified. We performed extensive screening of the X. axonopodis pv. citri genome with the yeast two-hybrid system to identify a protein with the characteristics of the flagellar chaperone FlgN. We found a candidate (XAC1990) encoded by an operon for components of the flagellum apparatus that interacted with FlgK. In order to further support this finding, Xac FlgK and XAC1990 were cloned, expressed, and purified. The recombinant proteins were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their interaction in vitro confirmed by pull-down assays. We, therefore, conclude that XAC1990 and its homologs in other Xanthomonas species are, in fact, FlgN proteins. These observations extend the sequence diversity covered by this family of proteins.

  11. Functions of yeast Hsp40 chaperone Sis1p dispensable for prion propagation but important for prion curing and protection from prion toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, P Aaron; Reidy, Michael; Masison, Daniel C

    2011-07-01

    Replication of amyloid-based yeast prions [PSI(+)], [URE3], and [PIN(+)] depends on the protein disaggregation machinery that includes Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40 molecular chaperones. Yet, overexpressing Hsp104 cures cells of [PSI(+)] prions. An Hsp70 mutant (Ssa1-21p) antagonizes propagation of [PSI(+)] in a manner resembling elevated Hsp104. The major cytosolic Hsp40 Sis1p is the only Hsp40 required for replication of these prions, but its role in [PSI(+)] curing is unknown. Here we find that all nonessential functional regions of Sis1p are dispensable for [PSI(+)] propagation, suggesting that other Hsp40's might provide Hsp40 functions required for [PSI(+)] replication. Conversely, several Sis1p functions were important for promoting antiprion effects of both Ssa1-21p and Hsp104, which implies a link between the antiprion effects of these chaperones and suggests that Sis1p is a specific Hsp40 important for [PSI(+)] curing. These contrasting findings suggest that the functions of Hsp104 that are important for propagation and elimination of [PSI(+)] are either distinct or specified by different Hsp40's. This work also uncovered a growth inhibition caused by [PSI(+)] when certain functions of Sis1p were absent, suggesting that Sis1p protects cells from cytotoxicity caused by [PSI(+)] prions.

  12. Sugar-Terminated Nanoparticle Chaperones Are 102-105 Times Better Than Molecular Sugars in Inhibiting Protein Aggregation and Reducing Amyloidogenic Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nibedita; Shekhar, Shashi; Jana, Nihar R; Jana, Nikhil R

    2017-03-29

    Sugar-based osmolyte molecules are known to stabilize proteins under stress, but usually they have poor chaperone performance in inhibiting protein aggregation. Here, we show that the nanoparticle form of sugars molecule can enhance their chaperone performance typically by 102-105 times, compared to molecular sugar. Sugar-based plate-like nanoparticles of 20-40 nm hydrodynamic size have been synthesized by simple heating of acidic aqueous solution of glucose/sucrose/maltose/trehalose. These nanoparticles have excitation-dependent green/yellow/orange emission and surface chemistry identical to the respective sugar molecule. Fibrillation of lysozyme/insulin/amyloid beta in extracellular space, aggregation of mutant huntingtin protein inside model neuronal cell, and cytotoxic effect of fibrils are investigated in the presence of these sugar nanoparticles. We found that sugar nanoparticles are 102-105 times efficient than respective sugar molecules in inhibiting protein fibrillation and preventing cytotoxicity arising of fibrils. We propose that better performance of the nanoparticle form is linked to its stronger binding with fibril structure and enhanced cell uptake. This result suggests that nanoparticle form of osmolyte can be an attractive option in prevention and curing of protein aggregation-derived diseases.

  13. Chaperone protein HYPK interacts with the first 17 amino acid region of Huntingtin and modulates mutant HTT-mediated aggregation and cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Kamalika Roy [Crystallography and Molecular Biology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Centre for Neuroscience, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Bhattacharyya, Nitai P., E-mail: nitai_sinp@yahoo.com [Biomedical Genomics Centre, PG Polyclinic Building, 5, Suburbun Hospital Road, Kolkata 700020 (India)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • HYPK reduces mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. • Interaction of HYPK with HTT requires N-terminal 17 amino acid of HTT (HTT-N17). • Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to SDS-soluble, smaller, nuclear aggregates. • These smaller aggregates do not associate with HYPK and are more cytotoxic. • Maybe, interaction of HYPK with amphipathic HTT-N17 block HTT aggregate formation. - Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a polyglutamine expansion disorder, characterized by mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. Many reports suggests roles of N-terminal 17 amino acid domain of HTT (HTT-N17) towards subcellular localization, aggregate formation and subsequent pathogenicity induced by N-terminal HTT harboring polyQ stretch in pathogenic range. HYPK is a HTT-interacting chaperone which can reduce N-terminal mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity in neuronal cell lines. However, how HYPK interacts with N-terminal fragment of HTT remained unknown. Here we report that specific interaction of HYPK with HTT-N17 is crucial for the chaperone activity of HYPK. Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to formation of tinier, SDS-soluble nuclear aggregates formed by N-terminal mutant HTT. The increased cytotoxicity imparted by these tiny aggregates might be contributed due to loss of interaction with HYPK.

  14. Molecular crime and cellular punishment: active detoxification of misfolded and aggregated proteins in the cell by the chaperone and protease networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinault, Marie-Pierre; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Labile or mutation-sensitised proteins may spontaneously convert into aggregation-prone conformations that may be toxic and infectious. This hazardous behavior, which can be described as a form of "molecular criminality", can be actively counteracted in the cell by a network of molecular chaperone and proteases. Similar to law enforcement agents, molecular chaperones and proteases can specifically identify, apprehend, unfold and thus neutralize "criminal" protein conformers, allowing them to subsequently refold into harmless functional proteins. Irreversibly damaged polypeptides that have lost the ability to natively refold are preferentially degraded by highly controlled ATP-consuming proteases. Damaged proteins that escape proteasomal degradation can also be "incarcerated" into dense amyloids, "evicted" from the cell, or internally "exiled" to the lysosome to be hydrolysed and recycled. Thus, remarkable parallels exist between molecular and human forms of criminality, as well as in the cellular and social responses to various forms of crime. Yet, differences also exist: whereas programmed death is the preferred solution chosen by aged and aggregation-stressed cells, collective suicide is seldom chosen by lawless societies. Significantly, there is no cellular equivalent for the role of familial care and of education in general, which is so crucial to the proper shaping of functional persons in the society. Unlike in the cell, humanism introduces a bias against radical solutions such as capital punishment, favouring crime prevention, reeducation and social reinsertion of criminals.

  15. Artemin, a diapause-specific chaperone, contributes to the stress tolerance of Artemia franciscana cysts and influences their release from females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allison M; Toxopeus, Jantina; MacRae, Thomas H

    2014-05-15

    Females of the crustacean Artemia franciscana produce either motile nauplii or gastrula stage embryos enclosed in a shell impermeable to nonvolatile compounds and known as cysts. The encysted embryos enter diapause, a state of greatly reduced metabolism and profound stress tolerance. Artemin, a diapause-specific ferritin homolog in cysts has molecular chaperone activity in vitro. Artemin represents 7.2% of soluble protein in cysts, approximately equal to the amount of p26, a small heat shock protein. However, there is almost twice as much artemin mRNA in cysts as compared with p26 mRNA, suggesting that artemin mRNA is translated less efficiently. RNA interference employing the injection of artemin double-stranded RNA into the egg sacs of A. franciscana females substantially reduced artemin mRNA and protein in cysts. Decreasing artemin diminished desiccation and freezing tolerance of cysts, demonstrating a role for this protein in stress resistance. Knockdown of artemin increased the time required for complete discharge of a brood of cysts carried within a female from a few hours up to 4 days, an effect weakened in successive broods. Artemin, an abundant molecular chaperone, contributes to stress tolerance of A. franciscana cysts while influencing their development and/or exit from females. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. An unexpected role for the yeast nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 as a reductant acting on the molecular chaperone BiP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Kevin D; Pareja, Kristeen A; Wang, Jie; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2017-03-03

    Unfavorable redox conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can decrease the capacity for protein secretion, altering vital cell functions. While systems to manage reductive stress are well-established, how cells cope with an overly oxidizing ER remains largely undefined. In previous work (Wang et al., 2014), we demonstrated that the chaperone BiP is a sensor of overly oxidizing ER conditions. We showed that modification of a conserved BiP cysteine during stress beneficially alters BiP chaperone activity to cope with suboptimal folding conditions. How this cysteine is reduced to reestablish 'normal' BiP activity post-oxidative stress has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that BiP's nucleotide exchange factor - Sil1 - can reverse BiP cysteine oxidation. This previously unexpected reductant capacity for yeast Sil1 has potential implications for the human ataxia Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, where it is interesting to speculate that a disruption in ER redox-signaling (due to genetic defects in SIL1 ) may influence disease pathology.

  17. Computational Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems (CS involve many elements that interact at different scales in time and space. The challenges in modeling CS led to the development of novel computational tools with applications in a wide range of scientific areas. The computational problems posed by CS exhibit intrinsic difficulties that are a major concern in Computational Complexity Theory. [...

  18. Complex narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. It interrogates the different terms - forking-path narratives, mind-game films, modular narratives, multiple-draft films, database narratives,

  19. Communication Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaikumar Radhakrishnan

    Communication complexity. Strategy I. Alice x ∈ {0, 1}n. ⇒. ⇐. Bob y ∈ {0, 1}n. Naive strategy. Alice sends x to Bob. Bob tells Alice if x = y. Cost. Requires n + 1 bits of communication. Jaikumar Radhakrishnan. Communication Complexity ...

  20. Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    A complex system consists of many interacting parts, generates new collective behavior through self organization, and adaptively evolves through time. Many theories have been developed to study complex systems, including chaos, fractals, cellular automata, self organization, stochastic processes, turbulence, and genetic algorithms.

  1. Complex derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  2. Mathematical simulation of complex formation of protein molecules allowing for their domain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshlan, T. V.; Kulikov, K. G.

    2017-04-01

    A physical model of the interactions between protein molecules has been presented and an analysis of their propensity to form complex biological complexes has been performed. The reactivities of proteins have been studied using electrostatics methods based on the example of the histone chaperone Nap1 and histones H2A and H2B. The capability of proteins to form stable biological complexes that allow for different segments of amino acid sequences has been analyzed. The ability of protein molecules to form compounds has been considered by calculating matrices of electrostatic potential energy of amino acid residues constituting the polypeptide chain. The method of block matrices has been used in the analysis of the ability of protein molecules to form complex biological compounds.

  3. CaM/BAG5/Hsc70 signaling complex dynamically regulates leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luhua; Xing, Yangfei; Chang, Dong; Fang, Shasha; Cui, Boyang; Li, Qi; Wang, Xuejie; Guo, Shang; Yang, Xue; Men, Shuzhen; Shen, Yuequan

    2016-08-19

    Calcium signaling plays an essential role in plant cell physiology, and chaperone-mediated protein folding directly regulates plant programmed cell death. The Arabidopsis thaliana protein AtBAG5 (Bcl-2-associated athanogene 5) is unique in that it contains both a BAG domain capable of binding Hsc70 (Heat shock cognate protein 70) and a characteristic IQ motif that is specific for Ca(2+)-free CaM (Calmodulin) binding and hence acts as a hub linking calcium signaling and the chaperone system. Here, we determined crystal structures of AtBAG5 alone and in complex with Ca(2+)-free CaM. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that Ca(2+)-free CaM and Hsc70 bind AtBAG5 independently, whereas Ca(2+)-saturated CaM and Hsc70 bind AtBAG5 with negative cooperativity. Further in vivo studies confirmed that AtBAG5 localizes to mitochondria and that its overexpression leads to leaf senescence symptoms including decreased chlorophyll retention and massive ROS production in dark-induced plants. Mutants interfering the CaM/AtBAG5/Hsc70 complex formation leads to different phenotype of leaf senescence. Collectively, we propose that the CaM/AtBAG5/Hsc70 signaling complex plays an important role in regulating plant senescence.

  4. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  5. Carney Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least one of the features listed. Major diagnostic features for Carney Complex Spotty skin pigmentation with ... called large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCST) Thyroid cancer Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma, meaning tumors that grow on ...

  6. Complex Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Kleefeld

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to some generalized correspondence principle the classical limit of a non-Hermitian quantum theory describing quantum degrees of freedom is expected to be the well known classical mechanics of classical degrees of freedom in the complex phase space, i.e., some phase space spanned by complex-valued space and momentum coordinates. As special relativity was developed by Einstein merely for real-valued space-time and four-momentum, we will try to understand how special relativity and covariance can be extended to complex-valued space-time and four-momentum. Our considerations will lead us not only to some unconventional derivation of Lorentz transformations for complex-valued velocities, but also to the non-Hermitian Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, which are to lay the foundations of a non-Hermitian quantum theory.

  7. Production of 10S-hydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from oleic acid by whole recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing 10S-dioxygenase from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 with the aid of a chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Seo, Min-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Chul; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2017-01-01

    To increase the production of 10S-hydroxy-8(E)-octadecenoic acid from oleic acid by whole recom