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Sample records for chaperone chz1p regulates

  1. Molecular chaperones and proteostasis regulation during redox imbalance

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    Katerina Niforou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals originate from both exogenous environmental sources and as by-products of the respiratory chain and cellular oxygen metabolism. Sustained accumulation of free radicals, beyond a physiological level, induces oxidative stress that is harmful for the cellular homeodynamics as it promotes the oxidative damage and stochastic modification of all cellular biomolecules including proteins. In relation to proteome stability and maintenance, the increased concentration of oxidants disrupts the functionality of cellular protein machines resulting eventually in proteotoxic stress and the deregulation of the proteostasis (homeostasis of the proteome network (PN. PN curates the proteome in the various cellular compartments and the extracellular milieu by modulating protein synthesis and protein machines assembly, protein recycling and stress responses, as well as refolding or degradation of damaged proteins. Molecular chaperones are key players of the PN since they facilitate folding of nascent polypeptides, as well as holding, folding, and/or degradation of unfolded, misfolded, or non-native proteins. Therefore, the expression and the activity of the molecular chaperones are tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational level at organismal states of increased oxidative and, consequently, proteotoxic stress, including ageing and various age-related diseases (e.g. degenerative diseases and cancer. In the current review we present a synopsis of the various classes of intra- and extracellular chaperones, the effects of oxidants on cellular homeodynamics and diseases and the redox regulation of chaperones.

  2. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

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    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER Chaperones and Oxidoreductases: Critical Regulators of Tumor Cell Survival and Immunorecognition

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    Thomas eSimmen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed bulk flow, ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER. However, solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response (UPR upregulate ER chaperones and oxidoreductases. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the production of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an eat-me signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, Ero1α and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  4. Protein kinase A regulates molecular chaperone transcription and protein aggregation.

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    Yue Zhang

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 regulates one of the major pathways of protein quality control and is essential for deterrence of protein-folding disorders, particularly in neuronal cells. However, HSF1 activity declines with age, a change that may open the door to progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We have investigated mechanisms of HSF1 regulation that may become compromised with age. HSF1 binds stably to the catalytic domain of protein kinase A (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on at least one regulatory serine residue (S320. We show here that PKA is essential for effective transcription of HSP genes by HSF1. PKA triggers a cascade involving HSF1 binding to the histone acetylase p300 and positive translation elongation factor 1 (p-TEFb and phosphorylation of the c-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, a key mechanism in the downstream steps of HSF1-mediated transcription. This cascade appears to play a key role in protein quality control in neuronal cells expressing aggregation-prone proteins with long poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts. Such proteins formed inclusion bodies that could be resolved by HSF1 activation during heat shock. Resolution of the inclusions was inhibited by knockdown of HSF1, PKAcα, or the pTEFb component CDK9, indicating a key role for the HSF1-PKA cascade in protein quality control.

  5. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress

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    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles. PMID:28076420

  6. Global small RNA chaperone Hfq and regulatory small RNAs are important virulence regulators in Erwinia amylovora.

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    Zeng, Quan; McNally, R Ryan; Sundin, George W

    2013-04-01

    Hfq is a global small RNA (sRNA) chaperone that interacts with Hfq-regulated sRNAs and functions in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this work, we identified Hfq to be a virulence regulator in the Gram-negative fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Deletion of hfq in E. amylovora Ea1189 significantly reduced bacterial virulence in both immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Analysis of virulence determinants in strain Ea1189Δhfq showed that Hfq exerts pleiotropic regulation of amylovoran exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation, motility, and the type III secretion system (T3SS). Further characterization of biofilm regulation by Hfq demonstrated that Hfq limits bacterial attachment to solid surfaces while promoting biofilm maturation. Characterization of T3SS regulation by Hfq revealed that Hfq positively regulates the translocation and secretion of the major type III effector DspE and negatively controls the secretion of the putative translocator HrpK and the type III effector Eop1. Lastly, 10 Hfq-regulated sRNAs were identified using a computational method, and two of these sRNAs, RprA and RyhA, were found to be required for the full virulence of E. amylovora.

  7. Differential regulation of the histone chaperone HIRA during muscle cell differentiation by a phosphorylation switch.

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    Yang, Jae-Hyun; Song, Tae-Yang; Jo, Chanhee; Park, Jinyoung; Lee, Han-Young; Song, Ilang; Hong, Suji; Jung, Kwan Young; Kim, Jaehoon; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2016-08-12

    Replication-independent incorporation of variant histone H3.3 has a profound impact on chromatin function and numerous cellular processes, including the differentiation of muscle cells. The histone chaperone HIRA and H3.3 have essential roles in MyoD regulation during myoblast differentiation. However, the precise mechanism that determines the onset of H3.3 deposition in response to differentiation signals is unclear. Here we show that HIRA is phosphorylated by Akt kinase, an important signaling modulator in muscle cells. By generating a phosphospecific antibody, we found that a significant amount of HIRA was phosphorylated in myoblasts. The phosphorylation level of HIRA and the occupancy of phosphorylated protein on muscle genes gradually decreased during cellular differentiation. Remarkably, the forced expression of the phosphomimic form of HIRA resulted in reduced H3.3 deposition and suppressed the activation of muscle genes in myotubes. Our data show that HIRA phosphorylation limits the expression of myogenic genes, while the dephosphorylation of HIRA is required for proficient H3.3 deposition and gene activation, demonstrating that the phosphorylation switch is exploited to modulate HIRA/H3.3-mediated muscle gene regulation during myogenesis.

  8. Model-Driven Understanding of Palmitoylation Dynamics: Regulated Acylation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin.

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    Tiziano Dallavilla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular functions are largely regulated by reversible post-translational modifications of proteins which act as switches. Amongst these, S-palmitoylation is unique in that it confers hydrophobicity. Due to technical difficulties, the understanding of this modification has lagged behind. To investigate principles underlying dynamics and regulation of palmitoylation, we have here studied a key cellular protein, the ER chaperone calnexin, which requires dual palmitoylation for function. Apprehending the complex inter-conversion between single-, double- and non-palmitoylated species required combining experimental determination of kinetic parameters with extensive mathematical modelling. We found that calnexin, due to the presence of two cooperative sites, becomes stably acylated, which not only confers function but also a remarkable increase in stability. Unexpectedly, stochastic simulations revealed that palmitoylation does not occur soon after synthesis, but many hours later. This prediction guided us to find that phosphorylation actively delays calnexin palmitoylation in resting cells. Altogether this study reveals that cells synthesize 5 times more calnexin than needed under resting condition, most of which is degraded. This unused pool can be mobilized by preventing phosphorylation or increasing the activity of the palmitoyltransferase DHHC6.

  9. Model-Driven Understanding of Palmitoylation Dynamics: Regulated Acylation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin.

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    Dallavilla, Tiziano; Abrami, Laurence; Sandoz, Patrick A; Savoglidis, Georgios; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2016-02-01

    Cellular functions are largely regulated by reversible post-translational modifications of proteins which act as switches. Amongst these, S-palmitoylation is unique in that it confers hydrophobicity. Due to technical difficulties, the understanding of this modification has lagged behind. To investigate principles underlying dynamics and regulation of palmitoylation, we have here studied a key cellular protein, the ER chaperone calnexin, which requires dual palmitoylation for function. Apprehending the complex inter-conversion between single-, double- and non-palmitoylated species required combining experimental determination of kinetic parameters with extensive mathematical modelling. We found that calnexin, due to the presence of two cooperative sites, becomes stably acylated, which not only confers function but also a remarkable increase in stability. Unexpectedly, stochastic simulations revealed that palmitoylation does not occur soon after synthesis, but many hours later. This prediction guided us to find that phosphorylation actively delays calnexin palmitoylation in resting cells. Altogether this study reveals that cells synthesize 5 times more calnexin than needed under resting condition, most of which is degraded. This unused pool can be mobilized by preventing phosphorylation or increasing the activity of the palmitoyltransferase DHHC6.

  10. Regulation of the expression of chaperone gp96 in macrophages and dendritic cells.

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    Lutz Wolfram

    Full Text Available The chaperone function of the ER-residing heat shock protein gp96 plays an important role in protein physiology and has additionally important immunological functions due to its peptide-binding capacity. Low amounts of gp96 stimulate immunity; high quantities induce tolerance by mechanisms not fully understood. A lack of gp96 protein in intestinal macrophages (IMACs from Crohn`s disease (CD patients correlates with loss of tolerance against the host gut flora, leading to chronic inflammation. Since gp96 shows dose-dependent direction of immunological reactions, we studied primary IMACs and developed cell models to understand the regulation of gp96 expression. Induction of gp96-expression was higher in in vitro differentiated dendritic cells (i.v.DCs than in in vitro differentiated macrophages (i.v.MACs, whereas monocytes (MOs expressed only low gp96 levels. The highest levels of expression were found in IMACs. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, muramyl dipeptide (MDP, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, and Interleukin (IL-4 induced gp96-expression, while IL12, IL-17, IL-23 and interferon (IFN-γ were not effective indicating that Th1 and Th17 cells are probably not involved in the induction of gp96. Furthermore, gp96 was able to induce its own expression. The ER-stress inducer tunicamycin increased gp96-expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both ulcerative colitis (UC and CD patients showed significantly elevated gp96 mRNA levels in intestinal biopsies which correlated positively with the degree of inflammation of the tissue. Since gp96 is highly expressed on the one hand upon stress induction as during inflammation and on the other hand possibly mediating tolerance, these results will help to understand the whether gp96 plays a role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD.

  11. Identification of New Potential Interaction Partners for Human Cytoplasmic Copper Chaperone Atox1: Roles in Gene Regulation?

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    Helena Öhrvik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human copper (Cu chaperone Atox1 delivers Cu to P1B type ATPases in the Golgi network, for incorporation into essential Cu-dependent enzymes. Atox1 homologs are found in most organisms; it is a 68-residue ferredoxin-fold protein that binds Cu in a conserved surface-exposed Cys-X-X-Cys (CXXC motif. In addition to its well-documented cytoplasmic chaperone function, in 2008 Atox1 was suggested to have functionality in the nucleus. To identify new interactions partners of Atox1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with a large human placenta library of cDNA fragments using Atox1 as bait. Among 98 million fragments investigated, 25 proteins were found to be confident interaction partners. Nine of these were uncharacterized proteins, and the remaining 16 proteins were analyzed by bioinformatics with respect to cell localization, tissue distribution, function, sequence motifs, three-dimensional structures and interaction networks. Several of the hits were eukaryotic-specific proteins interacting with DNA or RNA implying that Atox1 may act as a modulator of gene regulation. Notably, because many of the identified proteins contain CXXC motifs, similarly to the Cu transport reactions, interactions between these and Atox1 may be mediated by Cu.

  12. Cell cycle- and chaperone-mediated regulation of H3K56ac incorporation in yeast.

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    Tommy Kaplan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 is a covalent modification best known as a mark of newly replicated chromatin, but it has also been linked to replication-independent histone replacement. Here, we measured H3K56ac levels at single-nucleosome resolution in asynchronously growing yeast cultures, as well as in yeast proceeding synchronously through the cell cycle. We developed a quantitative model of H3K56ac kinetics, which shows that H3K56ac is largely explained by the genomic replication timing and the turnover rate of each nucleosome, suggesting that cell cycle profiles of H3K56ac should reveal most first-time nucleosome incorporation events. However, since the deacetylases Hst3/4 prevent use of H3K56ac as a marker for histone deposition during M phase, we also directly measured M phase histone replacement rates. We report a global decrease in turnover rates during M phase and a further specific decrease in turnover at several early origins of replication, which switch from rapidly replaced in G1 phase to stably bound during M phase. Finally, by measuring H3 replacement in yeast deleted for the H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109 and its two co-chaperones Asf1 and Vps75, we find evidence that Rtt109 and Asf1 preferentially enhance histone replacement at rapidly replaced nucleosomes, whereas Vps75 appears to inhibit histone turnover at those loci. These results provide a broad perspective on histone replacement/incorporation throughout the cell cycle and suggest that H3K56 acetylation provides a positive-feedback loop by which replacement of a nucleosome enhances subsequent replacement at the same location.

  13. Integrating the cell stress response: a new view of molecular chaperones as immunological and physiological homeostatic regulators.

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    Henderson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The response of cells to stress was first documented in the 1960s and 1970s and the molecular nature of the families of proteins that subserve this vital response, the molecular chaperones, were identified and subjected to critical study in the period from the late 1980s. This resulted in the rapidly advancing new field of protein folding and its role in cellular function. Emerging at the same time, but initially largely ignored, were reports that molecular chaperones could be released by cells and exist on the outer plasma membrane or in the body fluids. These secreted molecular chaperones were found to have intercellular signalling functions. There is now a growing body of evidence to support the hypothesis that molecular chaperones have properties ascribed to the Roman god Janus, the god of gates, doors, beginnings and endings, whose two faces point in different directions. Molecular chaperones appear to have one set of key functions within the cell and, potentially, a separate set of functions when they exist on the cell surface or in the various fluid phases of the body. Thus, it is a likely hypothesis that secreted molecular chaperones act as an additional level of homeostatic control possibly linking cellular stress to physiological systems such as the immune system. This review concentrates on three key molecular chaperones: Hsp10, Hsp60 and the Hsp70 family for which most information is available. An important consideration is the role that these proteins may play in human disease and in the treatment of human disease.

  14. Dexamethasone regulates CFTR expression in Calu-3 cells with the involvement of chaperones HSP70 and HSP90.

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    Luiz Felipe M Prota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dexamethasone is widely used for pulmonary exacerbation in patients with cystic fibrosis, however, not much is known about the effects of glucocorticoids on the wild-type cystic fibrosis channel transmembrane regulator (CFTR. Our aim was to determine the effects of dexamethasone treatment on wild-type CFTR expression. METHODS AND RESULTS: Dose-response (1 nM to 10 µM and time course (3 to 48 h curves were generated for dexamethasone for mRNA expression in Calu-3 cells using a real-time PCR. Within 24 h, dexamethasone (10 nM showed a 0.3-fold decrease in CFTR mRNA expression, and a 3.2-fold increase in αENaC mRNA expression compared with control groups. Dexamethasone (10 nM induced a 1.97-fold increase in the total protein of wild-type CFTR, confirmed by inhibition by mifepristone. To access surface protein expression, biotinylation followed by Western blotting showed that dexamethasone treatment led to a 2.35-fold increase in the amount of CFTR in the cell surface compared with the untreated control groups. Once protein translation was inhibited with cycloheximide, dexamethasone could not increase the amount of CFTR protein. Protein stability was assessed by inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide (50 µg/ml at different times in cells treated with dexamethasone and in untreated cells. Dexamethasone did not alter the degradation of wild-type CFTR. Assessment of the B band of CFTR within 15 min of metabolic pulse labeling showed a 1.5-fold increase in CFTR protein after treatment with dexamethasone for 24 h. Chaperone 90 (HSP90 binding to CFTR increased 1.55-fold after treatment with dexamethasone for 24 h, whereas chaperone 70 (HSP70 binding decreased 0.30 fold in an immunoprecipitation assay. CONCLUSION: Mature wild-type CFTR protein is regulated by dexamethasone post transcription, involving cotranslational mechanisms with HSP90 and HSP70, which enhances maturation and expression of wild-type CFTR.

  15. Posttranslocation Chaperone PrsA2 Regulates the Maturation and Secretion of Listeria monocytogenes Proprotein Virulence Factors ▿

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    Forster, Brian M.; Zemansky, Jason; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Marquis, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    PrsA2 is a conserved posttranslocation chaperone and a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that contributes to the virulence of the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. One of the phenotypes associated with a prsA2 mutant is decreased activity of the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). PC-PLC is made as a proenzyme whose maturation is mediated by a metalloprotease (Mpl). The proforms of PC-PLC and Mpl accumulate at the membrane-cell wall interface until a decrease in pH triggers their maturation and rapid secretion into the host cell. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which PrsA2 regulates the activity of PC-PLC. We observed that in the absence of PrsA2, the proenzymes are secreted at physiological pH and do not mature upon a decrease in pH. The sensitivity of the prsA2 mutant to cell wall hydrolases was modified. However, no apparent changes in cell wall porosity were detected. Interestingly, synthesis of PC-PLC in the absence of its propeptide lead to the secretion of a fully active enzyme in the cytosol of host cells independent of PrsA2, indicating that neither the propeptide of PC-PLC nor PrsA2 is required for native folding of the catalytic domain, although both influence secretion of the enzyme. Taken together, these results suggest that PrsA2 regulates compartmentalization of Mpl and PC-PLC, possibly by influencing cell wall properties and interacting with the PC-PLC propeptide. Moreover, the ability of these proproteins to respond to a decrease in pH during intracellular growth depends on their localization at the membrane-cell wall interface. PMID:21908675

  16. Posttranslocation chaperone PrsA2 regulates the maturation and secretion of Listeria monocytogenes proprotein virulence factors.

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    Forster, Brian M; Zemansky, Jason; Portnoy, Daniel A; Marquis, Hélène

    2011-11-01

    PrsA2 is a conserved posttranslocation chaperone and a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that contributes to the virulence of the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. One of the phenotypes associated with a prsA2 mutant is decreased activity of the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). PC-PLC is made as a proenzyme whose maturation is mediated by a metalloprotease (Mpl). The proforms of PC-PLC and Mpl accumulate at the membrane-cell wall interface until a decrease in pH triggers their maturation and rapid secretion into the host cell. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which PrsA2 regulates the activity of PC-PLC. We observed that in the absence of PrsA2, the proenzymes are secreted at physiological pH and do not mature upon a decrease in pH. The sensitivity of the prsA2 mutant to cell wall hydrolases was modified. However, no apparent changes in cell wall porosity were detected. Interestingly, synthesis of PC-PLC in the absence of its propeptide lead to the secretion of a fully active enzyme in the cytosol of host cells independent of PrsA2, indicating that neither the propeptide of PC-PLC nor PrsA2 is required for native folding of the catalytic domain, although both influence secretion of the enzyme. Taken together, these results suggest that PrsA2 regulates compartmentalization of Mpl and PC-PLC, possibly by influencing cell wall properties and interacting with the PC-PLC propeptide. Moreover, the ability of these proproteins to respond to a decrease in pH during intracellular growth depends on their localization at the membrane-cell wall interface.

  17. Senescent mouse cells fail to overtly regulate the HIRA histone chaperone and do not form robust Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci

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    Enders Greg H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a permanent growth arrest that occurs in response to cellular stressors, such as telomere shortening or activation of oncogenes. Although the process of senescence growth arrest is somewhat conserved between mouse and human cells, there are some critical differences in the molecular pathways of senescence between these two species. Recent studies in human fibroblasts have defined a cell signaling pathway that is initiated by repression of a specific Wnt ligand, Wnt2. This, in turn, activates a histone chaperone HIRA, and culminates in formation of specialized punctate domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence-Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF, that are enriched in the histone variant, macroH2A. SAHF are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. We asked whether this Wnt2-HIRA-SAHF pathway is conserved in mouse fibroblasts. Results We show that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and mouse skin fibroblasts, do not form robust punctate SAHF in response to an activated Ras oncogene or shortened telomeres. However, senescent MEFs do exhibit elevated levels of macroH2A staining throughout the nucleus as a whole. Consistent with their failure to fully activate the SAHF assembly pathway, the Wnt2-HIRA signaling axis is not overtly regulated between proliferating and senescent mouse cells. Conclusions In addition to the previously defined differences between mouse and human cells in the mechanisms and phenotypes associated with senescence, we conclude that senescent mouse and human fibroblasts also differ at the level of chromatin and the signaling pathways used to regulate chromatin. These differences between human and mouse senescence may contribute to the increased propensity of mouse fibroblasts (and perhaps other mouse cell types to become immortalized and transformed, compared to human cells.

  18. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2 in regulating human sperm-egg recognition

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    Brett Nixon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI, recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2, as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  19. The role of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2) in regulating human sperm-egg recognition.

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    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Dun, Matthew D; Redgrove, Kate A; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Aitken, R John

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common lesions present in the spermatozoa of human infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. Although this unique cellular interaction can now be readily by-passed by assisted reproductive strategies such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), recent large-scale epidemiological studies have encouraged the cautious use of this technology and highlighted the need for further research into the mechanisms responsible for defective sperm-egg recognition. Previous work in this field has established that the sperm domains responsible for oocyte interaction are formed during spermatogenesis prior to being dynamically modified during epididymal maturation and capacitation in female reproductive tract. While the factors responsible for the regulation of these sequential maturational events are undoubtedly complex, emerging research has identified the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein A2 (HSPA2), as a key regulator of these events in human spermatozoa. HSPA2 is a testis-enriched member of the 70 kDa heat shock protein family that promotes the folding, transport, and assembly of protein complexes and has been positively correlated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) success. Furthermore, reduced expression of HSPA2 from the human sperm proteome leads to an impaired capacity for cumulus matrix dispersal, sperm-egg recognition and fertilization following both IVF and ICSI. In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the role of HSPA2 in sperm function and explore the potential mechanisms by which it is depleted in the spermatozoa of infertile patients. Such information offers novel insights into the molecular mechanisms governing sperm function.

  20. Posttranslocation Chaperone PrsA2 Regulates the Maturation and Secretion of Listeria monocytogenes Proprotein Virulence Factors ▿

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    Forster, Brian M.; Zemansky, Jason; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Marquis, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    PrsA2 is a conserved posttranslocation chaperone and a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that contributes to the virulence of the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. One of the phenotypes associated with a prsA2 mutant is decreased activity of the broad-range phospholipase C (PC-PLC). PC-PLC is made as a proenzyme whose maturation is mediated by a metalloprotease (Mpl). The proforms of PC-PLC and Mpl accumulate at the membrane-cell wall interface until a de...

  1. The heat shock protein-90 co-chaperone, Cyclophilin 40, promotes ALK-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma viability and its expression is regulated by the NPM-ALK oncoprotein

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    Pearson Joel D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL is a T cell lymphoma defined by the presence of chromosomal translocations involving the ALK tyrosine kinase gene. These translocations generate fusion proteins (e.g. NPM-ALK with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity, which activate numerous signalling pathways important for ALK+ ALCL pathogenesis. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90 plays a critical role in allowing NPM-ALK and other signalling proteins to function in this lymphoma. Co-chaperone proteins are important for helping Hsp90 fold proteins and for directing Hsp90 to specific clients; however the importance of co-chaperone proteins in ALK+ ALCL has not been investigated. Our preliminary findings suggested that expression of the immunophilin co-chaperone, Cyclophilin 40 (Cyp40, is up-regulated in ALK+ ALCL by JunB, a transcription factor activated by NPM-ALK signalling. In this study we examined the regulation of the immunophilin family of co-chaperones by NPM-ALK and JunB, and investigated whether the immunophilin co-chaperones promote the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines. Methods NPM-ALK and JunB were knocked-down in ALK+ ALCL cell lines with siRNA, and the effect on the expression of the three immunophilin co-chaperones: Cyp40, FK506-binding protein (FKBP 51, and FKBP52 examined. Furthermore, the effect of knock-down of the immunophilin co-chaperones, either individually or in combination, on the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines and NPM-ALK levels and activity was also examined. Results We found that NPM-ALK promoted the transcription of Cyp40 and FKBP52, but only Cyp40 transcription was promoted by JunB. We also observed reduced viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines treated with Cyp40 siRNA, but not with siRNAs directed against FKBP52 or FKBP51. Finally, we demonstrate that the decrease in the viability of ALK+ ALCL cell lines treated with Cyp40 siRNA does not appear to

  2. Study on the chaperone properties of conserved GTPases.

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    Wang, Xiang; Xue, Jiaying; Sun, Zhe; Qin, Yan; Gong, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    As a large family of hydrolases, GTPases are widespread in cells and play the very important biological function of hydrolyzing GTP into GDP and inorganic phosphate through binding with it. GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, protein synthesis, and protein transportation. Chaperones can facilitate the folding or refolding of nascent peptides and denatured proteins to their native states. However, chaperones do not occur in the native structures in which they can perform their normal biological functions. In the current study, the chaperone activity of the conserved GTPases of Escherichia coli is tested by the chemical denaturation and chaperone-assisted renaturation of citrate synthase and α-glucosidase. The effects of ribosomes and nucleotides on the chaperone activity are also examined. Our data indicate that these conserved GTPases have chaperone properties, and may be ancestral protein folding factors that have appeared before dedicated chaperones.

  3. Inducible Hsp70 in the Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival: Analysis of Chaperone Induction, Expression and Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Zorzi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that control stress is central to realize how cells respond to environmental and physiological insults. All the more important is to reveal how tumour cells withstand their harsher growth conditions and cope with drug-induced apoptosis, since resistance to chemotherapy is the foremost complication when curing cancer. Intensive research on tumour biology over the past number of years has provided significant insights into the molecular events that occur during oncogenesis, and resistance to anti-cancer drugs has been shown to often rely on stress response and expression of inducible heat shock proteins (HSPs. However, with respect to the mechanisms guarding cancer cells against proteotoxic stresses and the modulatory effects that allow their survival, much remains to be defined. Heat shock proteins are molecules responsible for folding newly synthesized polypeptides under physiological conditions and misfolded proteins under stress, but their role in maintaining the transformed phenotype often goes beyond their conventional chaperone activity. Expression of inducible HSPs is known to correlate with limited sensitivity to apoptosis induced by diverse cytotoxic agents and dismal prognosis of several tumour types, however whether cancer cells survive because of the constitutive expression of heat shock proteins or the ability to induce them when adapting to the hostile microenvironment remains to be elucidated. Clear is that tumours appear nowadays more “addicted” to heat shock proteins than previously envisaged, and targeting HSPs represents a powerful approach and a future challenge for sensitizing tumours to therapy. This review will focus on the anti-apoptotic role of heat shock 70kDa protein (Hsp70, and how regulatory factors that control inducible Hsp70 synthesis, expression and activity may be relevant for response to stress and survival of cancer cells.

  4. The RNA chaperone Hfq is involved in stress response and virulence in Neisseria meningitidis and is a pleiotropic regulator of protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantappiè, Laura; Metruccio, Matteo M E; Seib, Kate L; Oriente, Francesca; Cartocci, Elena; Ferlicca, Francesca; Giuliani, Marzia M; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Delany, Isabel

    2009-05-01

    The well-conserved protein Hfq has emerged as the key modulator of riboregulation in bacteria. This protein is thought to function as an RNA chaperone and to facilitate base pairing between small regulatory RNA (sRNA) and mRNA targets, and many sRNAs are dependent on the Hfq protein for their regulatory functions. To address the possible role of Hfq in riboregulated circuits in Neisseria meningitidis, we generated an Hfq mutant of the MC58 strain, and the knockout mutant has pleiotropic phenotypes; it has a general growth phenotype in vitro in culture media, and it is sensitive to a wide range of stresses, including those that it may encounter in the host. Furthermore, the expression profile of a vast number of proteins is clearly altered in the mutant, and we have identified 27 proteins by proteomics. All of the phenotypes tested to date are also restored by complementation of Hfq expression in the mutant strain. Importantly, in ex vivo and in vivo models of infection the Hfq mutant is attenuated. These data indicate that Hfq plays a key role in stress response and virulence, and we propose a major role for Hfq in regulation of gene expression. Moreover, this study suggests that in meningococcus there is a large Hfq-mediated sRNA network which so far is largely unexplored.

  5. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  6. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  7. Molecular chaperones: The modular evolution of cellular networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tamás Korcsmáros; István A Kovács; Máté S Szalay; Péter Csermely

    2007-04-01

    Molecular chaperones play a prominent role in signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks of the cell. Recent advances uncovered that chaperones act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Chaperones have weak links, connect hubs, are in the overlaps of network modules and may uncouple these modules during stress, which gives an additional protection for the cell at the network-level. Moreover, after stress chaperones are essential to re-build inter-modular contacts by their low affinity sampling of the potential interaction partners in different modules. This opens the way to the chaperone-regulated modular evolution of cellular networks, and helps us to design novel therapeutic and anti-aging strategies.

  8. Yeast prions help identify and define chaperone interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Michael; Masison, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Proteins in the cell experience various stressful conditions that can affect their ability to attain and maintain the structural conformations they need to perform effectively. Protein chaperones are an important part of a cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome in the face of such challenges. Chaperones from different conserved families have multiple members that cooperate to regulate each other's activity and produce machines that perform a variety of tasks. The large numbers of related chaperones with both functionally overlapping and distinct activities allows fine-tuning of the machinery for specific tasks, but presents a daunting degree of complexity. Yeast prions are misfolded forms of cellular proteins whose propagation depends on the action of protein chaperones. Studying how propagation of yeast prions is affected by alterations in functions of various chaperones provides an approach to understanding this complexity.

  9. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates.

  10. Salt bridges regulate both dimer formation and monomeric flexibility in HdeB and may have a role in periplasmic chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjian; Rasmussen, Tim; Harding, Amanda J; Booth, Nuala A; Booth, Ian R; Naismith, James H

    2012-01-20

    Escherichia coli and Gram-negative bacteria that live in the human gut must be able to tolerate rapid and large changes in environmental pH. Low pH irreversibly denatures and precipitates many bacterial proteins. While cytoplasmic proteins are well buffered against such swings, periplasmic proteins are not. Instead, it appears that some bacteria utilize chaperone proteins that stabilize periplasmic proteins, preventing their precipitation. Two highly expressed and related proteins, HdeA and HdeB, have been identified as acid-activated chaperones. The structure of HdeA is known and a mechanism for activation has been proposed. In this model, dimeric HdeA dissociates at low pH, and the exposed dimeric interface binds exposed hydrophobic surfaces of acid-denatured proteins, preventing their irreversible aggregation. We now report the structure and biophysical characterization of the HdeB protein. The monomer of HdeB shares a similar structure with HdeA, but its dimeric interface is different in composition and spatial location. We have used fluorescence to study the behavior of HdeB as pH is lowered, and like HdeA, it dissociates to monomers. We have identified one of the key intersubunit interactions that controls pH-induced monomerization. Our analysis identifies a structural interaction within the HdeB monomer that is disrupted as pH is lowered, leading to enhanced structural flexibility.

  11. Salt Bridges Regulate Both Dimer Formation and Monomeric Flexibility in HdeB and May Have a Role in Periplasmic Chaperone Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjian; Rasmussen, Tim; Harding, Amanda J.; Booth, Nuala A.; Booth, Ian R.; Naismith, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Gram-negative bacteria that live in the human gut must be able to tolerate rapid and large changes in environmental pH. Low pH irreversibly denatures and precipitates many bacterial proteins. While cytoplasmic proteins are well buffered against such swings, periplasmic proteins are not. Instead, it appears that some bacteria utilize chaperone proteins that stabilize periplasmic proteins, preventing their precipitation. Two highly expressed and related proteins, HdeA and HdeB, have been identified as acid-activated chaperones. The structure of HdeA is known and a mechanism for activation has been proposed. In this model, dimeric HdeA dissociates at low pH, and the exposed dimeric interface binds exposed hydrophobic surfaces of acid-denatured proteins, preventing their irreversible aggregation. We now report the structure and biophysical characterization of the HdeB protein. The monomer of HdeB shares a similar structure with HdeA, but its dimeric interface is different in composition and spatial location. We have used fluorescence to study the behavior of HdeB as pH is lowered, and like HdeA, it dissociates to monomers. We have identified one of the key intersubunit interactions that controls pH-induced monomerization. Our analysis identifies a structural interaction within the HdeB monomer that is disrupted as pH is lowered, leading to enhanced structural flexibility. PMID:22138344

  12. Enhancement of lipase r27RCL production in Pichia pastoris by regulating gene dosage and co-expression with chaperone protein disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Chong; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Lin, Nai-Xin; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Yan

    2013-12-10

    Pichia pastoris has been successfully used in the production of many secreted and intracellular recombinant proteins, but there is still a large room of improvement for this expression system. Two factors drastically influence the lipase r27RCL production from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021, which are gene dosage and protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Regarding the effect of gene dosage, the enzyme activity for recombinant strain with three copies lipase gene was 1.95-fold higher than that for recombinant strain with only one copy lipase gene. In addition, the lipase production was further improved by co-expression with chaperone PDI involved in the disulfide bond formation in the ER. Overall, the maximum enzyme activity reached 355U/mL by the recombinant strain with one copy chaperone gene PDI plus five copies lipase gene proRCL in shaking flasks, which was 2.74-fold higher than that for the control strain with only one copy lipase gene. Overall, co-expression with PDI vastly increased the capacity for processing proteins of ER in P. pastoris.

  13. Cell-cycle-regulated control of VSG expression site silencing by histones and histone chaperones ASF1A and CAF-1b in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsford, Sam; Horn, David

    2012-11-01

    Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes involves monoallelic expression and reversible silencing of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes found adjacent to telomeres in polycistronic expression sites (ESs). We assessed the impact on ES silencing of five candidate essential chromatin-associated factors that emerged from a genome-wide RNA interference viability screen. Using this approach, we demonstrate roles in VSG ES silencing for two histone chaperones. Defects in S-phase progression in cells depleted for histone H3, or either chaperone, highlight in particular the link between chromatin assembly and DNA replication control. S-phase checkpoint arrest was incomplete, however, allowing G2/M-specific VSG ES derepression following knockdown of histone H3. In striking contrast, knockdown of anti-silencing factor 1A (ASF1A) allowed for derepression at all cell cycle stages, whereas knockdown of chromatin assembly factor 1b (CAF-1b) revealed derepression predominantly in S-phase and G2/M. Our results support a central role for chromatin in maintaining VSG ES silencing. ASF1A and CAF-1b appear to play constitutive and DNA replication-dependent roles, respectively, in the recycling and assembly of chromatin. Defects in these functions typically lead to arrest in S-phase but defective cells can also progress through the cell cycle leading to nucleosome depletion and derepression of telomeric VSG ESs.

  14. Molecular chaperones and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of intracellular or extracellular protein aggregates that result from conformational changes in proteins. These diseases may result from an imbalance between the production of misfolded proteins and normal chaperone capacity. Molecular chaperones provide a first line of defence against misfolded, aggregation-prone proteins and are, therefore, promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Histone chaperones: assisting histone traffic and nucleosome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The functional organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin uses histones as components of its building block, the nucleosome. Histone chaperones, which are proteins that escort histones throughout their cellular life, are key actors in all facets of histone metabolism; they regulate the supply and dynamics of histones at chromatin for its assembly and disassembly. Histone chaperones can also participate in the distribution of histone variants, thereby defining distinct chromatin landscapes of importance for genome function, stability, and cell identity. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of the known histone chaperones and their histone partners, focusing on histone H3 and its variants. We then place them into an escort network that distributes these histones in various deposition pathways. Through their distinct interfaces, we show how they affect dynamics during DNA replication, DNA damage, and transcription, and how they maintain genome integrity. Finally, we discuss the importance of histone chaperones during development and describe how misregulation of the histone flow can link to disease.

  16. Advances in molecular chaperones regulating yeast prion [ PSI+] propagation%分子伴侣对酵母朊病毒[ PSI+]增殖影响的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林康伟; 连惠勇; 蔡澎

    2015-01-01

    The finding and research on yeast prion are of great values for biology and medical sciences.Research advances in molecular chaperones, especially in Hsp104p, Hsp70p and Hsp40p, regulating yeast prion [PSI+] propaga-tion,are reviewed.%酵母朊病毒( prion)的发现和研究在生物学和医学上有着极其重要的理论价值和实际应用价值。该文综述了分子伴侣对酵母prion[PSI+]增殖影响的研究进展,重点介绍了热休克蛋白Hsp104p、Hsp70p和Hsp40p在其中发挥的重要作用。

  17. The molecular chaperone HSPA2 plays a key role in regulating the expression of sperm surface receptors that mediate sperm-egg recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A; Nixon, Brett; Baker, Mark A; Hetherington, Louise; Baker, Gordon; Liu, De-Yi; Aitken, R John

    2012-01-01

    A common defect encountered in the spermatozoa of male infertility patients is an idiopathic failure of sperm-egg recognition. In order to resolve the molecular basis of this condition we have compared the proteomic profiles of spermatozoa exhibiting an impaired capacity for sperm-egg recognition with normal cells using label free mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantification. This analysis indicated that impaired sperm-zona binding was associated with reduced expression of the molecular chaperone, heat shock 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2), from the sperm proteome. Western blot analysis confirmed this observation in independent patients and demonstrated that the defect did not extend to other members of the HSP70 family. HSPA2 was present in the acrosomal domain of human spermatozoa as a major component of 5 large molecular mass complexes, the most dominant of which was found to contain HSPA2 in close association with just two other proteins, sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) and arylsulfatase A (ARSA), both of which that have previously been implicated in sperm-egg interaction. The interaction between SPAM1, ARSA and HSPA2 in a multimeric complex mediating sperm-egg interaction, coupled with the complete failure of this process when HSPA2 is depleted in infertile patients, provides new insights into the mechanisms by which sperm function is impaired in cases of male infertility.

  18. Molecular mechanisms used by chaperones to reduce the toxicity of aberrant protein oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannini, Benedetta; Cascella, Roberta; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Van Waarde-Verhagen, Maria; Meehan, Sarah; Roodveldt, Cintia; Campioni, Silvia; Boninsegna, Matilde; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Kampinga, Harm H.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wilson, Mark R.; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Chaperones are the primary regulators of the proteostasis network and are known to facilitate protein folding, inhibit protein aggregation, and promote disaggregation and clearance of misfolded aggregates inside cells. We have tested the effects of five chaperones on the toxicity of misfolded oligom

  19. Identification of putative RuBisCo activase (TaRca1 ˗ the catalytic chaperone regulating carbon assimilatory pathway in wheat (Triticum aestivum under the heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANJEET RANJAN KUMAR

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available RuBisCo activase (Rca is a catalytic chaperone involved in modulating the activity of RuBisCo (key enzyme of photosynthetic pathway. Here, we identified eight novel transcripts from wheat through data mining predicted to be Rca and cloned a transcript of 1.4 kb from cv. HD2985, named as TaRca1 (GenBank acc. no. KC776912. Single copy number of TaRca1 was observed in wheat genome. Expression analysis in diverse wheat genotypes (HD2985, Halna, PBW621 and HD2329 showed very high relative expression of TaRca1 in Halna under control and HS-treated, as compared to other cultivars at different stages of growth. TaRca1 protein was predicted to be chloroplast-localized with numerous potential phosphorylation sites. Nothern blot analysis showed maximum accumulation of TaRca1 transcript in thermotolerant cv. during mealy-ripe stage, as compared to thermosusceptible. Decrease in the photosynthetic parameters was observed in all the cultivars, except PBW621 in response to HS. We observed significant increase in the Rca activity in all the cultivars under HS at different stages of growth. HS causes decrease in the RuBisCo activity; maximum reduction was observed during pollination stage in thermosusceptible cvs. as validated through immunoblotting. We observed uniform carbon distribution in different tissues of thermotolerant cvs., as compared to thermosusceptible. Similarly, tolerance level of leaf was observed maximum in Halna having high Rca activity under HS. A positive correlation was observed between the transcript and activity of TaRca1 in HS-treated Halna. Similarly, TaRca1 enzyme showed positive correlation with the activity of RuBisCo. There is, however, need to manipulate the thermal stability of TaRca1 enzyme through protein engineering for sustaining the photosynthetic rate under HS – a novel approach towards development of ‘climate-smart’ crop.

  20. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L.; Champion, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress. PMID:27626276

  1. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L; Champion, Matthew M; Clark, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress.

  2. The conformational dynamics of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapa, Koyeli; Sikor, Martin; Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Waegemann, Karin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Seidel, Claus A M; Neupert, Walter; Lamb, Don C; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2010-04-09

    Heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70) represent a ubiquitous and conserved family of molecular chaperones involved in a plethora of cellular processes. The dynamics of their ATP hydrolysis-driven and cochaperone-regulated conformational cycle are poorly understood. We used fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze, in real time and at single-molecule resolution, the effects of nucleotides and cochaperones on the conformation of Ssc1, a mitochondrial member of the family. We report that the conformation of its ADP state is unexpectedly heterogeneous, in contrast to a uniform ATP state. Substrates are actively involved in determining the conformation of Ssc1. The J protein Mdj1 does not interact transiently with the chaperone, as generally believed, but rather is released slowly upon ATP hydrolysis. Analysis of the major bacterial Hsp70 revealed important differences between highly homologous members of the family, possibly explaining tuning of Hsp70 chaperones to meet specific functions in different organisms and cellular compartments.

  3. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  4. Hsp70 chaperone systems: diversity of cellular functions and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M P; Bukau, B

    1998-03-01

    Hsp70 chaperone systems play an essential role in the life cycle of many proteins not only in an hostile environment but also under normal growth conditions. In the course of evolution the diversification of functions was accompanied by an amplification of components of the Hsp70 system. Here strategies are reviewed how different Hsp70 systems work independently or cooperate with each other in a functional network to perform their housekeeping tasks even under stress conditions. We further discuss how co-chaperones which act as targeting factors regulate the cycle of substrate binding and release upon which the Hsp70 chaperone activity depends.

  5. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  6. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cetinbaş

    Full Text Available Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  7. Heat shock protein 90 acts as a molecular chaperone in late-phase acti-vation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 stimulated by oxida-tive stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai-hua LIU; Hao-yu YUAN; Chun-ya CAO; Zhi-ping GAO; Bing-yang ZHU; Hong-lin HUANG; Duan-fang LIAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether cytosolic heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) acts as a molecular chaperone on the activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and cell proliferation stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Methods: VSMC were exposed to 1 μmol/L LY83583 (6-anilinoquinoline-5,8-quinolinedione, producer of ROS) for 120 min in the presence or absence of 5 μmol/L geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of HSP90. Then the total, soluble, and insoluble proteins of the ceils were collected. HSP90, ERK1/2, and phosphor-ERK 1/2 in the cell lysate were measured by Western blotting. The interaction of HSP90 and phosphor-ERK1/2 was analyzed by immunoprecipi- tation assay, and the nuclear phosphor-ERK1/2 was measured by Western blot- ting and immunofluorescence. Cell proliferation was tested by cell counting and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-di-phenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT). Results: The cytosolic HSP90 of VSMC was upregulated by LY83583 in a time-dependent man- ner with the peak at 120 min, which is consistent with the late peak of phosphor- ERK1/2. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting analyses showed that LY83583 increased the interaction of HSP90 with phosphor-ERK1/2, the phosphor-ERK1/2 level, and the soluble phosphor-ERK1/2 level by 1.8-, 2.5-, and 2.9-fold, respectively. In contrast, the insoluble phosphor-ERK1/2 of VSMC was decreased. Interestingly, LY83583 treatment promoted the nuclear phosphor-ERK1/2 by 7.6-fold as con- finned by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. Furthermore, cell counting and the MTT assay showed that LY83583 stimulated VSMC prolifera- tion with the increased expression of HSP90 and levels of soluble and nuclear phosphor-ERK1/2. Pretreatment of geldanamycin antagonized the effect of LY83583. Conclusion: HSP90 could mediate the oxidative stress-stimulated, late- phase activation of ERK1/2 and VSMC proliferation by promoting the ERK1/2 phosphorylation, the

  8. Insight into the assembly of chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Stegmann, R.; Manakova, E.; Roessle, M.; Hermann, T.; Heumann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Martinsried (Germany); Axmann, S.; Plueckthun, A. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland); Wiedenmann, A. [HMI, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    Chaperones are proteins that help other proteins (substrate proteins) to acquire a `good` conformation. The folding is a dynamic process and involves repetitive binding and release of the chaperone components and of the substrate protein. Small-angle neutron scattering is used to investigate the structural changes that appear to happen during the folding process. (author). 2 refs.

  9. Posttranslational modulation on the biological activities of molecular chaperones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are a family of proteins that were first noticed to exist about 45 years ago from their increased transcription under heat shock conditions.As a result,the regulation of their encoding genes has been subject to extensive studies.Recent studies revealed that the biological activities of molecular chaperones can also be effectively modulated at the protein level.The ways of modulation so far elucidated include allosteric effect,covalent modification,protein-protein interaction,and con-formational alteration induced by such macro-environmental conditions as temperature and pH.These latter aspects were reviewed here.Emphasized here is the importance of such immediate structural alterations that lead to an immediate activity increase,providing the immediate protection needed for the cells to survive the stress conditions.

  10. Posttranslational modulation on the biological activities of molecular chaperones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG ZengYi

    2009-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are a family of proteins that were first noticed to exist about 45 years ago from their increased transcription under heat shock conditions. As a result, the regulation of their encoding genes has been subject to extensive studies. Recent studies revealed that the biological activities of molecular chaperones can also be effectively modulated at the protein level. The ways of modulation so far elucidated include allosteric effect, covalent modification, protein-protein interaction, and con-formational alteration induced by such macro-environmental conditions as temperature and pH. These latter aspects were reviewed here. Emphasized here is the importance of such immediate structural alterations that lead to an immediate activity increase, providing the immediate protection needed for the cells to survive the stress conditions.

  11. The histone chaperones Nap1 and Vps75 bind histones H3 and H4 in a tetrameric conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Ward, Richard; Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; El-Mkami, Hassane; Norman, David George; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2011-02-18

    Histone chaperones physically interact with histones to direct proper assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes regulating diverse nuclear processes such as DNA replication, promoter remodeling, transcription elongation, DNA damage, and histone variant exchange. Currently, the best-characterized chaperone-histone interaction is that between the ubiquitous chaperone Asf1 and a dimer of H3 and H4. Nucleosome assembly proteins (Nap proteins) represent a distinct class of histone chaperone. Using pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) measurements and protein crosslinking, we show that two members of this class, Nap1 and Vps75, bind histones in the tetrameric conformation also observed when they are sequestered within the nucleosome. Furthermore, H3 and H4 trapped in their tetrameric state can be used as substrates in nucleosome assembly and chaperone-mediated lysine acetylation. This alternate mode of histone interaction provides a potential means of maintaining the integrity of the histone tetramer during cycles of nucleosome reassembly.

  12. Oxidative stress induces monocyte necrosis with enrichment of cell-bound albumin and overexpression of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Tang

    Full Text Available In the present study, monocytes were treated with 5-azacytidine (azacytidine, gossypol or hydrogen peroxide to induce cell death through oxidative stress. A shift from apoptotic to necrotic cell death occurred when monocytes were treated with 100 µM azacytidine for more than 12 hours. Necrotic monocytes exhibited characteristics, including enrichment of cell-bound albumin and up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER- and mitochondrial-specific chaperones to protect mitochondrial integrity, which were not observed in other necrotic cells, including HUH-7, A2780, A549 and HOC1a. Our results show that the cell-bound albumin originates in the culture medium rather than from monocyte-derived hepatocytes, and that HSP60 is a potential binding partner of the cell-bound albumin. Proteomic analysis shows that HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase are the most abundant up-regulated mitochondrial and ER-chaperones, and that both HSP60 and calreticulin are ubiquitinated in necrotic monocytes. In contrast, expression levels of the cytosolic chaperones HSP90 and HSP71 were down-regulated in the azacytidine-treated monocytes, concomitant with an increase in the levels of these chaperones in the cell culture medium. Collectively, our results demonstrates that chaperones from different organelles behave differently in necrotic monocytes, ER- and mitochondrial chaperones being retained and cytosolic and nuclear chaperones being released into the cell culture medium through the ruptured cell membrane. HSP60 may serve as a new target for development of myeloid leukemia treatment.

  13. RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yang; Hongjie Xia; Qi Qian; Xi Zhou

    2015-01-01

    RNAs are functionally diverse macromolecules whose proper functions rely strictly upon their correct tertiary structures. However, because of their high structural flexibility, correct folding of RNAs is challenging and slow. Therefore, cells and viruses encode a variety of RNA remodeling proteins, including helicases and RNA chaperones. In RNA viruses, these proteins are believed to play pivotal roles in all the processes involving viral RNAs during the life cycle. RNA helicases have been studied extensively for decades, whereas RNA chaperones, particularly virus-encoded RNA chaperones, are often overlooked. This review describes the activities of RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses, particularly the ones identified and characterized in recent years, and the functions of these proteins in different steps of viral life cycles, and presents an overview of this unique group of proteins.

  14. Chaperone effects on prion and nonprion aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhvanov, Eugene G; Romanova, Nina V; Chernoff, Yury O

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to high temperature or other stresses induces a synthesis of heat shock proteins. Many of these proteins are molecular chaperones, and some of them help cells to cope with heat-induced denaturation and aggregation of other proteins. In the last decade, chaperones have received increased attention in connection with their role in maintenance and propagation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prions, infectious or heritable agents transmitted at the protein level. Recent data suggest that functioning of the chaperones in reactivation of heat-damaged proteins and in propagation of prions is based on the same molecular mechanisms but may lead to different consequences depending on the type of aggregate. In both cases the concerted and balanced action of "chaperones' team," including Hsp104, Hsp70, Hsp40 and possibly other proteins, determines whether a misfolded protein is to be incorporated into an aggregate, rescued to the native state or targeted for degradation.

  15. Chaperone receptors: guiding proteins to intracellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; von Löffelholz, Ottilie; Abell, Ben M

    2012-01-01

    Despite mitochondria and chloroplasts having their own genome, 99% of mitochondrial proteins (Rehling et al., Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 5:519-530, 2004) and more than 95% of chloroplast proteins (Soll, Curr Opin Plant Biol 5:529-535, 2002) are encoded by nuclear DNA, synthesised in the cytosol and imported post-translationally. Protein targeting to these organelles depends on cytosolic targeting factors, which bind to the precursor, and then interact with membrane receptors to deliver the precursor into a translocase. The molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 have been widely implicated in protein targeting to mitochondria and chloroplasts, and receptors capable of recognising these chaperones have been identified at the surface of both these organelles (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007). The role of these chaperone receptors is not fully understood, but they have been shown to increase the efficiency of protein targeting (Young et al., Cell 112:41-50, 2003; Qbadou et al., EMBO J 25:1836-1847, 2006). Whether these receptors contribute to the specificity of targeting is less clear. A class of chaperone receptors bearing tetratricopeptide repeat domains is able to specifically bind the highly conserved C terminus of Hsp70 and/or Hsp90. Interestingly, at least of one these chaperone receptors can be found on each organelle (Schlegel et al., Mol Biol Evol 24:2763-2774, 2007), which suggests a universal role in protein targeting for these chaperone receptors. This review will investigate the role that chaperone receptors play in targeting efficiency and specificity, as well as examining recent in silico approaches to find novel chaperone receptors.

  16. Polypeptide binding properties of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C S; Heegaard, N H; Holm, A;

    2000-01-01

    Calreticulin is a highly conserved eukaryotic ubiquitious protein located mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Two major characteristics of calreticulin are its chaperone activity and its lectin properties, but its precise function in intracellular protein and peptide processing remains to be elu......Calreticulin is a highly conserved eukaryotic ubiquitious protein located mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Two major characteristics of calreticulin are its chaperone activity and its lectin properties, but its precise function in intracellular protein and peptide processing remains...

  17. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambre eSala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the Trigger Factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen M. tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin-antitoxin (TA system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria.

  18. Sequence and domain conservation of the coelacanth Hsp40 and Hsp90 chaperones suggests conservation of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Özlem Tastan; Edkins, Adrienne Lesley; Blatch, Gregory Lloyd

    2014-09-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones play an important role in preserving and regulating the active conformational state of cellular proteins. The chaperone complement of the Indonesian Coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis, was elucidated using transcriptomic sequences. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) chaperones, and associated co-chaperones were focused on, and homologous human sequences were used to search the sequence databases. Coelacanth homologs of the cytosolic, mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of human Hsp90 were identified, as well as all of the major co-chaperones of the cytosolic isoform. Most of the human Hsp40s were found to have coelacanth homologs, and the data suggested that all of the chaperone machinery for protein folding at the ribosome, protein translocation to cellular compartments such as the ER and protein degradation were conserved. Some interesting similarities and differences were identified when interrogating human, mouse, and zebrafish homologs. For example, DnaJB13 is predicted to be a non-functional Hsp40 in humans, mouse, and zebrafish due to a corrupted histidine-proline-aspartic acid (HPD) motif, while the coelacanth homolog has an intact HPD. These and other comparisons enabled important functional and evolutionary questions to be posed for future experimental studies.

  19. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Chapman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®, which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and

  20. The future of molecular chaperones and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffard, Rona G; Macario, Alberto J L; de Macario, Everly Conway

    2013-08-01

    Protection of hair cells by HSP70 released by supporting cells is reported by May et al. in this issue of the JCI. Their findings suggest a new way to reduce ototoxicity from therapeutic medications and raise larger questions about the role and integration of heat shock proteins in non–cell-autonomous responses to stress. Increasing evidence suggests an important role for extracellular heat shock proteins in both the nervous system and the immune system. The work also suggests that defective chaperones could cause ear disease and supports the potential use of chaperone therapeutics.

  1. Phenylalanine hydroxylase misfolding and pharmacological chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhaug, Jarl; Aubi, Oscar; Martinez, Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a loss-of-function inborn error of metabolism. As many other inherited diseases the main pathologic mechanism in PKU is an enhanced tendency of the mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) to misfold and undergo ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Recent alternative approaches with therapeutic potential for PKU aim at correcting the PAH misfolding, and in this respect pharmacological chaperones are the focus of increasing interest. These compounds, which often resemble the natural ligands and show mild competitive inhibition, can rescue the misfolded proteins by stimulating their renaturation in vivo. For PKU, a few studies have proven the stabilization of PKU-mutants in vitro, in cells, and in mice by pharmacological chaperones, which have been found either by using the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor as query structure for shape-focused virtual screening or by high-throughput screening of small compound libraries. Both approaches have revealed a number of compounds, most of which bind at the iron-binding site, competitively with respect to BH(4). Furthermore, PAH shares a number of ligands, such as BH(4), amino acid substrates and inhibitors, with the other aromatic amino acid hydroxylases: the neuronal/neuroendocrine enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the tryptophan hydroxylases (TPHs). Recent results indicate that the PAH-targeted pharmacological chaperones should also be tested on TH and the TPHs, and eventually be derivatized to avoid unwanted interactions with these other enzymes. After derivatization and validation in animal models, the PAH-chaperoning compounds represent novel possibilities in the treatment of PKU.

  2. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  3. Identification of Putative RuBisCo Activase (TaRca1)—The Catalytic Chaperone Regulating Carbon Assimilatory Pathway in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) under the Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Suneha; Singh, Khushboo; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Renu; Verma, Neeraj; Kala, Yugal K.; Rai, Gyanendra K.; Grover, Monendra; Mishra, Dwijesh C.; Singh, Bhupinder; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    RuBisCo activase (Rca) is a catalytic chaperone involved in modulating the activity of RuBisCo (key enzyme of photosynthetic pathway). Here, we identified eight novel transcripts from wheat through data mining predicted to be Rca and cloned a transcript of 1.4 kb from cv. HD2985, named as TaRca1 (GenBank acc. no. KC776912). Single copy number of TaRca1 was observed in wheat genome. Expression analysis in diverse wheat genotypes (HD2985, Halna, PBW621, and HD2329) showed very high relative expression of TaRca1 in Halna under control and HS-treated, as compared to other cultivars at different stages of growth. TaRca1 protein was predicted to be chloroplast-localized with numerous potential phosphorylation sites. Northern blot analysis showed maximum accumulation of TaRca1 transcript in thermotolerant cv. during mealy-ripe stage, as compared to thermosusceptible. Decrease in the photosynthetic parameters was observed in all the cultivars, except PBW621 in response to HS. We observed significant increase in the Rca activity in all the cultivars under HS at different stages of growth. HS causes decrease in the RuBisCo activity; maximum reduction was observed during pollination stage in thermosusceptible cvs. as validated through immunoblotting. We observed uniform carbon distribution in different tissues of thermotolerant cvs., as compared to thermosusceptible. Similarly, tolerance level of leaf was observed maximum in Halna having high Rca activity under HS. A positive correlation was observed between the transcript and activity of TaRca1 in HS-treated Halna. Similarly, TaRca1 enzyme showed positive correlation with the activity of RuBisCo. There is, however, need to manipulate the thermal stability of TaRca1 enzyme through protein engineering for sustaining the photosynthetic rate under HS—a novel approach toward development of “climate-smart” crop. PMID:27462325

  4. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit......Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length...... and composition. A large set of available synthetic peptides (n=127) was tested for binding to calreticulin and the results analysed by multivariate data analysis. The parameter that correlated best with binding was hydrophobicity while beta-turn potential disfavoured binding. Only hydrophobic peptides longer...... a peptide-binding specificity for hydrophobic sequences and delineate the fine specificity of calreticulin for hydrophobic amino acid residues....

  5. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% ofthe world population or more than 185 million peopleworldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseasesincluding cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV isthe most common indication for liver transplantation inpatients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an envelopedRNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in theFlaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cellcan be divided into six phases (1) binding and internalization;(2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3)viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNAgenome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) andassembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation)and secretion. Many host factors are involved in theHCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group ofhost cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerouscellular processes including protein folding, multimericprotein assembly, protein trafficking, and proteindegradation. All phases of the viral life cycle requirechaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteinswith chaperones. This review will present our currentknowledge and understanding of the role of chaperonesin the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCVinfection will provide further insights into viral/hostinteractions and potential therapeutic targets for bothHCV and other viruses.

  6. E. coli chaperones DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy inhibit bacterial functional amyloid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margery L; Schmidt, Jens C; Ilbert, Marianne; Doyle, Shannon M; Quan, Shu; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula; Wickner, Sue; Chapman, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation is an ordered aggregation process, where β-sheet rich polymers are assembled from unstructured or partially folded monomers. We examined how two Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones, DnaK and Hsp33, and a more recently characterized periplasmic chaperone, Spy, modulate the aggregation of a functional amyloid protein, CsgA. We found that DnaK, the Hsp70 homologue in E. coli, and Hsp33, a redox-regulated holdase, potently inhibited CsgA amyloidogenesis. The Hsp33 anti-amyloidogenesis activity was oxidation dependent, as oxidized Hsp33 was significantly more efficient than reduced Hsp33 at preventing CsgA aggregation. When soluble CsgA was seeded with preformed amyloid fibers, neither Hsp33 nor DnaK were able to efficiently prevent soluble CsgA from adopting the amyloid conformation. Moreover, both DnaK and Hsp33 increased the time that CsgA was reactive with the amyloid oligomer conformation-specific A11 antibody. Since CsgA must also pass through the periplasm during secretion, we assessed the ability of the periplasmic chaperone Spy to inhibit CsgA polymerization. Like DnaK and Hsp33, Spy also inhibited CsgA polymerization in vitro. Overexpression of Spy resulted in increased chaperone activity in periplasmic extracts and in reduced curli biogenesis in vivo. We propose that DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy exert their effects during the nucleation stages of CsgA fibrillation. Thus, both housekeeping and stress induced cytosolic and periplasmic chaperones may be involved in discouraging premature CsgA interactions during curli biogenesis.

  7. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  8. Disaggregases, molecular chaperones that resolubilize protein aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Z. Mokry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of folding is a seminal event in the life of a protein, as it is essential for proper protein function and therefore cell physiology. Inappropriate folding, or misfolding, can not only lead to loss of function, but also to the formation of protein aggregates, an insoluble association of polypeptides that harm cell physiology, either by themselves or in the process of formation. Several biological processes have evolved to prevent and eliminate the existence of non-functional and amyloidogenic aggregates, as they are associated with several human pathologies. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins are specialized in controlling the quality of the proteins in the cell, specifically by aiding proper folding, and dissolution and clearance of already formed protein aggregates. The latter is a function of disaggregases, mainly represented by the ClpB/Hsp104 subfamily of molecular chaperones, that are ubiquitous in all organisms but, surprisingly, have no orthologs in the cytosol of metazoan cells. This review aims to describe the characteristics of disaggregases and to discuss the function of yeast Hsp104, a disaggregase that is also involved in prion propagation and inheritance.

  9. A primate specific extra domain in the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwadeepak Tripathi

    Full Text Available Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90 is an essential molecular chaperone that mediates folding and quality control of client proteins. Many of them such as protein kinases, steroid receptors and transcription factors are involved in cellular signaling processes. Hsp90 undergoes an ATP hydrolysis dependent conformational cycle to assist folding of the client protein. The canonical Hsp90 shows a typical composition of three distinct domains and interacts with individual cochaperone partners such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase that regulate the reaction cycle of the molecular chaperone. A bioinformatic survey identified an additional domain of 122 amino acids in front of the canonical Hsp90 sequence. This extra domain (E domain is specific to the Catarrhini or drooping nose monkeys, a subdivision of the higher primates that includes man, the great apes and the old world monkeys but is absent from all other species. Our biochemical analysis reveals that Hsp103 associates with cochaperone proteins such as Hop, Cdc37 and Aha1 similar to Hsp90. However, the extra domain reduces the ATP hydrolysis rate to about half when compared to Hsp90 thereby acting as a negative regulator of the molecular chaperonés intrinsic ATPase activity.

  10. Chaperoning Proteins for Destruction: Diverse Roles of Hsp70 Chaperones and their Co-Chaperones in Targeting Misfolded Proteins to the Proteasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Shiber

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones were originally discovered as heat shock-induced proteins that facilitate proper folding of proteins with non-native conformations. While the function of chaperones in protein folding has been well documented over the last four decades, more recent studies have shown that chaperones are also necessary for the clearance of terminally misfolded proteins by the Ub-proteasome system. In this capacity, chaperones protect misfolded degradation substrates from spontaneous aggregation, facilitate their recognition by the Ub ligation machinery and finally shuttle the ubiquitylated substrates to the proteasome. The physiological importance of these functions is manifested by inefficient proteasomal degradation and the accumulation of protein aggregates during ageing or in certain neurodegenerative diseases, when chaperone levels decline. In this review, we focus on the diverse roles of stress-induced chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins to the proteasome and the consequences of their compromised activity. We further discuss the implications of these findings to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  11. Molecular chaperones as targets to circumvent the CFTR defect in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Chanoux

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is the most common autosomal recessive lethal disorder among Caucasian populations. CF results from mutations and resulting dysfunction of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. CFTR is a cyclic AMP-dependent chloride channel that is localized to the apical membrane in epithelial cells where it plays a key role in salt and water homeostasis. An intricate network of molecular chaperone proteins regulates CFTR’s proper maturation and trafficking to the apical membrane. Understanding and manipulation of this network may lead to therapeutics for Cystic Fibrosis in cases where mutant CFTR has aberrant trafficking.

  12. Principles of Quantitative Estimation of the Chaperone-Like Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are able to interact with unfolded states of the protein molecule preventing their aggregation and facilitating folding of the polypeptide chain into the native structure. An understanding of the mechanism of protein aggregation is required to estimate the efficiency of action of chaperones in the test-systems based on the suppression of aggregation of protein substrates. The kinetic regimes of aggregation of proteins are discussed. The analysis of the aggregation kinetics of proteins shows that after passing the lag phase, aggregation follows, as a rule, first order kinetics. The quantitative characterization methods of the ability of chaperones to prevent aggregation of protein substrates have been elaborated.

  13. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  14. Chaperone-assisted refolding of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subhankar; Punam, Shashikala; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2007-11-01

    In vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase, a 69 kDa monomeric Escherichia coli protein, was studied in the presence of glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethylamine-N-oxide, ethylene glycol, trehalose, proline and chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Different osmolytes, namely proline, glycerol, trimethylamine-N-oxide and dimethylsulfoxide, also known as chemical chaperones, assist in protein folding through effective inhibition of the aggregation process. In the present study, it was observed that a few chemical chaperones effectively reduced the aggregation process of maltodextrin glucosidase and hence the in vitro refolding was substantially enhanced, with ethylene glycol being the exception. Although, the highest recovery of active maltodextrin glucosidase was achieved through the ATP-mediated GroEL/GroES-assisted refolding of denatured protein, the yield of correctly folded protein from glycerol- or proline-assisted spontaneous refolding process was closer to the chaperonin-assisted refolding. It was also observed that the combined application of chemical chaperones and molecular chaperone was more productive than their individual contribution towards the in vitro refolding of maltodextrin glucosidase. The chemical chaperones, except ethylene glycol, were found to provide different degrees of protection to maltodextrin glucosidase from thermal denaturation, whereas proline caused the highest protection. The observations from the present studies conclusively demonstrate that chemical or molecular chaperones, or the combination of both chaperones, could be used in the efficient refolding of recombinant E. coli maltodextrin glucosidase, which enhances the possibility of identifying or designing suitable small molecules that can act as chemical chaperones in the efficient refolding of various aggregate-prone proteins of commercial and medical importance.

  15. FKBP immunophilins and Alzheimer's disease: A chaperoned affair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weihuan Cao; Mary Konsolaki

    2011-08-01

    The FK506-binding protein (FKBP) family of immunophilins consists of proteins with a variety of protein–protein interaction domains and versatile cellular functions. Analysis of the functions of immunophilins has been the focus of studies in recent years and has led to the identification of various molecular pathways in which FKBPs play an active role. All FKBPs contain a domain with prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Binding of the immunosuppressant molecule FK506 to this domain inhibits their PPIase activity while mediating immune suppression through inhibition of calcineurin. The larger members, FKBP51 and FKBP52, interact with Hsp90 and exhibit chaperone activity that is shown to regulate steroid hormone signalling. From these studies it is clear that FKBP proteins are expressed ubiquitously but show relatively high levels of expression in the nervous system. Consistent with this expression, FKBPs have been implicated with both neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. This review will focus on recent studies involving FKBP immunophilins in Alzheimer’s-disease-related pathways.

  16. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: should a chaperone accompany our therapeutic approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin L; Li, Chengyuan; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes that is associated with axonal atrophy, demyelination, blunted regenerative potential, and loss of peripheral nerve fibers. The development and progression of DPN is due in large part to hyperglycemia but is also affected by insulin deficiency and dyslipidemia. Although numerous biochemical mechanisms contribute to DPN, increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction seem intimately associated with nerve dysfunction and diminished regenerative capacity. Despite advances in understanding the etiology of DPN, few approved therapies exist for the pharmacological management of painful or insensate DPN. Therefore, identifying novel therapeutic strategies remains paramount. Because DPN does not develop with either temporal or biochemical uniformity, its therapeutic management may benefit from a multifaceted approach that inhibits pathogenic mechanisms, manages inflammation, and increases cytoprotective responses. Finally, exercise has long been recognized as a part of the therapeutic management of diabetes, and exercise can delay and/or prevent the development of painful DPN. This review presents an overview of existing therapies that target both causal and symptomatic features of DPN and discusses the role of up-regulating cytoprotective pathways via modulating molecular chaperones. Overall, it may be unrealistic to expect that a single pharmacologic entity will suffice to ameliorate the multiple symptoms of human DPN. Thus, combinatorial therapies that target causal mechanisms and enhance endogenous reparative capacity may enhance nerve function and improve regeneration in DPN if they converge to decrease oxidative stress, improve mitochondrial bioenergetics, and increase response to trophic factors.

  17. Protein chaperones: a composition of matter review (2008 – 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taldone, Tony; Patel, Hardik J; Bolaender, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are proteins with important functions in regulating disease phenotypes. Historically, Hsp90 has first received recognition as a target in cancer, with consequent efforts extending its potential role to other diseases. Hsp70 has also attracted interest as a therapeutic target for its role as a co-chaperone to Hsp90 as well as its own anti-apoptotic roles. Areas covered Herein, patents from 2008 to 2013 are reviewed to identify those that disclose composition of matter claimed to inhibit Hsp90 or Hsp70. Expert opinion For Hsp90, there has been considerable creativity in the discovery of novel pharmacophores that fall outside the three initially discovered scaffolds (i.e., ansamycins, resorcinols and purines). Nonetheless, much of the patent literature appears to build on previously reported structure activity relationship through slight modifications of Hsp90 inhibitor space by finding weaknesses in existing patents. The major goal of future development of Hsp90 inhibitors is not necessarily identifying better molecules but rather understanding how to rationally use these agents in the clinic. The development of Hsp70 inhibitors has lagged behind. It will require a more concerted effort from the drug discovery community in order to begin to realize the potential of this target. PMID:24742089

  18. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  19. The use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Afaneh, I

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of a chaperone in obstetrical and gynaecological practice in Ireland and to explore patients\\' opinions. Two questionnaires were designed; one for patients and the other one was sent to 145 gynaecologists in Ireland. One hundred and fifty two women took part in this survey of whom 74 were gynaecological and 78 were obstetric patients. Ninety five (65%) patients felt no need for a chaperone during a vaginal examination (VE) by a male doctor. On the other hand 34 (23%) participating women would request a chaperone if being examined by a female doctor. Among clinicians 116 (80%) responded by returning the questionnaire. Overall 60 (52%) always used a chaperone in public practice, in contrast to 24 (27%) in private practice. The study demonstrated that most patients do not wish to have a chaperone during a VE but a small proportion would still request one regardless of the examiner\\'s gender. Patients should be offered the choice of having a chaperone and their opinion should be respected and documented.

  20. Chemical chaperones mitigate experimental asthma by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Lokesh; Krishnan, Veda; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Chakraborty, Samarpana; Maity, Shuvadeep; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Chakraborty, Kausik; Ghosh, Balaram; Agrawal, Anurag

    2014-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and consequent unfolded protein response (UPR) are important in inflammation but have been poorly explored in asthma. We used a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) with features of asthma to understand the role of ER stress and to explore potential therapeutic effects of inhaled chemical chaperones, which are small molecules that can promote protein folding and diminish UPR. UPR markers were initially measured on alternate days during a 7-day daily allergen challenge model. UPR markers increased within 24 hours after the first allergen challenge and peaked by the third challenge, before AAI was fully established (from the fifth challenge onward). Three chemical chaperones-glycerol, trehalose, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)-were initially administered during allergen challenge (preventive regimen). TMAO, the most effective of these chemical chaperones and 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical chaperone currently in clinical trials, were further tested for potential therapeutic activities after AAI was established (therapeutic regimen). Chemical chaperones showed a dose-dependent reduction in UPR markers, airway inflammation, and remodeling in both regimens. Our results indicate an early and important role of the ER stress pathway in asthma pathogenesis and show therapeutic potential for chemical chaperones.

  1. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  2. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Qun Kuang

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  3. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yi-Qun; Charette, Nicholle; Frazer, Jennifer; Holland, Patrick J; Attwood, Kathleen M; Dellaire, Graham; Dupré, Denis J

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x)6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  4. c-Abl Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Aha1 Activates Its Co-chaperone Function in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Dunn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90 to hydrolyze ATP is essential for its chaperone function. The co-chaperone Aha1 stimulates Hsp90 ATPase activity, tailoring the chaperone function to specific “client” proteins. The intracellular signaling mechanisms directly regulating Aha1 association with Hsp90 remain unknown. Here, we show that c-Abl kinase phosphorylates Y223 in human Aha1 (hAha1, promoting its interaction with Hsp90. This, consequently, results in an increased Hsp90 ATPase activity, enhances Hsp90 interaction with kinase clients, and compromises the chaperoning of non-kinase clients such as glucocorticoid receptor and CFTR. Suggesting a regulatory paradigm, we also find that Y223 phosphorylation leads to ubiquitination and degradation of hAha1 in the proteasome. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of c-Abl prevents hAha1 interaction with Hsp90, thereby hypersensitizing cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors both in vitro and ex vivo.

  5. Direct interplay among histones, histone chaperones, and a chromatin boundary protein in the control of histone gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunder, Rachel M; Rine, Jasper

    2012-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 binds newly synthesized histone proteins and mediates their delivery into chromatin during transcription, replication, and silencing. Rtt106 is also recruited to histone gene regulatory regions by the HIR histone chaperone complex to ensure S-phase-specific expression. Here we showed that this Rtt106:HIR complex included Asf1 and histone proteins. Mutations in Rtt106 that reduced histone binding reduced Rtt106 enrichment at histone genes, leading to their increased transcription. Deletion of the chromatin boundary element Yta7 led to increased Rtt106:H3 binding, increased Rtt106 enrichment at histone gene regulatory regions, and decreased histone gene transcription at the HTA1-HTB1 locus. These results suggested a unique regulatory mechanism in which Rtt106 sensed the level of histone proteins to maintain the proper level of histone gene transcription. The role of these histone chaperones and Yta7 differed markedly among the histone gene loci, including the two H3-H4 histone gene pairs. Defects in silencing in rtt106 mutants could be partially accounted for by Rtt106-mediated changes in histone gene repression. These studies suggested that feedback mediated by histone chaperone complexes plays a pivotal role in regulating histone gene transcription.

  6. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Len Neckers

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 inhibitors are unique in that, although they are directed towards a specific molecular target, they simultaneously inhibit multiple cellular signalling pathways. By inhibiting nodal points in multiple overlapping survival pathways utilized by cancer cells, combination of an Hsp90 inhibitor with standard chemotherapeutic agents may dramatically increase the in vivo efficacy of the standard agent. Hsp90 inhibitors may circumvent the characteristic genetic plasticity that has allowed cancer cells to eventually evade the toxic effects of most molecularly targeted agents. The mechanism-based use of Hsp90 inhibitors, both alone and in combination with other drugs, should be effective toward multiple forms of cancer. Further, because Hsp90 inhibitors also induce Hsf-1-dependent expression of Hsp70, and because certain mutated Hsp90 client proteins are neurotoxic, these drugs display ameliorative properties in several neurodegenerative disease models, suggesting a novel role for Hsp90 inhibitors in treating multiple pathologies involving neurodegeneration.

  7. Molecular chaperones encoded by a reduced nucleus: the cryptomonad nucleomorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, J M; Cavalier-Smith, T; Maier, U; Douglas, S

    2001-06-01

    Molecular chaperones mediate the correct folding of nascent or denatured proteins and are found in both the organelles and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Cryptomonad algae are unusual in possessing an extra cytoplasmic compartment (the periplastid space), the result of having engulfed and retained a photosynthetic eukaryote. Within the periplastid space is a diminutive nucleus (the nucleomorph) that encodes mostly genes for its own expression as well as a few needed by the plastid. Two plastid-encoded chaperones (GroEL and DnaK) and a nucleomorph-encoded chaperone (Cpn60) have been reported from the cryptomonad, Guillardia theta. Here we analyse G. theta nucleomorph genes for members of the cytosolic HSP70 and HSP90 families of molecular chaperones, a heat shock transcription factor (HSF), and all eight subunits of the group II chaperonin, CCT. These are presumably all active in the periplastid space, assisting in the maturation of polypeptides required by the cell; we propose a central role for them also in the structure and assembly of a putative relict mitotic apparatus. Curiously, none of the genes for co-chaperones of HSP70, HSP90, or CCT have been detected in the nucleomorph genome; they are either not needed or are encoded in the host nuclear genome and targeted back into the periplastid space. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homologs of HSP70 and HSP90 are also not present. Striking differences in the degree of conservation of the various nucleomorph-encoded molecular chaperones were observed. While the G. theta HSP70 and HSP90 homologs are well conserved, each of the eight CCT subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, and zeta) is remarkably divergent. Such differences are likely evidence for reduced/different functional constraints on the various molecular chaperones functioning in the periplastid space.

  8. Targeting Hsp90-Cdc37: a promising therapeutic strategy by inhibiting Hsp90 chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Li; Gu, Kai; Xu, Xiao-Li; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2016-05-27

    The Hsp90 chaperone protein regulates the folding, maturation and stability of a wide variety of oncoproteins. In recent years, many Hsp90 inhibitors have entered into the clinical trials while all of them target ATPase showing similar binding capacity and kinds of side-effects so that none have reached to the market. During the regulation progress, numerous protein-protein interactions (PPI) such as Hsp90 and client proteins or cochaperones are involved. With the Hsp90-cochaperones PPI networks being more and more clear, many cancerous proteins have been reported to be tightly correlated to Hsp90-cochaperones PPI. Among them, Hsp90-Cdc37 PPI has been widely reported to associate with numerous protein kinases, making it a novel target for the treatment of cancers. In this paper, we briefly review the strategies and modulators targeting Hsp90-Cdc37 complex including direct and indirect regulation mechanism. Through these discussions we expect to present inspirations for new insights into an alternative way to inhibit Hsp90 chaperone function.

  9. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Suhonen, P M

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain $\\beta \\approx 1.26$ for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be ...

  10. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone.

  11. Phosphorylation-mediated control of histone chaperone ASF1 levels by Tousled-like kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Pilyugin

    Full Text Available Histone chaperones are at the hub of a diverse interaction networks integrating a plethora of chromatin modifying activities. Histone H3/H4 chaperone ASF1 is a target for cell-cycle regulated Tousled-like kinases (TLKs and both proteins cooperate during chromatin replication. However, the precise role of post-translational modification of ASF1 remained unclear. Here, we identify the TLK phosphorylation sites for both Drosophila and human ASF1 proteins. Loss of TLK-mediated phosphorylation triggers hASF1a and dASF1 degradation by proteasome-dependent and independent mechanisms respectively. Consistent with this notion, introduction of phosphorylation-mimicking mutants inhibits hASF1a and dASF1 degradation. Human hASF1b is also targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation, but its stability is not affected by phosphorylation indicating that other mechanisms are likely to be involved in control of hASF1b levels. Together, these results suggest that ASF1 cellular levels are tightly controlled by distinct pathways and provide a molecular mechanism for post-translational regulation of dASF1 and hASF1a by TLK kinases.

  12. Structure of transmembrane domain of lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) reveals key features for substrate specificity in chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Ashok K; Strub, Marie-Paule; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Tjandra, Nico

    2014-12-19

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a highly regulated cellular process that mediates the degradation of a selective subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Increasing CMA activity is one way for a cell to respond to stress, and it leads to enhanced turnover of non-critical cytosolic proteins into sources of energy or clearance of unwanted or damaged proteins from the cytosol. The lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) together with a complex of chaperones and co-chaperones are key regulators of CMA. LAMP-2A is a transmembrane protein component for protein translocation to the lysosome. Here we present a study of the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane domain of human LAMP-2A in n-dodecylphosphocholine micelles by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We showed that LAMP-2A exists as a homotrimer in which the membrane-spanning helices wrap around each other to form a parallel coiled coil conformation, whereas its cytosolic tail is flexible and exposed to the cytosol. This cytosolic tail of LAMP-2A interacts with chaperone Hsc70 and a CMA substrate RNase A with comparable affinity but not with Hsp40 and RNase S peptide. Because the substrates and the chaperone complex can bind at the same time, thus creating a bimodal interaction, we propose that substrate recognition by chaperones and targeting to the lysosomal membrane by LAMP-2A are coupled. This can increase substrate affinity and specificity as well as prevent substrate aggregation, assist in the unfolding of the substrate, and promote the formation of the higher order complex of LAMP-2A required for translocation.

  13. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  14. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  15. Tah1 helix-swap dimerization prevents mixed Hsp90 co-chaperone complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Pal, Mohinder; Roe, S. Mark; Pearl, Laurence H., E-mail: laurence.pearl@sussex.ac.uk; Prodromou, Chrisostomos, E-mail: laurence.pearl@sussex.ac.uk [University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    A helix swap involving the fifth helix between two adjacently bound Tah1 molecules restores the normal binding environment of the conserved MEEVD peptide of Hsp90. Dimerization also explains how other monomeric TPR-domain proteins are excluded from forming inappropriate mixed co-chaperone complexes with Hsp90 and Tah1. Specific co-chaperone adaptors facilitate the recruitment of client proteins to the Hsp90 system. Tah1 binds the C-terminal conserved MEEVD motif of Hsp90, thus linking an eclectic set of client proteins to the R2TP complex for their assembly and regulation by Hsp90. Rather than the normal complement of seven α-helices seen in other tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, Tah1 unusually consists of the first five only. Consequently, the methionine of the MEEVD peptide remains exposed to solvent when bound by Tah1. In solution Tah1 appears to be predominantly monomeric, and recent structures have failed to explain how Tah1 appears to prevent the formation of mixed TPR domain-containing complexes such as Cpr6–(Hsp90){sub 2}–Tah1. To understand this further, the crystal structure of Tah1 in complex with the MEEVD peptide of Hsp90 was determined, which shows a helix swap involving the fifth α-helix between two adjacently bound Tah1 molecules. Dimerization of Tah1 restores the normal binding environment of the bound Hsp90 methionine residue by reconstituting a TPR binding site similar to that in seven-helix-containing TPR domain proteins. Dimerization also explains how other monomeric TPR-domain proteins are excluded from forming inappropriate mixed co-chaperone complexes.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-11-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologues are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residue 16 to 41 and from residue 55 to 76. The helices of PcrG are partially formed, have similar backbone dynamics, and are flexible. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from position 9 to 76 is involved in binding to PcrV. PcrG adds to the growing list of partially folded or unstructured proteins with important roles in type III secretion.

  17. Modulation of the chaperone heat shock cognate 70 by embryonic (pro)insulin correlates with prevention of apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Vega-Núñez, Elena; Morales, Aixa V.; Serna, José; Rubio, Eva; de Pablo, Flora

    1998-01-01

    Insights have emerged concerning insulin function during development, from the finding that apoptosis during chicken embryo neurulation is prevented by prepancreatic (pro)insulin. While characterizing the molecules involved in this survival effect of insulin, we found insulin-dependent regulation of the molecular chaperone heat shock cognate 70 kDa (Hsc70), whose cloning in chicken is reported here. This chaperone, generally considered constitutively expressed, showed regulation of its mRNA and protein levels in unstressed embryos during early development. More important, Hsc70 levels were found to depend on endogenous (pro)insulin, as shown by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against (pro)insulin mRNA in cultured neurulating embryos. Further, in the cultured embryos, apoptosis affected mainly cells with the lowest level of Hsc70, as shown by simultaneous Hsc70 immunostaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP nick end labeling. These results argue in favor of Hsc70 involvement, modulated by embryonic (pro)insulin, in the prevention of apoptosis during early development and suggest a role for a molecular chaperone in normal embryogenesis. PMID:9707581

  18. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierling, Elizabeth [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  19. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl At; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James Ca

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These "Super Spy" variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001.

  20. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt C-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α ring1–4. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit5–10. We report that the base subassembly of the proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6, and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3 pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α pocket in mature proteasomes2–4, it inserts into the α2/α3 pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme. PMID:23644457

  1. The small heat shock proteins family : The long forgotten chaperones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, C.; Paul, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Kampinga, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their i

  2. Chaperone-interacting TPR proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Eckl, Julia M; Kaiser, Christoph J O; Papsdorf, Katharina; Hessling, Martin; Richter, Klaus

    2013-08-23

    The ATP-hydrolyzing molecular chaperones Hsc70/Hsp70 and Hsp90 bind a diverse set of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing cofactors via their C-terminal peptide motifs IEEVD and MEEVD. These cochaperones contribute to substrate turnover and confer specific activities to the chaperones. Higher eukaryotic genomes encode a large number of TPR-domain-containing proteins. The human proteome contains more than 200 TPR proteins, and that of Caenorhabditis elegans, about 80. It is unknown how many of them interact with Hsc70 or Hsp90. We systematically screened the C. elegans proteome for TPR-domain-containing proteins that likely interact with Hsc70 and Hsp90 and ranked them due to their similarity with known chaperone-interacting TPRs. We find C. elegans to encode many TPR proteins, which are not present in yeast. All of these have homologs in fruit fly or humans. Highly ranking uncharacterized open reading frames C33H5.8, C34B2.5 and ZK370.8 may encode weakly conserved homologs of the human proteins RPAP3, TTC1 and TOM70. C34B2.5 and ZK370.8 bind both Hsc70 and Hsp90 with low micromolar affinities. Mutation of amino acids involved in EEVD binding disrupts the interaction. In vivo, ZK370.8 is localized to mitochondria in tissues with known chaperone requirements, while C34B2.5 colocalizes with Hsc70 in intestinal cells. The highest-ranking open reading frame with non-conserved EEVD-interacting residues, F52H3.5, did not show any binding to Hsc70 or Hsp90, suggesting that only about 15 of the TPR-domain-containing proteins in C. elegans interact with chaperones, while the many others may have evolved to bind other ligands.

  3. Molecular chaperone CCT3 supports proper mitotic progression and cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yuqi; Wei, Youheng; Wu, Jiaxue; Zhang, Pingzhao; Shen, Suqin; Saiyin, Hexige; Wumaier, Reziya; Yang, Xianmei; Wang, Chenji; Yu, Long

    2016-03-01

    CCT3 was one of the subunits of molecular chaperone CCT/TRiC complex, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular proteostasis. We demonstrated that expressions of CCT3 mRNA and protein are highly up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and high level of CCT3 is correlated with poor survival in cancer patients. In HCC cell lines, CCT3 depletion suppresses cell proliferation by inducing mitotic arrest at prometaphase and apoptosis eventually. We also identified CCT3 as a novel regulator of spindle integrity and as a requirement for proper kinetochore-microtubule attachment during mitosis. Moreover, we found that CCT3 depletion sensitizes HCC cells to microtubule destabilizing drug Vincristine. Collectively, our study suggests that CCT3 is indispensible for HCC cell proliferation, and provides a potential drug target for treatment of HCC.

  4. Chaperonopathies of senescence and the scrambling of interactions between the chaperoning and the immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2010-06-01

    Aging entails progressive deterioration of molecules and supramolecular structures, including Hsp chaperones and their complexes, paralleled by functional decline. Recent research has changed our views on Hsp chaperones. They work inside and outside cells in many locations, alone or forming teams, interacting with cells, receptors, and molecules that are not chaperones, in roles that are not typically attributed to chaperones, such as protein folding. Hsp chaperones form a physiological system with a variety of functions and interactions with other systems, for example, the immune system. We propose that chaperone malfunctioning due to structural damage or gene dysregulation during aging has an impact on the immune system, creating the conditions for an overall malfunction of both systems. Pathological chaperones cannot interact with the immune system as normal ones do, and this leads to an overall readjustment of the interactions that is apparent during senescence and is likely to cause many of its manifestations.

  5. Hsp90 as a "Chaperone" of the Epigenome: Insights and Opportunities for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    The cellular functions of Hsp90 have historically been attributed to its ability to chaperone client proteins involved in signal transduction. Although numerous stimuli and the signaling cascades they activate contribute to cancer progression, many of these pathways ultimately require transcriptional effectors to elicit tumor-promoting effects. Despite this obvious connection, the majority of studies evaluating Hsp90 function in malignancy have focused upon its regulation of cytosolic client proteins, and particularly members of receptor and/or kinase families. However, in recent years, Hsp90 has emerged as a pivotal orchestrator of nuclear events. Discovery of an expanding repertoire of Hsp90 clients has illuminated a vital role for Hsp90 in overseeing nuclear events and influencing gene transcription. Hence, this chapter will cast a spotlight upon several regulatory themes involving Hsp90-dependent nuclear functions. Highlighted topics include a summary of chaperone-dependent regulation of key transcription factors (TFs) and epigenetic effectors in malignancy, as well as a discussion of how the complex interplay among a subset of these TFs and epigenetic regulators may generate feed-forward loops that further support cancer progression. This chapter will also highlight less recognized indirect mechanisms whereby Hsp90-supported signaling may impinge upon epigenetic regulation. Finally, the relevance of these nuclear events is discussed within the framework of Hsp90's capacity to enable phenotypic variation and drug resistance. These newly acquired insights expanding our understanding of Hsp90 function support the collective notion that nuclear clients are major beneficiaries of Hsp90 action, and their impairment is likely responsible for many of the anticancer effects elicited by Hsp90-targeted approaches.

  6. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented.

  7. Oridonin Triggers Chaperon-mediated Proteasomal Degradation of BCR-ABL in Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huilin; Weng, Hengyou; Dong, Bowen; Zhao, Panpan; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Lianghu

    2017-01-01

    Inducing degradation of oncoproteins by small molecule compounds has the potential to avoid drug resistance and therefore deserves to be exploited for new therapies. Oridonin is a natural compound with promising antitumor efficacy that can trigger the degradation of oncoproteins; however, the direct cellular targets and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that oridonin depletes BCR-ABL through chaperon-mediated proteasomal degradation in leukemia. Mechanistically, oridonin poses oxidative stress in cancer cells and directly binds to cysteines of HSF1, leading to the activation of this master regulator of the chaperone system. The resulting induction of HSP70 and ubiquitin proteins and the enhanced binding to CHIP E3 ligase hence target BCR-ABL for ubiquitin-proteasome degradation. Both wild-type and mutant forms of BCR-ABL can be efficiently degraded by oridonin, supporting its efficacy observed in cultured cells as well as mouse tumor xenograft assays with either imatinib-sensitive or -resistant cells. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism by which oridonin induces rapid degradation of BCR-ABL as well as a novel pharmaceutical activator of HSF1 that represents a promising treatment for leukemia. PMID:28128329

  8. Modulating Molecular Chaperones Improves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Decreases the Inflammatory Transcriptome in Diabetic Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiacheng; Pan, Pan; Anyika, Mercy; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2015-09-16

    We have previously demonstrated that modulating molecular chaperones with KU-32, a novobiocin derivative, ameliorates physiologic and bioenergetic deficits of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Replacing the coumarin core of KU-32 with a meta-fluorinated biphenyl ring system created KU-596, a novobiocin analogue (novologue) that showed neuroprotective activity in a cell-based assay. The current study sought to determine whether KU-596 offers similar therapeutic potential for treating DPN. Administration of 2-20 mg/kg of KU-596 improved diabetes induced hypoalgesia and sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits in a dose-dependent manner. However, the drug could not improve these neuropathic deficits in diabetic heat shock protein 70 knockout (Hsp70 KO) mice. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which KU-596 improved DPN, we performed transcriptomic analysis of sensory neuron RNA obtained from diabetic wild-type and Hsp70 KO mice using RNA sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that diabetes strongly increased inflammatory pathways and that KU-596 therapy effectively reversed these increases independent of Hsp70. In contrast, the effects of KU-596 on decreasing the expression of genes regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were more Hsp70-dependent. These data indicate that modulation of molecular chaperones by novologue therapy offers an effective approach toward correcting nerve dysfunction in DPN but that normalization of inflammatory pathways alone by novologue therapy seems to be insufficient to reverse sensory deficits associated with insensate DPN.

  9. Transporters, chaperones, and P-type ATPases controlling grapevine copper homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiangpeng; Mu, Qian; Wang, Xiaomin; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Xudong; Shangguan, Lingfei; Fang, Jinggui

    2015-11-01

    With more copper and copper-containing compounds used as bactericides and fungicides in viticulture, copper homeostasis in grapevine (Vitis) has become one of the serious environmental crises with great risk. To better understand the regulation of Cu homeostasis in grapevine, grapevine seedlings cultured in vitro with different levels of Cu were utilized to investigate the tolerance mechanisms of grapevine responding to copper availability at physiological and molecular levels. The results indicated that Cu contents in roots and leaves arose with increasing levels of Cu application. With copper concentration increasing, malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased in roots and leaves and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) increased to protect the plant itself from damage. The expression patterns of 19 genes, encoding transporters, chaperones, and P-type ATPases involved in copper homeostasis in root and leaf of grapevine seedling under various levels of Cu(2+) were further analyzed. The expression patterns indicated that CTr1, CTr2, and CTr8 transporters were significantly upregulated in response both to Cu excess and deficiency. ZIP2 was downregulated in response to Cu excess and upregulated under Cu-deficient conditions, while ZIP4 had an opposite expression pattern under similar conditions. The expression of chaperones and P-type ATPases in response to Cu availability in grapevine were also briefly studied.

  10. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Pasheva, Evdokia, E-mail: eva@bio21.bas.bg [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  11. New concept in nutrition for the maintenance of the aging eye redox regulation and therapeutic treatment of cataract disease; synergism of natural antioxidant imidazole-containing amino acid-based compounds, chaperone, and glutathione boosting agents: a systemic perspective on aging and longevity emerged from studies in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Cataract, opacification of the lens, is one of the commonest causes of loss of useful vision during aging, with an estimated 16 million people world-wide affected. The role of nutritional supplementation in prevention of onset or progression of ocular disease is of interest to health care professionals and patients. The aging eye seems to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. This review outlines the potential role of the new nutritional strategy on redox balance in age-related eye diseases and detail how the synergism and interaction of imidazole-containing amino acid-based compounds (nonhydrolized L-carnosine, histidine), chaperone agents (such as, L-carnosine, D-pantethine), glutathione-boosting agents (N-acetylcysteine, vitamin E, methionine), and N-acetylcarnosine eye drops plays key roles in the function and maintenance of the redox systems in the aging eye and in the treatment of human cataract disease. A novel patented oral health supplement is presented which enhances the anticataract activity of eye drops and activates functional visual acuity. The clinical data demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of a combined oral health care treatment with amino acids possessing chaperone-like activity with N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops. L-carnosine and N-acetylcarnosine protected the chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin and reduced the increased posttranslational modifications of lens proteins. Biological activities of the nonhydrolyzed carnosine in the oral formulation are based on its antioxidant and antiglycating (transglycating) action that, in addition to heavy metal chelation and pH-buffering ability, makes carnosine an essential factor for preventing sight-threatening eye disorders having oxidative stress in their pathogenesis, neurodegeneration, and accumulation of senile features. The findings suggest that synergism is required between carnosine or other imidazole-containing compounds and reduced glutathione in tissues and cells for

  12. The crystal structure of the human co-chaperone P58(IPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Svärd

    Full Text Available P58(IPK is one of the endoplasmic reticulum- (ER- localised DnaJ (ERdj proteins which interact with the chaperone BiP, the mammalian ER ortholog of Hsp70, and are thought to contribute to the specificity and regulation of its diverse functions. P58(IPK, expression of which is upregulated in response to ER stress, has been suggested to act as a co-chaperone, binding un- or misfolded proteins and delivering them to BiP. In order to give further insights into the functions of P58(IPK, and the regulation of BiP by ERdj proteins, we have determined the crystal structure of human P58(IPK to 3.0 Å resolution using a combination of molecular replacement and single wavelength anomalous diffraction. The structure shows the human P58(IPK monomer to have a very elongated overall shape. In addition to the conserved J domain, P58(IPK contains nine N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat motifs, divided into three subdomains of three motifs each. The J domain is attached to the C-terminal end via a flexible linker, and the structure shows the conserved Hsp70-binding histidine-proline-aspartate (HPD motif to be situated on the very edge of the elongated protein, 100 Å from the putative binding site for unfolded protein substrates. The residues that comprise the surface surrounding the HPD motif are highly conserved in P58(IPK from other organisms but more varied between the human ERdj proteins, supporting the view that their regulation of different BiP functions is facilitated by differences in BiP-binding.

  13. The Role of Copper Chaperone Atox1 in Coupling Redox Homeostasis to Intracellular Copper Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatori, Yuta; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) is a small cytosolic protein with an essential role in copper homeostasis. Atox1 functions as a copper carrier facilitating copper transfer to the secretory pathway. This process is required for activation of copper dependent enzymes involved in neurotransmitter biosynthesis, iron efflux, neovascularization, wound healing, and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, new cellular roles for Atox1 have emerged. Changing levels of Atox1 were shown to modulate response to cancer therapies, contribute to inflammatory response, and protect cells against various oxidative stresses. It has also become apparent that the activity of Atox1 is tightly linked to the cellular redox status. In this review, we summarize biochemical information related to a dual role of Atox1 as a copper chaperone and an antioxidant. We discuss how these two activities could be linked and contribute to establishing the intracellular copper balance and functional identity of cells during differentiation. PMID:27472369

  14. A novel C-terminal homologue of Aha1 co-chaperone binds to heat shock protein 90 and stimulates its ATPase activity in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meetali; Shah, Varun; Tatu, Utpal

    2014-04-17

    Cytosolic heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to be essential for many infectious pathogens and is considered a potential target for drug development. In this study, we have carried out biochemical characterization of Hsp90 from a poorly studied protozoan parasite of clinical importance, Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that Entamoeba Hsp90 can bind to both ATP and its pharmacological inhibitor, 17-AAG (17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin), with Kd values of 365.2 and 10.77 μM, respectively, and it has a weak ATPase activity with a catalytic efficiency of 4.12×10(-4) min(-1) μM(-1). Using inhibitor 17-AAG, we have shown dependence of Entamoeba on Hsp90 for its growth and survival. Hsp90 function is regulated by various co-chaperones. Previous studies suggest a lack of several important co-chaperones in E. histolytica. In this study, we describe the presence of a novel homologue of co-chaperone Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase), EhAha1c, lacking a canonical Aha1 N-terminal domain. We also show that EhAha1c is capable of binding and stimulating ATPase activity of EhHsp90. In addition to highlighting the potential of Hsp90 inhibitors as drugs against amoebiasis, our study highlights the importance of E. histolytica in understanding the evolution of Hsp90 and its co-chaperone repertoire.

  15. Tetrahydrobiopterin shows chaperone activity for tyrosine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöny, Beat; Calvo, Ana C; Scherer, Tanja; Svebak, Randi M; Haavik, Jan; Blau, Nenad; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. Primary inherited defects in TH have been associated with l-DOPA responsive and non-responsive dystonia and infantile parkinsonism. In this study, we show that both the cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the feedback inhibitor and catecholamine product dopamine increase the kinetic stability of human TH isoform 1 in vitro. Activity measurements and synthesis of the enzyme by in vitro transcription-translation revealed a complex regulation by the cofactor including both enzyme inactivation and conformational stabilization. Oral BH(4) supplementation to mice increased TH activity and protein levels in brain extracts, while the Th-mRNA level was not affected. All together our results indicate that the molecular mechanisms for the stabilization are a primary folding-aid effect of BH(4) and a secondary effect by increased synthesis and binding of catecholamine ligands. Our results also establish that orally administered BH(4) crosses the blood-brain barrier and therapeutic regimes based on BH(4) supplementation should thus consider the effect on TH. Furthermore, BH(4) supplementation arises as a putative therapeutic agent in the treatment of brain disorders associated with TH misfolding, such as for the human TH isoform 1 mutation L205P.

  16. HSP-molecular chaperones in cancer biogenesis and tumor therapy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Francesca; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; David, Sabrina; Campanella, Claudia; Carini, Francesco; Tomasello, Giovanni; Damiani, Provvidenza; Cappello, Francesco; DE Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J L

    2012-12-01

    Molecular chaperones, many of which are heat-shock proteins (HSPs), are an important class of molecules with various functions. Pathological conditions in which chaperones become etiological and/or pathogenic factors are called chaperonopathies, and are classified into by defect, by excess, and by 'mistake'. In the latter case, the chaperone is structurally and functionally normal but participates in pathways that favor disease, although in some cases the chaperone may have post-translational modifications that may lead it to change its location and function and, thus, to become pathogenic. For example, HSP-chaperones are involved in carcinogenesis in various ways, so that some forms of cancer may be considered 'chaperonopathies by mistake'. This concept suggests new strategies for anticancer therapy (chaperonotherapy), in which the primary targets or therapeutic agents are chaperones. Chaperonotherapy consists of the utilization of HSP-chaperones for treating chaperonopathies, including cancer. Negative chaperonotherapy is aimed at eliminating or blocking the action of chaperones that favor carcinogenesis or other diseases, whereas positive chaperonotherapy uses chaperones, genes or proteins, to fight against diseases, such as cancer, by stimulating the immune system or the cellular defenses against stress.

  17. Protein refolding in peroxisomes is dependent upon an HSF1-regulated function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heldens, Lonneke; van Genesen, Siebe T.; Hanssen, Lars L. P.; Hageman, Jurre; Kampinga, Harm H.; Lubsen, Nicolette H.

    2012-01-01

    Post-heat shock refolding of luciferase requires chaperones. Expression of a dominant negative HSF1 mutant (dnHSF1), which among other effects depletes cells of HSF1-regulated chaperones, blocked post-heat shock refolding of luciferase targeted to the cytoplasm, nucleus, or peroxisomes, while refold

  18. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  19. Catapult mechanism renders the chaperone action of Hsp70 unidirectional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, S M; Pierpaoli, E V; Christen, P

    1998-06-19

    Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 type promote the folding and membrane translocation of proteins. The interaction of Hsp70s with polypeptides is linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis. We formed complexes of seven different fluorescence-labeled peptides with DnaK, the Hsp70 homolog of Escherichia coli, and determined the rate of peptide release under two different sets of conditions. (1) Upon addition of ATP to nucleotide-free peptide.DnaK complexes, all tested peptides were released with similar rate constants (2.2 s-1 to 6.7 s-1). (2) In the binding equilibrium of peptide and ATP-liganded DnaK, the dissociation followed one or two-step reactions, depending on the amino acid sequence of the peptide. For the monophasic reactions, the dissociation rate constants diverged by four orders of magnitude from 0.0004 s-1 to 5.7 s-1; for the biphasic reactions, the rate constants of the second, slower isomerization step were in the range from 0.3 s-1 to 0.0005 s-1. The release of the different peptides in case (1) is 1.4 to 14,000 times faster than in case (2). Apparently, binding of ATP induces a transient state of the chaperone which ejects target peptides before the final state of ATP-liganded DnaK is reached. This "catapult" mechanism provides the chaperone cycle with a mode of peptide release that does not correspond with the reverse of peptide binding. By allowing the conformation of the outgoing polypeptide to differ from that of the incoming polypeptide, a futile cycle with respect to conformational work exerted on the target protein is obviated.

  20. Structure of Spa15, a type III secretion chaperone from Shigella flexneri with broad specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, André van; Hamiaux, Cyril; Pérez, Javier; Parsot, Claude; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2004-01-01

    Type III secretion (TTS) systems are used by many Gram-negative pathogens to inject virulence proteins into the cells of their hosts. Several of these virulence effectors require TTS chaperones that maintain them in a secretion-competent state. Whereas most chaperones bind only one effector, Spa15 f

  1. Information encoded in non-native states drives substrate-chaperone pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapa, Koyeli; Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik

    2012-09-05

    Many proteins refold in vitro through kinetic folding intermediates that are believed to be by-products of native-state centric evolution. These intermediates are postulated to play only minor roles, if any, in vivo because they lack any information related to translation-associated vectorial folding. We demonstrate that refolding intermediate of a test protein, generated in vitro, is able to find its cognate chaperone, from the whole complement of Escherichia coli soluble chaperones. Cognate chaperone-binding uniquely alters the conformation of non-native substrate. Importantly, precise chaperone targeting of substrates are maintained as long as physiological molar ratios of chaperones remain unaltered. Using a library of different chaperone substrates, we demonstrate that kinetically trapped refolding intermediates contain sufficient structural features for precise targeting to cognate chaperones. We posit that evolution favors sequences that, in addition to coding for a functional native state, encode folding intermediates with higher affinity for cognate chaperones than noncognate ones.

  2. Natural products triptolide, celastrol, and withaferin A inhibit the chaperone activity of peroxiredoxin i

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Qian; Ding, Yu; Deng, Zhangshuang; Lee, On Yi; Gao, Peng; Chen, Pin; Rose, Rebecca J.; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Zhehao; Tao, Xin Pei; Heck, Albert J R; Kao, Richard; Yang, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) plays an important role in cancer development and inflammation. It is a dual-functional protein which acts as both an antioxidant enzyme and a molecular chaperone. While there have been intensive studies on its peroxidase activity, Prx I's chaperone activity remains elusive,

  3. Molecular chaperone activity and biological regulatory actions of the TPR-domain immunophilins FKBP51 and FKBP52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Harris, Diondra C; Cox, Marc B; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-05-01

    Immunophilins comprise a family of intracellular proteins with peptidyl-prolyl-(cis/trans)-isomerase activity. These foldases are abundant, ubiquitous, and able to bind immunosuppressant drugs, from which the term immunophilin derives. Family members are found in abundance in virtually all organisms and subcellular compartments, and their amino acid sequences are conserved phylogenetically. Immunophilins possess the ability to function as molecular chaperones favoring the proper folding and biological regulation of their biological actions. Their ability to interact via their TPR domains with the 90-kDa heat-shock protein, and through this chaperone, with several signalling cascade factors is of particular importance. Among the family members, the highly homologous proteins FKBP51 and FKBP52 were first characterized due to their ability to interact with steroid hormone receptors. Since then, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms by which they regulate receptor signaling and the resulting roles they play not only in endocrine processes, but also in cell architecture, neurodifferentiation, and tumor progression. In this article we review the most relevant features of these two immunophilins and their potential as pharmacologic targets.

  4. Chaperones in Polyglutamine Aggregation: Beyond the Q-Stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, E. F. E.; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Jardim, Laura B.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in at least nine unrelated proteins lead to inherited neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. The expansion size in all diseases correlates with age at onset (AO) of disease and with polyQ protein aggregation, indicating that the expanded polyQ stretch is the main driving force for the disease onset. Interestingly, there is marked interpatient variability in expansion thresholds for a given disease. Between different polyQ diseases the repeat length vs. AO also indicates the existence of modulatory effects on aggregation of the upstream and downstream amino acid sequences flanking the Q expansion. This can be either due to intrinsic modulation of aggregation by the flanking regions, or due to differential interaction with other proteins, such as the components of the cellular protein quality control network. Indeed, several lines of evidence suggest that molecular chaperones have impact on the handling of different polyQ proteins. Here, we review factors differentially influencing polyQ aggregation: the Q-stretch itself, modulatory flanking sequences, interaction partners, cleavage of polyQ-containing proteins, and post-translational modifications, with a special focus on the role of molecular chaperones. By discussing typical examples of how these factors influence aggregation, we provide more insight on the variability of AO between different diseases as well as within the same polyQ disorder, on the molecular level. PMID:28386214

  5. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  6. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  7. Pharmacological chaperone approaches for rescuing GPCR mutants: Current state, challenges, and screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerepoot, Pieter; Nazari, Reza; Salahpour, Ali

    2017-03-01

    A substantial number of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) genetic disorders are due to mutations that cause misfolding or dysfunction of the receptor product. Pharmacological chaperoning approaches can rescue such mutant receptors by stabilizing protein conformations that behave similar to the wild type protein. For example, this can be achieved by improving folding efficiency and/or interaction with chaperone proteins. Although efficacy of pharmacological chaperones has been demonstrated in vitro for a variety of GPCRs, translation to clinical use has been limited. In this paper we discuss the history of pharmacological chaperones of GPCR's and other membrane proteins, the challenges in translation to the clinic, and the use of different assays for pharmacological chaperone discovery.

  8. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on angiogenesis and cellular signalling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SR BHARATHI DEVI; DHIVYA M ALOYSIUS; KN SULOCHANA

    2016-09-01

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studieshave reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate coppertrafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in relation to angiogenesishas to be further explored. The intracellular copper levels when in excess are deleterious and certain mutations ofcopper chaperones have been shown to induce cell death and influence various cellular metabolisms. The study ofthese chaperones will be helpful in understanding the players in the cascade of events in angiogenesis and their role incellular metabolic pathways. In this review we have briefly listed the copper chaperones associated with angiogenicand metabolic signalling and their function.

  9. Experimental Milestones in the Discovery of Molecular Chaperones as Polypeptide Unfolding Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finka, Andrija; Mattoo, Rayees U H; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Molecular chaperones control the cellular folding, assembly, unfolding, disassembly, translocation, activation, inactivation, disaggregation, and degradation of proteins. In 1989, groundbreaking experiments demonstrated that a purified chaperone can bind and prevent the aggregation of artificially unfolded polypeptides and use ATP to dissociate and convert them into native proteins. A decade later, other chaperones were shown to use ATP hydrolysis to unfold and solubilize stable protein aggregates, leading to their native refolding. Presently, the main conserved chaperone families Hsp70, Hsp104, Hsp90, Hsp60, and small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) apparently act as unfolding nanomachines capable of converting functional alternatively folded or toxic misfolded polypeptides into harmless protease-degradable or biologically active native proteins. Being unfoldases, the chaperones can proofread three-dimensional protein structures and thus control protein quality in the cell. Understanding the mechanisms of the cellular unfoldases is central to the design of new therapies against aging, degenerative protein conformational diseases, and specific cancers.

  10. Solution structure of histone chaperone ANP32B: interaction with core histones H3-H4 through its acidic concave domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochio, Naoya; Umehara, Takashi; Munemasa, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Shin; Tsuda, Kengo; Koshiba, Seizo; Kigawa, Takanori; Nagai, Ryozo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by histone deposition onto and eviction from nucleosomes, which are mediated by several chromatin-modulating factors. Among them, histone chaperones are key factors that facilitate nucleosome assembly. Acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32B (ANP32B) belongs to the ANP32 family, which shares N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a C-terminal variable anionic region. The C-terminal region functions as an inhibitor of histone acetylation, but the functional roles of the LRR domain in chromatin regulation have remained elusive. Here, we report that the LRR domain of ANP32B possesses histone chaperone activity and forms a curved structure with a parallel beta-sheet on the concave side and mostly helical elements on the convex side. Our analyses revealed that the interaction of ANP32B with the core histones H3-H4 occurs on its concave side, and both the acidic and hydrophobic residues that compose the concave surface are critical for histone binding. These results provide a structural framework for understanding the functional mechanisms of acidic histone chaperones.

  11. Crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amick, Joseph; Schlanger, Simon E; Wachnowsky, Christine; Moseng, Mitchell A; Emerson, Corey C; Dare, Michelle; Luo, Wen-I; Ithychanda, Sujay S; Nix, Jay C; Cowan, J A; Page, Richard C; Misra, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Mortalin, a member of the Hsp70-family of molecular chaperones, functions in a variety of processes including mitochondrial protein import and quality control, Fe-S cluster protein biogenesis, mitochondrial homeostasis, and regulation of p53. Mortalin is implicated in regulation of apoptosis, cell stress response, neurodegeneration, and cancer and is a target of the antitumor compound MKT-077. Like other Hsp70-family members, Mortalin consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain. We determined the crystal structure of the NBD of human Mortalin at 2.8 Å resolution. Although the Mortalin nucleotide-binding pocket is highly conserved relative to other Hsp70 family members, we find that its nucleotide affinity is weaker than that of Hsc70. A Parkinson's disease-associated mutation is located on the Mortalin-NBD surface and may contribute to Mortalin aggregation. We present structure-based models for how the Mortalin-NBD may interact with the nucleotide exchange factor GrpEL1, with p53, and with MKT-077. Our structure may contribute to the understanding of disease-associated Mortalin mutations and to improved Mortalin-targeting antitumor compounds.

  12. Transcriptional activation of endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP78 by HCMV IE1-72 protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Derick Shi-Chen Ou; Sung-Bau Lee; Chi-Shuen Chu; Liang-Hao Chang; Bon-chu Chung; Li-Jung Juan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a key regulator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, facilitates cancer cell growth and viral replication. The mechanism leading to grp78 gene activation during viral infection is largely unknown, in this study, we show that the immediate-early 1 (IE1-72) protein of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is essential for HCMV-mediated GRP78 activation. IE1-72 upregulated grp 78 gene expression depending on the ATPbinding site, the zinc-finger domain and the putative leucine-zipper motif of IE1-72, as well as the ER stress response elements (ERSEs) on the grp78 promoter. The purified IE1-72 protein bound to the CCAAT box within ERSE in vitro, whereas deletion mutants of IE1-72 deficient in grp78 promoter stimulation failed to do so. Moreover, IE1-72 binding to the grp78 promoter in infected cells accompanied the recruitment of TATA box-binding protein-associated factor 1 (TAF1), a histone acetyltransferase, and the increased level of acetylated histone H4, an indicator of activestate chromatin. These results provide evidence that HCMV IE1-72 activates grp78 gene expression through direct promoter binding and modulation of the local chromatin structure, indicating an active viral mechanism of cellular chaperone induction for viral growth.

  13. In silico identification of carboxylate clamp type tetratricopeptide repeat proteins in Arabidopsis and rice as putative co-chaperones of Hsp90/Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishun D Prasad

    Full Text Available The essential eukaryotic molecular chaperone Hsp90 operates with the help of different co-chaperones, which regulate its ATPase activity and serve as adaptors to recruit client proteins and other molecular chaperones, such as Hsp70, to the Hsp90 complex. Several Hsp90 and Hsp70 co-chaperones contain the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain, which interacts with the highly conserved EEVD motif at the C-terminal ends of Hsp90 and Hsp70. The acidic side chains in EEVD interact with a subset of basic residues in the TPR binding pocket called a 'carboxylate clamp'. Since the carboxylate clamp residues are conserved in the TPR domains of known Hsp90/Hsp70 co-chaperones, we carried out an in silico search for TPR proteins in Arabidopsis and rice comprising of at least one three-motif TPR domain with conserved amino acid residues required for Hsp90/Hsp70 binding. This approach identified in Arabidopsis a total of 36 carboxylate clamp (CC-TPR proteins, including 24 novel proteins, with potential to interact with Hsp90/Hsp70. The newly identified CC-TPR proteins in Arabidopsis and rice contain additional protein domains such as ankyrin, SET, octicosapeptide/Phox/Bem1p (Phox/PB1, DnaJ-like, thioredoxin, FBD and F-box, and protein kinase and U-box, indicating varied functions for these proteins. To provide proof-of-concept of the newly identified CC-TPR proteins for interaction with Hsp90, we demonstrated interaction of AtTPR1 and AtTPR2 with AtHsp90 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull down assays. These findings indicate that the in silico approach used here successfully identified in a genome-wide context CC-TPR proteins with potential to interact with Hsp90/Hsp70, and further suggest that the Hsp90/Hsp70 system relies on TPR co-chaperones more than it was previously realized.

  14. The nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70 molecular chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBracher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family form an important hub in the cellular protein folding networks in bacteria and eukaryotes, connecting translation with the downstream machineries of protein folding and degradation. The Hsp70 folding cycle is driven by two types of cochaperones: J-domain proteins stimulate ATP hydrolysis by Hsp70, while nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs promote replacement of Hsp70-bound ADP with ATP. Bacteria and organelles of bacterial origin have only one known NEF type for Hsp70, GrpE. In contrast, a large diversity of Hsp70 NEFs has been discovered in the eukaryotic cell. These NEFs belong to the Hsp110/Grp170, HspBP1/Sil1 and BAG domain protein families. In this short review we compare the structures and molecular mechanisms of nucleotide exchange factors for Hsp70 and discuss how these cochaperones contribute to protein folding and quality control in the cell.

  15. Chaperone-mediated autophagy is defective in mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Bhuvarahamurthy; Mesires, Nicholas T; Kennedy, John C; Curcio-Morelli, Cyntia; Laplante, Janice M; Dice, J Fred; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2009-05-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel gene family. The encoded protein, transient receptor potential mucolipin-1 (TRPML1), has been localized to lysosomes and late endosomes but the pathogenic mechanism by which loss of TRPML1 leads to abnormal cellular storage and neuronal cell death is still poorly understood. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation (coIP) experiments identified interactions between TRPML1 and Hsc70 as well as TRPML1 and Hsp40. Hsc70 and Hsp40 are members of a molecular chaperone complex required for protein transport into the lysosome during chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). To determine the functional relevance of this interaction, we compared fibroblasts from MLIV patients to those from sex- and age-matched controls and show a defect in CMA in response to serum withdrawal. This defect in CMA was subsequently confirmed in purified lysosomes isolated from control and MLIV fibroblasts. We further show that the amount of lysosomal-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A) is reduced in lysosomal membranes of MLIV fibroblasts. As a result of decreased CMA, MLIV fibroblasts have increased levels of oxidized proteins compared to control fibroblasts. We hypothesize that TRPML1 may act as a docking site for intralysosomal Hsc70 (ly-Hsc70) allowing it to more efficiently pull in substrates for CMA. It is also possible that TRPML1 channel activity may be required for CMA. Understanding the role of TRPML1 in CMA will undoubtedly help to characterize the pathogenesis of MLIV.

  16. Antarctic krill 454 pyrosequencing reveals chaperone and stress transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody S Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp. In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS, providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. CONCLUSIONS: This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical "stress proteins", such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of "stress" genes for studies understanding

  17. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2016-04-20

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from(1)H-(15)N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell.

  18. Universal Stress Protein exhibits a redox-dependent chaperone function in Arabidopsis and enhances plant tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung eYoung Jun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although a wide range of physiological information on Universal Stress Proteins (USPs is available from many organisms, their biochemical and molecular functions remain unidentified. The biochemical function of AtUSP (At3g53990 from Arabidopsis thaliana was therefore investigated. Plants over-expressing AtUSP showed a strong resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress, compared with wild-type and Atusp knock-out plants, confirming the crucial role of AtUSP in stress tolerance. AtUSP was present in a variety of structures including monomers, dimers, trimers, and oligomeric complexes, and switched in response to external stresses from low molecular weight (LMW species to high molecular weight (HMW complexes. AtUSP exhibited a strong chaperone function under stress conditions in particular, and this activity was significantly increased by heat treatment. Chaperone activity of AtUSP was critically regulated by the redox status of cells and accompanied by structural changes to the protein. Over-expression of AtUSP conferred a strong tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress upon Arabidopsis, primarily via its chaperone function.

  19. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C A

    2011-03-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. The structure of Spy is unlike that of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors.

  20. FGL chaperone-assembled fimbrial polyadhesins: anti-immune armament of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavialov, Anton; Zav'yalova, Galina; Korpela, Timo; Zav'yalov, Vladimir

    2007-07-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge on the structure, function, assembly, and biomedical applications of the family of adhesive fimbrial organelles assembled on the surface of Gram-negative pathogens via the FGL chaperone/usher pathway. Recent studies revealed the unique structural and functional properties of these organelles, distinguishing them from a related family, FGS chaperone-assembled adhesive pili. The FGL chaperone-assembled organelles consist of linear polymers of one or two types of protein subunits, each possessing one or two independent adhesive sites specific to different host cell receptors. This structural organization enables these fimbrial organelles to function as polyadhesins. Fimbrial polyadhesins may ensure polyvalent fastening of bacteria to the host cells, aggregating their receptors and triggering subversive signals that allow pathogens to evade immune defense. The FGL chaperone-assembled fimbrial polyadhesins are attractive targets for vaccine and drug design.

  1. Cooperative Subunit Refolding of a Light-Harvesting Protein through a Self-Chaperone Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laos, Alistair J; Dean, Jacob C; Toa, Zi S D; Wilk, Krystyna E; Scholes, Gregory D; Curmi, Paul M G; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-27

    The fold of a protein is encoded by its amino acid sequence, but how complex multimeric proteins fold and assemble into functional quaternary structures remains unclear. Here we show that two structurally different phycobiliproteins refold and reassemble in a cooperative manner from their unfolded polypeptide subunits, without biological chaperones. Refolding was confirmed by ultrafast broadband transient absorption and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to probe internal chromophores as a marker of quaternary structure. Our results demonstrate a cooperative, self-chaperone refolding mechanism, whereby the β-subunits independently refold, thereby templating the folding of the α-subunits, which then chaperone the assembly of the native complex, quantitatively returning all coherences. Our results indicate that subunit self-chaperoning is a robust mechanism for heteromeric protein folding and assembly that could also be applied in self-assembled synthetic hierarchical systems.

  2. Capturing a Dynamic Chaperone-Substrate Interaction Using NMR-Informed Molecular Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Loïc; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Horowitz, Scott; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-08-10

    Chaperones maintain a healthy proteome by preventing aggregation and by aiding in protein folding. Precisely how chaperones influence the conformational properties of their substrates, however, remains unclear. To achieve a detailed description of dynamic chaperone-substrate interactions, we fused site-specific NMR information with coarse-grained simulations. Our model system is the binding and folding of a chaperone substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), with the chaperone Spy. We first used an automated procedure in which NMR chemical shifts inform the construction of system-specific force fields that describe each partner individually. The models of the two binding partners are then combined to perform simulations on the chaperone-substrate complex. The binding simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data from multiple biophysical measurements. Upon binding, Im7 interacts with a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on Spy's surface, causing conformational exchange within Im7 to slow down as Im7 folds. Meanwhile, the motion of Spy's flexible loop region increases, allowing for better interaction with different substrate conformations, and helping offset losses in Im7 conformational dynamics that occur upon binding and folding. Spy then preferentially releases Im7 into a well-folded state. Our strategy has enabled a residue-level description of a dynamic chaperone-substrate interaction, improving our understanding of how chaperones facilitate substrate folding. More broadly, we validate our approach using two other binding partners, showing that this approach provides a general platform from which to investigate other flexible biomolecular complexes through the integration of NMR data with efficient computational models.

  3. Catalysis of Protein Folding by Chaperones Accelerates Evolutionary Dynamics in Adapting Cell Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Cetinbaş; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly f...

  4. Investigation of original multivalent iminosugars as pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laigre, Eugénie; Hazelard, Damien; Casas, Josefina; Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Michelakakis, Helen; Mavridou, Irene; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Delgado, Antonio; Compain, Philippe

    2016-06-24

    Multivalent iminosugars conjugated with a morpholine moiety and/or designed as prodrugs have been prepared and evaluated as new classes of pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease. This study further confirms the interest of the prodrug concept and shows that the addition of a lysosome-targeting morpholine unit into iminosugar cluster structures has no significant impact on the chaperone activity on Gaucher cells.

  5. Structure of the Escherichia coli ProQ RNA chaperone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Grecia; Hardwick, Steven; Maslen, Sarah L; Skehel, J Mark; Holmqvist, Erik; Vogel, Jörg; Bateman, Alex; Luisi, Ben; Broadhurst, R William

    2017-02-13

    The protein ProQ has recently been identified as a global RNA chaperone in Salmonella, and a similar role is anticipated for its numerous homologues in divergent bacterial species. We report the solution structure of Escherichia coli ProQ, revealing an N-terminal FinO-like domain, a C-terminal domain that unexpectedly has a Tudor-domain fold commonly found in eukaryotes, and an elongated bridging intra-domain linker that is flexible but nonetheless incompressible. Structure based sequence analysis suggests that the Tudor domain was acquired through horizontal gene transfer and gene fusion to the ancestral FinO-like domain. Through a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we have mapped putative RNA binding surfaces on all three domains of ProQ and modelled the protein's conformation in the apo and RNA-bound forms. Taken together, these data suggest how the FinO, Tudor and linker domains of ProQ cooperate to recognise complex RNA structures and serve to promote RNA-mediated regulation.

  6. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy and Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Parkinson’s Disease

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    Ruixin Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD, a complex neurodegenerative disorder, is pathologically characterized by the formation of Lewy bodies and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc. Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be one of the most important causative mechanisms. In addition, dysfunction of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA, one of the lysosomal proteolytic pathways, has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. An exciting and important development is recent finding that CMA and mitochondrial quality control may be linked. This review summarizes the studies revealing the link between autophagy and mitochondrial function. Discussions are focused on the connections between CMA and mitochondrial failure and on the role of MEF2D, a neuronal survival factor, in mediating the regulation of mitochondria in the context of CMA. These new findings highlight the need to further explore the possibility of targeting the MEF2D-mitochondria-CMA network in both understanding the PD pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  7. Intracellular protozoan parasites of humans: the role of molecular chaperones in development and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonhai, Addmore; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M; Blatch, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Certain kinetoplastid (Leishmania spp. and Tryapnosoma cruzi) and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii) are capable of invading human cells as part of their pathology. These parasites appear to have evolved a relatively expanded or diverse complement of genes encoding molecular chaperones. The gene families encoding heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones show significant expansion and diversity (especially for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi), and in particular the Hsp40 family appears to be an extreme example of phylogenetic radiation. In general, Hsp40 proteins act as co-chaperones of Hsp70 chaperones, forming protein folding pathways that integrate with Hsp90 to ensure proteostasis in the cell. It is tempting to speculate that the diverse environmental insults that these parasites endure have resulted in the evolutionary selection of a diverse and expanded chaperone network. Hsp90 is involved in development and growth of all of these intracellular parasites, and so far represents the strongest candidate as a target for chemotherapeutic interventions. While there have been some excellent studies on the molecular and cell biology of Hsp70 proteins, relatively little is known about the biological function of Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in these intracellular parasites. This review focuses on intracellular protozoan parasites of humans, and provides a critique of the role of heat shock proteins in development and pathogenesis, especially the molecular chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp40.

  8. Large-Scale Conformational Transitions and Dimerization Are Encoded in the Amino-Acid Sequences of Hsp70 Chaperones

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    Malinverni, Duccio; Marsili, Simone; Barducci, Alessandro; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70s are a class of ubiquitous and highly conserved molecular chaperones playing a central role in the regulation of proteostasis in the cell. Hsp70s assist a myriad of cellular processes by binding unfolded or misfolded substrates during a complex biochemical cycle involving large-scale structural rearrangements. Here we show that an analysis of coevolution at the residue level fully captures the characteristic large-scale conformational transitions of this protein family, and predicts an evolutionary conserved–and thus functional–homo-dimeric arrangement. Furthermore, we highlight that the features encoding the Hsp70 dimer are more conserved in bacterial than in eukaryotic sequences, suggesting that the known Hsp70/Hsp110 hetero-dimer is a eukaryotic specialization built on a pre-existing template. PMID:26046683

  9. Molecular chaperones as therapeutic targets to counteract proteostasis defects.

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    Cattaneo, Monica; Dominici, Roberto; Cardano, Marina; Diaferia, Giuseppe; Rovida, Ermanna; Biunno, Ida

    2012-03-01

    The health of cells is preserved by the levels and correct folding states of the proteome, which is generated and maintained by the proteostasis network, an integrated biological system consisting of several cytoprotective and degradative pathways. Indeed, the health conditions of the proteostasis network is a fundamental prerequisite to life as the inability to cope with the mismanagement of protein folding arising from genetic, epigenetic, and micro-environment stress appears to trigger a whole spectrum of unrelated diseases. Here we describe the potential functional role of the proteostasis network in tumor biology and in conformational diseases debating on how the signaling branches of this biological system may be manipulated to develop more efficacious and selective therapeutic strategies. We discuss the dual strategy of these processes in modulating the folding activity of molecular chaperones in order to counteract the antithetic proteostasis deficiencies occurring in cancer and loss/gain of function diseases. Finally, we provide perspectives on how to improve the outcome of these disorders by taking advantage of proteostasis modeling.

  10. Fab Chaperone-Assisted RNA Crystallography (Fab CARC).

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    Sherman, Eileen; Archer, Jennifer; Ye, Jing-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Recent discovery of structured RNAs such as ribozymes and riboswitches shows that there is still much to learn about the structure and function of RNAs. Knowledge learned can be employed in both biochemical research and clinical applications. X-ray crystallography gives unparalleled atomic-level structural detail from which functional inferences can be deduced. However, the difficulty in obtaining high-quality crystals and their phasing information make it a very challenging task. RNA crystallography is particularly arduous due to several factors such as RNA's paucity of surface chemical diversity, lability, repetitive anionic backbone, and flexibility, all of which are counterproductive to crystal packing. Here we describe Fab chaperone assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), a systematic technique to increase RNA crystallography success by facilitating crystal packing as well as expediting phase determination through molecular replacement of conserved Fab domains. Major steps described in this chapter include selection of a synthetic Fab library displayed on M13 phage against a structured RNA crystallization target, ELISA for initial choice of binding Fabs, Fab expression followed by protein A affinity then cation exchange chromatography purification, final choice of Fab by binding specificity and affinity as determined by a dot blot assay, and lastly gel filtration purification of a large quantity of chosen Fabs for crystallization.

  11. Promoting Neuronal Tolerance of Diabetic Stress: Modulating Molecular Chaperones.

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    Emery, S M; Dobrowsky, R T

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) involves an interrelated series of metabolic and vascular insults that ultimately contribute to sensory neuron degeneration. In the quest to pharmacologically manage DPN, small-molecule inhibitors have targeted proteins and pathways regarded as "diabetes specific" as well as others whose activity are altered in numerous disease states. These efforts have not yielded any significant therapies, due in part to the complicating issue that the biochemical contribution of these targets/pathways to the progression of DPN does not occur with temporal and/or biochemical uniformity between individuals. In a complex, chronic neurodegenerative disease such as DPN, it is increasingly appreciated that effective disease management may not necessarily require targeting a pathway or protein considered to contribute to disease progression. Alternatively, it may prove sufficiently beneficial to pharmacologically enhance the activity of endogenous cytoprotective pathways to aid neuronal tolerance to and recovery from glucotoxic stress. In pursuing this paradigm shift, we have shown that modulating the activity and expression of molecular chaperones such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) may provide translational potential for the effective medical management of insensate DPN. Considerable evidence supports that modulating Hsp70 has beneficial effects in improving inflammation, oxidative stress, and glucose sensitivity. Given the emerging potential of modulating Hsp70 to manage DPN, the current review discusses efforts to characterize the cytoprotective effects of this protein and the benefits and limitations that may arise in drug development efforts that exploit its cytoprotective activity.

  12. Expressional patterns of chaperones in ten human tumor cell lines

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    Slavc Irene

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperones (CH play an important role in tumor biology but no systematic work on expressional patterns has been reported so far. The aim of the study was therefore to present an analytical method for the concomitant determination of several CH in human tumor cell lines, to generate expressional patterns in the individual cell lines and to search for tumor and non-tumor cell line specific CH expression. Human tumor cell lines of neuroblastoma, colorectal and adenocarcinoma of the ovary, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma, lung, cervical and breast cancer, promyelocytic leukaemia were homogenised, proteins were separated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with in-gel digestion of proteins and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis was carried out for the identification of CH. Results A series of CH was identified including the main CH groups as HSP90/HATPas_C, HSP70, Cpn60_TCP1, DnaJ, Thioredoxin, TPR, Pro_isomerase, HSP20, ERP29_C, KE2, Prefoldin, DUF704, BAG, GrpE and DcpS. Conclusions The ten individual tumor cell lines showed different expression patterns, which are important for the design of CH studies in tumor cell lines. The results can serve as a reference map and form the basis of a concomitant determination of CH by a protein chemical rather than an immunochemical method, independent of antibody availability or specificity.

  13. Withaferin A Analogs That Target the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Xu, Ya-ming; Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Lau, Eric C.; Mesa, Celestina; Mason, Damian J.; Brown, Robert V.; Clair, James J. La; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; Zhang, Donna D.; Chapman, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mode of action (MOA) of many natural products can be puzzling with mechanistic clues that seem to lack a common thread. One such puzzle lies in the evaluation of the antitumor properties of the natural product withaferin A (WFA). A variety of seemingly unrelated pathways have been identified to explain its activity, suggesting a lack of selectivity. We now show that WFA acts as an inhibitor of the chaperone, p97, both in vitro and in cell models in addition to inhibiting the proteasome in vitro. Through medicinal chemistry, we have refined the activity of WFA toward p97 and away from the proteasome. Subsequent studies indicated that these WFA analogs retained p97 activity and cytostatic activity in cell models, suggesting that the modes of action reported for WFA could be connected by proteostasis modulation. Through this endeavor, we highlight how the parallel integration of medicinal chemistry with chemical biology offers a potent solution to one of natures’ intriguing molecular puzzles. PMID:26006219

  14. Investigation of the chaperone function of the small heat shock protein — AgsA

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    Nagamune Hideaki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small heat shock protein AgsA was originally isolated from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We previously demonstrated that AgsA was an effective chaperone that could reduce the amount of heat-aggregated proteins in an Escherichia coli rpoH mutant. AgsA appeared to promote survival at lethal temperatures by cooperating with other chaperones in vivo. To investigate the aggregation prevention mechanisms of AgsA, we constructed N- or C-terminal truncated mutants and compared their properties with wild type AgsA. Results AgsA showed significant overall homology to wheat sHsp16.9 allowing its three-dimensional structure to be predicted. Truncations of AgsA until the N-terminal 23rd and C-terminal 11th amino acid (AA from both termini preserved its in vivo chaperone activity. Temperature-controlled gel filtration chromatography showed that purified AgsA could maintain large oligomeric complexes up to 50°C. Destabilization of oligomeric complexes was observed for N-terminal 11- and 17-AA truncated AgsA; C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA could not form large oligomeric complexes. AgsA prevented the aggregation of denatured lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase (MDH and citrate synthase (CS but did not prevent the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. N-terminal 17-AA truncated AgsA showed no chaperone activity towards MDH. C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA showed weak or no chaperone activity towards lysozyme, MDH and CS although it prevented the aggregation of insulin at 25°C. When the same amount of AgsA and C-terminal 11-AA truncated AgsA were mixed (half of respective amount required for efficient chaperone activities, good chaperone activity for all substrates and temperatures was observed. Detectable intermolecular exchanges between AgsA oligomers at 25°C were not observed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis; however, significant exchanges between AgsA oligomers and C-terminal truncated AgsA were observed at 25

  15. Quantifying chaperone-mediated transitions in the proteostasis network of E. coli.

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    Alex Dickson

    Full Text Available For cells to function, the concentrations of all proteins in the cell must be maintained at the proper levels (proteostasis. This task--complicated by cellular stresses, protein misfolding, aggregation, and degradation--is performed by a collection of chaperones that alter the configurational landscape of a given client protein through the formation of protein-chaperone complexes. The set of all such complexes and the transitions between them form the proteostasis network. Recently, a computational model was introduced (FoldEco that synthesizes experimental data into a system-wide description of the proteostasis network of E. coli. This model describes the concentrations over time of all the species in the system, which include different conformations of the client protein, as well as protein-chaperone complexes. We apply to this model a recently developed analysis tool to calculate mediation probabilities in complex networks. This allows us to determine the probability that a given chaperone system is used to mediate transitions between client protein conformations, such as folding, or the correction of misfolded conformations. We determine how these probabilities change both across different proteins, as well as with system parameters, such as the synthesis rate, and in each case reveal in detail which factors control the usage of one chaperone system over another. We find that the different chaperone systems do not operate orthogonally and can compensate for each other when one system is disabled or overworked, and that this can complicate the analysis of "knockout" experiments, where the concentration of native protein is compared both with and without the presence of a given chaperone system. This study also gives a general recipe for conducting a transition-path-based analysis on a network of coupled chemical reactions, which can be useful in other types of networks as well.

  16. The role of chaperone-mediated autophagy in huntingtin degradation.

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    Lin Qi

    Full Text Available Huntington Disease (HD is caused by an abnormal expansion of polyQ tract in the protein named huntingtin (Htt. HD pathology is featured by accumulation and aggregation of mutant Htt in striatal and cortical neurons. Aberrant Htt degradation is implicated in HD pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory role of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA components, heat shock protein cognate 70 (Hsc70 and lysosome-associated protein 2A (LAMP-2A in degradation of Htt fragment 1-552aa (Htt-552. A cell model of HD was produced by overexpression of Htt-552 with adenovirus. The involvement of CMA components in degradation of Htt-552 was determined with over-expression or silencing of Hsc70 and LAMP-2A. The results confirmed previous reports that both macroautophagy and CMA were involved in degradation of Htt-552. Changing the levels of CMA-related proteins affected the accumulation of Htt-552. The lysosomal binding and luminal transport of Htt-552 was demonstrated by incubation of Htt-552 with isolated lysosomes. Expansion of the polyQ tract in Htt-552 impaired its uptake and degradation by lysosomes. Mutation of putative KFERQ motif in wild-type Htt-552 interfered with interactions between Htt-552 and Hsc70. Endogenous Hsc70 and LAMP-2A interacted with exogenously expressed Htt-552. Modulating the levels of CMA related proteins degraded endogenous full-length Htt. These studies suggest that Hsc70 and LAMP-2A through CMA play a role in the clearance of Htt and suggest a novel strategy to target the degradation of mutant Htt.

  17. Biologic activities of molecular chaperones and pharmacologic chaperone imidazole-containing dipeptide-based compounds: natural skin care help and the ultimate challenge: implication for adaptive responses in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady M; Nikolayeva, Juliana G; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2012-03-01

    Accumulation of molecular damage and increased molecular heterogeneity are hallmarks of photoaged skin and pathogenesis of human cutaneous disease. Growing evidence demonstrates the ability of molecular chaperone proteins and of pharmacologic chaperones to decrease the environmental stress and ameliorate the oxidation stress-related and glycation disease phenotypes, suggesting that the field of chaperone therapy might hold novel treatments for skin diseases and aging. In this review, we examine the evidence suggesting a role for molecular chaperone proteins in the skin and their inducer and protecting agents: pharmacologic chaperone imidazole dipeptide-based agents (carcinine and related compounds) in cosmetics and dermatology. Furthermore, we discuss the use of chaperone therapy for the treatment of skin photoaging diseases and other skin pathologies that have a component of increased glycation and/or free radical-induced oxidation in their genesis. We examine biologic activities of molecular and pharmacologic chaperones, including strategies for identifying potential chaperone compounds and for experimentally demonstrating chaperone activity in in vitro and in vivo models of human skin disease. This allows the protein to function and traffic to the appropriate location in the skin, thereby increasing protein activity and cellular function and reducing stress on skin cells. The benefits of imidazole dipeptide antioxidants with transglycating activity (such as carcinine) in skin care are that they help protect and repair cell membrane damage and help retain youthful, younger-looking skin. All skin types will benefit from daily, topical application of pharmacologic chaperone antioxidants, anti-irritants, in combination with water-binding protein agents that work to mimic the structure and function of healthy skin. General strategies are presented addressing ground techniques to improve absorption of usually active chaperone proteins and dipeptide compounds, include

  18. Therapy of Fabry disease with pharmacological chaperones: from in silico predictions to in vitro tests

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    Cammisa Marco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is a rare disorder caused by a large variety of mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal alpha-galactosidase. Many of these mutations are unique to individual families. Fabry disease can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy, but a promising novel strategy relies on small molecules, so called "pharmacological chaperones", which can be administered orally. Unfortunately only 42% of genotypes respond to pharmacological chaperones. Results A procedure to predict which genotypes responsive to pharmacological chaperones in Fabry disease has been recently proposed. The method uses a position-specific substitution matrix to score the mutations. Using this method, we have screened public databases for predictable responsive cases and selected nine representative mutations as yet untested with pharmacological chaperones. Mutant lysosomal alpha galactosidases were produced by site directed mutagenesis and expressed in mammalian cells. Seven out of nine mutations responded to pharmacological chaperones. Nineteen other mutations that were tested with pharmacological chaperones, but were not included in the training of the predictive method, were gathered from literature and analyzed in silico. In this set all five mutations predicted to be positive were responsive to pharmacological chaperones, bringing the percentage of responsive mutations among those predicted to be positive and not used to train the classifier to 86% (12/14. This figure differs significantly from the percentage of responsive cases observed among all the Fabry mutants tested so far. Conclusions In this paper we provide experimental support to an "in silico" method designed to predict missense mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal alpha galactosidase responsive to pharmacological chaperones. We demonstrated that responsive mutations can be predicted with a low percentage of false positive cases. Most of the mutations tested to validate the method

  19. Engineering and evolution of molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases with enhanced activity

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    Korrie eMack

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells have evolved a sophisticated proteostasis network to ensure that proteins acquire and retain their native structure and function. Critical components of this network include molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases, which function to prevent and reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, proteostasis networks have limits, which when exceeded can have fatal consequences as in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A promising strategy is to engineer proteostasis networks to counter challenges presented by specific diseases or specific proteins. Here, we review efforts to enhance the activity of individual molecular chaperones or protein disaggregases via engineering and directed evolution. Remarkably, enhanced global activity or altered substrate specificity of various molecular chaperones, including GroEL, Hsp70, ClpX, and Spy, can be achieved by minor changes in primary sequence and often a single missense mutation. Likewise, small changes in the primary sequence of Hsp104 yield potentiated protein disaggregases that reverse the aggregation and buffer toxicity of various neurodegenerative disease proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43, and FUS. Collectively, these advances have revealed key mechanistic and functional insights into chaperone and disaggregase biology. They also suggest that enhanced chaperones and disaggregases could have important applications in treating human disease as well as in the purification of valuable proteins in the pharmaceutical sector.

  20. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

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    Jose M. Requena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis.

  1. Yeast prions are useful for studying protein chaperones and protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masison, Daniel C; Reidy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein chaperones help proteins adopt and maintain native conformations and play vital roles in cellular processes where proteins are partially folded. They comprise a major part of the cellular protein quality control system that protects the integrity of the proteome. Many disorders are caused when proteins misfold despite this protection. Yeast prions are fibrous amyloid aggregates of misfolded proteins. The normal action of chaperones on yeast prions breaks the fibers into pieces, which results in prion replication. Because this process is necessary for propagation of yeast prions, even small differences in activity of many chaperones noticeably affect prion phenotypes. Several other factors involved in protein processing also influence formation, propagation or elimination of prions in yeast. Thus, in much the same way that the dependency of viruses on cellular functions has allowed us to learn much about cell biology, the dependency of yeast prions on chaperones presents a unique and sensitive way to monitor the functions and interactions of many components of the cell's protein quality control system. Our recent work illustrates the utility of this system for identifying and defining chaperone machinery interactions.

  2. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme.

  3. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Jose M.; Montalvo, Ana M.; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges) for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis. PMID:26167482

  4. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

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    Adélle Burger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c.

  5. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

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    Jiménez-Zurdo José I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64% elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently

  6. Multi-layered molecular mechanisms of polypeptide holding, unfolding and disaggregation by HSP70/HSP110 chaperones

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    Finka, Andrija; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Members of the HSP70/HSP110 family (HSP70s) form a central hub of the chaperone network controlling all aspects of proteostasis in bacteria and the ATP-containing compartments of eukaryotic cells. The heat-inducible form HSP70 (HSPA1A) and its major cognates, cytosolic HSC70 (HSPA8), endoplasmic reticulum BIP (HSPA5), mitochondrial mHSP70 (HSPA9) and related HSP110s (HSPHs), contribute about 3% of the total protein mass of human cells. The HSP70s carry out a plethora of housekeeping cellular functions, such as assisting proper de novo folding, assembly and disassembly of protein complexes, pulling polypeptides out of the ribosome and across membrane pores, activating and inactivating signaling proteins and controlling their degradation. The HSP70s can induce structural changes in alternatively folded protein conformers, such as clathrin cages, hormone receptors and transcription factors, thereby regulating vesicular trafficking, hormone signaling and cell differentiation in development and cancer. To carry so diverse cellular housekeeping and stress-related functions, the HSP70s act as ATP-fuelled unfolding nanomachines capable of switching polypeptides between different folded states. During stress, the HSP70s can bind (hold) and prevent the aggregation of misfolding proteins and thereafter act alone or in collaboration with other unfolding chaperones to solubilize protein aggregates. Here, we discuss the common ATP-dependent mechanisms of holding, unfolding-by-clamping and unfolding-by-entropic pulling, by which the HSP70s can apparently convert various alternatively folded and misfolded polypeptides into differently active conformers. Understanding how HSP70s can prevent the formation of cytotoxic protein aggregates, pull, unfold, and solubilize them into harmless species is central to the design of therapies against protein conformational diseases. PMID:26097841

  7. The fictile coordination chemistry of cuprous-thiolate sites in copper chaperones.

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    Pushie, M Jake; Zhang, Limei; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N

    2012-06-01

    Copper plays vital roles in the active sites of cytochrome oxidase and in several other enzymes essential for human health. Copper is also highly toxic when dysregulated; because of this an elaborate array of accessory proteins have evolved which act as intracellular carriers or chaperones for the copper ions. In most cases chaperones transport cuprous copper. This review discusses some of the chemistry of these copper sites, with a view to some of the structural factors in copper coordination which are important in the biological function of these chaperones. The coordination chemistry and accessible geometries of the cuprous oxidation state are remarkably plastic and we discuss how this may relate to biological function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  8. Molecular chaperones in targeting misfolded proteins for ubiquitin-dependent degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Ellgaard, Lars; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins presents a considerable threat to the health of individual cells and has been linked to severe diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Considering that, in nature, cells often are exposed to stress conditions that may lead to aberrant protein...... conformational changes, it becomes clear that they must have an efficient quality control apparatus to refold or destroy misfolded proteins. In general, cells rely on molecular chaperones to seize and refold misfolded proteins. If the native state is unattainable, misfolded proteins are targeted for degradation...... the misfolded protein substrate. Thus, by delegating substrate recognition to chaperones, E3s deftly utilize a pre-existing cellular system for selectively targeting misfolded proteins. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the interplay between molecular chaperones and the ubiquitin...

  9. The RNA chaperone Hfq impacts growth, metabolism and production of virulence factors in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kakoschke

    Full Text Available To adapt to changes in environmental conditions, bacteria regulate their gene expression at the transcriptional but also at the post-transcriptional level, e.g. by small RNAs (sRNAs which modulate mRNA stability and translation. The conserved RNA chaperone Hfq mediates the interaction of many sRNAs with their target mRNAs, thereby playing a global role in fine-tuning protein production. In this study, we investigated the significance of Hfq for the enteropathogen Yersina enterocolitica serotype O:8. Hfq facilitated optimal growth in complex and minimal media. Our comparative protein analysis of parental and hfq-negative strains suggested that Hfq promotes lipid metabolism and transport, cell redox homeostasis, mRNA translation and ATP synthesis, and negatively affects carbon and nitrogen metabolism, transport of siderophore and peptides and tRNA synthesis. Accordingly, biochemical tests indicated that Hfq represses ornithine decarboxylase activity, indole production and utilization of glucose, mannitol, inositol and 1,2-propanediol. Moreover, Hfq repressed production of the siderophore yersiniabactin and its outer membrane receptor FyuA. In contrast, hfq mutants exhibited reduced urease production. Finally, strains lacking hfq were more susceptible to acidic pH and oxidative stress. Unlike previous reports in other Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq was dispensable for type III secretion encoded by the virulence plasmid. Using a chromosomally encoded FLAG-tagged Hfq, we observed increased production of Hfq-FLAG in late exponential and stationary phases. Overall, Hfq has a profound effect on metabolism, resistance to stress and modulates the production of two virulence factors in Y. enterocolitica, namely urease and yersiniabactin.

  10. Roles of histone chaperone CIA/Asf1 in nascent DNA elongation during nucleosome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Katsuyuki; Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Tada, Shusuke; Natsume, Ryo; Kundu, Lena Rani; Nozaki, Naohito; Senda, Toshiya; Enomoto, Takemi; Horikoshi, Masami; Seki, Masayuki

    2011-10-01

    The nucleosome, which is composed of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, is a fundamental unit of chromatin and is duplicated during the eukaryotic DNA replication process. The evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone cell cycle gene 1 (CCG1) interacting factor A/anti-silencing function 1 (CIA/Asf1) is involved in histone transfer and nucleosome reassembly during DNA replication. CIA/Asf1 has been reported to split the histone (H3-H4)(2) tetramer into histone H3-H4 dimer(s) in vitro, raising a possibility that, in DNA replication, CIA/Asf1 is involved in nucleosome disassembly and the promotion of semi-conservative histone H3-H4 dimer deposition onto each daughter strand in vivo. Despite numerous studies on the functional roles of CIA/Asf1, its mechanistic role(s) remains elusive because of lack of biochemical analyses. The biochemical studies described here show that a V94R CIA/Asf1 mutant, which lacks histone (H3-H4)(2) tetramer splitting activity, does not form efficiently a quaternary complex with histones H3-H4 and the minichromosome maintenance 2 (Mcm2) subunit of the Mcm2-7 replicative DNA helicase. Interestingly, the mutant enhances nascent DNA strand synthesis in a cell-free chromosomal DNA replication system using Xenopus egg extracts. These results suggest that CIA/Asf1 in the CIA/Asf1-H3-H4-Mcm2 complex, which is considered to be an intermediate in histone transfer during DNA replication, negatively regulates the progression of the replication fork.

  11. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the TCP-1 Tubulin Chaperone Complex [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J; Rogala, Kacper B; Deane, Charlotte M; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G

    2015-06-29

    Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies, but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs.

  12. Quantification of interaction strengths between chaperones and tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Regina; Soll, Jürgen; Jung, Kirsten; Heermann, Ralf; Schwenkert, Serena

    2013-10-18

    The three tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing docking proteins Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 reside in the chloroplast, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. They are suggested to act during post-translational protein import by association with chaperone-bound preprotein complexes. Here, we performed a detailed biochemical, biophysical, and computational analysis of the interaction between Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 and the five cytosolic chaperones HSP70.1, HSP90.1, HSP90.2, HSP90.3, and HSP90.4. We used surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy in combination with Interaction Map® analysis to distinguish between chaperone oligomerization and docking protein-chaperone interactions and to calculate binding affinities for all tested interactions. Complementary to this, we applied pulldown assays as well as microscale thermophoresis as surface immobilization independent techniques. The data revealed that OM64 prefers HSP70 over HSP90, whereas Toc64 binds all chaperones with comparable affinities. We could further show that AtTPR7 is able to bind HSP90 in addition to HSP70. Moreover, differences between the HSP90 isoforms were detected and revealed a weaker binding for HSP90.1 to AtTPR7 and OM64, showing that slight differences in the amino acid composition or structure of the chaperones influence binding to the tetratricopeptide repeat domain. The combinatory approach of several methods provided a powerful toolkit to determine binding affinities of similar interaction partners in a highly quantitative manner.

  13. Interplay between Molecular Chaperones and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Targeting of Misfolded Proteins for Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    interacting with purified 26S proteasomes, and the subsequent characterization of two novel proteasome interacting proteins. The third study was aimed at analyzing the chaperone-assisted pathway leading to degradation of misfolded kinetochore proteins in S. pombe. In this study chaperones, E2s, E3s and DUBs...

  14. Copy-choice recombination by reverse transcriptases: Reshuffling of genetic markers mediated by RNA chaperones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Matteo; Buc, Henri

    2000-01-01

    Copy-choice recombination efficiently reshuffles genetic markers in retroviruses. In vivo, the folding of the genomic RNA is controlled by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). We show that binding of NC onto the acceptor RNA molecule is sufficient to enhance recombination, providing evidence for a mechanism where the structure of the acceptor template determines the template switch. NC as well as another RNA chaperone (StpA) converts recombination into a widespread process no longer restricted to rare hot spots, an effect maximized when both the NC and the reverse transcriptase come from HIV-1. These data suggest that RNA chaperones confer a higher genetic flexibility to retroviruses. PMID:10829081

  15. Single methyl group determines prion propagation and protein degradation activities of yeast heat shock protein (Hsp)-70 chaperones Ssa1p and Ssa2p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Masison, Daniel C

    2011-08-16

    Organisms encode multiple homologous heat shock protein (Hsp)-70s, which are essential protein chaperones that play the major role in cellular protein "quality control." Although Hsp70s are functionally redundant and highly homologous, many possess distinct functions. A regulatory motif underlying such distinctions, however, is unknown. The 98% identical cytoplasmic Hsp70s Ssa1p and Ssa2p function differently with regard to propagation of yeast [URE3] prions and in the vacuolar-mediated degradation of gluconeogenesis enzymes, such as FBPase. Here, we show that the Hsp70 nucleotide binding domain (NBD) regulates these functional specificities. We find little difference in ATPase, protein refolding, and amyloid inhibiting activities of purified Ssa1p and Ssa2p, but show that interchanging NBD residue alanine 83 (Ssa1p) and glycine 83 (Ssa2p) switched functions of Ssa1p and Ssa2p in [URE3] propagation and FBPase degradation. Disrupting the degradation pathway did not affect prion propagation, however, indicating these are two distinct processes where Ssa1/2p chaperones function differently. Our results suggest that the primary evolutionary pressure for Hsp70 functional distinctions is not to specify interactions of Hsp70 with substrate, but to specify the regulation of this activity. Our data suggest a rationale for maintaining multiple Hsp70s and suggest that subtle differences among Hsp70s evolved to provide functional specificity without affecting overall enzymatic activity.

  16. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  17. A [Cu]rious Ribosomal Profiling Pattern Leads to the Discovery of Ribosomal Frameshifting in the Synthesis of a Copper Chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Baranov, Pavel V

    2017-01-19

    In many bacteria, separate genes encode a copper binding chaperone and a copper efflux pump, but in some the chaperone encoding gene has been elusive. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Meydan et al. (2017) report that ribosomes translating the ORF that encodes the copper pump frequently frameshift and terminate to produce the copper chaperone.

  18. The Yersinia enterocolitica type three secretion chaperone SycO is integrated into the Yop regulatory network and binds to the Yop secretion protein YscM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heesemann Jürgen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenic yersiniae (Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica share a virulence plasmid encoding a type three secretion system (T3SS. This T3SS comprises more than 40 constituents. Among these are the transport substrates called Yops (Yersinia outer proteins, the specific Yop chaperones (Sycs, and the Ysc (Yop secretion proteins which form the transport machinery. The effectors YopO and YopP are encoded on an operon together with SycO, the chaperone of YopO. The characterization of SycO is the focus of this study. Results We have established the large-scale production of recombinant SycO in its outright form. We confirm that Y. enterocolitica SycO forms homodimers which is typical for Syc chaperones. SycO overproduction in Y. enterocolitica decreases secretion of Yops into the culture supernatant suggesting a regulatory role of SycO in type III secretion. We demonstrate that in vitro SycO interacts with YscM1, a negative regulator of Yop expression in Y. enterocolitica. However, the SycO overproduction phenotype was not mediated by YscM1, YscM2, YopO or YopP as revealed by analysis of isogenic deletion mutants. Conclusion We present evidence that SycO is integrated into the regulatory network of the Yersinia T3SS. Our picture of the Yersinia T3SS interactome is supplemented by identification of the SycO/YscM1 interaction. Further, our results suggest that at least one additional interaction partner of SycO has to be identified.

  19. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  20. Dynamic changes in the localization of thermally unfolded nuclear proteins associated with chaperone-dependent protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollen, E A; Salomons, F A; Brunsting, J F; van der Want, J J; Sibon, O C; Kampinga, H H

    2001-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in the protection of cells against protein damage through their ability to hold, disaggregate, and refold damaged proteins or their ability to facilitate degradation of damaged proteins. Little is known about how these processes are spatially coordinated in cells. U

  1. Comparison of intra-organellar chaperone capacity for dealing with stress-induced protein unfolding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; van Waarde, Maria A. W. H.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential for cells to prevent that partially unfolded proteins form non-functional, toxic aggregates. This requirement is increased when cells experience protein unfolding stresses and such could affect all compartments in the eukaryotic cell. Whether all organelles are equ

  2. Malaria heat shock proteins: drug targets that chaperone other drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, E-R; Cockburn, I L; Goble, J L; Stephens, L L; Blatch, G L

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing research into the chaperone systems of malaria parasites, and particularly of Plasmodium falciparum, suggests that heat shock proteins (Hsps) could potentially be an excellent class of drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes a vast range and large number of chaperones, including 43 Hsp40, six Hsp70, and three Hsp90 proteins (PfHsp40s, PfHsp70s and PfHsp90s), which are involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including protein folding and assembly, protein translocation, signal transduction and the cellular stress response. Despite the fact that Hsps are relatively conserved across different species, PfHsps do exhibit a considerable number of unique structural and functional features. One PfHsp90 is thought to be sufficiently different to human Hsp90 to allow for selective targeting. PfHsp70s could potentially be used as drug targets in two ways: either by the specific inhibition of Hsp70s by small molecule modulators, as well as disruption of the interactions between Hsp70s and co-chaperones such as the Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop) and Hsp40s. Of the many PfHsp40s present on the parasite, there are certain unique or essential members which are considered to have good potential as drug targets. This review critically evaluates the potential of Hsps as malaria drug targets, as well as the use of chaperones as aids in the heterologous expression of other potential malarial drug targets.

  3. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhani Nagpal

    Full Text Available Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS. Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  4. Orf1/SpcS Chaperones ExoS for Type Three Secretion by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DA-KANG SHEN; LAURIANE QUENEE; MARIETTE BONNET; LAURIANE KUHN; MADIHA DEROUAZI; DANIELE LAMOTTE; BERTRAND TOUSSAINT; BENOIT POLACK

    2008-01-01

    Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous and opportunistic pathogen that uses the type III secretion system (TTSS)to inject effector proteins directly into the cytosol of target cells to subvert the host cell's functions.Specialized bacterial chaperones are required for effective secretion of some effectors.To identify the chaperone of ExoS,the representative effector secreted by the TTSS of P. aeruginosa,we analyzed the role of a postulated chaperone termed Orfl.Methods By allelic exchange,we constructed the mutant with the deletion of gene Orfl.Analysis of secreted and cell-associated fractions was performed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting.Using strain expressing in trans Orfl,tagged by V5 polypeptide and histidine,protein-protein interaction Was determined by affinity resin pull-down assay in combination with MALDI-TOF. The role of Orfl in the expression of eroS was evaluated by genel reporter analysis.Results Pull-down assay showed that Orfl binds to ExoS and ExoT.Secretion profile analysis showedthat Orfl was necessary for the optimal secretion of ExoS and ExoT.However,Orfl had no effect on the expression of eroS.Conclusion Orfl is important for the secretion of ExoS probablY by mamtauung ExoS in a secretion-competent conformation.We propose to name Orfl as SpcS for "specific Pseudomonas chaperone for ExoS".

  5. Chaperone driven polymer translocation through Nanopore: spatial distribution and binding energy

    CERN Document Server

    Abdolvahab, Rouhollah Haji

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are binding proteins which work as a driving force to bias the biopolymer translocation by binding to it near the pore and preventing its backsliding. Chaperones may have different spatial distribution. Recently we show the importance of their spatial distribution in translocation and how it effects on sequence dependency of the translocation time. Here we focus on homopolymers and exponential distribution. As a result of the exponential distribution of chaperones, energy dependency of the translocation time will changed and one see a minimum in translocation time versus effective energy curve. The same trend can be seen in scaling exponent of time versus polymer length, $\\beta$ ($T\\sim\\beta$). Interestingly in some special cases e.g. chaperones of size $\\lambda=6$ and with exponential distribution rate of $\\alpha=5$, the minimum reaches even to amount of less than $1$ ($\\beta<1$). We explain the possibility of this rare result and base on a theoretical discussion we show that by taking into acc...

  6. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  7. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picking Wendy L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. Results In this study, we present the 3.3 Å crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155 of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC1-151. Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric "head-to- head" dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC1-151. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II

  8. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2010-10-05

    Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may

  9. MITRAC7 Acts as a COX1-Specific Chaperone and Reveals a Checkpoint during Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Sven; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Jans, Daniel; Hellwig, Christin; Bareth, Bettina; Jakobs, Stefan; Deckers, Markus; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter

    2015-09-08

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, is assembled from mitochondria- and nuclear-encoded subunits. The MITRAC complex represents the central assembly intermediate during this process as it receives imported subunits and regulates mitochondrial translation of COX1 mRNA. The molecular processes that promote and regulate the progression of assembly downstream of MITRAC are still unknown. Here, we identify MITRAC7 as a constituent of a late form of MITRAC and as a COX1-specific chaperone. MITRAC7 is required for cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. Surprisingly, loss of MITRAC7 or an increase in its amount causes selective cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells. We demonstrate that increased MITRAC7 levels stabilize and trap COX1 in MITRAC, blocking progression in the assembly process. In contrast, MITRAC7 deficiency leads to turnover of newly synthesized COX1. Accordingly, MITRAC7 affects the biogenesis pathway by stabilizing newly synthesized COX1 in assembly intermediates, concomitantly preventing turnover.

  10. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Essential for Virulence and Modulates the Expression of Four Adhesins in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoschke, Tamara Katharina; Kakoschke, Sara Carina; Zeuzem, Catharina; Bouabe, Hicham; Adler, Kristin; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rossier, Ombeline

    2016-07-08

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the RNA chaperone Hfq mediates the interaction of small RNAs with target mRNAs, thereby modulating transcript stability and translation. This post-transcriptional control helps bacteria adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions. Our previous mutational analysis showed that Hfq is involved in metabolism and stress survival in the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. In this study we demonstrate that Hfq is essential for virulence in mice and influences production of surface pathogenicity factors, in particular lipopolysaccharide and adhesins mediating interaction with host tissue. Hfq inhibited the production of Ail, the Ail-like protein OmpX and the MyfA pilin post-transcriptionally. In contrast Hfq promoted production of two major autotransporter adhesins YadA and InvA. While protein secretion in vitro was not affected, hfq mutants exhibited decreased protein translocation by the type III secretion system into host cells, consistent with decreased production of YadA and InvA. The influence of Hfq on YadA resulted from a complex interplay of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and likely post-translational effects. Hfq regulated invA by modulating the expression of the transcriptional regulators rovA, phoP and ompR. Therefore, Hfq is a global coordinator of surface virulence determinants in Y. enterocolitica suggesting that it constitutes an attractive target for developing new antimicrobial strategies.

  11. Conformational selection underlies recognition of a molybdoenzyme by its dedicated chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Lorenzi

    Full Text Available Molecular recognition is central to all biological processes. Understanding the key role played by dedicated chaperones in metalloprotein folding and assembly requires the knowledge of their conformational ensembles. In this study, the NarJ chaperone dedicated to the assembly of the membrane-bound respiratory nitrate reductase complex NarGHI, a molybdenum-iron containing metalloprotein, was taken as a model of dedicated chaperone. The combination of two techniques ie site-directed spin labeling followed by EPR spectroscopy and ion mobility mass spectrometry, was used to get information about the structure and conformational dynamics of the NarJ chaperone upon binding the N-terminus of the NarG metalloprotein partner. By the study of singly spin-labeled proteins, the E119 residue present in a conserved elongated hydrophobic groove of NarJ was shown to be part of the interaction site. Moreover, doubly spin-labeled proteins studied by pulsed double electron-electron resonance (DEER spectroscopy revealed a large and composite distribution of inter-label distances that evolves into a single preexisting one upon complex formation. Additionally, ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments fully support these findings by revealing the existence of several conformers in equilibrium through the distinction of different drift time curves and the selection of one of them upon complex formation. Taken together our work provides a detailed view of the structural flexibility of a dedicated chaperone and suggests that the exquisite recognition and binding of the N-terminus of the metalloprotein is governed by a conformational selection mechanism.

  12. Conformational Selection Underlies Recognition of a Molybdoenzyme by Its Dedicated Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Magali; Sylvi, Léa; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Mileo, Elisabetta; Halgand, Frédéric; Walburger, Anne; Vezin, Hervé; Belle, Valérie; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to all biological processes. Understanding the key role played by dedicated chaperones in metalloprotein folding and assembly requires the knowledge of their conformational ensembles. In this study, the NarJ chaperone dedicated to the assembly of the membrane-bound respiratory nitrate reductase complex NarGHI, a molybdenum-iron containing metalloprotein, was taken as a model of dedicated chaperone. The combination of two techniques ie site-directed spin labeling followed by EPR spectroscopy and ion mobility mass spectrometry, was used to get information about the structure and conformational dynamics of the NarJ chaperone upon binding the N-terminus of the NarG metalloprotein partner. By the study of singly spin-labeled proteins, the E119 residue present in a conserved elongated hydrophobic groove of NarJ was shown to be part of the interaction site. Moreover, doubly spin-labeled proteins studied by pulsed double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy revealed a large and composite distribution of inter-label distances that evolves into a single preexisting one upon complex formation. Additionally, ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments fully support these findings by revealing the existence of several conformers in equilibrium through the distinction of different drift time curves and the selection of one of them upon complex formation. Taken together our work provides a detailed view of the structural flexibility of a dedicated chaperone and suggests that the exquisite recognition and binding of the N-terminus of the metalloprotein is governed by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:23185350

  13. The assembly and intermolecular properties of the Hsp70-Tomm34-Hsp90 molecular chaperone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trcka, Filip; Durech, Michal; Man, Petr; Hernychova, Lenka; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj

    2014-04-01

    Maintenance of protein homeostasis by molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 requires their spatial and functional coordination. The cooperation of Hsp70 and Hsp90 is influenced by their interaction with the network of co-chaperone proteins, some of which contain tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains. Critical to these interactions are TPR domains that target co-chaperone binding to the EEVD-COOH motif that terminates Hsp70/Hsp90. Recently, the two-TPR domain-containing protein, Tomm34, was reported to bind both Hsp70 and Hsp90. Here we characterize the structural basis of Tomm34-Hsp70/Hsp90 interactions. Using multiple methods, including pull-down assays, fluorescence polarization, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and site-directed mutagenesis, we defined the binding activities and specificities of Tomm34 TPR domains toward Hsp70 and Hsp90. We found that Tomm34 TPR1 domain specifically binds Hsp70. This interaction is partly mediated by a non-canonical TPR1 two-carboxylate clamp and is strengthened by so far unidentified additional intermolecular contacts. The two-carboxylate clamp of the isolated TPR2 domain has affinity for both chaperones, but as part of the full-length Tomm34 protein, the TPR2 domain binds specifically Hsp90. These binding properties of Tomm34 TPR domains thus enable simultaneous binding of Hsp70 and Hsp90. Importantly, we provide evidence for the existence of an Hsp70-Tomm34-Hsp90 tripartite complex. In addition, we defined the basic conformational demands of the Tomm34-Hsp90 interaction. These results suggest that Tomm34 represents a novel scaffolding co-chaperone of Hsp70 and Hsp90, which may facilitate Hsp70/Hsp90 cooperation during protein folding.

  14. The Malarial Exported PFA0660w Is an Hsp40 Co-Chaperone of PfHsp70-x.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O Daniyan

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum, the human pathogen responsible for the most dangerous malaria infection, survives and develops in mature erythrocytes through the export of proteins needed for remodelling of the host cell. Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein (Hsp family are prominent members of the exportome, including a number of Hsp40s and a Hsp70. PFA0660w, a type II Hsp40, has been shown to be exported and possibly form a complex with PfHsp70-x in the infected erythrocyte cytosol. However, the chaperone properties of PFA0660w and its interaction with human and parasite Hsp70s are yet to be investigated. Recombinant PFA0660w was found to exist as a monomer in solution, and was able to significantly stimulate the ATPase activity of PfHsp70-x but not that of a second plasmodial Hsp70 (PfHsp70-1 or a human Hsp70 (HSPA1A, indicating a potential specific functional partnership with PfHsp70-x. Protein binding studies in the presence and absence of ATP suggested that the interaction of PFA0660w with PfHsp70-x most likely represented a co-chaperone/chaperone interaction. Also, PFA0660w alone produced a concentration-dependent suppression of rhodanese aggregation, demonstrating its chaperone properties. Overall, we have provided the first biochemical evidence for the possible role of PFA0660w as a chaperone and as co-chaperone of PfHsp70-x. We propose that these chaperones boost the chaperone power of the infected erythrocyte, enabling successful protein trafficking and folding, and thereby making a fundamental contribution to the pathology of malaria.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the interplay between hsc70 and its co-chaperone HspBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Mahboubi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chaperones and their co-factors are components of a cellular network; they collaborate to maintain proteostasis under normal and harmful conditions. In particular, hsp70 family members and their co-chaperones are essential to repair damaged proteins. Co-chaperones are present in different subcellular compartments, where they modulate chaperone activities.Methods and Results. Our studies assessed the relationship between hsc70 and its co-factor HspBP1 in human cancer cells. HspBP1 promotes nucleotide exchange on hsc70, but has also chaperone-independent functions. We characterized the interplay between hsc70 and HspBP1 by quantitative confocal microscopy combined with automated image analyses and statistical evaluation. Stress and the recovery from insult changed significantly the subcellular distribution of hsc70, but had little effect on HspBP1. Single-cell measurements and regression analysis revealed that the links between the chaperone and its co-factor relied on (i the physiological state of the cell and (ii the subcellular compartment. As such, we identified a linear relationship and strong correlation between hsc70 and HspBP1 distribution in control and heat-shocked cells; this correlation changed in a compartment-specific fashion during the recovery from stress. Furthermore, we uncovered significant stress-induced changes in the colocalization between hsc70 and HspBP1 in the nucleus and cytoplasm.Discussion. Our quantitative approach defined novel properties of the co-chaperone HspBP1 as they relate to its interplay with hsc70. We propose that changes in cell physiology promote chaperone redistribution and thereby stimulate chaperone-independent functions of HspBP1.

  16. Stability of the Human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 Chaperone Complex against Nucleotides and Hsp90 Inhibitors, and the Influence of Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne H. Olesen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein–protein interaction (PPI inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2 did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM, while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands.

  17. Protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt5-Mep50 methylates histones H2A and H4 and the histone chaperone nucleoplasmin in Xenopus laevis eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Carola; Chitta, Raghu; Woo, Eileen; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Chait, Brian T; Hunt, Donald F; Shechter, David

    2011-12-01

    Histone proteins carry information contained in post-translational modifications. Eukaryotic cells utilize this histone code to regulate the usage of the underlying DNA. In the maturing oocytes and eggs of the frog Xenopus laevis, histones are synthesized in bulk in preparation for deposition during the rapid early developmental cell cycles. During this key developmental time frame, embryonic pluripotent chromatin is established. In the egg, non-chromatin-bound histones are complexed with storage chaperone proteins, including nucleoplasmin. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a complex of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (Prmt5) and the methylosome protein 50 (Mep50) isolated from Xenopus eggs that specifically methylates predeposition histones H2A/H2A.X-F and H4 and the histone chaperone nucleoplasmin on a conserved motif (GRGXK). We demonstrate that nucleoplasmin (Npm), an exceedingly abundant maternally deposited protein, is a potent substrate for Prmt5-Mep50 and is monomethylated and symmetrically dimethylated at Arg-187. Furthermore, Npm modulates Prmt5-Mep50 activity directed toward histones, consistent with a regulatory role for Npm in vivo. We show that H2A and nucleoplasmin methylation appears late in oogenesis and is most abundant in the laid egg. We hypothesize that these very abundant arginine methylations are constrained to pre-mid blastula transition events in the embryo and therefore may be involved in the global transcriptional repression found in this developmental time frame.

  18. Stability of the human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 chaperone complex against nucleotides and Hsp90 inhibitors, and the influence of phosphorylation by casein kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sanne H; Ingles, Donna J; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P; Betzi, Stephane; Georg, Gunda I; Tash, Joseph S; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2015-01-19

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM), while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands.

  19. The flagellar-specific transcription factor, sigma28, is the Type III secretion chaperone for the flagellar-specific anti-sigma28 factor FlgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Phillip D; Karlinsey, Joyce E; Aldridge, Christine; Birchall, Christopher; Thompson, Danielle; Yagasaki, Jin; Hughes, Kelly T

    2006-08-15

    The sigma(28) protein is a member of the bacterial sigma(70)-family of transcription factors that directs RNA polymerase to flagellar late (class 3) promoters. The sigma(28) protein is regulated in response to flagellar assembly by the anti-sigma(28) factor FlgM. FlgM inhibits sigma(28)-dependent transcription of genes whose products are needed late in assembly until the flagellar basal motor structure, the hook-basal body (HBB), is constructed. A second function for the sigma(28) transcription factor has been discovered: sigma(28) facilitates the secretion of FlgM through the HBB, acting as the FlgM Type III secretion chaperone. Transcription-specific mutants in sigma(28) were isolated that remained competent for FlgM-facilitated secretion separating the transcription and secretion-facilitation activities of sigma (28). Conversely, we also describe the isolation of mutants in sigma(28) that are specific for FlgM-facilitated secretion. The data demonstrate that sigma(28) is the Type III secretion chaperone for its own anti-sigma factor FlgM. Thus, a novel role for a sigma(70)-family transcription factor is described.

  20. Stability of the Human Hsp90-p50Cdc37 Chaperone Complex against Nucleotides and Hsp90 Inhibitors, and the Influence of Phosphorylation by Casein Kinase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sanne H.; Ingles, Donna J.; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P.; Betzi, Stephane; Georg, Gunda I.; Tash, Joseph S.; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is regulated by co-chaperones such as p50Cdc37, which recruits a wide selection of client protein kinases. Targeted disruption of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex by protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors has emerged as an alternative strategy to treat diseases characterized by aberrant Hsp90 activity. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, ELISA and GST-pull down assays we evaluated reported Hsp90 inhibitors and nucleotides for their ability to inhibit formation of the human Hsp90β-p50Cdc37 complex, reconstituted in-vitro from full-length proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors, including the proposed PPI inhibitors gedunin and H2-gamendazole, did not affect the interaction of Hsp90 with p50Cdc37 in vitro. Phosphorylation of Hsp90 and p50Cdc37 by casein kinase 2 (CK2) did not alter the thermodynamic signature of complex formation. However, the phosphorylated complex was vulnerable to disruption by ADP (IC50 = 32 µM), while ATP, AMPPNP and Hsp90 inhibitors remained largely ineffective. The differential inhibitory activity of ADP suggests that phosphorylation by CK2 primes the complex for dissociation in response to a drop in ATP/ADP levels. The approach applied herein provides robust assays for a comprehensive biochemical evaluation of potential effectors of the Hsp90-p50Cdc37 complex, such as phosphorylation by a kinase or the interaction with small molecule ligands. PMID:25608045

  1. Regulation of Proto-Oncogenic Dbl by Chaperone-Controlled, Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kamynina, Elena; Kauppinen, Krista; Duan, Faping; Muakkassa, Nora; Manor, Danny

    2006-01-01

    The dbl proto-oncogene product is a prototype of a growing family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that stimulate the activation of small GTP-binding proteins from the Rho family. Mutations that result in the loss of proto-Dbl's amino terminus produce a variant with constitutive GEF activity and high oncogenic potential. Here, we show that proto-Dbl is a short-lived protein that is kept at low levels in cells by efficient ubiquitination and degradation. The cellular fate of proto...

  2. Chaperone Function in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    molecular mechanism by which FKBP51 regulates AR activity. Using recombi - nant proteins, we show that FKBP51 stimulates recruitment of the cochaperone...organization that includes an N-terminal AF-1 domain, a central DNA -binding domain, a hinge region, and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD). AR

  3. Drosophila Frataxin: An Iron Chaperone During Cellular Fe-S Cluster Bioassembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondapalli, K.C.; Kok, N.M.; Dancis, A.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-20

    Frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is directly involved in regulating cellular iron homeostasis, has been suggested to serve as an iron chaperone during cellular Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. In humans, decreased amounts or impaired function of frataxin causes the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich's ataxia. Cellular production of Fe-S clusters is accomplished by the Fe cofactor assembly platform enzymes Isu (eukaryotes) and IscU (prokaryotes). In this report, we have characterized the overall stability and iron binding properties of the Drosophila frataxin homologue (Dfh). Dfh is highly folded with secondary structural elements consistent with the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. While the melting temperature (T{sub M} {approx} 59 C) and chemical stability ([urea]{sub 50} {approx} 2.4 M) of Drosophila frataxin, measured using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, closely match values determined for the human ortholog, pure Dfh is more stable against autodegradation than both the human and yeast proteins. The ferrous iron binding affinity (K{sub d} {approx} 6.0 {micro}M) and optimal metal to protein stoichiometry (1:1) for Dfh have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Under anaerobic conditions with salt present, holo-Dfh is a stable iron-loaded protein monomer. Frataxin prevents reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to DNA when presented with both Fe(II) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Ferrous iron bound to Dfh is high-spin and held in a partially symmetric Fe-(O/N){sub 6} coordination environment, as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) simulations indicate the average Fe-O/N bond length in Dfh is 2.13 {angstrom}, consistent with a ligand geometry constructed by water and carboxylate oxygens most likely supplied in part by surface-exposed conserved acidic residues located on helix 1 and strand 1 in the structurally

  4. Drosophila frataxin: an iron chaperone during cellular Fe-S cluster bioassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondapalli, Kalyan C; Kok, Nicole M; Dancis, Andrew; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2008-07-01

    Frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is directly involved in regulating cellular iron homeostasis, has been suggested to serve as an iron chaperone during cellular Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. In humans, decreased amounts or impaired function of frataxin causes the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich's ataxia. Cellular production of Fe-S clusters is accomplished by the Fe cofactor assembly platform enzymes Isu (eukaryotes) and IscU (prokaryotes). In this report, we have characterized the overall stability and iron binding properties of the Drosophila frataxin homologue (Dfh). Dfh is highly folded with secondary structural elements consistent with the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. While the melting temperature ( T M approximately 59 degrees C) and chemical stability ([urea] 50% approximately 2.4 M) of Drosophila frataxin, measured using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, closely match values determined for the human ortholog, pure Dfh is more stable against autodegradation than both the human and yeast proteins. The ferrous iron binding affinity ( K d approximately 6.0 microM) and optimal metal to protein stoichiometry (1:1) for Dfh have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Under anaerobic conditions with salt present, holo-Dfh is a stable iron-loaded protein monomer. Frataxin prevents reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to DNA when presented with both Fe(II) and H 2O 2. Ferrous iron bound to Dfh is high-spin and held in a partially symmetric Fe-(O/N) 6 coordination environment, as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) simulations indicate the average Fe-O/N bond length in Dfh is 2.13 A, consistent with a ligand geometry constructed by water and carboxylate oxygens most likely supplied in part by surface-exposed conserved acidic residues located on helix 1 and strand 1 in the structurally characterized frataxin

  5. A Rational Design Strategy for the Selective Activity Enhancement of a Molecular Chaperone toward a Target Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Francesco A; Sormanni, Pietro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-08-18

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the folding and assembly of proteins and inhibit their aberrant aggregation. They thus offer several opportunities for biomedical and biotechnological applications, as for example they can often prevent protein aggregation more effectively than other therapeutic molecules, including small molecules and antibodies. Here we present a method of designing molecular chaperones with enhanced activity against specific amyloidogenic substrates while leaving unaltered their functions toward other substrates. The method consists of grafting onto a molecular chaperone a peptide designed to bind specifically an epitope in the target substrate. We illustrate this strategy by describing Hsp70 variants with increased affinities for α-synuclein and Aβ42 but otherwise unaltered affinities for other substrates. These designed variants inhibit protein aggregation and disaggregate preformed fibrils significantly more effectively than wild-type Hsp70 indicating that the strategy presented here provides a possible route for tailoring rationally molecular chaperones for specific purposes.

  6. Different contributions of HtrA protease and chaperone activities to Campylobacter jejuni stress tolerance and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Skórko-Glonek, Joanna;

    2011-01-01

    The microaerophilic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne infections in the developed world. Tolerance to environmental stress relies on proteases and chaperones in the cell envelope such as HtrA and SurA. HtrA displays both chaperone and protease activity......, but little is known about how each of these activities contributes to stress tolerance in bacteria. In vitro experiments showed temperature dependent protease and chaperone activities of C. jejuni HtrA. A C. jejuni mutant lacking only the protease activity of HtrA was used to show that the HtrA chaperone...... activity is sufficient for growth at high temperature or oxidative stress, whereas the HtrA protease activity is only essential at conditions close to the growth limit for C. jejuni. However, the protease activity was required to prevent induction of the cytoplasmic heat-shock response even at optimal...

  7. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro.

  8. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Pathogenesis of Lewisite-Induced Cutaneous Blistering and Inflammation: Chemical Chaperones as Potential Novel Antidotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changzhao; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Weng, Zhiping; Croutch, Claire R; Agarwal, Anupam; Elmets, Craig A; Afaq, Farrukh; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Lewisite is a potent arsenic-based chemical warfare agent known to induce painful cutaneous inflammation and blistering. Only a few modestly effective antidotes have so far been described in the literature. However, the discovery of effective antidotes for lewisite was hampered by the paucity of the exact molecular mechanism underlying its cutaneous pathogenesis. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying lewisite-induced cutaneous blistering and inflammation and describe its novel antidotes. On the basis of our initial screening, we used a highly sensitive murine model that recapitulates the known human pathogenesis of arsenicals-induced cutaneous inflammation and blistering. Topically administered lewisite induced potent acute inflammation and microvesication in the skin of Ptch1(+/-)/SKH-1 mice. Even at a very low dose, lewisite up-regulates unfolded protein response signaling, inflammatory response, and apoptosis. These cutaneous lesions were associated with production of reactive oxygen species and extensive apoptosis of the epidermal keratinocytes. We confirmed that activation of reactive oxygen species-dependent unfolded protein response signaling is the underlying molecular mechanism of skin damage. Similar alterations were noticed in lewisite-treated cultured human skin keratinocytes. We discovered that chemical chaperone 4-phenyl butyric acid and antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, which significantly attenuate lewisite-mediated skin injury, can serve as potent antidotes. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying the cutaneous pathogenesis of lewisite-induced lesions. We also identified novel potential therapeutic targets for lewisite-mediated cutaneous injury.

  9. Transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 couples the histone chaperone Asf1b to HSV-1 DNA replication components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Nogueira, Mauricio L; Vogel, Jodi L; Kristie, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    The cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 interacts with numerous transcription factors as well as other coactivators and is a component of multiple chromatin modulation complexes. The protein is essential for the expression of the immediate early genes of both herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella zoster virus and functions, in part, by coupling chromatin modification components including the Set1 or MLL1 histone methyltransferases and the histone demethylase LSD1 to promote the installation of positive chromatin marks and the activation of viral immediately early gene transcription. Although studies have investigated the role of HCF-1 in both cellular and viral transcription, little is known about other processes that the protein may be involved in. Here we demonstrate that HCF-1 localizes to sites of HSV replication late in infection. HCF-1 interacts directly and simultaneously with both HSV DNA replication proteins and the cellular histone chaperone Asf1b, a protein that regulates the progression of cellular DNA replication forks via chromatin reorganization. Asf1b localizes with HCF-1 in viral replication foci and depletion of Asf1b results in significantly reduced viral DNA accumulation. The results support a model in which the transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 is a component of the HSV DNA replication assembly and promotes viral DNA replication by coupling Asf1b to DNA replication components. This coupling provides a novel function for HCF-1 and insights into the mechanisms of modulating chromatin during DNA replication.

  10. Hsp70 Structure, Function, Regulation and Influence on Yeast Prions

    OpenAIRE

    D. Sharma; Masison, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock proteins protect cells from various conditions of stress. Hsp70, the most ubiquitous and highly conserved Hsp, helps proteins adopt native conformation or regain function after misfolding. Various co-chaperones specify Hsp70 function and broaden its substrate range. We discuss Hsp70 structure and function, regulation by co-factors and influence on propagation of yeast prions.

  11. Screening Molecular Chaperones Similar to Small Heat Shock Proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiyoung; Kim, Kanghwa; Lee, Songmi

    2015-09-01

    To screen molecular chaperones similar to small heat shock proteins (sHsps), but without α-crystalline domain, heat-stable proteins from Schizosaccharomyces pombe were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sixteen proteins were identified, and four recombinant proteins, including cofilin, NTF2, pyridoxin biosynthesis protein (Snz1) and Wos2 that has an α-crystalline domain, were purified. Among these proteins, only Snz1 showed the anti-aggregation activity against thermal denaturation of citrate synthase. However, pre-heating of NTF2 and Wos2 at 70℃ for 30 min, efficiently prevented thermal aggregation of citrate synthase. These results indicate that Snz1 and NTF2 possess molecular chaperone activity similar to sHsps, even though there is no α-crystalline domain in their sequences.

  12. Transthyretin Amyloidosis: Chaperone Concentration Changes and Increased Proteolysis in the Pathway to Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Transthyretin amyloidosis is a conformational pathology characterized by the extracellular formation of amyloid deposits and the progressive impairment of the peripheral nervous system. Point mutations in this tetrameric plasma protein decrease its stability and are linked to disease onset and progression. Since non-mutated transthyretin also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis and some mutation bearers are asymptomatic throughout their lives, non-genetic factors must also be involved in transthyretin amyloidosis. We discovered, using a differential proteomics approach, that extracellular chaperones such as fibrinogen, clusterin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-anti-trypsin and 2-macroglobulin are overrepresented in transthyretin amyloidosis. Our data shows that a complex network of extracellular chaperones are over represented in human plasma and we speculate that they act synergistically to cope with amyloid prone proteins. Proteostasis may thus be as important as point mutations in transthyretin amyloidosis.

  13. The Role of System-Specific Molecular Chaperones in the Maturation of Molybdoenzymes in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Neumann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenesis of prokaryotic molybdoenzymes is a complex process with the final step representing the insertion of a matured molybdenum cofactor (Moco into a folded apoenzyme. Usually, specific chaperones of the XdhC family are required for the maturation of molybdoenzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria. Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are characterized to contain an equatorial sulfur ligand at the molybdenum center of Moco. This sulfur ligand is inserted into Moco while bound to the XdhC-like protein and before its insertion into the target enzyme. In addition, enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family bind either the molybdopterin (Mo-MPT form of Moco or the modified molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor (MCD. In both cases, only the matured cofactor is inserted by a proofreading process of XdhC. The roles of these specific XdhC-like chaperones during the biogenesis of enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family in bacteria are described.

  14. The heat shock protein/chaperone network and multiple stress resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Jacob, Pierre

    2016-11-15

    Crop yield has been greatly enhanced during the last century. However, most elite cultivars are adapted to temperate climates and are not well suited to more stressful conditions. In the context of climate change, stress resistance is a major concern. To overcome these difficulties, scientists may help breeders by providing genetic markers associated with stress resistance. However, multi-stress resistance cannot be obtained from the simple addition of single stress resistance traits. In the field, stresses are unpredictable and several may occur at once. Consequently, the use of single stress resistance traits is often inadequate. Although it has been historically linked with the heat stress response, the heat shock protein (HSP)/chaperone network is a major component of multiple stress responses. Among the HSP/chaperone

  15. A novel protein refolding method integrating ion exchange chromatography with artificial molecular chaperone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Ming Zhang; Chao Zhan Wang; Jiang Feng Liu; Li Li Wang

    2008-01-01

    Artificial molecular chaperone (AMC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEC) were integrated, thus a new refolding method,artificial molecular chaperone-ion exchange chromatography (AMC-IEC) was developed. Compared with AMC and IEC, theactivity recovery of lysozyme obtained by AMC-IEC was much higher in the investigated range of initial protein concentrations,and the results show that AMC-IEC is very efficient for protein refolding at high concentrations. When the initial concentration oflysozyme is 180 mg/mL, its activity recovery obtained by AMC-IEC is still as high as 76.6%, while the activity recoveries obtainedby AMC and IEC are 45.6% and 42.4%, respectively.2008 Chao Zhan Wang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry (Dupont)

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  17. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  18. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Chingakham R. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan [University of Kansas, Del Shankel Structural Biology Center, Lawrence, KS 66047 (United States); Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S. [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Battaile, Kevin P. [IMCA-CAT Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 435A, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Roelofs, Jeroen, E-mail: jroelofs@ksu.edu [Kansas State University, 338 Ackert Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  19. The Hsp90/Cdc37p chaperone system is a determinant of molybdate resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millson, Stefan H; Nuttall, James M; Mollapour, Mehdi; Piper, Peter W

    2009-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks enzymes that contain the molybdopterin co-factor and therefore any requirement for molybdenum as a trace mineral supplement. Instead, high molybdate levels are inhibitory to its growth. Low cellular levels of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), an essential chaperone, were found to enhance this sensitivity to molybdate. Certain Hsp90 point mutations and co-chaperone protein defects that partially compromise the function of the Hsp90/Cdc37p chaperone system also rendered S. cerevisiae hypersensitive to high molybdate levels. Sensitivity was especially apparent with mutations close to the Hsp90 nucleotide binding site, with the loss of the non-essential co-chaperone Sti1p (the equivalent of mammalian Hop), and with the abolition of residue Ser14 phosphorylation on the essential co-chaperone Cdc37p. While it remains to be proved that these effects reflect direct inhibition of the Hsp90 of the cell by the MoO(4) (2+) oxyanion in vivo; this possibility is suggested by molybdate sensitivity arising with a mutation in the Hsp90 nucleotide binding site that does not generate stress sensitivity or an impaired stress response. Molybdate sensitivity may therefore be a useful phenotype to score when studying mutations in this chaperone system.

  20. Increased expression of Hsp40 chaperones, transcriptional factors, and ribosomal protein Rpp0 can cure yeast prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryndushkin, Dmitry S; Smirnov, Vladimir N; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D; Kushnirov, Vitaly V

    2002-06-28

    The Sup35 (eRF3) translation termination factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo a prion-like conformational conversion, thus resulting in the [PSI(+)] nonsense-suppressor determinant. In vivo this process depends critically on the chaperone Hsp104, whose lack or overexpression can cure [PSI(+)]. The use of artificial prion [PSI(+)PS] based on a hybrid Sup35PS with prion domain from the yeast Pichia methanolica allowed us to uncover three more chaperones, Ssb1, Ssa1, and Ydj1, whose overexpression can cure prion determinants. Here, we used the [PSI(+)PS] to search a multicopy yeast genomic library for novel factors able to cure prions. It was found that overexpression of the Hsp40 family chaperones Sis1 and Ynl077w, chaperone Sti1, transcriptional factors Sfl1 and Ssn8, and acidic ribosomal protein Rpp0 can interfere with propagation and manifestation of [PSI(+)PS] in a prion strain-specific manner. Some of these factors also affected the manifestation and propagation of conventional [PSI(+)]. Excess of Sfl1, Ssn8, and Rpp0 influenced at least one of the tested chaperone-specific promoters, SSA4, HSP104, and model promoters, with either the heat shock or stress response elements. Thus, the induction of chaperone expression by these proteins could explain their prion-curing effects.

  1. Multiscale modeling of a conditionally disordered pH-sensing chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, Logan S; Law, Sean M; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-04-24

    The pH-sensing chaperone HdeA promotes the survival of enteropathogenic bacteria during transit through the harshly acidic environment of the mammalian stomach. At low pH, HdeA transitions from an inactive, folded, dimer to chaperone-active, disordered, monomers to protect against the acid-induced aggregation of periplasmic proteins. Toward achieving a detailed mechanistic understanding of the pH response of HdeA, we develop a multiscale modeling approach to capture its pH-dependent thermodynamics. Our approach combines pK(a) (logarithmic acid dissociation constant) calculations from all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics simulations with coarse-grained modeling and yields new, atomic-level, insights into HdeA chaperone function that can be directly tested by experiment. "pH triggers" that significantly destabilize the dimer are each located near the N-terminus of a helix, suggesting that their neutralization at low pH destabilizes the helix macrodipole as a mechanism of monomer disordering. Moreover, we observe a non-monotonic change in the pH-dependent stability of HdeA, with maximal stability of the dimer near pH5. This affect is attributed to the protonation Glu37, which exhibits an anomalously high pK(a) value and is located within the hydrophobic dimer interface. Finally, the pH-dependent binding pathway of HdeA comprises a partially unfolded, dimeric intermediate that becomes increasingly stable relative to the native dimer at lower pH values and displays key structural features for chaperone-substrate interaction. We anticipate that the insights from our model will help inform ongoing NMR and biochemical investigations.

  2. Procollagen triple helix assembly: an unconventional chaperone-assisted folding paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makareeva, Elena; Leikin, Sergey

    2007-10-10

    Fibers composed of type I collagen triple helices form the organic scaffold of bone and many other tissues, yet the energetically preferred conformation of type I collagen at body temperature is a random coil. In fibers, the triple helix is stabilized by neighbors, but how does it fold? The observations reported here reveal surprising features that may represent a new paradigm for folding of marginally stable proteins. We find that human procollagen triple helix spontaneously folds into its native conformation at 30-34 degrees C but not at higher temperatures, even in an environment emulating Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). ER-like molecular crowding by nonspecific proteins does not affect triple helix folding or aggregation of unfolded chains. Common ER chaperones may prevent aggregation and misfolding of procollagen C-propeptide in their traditional role of binding unfolded polypeptide chains. However, such binding only further destabilizes the triple helix. We argue that folding of the triple helix requires stabilization by preferential binding of chaperones to its folded, native conformation. Based on the triple helix folding temperature measured here and published binding constants, we deduce that HSP47 is likely to do just that. It takes over 20 HSP47 molecules to stabilize a single triple helix at body temperature. The required 50-200 microM concentration of free HSP47 is not unusual for heat-shock chaperones in ER, but it is 100 times higher than used in reported in vitro experiments, which did not reveal such stabilization.

  3. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jin Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs or resistance (R proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells.

  4. Structure of the Spt16 Middle Domain Reveals Functional Features of the Histone Chaperone FACT*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemble, David J.; Whitby, Frank G.; Robinson, Howard; McCullough, Laura L.; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    The histone chaperone FACT is an essential and abundant heterodimer found in all eukaryotes. Here we report a crystal structure of the middle domain of the large subunit of FACT (Spt16-M) to reveal a double pleckstrin homology architecture. This structure was found previously in the Pob3-M domain of the small subunit of FACT and in the related histone chaperone Rtt106, although Spt16-M is distinguished from these structures by the presence of an extended α-helix and a C-terminal addition. Consistent with our finding that the double pleckstrin homology structure is common to these three histone chaperones and reports that Pob3 and Rtt106 double pleckstrin homology domains bind histones H3-H4, we also find that Spt16-M binds H3-H4 with low micromolar affinity. Our structure provides a framework for interpreting a large body of genetic data regarding the physiological functions of FACT, including the identification of potential interaction surfaces for binding histones or other proteins. PMID:23417676

  5. Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (hop): beyond interactions with chaperones and prion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baindur-Hudson, Swati; Edkins, Adrienne L; Blatch, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein (Hop), also known as stress-inducible protein 1 (STI1), has received considerable attention for diverse cellular functions in both healthy and diseased states. There is extensive evidence that intracellular Hop is a co-chaperone of the major chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, playing an important role in the productive folding of Hsp90 client proteins. Consequently, Hop is implicated in a number of key signalling pathways, including aberrant pathways leading to cancer. However, Hop is also secreted and it is now well established that Hop also serves as a receptor for the prion protein, PrP(C). The intracellular and extracellular forms of Hop most likely represent two different isoforms, although the molecular determinants of these divergent functions are yet to be identified. There is also a growing body of research that reports the involvement of Hop in cellular activities that appear independent of either chaperones or PrP(C). While Hop has been shown to have various cellular functions, its biological function remains elusive. However, recent knockout studies in mammals suggest that Hop has an important role in embryonic development. This review provides a critical overview of the latest molecular, cellular and biological research on Hop, critically evaluating its function in healthy systems and how this function is adapted in diseases states.

  6. The yeast histone chaperone hif1p functions with RNA in nucleosome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Knapp

    Full Text Available Hif1p is an H3/H4-specific histone chaperone that associates with the nuclear form of the Hat1p/Hat2p complex (NuB4 complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While not capable of depositing histones onto DNA on its own, Hif1p can act in conjunction with a yeast cytosolic extract to assemble nucleosomes onto a relaxed circular plasmid.To identify the factor(s that function with Hif1p to carry out chromatin assembly, multiple steps of column chromatography were carried out to fractionate the yeast cytosolic extract. Analysis of partially purified fractions indicated that Hif1p-dependent chromatin assembly activity resided in RNA rather than protein. Fractionation of isolated RNA indicated that the chromatin assembly activity did not simply purify with bulk RNA. In addition, the RNA-mediated chromatin assembly activity was blocked by mutations in the human homolog of Hif1p, sNASP, that prevent the association of this histone chaperone with histone H3 and H4 without altering its electrostatic properties.These results suggest that specific RNA species may function in concert with histone chaperones to assemble chromatin.

  7. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  8. CCT2 Mutations Evoke Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to Chaperone Complex Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minegishi, Yuriko; Sheng, XunLun; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Sergeev, Yuri; Iejima, Daisuke; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Furuno, Masaaki; Zhuang, Wenjun; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Hattori, Seisuke; Iwata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a hereditary early-onset retinal dystrophy that is accompanied by severe macular degeneration. In this study, novel compound heterozygous mutations were identified as LCA-causative in chaperonin-containing TCP-1, subunit 2 (CCT2), a gene that encodes the molecular chaperone protein, CCTβ. The zebrafish mutants of CCTβ are known to exhibit the eye phenotype while its mutation and association with human disease have been unknown. The CCT proteins (CCT α-θ) forms ring complex for its chaperon function. The LCA mutants of CCTβ, T400P and R516H, are biochemically instable and the affinity for the adjacent subunit, CCTγ, was affected distinctly in both mutants. The patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), carrying these CCTβ mutants, were less proliferative than the control iPSCs. Decreased proliferation under Cct2 knockdown in 661W cells was significantly rescued by wild-type CCTβ expression. However, the expression of T400P and R516H didn’t exhibit the significant effect. In mouse retina, both CCTβ and CCTγ are expressed in the retinal ganglion cells and connecting cilium of photoreceptor cells. The Cct2 knockdown decreased its major client protein, transducing β1 (Gβ1). Here we report the novel LCA mutations in CCTβ and the impact of chaperon disability by these mutations in cellular biology. PMID:27645772

  9. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  10. The crystal structure of the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cpr7 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu; Ge, Qiangqiang; Wang, Mingxing; Lv, Hui; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2017-02-09

    The versatility of Hsp90 can be attributed to the variety of co-chaperone proteins that modulate the role of Hsp90 in many cellular processes. As a co-chaperone of Hsp90, Cpr7 is essential for accelerating the cell growth in an Hsp90-containing trimeric complex. Here, we report the crystal structure of Cpr7 at a resolution of 1.8Å. It consists of an N-terminal PPI domain and a C-terminal TPR domain, and exhibits a U-shape conformation. Our studies revealed the aggregation state of Cpr7 in solution and the interaction properties between Cpr7 and the MEEVD sequence from the C-terminus of Hsp90. In addition, the structure and sequence analysis between Cpr7 and homologues revealed the structure basis both for the function differences between Cpr6 and Cpr7 and the functional complements between Cns1 and Cpr7. Our studies facilitate the understanding of Cpr7 and provide decent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 co-chaperone pathway.

  11. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sao, Kentaro [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Murata, Masaharu, E-mail: m-murata@dem.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hashizume, Makoto [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  12. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK facilitates its chaperone-like activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swasti Raychaudhuri; Rachana Banerjee; Subhasish Mukhopadhyay; Nitai P Bhattacharyya

    2014-09-01

    Human HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast-two-hybrid Protein K) is an intrinsically unstructured chaperone-like protein with no sequence homology to known chaperones. HYPK is also known to be a part of ribosome-associated protein complex and present in polysomes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the evolutionary influence on HYPK primary structure and its impact on the protein’s function. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed 105 orthologs of human HYPK from plants, lower invertebrates to mammals. C-terminal part of HYPK was found to be particularly conserved and to contain nascent polypeptide-associated alpha subunit (NPAA) domain. This region experiences highest selection pressure, signifying its importance in the structural and functional evolution. NPAA domain of human HYPK has unique amino acid composition preferring glutamic acid and happens to be more stable from a conformational point of view having higher content of -helices than the rest. Cell biology studies indicate that overexpressed C-terminal human HYPK can interact with nascent proteins, co-localizes with huntingtin, increases cell viability and decreases caspase activities in Huntington’s disease (HD) cell culture model. This domain is found to be required for the chaperone-like activity of HYPK in vivo. Our study suggested that by virtue of its flexibility and nascent peptide binding activity, HYPK may play an important role in assisting protein (re)folding.

  13. Discovery of a novel target for the dysglycemic chromogranin A fragment pancreastatin: interaction with the chaperone GRP78 to influence metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Biswas

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The chromogranin A-derived peptide pancreastatin (PST is a dysglycemic, counter-regulatory peptide for insulin action, especially in liver. Although previous evidence for a PST binding protein has been reported, such a receptor has not been identified or sequenced. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used ligand affinity to purify the PST target, with biotinylated human PST (hCHGA273-301-amide as "bait" and mouse liver homogenate as "prey", and identified GRP78 (a.k.a. "78 kDa Glucose Regulated Protein", HSPA5, BIP as a major interacting partner of PST. GRP78 belongs to the family of heat shock proteins (chaperones, involved in several cellular processes including protein folding and glucose metabolism. We analyzed expression of GRP78 in the absence of PST in a mouse knockout model lacking its precursor CHGA: hepatic transcriptome data revealed global over-expression of not only GRP78 but also other heat shock transcripts (of the "adaptive UPR" in CHGA(-/- mice compared to wild-type (+/+. By contrast, we found a global decline in expression of hepatic pro-apoptotic transcripts in CHGA(-/- mice. GRP78's ATPase enzymatic activity was dose-dependently inhibited by PST (IC50∼5.2 µM. PST also inhibited the up-regulation of GRP78 expression during UPR activation (by tunicamycin in hepatocytes. PST inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes, and increased hepatic expression of G6Pase (the final step in gluconeogenesis/glycogenolysis. In hepatocytes not only PST but also other GRP78-ATPase inhibitors (VER-155008 or ADP increased G6Pase expression. GRP78 over-expression inhibited G6Pase expression in hepatocytes, with partial restoration by GRP78-ATPase inhibitors PST, VER-155008, or ADP. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that an unexpected major hepatic target of PST is the adaptive UPR chaperone GRP78. PST not only binds to GRP78 (in pH-dependent fashion, but also inhibits GRP78's ATPase enzymatic activity, and impairs its biosynthetic

  14. Oxidative modification of the molecular chaperone family in a PC12 cell model of Parkinson's disease induced by Z-lle-Glu(OtBu)-Ala-Leucinal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Yimin Yang; Jing Bai; Ming Chang; Linsen Hu

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ubiquitin-proteasome system function is significantly decreased in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients.In the present study, proteasome inhibitor Z-Ile-Glu(OtBu)-Ala-Leucinal (PSI) was used to inhibit the function of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in PC12 cells to simulate Parkinson's disease.Oxidatively modified proteins were identified to determine pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.Results demonstrated that 24 hours of 10 μmol/L PSI-treatment in PC12 cells simulated pathological characteristics of Parkinson's disease: neuronal degeneration and eosinophilic inclusion formation in neurons.In PSI-treated PC12 cells, three oxidative proteins and a molecular chaperone family member were detected: chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 subunit 3, glucose-regulated protein 58,and heat shock protein 70.This is the first study to demonstrate oxidative modification of a molecule family in a cell model of Parkinson's disease induced with PSI.

  15. Progress and potential of non-inhibitory small molecule chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease and its implications for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Olive; Patnaik, Samarjit; Marugan, Juan; Sidransky, Ellen; Westbroek, Wendy

    2016-05-01

    Gaucher disease, caused by pathological mutations GBA1, encodes the lysosome-resident enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which cleaves glucosylceramide into glucose and ceramide. In Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to lysosomal accumulation of substrate, primarily in cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. Gaucher disease has broad clinical heterogeneity, and mutations in GBA1 are a risk factor for the development of different synucleinopathies. Insights into the cell biology and biochemistry of glucocerebrosidase have led to new therapeutic approaches for Gaucher disease including small chemical chaperones. Such chaperones facilitate proper enzyme folding and translocation to lysosomes, thereby preventing premature breakdown of the enzyme in the proteasome. This review discusses recent progress in developing chemical chaperones as a therapy for Gaucher disease, with implications for the treatment of synucleinopathies. It focuses on the development of non-inhibitory glucocerebrosidase chaperones and their therapeutic advantages over inhibitory chaperones, as well as the challenges involved in identifying and validating chemical chaperones.

  16. LAMP-2C Inhibits MHC Class II Presentation of Cytoplasmic Antigens by Disrupting Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Liliana; McLetchie, Shawna; Gardiner, Gail J; Deffit, Sarah N; Zhou, Delu; Blum, Janice S

    2016-03-15

    Cells use multiple autophagy pathways to sequester macromolecules, senescent organelles, and pathogens. Several conserved isoforms of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) regulate these pathways influencing immune recognition and responses. LAMP-2A is required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), which promotes Ag capture and MHC class II (MHCII) presentation in B cells and signaling in T cells. LAMP-2B regulates lysosome maturation to impact macroautophagy and phagocytosis. Yet, far less is known about LAMP-2C function. Whereas LAMP2A and LAMP2B mRNA were broadly detected in human tissues, LAMP2C expression was more limited. Transcripts for the three LAMP2 isoforms increased with B cell activation, although specific gene induction varied depending on TLR versus BCR engagement. To examine LAMP-2C function in human B cells and specifically its role in Ag presentation, we used ectopic gene expression. Increased LAMP-2C expression in B cells did not alter MHCII expression or invariant chain processing, but did perturb cytoplasmic Ag presentation via CMA. MHCII presentation of epitopes from exogenous and membrane Ags was not affected by LAMP-2C expression in B cells. Similarly, changes in B cell LAMP-2C expression did not impact macroautophagy. The gene expression of other LAMP2 isoforms and proteasome and lysosomal proteases activities were unperturbed by LAMP-2C ectopic expression. LAMP-2C levels modulated the steady-state expression of several cytoplasmic proteins that are targeted for degradation by CMA and diminished peptide translocation via this pathway. Thus, LAMP-2C serves as a natural inhibitor of CMA that can selectively skew MHCII presentation of cytoplasmic Ags.

  17. A role for the RNA chaperone Hfq in controlling adherent-invasive Escherichia coli colonization and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina T Simonsen

    Full Text Available Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC has been linked with the onset and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel diseases. The AIEC strain LF82 was originally isolated from an ileal biopsy from a patient with Crohn's disease. The pathogenesis of LF82 results from its abnormal adherence to and subsequent invasion of the intestinal epithelium coupled with its ability to survive phagocytosis by macrophages once it has crossed the intestinal barrier. To gain further insight into AIEC pathogenesis we employed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an in vivo infection model. We demonstrate that AIEC strain LF82 forms a persistent infection in C. elegans, thereby reducing the host lifespan significantly. This host killing phenotype was associated with massive bacterial colonization of the nematode intestine and damage to the intestinal epithelial surface. C. elegans killing was independent of known LF82 virulence determinants but was abolished by deletion of the LF82 hfq gene, which encodes an RNA chaperone involved in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs. This finding reveals that important aspects of LF82 pathogenesis are controlled at the posttranscriptional level by riboregulation. The role of Hfq in LF82 virulence was independent of its function in regulating RpoS and RpoE activity. Further, LF82Δhfq mutants were non-motile, impaired in cell invasion and highly sensitive to various chemical stress conditions, reinforcing the multifaceted function of Hfq in mediating bacterial adaptation. This study highlights the usefulness of simple non-mammalian infection systems for the identification and analysis of bacterial virulence factors.

  18. HIV-1 Protein Nef Inhibits Activity of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 by Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, Lucas; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Popratiloff, Anastas; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to an altered high density lipoprotein profile exacerbated by down-modulation and impairment of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) activity by the HIV-1 protein Nef. However, the mechanisms of this Nef effect remain unknown. Here, we show that Nef interacts with an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin, which regulates folding and maturation of glycosylated proteins. Nef disrupted interaction between calnexin and ABCA1 but increased affinity and enhanced interaction of calnexin with HIV-1 gp160. The Nef mutant that did not bind to calnexin did not affect the calnexin-ABCA1 interaction. Interaction with calnexin was essential for functionality of ABCA1, as knockdown of calnexin blocked the ABCA1 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced ABCA1 abundance, and inhibited cholesterol efflux; the same effects were observed after Nef overexpression. However, the effects of calnexin knockdown and Nef on cholesterol efflux were not additive; in fact, the combined effect of these two factors together did not differ significantly from the effect of calnexin knockdown alone. Interestingly, gp160 and ABCA1 interacted with calnexin differently; although gp160 binding to calnexin was dependent on glycosylation, glycosylation was of little importance for the interaction between ABCA1 and calnexin. Thus, Nef regulates the activity of calnexin to stimulate its interaction with gp160 at the expense of ABCA1. This study identifies a mechanism for Nef-dependent inactivation of ABCA1 and dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25170080

  19. The role of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in diseases caused by misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason C

    2014-03-01

    Protein-folding diseases are an ongoing medical challenge. Many diseases within this group are genetically determined, and have no known cure. Among the examples in which the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are well understood are diseases driven by misfolding of transmembrane proteins that normally function as cell-surface ion channels. Wild-type forms are synthesized and integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane system and, upon correct folding, are trafficked by the secretory pathway to the cell surface. Misfolded mutant forms traffic poorly, if at all, and are instead degraded by the ER-associated proteasomal degradation (ERAD) system. Molecular chaperones can assist the folding of the cytosolic domains of these transmembrane proteins; however, these chaperones are also involved in selecting misfolded forms for ERAD. Given this dual role of chaperones, diseases caused by the misfolding and aberrant trafficking of ion channels (referred to here as ion-channel-misfolding diseases) can be regarded as a consequence of insufficiency of the pro-folding chaperone activity and/or overefficiency of the chaperone ERAD role. An attractive idea is that manipulation of the chaperones might allow increased folding and trafficking of the mutant proteins, and thereby partial restoration of function. This Review outlines the roles of the cytosolic HSP70 chaperone system in the best-studied paradigms of ion-channel-misfolding disease--the CFTR chloride channel in cystic fibrosis and the hERG potassium channel in cardiac long QT syndrome type 2. In addition, other ion channels implicated in ion-channel-misfolding diseases are discussed.

  20. Structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence of the periplasmic chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, D A; Zavialov, A V; Chernovskaya, T V; Karlyshev, A V; Zav'yalova, G A; Vasiliev, A M; Dudich, I V; Abramov, V M; Zav'yalov, V P; MacIntyre, S

    1999-04-01

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis is a typical representative of a subfamily of specific chaperones involved in assembly of surface adhesins with a very simple structure. One characteristic feature of this Caf1M-like subfamily is possession of an extended, variable sequence (termed FGL) between the F1 and subunit binding G1 beta-strands. In contrast, FGS subfamily members, characterized by PapD, have a short F1-G1 loop and are involved in assembly of complex pili. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the FGL sequence, a mutant Caf1M molecule (dCaf1M), in which the 27 amino acid residues between the F1 and G1 beta-strands had been deleted, was constructed. Expression of the mutated caf1M in Escherichia coli resulted in accumulation of high levels of dCaf1M. The far-UV circular dichroism spectra of the mutant and wild-type proteins were indistinguishable and exhibited practically the same temperature and pH dependencies. Thus, the FGL sequence of Caf1M clearly does not contribute significantly to the stability of the protein conformation. Preferential cleavage of Caf1M by trypsin at Lys-119 confirmed surface exposure of this part of the FGL sequence in the isolated chaperone and periplasmic chaperone-subunit complex. There was no evidence of surface-localized Caf1 subunit in the presence of the Caf1A outer membrane protein and dCaf1M. In contrast to Caf1M, dCaf1M was not able to form a stable complex with Caf1 nor could it protect the subunit from proteolytic degradation in vivo. This demonstration that the FGL sequence is required for stable chaperone-subunit interaction, but not for folding of a stable chaperone, provides a sound basis for future detailed molecular analyses of the FGL subfamily of chaperones.

  1. In silico identification of potential chaperone genes that belong to type III and type IV secretion systems in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Khater

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The secretion of bacterial virulence factors and flagellar components requires the assistance of specific type III and flagellar chaperones. Standard computational annotation of the genome of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri, a plant pathogen that causes citrus canker, initially did not identify any genes belonging to these chaperone categories since the primary sequence homology between them was very low. However, in a search for hypothetical proteins with characteristics similar to these chaperones, we have now identified 30 chromosomal and 10 plasmidial potential genes encoding chaperones belonging to types III/IV, and flagellar secretion systems in this organism. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  2. Reversible Interactions of Proteins with Mixed Shell Polymeric Micelles: Tuning the Surface Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Balance toward Efficient Artificial Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianzu; Song, Yiqing; Sun, Pingchuan; An, Yingli; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2016-03-22

    Molecular chaperones can elegantly fine-tune its hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance to assist a broad spectrum of nascent polypeptide chains to fold properly. Such precious property is difficult to be achieved by chaperone mimicking materials due to limited control of their surface characteristics that dictate interactions with unfolded protein intermediates. Mixed shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), which consist of two kinds of dissimilar polymeric chains in the micellar shell, offer a convenient way to fine-tune surface properties of polymeric nanoparticles. In the current work, we have fabricated ca. 30 kinds of MSPMs with finely tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties. We investigated the respective roles of thermosensitive and hydrophilic polymeric chains in the thermodenaturation protection of proteins down to the molecular structure. Although the three kinds of thermosensitive polymers investigated herein can form collapsed hydrophobic domains on the micellar surface, we found distinct capability to capture and release unfolded protein intermediates, due to their respective affinity for proteins. Meanwhile, in terms of the hydrophilic polymeric chains in the micellar shell, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) excels in assisting unfolded protein intermediates to refold properly via interacting with the refolding intermediates, resulting in enhanced chaperone efficiency. However, another hydrophilic polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) severely deteriorates the chaperone efficiency of MSPMs, due to its protein-resistant properties. Judicious combination of thermosensitive and hydrophilic chains in the micellar shell lead to MSPM-based artificial chaperones with optimal efficacy.

  3. HSP33 in eukaryotes - an evolutionary tale of a chaperone adapted to photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2015-06-01

    HSP33 was originally identified in bacteria as a redox-sensitive chaperone that protects unfolded proteins from aggregation. Here, we describe a eukaryote ortholog of HSP33 from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which appears to play a protective role under light-induced oxidizing conditions. The algal HSP33 exhibits chaperone activity, as shown by citrate synthase aggregation assays. Studies from the Jakob laboratory established that activation of the bacterial HSP33 upon its oxidation initiates by the release of pre-bound Zn from the well conserved Zn-binding motif Cys-X-Cys-Xn -Cys-X-X-Cys, and is followed by significant structural changes (Reichmann et al., ). Unlike the bacterial protein, the HSP33 from C. reinhardtii had lost the first cysteine residue of its center, diminishing Zn-binding activity under all conditions. As a result, the algal protein can be easily activated by minor structural changes in response to oxidation and/or excess heat. An attempt to restore the missing first cysteine did not have a major effect on Zn-binding and on the mode of activation. Replacement of all remaining cysteines abolished completely any residual Zn binding, although the chaperone activation was maintained. A phylogenetic analysis of the algal HSP33 showed that it clusters with the cyanobacterial protein, in line with its biochemical localization to the chloroplast. Indeed, expression of the algal HSP33 increases in response to light-induced oxidative stress, which is experienced routinely by photosynthetic organisms. Despite the fact that no ortholog could be found in higher eukaryotes, its abundance in all algal species examined could have a biotechnological relevance.

  4. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a matrix scavenger chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chlenski

    Full Text Available Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC is one of the major non-structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM in remodeling tissues. The functional significance of SPARC is emphasized by its origin in the first multicellular organisms and its high degree of evolutionary conservation. Although SPARC has been shown to act as a critical modulator of ECM remodeling with profound effects on tissue physiology and architecture, no plausible molecular mechanism of its action has been proposed. In the present study, we demonstrate that SPARC mediates the disassembly and degradation of ECM networks by functioning as a matricellular chaperone. While it has low affinity to its targets inside the cells where the Ca(2+ concentrations are low, high extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+ activate binding to multiple ECM proteins, including collagens. We demonstrated that in vitro, this leads to the inhibition of collagen I fibrillogenesis and disassembly of pre-formed collagen I fibrils by SPARC at high Ca(2+ concentrations. In cell culture, exogenous SPARC was internalized by the fibroblast cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pulse-chase assay further revealed that internalized SPARC is quickly released outside the cell, demonstrating that SPARC shuttles between the cell and ECM. Fluorescently labeled collagen I, fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminin were co-internalized with SPARC by fibroblasts, and semi-quantitative Western blot showed that SPARC mediates internalization of collagen I. Using a novel 3-dimensional model of fluorescent ECM networks pre-deposited by live fibroblasts, we demonstrated that degradation of ECM depends on the chaperone activity of SPARC. These results indicate that SPARC may represent a new class of scavenger chaperones, which mediate ECM degradation, remodeling and repair by disassembling ECM networks and shuttling ECM proteins into the cell. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide

  5. Indole and synthetic derivative activate chaperone expression to reduce polyQ aggregation in SCA17 neuronal cell and slice culture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung PJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pin-Jui Kung,1,* Yu-Chen Tao,1,* Ho-Chiang Hsu,1 Wan-Ling Chen,1 Te-Hsien Lin,1 Donala Janreddy,2 Ching-Fa Yao,2 Kuo-Hsuan Chang,3 Jung-Yaw Lin,1 Ming-Tsan Su,1 Chung-Hsin Wu,1 Guey-Jen Lee-Chen,1 Hsiu-Mei Hsieh-Li1 1Department of Life Science, 2Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17, the expansion of a translated CAG repeat in the TATA box binding protein (TBP gene results in a long polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the TBP protein, leading to intracellular accumulation of aggregated TBP and cell death. The molecular chaperones act in preventing protein aggregation to ameliorate downstream harmful events. In this study, we used Tet-On SH-SY5Y cells with inducible SCA17 TBP/Q79-green fluorescent protein (GFP expression to test indole and synthetic derivative NC001-8 for neuroprotection. We found that indole and NC001-8 up-regulated chaperone expression to reduce polyQ aggregation in neuronal differentiated TBP/Q79 cells. The effects on promoting neurite outgrowth and on reduction of aggregation on Purkinje cells were also confirmed with cerebellar primary and slice cultures of SCA17 transgenic mice. Our results demonstrate how indole and derivative NC001-8 reduce polyQ aggregation to support their therapeutic potentials in SCA17 treatment. Keywords: spinocerebellar ataxia type 17, TATA box binding protein, polyQ aggregation, indole and derivative, therapeutics

  6. Theoretical and experimental investigation of chaperone effects on soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli: effect of free DnaK level on temperature-induced recombinant streptokinase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagurunathan, Balaji; Jayaraman, Guhan

    2008-06-01

    Modeling and analysis of genetic networks have become increasingly important in the investigation of cellular processes. The genetic networks involved in cellular stress response can have a critical effect on the productivity of recombinant proteins. In this work, it was found that the temperature-inducible expression system for the production of soluble recombinant streptokinase in Escherichia coli resulted in a lower productivity compared to the chemically-induced system. To investigate the effect of the induced cellular response due to temperature up-shift a model-based approach is adopted. The role played by the major molecular chaperone teams DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroEL-GroES on the productivity of recombinant streptokinase was experimentally determined. Based on these investigations, a detailed mechanistic mathematical model was developed for the cellular response during the temperature-induced recombinant streptokinase production. The model simulations were found to have a good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The mechanistic mathematical model was validated with the experiments conducted on a sigma(32) mutant strain. Detailed analysis of the parameter sensitivities of the model indicated that the level of free DnaK chaperone in the cell has the major effect on the productivity of recombinant streptokinase during temperature induction. Analysis of the model simulations also shows that down regulation or selective redirection of the heat shock proteins could be a better way of manipulating the cellular stress response than overexpression or deletion. In other words, manipulating the system properties resulting from the interaction of the components is better than manipulating the individual components. Although our results are specific to a recombinant protein (streptokinase) and the expression system (E. coli), we believe that such a systems-biological approach has several advantages over conventional experimental approaches and could be in

  7. The wonderous chaperones: A highlight on therapeutics of cancer and potentially malignant disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutan Tyagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse environmental and physiological factors are known to induce the transcription of a set of genes encoding special protective molecules known as "molecular chaperones" within our cells. Literature abounds in evidence regarding the varied roles; these "guides" can effectively perform in our system. Highly conserved through evolution, from the prokaryotes to the eukaryotes, these make perfect study tools for verifying their role in both the pathogenesis as well as the therapeutics of varied neurodegenerative, autoimmune and potentially malignant disorders and varied cancer states. We present a concise review of this ever dynamic molecule, highlighting the probable role in a potentially malignant disorder, oral lichen planus.

  8. Effects of pH and Iminosugar Pharmacological Chaperones on Lysosomal Glycosidase Structure and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Raquel L.; D’aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; (Harvard-Med); (Brandeis)

    2009-06-05

    Human lysosomal enzymes acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase) and acid-{alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-Gal A) hydrolyze the sphingolipids glucosyl- and globotriaosylceramide, respectively, and mutations in these enzymes lead to the lipid metabolism disorders Gaucher and Fabry disease, respectively. We have investigated the structure and stability of GCase and {alpha}-Gal A in a neutral-pH environment reflective of the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic-pH environment reflective of the lysosome. These details are important for the development of pharmacological chaperone therapy for Gaucher and Fabry disease, in which small molecules bind mutant enzymes in the ER to enable the mutant enzyme to meet quality control requirements for lysosomal trafficking. We report crystal structures of apo GCase at pH 4.5, at pH 5.5, and in complex with the pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) at pH 7.5. We also present thermostability analysis of GCase at pH 7.4 and 5.2 using differential scanning calorimetry. We compare our results with analogous experiments using {alpha}-Gal A and the chaperone 1-deoxygalactonijirimycin (DGJ), including the first structure of {alpha}-Gal A with DGJ. Both GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are more stable at lysosomal pH with and without their respective iminosugars bound, and notably, the stability of the GCase-IFG complex is pH sensitive. We show that the conformations of the active site loops in GCase are sensitive to ligand binding but not pH, whereas analogous galactose- or DGJ-dependent conformational changes in {alpha}-Gal A are not seen. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from {alpha}-Gal A unfolding indicate two-state, van't Hoff unfolding in the absence of the iminosugar at neutral and lysosomal pH, and non-two-state unfolding in the presence of DGJ. Taken together, these results provide insight into how GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are thermodynamically stabilized by iminosugars and suggest strategies for the development of new pharmacological

  9. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant ...

  10. Lack of the RNA chaperone hfq attenuates pathogenicity of several Escherichia coli pathotypes towards Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Jakobsen, Henrik; Struve, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    as a model for virulence characterization and screening for novel antimicrobial entities. Several E. coli human pathotypes are also pathogenic towards C. elegans, and we show here that lack of the RNA chaperone Hfq significantly reduces pathogenicity of VTEC, EAEC, and UPEC in the nematode model. Thus, Hfq...... is intrinsically essential to pathogenic E. coli for survival and virulence exerted in the C. elegans host.......Escherichia coli is an important agent of Gram-negative bacterial infections worldwide, being one of the leading causes of diarrhoea and urinary tract infections. Strategies to understand pathogenesis and develop therapeutic compounds include the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans...

  11. Quantifying the role of chaperones in protein translocation by computational modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore eAssenza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular chaperone Hsp70 plays a central role in the import of cytoplasmic proteins into organelles,driving their translocation by binding them from the organellar interior. Starting from the experimentally-determined structure of the E. coli Hsp70, we computed, by means of molecular simulations,the effective free-energy profile for substrate translocation uponchaperone binding. We then used the resulting free energy to quantitatively characterize the kinetics of the import process, whose comparison with unassisted translocation highlights the essential role played by Hsp70 in importing cytoplasmic proteins.

  12. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies.

  13. Blind cavefish and heat shock protein chaperones: a novel role for hsp90alpha in lens apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooven, Thomas A; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Jeffery, William R

    2004-01-01

    Lens apoptosis plays a central role in cavefish eye degeneration. Heat shock proteins (hsps) can regulate apoptosis; therefore, we examined the relationship between constitutive hsp70 and hsp90 expression and lens apoptosis. The model system is Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost species consisting of an eyed surface-dwelling (surface fish) form and numerous blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. Optic primordia are formed in the cavefish embryo but they subsequently undergo lens apoptosis, arrest in development and degenerate. Astyanax hsp90 and hsp70 DNAs were isolated to use as probes to compare gene expression during surface fish and cavefish development. Hsp90beta, which encodes one of two hsp90 isoforms, was not expressed in the surface fish or cavefish lens, whereas hsp70 was expressed in the lens of both forms, suggesting that neither is directly involved in lens apoptosis. In contrast, hsp90alpha, the other hsp90 isoform, was expressed in the cavefish but not the surface fish lens. Hsp90alpha expression peaked shortly before the beginning of lens apoptosis in three convergent cavefish populations, suggesting a close relationship with lens apoptosis. The absence of hsp90beta in the lens allowed us to use geldanamycin and radicicol, specific inhibitors of hsp90 chaperone function, to determine whether lens cell death requires hsp90alpha expression. Both inhibitors blocked TUNEL labeling in the cavefish lens, suggesting that hsp90alpha is required for apoptosis. In contrast to their effects on the lens, these inhibitors induced TUNEL labeling in the surface epidermis, presumably due to effects on hsp90beta function, implying that the two-hsp90 isoforms may have contrasting roles in cell survival. We conclude that hsp90alpha plays a novel role in lens apoptosis and cavefish eye degeneration.

  14. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  15. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  16. Division of Labor: ER-Resident BiP Co-Chaperones Match Substrates to Fates Based on Specific Binding Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Daniel N; Clerico, Eugenia M; Gierasch, Lila M

    2016-09-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Behnke et al. (2016) describe a novel cell-based peptide-binding assay and use it to analyze the binding specificities of the endoplasmic reticulum Hsp70 chaperone and its co-chaperones and to probe their different roles in protein quality control.

  17. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph

    2012-01-01

    support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result, this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal Cu homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation...... chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution...

  18. Gamma-irradiation effects to posttranslational modification and chaperon function of bovine {alpha}-crystalline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroki, K; Matsumoto, S.; Awakura, M. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Science, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, N. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2001-01-01

    The formation of D-asparate (D-Asp) in {alpha}A-crystallin of the aged human eye and the cataract crystalline lens has been reported. Crystalline lens keeps the transparency by forming {alpha}-crystallin which consists of a high order association of {alpha}A-and {alpha}B-crystallin. Bovine {alpha}-crystallin for investigating a chaperone function which protects the crystalline lens from getting to opaque or disordered agglutination with heat or light, is irradiated by gamma-ray (Co-60) at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy, respectively. The irradiated bovine {alpha}-crystallin are analyzed with electrophoresis, gel permeation chromatograph, and UV absorption spectrometer for checking on the agglutination and the isomerization of macromolecules. Oxidation of methionine residues (Met-1) and isomerization of asparagine residues (Asp-151) in the {alpha}A-crystallin are ascertained in molecular levels with reversed phase liquid chromatography. The Met-1 oxidation and the Asp-151 isomerization depend on gamma-irradiation doses. It is thought that OH radical and H radical in water generated by the irradiation lead to the oxidation and the isomerization. Stereoinversion in the {alpha}-crystallin following to such a chemical change are considered to lead to the agglutination of polymer and the reduction of chaperon function. (M. Suetake)

  19. Glutathione selectively modulates the binding of platinum drugs to human copper chaperone Cox17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linhong; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Han; Xi, Zhaoyong; Liu, Yangzhong

    2015-12-01

    The copper chaperone Cox17 (cytochrome c oxidase copper chaperone) has been shown to facilitate the delivery of cisplatin to mitochondria, which contributes to the overall cytotoxicity of the drug [Zhao et al. (2014) Chem. Commun. 50: , 2667-2669]. Kinetic data indicate that Cox17 has reactivity similar to glutathione (GSH), the most abundant thiol-rich molecule in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we found that GSH significantly modulates the reaction of platinum complexes with Cox17. GSH enhances the reactivity of three anti-cancer drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin) to Cox17, but suppresses the reaction of transplatin. Surprisingly, the pre-formed cisplatin-GSH adducts are highly reactive to Cox17; over 90% platinum transfers from GSH to Cox17. On the other hand, transplatin-GSH adducts are inert to Cox17. These different effects are consistent with the drug activity of these platinum complexes. In addition, GSH attenuates the protein aggregation of Cox17 induced by platination. These results indicate that the platinum-protein interactions could be substantially influenced by the cellular environment.

  20. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M.; Sim, Valerie L.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation.

  1. Improvement of the crystallizability and expression of an RNA crystallization chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, P.; Heroux, A.; Ye, J.-D.

    2011-11-01

    Crystallizing RNA has been an imperative and challenging task in the world of RNA research. Assistive methods such as chaperone-assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), employing monoclonal antibody fragments (Fabs) as crystallization chaperones have enabled us to obtain RNA crystal structures by forming crystal contacts and providing initial phasing information. Despite the early successes, the crystallization of large RNA-Fab complex remains a challenge in practice. The possible reason for this difficulty is that the Fab scaffold has not been optimized for crystallization in complex with RNA. Here, we have used the surface entropy reduction (SER) technique for the optimization of {Delta}C209 P4-P6/Fab2 model system. Protruding lysine and glutamate residues were mutated to a set of alanines or serines to construct Fab2SMA or Fab2SMS. Expression with the shake flask approach was optimized to allow large scale production for crystallization. Crystal screening shows that significantly higher crystal-forming ratio was observed for the mutant complexes. As the chosen SER residues are far away from the CDR regions of the Fab, the same set of mutations can now be directly applied to other Fabs binding to a variety of ribozymes and riboswitches to improve the crystallizability of Fab-RNA complex.

  2. Crystal Structure and Function of Human Nucleoplasmin (Npm2): A Histone Chaperone in Oocytes and Embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O Platonova; I Akey; J Head; C Akey

    2011-12-31

    Human Npm2 is an ortholog of Xenopus nucleoplasmin (Np), a chaperone that binds histones. We have determined the crystal structure of a truncated Npm2-core at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and show that the N-terminal domains of Npm2 and Np form similar pentamers. This allowed us to model an Npm2 decamer which may be formed by hydrogen bonds between quasi-conserved residues in the interface between two pentamers. Interestingly, the Npm2 pentamer lacks a prototypical A1-acidic tract in each of its subunits. This feature may be responsible for the inability of Npm2-core to bind histones. However, Npm2 with a large acidic tract in its C-terminal tail (Npm2-A2) is able to bind histones and form large complexes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments and biochemical analysis of loop mutations support the premise that nucleoplasmins form decamers when they bind H2A-H2B dimers and H3-H4 tetramers simultaneously. In the absence of histone tetramers, these chaperones bind H2A-H2B dimers with a single pentamer forming the central hub. When taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism of histone binding by nucleoplasmins.

  3. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

  4. Chaperones are necessary for the expression of catalytically active potato apyrases in prokaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porowińska, Dorota; Czarnecka, Joanna; Komoszyński, Michał

    2014-07-01

    NTPDases (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases) (also called in plants apyrases) hydrolyze nucleoside 5'-tri- and/or diphosphate bonds producing nucleosides di or monophosphate and inorganic phosphate. For years, studies have been carried out to use both plant and animal enzymes for medicine. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient method for the quick production of large amounts of homogeneous proteins with high catalytic activity. Expression of proteins in prokaryotic cells is the most common way for the protein production. The aim of our study was to develop a method of expression of potato apyrase (StAPY4, 5, and 6) genes in bacterial cells under conditions that allowed the production of catalytically active form of these enzymes. Apyrase 4 and 6 were overexpressed in BL21-CodonPlus (DE3) bacteria strain but they were accumulated in inclusion bodies, regardless of the culture conditions and induction method. Co-expression of potato apyrases with molecular chaperones allowed the expression of catalytically active apyrase 5. However, its high nucleotidase activity could be toxic for bacteria and is therefore synthesized in small amounts in cells. Our studies show that each protein requires other conditions for maturation and even small differences in amino acid sequence can essentially affect protein folding regardless of presence of chaperones.

  5. Chaperone potential of Pulicaria undulata extract in preventing aggregation of stressed proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahghaei, Arezou; Valizadeh, Jafar; Nazari, Shahrzad; Ravandeh, Mehdi

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effect of an aqueous extract of Pulicaria undulata on the 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of proteins. The effects of the chaperone properties of P. undulata extract on protein aggregation were determined by measuring light scattering absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The aqueous extract of P. undulata possesses good chaperone properties but the protection effect was varied in different protein. The extract showed a higher level of protection in high molecular weight proteins than in those of low molecular weight. Using a fluorescence study, the present study provides information on the hydrophobic area of proteins interacting with the P. undulata extract. In fact, by increasing the concentration of the P. undulata extract, the hydrophic area of the protein decreased. CD spectroscopy also revealed that DTT caused changes in both the tertiary and the secondary structure of the proteins, while in the presence of P. undulata extract, there was little change. Our finding suggests the possibility of using P. undulata extract for the inhibition of aggregation and the deposition of protein in disease.

  6. Allosteric drugs: the interaction of antitumor compound MKT-077 with human Hsp70 chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousaki, Aikaterini; Miyata, Yoshinari; Jinwal, Umesh K; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-08-19

    Hsp70 (heat shock protein 70 kDa) chaperones are key to cellular protein homeostasis. However, they also have the ability to inhibit tumor apoptosis and contribute to aberrant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neuronal cells affected by tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Hence, Hsp70 chaperones are increasingly becoming identified as targets for therapeutic intervention in these widely abundant diseases. Hsp70 proteins are allosteric machines and offer, besides classical active-site targets, also opportunities to target the mechanism of allostery. In this work, it is demonstrated that the action of the potent anticancer compound MKT-077 (1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden)]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride) occurs through a differential interaction with Hsp70 allosteric states. MKT-077 is therefore an "allosteric drug." Using NMR spectroscopy, we identify the compound's binding site on human HSPA8 (Hsc70). The binding pose is obtained from NMR-restrained docking calculations, subsequently scored by molecular-dynamics-based energy and solvation computations. Suggestions for the improvement of the compound's properties are made on the basis of the binding location and pose.

  7. Heterologous gln/asn-rich proteins impede the propagation of yeast prions by altering chaperone availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi; Hong, Joo Y; Derkatch, Irina L; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-01-01

    Prions are self-propagating conformations of proteins that can cause heritable phenotypic traits. Most yeast prions contain glutamine (Q)/asparagine (N)-rich domains that facilitate the accumulation of the protein into amyloid-like aggregates. Efficient transmission of these infectious aggregates to daughter cells requires that chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, continually sever the aggregates into smaller "seeds." We previously identified 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains that, when overproduced, facilitate the de novo aggregation of the Sup35 protein into the [PSI(+)] prion state. Here, we show that overexpression of many of the same 11 Q/N-rich proteins can also destabilize pre-existing [PSI(+)] or [URE3] prions. We explore in detail the events leading to the loss (curing) of [PSI(+)] by the overexpression of one of these proteins, the Q/N-rich domain of Pin4, which causes Sup35 aggregates to increase in size and decrease in transmissibility to daughter cells. We show that the Pin4 Q/N-rich domain sequesters Hsp104 and Sis1 chaperones away from the diffuse cytoplasmic pool. Thus, a mechanism by which heterologous Q/N-rich proteins impair prion propagation appears to be the loss of cytoplasmic Hsp104 and Sis1 available to sever [PSI(+)].

  8. Hsp40s specify functions of Hsp104 and Hsp90 protein chaperone machines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Reidy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hsp100 family chaperones of microorganisms and plants cooperate with the Hsp70/Hsp40/NEF system to resolubilize and reactivate stress-denatured proteins. In yeast this machinery also promotes propagation of prions by fragmenting prion polymers. We previously showed the bacterial Hsp100 machinery cooperates with the yeast Hsp40 Ydj1 to support yeast thermotolerance and with the yeast Hsp40 Sis1 to propagate [PSI+] prions. Here we find these Hsp40s similarly directed specific activities of the yeast Hsp104-based machinery. By assessing the ability of Ydj1-Sis1 hybrid proteins to complement Ydj1 and Sis1 functions we show their C-terminal substrate-binding domains determined distinctions in these and other cellular functions of Ydj1 and Sis1. We find propagation of [URE3] prions was acutely sensitive to alterations in Sis1 activity, while that of [PIN+] prions was less sensitive than [URE3], but more sensitive than [PSI+]. These findings support the ideas that overexpressing Ydj1 cures [URE3] by competing with Sis1 for interaction with the Hsp104-based disaggregation machine, and that different prions rely differently on activity of this machinery, which can explain the various ways they respond to alterations in chaperone function.

  9. Heterologous gln/asn-rich proteins impede the propagation of yeast prions by altering chaperone availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Yang

    Full Text Available Prions are self-propagating conformations of proteins that can cause heritable phenotypic traits. Most yeast prions contain glutamine (Q/asparagine (N-rich domains that facilitate the accumulation of the protein into amyloid-like aggregates. Efficient transmission of these infectious aggregates to daughter cells requires that chaperones, including Hsp104 and Sis1, continually sever the aggregates into smaller "seeds." We previously identified 11 proteins with Q/N-rich domains that, when overproduced, facilitate the de novo aggregation of the Sup35 protein into the [PSI(+] prion state. Here, we show that overexpression of many of the same 11 Q/N-rich proteins can also destabilize pre-existing [PSI(+] or [URE3] prions. We explore in detail the events leading to the loss (curing of [PSI(+] by the overexpression of one of these proteins, the Q/N-rich domain of Pin4, which causes Sup35 aggregates to increase in size and decrease in transmissibility to daughter cells. We show that the Pin4 Q/N-rich domain sequesters Hsp104 and Sis1 chaperones away from the diffuse cytoplasmic pool. Thus, a mechanism by which heterologous Q/N-rich proteins impair prion propagation appears to be the loss of cytoplasmic Hsp104 and Sis1 available to sever [PSI(+].

  10. The CENP-T/-W complex is a binding partner of the histone chaperone FACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Lisa; Müller, Sebastian; Liu, Yiwei; Huang, Hongda; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Vassias, Isabelle; Patel, Dinshaw J; Sullivan, Kevin F; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2016-06-01

    The CENP-T/-W histone fold complex, as an integral part of the inner kinetochore, is essential for building a proper kinetochore at the centromere in order to direct chromosome segregation during mitosis. Notably, CENP-T/-W is not inherited at centromeres, and new deposition is absolutely required at each cell cycle for kinetochore function. However, the mechanisms underlying this new deposition of CENP-T/-W at centromeres are unclear. Here, we found that CENP-T deposition at centromeres is uncoupled from DNA synthesis. We identified Spt16 and SSRP1, subunits of the H2A-H2B histone chaperone facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT), as CENP-W binding partners through a proteomic screen. We found that the C-terminal region of Spt16 binds specifically to the histone fold region of CENP-T/-W. Furthermore, depletion of Spt16 impairs CENP-T and CENP-W deposition at endogenous centromeres, and site-directed targeting of Spt16 alone is sufficient to ensure local de novo CENP-T accumulation. We propose a model in which the FACT chaperone stabilizes the soluble CENP-T/-W complex in the cell and promotes dynamics of exchange, enabling CENP-T/-W deposition at centromeres.

  11. Molecular chaperones-related studies using latent stages of invertebrates exposed to space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, O. A.; Alexeev, V. R.; Sychev, V. N.; Okuda, T.; Saigusa, M.

    The latent stages of certain groups of invertebrates such as Artemia and Daphnia cyst Crustacea tuns of water bears Tardigrada are very perspective material for the investigation of the boundaries of the survival of the living organisms in the space environment While the number of authors showed that exposition the space flight causes the alteration in the survivability of the Artemia cysts there is no data about the changes in the stress response on the molecular level after short and long-termed space flight In this report we present preliminary results of the analysis of the expression of hsp90 chaperon in response to the heat shock in the larvae of the Artemia obtained from the cyst exposed to the real space flight onboard ISS for 1 and 6 month in the frame of the Aquarium program 2005-2006 and control ground group The perspectives of the usage of the molecular chaperons hsp in the studies for elucidation of the influence of the open space environment BIORISK and EXPOSE research programs on the immune response end general physiology of the invertebrates in their latent stages are discussed

  12. Contributions of chaperone and glycosyltransferase activities of O-fucosyltransferase 1 to Notch signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvine Kenneth D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background O-fucosyltransferase1 (OFUT1 is a conserved ER protein essential for Notch signaling. OFUT1 glycosylates EGF domains, which can then be further modified by the N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Fringe. OFUT1 also possesses a chaperone activity that promotes the folding and secretion of Notch. Here, we investigate the respective contributions of these activities to Notch signaling in Drosophila. Results We show that expression of an isoform lacking fucosyltransferase activity, Ofut1R245A, rescues the requirement for Ofut1 in embryonic neurogenesis. Lack of requirement for O-fucosylation is further supported by the absence of embryonic phenotypes in Gmd mutants, which lack all forms of fucosylation. Requirements for O-fucose during imaginal development were evaluated by characterizing clones of cells expressing only Ofut1R245A. These clones phenocopy fringe mutant clones, indicating that the absence of O-fucose is functionally equivalent to the absence of elongated O-fucose. Conclusion Our results establish that Notch does not need to be O-fucosylated for fringe-independent Notch signaling in Drosophila; the chaperone activity of OFUT1 is sufficient for the generation of functional Notch.

  13. The Role of Histidine-Proline-Rich Glycoprotein as Zinc Chaperone for Skeletal Muscle AMP Deaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ranieri-Raggi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metallochaperones function as intracellular shuttles for metal ions. At present, no evidence for the existence of any eukaryotic zinc-chaperone has been provided although metallochaperones could be critical for the physiological functions of Zn2+ metalloenzymes. We propose that the complex formed in skeletal muscle by the Zn2+ metalloenzyme AMP deaminase (AMPD and the metal binding protein histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG acts in this manner. HPRG is a major plasma protein. Recent investigations have reported that skeletal muscle cells do not synthesize HPRG but instead actively internalize plasma HPRG. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS performed on fresh preparations of rabbit skeletal muscle AMPD provided evidence for a dinuclear zinc site in the enzyme compatible with a (μ-aqua(μ-carboxylatodizinc(II core with two histidine residues at each metal site. XAS on HPRG isolated from the AMPD complex showed that zinc is bound to the protein in a dinuclear cluster where each Zn2+ ion is coordinated by three histidine and one heavier ligand, likely sulfur from cysteine. We describe the existence in mammalian HPRG of a specific zinc binding site distinct from the His-Pro-rich region. The participation of HPRG in the assembly and maintenance of skeletal muscle AMPD by acting as a zinc chaperone is also demonstrated.

  14. The archaic chaperone-usher pathways may depend on donor strand exchange for intersubunit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xu, Shihui; Zhu, Wei; Mao, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Subunit-subunit interactions of the classical and alternate chaperone-usher (CU) systems have been shown to proceed through a donor strand exchange (DSE) mechanism. However, it is not known whether DSE is required for intersubunit interactions in the archaic CU system. We have previously shown that the Myxococcus xanthus Mcu system, a member of the archaic CU family that functions in spore coat formation, is likely to use the principle of donor strand complementation to medicate chaperone-subunit interactions analogous to the classical CU pathway. Here we describe the results of studies on Mcu subunit-subunit interactions. We constructed a series of N-terminal-deleted, single amino acid-mutated and donor strand-complemented Mcu subunits, and characterized their abilities to participate in subunit-subunit interactions. It appears that certain residues in both the N and C termini of McuA, a subunit of the Mcu system, play a critical role in intersubunit interactions and these interactions may involve the general principle of DSE of the classical and alternate CU systems. In addition, the specificity of the M. xanthus CU system for Mcu subunits over other spore coat proteins is demonstrated.

  15. A mathematical model of the dynamics of prion aggregates with chaperone-mediated fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason K; Sindi, Suzanne S

    2016-05-01

    Prions are proteins most commonly associated with fatal neurodegenerative diseases in mammals but are also responsible for a number of harmless heritable phenotypes in yeast. These states arise when a misfolded form of a protein appears and, rather than be removed by cellular quality control mechanisms, persists. The misfolded prion protein forms aggregates and is capable of converting normally folded protein to the misfolded state through direct interaction between the two forms. The dominant mathematical model for prion aggregate dynamics has been the nucleated polymerization model (NPM) which considers the dynamics of only the normal protein and the aggregates. However, for yeast prions the molecular chaperone Hsp104 is essential for prion propagation. Further, although mammals do not express Hsp104, experimental assays have shown Hsp104 also interacts with mammalian prion aggregates. In this study, we generalize the NPM to account for molecular chaperones and develop what we call the enzyme-limited nucleated polymerization model (ELNPM). We discuss existence, uniqueness and stability of solutions to our model and demonstrate that the NPM represents a quasi-steady-state reduction of our model. We validate the ELNPM by demonstrating agreement with experimental results on the yeast prion PSI(+) that could not be supported by the NPM. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to the NPM, the ELNPM permits the coexistence of multiple prion strains.

  16. A Salmonella type three secretion effector/chaperone complex adopts a hexameric ring-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Pierre; Dewitte, Frédérique; Villeret, Vincent; Biondi, Emanuele G; Bompard, Coralie

    2015-02-15

    Many bacterial pathogens use type three secretion systems (T3SS) to inject virulence factors, named effectors, directly into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Most of the T3SS components are conserved among plant and animal pathogens, suggesting a common mechanism of recognition and secretion of effectors. However, no common motif has yet been identified for effectors allowing T3SS recognition. In this work, we performed a biochemical and structural characterization of the Salmonella SopB/SigE chaperone/effector complex by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our results showed that the SopB/SigE complex is assembled in dynamic homohexameric-ring-shaped structures with an internal tunnel. In this ring, the chaperone maintains a disordered N-terminal end of SopB molecules, in a good position to be reached and processed by the T3SS. This ring dimensionally fits the ring-organized molecules of the injectisome, including ATPase hexameric rings; this organization suggests that this structural feature is important for ATPase recognition by T3SS. Our work constitutes the first evidence of the oligomerization of an effector, analogous to the organization of the secretion machinery, obtained in solution. As effectors share neither sequence nor structural identity, the quaternary oligomeric structure could constitute a strategy evolved to promote the specificity and efficiency of T3SS recognition.

  17. Beyond genetic factors in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: protein glycation and the loss of fibrinogen's chaperone activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP is a systemic conformational disease characterized by extracellular amyloid fibril formation from plasma transthyretin (TTR. This is a crippling, fatal disease for which liver transplantation is the only effective therapy. More than 80 TTR point mutations are associated with amyloidotic diseases and the most widely accepted disease model relates TTR tetramer instability with TTR point mutations. However, this model fails to explain two observations. First, native TTR also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis, a geriatric disease. Second, age at disease onset varies by decades for patients bearing the same mutation and some mutation carrier individuals are asymptomatic throughout their lives. Hence, mutations only accelerate the process and non-genetic factors must play a key role in the molecular mechanisms of disease. One of these factors is protein glycation, previously associated with conformational diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. The glycation hypothesis in FAP is supported by our previous discovery of methylglyoxal-derived glycation of amyloid fibrils in FAP patients. Here we show that plasma proteins are differentially glycated by methylglyoxal in FAP patients and that fibrinogen is the main glycation target. Moreover, we also found that fibrinogen interacts with TTR in plasma. Fibrinogen has chaperone activity which is compromised upon glycation by methylglyoxal. Hence, we propose that methylglyoxal glycation hampers the chaperone activity of fibrinogen, rendering TTR more prone to aggregation, amyloid formation and ultimately, disease.

  18. Structural and functional homology between periplasmic bacterial molecular chaperones and small heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zav'yalova, G A; Denesyuk, A I; Gaestel, M; Korpela, T

    1995-07-01

    The periplasmic Yersinia pestis molecular chaperone Caf1M belongs to a superfamily of bacterial proteins for one of which (PapD protein of Escherichia coli) the immunoglobulin-like fold was solved by X-ray analysis. The N-terminal domain of Caf1M was found to share a 20% amino acid sequence identity with an inclusion body-associated protein IbpB of Escherichia coli. One of the regions that was compared, was 32 amino acids long, and displayed more than 40% identity, probability of random coincidence was 1.2 x 10(-4). IbpB is involved in a superfamily of small heat shock proteins which fulfil the function of molecular chaperone. On the basis of the revealed homology, an immunoglobulin-like one-domain model of IbpB three-dimensional structure was designed which could be a prototype conformation of sHsp's. The structure suggested is in good agreement with the known experimental data obtained for different members of sHsp's superfamily.

  19. Proteomic analysis of exported chaperone/co-chaperone complexes of P. falciparum reveals an array of complex protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Ma, Cheng; Oberli, Alexander; Zinz, Astrid; Engels, Sonja; Przyborski, Jude M.

    2017-01-01

    Malaria parasites modify their human host cell, the mature erythrocyte. This modification is mediated by a large number of parasite proteins that are exported to the host cell, and is also the underlying cause for the pathology caused by malaria infection. Amongst these proteins are many Hsp40 co-chaperones, and a single Hsp70. These proteins have been implicated in several processes in the host cell, including a potential role in protein transport, however the further molecular players in this process remain obscure. To address this, we have utilized chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting to isolate and characterize proteins complexes containing an exported Hsp40 (PFE55), and the only known exported Hsp70 (PfHsp70x). Our data reveal that both of these proteins are contained in high molecular weight protein complexes. These complexes are found both in the infected erythrocyte, and within the parasite-derived compartment referred to as the parasitophorous vacuole. Surprisingly, our data also reveal an association of PfHsp70x with components of PTEX, a putative protein translocon within the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole. Our results suggest that the P. falciparum- infected human erythrocyte contains numerous high molecular weight protein complexes, which may potentially be involved in host cell modification. PMID:28218284

  20. Structural Insight into Archaic and Alternative Chaperone-Usher Pathways Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Pilus Biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pakharukova, Natalia; Garnett, J.A.; Tuittila, Minna; Paavilainen, Sari; Diallo, Mamou; Xu, Yingqi; Matthews, S.J.; Zavialov, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogens express fibrous adhesive organelles that mediate targeting to sites of infection. The major class of these organelles is assembled via the classical, alternative and archaic chaperone-usher pathways. Although non-classical systems share a wider phylogenetic distribution an

  1. Protein Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone ERP-57 Decreases Plasma Membrane Expression of the Human GnRH Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yánez, Rodrigo Ayala; Conn, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Retention of misfolded proteins by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a quality control mechanism involving the participation of endogenous chaperones such as calnexin (CANX) which interact and restrict plasma membrane expression of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), a G protein coupled receptor. CANX also interacts with ERP-57, a thiol oxidoreductase chaperone present in the ER. CANX along with ERP-57, promotes the formation of disulfide bond bridges in nascent proteins. The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR) is stabilized by two disulfide bond bridges (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196), that, when broken, its expression at plasma membrane decreases. To determine if the presence of chaperones CANX and ERP-57 exert an influence over membrane routing and second messenger activation, we assessed the effect of various mutants including those with broken bridges (Cys→Ala) along with the wild type hGnRHR. The effect of chaperones on mutants was insignificant, whereas the overexpression of ERP-57 led to a wild type hGnRHR retention which was further enhanced by cotransfection with CANX cDNA disclosing receptor retention by ERP-57 augmented by CANX, suggesting a quality control mechanism. PMID:20029959

  2. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia;

    2015-01-01

    , chaperones histones H3-H4. Our first structure shows an H3-H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3-H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required...

  3. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    Agaricus bisporus and equine cytochrome c. Only for the first target β-casein was acting as a molecular chaperone i.e. its presence resulted in higher residual activity (higher degree of the function preservation). β-Casein did not have any influence on the residual activity of tyrosinase. Surprisingly...

  4. Egress of budded virions of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus does not require activity of Spodoptera frugiperda HSP/HSC70 chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Orlova, Olga V; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey N; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2014-11-04

    The induction of heat shock proteins in baculovirus infected cells is well documented. However a role of these chaperones in infection cycle remains unknown. The observation that HSP70s are associated with virions of different baculoviruses reported by several researchers suggests that HSPs might be structural components of viruses or involved in virion assembly. These hypotheses were examined by using a novel inhibitor of the ATPase and chaperoning activity of HSP/HSC70s, VER-155008. When VER-155008 was added early in infection, the synthesis of viral proteins, genome replication and the production of budded virions (BV) were markedly inhibited indicating the dependence of virus reproduction on host chaperones. However, BV production was unaffected when VER-155008 was added in the mid-replication phase which is after accumulation of products required for completion of the viral DNA replication. These results suggest that the final stages in assembly of BV and their egress from cells do not depend on chaperone activity of host HSP/HSC70s.

  5. Expression and chaperone-assisted refolding of a new cold-active lipase from Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novototskaya-Vlasova, Ksenia; Petrovskaya, Lada; Kryukova, Elena; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Dolgikh, Dmitry; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    We describe cloning and expression of genes coding for lipase Lip2Pc and lipase-specific foldase LifPc from a psychrotrophic microorganism Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5(T) isolated from a Siberian cryopeg (the lense of overcooled brine within permafrost). Upon expression in Escherichiacoli Lip2Pc accumulated in inclusion bodies while chaperone was synthesized in a soluble form. An efficient protocol for solubilization and subsequent refolding of the recombinant lipase in the presence of the truncated chaperone was developed. Using this procedure Lip2Pc with specific activity of 6900U/mg was obtained. Contrary to published data on other lipase-chaperone complexes, refolded Lip2Pc was mostly recovered from the complex with chaperone by metal-affinity chromatography. Recombinant Lip2Pc displayed maximum lipolytic activity at 25°C and pH 8.0 with p-nitrophenyl palmitate (C16) as a substrate. Activity assays conducted at different temperatures revealed that the recombinant Lip2Pc is a cold-adapted lipase with ability to utilize substrates with long (C10-C16) hydrocarbon chains in the temperature range from +5 to +65°C. It demonstrated relatively high stability at temperatures above 60°C and in the presence of various metal ions or organic solvents (ethanol, methanol, etc.). Non-ionic detergents, such as Triton X-100 and Tween 20 decreased Lip2Pc activity and SDS completely inhibited it.

  6. Structure of Human J-type Co-chaperone HscB Reveals a Tetracysteine Metal-binding Domain

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    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Bittova, Lenka; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW); (UC)

    2008-11-24

    Iron-sulfur proteins play indispensable roles in a broad range of biochemical processes. The biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins is a complex process that has become a subject of extensive research. The final step of iron-sulfur protein assembly involves transfer of an iron-sulfur cluster from a cluster-donor to a cluster-acceptor protein. This process is facilitated by a specialized chaperone system, which consists of a molecular chaperone from the Hsc70 family and a co-chaperone of the J-domain family. The 3.0 A crystal structure of a human mitochondrial J-type co-chaperone HscB revealed an L-shaped protein that resembles Escherichia coli HscB. The important difference between the two homologs is the presence of an auxiliary metal-binding domain at the N terminus of human HscB that coordinates a metal via the tetracysteine consensus motif CWXCX(9-13)FCXXCXXXQ. The domain is found in HscB homologs from animals and plants as well as in magnetotactic bacteria. The metal-binding site of the domain is structurally similar to that of rubredoxin and several zinc finger proteins containing rubredoxin-like knuckles. The normal mode analysis of HscB revealed that this L-shaped protein preferentially undergoes a scissors-like motion that correlates well with the conformational changes of human HscB observed in the crystals.

  7. Structure, Function and Regulation of the Hsp90 Machinery

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    Jing Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is essential in eukaryotes. It is required for the activation and stabilization of a wide variety of client proteins and many of them are involved in important cellular pathways. Since Hsp90 affects numerous physiological processes such as signal transduction, intracellular transport, and protein degradation, it became an interesting target for cancer therapy. Structurally, Hsp90 is a flexible dimeric protein composed of three different domains which adopt structurally distinct conformations. ATP binding triggers directionality in these conformational changes and leads to a more compact state. To achieve its function, Hsp90 works together with a large group of cofactors, termed co-chaperones. Co-chaperones form defined binary or ternary complexes with Hsp90, which facilitate the maturation of client proteins. In addition, posttranslational modifications of Hsp90, such as phosphorylation and acetylation, provide another level of regulation. They influence the conformational cycle, co-chaperone interaction, and inter-domain communications. In this review, we discuss the recent progress made in understanding the Hsp90 machinery.

  8. A chaperone function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 is required to maintain catalase activity and for multiple stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity.

  9. Dissecting the Molecular Roles of Histone Chaperones in Histone Acetylation by Type B Histone Acetyltransferases (HAT-B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigney, Allison; Ricketts, M Daniel; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-12-18

    The HAT-B enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines K5 and K12. HAT-B is a multisubunit complex composed of the histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) catalytic subunit and the Hat2 (rbap46) histone chaperone. Hat1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus as a member of a trimeric NuB4 complex containing Hat1, Hat2, and a histone H3-H4 specific histone chaperone called Hif1 (NASP). In addition to Hif1 and Hat2, Hat1 interacts with Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1), a histone chaperone that has been reported to be involved in both replication-dependent and -independent chromatin assembly. To elucidate the molecular roles of the Hif1 and Asf1 histone chaperones in HAT-B histone binding and acetyltransferase activity, we have characterized the stoichiometry and binding mode of Hif1 and Asf1 to HAT-B and the effect of this binding on the enzymatic activity of HAT-B. We find that Hif1 and Asf1 bind through different modes and independently to HAT-B, whereby Hif1 binds directly to Hat2, and Asf1 is only capable of interactions with HAT-B through contacts with histones H3-H4. We also demonstrate that HAT-B is significantly more active against an intact H3-H4 heterodimer over a histone H4 peptide, independent of either Hif1 or Asf1 binding. Mutational studies further demonstrate that HAT-B binding to the histone tail regions is not sufficient for this enhanced activity. Based on these data, we propose a model for HAT-B/histone chaperone assembly and acetylation of H3-H4 complexes.

  10. AtDeg2 – a chloroplast protein with dual protease/chaperone activity

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    Przemysław Jagodzik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast protease AtDeg2 (an ATP-independent serine endopeptidase is cytosolically synthesized as a precursor, which is imported into the chloroplast stroma and deprived of its transit peptide. Then the mature protein undergoes routing to its functional location at the stromal side of thylakoid membrane. In its linear structure AtDeg2 molecule contains the protease domain with catalytic triad (HDS and two PDZ domains (PDZ1 and PDZ2. In vivo AtDeg2 most probably exists as a supposedly inactive haxamer, which may change its oligomeric stage to form active 12-mer, or 24-mer. AtDeg2 has recently been demonstrated to exhibit dual protease/chaperone function. This review is focused on the current awareness with regard to AtDeg2 structure and functional significance.

  11. From molecular chaperones to membrane motors: through the lens of a mass spectrometrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, we obtained our first mass spectra of molecular chaperones in complex with protein ligands and entered a new field of gas-phase structural biology. It is perhaps now time to pause and reflect, and to ask how many of our initial structure predictions and models derived from mass spectrometry (MS) datasets were correct. With recent advances in structure determination, many of the most challenging complexes that we studied over the years have become tractable by other structural biology approaches enabling such comparisons to be made. Moreover, in the light of powerful new electron microscopy methods, what role is there now for MS? In considering these questions, I will give my personal view on progress and problems as well as my predictions for future directions. PMID:28202679

  12. Single-step Purification of Molecular Chaperone GroEL by Expanded Bed Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟晓冬; 杨征; 董晓燕; 孙彦

    2003-01-01

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) is an integrative downstream processing technique for the purification of biological substances directly from unclarified feedstock. In this study, molecular chaperone GroEL, an important protein folding helper both in vivo and in vitro, was purified by the single-step EBA technique from the unclarified homogenate of recombinant E. coli cells. Compared with packed bed adsorption, the EBA technique provided a single-step approach to yield an electrophoretic purity of GroEL. After the homogenate loading and column washing in the expanded bed mode, the GroEL protein was recovered by stepwise salt-gradient elution in packed-bed or expanded-bed modes, respectively. The expanded-bed elution mode was found as efficient as the packed-bed mode in the purification of GroEL from cell disruptate.

  13. Mechanism of thermal aggregation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I: role of intramolecular chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markossian, Kira A; Golub, Nikolay V; Khanova, Helen A; Levitsky, Dmitrii I; Poliansky, Nikolay B; Muranov, Konstantin O; Kurganov, Boris I

    2008-09-01

    Kinetics of thermal aggregation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I (yADH) have been studied using dynamic light scattering at a fixed temperature (56 degrees C) and under the conditions where the temperature was elevated at a constant rate (1 K/min). The initial parts of the dependences of the hydrodynamic radius on time (or temperature) follow the exponential law. At rather high values of time splitting of the population of aggregates into two components occurs. It is assumed that such peculiarities of the kinetics of thermal aggregation of yADH are due to the presence of a sequence -YSGVCHTDLHAWHGDWPLPVK- in the polypeptide chain possessing chaperone-like activity. Thermodynamic parameters for thermal denaturation of yADH have been calculated from the differential scanning calorimetry data.

  14. Heat shock protein 70 chaperoned alpha-fetoprotein in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line BEL-7402

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ping Wang; Qiao-Xia Wang; Hai-Yan Li; Rui-Fen Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction between heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and α-fetoprotein (AFP) in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line BEL7402.METHODS: The expression and localization of HSP70 and AFP in human HCC cell line BEL-7402 were determined by immunocytochemistry and indirect immunofluorescence cytochemical staining. The interaction between HSP70 and AFP in HCC cells was analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blot.RESULTS: Immunocytochemical staining detection showed that HCC cell BEL-7402 expressed a high level of HSP70 and AFP synchronously. Both were stained in cell plasma.AFP existed in the immunoprecipitate of anti-HSP70 mAb,while there was HSP70 in the immunoprecipitate of antiAFP mAb.CONCLUSION: HSP70 chaperones AFP in human HCCcell BEL-7402. The interaction between HSP70 and AFP in human HCC cell can be a new route to study the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of HCC.

  15. Improved Fab presentation on phage surface with the use of molecular chaperone coplasmid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Qiuting; Leong, Siew Wen; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-05-15

    The low presentation efficiency of Fab (fragment antigen binding) fragments during phage display is largely due to the complexity of disulphide bond formation. This can result in the presentation of Fab fragments devoid of a light chain during phage display. Here we propose the use of a coplasmid system encoding several molecular chaperones (DsbA, DsbC, FkpA, and SurA) to improve Fab packaging. A comparison was done using the Fab fragment from IgG and IgD. We found that the use of the coplasmid during phage packaging was able to improve the presentation efficiency of the Fab fragment on phage surfaces. A modified version of panning using the coplasmid system was evaluated and was successful at enriching Fab binders. Therefore, the coplasmid system would be an attractive alternative for improved Fab presentation for phage display.

  16. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lavado-Roldán

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2 acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation.

  17. A mutant chaperone converts a wild-type protein into a tumor-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schietinger, Andrea; Philip, Mary; Yoshida, Barbara A; Azadi, Parastoo; Liu, Hui; Meredith, Stephen C; Schreiber, Hans

    2006-10-13

    Monoclonal antibodies have become important therapeutic agents against certain cancers. Many tumor-specific antigens are mutant proteins that are predominantly intracellular and thus not readily accessible to monoclonal antibodies. We found that a wild-type transmembrane protein could be transformed into a tumor-specific antigen. A somatic mutation in the chaperone gene Cosmc abolished function of a glycosyltransferase, disrupting O-glycan Core 1 synthesis and creating a tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitope consisting of a monosaccharide and a specific wild-type protein sequence. This epitope induced a high-affinity, highly specific, syngeneic monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity. Such tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitopes represent potential targets for monoclonal antibody therapy.

  18. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  19. Molecular Chaperones, Cochaperones, and Ubiquitination/Deubiquitination System: Involvement in the Production of High Quality Spermatozoa

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    Rosaria Meccariello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex process in which mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation events coexist. The need to guarantee the production of qualitatively functional spermatozoa has evolved into several control systems that check spermatogenesis progression/sperm maturation and tag aberrant gametes for degradation. In this review, we will focus on the importance of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways involving molecular chaperones belonging to the superfamily of heat shock proteins (HSPs, their cochaperones, and ubiquitination/deubiquitination system all over the spermatogenetic process. In this respect, we will discuss the conserved role played by the DNAJ protein Msj-1 (mouse sperm cell-specific DNAJ first homologue and the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubpy (ubiquitin-specific processing protease-y during the spermiogenesis in both mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates.

  20. Molecular chaperone activity of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) endoplasmic reticulum-located small heat shock protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Tarlan G; Shono, Mariko

    2008-03-01

    The gene encoding the small heat shock protein (sHSP), LeHSP21.5, has been previously cloned from tomato (GenBank accession no. AB026983). The deduced amino acid sequence of this tomato sHSP was most similar to that of other endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized sHSPs (ER-sHSP) and can be predicted to target the ER. We examined whether the gene product of LeHSP21.5 (probable ER-sHSP) can act as molecular chaperone. For functional analysis, LeHSP21.5 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as His(6)-tagged protein in the C-terminal and purified. We confirmed that ER-sHSP could provide thermal protection of soluble proteins in vitro. We compared the thermal stability of E. coli strain BL21 (DE3) transformed with pET-ER-sHSP with the control E. coli strain BL21(DE3) transformed with only the pET vector under heat shock and IPTG-induced conditions. Most of the protein extracts from E. coli cells expressing ER-sHSP were protected from heat-induced denaturation, whereas extracts from cells not expressing ER-sHSP were very heat-sensitive under these conditions. A similar protective effect was observed when purified ER-sHSP was added to an E. coli cell extract. ER-sHSP prevented the thermal aggregation and inactivation of citrate synthase. These collective findings indicate that ER-sHSP can function as a molecular chaperone in vitro.

  1. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

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    Qualley, Dominic F., E-mail: dqualley@berry.edu; Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  2. Functional Rescue of Trafficking-Impaired ABCB4 Mutants by Chemical Chaperones.

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    Raquel Gordo-Gilart

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3, ABCB4 is a hepatocellular membrane protein that mediates biliary secretion of phosphatidylcholine. Null mutations in ABCB4 gene give rise to severe early-onset cholestatic liver disease. We have previously shown that the disease-associated mutations p.G68R, p.G228R, p.D459H, and p.A934T resulted in retention of ABCB4 in the endoplasmic reticulum, thus failing to target the plasma membrane. In the present study, we tested the ability of two compounds with chaperone-like activity, 4-phenylbutyrate and curcumin, to rescue these ABCB4 mutants by assessing their effects on subcellular localization, protein maturation, and phospholipid efflux capability. Incubation of transfected cells at a reduced temperature (30°C or exposure to pharmacological doses of either 4-PBA or curcumin restored cell surface expression of mutants G228R and A934T. The delivery of these mutants to the plasma membrane was accompanied by a switch in the ratio of mature to inmature protein forms, leading to a predominant expression of the mature protein. This effect was due to an improvement in the maturation rate and not to the stabilization of the mature forms. Both mutants were also functionally rescued, displaying bile salt-dependent phospholipid efflux activity after addition of 4-PBA or curcumin. Drug-induced rescue was mutant specific, given neither 4-PBA nor curcumin had an effect on the ABCB4 mutants G68R and A934T. Collectively, these data indicate that the functionality of selected trafficking-defective ABCB4 mutants can be recovered by chemical chaperones through restoration of membrane localization, suggesting a potential treatment for patients carrying such mutations.

  3. Progress in molecular chaperon GroEL%GroEL分子伴侣研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张经余; 赵志虎; 蔡民华

    2001-01-01

    大肠杆菌的GroEL是同型寡聚复合体,由14个相对分子质量58×103亚基组成背靠背的双环结构。它在新生蛋白质的正确折叠和组装以及在热或化学逆境下变性蛋白质的恢复过程中起重要作用。同时,在大肠杆菌的跨膜转运及插入细胞质膜方面都起重要作用。这些活动依赖于GroEL与底物蛋白的疏水片断的相互作用。综述了Hsp60分子伴侣系统中研究得比较清楚的GroEL的晶体结构、功能及作用机理等方面的研究进展。%Molecular chaperon GroEL of E.coli is a homo-oligomeric complex composed of 14 58kDa subunits arranged in two rings stacked back to back, which is required for correct folding and assambly of newly synthesized proteins and for recovery of the cell after exposure to either thermal or chemical stress .Apart from these functions, GroEL chaperon is able to play a role in protein translocation across or insertion into the cytoplasmic membrane of E.coli. These actions depend on the interaction between GroE chaperionin system and the hydrophobic side chains .

  4. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F.; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17–42 and Aβ16–21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are

  5. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquiza Sablón-Carrazana

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP:NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21:NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the

  6. The PprA-PprB two-component system activates CupE, the first non-archetypal Pseudomonas aeruginosa chaperone-usher pathway system assembling fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Caroline; Bernard, Christophe S; Calderon, Virginie; Yang, Liang; Filloux, Alain; Molin, Søren; Fichant, Gwennaele; Bordi, Christophe; de Bentzmann, Sophie

    2011-03-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has redundant molecular systems that contribute to its pathogenicity. Those assembling fimbrial structures promote complex organized community lifestyle. We characterized a new 5.8 kb genetic locus, cupE, that includes the conserved usher- and chaperone-encoding genes. This locus, widely conserved in different bacterial species, contains four additional genes encoding non-archetypal fimbrial subunits. We first evidenced that the cupE gene cluster was specifically expressed in biofilm conditions and was responsible for fibre assembly containing at least CupE1 protein, at the bacterial cell surface. These fimbriae not only played a significant role in the early stages (microcolony and macrocolony formation) but also in shaping 3D mushrooms during P. aeruginosa biofilm development. Using wide-genome transposon mutagenesis, we identified the PprAB two-component system (TCS) as a regulator of cupE expression, and further demonstrated the involvement of the PprAB TCS in direct CupE fimbrial assembly activation. Thus, this TCS represents a new regulatory element controlling the transition between planktonic and community lifestyles in P. aeruginosa.

  7. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  8. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Sangith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9, a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein, S14 (a ribosomal protein, CSH1 (a growth hormone, E12 (a transcription factor and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions.

  9. The modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by chemical chaperone upregulates immune negative cytokine IL-35 in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Dai, Shen; Dong, Zhaojing; Sun, Yue; Song, Xingguo; Guo, Chun; Zhu, Faliang; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Lining

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a newly identified immune negative molecule which is secreted by CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs) and contributes to their suppressive capacity. Early data have shown that IL-35 inhibits development of several autoimmune diseases. However, the role of IL-35 in atherosclerosis, a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease in arterial wall, remains to be investigated. Here, we found that IL-35 was involved in atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. ApoE(-/-) mice with established atherosclerotic lesion displayed a lower level of IL-35 compared to age-matched wild type C57BL/6 mice without plaque. However, IL-35 expression increased significantly in ApoE(-/-) mice with attenuated plaque. More importantly, we found that modulation of ER stress treated by chemical chaperone, 4-Phenyl butyric acid (PBA) in vivo, mainly upregulated immune negative regulating molecule IL-35, as well as IL-10 and Foxp3, accompanied by increased Tregs. However, no obvious impact on pro-inflammatory molecules such as TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-23 was observed, which provides new insight into the benefit of ER stress recovery from attenuated plaque. Our results suggest that IL-35 might have a potential value for atherosclerotic therapy.

  10. In vivo functional expression of a screened P. aeruginosa chaperone-dependent lipase in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiangping

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases particularly Pseudomonas lipases are widely used for biotechnological applications. It is a meaningful work to design experiments to obtain high-level active lipase. There is a limiting factor for functional overexpression of the Pseudomonas lipase that a chaperone is necessary for effective folding. As previously reported, several methods had been used to resolve the problem. In this work, the lipase (LipA and its chaperone (LipB from a screened strain named AB which belongs to Pseudomonas aeruginosa were overexpressed in E. coli with two dual expression plasmid systems to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA without in vitro refolding process. Results In this work, we screened a lipase-produced strain named AB through the screening procedure, which was identified as P. aeruginosa on the basis of 16S rDNA. Genomic DNA obtained from the strain was used to isolate the gene lipA (936 bp and lipase specific foldase gene lipB (1023 bp. One single expression plasmid system E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and two dual expression plasmid systems E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB and E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB were successfully constructed. The lipase activities of the three expression systems were compared to choose the optimal expression method. Under the same cultured condition, the activities of the lipases expressed by E. coli BL21/pET28a-lipAB and E. coli BL21/pETDuet-lipA-lipB were 1300 U/L and 3200 U/L, respectively, while the activity of the lipase expressed by E. coli BL21/pACYCDuet-lipA-lipB was up to 8500 U/L. The lipase LipA had an optimal temperature of 30°C and an optimal pH of 9 with a strong pH tolerance. The active LipA could catalyze the reaction between fatty alcohols and fatty acids to generate fatty acid alkyl esters, which meant that LipA was able to catalyze esterification reaction. The most suitable fatty acid and alcohol substrates for esterification were octylic acid and hexanol

  11. An interaction network predicted from public data as a discovery tool: application to the Hsp90 molecular chaperone machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo C Echeverría

    Full Text Available Understanding the functions of proteins requires information about their protein-protein interactions (PPI. The collective effort of the scientific community generates far more data on any given protein than individual experimental approaches. The latter are often too limited to reveal an interactome comprehensively. We developed a workflow for parallel mining of all major PPI databases, containing data from several model organisms, and to integrate data from the literature for a protein of interest. We applied this novel approach to build the PPI network of the human Hsp90 molecular chaperone machine (Hsp90Int for which previous efforts have yielded limited and poorly overlapping sets of interactors. We demonstrate the power of the Hsp90Int database as a discovery tool by validating the prediction that the Hsp90 co-chaperone Aha1 is involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Thus, we both describe how to build a custom database and introduce a powerful new resource for the scientific community.

  12. Histone density is maintained during transcription mediated by the chromatin remodeler RSC and histone chaperone NAP1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryan, Benjamin G; Kim, Jessica; Tran, Nancy Nga H; Lombardo, Sarah R; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Workman, Jerry L; Carey, Michael

    2012-02-01

    ATPases and histone chaperones facilitate RNA polymerase II (pol II) elongation on chromatin. In vivo, the coordinated action of these enzymes is necessary to permit pol II passage through a nucleosome while restoring histone density afterward. We have developed a biochemical system recapitulating this basic process. Transcription through a nucleosome in vitro requires the ATPase remodels structure of chromatin (RSC) and the histone chaperone nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1). In the presence of NAP1, RSC generates a hexasome. Despite the propensity of RSC to evict histones, NAP1 reprograms the reaction such that the hexasome is retained on the template during multiple rounds of transcription. This work has implications toward understanding the mechanism of pol II elongation on chromatin.

  13. Increasing the catalytic activity of Bilirubin oxidase from Bacillus pumilus: Importance of host strain and chaperones proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounel, Sébastien; Rouhana, Jad; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Cadet, Marine; Mano, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Aggregation of recombinant proteins into inclusion bodies (IBs) is the main problem of the expression of multicopper oxidase in Escherichia coli. It is usually attributed to inefficient folding of proteins due to the lack of copper and/or unavailability of chaperone proteins. The general strategies reported to overcome this issue have been focused on increasing the intracellular copper concentration. Here we report a complementary method to optimize the expression in E. coli of a promising Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) isolated from Bacillus pumilus. First, as this BOD has a disulfide bridge, we switched E.coli strain from BL21 (DE3) to Origami B (DE3), known to promote the formation of disulfide bridges in the bacterial cytoplasm. In a second step, we investigate the effect of co-expression of chaperone proteins on the protein production and specific activity. Our strategy allowed increasing the final amount of enzyme by 858% and its catalytic rate constant by 83%.

  14. The Chaperone ClpX Stimulates Expression of Staphylococcus aureus Protein A by Rot Dependent and Independent Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Ingmer, Hanne; Valihrach, Lukás;

    2010-01-01

    The Clp ATPases (Hsp100) constitute a family of closely related proteins that have protein reactivating and remodelling activities typical of molecular chaperones. In Staphylococcus aureus the ClpX chaperone is essential for virulence and for transcription of spa encoding Protein A. The present...... study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism by which ClpX stimulates expression of Protein A. For this purpose, we prepared antibodies directed against Rot, an activator of spa transcription, and demonstrated that cells devoid of ClpX contain three-fold less Rot than wild-type cells. By varying Rot...... expression from an inducible promoter we showed that expression of Protein A requires a threshold level of Rot. In the absence of ClpX the Rot content is reduced below this threshold level, hence, explaining the substantially reduced Protein A expression in the clpX mutant. Experiments addressed...

  15. Tissue distribution of HSPA9/mortalin in avian species and its regulation by gender, genotype and heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat shock 70kDa protein 9 (HSPA9)/mortalin is a multipotent chaperone regulating cellular processes ranging from stress response to energy homeostasis. HSPA9 has been extensively studied in mammals however there is a paucity of information in avian species. The present study aimed to characterize H...

  16. Modeling signal propagation mechanisms and ligand-based conformational dynamics of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone full-length dimer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone essential for protein folding and activation in normal homeostasis and stress response. ATP binding and hydrolysis facilitate Hsp90 conformational changes required for client activation. Hsp90 plays an important role in disease states, particularly in cancer, where chaperoning of the mutated and overexpressed oncoproteins is important for function. Recent studies have illuminated mechanisms related to the chaperone function. However, an atomic resolution view of Hsp90 conformational dynamics, determined by the presence of different binding partners, is critical to define communication pathways between remote residues in different domains intimately affecting the chaperone cycle. Here, we present a computational analysis of signal propagation and long-range communication pathways in Hsp90. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the full-length Hsp90 dimer, combined with essential dynamics, correlation analysis, and a signal propagation model. All-atom MD simulations with timescales of 70 ns have been performed for complexes with the natural substrates ATP and ADP and for the unliganded dimer. We elucidate the mechanisms of signal propagation and determine "hot spots" involved in interdomain communication pathways from the nucleotide-binding site to the C-terminal domain interface. A comprehensive computational analysis of the Hsp90 communication pathways and dynamics at atomic resolution has revealed the role of the nucleotide in effecting conformational changes, elucidating the mechanisms of signal propagation. Functionally important residues and secondary structure elements emerge as effective mediators of communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the C-terminal interface. Furthermore, we show that specific interdomain signal propagation pathways may be activated as a function of the ligand. Our results support a "conformational selection model" of the Hsp90 mechanism, whereby the protein may

  17. Molecular chaperone mediated late-stage neuroprotection in the SOD1(G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey S Novoselov

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are associated with familial ALS and lead to SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation. Here we show that the molecular chaperone, HSJ1 (DNAJB2, mutations in which cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy, can reduce mutant SOD1 aggregation and improve motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 models of ALS. Overexpression of human HSJ1a (hHSJ1a in vivo in motor neurons of SOD1(G93A transgenic mice ameliorated disease. In particular, there was a significant improvement in muscle force, increased motor unit number and enhanced motor neuron survival. hHSJ1a was present in a complex with SOD1(G93A and led to reduced SOD1 aggregation at late stages of disease progression. We also observed altered ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the double transgenic animals, suggesting that ubiquitin modification might be important for the observed improvements. In a cell model of SOD1(G93A aggregation, HSJ1a preferentially bound to mutant SOD1, enhanced SOD1 ubiquitylation and reduced SOD1 aggregation in a J-domain and ubiquitin interaction motif (UIM dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that HSJ1a acts on mutant SOD1 through a combination of chaperone, co-chaperone and pro-ubiquitylation activity. These results show that targeting SOD1 protein misfolding and aggregation in vivo can be neuroprotective and suggest that manipulation of DnaJ molecular chaperones might be useful in the treatment of ALS.

  18. Heterologous expression, chaperone mediated solubilization and purification of parasitic nematode-specific growth factor-like protein of Setaria digitata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W WP Rodrigo; R S Dassanayake; E H Karunanayake; YIN Silva Gunawardene; O VDS J Weerasena

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To clone, express and purify a putative parasitic nematode specific protein of Setaria digitata (S. digitata), filarial nematode that infects livestock and cause significant economic losses inFarEast andAsia to be used for structural and functional analyses. Methods:To characterize uncharacterized gene ofS. digitata(SDUG), the herterologous expression ofSDUG was carried out in the pET [cloned into pET45b(+)] expression system initially and co-expression ofSDUG using chaperone plasmids pG-KJE8, pGro7, pKJE7, pG-Tf2 and pTf16 containing chaperone proteins of dnaK-dnaJ-grpE-groES-gro-E, groES-groEL, dnaK-dnaJ-grpE, groES-groEL-tig, and tig respectively, was carried out subsequently.Results:Expression ofSDUG was seen whenEscherichia coli strainBL21(DE3) is used, while concentrating protein largely into the insoluble fraction.The co-expression ofSDUG using chaperone plasmid mediated system indicated a significant increase of the protein in the soluble fraction.Of the chaperon plasmid sets, the highest amount of recombinantSDUP in the soluble fraction was seen when pGro7 was used in the presence of 2 mg/mLL-arabinose and0.6MIPTG concentration in the culture medium and for3 h of incubation at the temperature of28 ℃.RecombinantSDUG was purified both from soluble and insoluble fractions usingNi affinity chromatography.SDS-PAGE and western blot analyses of these proteins revealed a single band having expected size of ~24 kDa.Conclusions:SDUG seems to be more aggregate-prone and hydrophobic in nature and such protein can make soluble by correct selecting the inducer concentrations and induction temperature and its duration.

  19. Probing nucleation, reverse annealing, and chaperone function along the reaction path of HIV-1 single-strand transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Yining; Liu, Hsiao-Wei; Landes, Christy F.; Kim, Yoen Joo; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhu, Yongjin; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps that are catalyzed (chaperoned) by the nucleocapsid protein (NC), including the annealing of the transactivation response region (TAR) RNA of the genome to the complementary sequence (TAR DNA) in minus-strand strong-stop DNA. It has been extremely challenging to obtain unambiguous mechanistic details on the annealing process at the molecular level because of the kinetic involvement of a complex and het...

  20. Chaperons expressions and search for new gravity-related genes in the embryos of crabs and amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, O.; Kashiwagi, A.; Saigusa, M.

    Molecular mechanism of influence of gravity on living system is a subject of controversy for many years. Influence of gravity directly or indirectly affects to wide variety of biological processes, including biological clocks and general patterns in development of vertebrates and invertebrates. cDNA subtraction method was used for detection of the genes related to the hatching of the embryos semi-terrestrial crab Chiromantes haematocheir. Timing of the hatching of the embryos is highly synchronized with Moon phase and tides. While no new genes were found, we found that expression of chaperon hsp-90 increase in the embryos within two days before hatching, while expression of other stress proteins doesn't show any significant difference. Another model we used -- is a development of amphibian embryos. In order to clarify the effect of high gravity environment on development of Xenopus laevis, embryos on several developmental stages were subjected to the short-time high-gravity pulses (3G, 5G, and 9G). Analysis of stress-protein expression level and cDNA subtraction among high-gravity stressed embryos and control group revealed some changes in level of RNA expression of stress-proteins in experimental group. At the same time, we found two new genes expressed exclusively in the embryos under high gravity stress. The expression of the genes dramatically increased within several hours after the gravity stress, while the expression of the typical chaperons showed just slight difference. The genes expression pattern and its comparison with previously reported chaperons let us assume the presence physiological mechanism of specific gravity-stress response using previously unreported, special type of chaperons.

  1. New players in heterochromatin silencing: histone variant H3.3 and the ATRX/DAXX chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Hsiao P J; Wong, Lee H

    2016-02-29

    A number of studies have demonstrated that various components of the ATRX/DAXX/Histone H3.3 complex are important for heterochromatin silencing at multiple genomic regions. We provide an overview of the individual components (ATRX, DAXX and/or H3.3) tested in each study and propose a model where the ATRX/DAXX chaperone complex deposits H3.3 to maintain the H3K9me3 modification at heterochromatin throughout the genome.

  2. Chaperone-like activity of alpha-cyclodextrin via hydrophobic nanocavity to protect native structure of ADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Mahnam, Karim; Ashtiani, Saman Hosseini

    2010-01-26

    The chaperone action of alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CyD), based on providing beneficial microenvironment of hydrophobic nanocavity to form molecular complex with alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was examined by experimental and computational techniques. The results of UV-vis and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that the chaperone-like activity of alpha-CyD depends on molecular complex formation between alpha-CyD and ADH, which caused to decrease the amount and size of polymerized molecules. Computational calculations of molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and blind docking (BD) demonstrated that alpha-CyD acts as an artificial chaperone because of its high affinity to the region of ADH's two chains interface. The hydrophobic nanocavity of alpha-CyD has the ability to form inclusion complex due to the presence of phenyl ring of aromatic phenylalanine (Phe) residue in the dimeric intersection area. Delocalization of ADH subunits, which causes the exposure of Phe110, takes part in the enzyme polymerization and has proven to be beneficial for aggregation inhibition and solubility enhancement within the host alpha-CyD-nanocavity.

  3. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity.

  4. Myosin Assembly, Maintenance and Degradation in Muscle: Role of the Chaperone UNC-45 in Myosin Thick Filament Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Pilgrim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Myofibrillogenesis in striated muscle cells requires a precise ordered pathway to assemble different proteins into a linear array of sarcomeres. The sarcomere relies on interdigitated thick and thin filaments to ensure muscle contraction, as well as properly folded and catalytically active myosin head. Achieving this organization requires a series of protein folding and assembly steps. The folding of the myosin head domain requires chaperone activity to attain its functional conformation. Folded or unfolded myosin can spontaneously assemble into short myosin filaments, but further assembly requires the short and incomplete myosin filaments to assemble into the developing thick filament. These longer filaments are then incorporated into the developing sarcomere of the muscle. Both myosin folding and assembly require factors to coordinate the formation of the thick filament in the sarcomere and these factors include chaperone molecules. Myosin folding and sarcomeric assembly requires association of classical chaperones as well as folding cofactors such as UNC-45. Recent research has suggested that UNC-45 is required beyond initial myosin head folding and may be directly or indirectly involved in different stages of myosin thick filament assembly, maintenance and degradation.

  5. Progesterone receptor chaperone complex-based highthroughput screening assay: identification of capsaicin as inhibitor of Hsp90 machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A.; Alfa, Eyad; Lu, Su; Chadli, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 and its co-chaperones are known to be important for cancer cell survival. The N-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 that are in ongoing clinical trials as anti-tumor agents have unfortunately shown disappointing efficacies in the clinic. Thus, novel inhibitors of the Hsp90 machine with different mechanism of action are urgently needed. We report here the development of a novel high-throughput drug-screening (HTS) assay platform to identify small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones. This assay quantitatively measures the ability of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones to refold/protect the progesterone receptor (PR), a physiological client of Hsp90, in 96-well plate format. We screened the NIH clinical collection drug library and identified capsaicin as a hit molecule. Capsaicin is an FDA-approved drug for topical use in pain management. Cell survival assays showed that capsaicin selectively kills cancer cells and destabilizes several Hsp90 client proteins. Thus, our data may explain the seemingly pleotropic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25184514

  6. An accessible hydrophobic surface is a key element of the molecular chaperone action of Atp11p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheluho, D; Ackerman, S H

    2001-10-26

    Atp11p is a soluble protein of mitochondria that binds unassembled beta subunits of the F(1)-ATPase and prevents them from aggregating in the matrix. In this report, we show that Atp11p protects the insulin B chain from aggregating in vitro and therefore acts as a molecular chaperone. The chaperone action of Atp11p is mediated by hydrophobic interactions. An accessible hydrophobic surface in Atp11p was identified with the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5-napththalenesulfonic acid (bis-ANS). The spectral changes of bis-ANS in the presence of Atp11p indicate that the probe binds to a nonpolar region of the protein. Furthermore, the dye quenches the fluorescence of Atp11p tryptophan residues in a concentration-dependent manner. Although up to three molecules of bis-ANS can bind cooperatively to Atp11p, the binding of only one dye molecule is sufficient to virtually eliminate the chaperone activity of the protein.

  7. Chemical Chaperones Increasing Expression Level of Soluble Single-chain Fv Antibody(scFv2F3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPX) is a selenoenzyme that protects the biomembrane and other cellular components against oxidative damage. The selenium-containing single chain Fv fragment of monoclonal antibody 2F3 (SescFv2F3 ) is a kind of GPX mimic and it has a wide clinical applications because of its high activity and low antigenicity. Se-scFv2F3 is generated by the chemical modification of the single chain Fy fragment of monoclonal antibody 2F3 ( scFv2F3 ), which can be expressed in E. coli. In this article, the effect of chemical chaperones, such as glycerol, glucose, and β-cyclodextrin added to the culture medium, on the expression of soluble scFv2F3 was investigated. The expression level was evaluated by the determination of soluble scFv2F3 contents in the whole cell lysates.The results suggest that both glycerol and β-cyclodextrin greatly increase the expression level of soluble scFv2F3, and β-cyclodextrin is found to be more effective compared with glycerol. Glucose has a slight effect on the expression level of soluble scFv2F3. This is the first example, wherein β-cyclodextrin has been used as a chemical chaperone during the cell culture to improve the expression level of recombinant proteins. In addition, chemical chaperones are found to decrease the toxic effect of IPTG on cells.

  8. Energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dots vs. labelled molecular chaperone systems by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Horiuchi, Hiromi; Usukura, Eiji; Sakai, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yohda, Masafumi [Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Resonant energy transfer in hybrid CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labelled molecular chaperone systems is observed with single molecule imaging technique. Photonic QDs are the core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on the outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's, and prefoldin (PFD) is used as prototype molecular chaperons. PFD is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portion of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within its central cavity. So the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs can also be captured be cause of its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. We have found one possible reaction pathway to get such artificial complex in aqueous solutions with keeping bioactivities of the proteins. Performance of the complex is evaluated by TIRF imaging microscopy. As the proteins are transparent in visible wavelength region, labeling dyes, Cy5, which also work as acceptors, are connected to detect their behaviors microscopically. Foerster type energy transfer is observed from the QD donors to Cy5-labeled PFD acceptors in single molecule level, which can be a distinct evidence for the complex formation. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly.

  10. Three classes of glucocerebrosidase inhibitors identified by quantitative high-throughput screening are chaperone leads for Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Padia, Janak; Urban, Daniel J; Jadhav, Ajit; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Simeonov, Anton; Goldin, Ehud; Auld, Douglas; LaMarca, Mary E; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Sidransky, Ellen

    2007-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene. Missense mutations result in reduced enzyme activity that may be due to misfolding, raising the possibility of small-molecule chaperone correction of the defect. Screening large compound libraries by quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) provides comprehensive information on the potency, efficacy, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of active compounds directly from the primary screen, facilitating identification of leads for medicinal chemistry optimization. We used qHTS to rapidly identify three structural series of potent, selective, nonsugar glucocerebrosidase inhibitors. The three structural classes had excellent potencies and efficacies and, importantly, high selectivity against closely related hydrolases. Preliminary SAR data were used to select compounds with high activity in both enzyme and cell-based assays. Compounds from two of these structural series increased N370S mutant glucocerebrosidase activity by 40-90% in patient cell lines and enhanced lysosomal colocalization, indicating chaperone activity. These small molecules have potential as leads for chaperone therapy for Gaucher disease, and this paradigm promises to accelerate the development of leads for other rare genetic disorders.

  11. Crystal structure of P58(IPK) TPR fragment reveals the mechanism for its molecular chaperone activity in UPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiahui; Petrova, Kseniya; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2010-04-16

    P58(IPK) might function as an endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone to maintain protein folding homeostasis during unfolded protein responses. P58(IPK) contains nine tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs and a C-terminal J-domain within its primary sequence. To investigate the mechanism by which P58(IPK) functions to promote protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum, we have determined the crystal structure of P58(IPK) TPR fragment to 2.5 A resolution by the SAD method. The crystal structure of P58(IPK) revealed three domains (I-III) with similar folds and each domain contains three TPR motifs. An ELISA assay indicated that P58(IPK) acts as a molecular chaperone by interacting with misfolded proteins such as luciferase and rhodanese. The P58(IPK) structure reveals a conserved hydrophobic patch located in domain I that might be involved in binding the misfolded polypeptides. Structure-based mutagenesis for the conserved hydrophobic residues located in domain I significantly reduced the molecular chaperone activity of P58(IPK).

  12. Chaperone-like effect of the linker on the isolated C-terminal domain of rabbit muscle creatine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Xia, Mengdie; He, Hua-Wei; Wang, Sha; Liu, Huihui; Gong, Haipeng; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Intramolecular chaperones (IMCs), which are specific domains/segments encoded in the primary structure of proteins, exhibit chaperone-like activity against the aggregation of the other domains in the same molecule. In this research, we found that the truncation of the linker greatly promoted the thermal aggregation of the isolated C-terminal domain (CTD) of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (RMCK). Either the existence of the linker covalently linked to CTD or the supply of the synthetic linker peptide additionally could successfully protect the CTD of RMCK against aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. Truncated fragments of the linker also behaved as a chaperone-like effect with lower efficiency, revealing the importance of its C-terminal half in the IMC function of the linker. The aggregation sites in the CTD of RMCK were identified by molecular dynamics simulations. Mutational analysis of the three key hydrophobic residues resulted in opposing effects on the thermal aggregation between the CTD with intact or partial linker, confirming the role of linker as a lid to protect the hydrophobic residues against exposure to solvent. These observations suggested that the linkers in multidomain proteins could act as IMCs to facilitate the correct folding of the aggregation-prone domains. Furthermore, the intactness of the IMC linker after proteolysis modulates the production of off-pathway aggregates, which may be important to the onset of some diseases caused by the toxic effects of aggregated proteolytic fragments.

  13. Lactic acid induces aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing by promoting its interaction with endoplasmic reticulum chaperone proteins.

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    Yiwen Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lactic acid, a natural by-product of glycolysis, is produced at excess levels in response to impaired mitochondrial function, high-energy demand, and low oxygen availability. The enzyme involved in the production of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ of Alzheimer's disease, BACE1, functions optimally at lower pH, which led us to investigate a potential role of lactic acid in the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lactic acid increased levels of Aβ40 and 42, as measured by ELISA, in culture medium of human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y, whereas it decreased APP metabolites, such as sAPPα. In cell lysates, APP levels were increased and APP was found to interact with ER-chaperones in a perinuclear region, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy studies. Lactic acid had only a very modest effect on cellular pH, did increase the levels of ER chaperones Grp78 and Grp94 and led to APP aggregate formation reminiscent of aggresomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that sustained elevations in lactic acid levels could be a risk factor in amyloidogenesis related to Alzheimer's disease through enhanced APP interaction with ER chaperone proteins and aberrant APP processing leading to increased generation of amyloid peptides and APP aggregates.

  14. Purification of Protein Chaperones and Their Functional Assays with Intermediate Filaments.

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    Perng, Ming-Der; Huang, Yu-Shan; Quinlan, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) scaffolds facilitate small heat shock protein (sHSP) function, while IF function is sHSP dependent. sHSPs interact with IFs and the importance of this interaction is to maintain the individuality of the IFs and to modulate interfilament interactions both in networks and in assembly intermediates. Mutations in both sHSPs and their interacting IF proteins phenocopy each other in the human diseases they cause. This establishes a key functional relationship between these two very distinct protein families, and it also evidences the role of this cytoskeleton-chaperone complex in the cellular stress response. In this chapter, we describe the detailed experimental protocols for the preparation of purified IF proteins and sHSPs to facilitate the study in vitro of their functional interactions. In addition, we describe the detailed biochemical procedures to assess the effect of sHSP on the assembly of IFs, the binding to IFs, and the prevention of noncovalent filament-filament interactions using in vitro cosedimentation, electron microscopy, and viscosity assays. These assays are valuable research tools to study and manipulate sHSP-IF complexes in vitro and therefore to determine the structure-function detail of this complex, and how it contributes to cellular, tissue, and organismal homeostasis and the in vivo stress response.

  15. In vitro thermodynamic dissection of human copper transfer from chaperone to target protein.

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    Moritz S Niemiec

    Full Text Available Transient protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are fundamental components of biological activity. To understand biological activity, not only the structures of the involved proteins are important but also the energetics of the individual steps of a reaction. Here we use in vitro biophysical methods to deduce thermodynamic parameters of copper (Cu transfer from the human copper chaperone Atox1 to the fourth metal-binding domain of the Wilson disease protein (WD4. Atox1 and WD4 have the same fold (ferredoxin-like fold and Cu-binding site (two surface exposed cysteine residues and thus it is not clear what drives metal transfer from one protein to the other. Cu transfer is a two-step reaction involving a metal-dependent ternary complex in which the metal is coordinated by cysteines from both proteins (i.e., Atox1-Cu-WD4. We employ size exclusion chromatography to estimate individual equilibrium constants for the two steps. This information together with calorimetric titration data are used to reveal enthalpic and entropic contributions of each step in the transfer process. Upon combining the equilibrium constants for both steps, a metal exchange factor (from Atox1 to WD4 of 10 is calculated, governed by a negative net enthalpy change of ∼10 kJ/mol. Thus, small variations in interaction energies, not always obvious upon comparing protein structures alone, may fuel vectorial metal transfer.

  16. An erythroid chaperone that facilitates folding of α-globin subunits for hemoglobin synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Kong, Yi; Dore, Louis C.; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Katein, Anne M.; Zhou, Suiping; Choi, John K.; Gell, David; Mackay, Joel P.; Gow, Andrew J.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2007-01-01

    Erythrocyte precursors produce abundant α- and β-globin proteins, which assemble with each other to form hemoglobin A (HbA), the major blood oxygen carrier. αHb-stabilizing protein (AHSP) binds free α subunits reversibly to maintain their structure and limit their ability to generate reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, loss of AHSP aggravates the toxicity of excessive free α-globin caused by β-globin gene disruption in mice. Surprisingly, we found that AHSP also has important functions when free α-globin is limited. Thus, compound mutants lacking both Ahsp and 1 of 4 α-globin genes (genotype Ahsp–/–α-globin*α/αα) exhibited more severe anemia and Hb instability than mice with either mutation alone. In vitro, recombinant AHSP promoted folding of newly translated α-globin, enhanced its refolding after denaturation, and facilitated its incorporation into HbA. Moreover, in erythroid precursors, newly formed free α-globin was destabilized by loss of AHSP. Therefore, in addition to its previously defined role in detoxification of excess α-globin, AHSP also acts as a molecular chaperone to stabilize nascent α-globin for HbA assembly. Our findings illustrate what we believe to be a novel adaptive mechanism by which a specialized cell coordinates high-level production of a multisubunit protein and protects against various synthetic imbalances. PMID:17607360

  17. NMR and Mutational Identification of the Collagen-Binding Site of the Chaperone Hsp47

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    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yoshikawa, Sumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Nishi, Yohei; Kurimoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yoshihito; Homma, Takayuki; Hoseki, Jun; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Koide, Takaki; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kato, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47) acts as a client-specific chaperone for collagen and plays a vital role in collagen maturation and the consequent embryonic development. In addition, this protein can be a potential target for the treatment of fibrosis. Despite its physiological and pathological importance, little is currently known about the collagen-binding mode of Hsp47 from a structural aspect. Here, we describe an NMR study that was conducted to identify the collagen-binding site of Hsp47. We used chicken Hsp47, which has higher solubility than its human counterpart, and applied a selective 15N-labeling method targeting its tryptophan and histidine residues. Spectral assignments were made based on site-directed mutagenesis of the individual residues. By inspecting the spectral changes that were observed upon interaction with a trimeric collagen peptide and the mutational data, we successfully mapped the collagen-binding site in the B/C β-barrel domain and a nearby loop in a 3D-homology model based upon a serpin fold. This conclusion was confirmed by mutational analysis. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the design of compounds that target the interaction between Hsp47 and procollagen as therapeutics for fibrotic diseases. PMID:23049894

  18. NMR and mutational identification of the collagen-binding site of the chaperone Hsp47.

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    Maho Yagi-Utsumi

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47 acts as a client-specific chaperone for collagen and plays a vital role in collagen maturation and the consequent embryonic development. In addition, this protein can be a potential target for the treatment of fibrosis. Despite its physiological and pathological importance, little is currently known about the collagen-binding mode of Hsp47 from a structural aspect. Here, we describe an NMR study that was conducted to identify the collagen-binding site of Hsp47. We used chicken Hsp47, which has higher solubility than its human counterpart, and applied a selective (15N-labeling method targeting its tryptophan and histidine residues. Spectral assignments were made based on site-directed mutagenesis of the individual residues. By inspecting the spectral changes that were observed upon interaction with a trimeric collagen peptide and the mutational data, we successfully mapped the collagen-binding site in the B/C β-barrel domain and a nearby loop in a 3D-homology model based upon a serpin fold. This conclusion was confirmed by mutational analysis. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the design of compounds that target the interaction between Hsp47 and procollagen as therapeutics for fibrotic diseases.

  19. Corticosteroid Receptors, Their Chaperones and Cochaperones: How Do They Modulate Adipogenesis?

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    Judith Toneatto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids are part of the list of hormones that control adipogenesis as well as different aspects of the physiology of the adipose tissue. Their actions are mediated through their binding to the glucocorticoid and the mineralocorticoid receptors (GR and MR, respectively, in complex with heat shock proteins (Hsps and high molecular weight immunophilins (IMMs. Albeit many aspects of the molecular mechanism of the corticosteroid receptors are not fully elucidated yet, it was not until recently that the first evidences of the functional importance of Hsps and IMMs in the process of adipocyte differentiation have been described. Hsp90 and the high molecular weight IMM FKBP51 modulate GR and MR activity at multiple levels, that is, hormone binding affinity, their subcellular distribution, and the transcriptional status, among other aspects of the NR function. Interestingly, it has recently been described that Hsp90 and FKBP51 also participate in the control of PPARγ, a key transcription factor in the control of adipogenesis and the maintenance of the adipocyte phenotype. In addition, novel roles have been uncovered for FKBP51 in the organization of the nuclear architecture through its participation in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina and the control of the subnuclear distribution of GR. Thus, the aim of this review is to integrate and discuss the actual understanding of the role of corticosteroid receptors, their chaperones and cochaperones, in the process of adipocyte differentiation.

  20. Profibrillin-1 Maturation by Human Dermal Fibroblasts: Proteolytic Processing and Molecular Chaperones

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    Wallis, Debra D.; Putnam, Elizabeth A.; Cretoiu, Jill S.; Carmical, Sonya G.; Cao, Shi-Nian; Thomas, Gary; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2006-01-01

    Fibrillin-1 is synthesized as a proprotein that undergoes proteolytic processing in the unique C-terminal domain by a member of the PACE/furin family of endoproteases. This family of endoproteases is active in the trans-Golgi network (TGN), but metabolic labeling studies have been controversial as to whether profibrillin-1 is processed intracellularly or after secretion. This report provides evidence that profibrillin-1 processing is not an intracellular event. Bafilomycin A1 and incubation of dermal fibroblasts at 22°C were used to block secretion in the TGN to confirm that profibrillin-1 processing did not occur in this compartment. Profibrillin-1 immunoprecipitation studies revealed that two endoplasmic reticulum-resident molecular chaperones, BiP and GRP94, interacted with profibrillin-1. To determine the proprotein convertase responsible for processing profibrillin-1, a specific inhibitor of furin, α-1-antitrypsin, Portland variant, was both expressed in the cells and added to cells exogenously. In both cases, the inhibitor blocked the processing of profibrillin-1, providing evidence that furin is the enzyme responsible for profibrillin-1 processing. These studies delineate the secretion and proteolytic processing of profibrillin-1, and identify the proteins that interact with profibrillin-1 in the secretory pathway. PMID:14523997

  1. Direct observation of the uptake of outer membrane proteins by the periplasmic chaperone Skp.

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    Zhi-Xin Lyu

    Full Text Available The transportation of membrane proteins through the aqueous subcellular space is an important and challenging process. Its molecular mechanism and the associated structural change are poorly understood. Periplasmic chaperones, such as Skp in Escherichia coli, play key roles in the transportation and protection of outer membrane proteins (OMPs in Gram-negative bacteria. The molecular mechanism through which Skp interacts with and protects OMPs remains mysterious. Here, a combined experimental and molecular dynamics simulation study was performed to gain the structural and dynamical information in the process of OMPs and Skp binding. Stopped-flow experiments on site specific mutated and labeled Skp and several OMPs, namely OmpC, the transmembrane domain of OmpA, and OmpF, allowed us to obtain the mechanism of OMP entering the Skp cavity, and molecular dynamics simulations yielded detailed molecular interactions responsible for this process. Both experiment and simulation show that the entrance of OMP into Skp is a highly directional process, which is initiated by the interaction between the N-terminus of OMP and the bottom "tentacle" domain of Skp. The opening of the more flexible tentacle of Skp, the non-specific electrostatic interactions between OMP and Skp, and the constant formation and breaking of salt bridges between Skp and its substrate together allow OMP to enter Skp and gradually "climb" into the Skp cavity in the absence of an external energy supply.

  2. Characterization of a chaperone ClpB homologue of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

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    Jesuino, Rosália S A; Azevedo, Maristela O; Felipe, M Sueli S; Pereira, Maristela; De Almeida Soares, Célia M

    2002-08-01

    We report the cloning and sequence analysis of a genomic clone encoding a Paracoccidioides brasiliensis ClpB chaperone homologue (PbClpB). The clpb gene was identified in a lambda Dash II library. Sequencing of Pbclpb revealed a long open reading frame capable of encoding a 792 amino acid, 87.9 kDa protein, pI of 5.34. The predicted polypeptide contains several consensus motifs of the ClpB proteins. Canonical sequences such as two putative nucleotide-binding sites, chaperonins ClpA/B signatures and highly conserved casein kinase phosphorylation domains are present. ClpB is 69% to 49% identical to members of the ClpB family from several organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The transcript of PbclpB was detected as a mRNA species of 3.0 kb, preferentially expressed in the yeast parasitic phase of the fungus. A 89 kDa protein was also detected in yeast cells of P. brasiliensis.

  3. Antimyeloma Effects of the Heat Shock Protein 70 Molecular Chaperone Inhibitor MAL3-101

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    Marc J. Braunstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is the second most common hematologic malignancy and remains incurable, primarily due to the treatment-refractory/resistant nature of the disease. A rational approach to this compelling challenge is to develop new drugs that act synergistically with existing effective agents. This approach will reduce drug concentrations, avoid treatment resistance, and also improve treatment effectiveness by targeting new and nonredundant pathways in MM. Toward this goal, we examined the antimyeloma effects of MAL3-101, a member of a new class of non-ATP-site inhibitors of the heat shock protein (Hsp 70 molecular chaperone. We discovered that MAL3-101 exhibited antimyeloma effects on MM cell lines in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft plasmacytoma model, as well as on primary tumor cells and bone marrow endothelial cells from myeloma patients. In combination with a proteasome inhibitor, MAL3-101 significantly potentiated the in vitro and in vivo antimyeloma effects. These data support a preclinical rationale for small molecule inhibition of Hsp70 function, either alone or in combination with other agents, as an effective therapeutic strategy for MM.

  4. The impact of the HIRA histone chaperone upon global nucleosome architecture.

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    Gal, Csenge; Moore, Karen M; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kent, Nicholas A; Whitehall, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    HIRA is an evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone that mediates replication-independent nucleosome assembly and is important for a variety of processes such as cell cycle progression, development, and senescence. Here we have used a chromatin sequencing approach to determine the genome-wide contribution of HIRA to nucleosome organization in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells lacking HIRA experience a global reduction in nucleosome occupancy at gene sequences, consistent with the proposed role for HIRA in chromatin reassembly behind elongating RNA polymerase II. In addition, we find that at its target promoters, HIRA commonly maintains the full occupancy of the -1 nucleosome. HIRA does not affect global chromatin structure at replication origins or in rDNA repeats but is required for nucleosome occupancy in silent regions of the genome. Nucleosome organization associated with the heterochromatic (dg-dh) repeats located at the centromere is perturbed by loss of HIRA function and furthermore HIRA is required for normal nucleosome occupancy at Tf2 LTR retrotransposons. Overall, our data indicate that HIRA plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome architecture at both euchromatic and heterochromatic loci.

  5. Evidence that avian reovirus σNS is an RNA chaperone: implications for genome segment assortment.

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    Borodavka, Alexander; Ault, James; Stockley, Peter G; Tuma, Roman

    2015-08-18

    Reoviruses are important human, animal and plant pathogens having 10-12 segments of double-stranded genomic RNA. The mechanisms controlling the assortment and packaging of genomic segments in these viruses, remain poorly understood. RNA-protein and RNA-RNA interactions between viral genomic segment precursors have been implicated in the process. While non-structural viral RNA-binding proteins, such as avian reovirus σNS, are essential for virus replication, the mechanism by which they assist packaging is unclear. Here we demonstrate that σNS assembles into stable elongated hexamers in vitro, which bind single-stranded nucleic acids with high affinity, but little sequence specificity. Using ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, we show that σNS also binds to a partially double-stranded RNA, resulting in gradual helix unwinding. The hexamer can bind multiple RNA molecules and exhibits strand-annealing activity, thus mediating conversion of metastable, intramolecular stem-loops into more stable heteroduplexes. We demonstrate that the ARV σNS acts as an RNA chaperone facilitating specific RNA-RNA interactions between genomic precursors during segment assortment and packaging.

  6. The human histone chaperone sNASP interacts with linker and core histones through distinct mechanisms.

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    Wang, Huanyu; Ge, Zhongqi; Walsh, Scott T R; Parthun, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) is a human homolog of the N1/N2 family of histone chaperones. sNASP contains the domain structure characteristic of this family, which includes a large acidic patch flanked by several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. sNASP possesses a unique binding specificity in that it forms specific complexes with both histone H1 and histones H3/H4. Based on the binding affinities of sNASP variants to histones H1, H3.3, H4 and H3.3/H4 complexes, sNASP uses distinct structural domains to interact with linker and core histones. For example, one of the acidic patches of sNASP was essential for linker histone binding but not for core histone interactions. The fourth TPR of sNASP played a critical role in interactions with histone H3/H4 complexes, but did not influence histone H1 binding. Finally, analysis of cellular proteins demonstrated that sNASP existed in distinct complexes that contained either linker or core histones.

  7. Mechanistic basis for the recognition of a misfolded protein by the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

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    Oroz, Javier; Kim, Jin Hae; Chang, Bliss J; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2017-02-20

    The critical toxic species in over 40 human diseases are misfolded proteins. Their interaction with molecular chaperones such as Hsp90, which preferentially interacts with metastable proteins, is essential for the blocking of disease progression. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the misfolded cytotoxic monomer of the amyloidogenic human protein transthyretin, which is characterized by the release of the C-terminal β-strand and perturbations of the A-B loop. The misfolded transthyretin monomer, but not the wild-type protein, binds to human Hsp90. In the bound state, the Hsp90 dimer predominantly populates an open conformation, and transthyretin retains its globular structure. The interaction surface for the transthyretin monomer comprises the N-terminal and middle domains of Hsp90 and overlaps with that of the Alzheimer's-disease-related protein tau. Taken together, the data suggest that Hsp90 uses a mechanism for the recognition of aggregation-prone proteins that is largely distinct from those of other Hsp90 clients.

  8. Chaperone ligand-discrimination by the TPR-domain protein Tah1.

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    Millson, Stefan H; Vaughan, Cara K; Zhai, Chao; Ali, Maruf M U; Panaretou, Barry; Piper, Peter W; Pearl, Laurence H; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2008-07-15

    Tah1 [TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat)-containing protein associated with Hsp (heat-shock protein) 90] has been identified as a TPR-domain protein. TPR-domain proteins are involved in protein-protein interactions and a number have been characterized that interact either with Hsp70 or Hsp90, but a few can bind both chaperones. Independent studies suggest that Tah1 interacts with Hsp90, but whether it can also interact with Hsp70/Ssa1 has not been investigated. Amino-acid-sequence alignments suggest that Tah1 is most similar to the TPR2b domain of Hop (Hsp-organizing protein) which when mutated reduces binding to both Hsp90 and Hsp70. Our alignments suggest that there are three TPR-domain motifs in Tah1, which is consistent with the architecture of the TPR2b domain. In the present study we find that Tah1 is specific for Hsp90, and is able to bind tightly the yeast Hsp90, and the human Hsp90alpha and Hsp90beta proteins, but not the yeast Hsp70 Ssa1 isoform. Tah1 acheives ligand discrimination by favourably binding the methionine residue in the conserved MEEVD motif (Hsp90) and positively discriminating against the first valine residue in the VEEVD motif (Ssa1). In the present study we also show that Tah1 can affect the ATPase activity of Hsp90, in common with some other TPR-domain proteins.

  9. Structure and function of the histone chaperone CIA/ASF1 complexed with histones H3 and H4.

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    Natsume, Ryo; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Akai, Yusuke; Sano, Norihiko; Horikoshi, Masami; Senda, Toshiya

    2007-03-15

    CIA (CCG1-interacting factor A)/ASF1, which is the most conserved histone chaperone among the eukaryotes, was genetically identified as a factor for an anti-silencing function (Asf1) by yeast genetic screening. Shortly after that, the CIA-histone-H3-H4 complex was isolated from Drosophila as a histone chaperone CAF-1 stimulator. Human CIA-I/II (ASF1a/b) was identified as a histone chaperone that interacts with the bromodomain-an acetylated-histone-recognizing domain-of CCG1, in the general transcription initiation factor TFIID. Intensive studies have revealed that CIA/ASF1 mediates nucleosome assembly by forming a complex with another histone chaperone in human cells and yeast, and is involved in DNA replication, transcription, DNA repair and silencing/anti-silencing in yeast. CIA/ASF1 was shown as a major storage chaperone for soluble histones in proliferating human cells. Despite all these biochemical and biological functional analyses, the structure-function relationship of the nucleosome assembly/disassembly activity of CIA/ASF1 has remained elusive. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.7 A resolution, of CIA-I in complex with histones H3 and H4. The structure shows the histone H3-H4 dimer's mutually exclusive interactions with another histone H3-H4 dimer and CIA-I. The carboxy-terminal beta-strand of histone H4 changes its partner from the beta-strand in histone H2A to that of CIA-I through large conformational change. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that CIA-I has a histone H3-H4 tetramer-disrupting activity. Mutants with weak histone H3-H4 dimer binding activity showed critical functional effects on cellular processes related to transcription. The histone H3-H4 tetramer-disrupting activity of CIA/ASF1 and the crystal structure of the CIA/ASF1-histone-H3-H4 dimer complex should give insights into mechanisms of both nucleosome assembly/disassembly and nucleosome semi-conservative replication.

  10. Vasopressin increases expression of UT-A1, UT-A3, and ER chaperone GRP78 in the renal medulla of mice with a urinary concentrating defect.

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    Cai, Qi; Nelson, Sarah K; McReynolds, Matthew R; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie Keck; Elliott, David; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2010-10-01

    Activation of V2 receptors (V2R) during antidiuresis increases the permeability of the inner medullary collecting duct to urea and water. Extracellular osmolality is elevated as the concentrating capacity of the kidney increases. Osmolality is known to contribute to the regulation of collecting duct water (aquaporin-2; AQP2) and urea transporter (UT-A1, UT-A3) regulation. AQP1KO mice are a concentrating mechanism knockout, a defect attributed to the loss of high interstitial osmolality. A V2R-specific agonist, deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP), was infused into wild-type and AQP1KO mice for 7 days. UT-A1 mRNA and protein abundance were significantly increased in the medullas of wild-type and AQP1KO mice following dDAVP infusion. The mRNA and protein abundance of UT-A3, the basolateral urea transporter, was significantly increased by dDAVP in both wild-type and AQP1KO mice. Semiquantitative immunoblots revealed that dDAVP infusion induced a significant increase in the medullary expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone GRP78. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that GRP78 expression colocalized with AQP2 in principal cells of the papillary tip of the renal medulla. Using immunohistochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy, we demonstrate that vasopressin induced a marked apical targeting of GRP78 in medullary principal cells. Urea-sensitive genes, GADD153 and ATF4 (components of the ER stress pathway), were significantly increased in AQP1KO mice by dDAVP infusion. These findings strongly support an important role of vasopressin in the activation of an ER stress response in renal collecting duct cells, in addition to its role in activating an increase in UT-A1 and UT-A3 abundance.

  11. The roles of co-chaperone CCRP/DNAJC7 in Cyp2b10 gene activation and steatosis development in mouse livers.

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    Marumi Ohno

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR retention protein (CCRP and also known as DNAJC7 is a co-chaperone previously characterized to retain nuclear receptor CAR in the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. Here we have produced CCRP knockout (KO mice and demonstrated that CCRP regulates CAR at multiple steps in activation of the cytochrome (Cyp 2b10 gene in liver: nuclear accumulation, RNA polymerase II recruitment and epigenetic modifications. Phenobarbital treatment greatly increased nuclear CAR accumulation in the livers of KO males as compared to those of wild type (WT males. Despite this accumulation, phenobarbital-induced activation of the Cyp2b10 gene was significantly attenuated. In ChIP assays, a CAR/retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα heterodimer binding to the Cyp2b10 promoter was already increased before phenobarbital treatment and further pronounced after treatment. However, RNA polymerase II was barely recruited to the promoter even after phenobarbital treatment. Histone H3K27 on the Cyp2b10 promoter was de-methylated only after phenobarbital treatment in WT but was fully de-methylated before treatment in KO males. Thus, CCRP confers phenobarbital-induced de-methylation capability to the promoter as well as the phenobarbital responsiveness of recruiting RNA polymerase II, but is not responsible for the binding between CAR and its cognate sequence, phenobarbital responsive element module. In addition, KO males developed steatotic livers and increased serum levels of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein in response to fasting. CCRP appears to be involved in various hepatic regulations far beyond CAR-mediated drug metabolism.

  12. Genetic regulation of spy gene expression in Escherichia coli in the presence of protein unfolding agent ethanol.

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    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Ghosh, Tamoghna; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2014-09-10

    In a living cell, folding of proteins is assisted by molecular chaperones and other folding helpers. In Escherichia coli (E. coli), recently an ATP independent chaperon 'Spy' was discovered which is highly up-regulated in the presence of protein unfolding agents like ethanol, butanol and tannic acid. Two response regulators; BaeR and CpxR have been recognized as transcriptional regulators of spy gene. However, the mechanism of genetic regulation of spy under protein denaturants like ethanol has not been studied in detail so far. Based on a combination of genetic, molecular biology and biochemical experimental data, we propose that BaeR protein is the primary regulator of spy gene in response to ethanol stress in E. coli. In addition, we expanded the experimental spectrum and validated that regulation of spy gene in the presence of zinc and copper metal stress is primarily via BaeR and CpxR regulators respectively. We also performed in-silico analysis to identify the homologs of Spy protein and their cognate regulatory elements in bacterial species belonging to enterobacteriaceae family. Based on the unique ATP-independent chaperone nature and genetic regulation of spy we also propose its importance in biosensor development and facilitated production of properly folded recombinant proteins.

  13. Chaperone-Usher Pili Loci of Colonization Factor-Negative Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Canto, Felipe; O'Ryan, Miguel; Pardo, Mirka; Torres, Alexia; Gutiérrez, Daniela; Cádiz, Leandro; Valdés, Raul; Mansilla, Aquiles; Martínez, Rodrigo; Hernández, Daniela; Caro, Benjamin; Levine, Myron M.; Rasko, David A.; Hill, Christopher M.; Pop, Mihai; Stine, O. Colin; Vidal, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most common causes of diarrhea worldwide. Among the 25 different ETEC adhesins, 22 are known as “colonization factors” (CFs), of which 17 are assembled by the chaperone-usher (CU) mechanism. Currently, there is no preventive therapy against ETEC, and CFs have been proposed as components for vaccine development. However, studies of diarrhea-causing ETEC strains worldwide indicate that between 15 and 50% of these are negative for known CFs, hindering the selection of the most widespread structures and suggesting that unknown adhesins remain to be identified. Here, we report the result of a comprehensive analysis of 35 draft genomes of ETEC strains which do not carry known adhesin genes; our goal was to find new CU pili loci. The phylogenetic profiles and serogroups of these strains were highly diverse, a majority of which produced only the heat-labile toxin. We identified 10 pili loci belonging to CU families β (1 locus), γ2 (7 loci), κ (1 locus), and π (1 locus), all of which contained the required number of open reading frames (ORFs) to encode functional structures. Three loci were variants of previously-known clusters, three had been only-partially described, and four are novel loci. Intra-loci genetic variability identified would allow the synthesis of up to 14 different structures. Clusters of putative γ2-CU pili were most common (23 strains), followed by putative β-CU pili (12 strains), which have not yet been fully characterized. Overall, our findings significantly increase the number of ETEC adhesion genes associated with human infections. PMID:28111618

  14. Evolutionary origins of Hsp90 chaperones and a deep paralogy in their bacterial ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stechmann, Alexandra; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The 82-90 kD family of molecular chaperone proteins has homologs in eukaryotes (Hsp90) and many eubacteria (HtpG) but not in Archaebacteria. We used representatives of all four different eukaryotic paralogs (cytosolic, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), chloroplast, mitochondrial) together with numerous eubacterial HtpG proteins for phylogenetic analyses to investigate their evolutionary origins. Our trees confirm that none of the organellar Hsp90s derives from the endosymbionts of early eukaryotes. Contrary to previous suggestions of distant origins through lateral gene transfer (LGT) all eukaryote Hsp90s are related to Gram-positive eubacterial HtpG proteins. The nucleocytosolic, ER and chloroplast Hsp90 paralogs are clearly mutually related. The origin of mitochondrial Hsp90 is more obscure, as these sequences are deeply nested within eubacteria. Our trees also reveal a deep split within eubacteria into a group of mainly long-branching sequences (including the eukaryote mitochondrial Hsp90s) and another group comprising exclusively short-branching HtpG proteins, from which the cytosolic/ER versions probably arose. Both versions are present in several eubacterial phyla, suggesting gene duplication very early in eubacterial evolution and multiple independent losses thereafter. We identified one probable case of LGT within eubacteria. However, multiple losses can simply explain the evolutionary pattern of the eubacterial HtpG paralogs and predominate over LGT. We suggest that the actinobacterial ancestor of eukaryotes harbored genes for both eubacterial HtpG paralogs, as the actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor still does; one could have given rise to the mitochondrial Hsp90 and the other, following another duplication event in the ancestral eukaryote, to the cytosolic and ER Hsp90 homologs.

  15. Dynamic Interaction of the Sec Translocon with the Chaperone PpiD*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachelaru, Ilie; Petriman, Narcis-Adrian; Kudva, Renuka; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    The Sec translocon constitutes a ubiquitous protein transport channel that consists in bacteria of the three core components: SecY, SecE, and SecG. Additional proteins interact with SecYEG during different stages of protein transport. During targeting, SecYEG interacts with SecA, the SRP receptor, or the ribosome. Protein transport into or across the membrane is then facilitated by the interaction of SecYEG with YidC and the SecDFYajC complex. During protein transport, SecYEG is likely to interact also with the protein quality control machinery, but details about this interaction are missing. By in vivo and in vitro site-directed cross-linking, we show here that the periplasmic chaperone PpiD is located in front of the lateral gate of SecY, through which transmembrane domains exit the SecY channel. The strongest contacts were found to helix 2b of SecY. Blue native PAGE analyses verify the presence of a SecYEG-PpiD complex in native Escherichia coli membranes. The PpiD-SecY interaction was not influenced by the addition of SecA and only weakly influenced by binding of nontranslating ribosomes to SecYEG. In contrast, PpiD lost contact to the lateral gate of SecY during membrane protein insertion. These data identify PpiD as an additional and transient subunit of the bacterial SecYEG translocon. The data furthermore demonstrate the highly modular and versatile composition of the Sec translocon, which is probably essential for its ability to transport a wide range of substrates across membranes in bacteria and eukaryotes. PMID:24951590

  16. Mechanosensitive liposomes as artificial chaperones for shear-driven acceleration of enzyme-catalyzed reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Tomotaka; Yoshimoto, Makoto

    2014-03-12

    Mechanosensitive liposomes were prepared and applied to continuously accelerate the glucose oxidase (GO) reaction in shear flow. The liposome membrane was composed of a ternary lipid mixture containing 20 mol % negatively charged lipid and 30 mol % cholesterol. The liposomes encapsulating GO and catalase were passed through microtubes with inner diameter of 190 or 380 μm at 25 °C to induce the catalytic oxidation of 10 mM glucose with simultaneous decomposition of H2O2 produced. The liposomal GO showed significantly low reactivity in the static liquid system because of the permeation resistance of lipid membranes to glucose. On the other hand, the enzyme activity of liposomal GO observed at the average shear rate of 7.8 × 10(3) s(-1) was significantly larger than its intrinsic activity free of mass transfer effect in the static liquid system. The structure of liposomes was highly shear-sensitive as elucidated on the basis of shear rate-dependent physical stability of liposomes and membrane permeability to 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein as well as to GO. Thus, the above shear-driven acceleration of GO reaction was indicated to be caused by the free GO molecules released from the structurally altered liposomes at high shear rates. Moreover, the shear-induced denaturation of free GO was completely depressed by the interaction with the sheared liposomes with the chaperone-like function. The shear-sensitive liposomal GO system can be a unique catalyst that continuously accelerates and also decelerates the oxidation reaction depending on the applied shear rate.

  17. DARPin-Based Crystallization Chaperones Exploit Molecular Geometry as a Screening Dimension in Protein Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batyuk, Alexander; Wu, Yufan; Honegger, Annemarie; Heberling, Matthew M; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-04-24

    DARPin libraries, based on a Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein consensus framework, are a rich source of binding partners for a wide variety of proteins. Their modular structure, stability, ease of in vitro selection and high production yields make DARPins an ideal starting point for further engineering. The X-ray structures of around 30 different DARPin complexes demonstrate their ability to facilitate crystallization of their target proteins by restricting flexibility and preventing undesired interactions of the target molecule. However, their small size (18 kDa), very hydrophilic surface and repetitive structure can limit the DARPins' ability to provide essential crystal contacts and their usefulness as a search model for addressing the crystallographic phase problem in molecular replacement. To optimize DARPins for their application as crystallization chaperones, rigid domain-domain fusions of the DARPins to larger proteins, proven to yield high-resolution crystal structures, were generated. These fusions were designed in such a way that they affect only one of the terminal capping repeats of the DARPin and do not interfere with residues involved in target binding, allowing to exchange at will the binding specificities of the DARPin in the fusion construct. As a proof of principle, we designed rigid fusions of a stabilized version of Escherichia coli TEM-1 β-lactamase to the C-terminal capping repeat of various DARPins in six different relative domain orientations. Five crystal structures representing four different fusion constructs, alone or in complex with the cognate target, show the predicted relative domain orientations and prove the validity of the concept.

  18. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of SrcA, a Multi-cargo Type III Secretion Chaperone in Salmonella Required for Pathogenic Association with a Host

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, C.; Zhang, K; Andres, S; Fnag, Y; Kaniuk, N; Hannemann, M; Brumell, J; Foster, L; Junop, M; Coombes, B

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2) is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2) and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  19. Structural and biochemical characterization of SrcA, a multi-cargo type III secretion chaperone in Salmonella required for pathogenic association with a host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Cooper

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2 is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 A revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2 and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  20. Improved 1, 2, 4-butanetriol production from an engineered Escherichia coli by co-expression of different chaperone proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinyao; He, Shuying; Zong, Hong; Song, Jian; Chen, Wen; Zhuge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    1, 2, 4-Butanetriol (BT) is a high-value non-natural chemical and has important applications in polymers, medical production and military industry. In the constructed BT biosynthesis pathway from xylose in Escherichia coli, the xylose dehydrogenase (Xdh) and the benzoylformate decarboxylase (MdlC) are heterologous enzymes and the activity of MdlC is the key limiting factor for BT production. In this study, six chaperone protein systems were introduced into the engineered E. coli harboring the recombinant BT pathway. The chaperone GroES-GroEL was beneficial to Xdh activity but had a negative effect on MdlC activity and BT titer. The plasmid pTf16 containing the tig gene (trigger factor) was beneficial to Xdh and MdlC activities and improved the BT titer from 0.42 to 0.56 g/l from 20 g/l xylose. However, co-expression of trigger factor and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced the activity of MdlC and had no effect on the BT production. The plasmid pKJE7 harboring dnaK-dnaJ-grpE showed significant negative effects on these enzyme activities and cell growth, leading to completely restrained the BT production. Similarly, co-expression of DnaKJ-GrpPE and GroES-GroEL simultaneously reduced Xdh and MdlC activities and decreased the BT titer by 45.2 %. The BT production of the engineered E. coli harboring pTf16 was further improved to the highest level at 1.01 g/l under pH control (pH 7). This work showed the potential application of chaperone proteins in microorganism engineering to get high production of target compounds as an effective and valuable tool.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Escherichia coli common pilus chaperone EcpB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, James A; Diallo, Mamou; Matthews, Steve J

    2015-06-01

    Pili are key cell-surface components that allow the attachment of bacteria to both biological and abiotic solid surfaces, whilst also mediating interactions between themselves. In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone-usher (CU) pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. The chaperone EcpB is involved in the biogenesis of the filament, which is composed of EcpA and EcpD. Initial attempts at crystallizing EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. Diffraction data have been processed to 2.4 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.65, c = 121.14 Å and one monomer in the asymmetric unit. Molecular replacement was unsuccessful, but selenomethionine-substituted protein and heavy-atom derivatives are being prepared for phasing. The three-dimensional structure of EcpB will provide invaluable information on the subtle mechanistic differences in biogenesis between the alternative and classical CU pathways. Furthermore, this is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones, and it could be implemented in similar systems where it has not been possible to obtain highly ordered crystals.

  2. The hydrophobic region of the DmsA twin-arginine leader peptide determines specificity with chaperone DmsD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstone, Tara M L; Tran, Vy A; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-10-29

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions.

  3. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47: minimal structural requirement and spatial molecular orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Asada, Shinichi; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-02-10

    The unique folding of procollagens in the endoplasmic reticulum is achieved with the assistance of procollagen-specific molecular chaperones. Heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone that plays an essential role in normal procollagen folding, although its molecular function has not yet been clarified. Recent advances in studies on the binding specificity of HSP47 have revealed that Arg residues at Yaa positions in collagenous Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats are critical for its interactions (Koide, T., Takahara, Y., Asada, S., and Nagata, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6178-6182; Tasab, M., Jenkinson, L., and Bulleid, N. J. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 35007-35012). In the present study, we further examined the client recognition mechanism of HSP47 by taking advantage of systems employing engineered collagen model peptides. First, in vitro binding studies using conformationally constrained collagen-like peptides revealed that HSP47 only recognized correctly folded triple helices and that the interaction with the corresponding single-chain polypeptides was negligible. Second, a binding study using heterotrimeric model clients for HSP47 demonstrated a minimal requirement for the number of Arg residues in the triple helix. Finally, a cross-linking study using photoreactive collagenous peptides provided information about the spatial orientation of an HSP47 molecule in the chaperone-collagen complex. The obtained results led to the development of a new model of HSP47-collagen complexes that differs completely from the previously proposed "flying capstan model" (Dafforn, T. R., Della, M., and Miller, A. D. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 49310-49319).

  4. A domain in the N-terminal part of Hsp26 is essential for chaperone function and oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Martin; Ignatiou, Athanasios; Saibil, Helen; Helmich, Sonja; Frenzl, Elke; Stromer, Thusnelda; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-10-15

    Small heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones which prevent the unspecific aggregation of non-native proteins. For Hsp26, a cytosolic sHsp from of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been shown that, at elevated temperatures, the 24 subunit complex dissociates into dimers. This dissociation is required for the efficient interaction with non-native proteins. Deletion analysis of the protein showed that the N-terminal half of Hsp26 (amino acid residues 1-95) is required for the assembly of the oligomer. Limited proteolysis in combination with mass spectrometry suggested that this region can be divided in two parts, an N-terminal segment including amino acid residues 1-30 and a second part ranging from residues 31-95. To analyze the structure and function of the N-terminal part of Hsp26 we created a deletion mutant lacking amino acid residues 1-30. We show that the oligomeric state and the structure, as determined by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy, corresponds to that of the Hsp26 wild-type protein. Furthermore, this truncated version of Hsp26 is active as a chaperone. However, in contrast to full length Hsp26, the truncated version dissociates at lower temperatures and complexes with non-native proteins are less stable than those found with wild-type Hsp26. Our results suggest that the N-terminal segment of Hsp26 is involved in both, oligomerization and chaperone function and that the second part of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 31-95) is essential for both functions.

  5. Expression levels of hsc70 and hsp60 are developmentally regulated during B-cell maturation and not associated to childhood c-ALL at presentation or relapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wehner, Peder Skov; Nielsen, Bendt; Hokland, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are potent regulators of apoptosis, and so they may also be involved in normal cellular differentiation and cancerogenesis. We used quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for determining whether either the constitutive chaperonic heat shock cognate protein 70 (hsc70)...

  6. Chemical chaperones improve transport and enhance stability of mutant alpha-glucosidases in glycogen storage disease type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Toshika; Kroos, Marian A; Vliet, Laura Van; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2007-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII; Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (AalphaGlu) deficiency and manifests predominantly as skeletal muscle weakness. Defects in post-translational modification and transport of mutant AalphaGlu species are frequently encountered and may potentially be corrected with chaperone-mediated therapy. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis by using deoxynojirimycin and derivatives as chemical chaperones to correct the AalphaGlu deficiency in cultured fibroblasts from patients with GSDII. Four mutant phenotypes were chosen: Y455F/Y455F, P545L/P545L, 525del/R600C and D645E/R854X. In case of Y455F/Y455F and P545L/P545L, N-(n-butyl)deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) restored the transport, maturation and activity of AalphaGlu in a dose dependent manner, while it had no effect on the reference enzyme beta-hexosaminidase. NB-DNJ promoted export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the lysosomes and stabilized the activity of mutant AalphaGlu species, Y455F and P545L, inside the lysosomes. In long-term culture, the AalphaGlu activity in the fibroblasts from the patients with mutant phenotypes, Y455F/Y455F and P545L/P545L, increased up to 14.0- and 7.9-fold, respectively, in the presence of 10mumol/L NB-DNJ. However, the effect of NB-DNJ on Y455F/Y455F subsided quickly after removal of the compound. We conclude that NB-DNJ acts in low concentration as chemical chaperone for certain mutant forms of AalphaGlu that are trapped in the ER, poorly transported or labile in the lysosomal environment. Chemical chaperone therapy could create new perspectives for therapeutic intervention in GSDII.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Escherichia coli common pilus chaperone EcpB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, James A.; Diallo, Mamou; Matthews, Steve J., E-mail: s.j.matthews@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-20

    In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone–usher pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. Initial attempts at crystallizing the chaperone EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. This is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones. Pili are key cell-surface components that allow the attachment of bacteria to both biological and abiotic solid surfaces, whilst also mediating interactions between themselves. In Escherichia coli, the common pilus (Ecp) belongs to an alternative chaperone–usher (CU) pathway that plays a major role in both early biofilm formation and host-cell adhesion. The chaperone EcpB is involved in the biogenesis of the filament, which is composed of EcpA and EcpD. Initial attempts at crystallizing EcpB using natively purified protein from the bacterial periplasm were not successful; however, after the isolation of EcpB under denaturing conditions and subsequent refolding, crystals were obtained at pH 8.0 using the sitting-drop method of vapour diffusion. Diffraction data have been processed to 2.4 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.65, c = 121.14 Å and one monomer in the asymmetric unit. Molecular replacement was unsuccessful, but selenomethionine-substituted protein and heavy-atom derivatives are being prepared for phasing. The three-dimensional structure of EcpB will provide invaluable information on the subtle mechanistic differences in biogenesis between the alternative and classical CU pathways. Furthermore, this is the first time that this refolding strategy has been used to purify CU chaperones, and it

  8. Heat Treatment of Small Heat Shock Proteins α-Crystallin and Hsp16.3: Structural Changes vs. Chaperone-like Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛启龙; 柯丹霞; 昌增益

    2001-01-01

    Both α-crystallin from bovine eye lens and Hsp16.3 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are members of the small heat shock protein family, They were preincubated at 100 C for 15 min and then cooled on ice immediately. The chaperone-like activities of preheated proteins were measured at 37 C using DTT-treated insulin B chains as substrates. Both preheated proteins exhibited greatly enhanced chaperone-like activities, accompanied with almost unchanged secondary structures and surface hydrophobicity but with a minor change in tertiary structures. The dramatically enhanced chaperone-like activities of preheated α-crystallln and Hsp16.3 may have resulted from the irreversible change in the tertiary structure as detected by near-UV CD spectra.

  9. Identification of an Allosteric Binding Site on Human Lysosomal Alpha-Galactosidase Opens the Way to New Pharmacological Chaperones for Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    den-Haan, Helena; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Del Prete, Rosita; Liguori, Ludovica; Cimmaruta, Chiara; Lukas, Jan; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Personalized therapies are required for Fabry disease due to its large phenotypic spectrum and numerous different genotypes. In principle, missense mutations that do not affect the active site could be rescued with pharmacological chaperones. At present pharmacological chaperones for Fabry disease bind the active site and couple a stabilizing effect, which is required, to an inhibitory effect, which is deleterious. By in silico docking we identified an allosteric hot-spot for ligand binding where a drug-like compound, 2,6-dithiopurine, binds preferentially. 2,6-dithiopurine stabilizes lysosomal alpha-galactosidase in vitro and rescues a mutant that is not responsive to a mono-therapy with previously described pharmacological chaperones, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin and galactose in a cell based assay. PMID:27788225

  10. A subset of the diverse COG0523 family of putative metal chaperones is linked to zinc homeostasis in all kingdoms of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merchant Sabeeha S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background COG0523 proteins are, like the nickel chaperones of the UreG family, part of the G3E family of GTPases linking them to metallocenter biosynthesis. Even though the first COG0523-encoding gene, cobW, was identified almost 20 years ago, little is known concerning the function of other members belonging to this ubiquitous family. Results Based on a combination of comparative genomics, literature and phylogenetic analyses and experimental validations, the COG0523 family can be separated into at least fifteen subgroups. The CobW subgroup involved in cobalamin synthesis represents only one small sub-fraction of the family. Another, larger subgroup, is suggested to play a predominant role in the response to zinc limitation based on the presence of the corresponding COG0523-encoding genes downstream from putative Zur binding sites in many bacterial genomes. Zur binding sites in these genomes are also associated with candidate zinc-independent paralogs of zinc-dependent enzymes. Finally, the potential role of COG0523 in zinc homeostasis is not limited to Bacteria. We have predicted a link between COG0523 and regulation by zinc in Archaea and show that two COG0523 genes are induced upon zinc depletion in a eukaryotic reference organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Conclusion This work lays the foundation for the pursuit by experimental methods of the specific role of COG0523 members in metal trafficking. Based on phylogeny and comparative genomics, both the metal specificity and the protein target(s might vary from one COG0523 subgroup to another. Additionally, Zur-dependent expression of COG0523 and putative paralogs of zinc-dependent proteins may represent a mechanism for hierarchal zinc distribution and zinc sparing in the face of inadequate zinc nutrition.

  11. Proteomic identification of calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin as a potential mediator for the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of fruit-derived glycoside amygdalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Yang, Chuanbin; Zhao, Jia; Tse, Hung Fat; Rong, Jianhui

    2015-02-01

    Amygdalin is a fruit-derived glycoside with the potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases. This study was designed to identify the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We initially demonstrated that amygdalin enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis and attenuated 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. To define protein targets for amygdalin, we selected a total of 11 mostly regulated protein spots from two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels for protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. We verified the effect of amygdalin on six representative proteins (i.e., calreticulin, Hsp90β, Grp94, 14-3-3η, 14-3-3ζ/δ and Rab GDI-α) for biological relevance to neuronal survival and differentiation. Calcium-binding chaperone calreticulin is of special interest for its activities to promote folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control of proteins that modulate cell survival and differentiation. We transiently knocked down calreticulin expression by specific siRNA and studied its effect on the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin. We found that amygdalin failed to enhance NGF-induced neuritogenesis in calreticulin-siRNA transfected cells. On the other hand, amygdalin rescued 6-OHDA-induced loss of calreticulin expression. We also found that amygdalin increased the intracellular calcium concentration possibly via inducing calreticulin. Collectively, our results demonstrated the role of calreticulin in mediating the neuroprotective and neuritogenic activities of amygdalin.

  12. Neuronopathic Gaucher disease: dysregulated mRNAs and miRNAs in brain pathogenesis and effects of pharmacologic chaperone treatment in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Nupur; Xu, You-Hai; Li, Ronghua; Peng, Yanyan; Pandey, Manoj K; Tinch, Stuart L; Liou, Benjamin; Inskeep, Venette; Zhang, Wujuan; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Keddache, Mehdi; Grabowski, Gregory A; Sun, Ying

    2015-12-15

    Defective lysosomal acid β-glucosidase (GCase) in Gaucher disease causes accumulation of glucosylceramide (GC) and glucosylsphingosine (GS) that distress cellular functions. To study novel pathological mechanisms in neuronopathic Gaucher disease (nGD), a mouse model (4L;C*), an analogue to subacute human nGD, was investigated for global profiles of differentially expressed brain mRNAs (DEGs) and miRNAs (DEmiRs). 4L;C* mice displayed accumulation of GC and GS, activated microglial cells, reduced number of neurons and aberrant mitochondrial function in the brain followed by deterioration in motor function. DEGs and DEmiRs were characterized from sequencing of mRNA and miRNA from cerebral cortex, brain stem, midbrain and cerebellum of 4L;C* mice. Gene ontology enrichment and pathway analysis showed preferential mitochondrial dysfunction in midbrain and uniform inflammatory response and identified novel pathways, axonal guidance signaling, synaptic transmission, eIF2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling potentially involved in nGD. Similar analyses were performed with mice treated with isofagomine (IFG), a pharmacologic chaperone for GCase. IFG treatment did not alter the GS and GC accumulation significantly but attenuated the progression of the disease and altered numerous DEmiRs and target DEGs to their respective normal levels in inflammation, mitochondrial function and axonal guidance pathways, suggesting its regulation on miRNA and the associated mRNA that underlie the neurodegeneration in nGD. These analyses demonstrate that the neurodegenerative phenotype in 4L;C* mice was associated with dysregulation of brain mRNAs and miRNAs in axonal guidance, synaptic plasticity, mitochondria function, eIF2 and mTOR signaling and inflammation and provides new insights for the nGD pathological mechanism.

  13. Determinants for simultaneous binding of copper and platinum to human chaperone Atox1: hitchhiking not hijacking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Palm-Espling

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is an anticancer agent that has been used for decades to treat a variety of cancers. CisPt treatment causes many side effects due to interactions with proteins that detoxify the drug before reaching the DNA. One key player in CisPt resistance is the cellular copper-transport system involving the uptake protein Ctr1, the cytoplasmic chaperone Atox1 and the secretory path ATP7A/B proteins. CisPt has been shown to bind to ATP7B, resulting in vesicle sequestering of the drug. In addition, we and others showed that the apo-form of Atox1 could interact with CisPt in vitro and in vivo. Since the function of Atox1 is to transport copper (Cu ions, it is important to assess how CisPt binding depends on Cu-loading of Atox1. Surprisingly, we recently found that CisPt interacted with Cu-loaded Atox1 in vitro at a position near the Cu site such that unique spectroscopic features appeared. Here, we identify the binding site for CisPt in the Cu-loaded form of Atox1 using strategic variants and a combination of spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. We directly prove that both metals can bind simultaneously and that the unique spectroscopic signals originate from an Atox1 monomer species. Both Cys in the Cu-site (Cys12, Cys15 are needed to form the di-metal complex, but not Cys41. Removing Met10 in the conserved metal-binding motif makes the loop more floppy and, despite metal binding, there are no metal-metal electronic transitions. In silico geometry minimizations provide an energetically favorable model of a tentative ternary Cu-Pt-Atox1 complex. Finally, we demonstrate that Atox1 can deliver CisPt to the fourth metal binding domain 4 of ATP7B (WD4, indicative of a possible drug detoxification mechanism.

  14. GroEL to DnaK chaperone network behind the stability modulation of σ(32) at physiological temperature in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Monobesh; Roy, Sourav Singha; Dasgupta, Rakhi; Basu, Tarakdas

    2015-12-21

    The stability of heat-shock transcription factor σ(32) in Escherichia coli has long been known to be modulated only by its own transcribed chaperone DnaK. Very few reports suggest a role for another heat-shock chaperone, GroEL, for maintenance of cellular σ(32) level. The present study demonstrates in vivo physical association between GroEL and σ(32) in E. coli at physiological temperature. This study further reveals that neither DnaK nor GroEL singly can modulate σ(32) stability in vivo; there is an ordered network between them, where GroEL acts upstream of DnaK.

  15. Munc18-1 is a molecular chaperone for α-synuclein, controlling its self-replicating aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ye Jin; Sierecki, Emma; Tomatis, Vanesa M; Gormal, Rachel S; Giles, Nichole; Morrow, Isabel C; Xia, Di; Götz, Jürgen; Parton, Robert G; Collins, Brett M; Gambin, Yann; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2016-09-12

    Munc18-1 is a key component of the exocytic machinery that controls neurotransmitter release. Munc18-1 heterozygous mutations cause developmental defects and epileptic phenotypes, including infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), suggestive of a gain of pathological function. Here, we used single-molecule analysis, gene-edited cells, and neurons to demonstrate that Munc18-1 EIEE-causing mutants form large polymers that coaggregate wild-type Munc18-1 in vitro and in cells. Surprisingly, Munc18-1 EIEE mutants also form Lewy body-like structures that contain α-synuclein (α-Syn). We reveal that Munc18-1 binds α-Syn, and its EIEE mutants coaggregate α-Syn. Likewise, removal of endogenous Munc18-1 increases the aggregative propensity of α-Syn(WT) and that of the Parkinson's disease-causing α-Syn(A30P) mutant, an effect rescued by Munc18-1(WT) expression, indicative of chaperone activity. Coexpression of the α-Syn(A30P) mutant with Munc18-1 reduced the number of α-Syn(A30P) aggregates. Munc18-1 mutations and haploinsufficiency may therefore trigger a pathogenic gain of function through both the corruption of native Munc18-1 and a perturbed chaperone activity for α-Syn leading to aggregation-induced neurodegeneration.

  16. A cypovirus VP5 displays the RNA chaperone-like activity that destabilizes RNA helices and accelerates strand annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Cheng, Zhenyun; Zhang, Songliu; Xiong, Wei; Xia, Hongjie; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Wu, Feige; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Yin, Lei; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-02-01

    For double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses in the family Reoviridae, their inner capsids function as the machinery for viral RNA (vRNA) replication. Unlike other multishelled reoviruses, cypovirus has a single-layered capsid, thereby representing a simplified model for studying vRNA replication of reoviruses. VP5 is one of the three major cypovirus capsid proteins and functions as a clamp protein to stabilize cypovirus capsid. Here, we expressed VP5 from type 5 Helicoverpa armigera cypovirus (HaCPV-5) in a eukaryotic system and determined that this VP5 possesses RNA chaperone-like activity, which destabilizes RNA helices and accelerates strand annealing independent of ATP. Our further characterization of VP5 revealed that its helix-destabilizing activity is RNA specific, lacks directionality and could be inhibited by divalent ions, such as Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+) or Zn(2+), to varying degrees. Furthermore, we found that HaCPV-5 VP5 facilitates the replication initiation of an alternative polymerase (i.e. reverse transcriptase) through a panhandle-structured RNA template, which mimics the 5'-3' cyclization of cypoviral positive-stranded RNA. Given that the replication of negative-stranded vRNA on the positive-stranded vRNA template necessitates the dissociation of the 5'-3' panhandle, the RNA chaperone activity of VP5 may play a direct role in the initiation of reoviral dsRNA synthesis.

  17. DNA and heparin chaperone the refolding of purified recombinant replication protein A subunit 1 from Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, C B B; Gui, K E; Perez, A M; da Silveira, R C V; Gava, L M; Ramos, C H I; Cano, M I N

    2009-02-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has been implicated in DNA metabolism and telomere maintenance. Subunit 1 of RPA from Leishmania amazonensis (LaRPA-1) has previously been affinity-purified on a column containing a G-rich telomeric DNA. LaRPA-1 binds and co-localizes with parasite telomeres in vivo. Here we describe the purification and characterization of native recombinant LaRPA-1 (rLaRPA-1). The protein was initially re-solubilized from inclusion bodies by using urea. After dialysis, rLaRPA-1 was soluble but contaminated with DNA, which was removed by an anion-exchange chromatography of the protein solubilized in urea. However, rLaRPA-1 precipitated after dialysis to remove urea. To investigate whether the contaminating DNA was involved in chaperoning the refolding of rLaRPA-1, salmon sperm DNA or heparin was added to the solution before dialysis. The addition of either of these substances prevented the precipitation of rLaRPA-1. The resulting rLaRPA-1 was soluble, correctly folded, and able to bind telomeric DNA. This is the first report showing the characterization of rLaRPA1 and of the importance of additives in chaperoning the refolding of this protein. The availability of rLaRPA-1 should be helpful in assessing the importance of this protein as a potential drug target.

  18. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups fo...

  19. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  20. Mimicking the action of folding chaperones by Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations : Application in the refinement of de novo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Hao; Periole, Xavier; Mark, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of using a variant of Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (Chaperone H-replica-exchange molecular dynamics [CH-REMD]) for the refinement of protein structural models generated de novo is investigated. In CH-REMD, the interaction between the protein and its environment, spe

  1. Gene cloning and sequence analysis of the cold-adapted chaperones DnaK and DnaJ from deep-sea psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913 is a phychrotrophic bacterium isolated from the deep-sea sediment. The genes encoding chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 were cloned by normal PCR and TAIL-PCR (GenBank accession Nos DQ640312, DQ504163). The chaperones DnaJ and DnaK from the strain SM9913 contain such conserved domains as those of many other bacteria, and show some cold-adapted characteristics in their structures when compared with those from psychro-, meso-and themophilic bacteria. It is indicated that chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 may be adapted to low temperature in deep-sea and function well in assisting folding, assembling and translocation of proteins at low temperature. This research lays a foundation for the further study on the cold-adapted mechanism of chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of cold-adapted microorganisms.

  2. Importance of electrostatic interactions in the association of intrinsically disordered histone chaperone Chz1 and histone H2A.Z-H2B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    Full Text Available Histone chaperones facilitate assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Understanding the process of how histone chaperones associate and dissociate from the histones can help clarify their roles in chromosome metabolism. Some histone chaperones are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs. Recent studies of IDPs revealed that the recognition of the biomolecules is realized by the flexibility and dynamics, challenging the century-old structure-function paradigm. Here we investigate the binding between intrinsically disordered chaperone Chz1 and histone variant H2A.Z-H2B by developing a structure-based coarse-grained model, in which Debye-Hückel model is implemented for describing electrostatic interactions due to highly charged characteristic of Chz1 and H2A.Z-H2B. We find that major structural changes of Chz1 only occur after the rate-limiting electrostatic dominant transition state and Chz1 undergoes folding coupled binding through two parallel pathways. Interestingly, although the electrostatic interactions stabilize bound complex and facilitate the recognition at first stage, the rate for formation of the complex is not always accelerated due to slow escape of conformations with non-native electrostatic interactions at low salt concentrations. Our studies provide an ionic-strength-controlled binding/folding mechanism, leading to a cooperative mechanism of "local collapse or trapping" and "fly-casting" together and a new understanding of the roles of electrostatic interactions in IDPs' binding.

  3. Analysis of the role of the gene bipA, encoding the major endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein in the secretion of homologous and heterologous proteins in black Aspergilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Gemeren, I.A. van; Drint-Kuijvenhoven, J.; Hessing, J.G.M.; Muijlwijk van - Harteveld, G.M.; Beijersbergen, A.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    1998-01-01

    The function of the endoplasmic-reticulum-localized chaperone binding protein (BiP) in relation to protein secretion in filamentous fungi was studied. It was shown that the overproduction of several homologous and heterologous recombinant proteins by Aspergillus strains induces the expression of bip

  4. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Jens Jacob; Nielsen, Marit Nyholm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Georgopoulos, Costa; Ang, Debbie; Lundemose, Jytte Banner; Niezen-Koning, Klary; Eiberg, Hans; Yang, Huanming; Kolvraa, Steen; Bolund, Lars; Gregersen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups for v

  5. Isolation of a Latimeria menadoensis heat shock protein 70 (Lmhsp70) that has all the features of an inducible gene and encodes a functional molecular chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modisakeng, Keoagile W; Jiwaji, Meesbah; Pesce, Eva-Rachele; Robert, Jacques; Amemiya, Chris T; Dorrington, Rosemary A; Blatch, Gregory L

    2009-08-01

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the correct folding of other proteins, and heat shock proteins form one of the major classes of molecular chaperones. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been extensively studied, and shown to be critically important for cellular protein homeostasis in almost all prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems studied to date. Since there have been very limited studies conducted on coelacanth chaperones, the main objective of this study was to genetically and biochemically characterize a coelacanth Hsp70. We have successfully isolated an Indonesian coelacanth (L. menadoensis) hsp70 gene, Lmhsp70, and found that it contained an intronless coding region and a potential upstream regulatory region. Lmhsp70 encoded a typical Hsp70 based on conserved structural and functional features, and the predicted upstream regulatory region was found to contain six potential promoter elements, and three potential heat shock elements (HSEs). The intronless nature of the coding region and the presence of HSEs suggested that Lmhsp70 was stress-inducible. Phylogenetic analyses provided further evidence that Lmhsp70 was probably inducible, and that it branched as a clade intermediate between bony fish and tetrapods. Recombinant LmHsp70 was successfully overproduced, purified and found to be functional using ATPase activity assays. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the first time that the coelacanth encodes a functional molecular chaperone system.

  6. Structure of Human J-type Co-chaperone HscB Reveals a Tetracysteine Metal-binding Domain*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Bittova, Lenka; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N.

    2008-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins play indispensable roles in a broad range of biochemical processes. The biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins is a complex process that has become a subject of extensive research. The final step of iron-sulfur protein assembly involves transfer of an iron-sulfur cluster from a cluster-donor to a cluster-acceptor protein. This process is facilitated by a specialized chaperone system, which consists of a molecular chaperone from the Hsc70 family and a co-chaperone of the J-domain family. The 3.0Å crystal structure of a human mitochondrial J-type co-chaperone HscB revealed an L-shaped protein that resembles Escherichia coli HscB. The important difference between the two homologs is the presence of an auxiliary metal-binding domain at the N terminus of human HscB that coordinates a metal via the tetracysteine consensus motif CWXCX9–13FCXXCXXXQ. The domain is found in HscB homologs from animals and plants as well as in magnetotactic bacteria. The metal-binding site of the domain is structurally similar to that of rubredoxin and several zinc finger proteins containing rubredoxin-like knuckles. The normal mode analysis of HscB revealed that this L-shaped protein preferentially undergoes a scissors-like motion that correlates well with the conformational changes of human HscB observed in the crystals. PMID:18713742

  7. Cataract-causing defect of a mutant γ-crystallin proceeds through an aggregation pathway which bypasses recognition by the α-crystallin chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L Moreau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transparency of the eye lens depends upon maintenance of the native state of the γ- and β-crystallins, which is aided by the abundant chaperones αA- and αB-crystallin. Mature onset cataract, the leading cause of blindness worldwide, involves the polymerization of covalently damaged or partially unfolded crystallins into light-scattering aggregates. A number of single amino acid substitutions and truncations of γ-crystallins result in congenital cataract in both humans and mice, though in many cases the coupling between the protein alterations and the accumulation of aggregates is poorly defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have studied the aggregation properties and chaperone interactions of human γD-crystallin carrying substitutions of two buried core mutants, I90F and V75D, which cause congenital cataract in mice. The in vitro aggregation pathway competing with productive refolding was not altered by either substitution. Furthermore, this aggregation pathway for both mutant proteins--originating from a partially folded intermediate--was efficiently suppressed by αB-crystallin. Thus the cataract pathology was unlikely to be associated with a direct folding defect. The native state of wild-type human γD-crystallin exhibited no tendency to aggregate under physiological conditions. However both I90F and V75D native-like proteins exhibited slow (days aggregation to high molecular weight aggregates under physiological conditions. The perturbed conformation of I90F was recognized and bound by both αA and αB chaperones. In contrast, the aggregation derived from the perturbed state of V75D was not suppressed by either chaperone, and the aggregating species were not bound by the chaperone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The cataract phenotype of I90F in mice may be due to premature saturation of the finite α- crystallin pool. The V75D aggregation pathway and its escape from chaperone surveillance and aggregation suppression

  8. The Periplasmic Chaperone Network of Campylobacter jejuni: Evidence that SalC (Cj1289) and PpiD (Cj0694) Are Involved in Maintaining Outer Membrane Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Aidan J.; Zakai, Shadi A. I.; Kelly, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria is a key structure in host–pathogen interactions that contains a plethora of proteins, performing a range of functions including adhesion, nutrient uptake, export of effectors and interaction with innate and adaptive components of the immune system. In addition, the OM can exclude drugs and thus contribute to antimicrobial resistance. The OM of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contains porins, adhesins and other virulence factors that must be specifically localized to this membrane, but the protein sorting mechanisms involved are only partially understood. In particular, chaperones are required to ferry OM proteins across the periplasm after they emerge from the Sec translocation system. The SurA-related chaperone PEB4 (Cj0596) is the only protein with a proven role in OM biogenesis and integrity in C. jejuni. In this work, we have constructed a set of isogenic deletion mutants in genes encoding both known and predicted chaperones (cj0596, cj0694, cj1069, cj1228c, and cj1289) using NCTC 11168H as the parental strain. These mutants were characterized using a range of assays to determine effects on growth, agglutination, biofilm formation, membrane permeability and hydrophobicity. We focused on Cj1289 and Cj0694, which our previous work suggested possessed both chaperone and peptidyl-proyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) domains. Mutants in either cj1289 or cj0694 showed growth defects, increased motility, agglutination and biofilm formation and severe OM permeability defects as measured by a lysozyme accessibility assay, that were comparable to those exhibited by the isogenic peb4 mutant. 2D-gel comparisons showed a general decrease in OM proteins in these mutants. We heterologously overproduced and purified Cj0694 and obtained evidence that this protein was an active PPIase, as judged by its acceleration of the refolding rate of reduced and alkylated ribonuclease T1 and that it also possessed

  9. Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-z, an Hsp110 homologue, exhibits independent chaperone activity and interacts with Hsp70-1 in a nucleotide-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zininga, Tawanda; Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Hoppe, Heinrich; Prinsloo, Earl; Dirr, Heini W; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-05-01

    The role of molecular chaperones, among them heat shock proteins (Hsps), in the development of malaria parasites has been well documented. Hsp70s are molecular chaperones that facilitate protein folding. Hsp70 proteins are composed of an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD), which confers them with ATPase activity and a C-terminal substrate binding domain (SBD). In the ADP-bound state, Hsp70 possesses high affinity for substrate and releases the folded substrate when it is bound to ATP. The two domains are connected by a conserved linker segment. Hsp110 proteins possess an extended lid segment, a feature that distinguishes them from canonical Hsp70s. Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70-z (PfHsp70-z) is a member of the Hsp110 family of Hsp70-like proteins. PfHsp70-z is essential for survival of malaria parasites and is thought to play an important role as a molecular chaperone and nucleotide exchange factor of its cytosolic canonical Hsp70 counterpart, PfHsp70-1. Unlike PfHsp70-1 whose functions are fairly well established, the structure-function features of PfHsp70-z remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we established that PfHsp70-z possesses independent chaperone activity. In fact, PfHsp70-z appears to be marginally more effective in suppressing protein aggregation than its cytosol-localized partner, PfHsp70-1. Furthermore, based on coimmunoaffinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analyses, PfHsp70-z associated with PfHsp70-1 in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Our findings suggest that besides serving as a molecular chaperone, PfHsp70-z could facilitate the nucleotide exchange function of PfHsp70-1. These dual functions explain why it is essential for parasite survival.

  10. Hydroimidazolone modification of the conserved Arg12 in small heat shock proteins: studies on the structure and chaperone function using mutant mimics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram H Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal (MGO is an α-dicarbonyl compound present ubiquitously in the human body. MGO reacts with arginine residues in proteins and forms adducts such as hydroimidazolone and argpyrimidine in vivo. Previously, we showed that MGO-mediated modification of αA-crystallin increased its chaperone function. We identified MGO-modified arginine residues in αA-crystallin and found that replacing such arginine residues with alanine residues mimicked the effects of MGO on the chaperone function. Arginine 12 (R12 is a conserved amino acid residue in Hsp27 as well as αA- and αB-crystallin. When treated with MGO at or near physiological concentrations (2-10 µM, R12 was modified to hydroimidazolone in all three small heat shock proteins. In this study, we determined the effect of arginine substitution with alanine at position 12 (R12A to mimic MGO modification on the structure and chaperone function of these proteins. Among the three proteins, the R12A mutation improved the chaperone function of only αA-crystallin. This enhancement in the chaperone function was accompanied by subtle changes in the tertiary structure, which increased the thermodynamic stability of αA-crystallin. This mutation induced the exposure of additional client protein binding sites on αA-crystallin. Altogether, our data suggest that MGO-modification of the conserved R12 in αA-crystallin to hydroimidazolone may play an important role in reducing protein aggregation in the lens during aging and cataract formation.

  11. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  12. Exploring geometric properties of gold nanoparticles using TEM images to explain their chaperone like activity for citrate synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Vikas; Lahiri, Tapobrata; Singha, Shantiswaroop; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Kumar, Upendra; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Study on geometric properties of nanoparticles and their relation with biomolecular activities, especially protein is quite a new field to explore. This work was carried out towards this direction where images of gold nanoparticles obtained from transmission electron microscopy were processed to extract their size and area profile at different experimental conditions including and excluding a protein, citrate synthase. Since the images were ill-posed, texture of a context-window for each pixel was used as input to a back-propagation network architecture to obtain decision on its membership as nanoparticle. The segmented images were further analysed by k-means clustering to derive geometric properties of individual nanoparticles even from their assembled form. The extracted geometric information was found to be crucial to give a model featuring porous cage like configuration of nanoparticle assembly using which the chaperone like activity of gold nanoparticles can be explained. PMID:22355230

  13. Gene cloning and soluble expression of Aspergillus niger phytase in E. coli cytosol via chaperone co-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushasree, Mrudula Vasudevan; Vidya, Jalaja; Pandey, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    A phytase gene from Aspergillus niger was isolated and two Escherichia coli expression systems, based on T7 RNA polymerase promoter and tac promoter, were used for its recombinant expression. Co-expression of molecular chaperone, GroES/EL, aided functional cytosolic expression of the phytase in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Untagged and maltose-binding protein-tagged recombinant phytase showed an activity band of ~49 and 92 kDa, respectively, on a zymogram. Heterologously-expressed phytase was fractionated from endogenous E. coli phytase by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. The enzyme had optimum activity at 50 °C and pH 6.5.

  14. Complex formation of CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystal vs. molecular chaperone in aqueous solution by hydrophobic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Hiromi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)]. E-mail: horihiro@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Iwami, Noriya [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tachibana, Fumi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Iizuka, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Zako, Tamotsu [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN - Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oda, Masaru [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yohda, Masafumi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tani, Toshiro [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Strategic Research Initiative for Future Nano-Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    Feasibilities to stabilize CdSe/ZnS/trioctylphosphineoxide (TOPO) nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) in aqueous solutions with prefoldin macromolecules in their bioactive states are reported. Prefoldin is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of the group II chaperonins. As a protein folding intermediate is captured within its central cavity, so CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs would also be included within this cavity. It is also found the QDs can be much more dispersed in aqueous solutions and suspended for certain period of time by adding trace amount of t-butanol in the buffer prior to the mixing of the QDs mother solution. While biochemical procedures are evaluated with ordinary fluorescence measurements, possible complex formations are also evaluated with TIRFM single-molecule detection techniques.

  15. Induction and adaptation of chaperone-assisted selective autophagy CASA in response to resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Anna; Gehlert, Sebastian; Leciejewski, Barbara; Schiffer, Thorsten; Bloch, Wilhelm; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA) is a tension-induced degradation pathway essential for muscle maintenance. Impairment of CASA causes childhood muscle dystrophy and cardiomyopathy. However, the importance of CASA for muscle function in healthy individuals has remained elusive so far. Here we describe the impact of strength training on CASA in a group of healthy and moderately trained men. We show that strenuous resistance exercise causes an acute induction of CASA in affected muscles to degrade mechanically damaged cytoskeleton proteins. Moreover, repeated resistance exercise during 4 wk of training led to an increased expression of CASA components. In human skeletal muscle, CASA apparently acts as a central adaptation mechanism that responds to acute physical exercise and to repeated mechanical stimulation.

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of the molecular chaperone prefoldin from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yoshiki; Kida, Hiroshi; Nishitani, Yuichi; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    Proper protein folding is an essential process for all organisms. Prefoldin (PFD) is a molecular chaperone that assists protein folding by delivering non-native proteins to group II chaperonin. A heterohexamer of eukaryotic PFD has been shown to specifically recognize and deliver non-native actin and tubulin to chaperonin-containing TCP-1 (CCT), but the mechanism of specific recognition is still unclear. To determine its crystal structure, recombinant human PFD was reconstituted, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 4.7 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 123.2, b = 152.4, c = 105.9 Å.

  17. Structural insights into yeast histone chaperone Hif1: a scaffold protein recruiting protein complexes to core histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hejun; Zhang, Mengying; He, Wei; Zhu, Zhongliang; Teng, Maikun; Gao, Yongxiang; Niu, Liwen

    2014-09-15

    Yeast Hif1 [Hat1 (histone acetyltransferase 1)-interacting factor], a homologue of human NASP (nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein), is a histone chaperone that is involved in various protein complexes which modify histones during telomeric silencing and chromatin reassembly. For elucidating the structural basis of Hif1, in the present paper we demonstrate the crystal structure of Hif1 consisting of a superhelixed TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain and an extended acid loop covering the rear of TPR domain, which represent typical characteristics of SHNi-TPR [Sim3 (start independent of mitosis 3)-Hif1-NASP interrupted TPR] proteins. Our binding assay indicates that Hif1 could bind to the histone octamer via histones H3 and H4. The acid loop is shown to be crucial for the binding of histones and may also change the conformation of the TPR groove. By binding to the core histone complex Hif1 may recruit functional protein complexes to modify histones during chromatin reassembly.

  18. Depletion of the histone chaperone tNASP inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3 cells

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    Tsuruta James K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NASP (Nuclear Autoantigenic Sperm Protein is a histone chaperone that is present in all dividing cells. NASP has two splice variants: tNASP and sNASP. Only cancer, germ, transformed, and embryonic cells have a high level of expression of the tNASP splice variant. We examined the consequences of tNASP depletion for prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Methods tNASP was depleted from prostate cancer PC-3 cells, cervical cancer HeLa cells, and prostate epithelial PWR-1E cells using lentivirus expression of tNASP shRNA. Cell cycle changes were studied by proliferation assay with CFSE labeling and double thymidine synchronization. Gene expression profiles were detected using RT2Profiler PCR Array, Western and Northern blotting. Results PC-3 and HeLa cells showed inhibited proliferation, increased levels of cyclin-dependant kinase inhibitor p21 protein and apoptosis, whereas non-tumorigenic PWR-1E cells did not. All three cell types showed decreased levels of HSPA2. Supporting in vitro experiments demonstrated that tNASP, but not sNASP is required for activation of HSPA2. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that PC-3 and HeLa cancer cells require tNASP to maintain high levels of HSPA2 activity and therefore viability, while PWR-1E cells are unaffected by tNASP depletion. These different cellular responses most likely arise from changes in the interaction between tNASP and HSPA2 and disturbed tNASP chaperoning of linker histones. This study has demonstrated that tNASP is critical for the survival of prostate cancer cells and suggests that targeting tNASP expression can lead to a new approach for prostate cancer treatment.

  19. Progressive aggregation despite chaperone associations of a mutant SOD1-YFP in transgenic mice that develop ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiou; Farr, George W; Zeiss, Caroline J; Rodriguez-Gil, Diego J; Wilson, Jean H; Furtak, Krystyna; Rutkowski, D Thomas; Kaufman, Randal J; Ruse, Cristian I; Yates, John R; Perrin, Steve; Feany, Mel B; Horwich, Arthur L

    2009-02-03

    Recent studies suggest that superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1)-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis results from destabilization and misfolding of mutant forms of this abundant cytosolic enzyme. Here, we have tracked the expression and fate of a misfolding-prone human SOD1, G85R, fused to YFP, in a line of transgenic G85R SOD1-YFP mice. These mice, but not wild-type human SOD1-YFP transgenics, developed lethal paralyzing motor symptoms at 9 months. In situ RNA hybridization of spinal cords revealed predominant expression in motor neurons in spinal cord gray matter in all transgenic animals. Concordantly, G85R SOD-YFP was diffusely fluorescent in motor neurons of animals at 1 and 6 months of age, but at the time of symptoms, punctate aggregates were observed in cell bodies and processes. Biochemical analyses of spinal cord soluble extracts indicated that G85R SOD-YFP behaved as a misfolded monomer at all ages. It became progressively insoluble at 6 and 9 months of age, associated with presence of soluble oligomers observable by gel filtration. Immunoaffinity capture and mass spectrometry revealed association of G85R SOD-YFP, but not WT SOD-YFP, with the cytosolic chaperone Hsc70 at all ages. In addition, 3 Hsp110's, nucleotide exchange factors for Hsp70s, were captured at 6 and 9 months. Despite such chaperone interactions, G85R SOD-YFP formed insoluble inclusions at late times, containing predominantly intermediate filament proteins. We conclude that motor neurons, initially "compensated" to maintain the misfolded protein in a soluble state, become progressively unable to do so.

  20. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: emerging links between cardiovascular disease and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although it is known that the central nervous system (CNS) contributes to this relationship, the detailed mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperone sigma-1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of CVD and depression. Several meta-analysis studies have showed that levels of BDNF in the blood of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are lower than normal controls, indicating that blood BDNF might be a biomarker for depression. Furthermore, blood levels of BDNF in patients with CVD are also lower than normal controls. A recent study using conditional BDNF knock-out mice in animal models of myocardial infarction highlighted the role of CNS-mediated mechanisms in the cardioprotective effects of BDNF. In addition, a recent study shows that decreased levels of sigma-1 receptor in the mouse brain contribute to the association between heart failure and depression. Moreover, sigma-1 receptor agonists, including the endogenous neurosteroid dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine, show potent cardioprotective and antidepressive effects in rodents, via sigma-1 receptor stimulation. Interestingly, agonist activation of sigma-1 receptors increased the secretion of mature BDNF from its precursor proBDNF via chaperone activity in the ER. Given the role of ER stress in the pathophysiology of CVD and MDD, the author will discuss the potential link between sigma-1 receptors and BDNF-TrkB pathway in the pathophysiology of these two diseases. Finally, the author will make a case for potent sigma-1 receptor agonists and TrkB agonists as new potential therapeutic drugs for depressive patients with CVD.

  1. Selective chaperone effect of aminocyclitol derivatives on G202R and other mutant glucocerebrosidases causing Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Díaz, Lucía; Guitiérrez-de Terán, Hugo; Sánchez-Ollé, Gessamí; Bujons, Jordi; Michelakakis, Helen; Mavridou, Irene; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Delgado, Antonio; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Casas, Josefina

    2014-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder characterized by the accumulation of glucosylceramide as a result of a deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Several competitive glucocerebrosidase inhibitors are able to act as pharmacological chaperones for an efficient rescue of the mutated, misfolded forms of the enzyme. Along this line, we report in this work on the ability of several aminocyclitols to increase the residual glucocerebrosidase activity in patient fibroblasts with different genotypes. Some of the compounds were slightly active on fibroblasts bearing some mutations, including the highly prevalent N370S mutation. All compounds were highly active as enzyme activity enhancers on fibroblasts from Gaucher disease patients containing the G202R mutation. Moreover, using the novel tagged sphingolipid ω-azidosphingosine, a reduction in the tagged glucosylceramide accumulation was also observed for selected aminocyclitols. Attempts to explain the activity impairment observed in glucocerebrosidase bearing the G202R mutation by comparative molecular dynamic studies on wild type and the G202R mutated proteins (free and isofagomine-bound, in both cases) were unsuccessful. Under the simulation conditions used, no clear effect of the G202R mutation neither over the global structure of the protein nor on the loops that constitute the glucocerebrosidase active site was observed. Since the G202R residue is located on the protein surface, altered protein-membrane or protein-protein interactions could account for the observed differences. In conclusion, we have tested novel compounds that have shown some chaperone effect on particular glucocerebrosidase mutant enzymes, supporting the enhancement therapy as an alternative approach for Gaucher disease.

  2. Myopathy in Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome links endoplasmic reticulum chaperone dysfunction to nuclear envelope pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Andreas; Buchkremer, Stephan; Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Labisch, Thomas; Gatz, Christian; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Brauers, Eva; Nolte, Kay; Schröder, J Michael; Kirschner, Janbernd; Jesse, Christopher Marvin; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Goswami, Anand; Zimmermann, Richard; Zahedi, René Peiman; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) features cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, cataracts, and progressive vacuolar myopathy with peculiar myonuclear alterations. Most MSS patients carry homozygous or compound heterozygous SIL1 mutations. SIL1 is a nucleotide exchange factor for the endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperone BiP which controls a plethora of essential processes in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study we made use of the spontaneous Sil1 mouse mutant woozy to explore pathomechanisms leading to Sil1 deficiency-related skeletal muscle pathology. We found severe, progressive myopathy characterized by alterations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, mitochondrial changes, and prominent myonuclear pathology including nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina alterations. These abnormalities were remarkably similar to the myopathy in human patients with MSS. In particular, the presence of perinuclear membranous structures which have been reported as an ultrastructural hallmark of MSS-related myopathy could be confirmed in woozy muscles. We found that these structures are derived from the nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina and associate with proliferations of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In line with impaired function of BiP secondary to loss of its nucleotide exchange factor Sil1, we observed activation of the unfolded protein response and the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation-pathway. Despite initiation of the autophagy-lysosomal system, autophagic clearance was found ineffective which is in agreement with the formation of autophagic vacuoles. This report identifies woozy muscle as a faithful phenocopy of the MSS myopathy. Moreover, we provide a link between two well-established disease mechanisms in skeletal muscle, dysfunction of chaperones and nuclear envelope pathology.

  3. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  4. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  5. From flexibility to function: Molecular dynamics simulations of conformational changes in chaperones and photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singhal, K.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are uniquely-shaped macromolecules that function as biological machines, and regulate a living cell’s behavior. Crucial to protein function is the folding of the polypeptide chain into a unique well-defined three-dimensional conformation. In complex cell environments, the spontaneous unassi

  6. The Co-chaperone BAG2 Mediates Cold-Induced Accumulation of Phosphorylated Tau in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Cesar Augusto Dias; Santiago, Fernando Enrique; de Oliveira, Adriele Silva Alves; Oliveira, Fernando Augusto; Almeida, Maria Camila; Carrettiero, Daniel Carneiro

    2016-05-01

    Inclusions of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) are a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders classified as "tauopathy," of which Alzheimer's disease is the most prevalent form. Dysregulation of tau phosphorylation disrupts neuron structure and function, and hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates to form neurotoxic inclusions. The abundance of ubiquitin in tau inclusions suggests a defect in ubiquitin-mediated tau protein degradation by the proteasome. Under the temperature of 37 °C, the co-chaperone BAG2 protein targets phosphorylated tau for degradation via by a more-efficient, ubiquitin-independent pathway. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, cold exposure induces the accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. The SH-SY5Y cell line differentiates into neuron-like cells on treatment with retinoic acid and is an established model for research on the effects of cold on tau phosphorylation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BAG2 mediates the cold-induced accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. Our findings show that cold exposure causes a decrease in BAG2 expression in undifferentiated cells. Conversely, BAG2 expression is increased in differentiated cells exposed to cold. Further, undifferentiated cells exposed to cold had an increased proportion of p-tau to total tau, suggesting an accumulation of p-tau that is consistent with decreased levels of BAG2. Overexpression of BAG2 in cold-exposed undifferentiated cells restored levels of p-tau to those of 37 °C undifferentiated control. Interestingly, although BAG2 expression increased in differentiated cells, this increase was not accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of p-tau to total tau. Further, overexpression of BAG2 in cold exposed differentiated cells showed no significant difference in p-tau levels compared to 37 °C controls. Taken together, these data show that expression of BAG2 is differently regulated in a differentiation-dependent context. Our results suggest that

  7. One out of four: HspL but no other small heat shock protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens acts as efficient virulence-promoting VirB8 chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Long Tsai

    Full Text Available Alpha-crystallin-type small heat shock proteins (sHsps are ubiquitously distributed in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Four sHsp genes named hspL, hspC, hspAT1, and hspAT2 were identified in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a plant pathogenic bacterium capable of unique interkingdom DNA transfer via type IV secretion system (T4SS. HspL is highly expressed in virulence-induced growth condition and functions as a VirB8 chaperone to promote T4SS-mediated DNA transfer. Here, we used genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate the involvement of the other three sHsps in T4SS and discovered the molecular basis underlying the dominant function of HspL in promoting T4SS function. While single deletion of hspL but no other sHsp gene reduced T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis efficiency, additional deletion of other sHsp genes in the hspL deletion background caused synergistic effects in the virulence phenotypes. This is correlated with the high induction of hspL and only modest increase of hspC, hspAT1, and hspAT2 at their mRNA and protein abundance in virulence-induced growth condition. Interestingly, overexpression of any single sHsp gene alone in the quadruple mutant caused increased T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis. Thermal aggregation protecting assays in vitro indicated that all four sHsps exhibit chaperone activity for the model substrate citrate synthase but only HspL functions as efficient chaperone for VirB8. The higher VirB8 chaperone activity of HspL was also demonstrated in vivo, in which lower amounts of HspL than other sHsps were sufficient in maintaining VirB8 homeostasis in A. tumefaciens. Domain swapping between HspL and HspAT2 indicated that N-terminal, central alpha-crystallin, and C-terminal domains of HspL all contribute to HspL function as an efficient VirB8 chaperone. Taken together, we suggest that the dominant role of HspL in promoting T4SS function is based on its higher expression in virulence

  8. SUMO: regulating the regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossis Guillaume

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifiers of the SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier family have emerged as key regulators of protein function and fate. While the past few years have seen an enormous increase in knowledge on SUMO enzymes, substrates, and consequences of modification, regulation of SUMO conjugation is far from being understood. This brief review will provide an overview on recent advances concerning (i the interplay between sumoylation and other post-translational modifications at the level of individual targets and (ii global regulation of SUMO conjugation and deconjugation.

  9. Enhancing functional production of a chaperone-dependent lipase in Escherichia coli using the dual expression cassette plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quyen Thi Dinh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background The lipase subfamilies I.1 and I.2 show more than 33% homology in the amino acid sequences and most members share another common property that their genes are clustered with the secondary genes whose protein products are required for folding the lipase into an active conformation and secretion into the culture medium. In previous studies, the lipase (LipA and its chaperone (LipB from Ralstonia sp. M1 were overexpressed in E. coli and the lipase was successfully refolded in vitro. The purpose of this study was to enhance the production of the active lipase LipA from Ralstonia sp. M1 in the heterologous host E. coli without in vitro refolding process, using two-plasmid co-expression systems and dual expression cassette plasmid systems. Results To produce more active lipase from Ralstonia sp. M1 in E. coli without in vitro refolding process but with the help of overexpression of the chaperone (LipB1 and LipB3 corresponding to 56-aa truncated and 26-aa truncated chaperone LipB, six different expression systems including 2 two-plasmid co-expression systems (E. coli BL21/pELipABa + pELipB1k and BL21/pELipABa + pELipB3k and 4 dual expression cassette plasmid systems (BL21/pELipAB-LipB1a, BL21/pELipAB-LipB3a, BL21/pELipA-LipB1a, and BL21/pELipA-LipB3a were constructed. The two-plasmid co-expression systems (E. coli BL21/pELipABa + pELipB1k and BL21/pELipABa + pELipB3k produced the active lipase at a level of 4 times as high as the single expression cassette plasmid system E. coli BL21/pELipABa did. For the first time, the dual expression cassette plasmid systems BL21/pELipAB-LipB1a and BL21/pELipAB-LipB3a yielded 29- and 19-fold production of the active lipase in comparison with the single expression cassette plasmid system E. coli BL21/pELipABa, respectively. Although the lipase amount was equally expressed in all these expression systems (40% of total cellular protein and only a small fraction of the overexpressed lipase was

  10. Homology-based modeling of the Erwinia amylovora type III secretion chaperone DspF used to identify amino acids required for virulence and interaction with the effector DspE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Wedemeyer, William J; Sundin, George W

    2010-09-01

    The structure of DspF, a type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperone required for virulence of the fruit tree pathogen Erwinia amylovora, was modeled based on predicted structural homology to characterized T3SS chaperones. This model guided the selection of 11 amino acid residues that were individually mutated to alanine via site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutant was assessed for its effect on virulence complementation, dimerization and interaction with the N-terminal chaperone-binding site of DspE. Four amino acid residues were identified that did not complement the virulence defect of a dspF knockout mutant, and three of these residues were required for interaction with the N-terminus of DspE. This study supports the significance of the predicted beta-sheet helix-binding groove in DspF chaperone function.

  11. Stimulation of Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer by a Novel Chaperone Synuclein Gamma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    transfected MCF-7 cells, our initial studies indicated that there was no physical interaction between SNCG and aromatase and no stimulation of aromatase ...manipulation with aromatase inhibitors and inactivators. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 86: 245–253. Gupta A, Godwin AK, Vanderveer L, Lu A, Liu J. (2003a...transcriptionally regulated by progestin and attenuates progestin responsiveness. Endocrinology 144: 2380–2387. Inaba S, Li C, Shi YE, Song DQ, Jiang JD, Liu J

  12. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, P J; Brady, L J

    2016-02-01

    The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery to cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC, and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle pathway, were also evaluated for their effects on mutacin production and genetic competence.

  13. Rapid preparation of (3R,4S,5R) polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine-based libraries to discover a pharmacological chaperone for treatment of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wang, Jen-Hon; Yun, Wen-Yi; Li, Huang-Yi; Hu, Jia-Ming

    2017-01-27

    The rapid discovery of a pharmacological chaperone toward human α-Gal A for the treatment of Fabry disease is described. Two polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines with the (3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern underwent rapid substituent diversity by conjugating the primary aminomethyl moiety of each with a variety of carboxylic acids to generate two libraries (2 × 60 members). Our bioevaluation results showed one member with the (2R,3R,4S,5R) configuration pattern and bearing a 5-cyclohexylpentanoyl group as a substituent moiety possessed sufficient chaperoning capability to rescue α-Gal A activity in the lymphocyte of the N215S Fabry patient-derived cell line and other α-Gal A mutants in COS7 cells.

  14. Chaperone molecules concentrate together with the ubiquitin-proteasome system inside particulate cytoplasmic structures: possible role in metabolism of misfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoli, Alessandro; Necchi, Vittorio; Barozzi, Serena; Manca, Rachele; Pecci, Alessandro; Solcia, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) proteins and proteolytic activity are localized in a recently identified cytoplasmic structure characterized by accumulation of barrel-like particles, which is known as the particulate cytoplasmic structure (PaCS). PaCSs have been detected in neoplastic, preneoplastic, chronically infected, and fetal cells, which produce high amounts of misfolded proteins to be degraded by the UPS. Chaperone molecules are crucial in the early stages of handling misfolded proteins; therefore, we searched for these molecules in PaCSs. Heat shock proteins (Hsp), Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp40, and Bcl-2-associated athanogene (Bag)3 chaperones, although not Bag6, were selectively concentrated into PaCSs of several cell lines and ex vivo fetal or neoplastic cells. Present findings point to PaCSs as an integrated, active UPS center well equipped for metabolism of misfolded proteins, especially in cells under physiological (fetal development) or pathological (neoplasia or inflammation) stress.

  15. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  16. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition. PMID:26670244

  17. Optimisation of production of a domoic acid-binding scFv antibody fragment in Escherichia coli using molecular chaperones and functional immobilisation on a mesoporous silicate support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuejun; O'Hara, Liam; White, Simon; Magner, Edmond; Kane, Marian; Wall, J Gerard

    2007-03-01

    Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin that can lead to amnesic shellfish poisoning in humans through ingestion of contaminated shellfish. We have produced and purified an anti-domoic acid single-chain Fragment variable (scFv) antibody fragment from the Escherichia coli periplasm. Yields of functional protein were increased by up to 100-fold upon co-production of E. coli DnaKJE molecular chaperones but co-overproduction of GroESL led to a reduction in solubility of the scFv. Co-production of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase trigger factor resulted in accumulation of unprocessed scFv in the E. coli cytoplasm. This was due to an apparent bottleneck in translocation of the cytoplasmic membrane by the recombinant polypeptide. Co-expression of the E. coli disulfide bond isomerase dsbC increased scFv yields by delaying lysis of the host bacterial cells though this effect was not synergistic with molecular chaperone co-production. Meanwhile, use of a cold-shock promoter for protein production led to accumulation of greater amounts of scFv polypeptide which was predominantly in insoluble form and could not be rescued by chaperones. Purification of the scFv was achieved using an optimised metal affinity chromatography procedure and the purified protein bound domoic acid when immobilised on a mesoporous silicate support. The work outlines the potential benefit of applying a molecular chaperone/folding catalyst screening approach to improve antibody fragment production for applications such as sensor development.

  18. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  19. Molecular basis and specificity of H2A.Z-H2B recognition and deposition by the histone chaperone YL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrick, Chrysa M; Marek, Martin; Ouararhni, Khalid; Papin, Christophe; Stoll, Isabelle; Ignatyeva, Maria; Obri, Arnaud; Ennifar, Eric; Dimitrov, Stefan; Romier, Christophe; Hamiche, Ali

    2016-04-01

    H2A.Z, a widely conserved histone variant, is evicted from chromatin by the histone chaperone ANP32E. However, to date, no deposition chaperone for H2A.Z is known in metazoans. Here, we identify YL1 as a specific H2A.Z-deposition chaperone. The 2.7-Å-resolution crystal structure of the human YL1-H2A.Z-H2B complex shows that YL1 binding, similarly to ANP32E binding, triggers an extension of the H2A.Z αC helix. The interaction with YL1 is, however, more extensive and includes both the extended acidic patch and the entire DNA-binding surface of H2A.Z-H2B. Substitution of only four amino acid residues of H2A is sufficient for the formation of an H2A.Z-like interface specifically recognized by YL1. Collectively, our data reveal the molecular basis of H2A.Z-specific recognition by YL1 and shed light on the mechanism of H2A.Z transfer to the nucleosome by the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes SRCAP and P400-TIP60.

  20. Single molecule FRET detection in CdSe-QD donor and Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone acceptor complex by imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Toshiro, E-mail: ttani@cc.tuat.ac.j [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Oda, Masaru [Division of Advanced Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Araki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ohtaki, Akashi; Yohda, Masafumi [Division of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Kogane-i, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    We report single molecule spectroscopic evidence of FRET in CdSe quantum dot (QD) conjugated with Cy5-labeled molecular chaperone systems in buffer solutions. Donor QDs are core-shell type nanocrystals covered with organic surfactants on their outermost surfaces, i.e. CdSe/ZnS/TOPO's. As prototype molecular chaperones, we adopt prefoldins (PFDs), on which Cy5's are labeled as acceptors. Donor QDs possess two-fold degenerate emission dipoles perpendicular to the c-axis, due to their Wurtzite crystal structures, while acceptor Cy5's possess linear absorption and emission dipoles. Thus, their combination provides novel features to those in conventional FRET systems. PFDs are jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperones of group II chaperonins, which recognize hydrophobic portions of denatured proteins and encapsulate them within their central cavities. Hence, PFDs will also capture the CdSe/ZnS/TOPO QDs due to its surface similarity to the denatured proteins. By introducing simple microscope setup for single QD-PFD-Cy5 spectroscopy, we have successfully captured the emission spectra in FRET regime. We also have observed peculiar features in time evolution profiles of single QD emissions conjugated with Cy5-labeled PFDs under polarization modulation measurements. Notable point of our hybrid conjugates is that they are biochemically in living action. We describe our present results in relation to possible protein reactions.

  1. Enhanced recombinant protein production and differential expression of molecular chaperones in sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells after baculovirus infection

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    Lai Yiu-Kay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few studies that have examined the potential of RNA inference (RNAi to increase protein production in the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS. Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm (Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells exhibit resistance to apoptosis and enhancement of recombinant protein production. However, the mechanism of recombinant protein augmentation in baculovirus-infected Caspase-repressed insect cells has not been elucidated. Results In the current study, we utilized RNAi-mediated Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells to clarify how the resistance to apoptosis can enhance both intracellular (firefly luciferase and extracellular (secreted alkaline phosphatase [SEAP] recombinant protein production in BEVS. Since the expression of molecular chaperones is strongly associated with the maximal production of exogenous proteins in BEVS, the differential expression of molecular chaperones in baculovirus-infected stable cells was also analyzed in this study. Conclusion The data indicated that the retention of expression of molecular chaperones in baculovirus-infected Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells give the higher recombinant protein accumulation.

  2. Drosophila TAP/p32 is a core histone chaperone that cooperates with NAP-1, NLP, and nucleophosmin in sperm chromatin remodeling during fertilization.

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    Emelyanov, Alexander V; Rabbani, Joshua; Mehta, Monika; Vershilova, Elena; Keogh, Michael C; Fyodorov, Dmitry V

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear DNA in the male gamete of sexually reproducing animals is organized as sperm chromatin compacted primarily by sperm-specific protamines. Fertilization leads to sperm chromatin remodeling, during which protamines are expelled and replaced by histones. Despite our increased understanding of the factors that mediate nucleosome assembly in the nascent male pronucleus, the machinery for protamine removal remains largely unknown. Here we identify four Drosophila protamine chaperones that mediate the dissociation of protamine-DNA complexes: NAP-1, NLP, and nucleophosmin are previously characterized histone chaperones, and TAP/p32 has no known function in chromatin metabolism. We show that TAP/p32 is required for the removal of Drosophila protamine B in vitro, whereas NAP-1, NLP, and Nph share roles in the removal of protamine A. Embryos from P32-null females show defective formation of the male pronucleus in vivo. TAP/p32, similar to NAP-1, NLP, and Nph, facilitates nucleosome assembly in vitro and is therefore a histone chaperone. Furthermore, mutants of P32, Nlp, and Nph exhibit synthetic-lethal genetic interactions. In summary, we identified factors mediating protamine removal from DNA and reconstituted in a defined system the process of sperm chromatin remodeling that exchanges protamines for histones to form the nucleosome-based chromatin characteristic of somatic cells.

  3. Cyclin Cln3 is retained at the ER and released by the J chaperone Ydj1 in late G1 to trigger cell cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergés, Emili; Colomina, Neus; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2007-06-08

    G1 cyclin Cln3 plays a key role in linking cell growth and proliferation in budding yeast. It is generally assumed that Cln3, which is present throughout G1, accumulates passively in the nucleus until a threshold is reached to trigger cell cycle entry. We show here that Cln3 is retained bound to the ER in early G1 cells. ER retention requires binding of Cln3 to the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28, a fraction of which also associates to the ER. Cln3 contains a chaperone-regulatory Ji domain that counteracts Ydj1, a J chaperone essential for ER release and nuclear accumulation of Cln3 in late G1. Finally, Ydj1 is limiting for release of Cln3 and timely entry into the cell cycle. As protein synthesis and ribosome assembly rates compromise chaperone availability, we hypothesize that Ydj1 transmits growth capacity information to the cell cycle for setting efficient size/ploidy ratios.

  4. The role of auxin in temperature regulated hypocotyl elongation

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    Estelle, Mark [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-10-02

    The major goal of this project was to determine how auxin mediates the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to increased ambient temperature. Previous studies have shown that the response is due, in part, to increased auxin biosynthesis via the IPA auxin biosynthetic pathway. This effect is related to increased transcription of genes that encode enzymes in this pathway. However, during the last year we have shown that transcription of key auxin regulated genes increases within minutes of a shift to elevated temperature. This response is probably to rapid to be explained by changes in the levels of auxin biosynthetic enzymes. Interestingly, we have recently discovered that temperature shift is associated with a rapid increase in the level of the auxin co-receptor TIR1. This change appears is the result of increased stability of the protein. At the same time, we have discovered that stability of TIR1 is dependent on the chaperone HSP9o and its co-chaperone SGT1. By using the specific HSP90 inhibitor GDA, we show that HSP90 is required for the temperature dependent change in TIR1 levels. We have also shown that HSP90 and SGT1 interact directly with TIR1. Our results also lead us to propose a new model in which the plant responds rapidly to changes in ambient temperature by directly regulating the TIR1/AFB receptor system, thus modulating the auxin signaling pathway.

  5. Establishment of a novel fluorescence-based method to evaluate chaperone-mediated autophagy in a single neuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Seki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA is a selective autophagy-lysosome protein degradation pathway. The role of CMA in normal neuronal functions and in neural disease pathogenesis remains unclear, in part because there is no available method to monitor CMA activity at the single-cell level. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sought to establish a single-cell monitoring method by visualizing translocation of CMA substrates from the cytosol to lysosomes using the HaloTag (HT system. GAPDH, a CMA substrate, was fused to HT (GAPDH-HT; this protein accumulated in the lysosomes of HeLa cells and cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs after labeling with fluorescent dye-conjugated HT ligand. Lysosomal accumulation was enhanced by treatments that activate CMA and prevented by siRNA-mediated knockdown of LAMP2A, a lysosomal receptor for CMA, and by treatments that inactivate CMA. These results suggest that lysosomal accumulation of GAPDH-HT reflects CMA activity. Using this method, we revealed that mutant γPKC, which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14, decreased CMA activity in cultured PCs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In the present study, we established a novel fluorescent-based method to evaluate CMA activity in a single neuron. This novel method should be useful and valuable for evaluating the role of CMA in various neuronal functions and neural disease pathogenesis.

  6. Chaperone-rich tumor cell lysate-mediated activation of antigen-presenting cells resists regulatory T cell suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmonier, Nicolas; Cantrell, Jessica; Lacasse, Collin; Li, Gang; Janikashvili, Nona; Situ, Elaine; Sepassi, Marjan; Andreansky, Samita; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2008-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) critically contribute to the mechanisms of cancer-induced tolerance. These cells suppress anti-tumoral CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes and can also restrain the function of APCs. We have previously documented the immunostimulatory effects of a chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) anti-cancer vaccine. Tumor-derived CRCL induces tumor immunity in vivo, partly by promoting dendritic cell (DC) and macrophage activation. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of CD4(+)CD25(+)forkhead box P3(+) Tregs isolated from mice bearing 12B1 bcr-abl(+) leukemia on DC and macrophages that had been activated by 12B1-derived CRCL. CRCL-activated DC and macrophages resisted Treg suppression, as the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB, and their immunostimulatory potential was unaffected by Tregs. Our results thus highlight CRCL as a powerful adjuvant endowed with the capacity to overcome tumor-induced Treg-inhibitory effects on APCs.

  7. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-11-29

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  8. Purification and in vitro chaperone activity of a class I small heat-shock protein abundant in recalcitrant chestnut seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collada, C; Gomez, L; Casado, R; Aragoncillo, C

    1997-09-01

    A 20-kD protein has been purified from cotyledons of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, where it accumulates at levels comparable to those of major seed storage proteins. This protein, termed Cs smHSP 1, forms homododecameric complexes under nondenaturing conditions and appears to be homologous to cytosolic class I small heat-shock proteins (smHSPs) from plant sources. In vitro evidence has been obtained that the isolated protein can function as a molecular chaperone; it increases, at stoichiometric levels, the renaturation yields of chemically denatured citrate synthase and also prevents the irreversible thermal inactivation of this enzyme. Although a role in desiccation tolerance has been hypothesized for seed smHSPs, this does not seem to be the case for Cs smHSP 1. We have investigated the presence of immunologically related proteins in orthodox and recalcitrant seeds of 13 woody species. Our results indicate that the presence of Cs smHSP 1-like proteins, even at high levels, is not enough to confer desiccation tolerance, and that the amount of these proteins does not furnish a reliable criterion to identify desiccation-sensitive seeds. Additional proteins or mechanisms appear necessary to keep the viability of orthodox seeds upon shedding.

  9. The SecB-like chaperone Rv1957 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zuokun; Wang, Han; Yu, TingTing

    2016-06-01

    Protein export is important in all bacteria, and bacteria have evolved specialized export machineries to fulfil this task. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, the general secretion pathway (Sec pathway) is conserved and is essential in performing the export of proteins. The bacterial Sec pathway post-translationally exports unfolded proteins out of the cytoplasm, and the core of the Sec pathway is composed of a heterotrimeric membrane-embedded channel, SecYEG, and two cytosolic components, SecA and SecB. SecB functions by stabilizing unfolded proteins, maintaining them in an export-competent state. Although SecB is mainly found in Proteobacteria, a SecB-like protein, Rv1957, that controls a stress-response toxin-antitoxin system, is found in M. tuberculosis. Rv1957 can also functionally replace the Escherichia coli SecB chaperone both in vivo and in vitro. In this work, the production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of Rv1957 are reported. Notably, diffraction-quality crystals were obtained only at high concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide, i.e. about 12%(v/v). The crystals of Rv1957 belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.5, b = 92.0, c = 115.4 Å.

  10. Dual chaperone role of the C-terminal propeptide in folding and oligomerization of the pore-forming toxin aerolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovache, Ioan; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Pernot, Lucile; Ho, Sylvia; Schiltz, Marc; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2011-07-01

    Throughout evolution, one of the most ancient forms of aggression between cells or organisms has been the production of proteins or peptides affecting the permeability of the target cell membrane. This class of virulence factors includes the largest family of bacterial toxins, the pore-forming toxins (PFTs). PFTs are bistable structures that can exist in a soluble and a transmembrane state. It is unclear what drives biosynthetic folding towards the soluble state, a requirement that is essential to protect the PFT-producing cell. Here we have investigated the folding of aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, and more specifically the role of the C-terminal propeptide (CTP). By combining the predictive power of computational techniques with experimental validation using both structural and functional approaches, we show that the CTP prevents aggregation during biosynthetic folding. We identified specific residues that mediate binding of the CTP to the toxin. We show that the CTP is crucial for the control of the aerolysin activity, since it protects individual subunits from aggregation within the bacterium and later controls assembly of the quaternary pore-forming complex at the surface of the target host cell. The CTP is the first example of a C-terminal chain-linked chaperone with dual function.

  11. Dual chaperone role of the C-terminal propeptide in folding and oligomerization of the pore-forming toxin aerolysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Iacovache

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout evolution, one of the most ancient forms of aggression between cells or organisms has been the production of proteins or peptides affecting the permeability of the target cell membrane. This class of virulence factors includes the largest family of bacterial toxins, the pore-forming toxins (PFTs. PFTs are bistable structures that can exist in a soluble and a transmembrane state. It is unclear what drives biosynthetic folding towards the soluble state, a requirement that is essential to protect the PFT-producing cell. Here we have investigated the folding of aerolysin, produced by the human pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, and more specifically the role of the C-terminal propeptide (CTP. By combining the predictive power of computational techniques with experimental validation using both structural and functional approaches, we show that the CTP prevents aggregation during biosynthetic folding. We identified specific residues that mediate binding of the CTP to the toxin. We show that the CTP is crucial for the control of the aerolysin activity, since it protects individual subunits from aggregation within the bacterium and later controls assembly of the quaternary pore-forming complex at the surface of the target host cell. The CTP is the first example of a C-terminal chain-linked chaperone with dual function.

  12. The Cac1 subunit of histone chaperone CAF-1 organizes CAF-1-H3/H4 architecture and tetramerizes histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wallace H; Roemer, Sarah C; Zhou, Yeyun; Shen, Zih-Jie; Dennehey, Briana K; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L; Liddle, Jennifer C; Nemkov, Travis; Ahn, Natalie G; Hansen, Kirk C; Tyler, Jessica K; Churchill, Mair EA

    2016-01-01

    The histone chaperone Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) deposits tetrameric (H3/H4)2 histones onto newly-synthesized DNA during DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of the tri-subunit CAF-1 complex in this process, we investigated the protein-protein interactions within the CAF-1-H3/H4 architecture using biophysical and biochemical approaches. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange and chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry reveal interactions that are essential for CAF-1 function in budding yeast, and importantly indicate that the Cac1 subunit functions as a scaffold within the CAF-1-H3/H4 complex. Cac1 alone not only binds H3/H4 with high affinity, but also promotes histone tetramerization independent of the other subunits. Moreover, we identify a minimal region in the C-terminus of Cac1, including the structured winged helix domain and glutamate/aspartate-rich domain, which is sufficient to induce (H3/H4)2 tetramerization. These findings reveal a key role of Cac1 in histone tetramerization, providing a new model for CAF-1-H3/H4 architecture and function during eukaryotic replication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18023.001 PMID:27690308

  13. Xaa-Arg-Gly triplets in the collagen triple helix are dominant binding sites for the molecular chaperone HSP47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Asada, Shinichi; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2002-02-22

    HSP47 is an essential procollagen-specific molecular chaperone that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum of procollagen-producing cells. Recent advances have revealed that HSP47 recognizes the (Pro-Pro-Gly)(n) sequence but not (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(n) and that HSP47 recognizes the triple-helical conformation. In this study, to better understand the substrate recognition by HSP47, we synthesized various collagen model peptides and examined their interaction with HSP47 in vitro. We found that the Pro-Arg-Gly triplet forms an HSP47-binding site. The HSP47 binding was observed only when Arg residues were incorporated in the Yaa positions of the Xaa-Yaa-Gly triplets. Amino acids in the Xaa position did not largely affect the interaction. The recognition of the Arg residue by HSP47 was specific to its side-chain structure because replacement of the Arg residue by other basic amino acids decreased the affinity to HSP47. The significance of Arg residues in HSP47 binding was further confirmed by using residue-specific chemical modification of types I and III collagen. Our results demonstrate that Xaa-Arg-Gly sequences in the triple-helical procollagen molecule are dominant binding sites for HSP47 and enable us to predict HSP47-binding sites in homotrimeric procollagen molecules.

  14. Mammalian ribosomal and chaperone protein RPS3A counteracts α-synuclein aggregation and toxicity in a yeast model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graeve, Stijn; Marinelli, Sarah; Stolz, Frank; Hendrix, Jelle; Vandamme, Jurgen; Engelborghs, Yves; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of aggregated forms of αSyn (α-synuclein) into Lewy bodies is a known hallmark associated with neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. When expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, αSyn interacts with the plasma membrane, forms inclusions and causes a concentration-dependent growth defect. We have used a yeast mutant, cog6Δ, which is particularly sensitive to moderate αSyn expression, for screening a mouse brain-specific cDNA library in order to identify mammalian proteins that counteract αSyn toxicity. The mouse ribosomal and chaperone protein RPS3A was identified as a suppressor of αSyn [WT (wild-type) and A53T] toxicity in yeast. We demonstrated that the 50 N-terminal amino acids are essential for this function. The yeast homologues of RPS3A were not effective in suppressing the αSyn-induced growth defect, illustrating the potential of our screening system to identify modifiers that would be missed using yeast gene overexpression as the first screening step. Co-expression of mouse RPS3A delayed the formation of αSyn-GFP inclusions in the yeast cells. The results of the present study suggest that the recently identified extraribosomal chaperonin function of RPS3A also acts on the neurodegeneration-related protein αSyn and reveal a new avenue for identifying promising candidate mammalian proteins involved in αSyn functioning.

  15. Histone chaperone spt16 promotes redeposition of the original h3-h4 histones evicted by elongating RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamai, Adil; Puglisi, Andrea; Strubin, Michel

    2009-08-14

    Nucleosomes are surprisingly dynamic structures in vivo, showing transcription-independent exchange of histones H2A-H2B genome-wide and exchange of H3-H4 mainly within the promoters of transcribed genes. In addition, nucleosomes are disrupted in front of and reassembled behind the elongating RNA polymerase. Here we show that inactivation of histone chaperone Spt16 in yeast results in rapid loss of H2B and H3 from transcribed genes but also from inactive genes. In all cases, histone loss is blocked by a transcription inhibitor, indicating a transcription-dependent event. Thus, nucleosomes are efficiently evicted by the polymerase but do not reform in the absence of Spt16. Yet exchange of nucleosomal H2B with free histones occurs normally, and, unexpectedly, incorporation of new H3 increases at all loci tested. This points to Spt16 restoring normal nucleosome structure by redepositing the displaced H3-H4 histones, thereby preventing incorporation of new histones and perhaps changes in histone modification patterns associated with ongoing transcription.

  16. Aqueous Extract of Paeonia lactiflora and Paeoniflorin as Aggregation Reducers Targeting Chaperones in Cell Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3

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    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA types 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 17 as well as Huntington’s disease are a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by expanded CAG repeats encoding a long polyglutamine (polyQ tract in the respective proteins. Evidence has shown that the accumulation of intranuclear and cytoplasmic misfolded polyQ proteins leads to apoptosis and cell death. Thus suppression of aggregate formation is expected to inhibit a wide range of downstream pathogenic events in polyQ diseases. In this study, we established a high-throughput aggregation screening system using 293 ATXN3/Q75-GFP cells and applied this system to test the aqueous extract of Paeonia lactiflora (P. lactiflora and its constituents. We found that the aggregation can be significantly prohibited by P. lactiflora and its active compound paeoniflorin. Meanwhile, P. lactiflora and paeoniflorin upregulated HSF1 and HSP70 chaperones in the same cell models. Both of them further reduced the aggregation in neuronal differentiated SH-SY5Y ATXN3/Q75-GFP cells. Our results demonstrate how P. lactiflora and paeoniflorin are likely to work on polyQ-aggregation reduction and provide insight into the possible working mechanism of P. lactiflora in SCA3. We anticipate our paper to be a starting point for screening more potential herbs for the treatment of SCA3 and other polyQ diseases.

  17. The molecular chaperone Hsp70 activates protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) by binding the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connarn, Jamie N; Assimon, Victoria A; Reed, Rebecca A; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Gestwicki, Jason E; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-31

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development.

  18. Periplasmic expression of soluble single chain T cell receptors is rescued by the chaperone FkpA

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    Bogen Bjarne

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient expression systems exist for antibody (Ab molecules, which allow for characterization of large numbers of individual Ab variants. In contrast, such expression systems have been lacking for soluble T cell receptors (TCRs. Attempts to generate bacterial systems have generally resulted in low yields and material which is prone to aggregation and proteolysis. Here we present an optimized periplasmic bacterial expression system for soluble single chain (sc TCRs. Results The effect of 1 over-expression of the periplasmic chaperon FkpA, 2 culture conditions and 3 molecular design was investigated. Elevated levels of FkpA allowed periplasmic soluble scTCR expression, presumably by preventing premature aggregation and inclusion body formation. Periplasmic expression enables disulphide bond formation, which is a prerequisite for the scTCR to reach its correct fold. It also enables quick and easy recovery of correctly folded protein without the need for time-consuming downstream processing. Expression without IPTG induction further improved the periplasmic expression yield, while addition of sucrose to the growth medium showed little effect. Shaker flask yield of mg levels of active purified material was obtained. The Vαβ domain orientation was far superior to the Vβα domain orientation regarding monomeric yield of functionally folded molecules. Conclusion The general expression regime presented here allows for rapid production of soluble scTCRs and is applicable for 1 high yield recovery sufficient for biophysical characterization and 2 high throughput screening of such molecules following molecular engineering.

  19. ATPase domain and interdomain linker play a key role in aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone Ssc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamowska, Marta; Sichting, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2010-02-12

    The co-chaperone Hep1 is required to prevent the aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. We have analyzed the interaction of Hep1 with mitochondrial Hsp70 (Ssc1) and the determinants in Ssc1 that make it prone to aggregation. The ATPase and peptide binding domain (PBD) of Hsp70 proteins are connected by a linker segment that mediates interdomain communication between the domains. We show here that the minimal Hep1 binding entity of Ssc1 consists of the ATPase domain and the interdomain linker. In the absence of Hep1, the ATPase domain with the interdomain linker had the tendency to aggregate, in contrast to the ATPase domain with the mutated linker segment or without linker, and in contrast to the PBD. The closest homolog of Ssc1, bacterial DnaK, and a Ssc1 chimera, in which a segment of the ATPase domain of Ssc1 was replaced by the corresponding segment from DnaK, did not aggregate in Delta hep1 mitochondria. The propensity to aggregate appears to be a specific property of the mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. The ATPase domain in combination with the interdomain linker is crucial for aggregation of Ssc1. In conclusion, our results suggest that interdomain communication makes Ssc1 prone to aggregation. Hep1 counteracts aggregation by binding to this aggregation-prone conformer.

  20. Lens gene expression analysis reveals downregulation of the anti-apoptotic chaperone alphaA-crystallin during cavefish eye degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Allen G; Byerly, Mardi S; Jeffery, William R

    2007-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the expression patterns of five genes encoding three different classes of major lens proteins during eye degeneration in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. This species consists of two forms, an eyed surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and a blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) form. Cavefish form an optic primordium with a lens vesicle and optic cup. In contrast to surface fish, however, the cavefish lens does not differentiate fiber cells and undergoes massive apoptosis. The genes encoding the lens intrinsic membrane proteins MIP and MP19 and the divergent betaB1- and gammaM2-crystallins are expressed during cavefish lens development, although their levels are reduced because of a smaller lens, and the spatial distribution of their transcripts is modified because of the lack of differentiated fiber cells. In contrast, the alphaA-crystallin gene, which encodes a heat shock protein-related chaperone with antiapoptotic activity, is substantially downregulated in the developing cavefish lens. The results suggest that suppression of alphaA-crystallin antiapoptotic activity may be involved in cavefish eye degeneration.

  1. Copper chaperone Atox1 interacts with the metal-binding domain of Wilson's disease protein in cisplatin detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, Nataliya V; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Yu, Corey H; George, Graham N; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2013-08-15

    Human copper transporters ATP7B (Wilson's disease protein) and ATP7A (Menkes' disease protein) have been implicated in tumour resistance to cisplatin, a widely used anticancer drug. Cisplatin binds to the copper-binding sites in the N-terminal domain of ATP7B, and this binding may be an essential step of cisplatin detoxification involving copper ATPases. In the present study, we demonstrate that cisplatin and a related platinum drug carboplatin produce the same adduct following reaction with MBD2 [metal-binding domain (repeat) 2], where platinum is bound to the side chains of the cysteine residues in the CxxC copper-binding motif. This suggests the same mechanism for detoxification of both drugs by ATP7B. Platinum can also be transferred to MBD2 from copper chaperone Atox1, which was shown previously to bind cisplatin. Binding of the free cisplatin and reaction with the cisplatin-loaded Atox1 produce the same protein-bound platinum intermediate. Transfer of platinum along the copper-transport pathways in the cell may serve as a mechanism of drug delivery to its target in the cell nucleus, and explain tumour-cell resistance to cisplatin associated with the overexpression of copper transporters ATP7B and ATP7A.

  2. Oligodendroglioma cells shed microvesicles which contain TRAIL as well as molecular chaperones and induce cell death in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Schiera, Gabriella; Proia, Patrizia; Saladino, Patrizia; Savettieri, Giovanni; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Di Liegro, Italia

    2011-12-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) shed from G26/24 oligodendroglioma cells were previously reported to cause a reproducible, dose-dependent, inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth, and eventually neuronal apoptosis, when added to primary cultures of rat cortical neurons. These effects were reduced but not abolished by functional monoclonal antibodies against Fas-L. In order to investigate whether MVs contain other factors able to induce cell death, we tested them for TRAIL and found clear evidence of its presence in the vesicles. This finding suggests the possibility that Fas-L and TRAIL cooperate in inducing brain cell death. Aimed at understanding the route through which the vesicles deliver their messages to the target cells, we labeled oligodendroglioma cells with radioactive methionine and then added the labeled vesicles shed from tumor cells to unlabeled astrocytes in culture. Here we report that labeled proteins were delivered to the test cells. In order to investigate whether astrocytes, like neurons, are sensitive to oligodendroglioma-derived vesicles, MVs were prepared from media conditioned by G26/24 oligodendroglioma cells and added to primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. These cells were clearly more resistant than neurons to microvesicle-induced damage: a high dose (40 µg) of shed MVs induced cell death in only about 40% of astrocytes. Finally, we demonstrated that Hsp70 is specifically enriched in MVs which also contain, even if at lower level, the Hsc70 constitutive chaperone.

  3. Vibrio cholerae utilizes direct sRNA regulation in expression of a biofilm matrix protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyan Song

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae biofilms contain exopolysaccharide and three matrix proteins RbmA, RbmC and Bap1. While much is known about exopolysaccharide regulation, little is known about the mechanisms by which the matrix protein components of biofilms are regulated. VrrA is a conserved, 140-nt sRNA of V. cholerae, whose expression is controlled by sigma factor σE. In this study, we demonstrate that VrrA negatively regulates rbmC translation by pairing to the 5' untranslated region of the rbmC transcript and that this regulation is not stringently dependent on the RNA chaperone protein Hfq. These results point to VrrA as a molecular link between the σE-regulon and biofilm formation in V. cholerae. In addition, VrrA represents the first example of direct regulation of sRNA on biofilm matrix component, by-passing global master regulators.

  4. Calnexin-dependent regulation of tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delom, F; Emadali, A; Cocolakis, E; Lebrun, J-J; Nantel, A; Chevet, E

    2007-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has evolved specific mechanisms to ensure protein folding as well as the maintenance of its own homeostasis. When these functions are not achieved, specific ER stress signals are triggered to activate either adaptive or apoptotic responses. Here, we demonstrate that MCF-7 cells are resistant to tunicamycin-induced apoptosis. We show that the expression level of the ER chaperone calnexin can directly influence tunicamycin sensitivity in this cell line. Interestingly, the expression of a calnexin lacking the chaperone domain (DeltaE) partially restores their sensitivity to tunicamycin-induced apoptosis. Indeed, we show that DeltaE acts as a scaffold molecule to allow the cleavage of Bap31 and thus generate the proapoptotic p20 fragment. Utilizing the ability of MCF-7 cells to resist tunicamycin-induced apoptosis, we have characterized a molecular mechanism by which calnexin regulates ER-stress-mediated apoptosis in a manner independent of its chaperone functions but dependent of its binding to Bap31.

  5. Codanin-1, mutated in the anaemic disease CDAI, regulates Asf1 function in S-phase histone supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask, Katrine; Jasencakova, Zusana; Menard, Patrice;

    2012-01-01

    Efficient supply of new histones during DNA replication is critical to restore chromatin organization and maintain genome function. The histone chaperone anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1) serves a key function in providing H3.1-H4 to CAF-1 for replication-coupled nucleosome assembly. We identify...... and binds directly to Asf1 via a conserved B-domain, implying a mutually exclusive interaction with the chaperones CAF-1 and HIRA. Codanin-1 depletion accelerates the rate of DNA replication and increases the level of chromatin-bound Asf1, suggesting that Codanin-1 guards a limiting step in chromatin...... replication. Consistently, ectopic Codanin-1 expression arrests S-phase progression by sequestering Asf1 in the cytoplasm, blocking histone delivery. We propose that Codanin-1 acts as a negative regulator of Asf1 function in chromatin assembly. This function is compromised by two CDAI mutations that impair...

  6. Unrestrained AMPylation targets cytosolic chaperones and activates the heat shock response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Zheng, Xu; Hanke, Leo; Damon, Jadyn R.; Grootveld, Monique; Krakowiak, Joanna; Pincus, David; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2017-01-01

    Protein AMPylation is a conserved posttranslational modification with emerging roles in endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. However, the range of substrates and cell biological consequences of AMPylation remain poorly defined. We expressed human and Caenorhabditis elegans AMPylation enzymes—huntingtin yeast-interacting protein E (HYPE) and filamentation-induced by cyclic AMP (FIC)-1, respectively—in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a eukaryote that lacks endogenous protein AMPylation. Expression of HYPE and FIC-1 in yeast induced a strong cytoplasmic Hsf1-mediated heat shock response, accompanied by attenuation of protein translation, massive protein aggregation, growth arrest, and lethality. Overexpression of Ssa2, a cytosolic heat shock protein (Hsp)70, was sufficient to partially rescue growth. In human cell lines, overexpression of active HYPE similarly induced protein aggregation and the HSF1-dependent heat shock response. Excessive AMPylation also abolished HSP70-dependent influenza virus replication. Our findings suggest a mode of Hsp70 inactivation by AMPylation and point toward a role for protein AMPylation in the regulation of cellular protein homeostasis beyond the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:28031489

  7. Chaperone-Targeting Cytotoxin and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Inducing Drug Synergize to Kill Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Backer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse physiological and therapeutic insults that increase the amount of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER induce the unfolded protein response, an evolutionarily conserved protective mechanism that manages ER stress. Glucose-regulated protein 78/immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (GRP78/BiP is an ER-resident protein that plays a central role in the ER stress response and is the only known substrate of the proteolytic A subunit (SubA of a novel bacterial AB5 toxin. Here, we report that an engineered fusion protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF-SubA, combining EGF and SubA, is highly toxic to growing and confluent epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing cancer cells, and its cytotoxicity is mediated by a remarkably rapid cleavage of GRP78/BiP. Systemic delivery of EGF-SubA results in a significant inhibition of human breast and prostate tumor xenografts in mouse models. Furthermore, EGF-SubA dramatically increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to the ER stress-inducing drug thapsigargin, and vice versa, demonstrating the first example of mechanism-based synergism in the action of a cytotoxin and an ER-targeting drug.

  8. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  9. Aspartic acid functions as carbonyl trapper to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products by chemical chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were implicated in pathology of numerous diseases. In this study, we present the bioactivity of aspartic acid (Asp) to inhibit the AGEs. Hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated with glucose, fructose, and ribose in the presence and absence of Asp (100-200 μM). HbA1c inhibition was investigated using human blood and characterized by micro-column ion exchange chromatography. The effect of methyl glyoxal (MG) on hemoglobin and BSA was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. The effect of MG on red blood cells morphology was characterized by scanning electron micrographs. Molecular docking was performed on BSA with Asp. Asp is capable of inhibiting the formation of fluorescent AGEs by reacting with the reducing sugars. The presence of Asp as supplement in whole blood reduced the HbA1c% from 8.8 to 6.1. The presence of MG showed an increase in fluorescence and the presence of Asp inhibited the glycation thereby the fluorescence was quenched. MG also affected the electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin and BSA by forming high molecular weight aggregates. Normal RBCs showed typical biconcave shape. MG modified RBCs showed twisted and elongated shape whereas the presence of ASP tends to protect RBC from twisting. Asp interacted with arginine residues of bovine serum albumin particularly ARG 194, ARG 198, and ARG 217 thereby stabilized the protein complex. We conclude that Asp has dual functions as a chemical chaperone to stabilize protein and as a dicarbonyl trapper, and thereby it can prevent the complications caused by glycation.

  10. Enhanced expression of membrane proteins in E. coli with a PBAD promoter mutant: synergies with chaperone pathway engineering strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannenga Brent L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins (MPs populate 20-30% of genomes sequenced to date and hold potential as therapeutic targets as well as for practical applications in bionanotechnology. However, MP toxicity and low yields in normally robust expression hosts such as E. coli has curtailed progress in our understanding of their structure and function. Results Using the seven transmembrane segments H. turkmenica deltarhodopsin (HtdR as a reporter, we isolated a spontaneous mutant in the arabinose-inducible PBAD promoter leading to improved cell growth and a twofold increase in the recovery of active HtdR at 37°C. A single transversion in a conserved region of the cyclic AMP receptor protein binding site caused the phenotype by reducing htdR transcript levels by 65%. When the mutant promoter was used in conjunction with a host lacking the molecular chaperone Trigger Factor (Δtig cells, toxicity was further suppressed and the amount of correctly folded HtdR was 4-fold that present in the membranes of control cells. More importantly, while improved growth barely compensated for the reduction in transcription rates when another polytopic membrane protein (N. pharonis sensory rhodopsin II was expressed under control of the mutant promoter in wild type cells, a 4-fold increase in productivity could be achieved in a Δtig host. Conclusions Our system, which combines a downregulated version of the tightly repressed PBAD promoter with a TF-deficient host may prove a valuable alternative to T7-based expression for the production of membrane proteins that have so far remained elusive targets.

  11. Impact of the lectin chaperone calnexin on the stress response, virulence and proteolytic secretome of the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret V Powers-Fletcher

    Full Text Available Calnexin is a membrane-bound lectin chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER that is part of a quality control system that promotes the accurate folding of glycoproteins entering the secretory pathway. We have previously shown that ER homeostasis is important for virulence of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, but the contribution of calnexin has not been explored. Here, we determined the extent to which A. fumigatus relies on calnexin for growth under conditions of environmental stress and for virulence. The calnexin gene, clxA, was deleted from A. fumigatus and complemented by reconstitution with the wild type gene. Loss of clxA altered the proteolytic secretome of the fungus, but had no impact on growth rates in either minimal or complex media at 37°C. However, the ΔclxA mutant was growth impaired at temperatures above 42°C and was hypersensitive to acute ER stress caused by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. In contrast to wild type A. fumigatus, ΔclxA hyphae were unable to grow when transferred to starvation medium. In addition, depleting the medium of cations by chelation prevented ΔclxA from sustaining polarized hyphal growth, resulting in blunted hyphae with irregular morphology. Despite these abnormal stress responses, the ΔclxA mutant remained virulent in two immunologically distinct models of invasive aspergillosis. These findings demonstrate that calnexin functions are needed for growth under conditions of thermal, ER and nutrient stress, but are dispensable for surviving the stresses encountered in the host environment.

  12. Quantitative proteomics identifies unanticipated regulators of nitrogen- and glucose starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødkær, Steven V; Pultz, Dennis; Brusch, Michelle;

    2014-01-01

    starvation. We identify nearly 1400 phosphorylation sites of which more than 500 are regulated in a temporal manner in response to glucose- or nitrogen starvation. By bioinformatics and network analyses, we have identified the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Sic1, the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37......, and the Hsp90 isoform Hsp82 to putatively mediate some of the starvation responses. Consistently, quantitative expression analyses showed that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 are required for normal expression of nutrient-responsive genes. Collectively, we therefore propose that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 may orchestrate...... parts of the cellular starvation response by regulating transcription factor- and kinase activities....

  13. BiPPred: Combined sequence- and structure-based prediction of peptide binding to the Hsp70 chaperone BiP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Markus; Rosam, Mathias; Glaser, Manuel; Patronov, Atanas; Shah, Harpreet; Back, Katrin Christiane; Daake, Marina Angelika; Buchner, Johannes; Antes, Iris

    2016-10-01

    Substrate binding to Hsp70 chaperones is involved in many biological processes, and the identification of potential substrates is important for a comprehensive understanding of these events. We present a multi-scale pipeline for an accurate, yet efficient prediction of peptides binding to the Hsp70 chaperone BiP by combining sequence-based prediction with molecular docking and MMPBSA calculations. First, we measured the binding of 15mer peptides from known substrate proteins of BiP by peptide array (PA) experiments and performed an accuracy assessment of the PA data by fluorescence anisotropy studies. Several sequence-based prediction models were fitted using this and other peptide binding data. A structure-based position-specific scoring matrix (SB-PSSM) derived solely from structural modeling data forms the core of all models. The matrix elements are based on a combination of binding energy estimations, molecular dynamics simulations, and analysis of the BiP binding site, which led to new insights into the peptide binding specificities of the chaperone. Using this SB-PSSM, peptide binders could be predicted with high selectivity even without training of the model on experimental data. Additional training further increased the prediction accuracies. Subsequent molecular docking (DynaDock) and MMGBSA/MMPBSA-based binding affinity estimations for predicted binders allowed the identification of the correct binding mode of the peptides as well as the calculation of nearly quantitative binding affinities. The general concept behind the developed multi-scale pipeline can readily be applied to other protein-peptide complexes with linearly bound peptides, for which sufficient experimental binding data for the training of classical sequence-based prediction models is not available. Proteins 2016; 84:1390-1407. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julia M; Nguyen, Phil P; Patel, Milan J; Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2014-07-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion functions may have

  15. The Salmonella type III effector SspH2 specifically exploits the NLR co-chaperone activity of SGT1 to subvert immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit P Bhavsar

    Full Text Available To further its pathogenesis, S. Typhimurium delivers effector proteins into host cells, including the novel E3 ubiquitin ligase (NEL effector SspH2. Using model systems in a cross-kingdom approach we gained further insight into the molecular function of this effector. Here, we show that SspH2 modulates innate immunity in both mammalian and plant cells. In mammalian cell culture, SspH2 significantly enhanced Nod1-mediated IL-8 secretion when transiently expressed or bacterially delivered. In addition, SspH2 also enhanced an Rx-dependent hypersensitive response in planta. In both of these nucleotide-binding leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR model systems, SspH2-mediated phenotypes required its catalytic E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and interaction with the conserved host protein SGT1. SGT1 has an essential cell cycle function and an additional function as an NLR co-chaperone in animal and plant cells. Interaction between SspH2 and SGT1 was restricted to SGT1 proteins that have NLR co-chaperone function and accordingly, SspH2 did not affect SGT1 cell cycle functions. Mechanistic studies revealed that SspH2 interacted with, and ubiquitinated Nod1 and could induce Nod1 activity in an agonist-independent manner if catalytically active. Interestingly, SspH2 in vitro ubiquitination activity and protein stability were enhanced by SGT1. Overall, this work adds to our understanding of the sophisticated mechanisms used by bacterial effectors to co-opt host pathways by demonstrating that SspH2 can subvert immune responses by selectively exploiting the functions of a conserved host co-chaperone.

  16. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  17. A Toxoplasma gondii Class XIV Myosin, Expressed in Sf9 Cells with a Parasite Co-chaperone, Requires Two Light Chains for Fast Motility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S.; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Ward, Gary E.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:25231988

  18. A Toxoplasma gondii class XIV myosin, expressed in Sf9 cells with a parasite co-chaperone, requires two light chains for fast motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M; Ward, Gary E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-10-31

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors.

  19. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga;

    2008-01-01

    was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding...... with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion...

  20. Interspecies Complementation of Escherichia coli ccm Mutants: CcmE (CycJ) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum Acts as a Heme Chaperone during Cytochrome c Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Henk; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes in α- and γ-proteobacteria requires the function of a set of orthologous genes (ccm genes) that encode specific maturation factors. The Escherichia coli CcmE protein is a periplasmic heme chaperone. The membrane protein CcmC is required for loading CcmE with heme. By expressing CcmE (CycJ) from Bradyrhizobium japonicum in E. coli we demonstrated that heme is bound covalently to this protein at a strictly conserved histidine residue. The B. japonicum homologue ...

  1. Regulation of apoptotic signal transduction pathways by the heat shock proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhengyu; ZHAO; Xia; WEI; Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    The study about apoptotic signal transductions has become a project to reveal the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (hsps), which play an important role in cell growth and apoptosis, have attracted great attentions. A lot of researches have showed there is a hsps superfamily including hsp90, hsp70, hsp60 and hsp27, etc., which regulates the biological behaviors of cells, particularly apoptotic signal transduction in Fas pathway, JNK/SAPK pathway and caspases pathway at different levels, partly by the function of molecular chaperone.

  2. alpha-Crystallin protein cognates in eggs of the moth, Plodia interpunctella: possible chaperones for the follicular epithelium yolk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirk, P D; Broza, R; Hemphill, M; Perera, O P

    1998-03-01

    alpha-Crystallin protein cognates were found in germ cells of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Shirk and Zimowska, 1997). A cDNA clone of 674 bp with a single open reading frame was isolated for a 25,000 molecular weight polypeptide member of this family, alpha CP25, and a single transcript of approximately 700 bp was found in the ovary of vitellogenic females. Both the DNA sequence and predicted amino acid sequence showed considerable homology with the embryonic lethal gene, l(2)efl, in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition to the sequence for l(2)efl, the predicted amino acid sequence for acp25 also showed significant sequence similarly with the alpha-crystallin A chain polypeptides from the lenses of vertebrae eyes. An N-terminal hydrophobic aggregation site and a C-terminal protective binding site common to alpha-crystallin proteins were present in the predicted acp25 and l(2)efl amino acid sequences, while only the C-terminal protective binding site was present in the small heat shock protein sequences from D. melanogaster. This evidence suggests that although the alpha-crystallin protein cognates in P. interpunctella evolved from a gene common with small heat shock protein genes, the amino acid sequence has converged on a structure similar to that of alpha-crystallin proteins. Native immunoblot analysis showed that the alpha-crystallin proteins formed high molecular weight complexes with the follicular epithelium yolk protein (FEYP) but not vitellin in yolk. An electroblot binding assay was used to show that the germ-cell alpha-crystallins of P. interpunctella bind specifically with the FEYP and that the binding was reversible in the presence of ATP or low pH. This evidence in conjunction with the evidence that the alpha-crystallins and FEYP form a stable complex that co-purifies from native egg proteins suggests that the alpha-cystallin cognates function as chaperones for the follicular epithelium yolk proteins in the embryos of P. interpunctella.

  3. The Escherichia coli Hfq protein: an unattended DNA-transactions regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz M Cech

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hfq protein was discovered in Escherichia coli as a host factor for bacteriophage Qβ RNA replication. Subsequent studies indicated that Hfq is a pleiotropic regulator of bacterial gene expression. The regulatory role of Hfq is ascribed mainly to its function as an RNA-chaperone, facilitating interactions between bacterial noncoding RNA and its mRNA target. Thus, it modulates mRNA translation and stability. Nevertheless, Hfq is able to interact with DNA as well. Its role in the regulation of DNA-related processes has been demonstrated. In this mini-review, it is discussed how Hfq interacts with DNA and what is the role of this protein in regulation of DNA transactions. Particularly, Hfq has been demonstrated to be involved in the control of ColE1 plasmid DNA replication, transposition, and possibly also transcription. Possible mechanisms of these Hfq-mediated regulations are described and discussed.

  4. An unexpected role for the yeast nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 as a reductant acting on the molecular chaperone BiP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Kevin D; Pareja, Kristeen A; Wang, Jie; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2017-01-01

    Unfavorable redox conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can decrease the capacity for protein secretion, altering vital cell functions. While systems to manage reductive stress are well-established, how cells cope with an overly oxidizing ER remains largely undefined. In previous work (Wang et al., 2014), we demonstrated that the chaperone BiP is a sensor of overly oxidizing ER conditions. We showed that modification of a conserved BiP cysteine during stress beneficially alters BiP chaperone activity to cope with suboptimal folding conditions. How this cysteine is reduced to reestablish 'normal' BiP activity post-oxidative stress has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that BiP's nucleotide exchange factor – Sil1 – can reverse BiP cysteine oxidation. This previously unexpected reductant capacity for yeast Sil1 has potential implications for the human ataxia Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, where it is interesting to speculate that a disruption in ER redox-signaling (due to genetic defects in SIL1) may influence disease pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24141.001 PMID:28257000

  5. ER stress is associated with reduced ABCA-1 protein levels in macrophages treated with advanced glycated albumin - reversal by a chemical chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Gabriela; Okuda, Ligia S; Pinto, Raphael S; Iborra, Rodgiro T; Nakandakare, Edna R; Santos, Celio X; Laurindo, Francisco R; Passarelli, Marisa

    2012-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 mediates the export of excess cholesterol from macrophages, contributing to the prevention of atherosclerosis. Advanced glycated albumin (AGE-alb) is prevalent in diabetes mellitus and is associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Independently of changes in ABCA-1 mRNA levels, AGE-alb induces oxidative stress and reduces ABCA-1 protein levels, which leads to macrophage lipid accumulation. These metabolic conditions are known to elicit endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We sought to determine if AGE-alb induces ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) in macrophages and how disturbances to the ER could affect ABCA-1 content and cholesterol efflux in macrophages. AGE-alb induced a time-dependent increase in ER stress and UPR markers. ABCA-1 content and cellular cholesterol efflux were reduced by 33% and 47%, respectively, in macrophages treated with AGE-alb, and both were restored by treatment with 4-phenyl butyric acid (a chemical chaperone that alleviates ER stress), but not MG132 (a proteasome inhibitor). Tunicamycin, a classical ER stress inductor, also impaired ABCA-1 expression and cholesterol efflux (showing a decrease of 61% and 82%, respectively), confirming the deleterious effect of ER stress in macrophage cholesterol accumulation. Glycoxidation induces macrophage ER stress, which relates to the reduction in ABCA-1 and in reverse cholesterol transport, endorsing the adverse effect of macrophage ER stress in atherosclerosis. Thus, chemical chaperones that alleviate ER stress may represent a useful tool for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis in diabetes.

  6. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  7. Spa13 of Shigella flexneri has a dual role: chaperone escort and export gate-activator switch of the type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherradi, Youness; Hachani, Abderrahman; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) is used by numerous Gram-negative pathogens to inject virulence factors into eukaryotic cells. The Shigella flexneri T3SA spans the bacterial envelope and its assembly requires the products of ~20 mxi and spa genes. Despite progress made in understanding how the T3SA is assembled, the role of several predicted soluble components, such as Spa13, remains elusive. Here, we show that the secretion defect of the spa13 mutant is associated with lack of T3SA assembly which is partly due to the instability of the needle component MxiH. In contrast to its Yersinia counterpart, Spa13 is not a secreted protein. We identified a network of interactions between Spa13 and the ATPase Spa47, the C-ring protein Spa33, and the inner-membrane protein Spa40. Moreover, we revealed a Spa13 interaction with the inner-membrane MxiA and showed that overexpression of the large cytoplasmic domain of MxiA in the WT background shuts off secretion. Lastly, we demonstrated that Spa13 interacts with the cleaved form of Spa40 and with the translocator chaperone IpgC, suggesting that Spa13 intervenes during the secretion hierarchy switch process. Collectively, our results support a dual role of Spa13 as a chaperone escort and as an export gate-activator switch.

  8. Artemin, a diapause-specific chaperone, contributes to the stress tolerance of Artemia franciscana cysts and influences their release from females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allison M; Toxopeus, Jantina; MacRae, Thomas H

    2014-05-15

    Females of the crustacean Artemia franciscana produce either motile nauplii or gastrula stage embryos enclosed in a shell impermeable to nonvolatile compounds and known as cysts. The encysted embryos enter diapause, a state of greatly reduced metabolism and profound stress tolerance. Artemin, a diapause-specific ferritin homolog in cysts has molecular chaperone activity in vitro. Artemin represents 7.2% of soluble protein in cysts, approximately equal to the amount of p26, a small heat shock protein. However, there is almost twice as much artemin mRNA in cysts as compared with p26 mRNA, suggesting that artemin mRNA is translated less efficiently. RNA interference employing the injection of artemin double-stranded RNA into the egg sacs of A. franciscana females substantially reduced artemin mRNA and protein in cysts. Decreasing artemin diminished desiccation and freezing tolerance of cysts, demonstrating a role for this protein in stress resistance. Knockdown of artemin increased the time required for complete discharge of a brood of cysts carried within a female from a few hours up to 4 days, an effect weakened in successive broods. Artemin, an abundant molecular chaperone, contributes to stress tolerance of A. franciscana cysts while influencing their development and/or exit from females.

  9. Pahenu1 is a mouse model for tetrahydrobiopterin-responsive phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency and promotes analysis of the pharmacological chaperone mechanism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersting, Søren W; Lagler, Florian B; Eichinger, Anna; Kemter, Kristina F; Danecka, Marta K; Messing, Dunja D; Staudigl, Michael; Domdey, Katharina A; Zsifkovits, Clemens; Fingerhut, Ralph; Glossmann, Hartmut; Roscher, Adelbert A; Muntau, Ania C

    2010-05-15

    The recent approval of sapropterin dihydrochloride, the synthetic form of 6[R]-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), for the treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) as the first pharmacological chaperone drug initiated a paradigm change in the treatment of monogenetic diseases. Symptomatic treatment is now replaced by a causal pharmacological therapy correcting misfolding of the defective phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) in numerous patients. Here, we disclose BH(4) responsiveness in Pah(enu1), a mouse model for PAH deficiency. Loss of function resulted from loss of PAH, a consequence of misfolding, aggregation, and accelerated degradation of the enzyme. BH(4) attenuated this triad by conformational stabilization augmenting the effective PAH concentration. This led to the rescue of the biochemical phenotype and enzyme function in vivo. Combined in vitro and in vivo analyses revealed a selective pharmaceutical action of BH(4) confined to the pathological metabolic state. Our data provide new molecular-level insights into the mechanisms underlying protein misfolding with loss of function and support a general model of pharmacological chaperone-induced stabilization of protein conformation to correct this intracellular phenotype. Pah(enu1) will be essential for pharmaceutical drug optimization and to design individually tailored therapies.

  10. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga; Hansen, Paul R; Mangor, Julie; Thielens, Nicole; Arlaud, Gérard J; Kongerslev, Leif; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2008-02-01

    The chaperone calreticulin has been suggested to function as a C1q and collectin receptor. The interaction of calreticulin with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) was investigated by solid-phase binding assays. Calreticulin showed saturable and time-dependent binding to recombinant MBL, provided that MBL was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding was observed. Interaction of calreticulin with recombinant MBL was fully inhibited by recombinant MASP-2, MASP-3 and MAp19, but not by the MASP-2 D105G and MAp19 Y59A variants characterized by defective MBL binding ability. Furthermore, MBL point mutants with impaired MASP binding showed no interaction with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion, the potential MBL co-receptor calreticulin binds to MBL at the MASP binding site and the interaction may involve a conformational change in MBL.

  11. Chaperone probes and bead-based enhancement to improve the direct detection of mRNA using silicon photonic sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindt, Jared T; Bailey, Ryan C

    2012-09-18

    Herein, we describe the utility of chaperone probes and a bead-based signal enhancement strategy for the analysis of full length mRNA transcripts using arrays of silicon photonic microring resonators. Changes in the local refractive index near microring sensors associated with biomolecular binding events are transduced as a shift in the resonant wavelength supported by the cavity, enabling the sensitive analysis of numerous analytes of interest. We employ the sensing platform for both the direct and bead-enhanced detection of three different mRNA transcripts, achieving a dynamic range spanning over 4 orders of magnitude and demonstrating expression profiling capabilities in total RNA extracts from the HL-60 cell line. Small, dual-use DNA chaperone molecules were developed and found to both enhance the binding kinetics of mRNA transcripts by disrupting complex secondary structure and serve as sequence-specific linkers for subsequent bead amplification. Importantly, this approach does not require amplification of the mRNA transcript, thereby allowing for simplified analyses that do not require expensive enzymatic reagents or temperature ramping capabilities associated with RT-PCR-based methods.

  12. Functional insight from the tetratricopeptide repeat-like motifs of the type III secretion chaperone SicA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Bae-Hoon; Jang, Jung Im; Eom, Jeong Seon; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Bang, Iel Soo; Park, Yong Keun

    2014-01-01

    SicA functions both as a class II chaperone for SipB and SipC of the type III secretion system (T3SS)-1 and as a transcriptional cofactor for the AraC-type transcription factor InvF in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bioinformatic analysis has predicted that SicA possesses three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like motifs, which are important for protein-protein interactions and serve as multiprotein complex mediators. To investigate whether the TPR-like motifs in SicA are critical for its transcriptional cofactor function, the canonical residues in these motifs were mutated to glutamate (SicAA44E , SicAA78E , and SicAG112E ). None of these mutants except SicAA44E were able to activate the expression of the sipB and sigD genes. SicAA44E still has a capacity to interact with InvF in vitro, and despite its instability in cell, it could activate the sigDE operon. This suggests that TPR motifs are important for the transcriptional cofactor function of the SicA chaperone.

  13. Chaperone protein HYPK interacts with the first 17 amino acid region of Huntingtin and modulates mutant HTT-mediated aggregation and cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Kamalika Roy [Crystallography and Molecular Biology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Centre for Neuroscience, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Bhattacharyya, Nitai P., E-mail: nitai_sinp@yahoo.com [Biomedical Genomics Centre, PG Polyclinic Building, 5, Suburbun Hospital Road, Kolkata 700020 (India)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • HYPK reduces mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. • Interaction of HYPK with HTT requires N-terminal 17 amino acid of HTT (HTT-N17). • Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to SDS-soluble, smaller, nuclear aggregates. • These smaller aggregates do not associate with HYPK and are more cytotoxic. • Maybe, interaction of HYPK with amphipathic HTT-N17 block HTT aggregate formation. - Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a polyglutamine expansion disorder, characterized by mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. Many reports suggests roles of N-terminal 17 amino acid domain of HTT (HTT-N17) towards subcellular localization, aggregate formation and subsequent pathogenicity induced by N-terminal HTT harboring polyQ stretch in pathogenic range. HYPK is a HTT-interacting chaperone which can reduce N-terminal mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity in neuronal cell lines. However, how HYPK interacts with N-terminal fragment of HTT remained unknown. Here we report that specific interaction of HYPK with HTT-N17 is crucial for the chaperone activity of HYPK. Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to formation of tinier, SDS-soluble nuclear aggregates formed by N-terminal mutant HTT. The increased cytotoxicity imparted by these tiny aggregates might be contributed due to loss of interaction with HYPK.

  14. The human TPR protein TTC4 is a putative Hsp90 co-chaperone which interacts with CDC6 and shows alterations in transformed cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Crevel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human TTC4 protein is a TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat motif-containing protein. The gene was originally identified as being localized in a genomic region linked to breast cancer and subsequent studies on melanoma cell lines revealed point mutations in the TTC4 protein that may be associated with the progression of malignant melanoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Here we show that TTC4 is a nucleoplasmic protein which interacts with HSP90 and HSP70, and also with the replication protein CDC6. It has significant structural and functional similarities with a previously characterised Drosophila protein Dpit47. We show that TTC4 protein levels are raised in malignant melanoma cell lines compared to melanocytes. We also see increased TTC4 expression in a variety of tumour lines derived from other tissues. In addition we show that TTC4 proteins bearing some of the mutations previously identified from patient samples lose their interaction with the CDC6 protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results and our previous work with the Drosophila Dpit47 protein we suggest that TTC4 is an HSP90 co-chaperone protein which forms a link between HSP90 chaperone activity and DNA replication. We further suggest that the loss of the interaction with CDC6 or with additional client proteins could provide one route through which TTC4 could influence malignant development of cells.

  15. The myosin-binding UCS domain but not the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of the UNC-45 chaperone is essential for function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weiming; Hutagalung, Alex H; Li, Shumin; Epstein, Henry F

    2011-09-15

    The UNC-45 family of molecular chaperones is expressed in metazoan organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. The UNC-45 protein is essential in C. elegans for early body-wall muscle cell development and A-band assembly. We show that the myosin-binding UCS domain of UNC-45 alone is sufficient to rescue lethal unc-45 null mutants arrested in embryonic muscle development and temperature-sensitive loss-of-function unc-45 mutants defective in worm A-band assembly. Removal of the Hsp90-binding TPR domain of UNC-45 does not affect rescue. Similar results were obtained with overexpression of the same fragments in wild-type nematodes when assayed for diminution of myosin accumulation and assembly. Titration experiments show that, on a per molecule basis, UCS has greater activity in C. elegans muscle in vivo than full-length UNC-45 protein, suggesting that UNC-45 is inhibited by either the TPR domain or its interaction with the general chaperone Hsp90. In vitro experiments with purified recombinant C. elegans Hsp90 and UNC-45 proteins show that they compete for binding to C. elegans myosin. Our in vivo genetic and in vitro biochemical experiments are consistent with a novel inhibitory role for Hsp90 with respect to UNC-45 action.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii: a bradyzoite-specific DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein.

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    Ueno, Akio; Dautu, George; Haga, Kaori; Munyaka, Biscah; Carmen, Gabriella; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Igarashi, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    The DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) gene (ToxoDB ID, TGME49_002020) is expressed predominantly at the bradyzoite stage. DnaK-TPR protein has a heat shock protein (DnaK) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains with amino acid sequence similarity to the counterparts of other organisms (40.2-43.7% to DnaK domain and 41.1-66.0% to TPR domain). These findings allowed us to infer that DnaK-TPR protein is important in the tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite development or maintenance of cyst structure although the function of this gene is still unknown. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that DnaK-TPR protein was expressed in Toxoplasma gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites and distributed in the whole part of parasite cells. We conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to identify proteins interacting with DnaK-TPR protein, and demonstrated that DnaK-TPR protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein (Tgp23). It was expected that DnaK-TPR protein would have a function as a molecular chaperon in bradyzoite cells associated with Tgp23. Possible mechanisms for this gene are discussed.

  17. Developmentally Regulated Post-translational Modification of Nucleoplasmin Controls Histone Sequestration and Deposition

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    Takashi Onikubo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoplasmin (Npm is an abundant histone chaperone in vertebrate oocytes and embryos. During embryogenesis, regulation of Npm histone binding is critical for its function in storing and releasing maternal histones to establish and maintain the zygotic epigenome. Here, we demonstrate that Xenopus laevis Npm post-translational modifications (PTMs specific to the oocyte and egg promote either histone deposition or sequestration, respectively. Mass spectrometry and Npm phosphomimetic mutations used in chromatin assembly assays identified hyperphosphorylation on the N-terminal tail as a critical regulator for sequestration. C-terminal tail phosphorylation and PRMT5-catalyzed arginine methylation enhance nucleosome assembly by promoting histone interaction with the second acidic tract of Npm. Electron microscopy reconstructions of Npm and TTLL4 activity toward the C-terminal tail demonstrate that oocyte- and egg-specific PTMs cause Npm conformational changes. Our results reveal that PTMs regulate Npm chaperoning activity by modulating Npm conformation and Npm-histone interaction, leading to histone sequestration in the egg.

  18. RIC-3 phosphorylation enables dual regulation of excitation and inhibition of Caenorhabditis elegans muscle.

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    Safdie, Gracia; Liewald, Jana F; Kagan, Sarah; Battat, Emil; Gottschalk, Alexander; Treinin, Millet

    2016-10-01

    Brain function depends on a delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Similarly, Caenorhabditis elegans motor system function depends on a precise balance between excitation and inhibition, as C. elegans muscles receive both inhibitory, GABAergic and excitatory, cholinergic inputs from motor neurons. Here we show that phosphorylation of the ER-resident chaperone of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, RIC-3, leads to increased muscle excitability. RIC-3 phosphorylation at Ser-164 depends on opposing functions of the phosphatase calcineurin (TAX-6), and of the casein kinase II homologue KIN-10. Effects of calcineurin down-regulation and of phosphorylated RIC-3 on muscle excitability are mediated by GABAA receptor inhibition. Thus RIC-3 phosphorylation enables effects of this chaperone on GABAA receptors in addition to nAChRs. This dual effect provides coordinated regulation of excitation and inhibition and enables fine-tuning of the excitation-inhibition balance. Moreover, regulation of inhibitory GABAA signaling by calcineurin, a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, enables homeostatic balancing of excitation and inhibition.

  19. Gpr177 regulates pulmonary vasculature development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Ku, Wei-yao; Fu, Jiang; Offermanns, Stefan; Hsu, Wei; Que, Jianwen

    2013-09-01

    Establishment of the functional pulmonary vasculature requires intimate interaction between the epithelium and mesenchyme. Previous genetic studies have led to inconsistent conclusions about the contribution of epithelial Wnts to pulmonary vasculature development. This discrepancy is possibly due to the functional redundancy among different Wnts. Here, we use Shh-Cre to conditionally delete Gpr177 (the mouse ortholog of Drosophila Wntless, Wls), a chaperon protein important for the sorting and secretion of Wnt proteins. Deletion of epithelial Gpr177 reduces Wnt signaling activity in both the epithelium and mesenchyme, resulting in severe hemorrhage and abnormal vasculature, accompanied by branching defects and abnormal epithelial differentiation. We then used multiple mouse models to demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not only required for the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchyme, but also is important for the maintenance of smooth muscle cells through the regulation of the transcription factor Kruppel-like factor 2 (Klf2). Together, our studies define a novel mechanism by which epithelial Wnts regulate the normal development and maintenance of pulmonary vasculature. These findings provide insight into the pathobiology of congenital lung diseases, such as alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD), that have abnormal alveolar development and dysmorphic pulmonary vasculature.

  20. Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Parakh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that results from the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Due to a lack of effective treatment, it is imperative to understand the underlying mechanisms and processes involved in disease progression. Regulations in cellular reduction/oxidation (redox processes are being increasingly implicated in disease. Here we discuss the possible involvement of redox dysregulation in the pathophysiology of ALS, either as a cause of cellular abnormalities or a consequence. We focus on its possible role in oxidative stress, protein misfolding, glutamate excitotoxicity, l