WorldWideScience

Sample records for channels mixing bursts

  1. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  2. Protograph LDPC Codes Over Burst Erasure Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Jones, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we design high rate protograph based LDPC codes suitable for binary erasure channels. To simplify the encoder and decoder implementation for high data rate transmission, the structure of codes are based on protographs and circulants. These LDPC codes can improve data link and network layer protocols in support of communication networks. Two classes of codes were designed. One class is designed for large block sizes with an iterative decoding threshold that approaches capacity of binary erasure channels. The other class is designed for short block sizes based on maximizing minimum stopping set size. For high code rates and short blocks the second class outperforms the first class.

  3. Burst pressure of phaseguide structures of different heights in all-polymer microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbarino, Francesca; Kistrup, Kasper; Rizzi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the burst/overflow pressure of water and a representative surfactant-containing buffer in microfluidic channels with phaseguide structures oriented at an angle of 90° to the channel length as a function of their height, . The all-polymer chips were...... structures were found able to pin both liquids and the burst pressure was found to increase approximately linearly with the height of the phaseguide from about 100–350 Pa for water and from about 25–200 Pa for the buffer. The burst pressure was found not to depend on the channel width and it was only weakly...... influenced by the presence of a branch on the phaseguide. For phaseguides with a branch, the liquid was always found to burst at the branch location. The measured burst pressures were compared to those estimated using a simple theory. The knowledge obtained in this study enables simple tuning of liquid...

  4. Double-Nanodomain Coupling of Calcium Channels, Ryanodine Receptors, and BK Channels Controls the Generation of Burst Firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Trussell, Laurence O

    2017-11-15

    Action potentials clustered into high-frequency bursts play distinct roles in neural computations. However, little is known about ionic currents that control the duration and probability of these bursts. We found that, in cartwheel inhibitory interneurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the likelihood of bursts and the interval between their spikelets were controlled by Ca 2+ acting across two nanodomains, one between plasma membrane P/Q Ca 2+ channels and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) ryanodine receptors and another between ryanodine receptors and large-conductance, voltage- and Ca 2+ -activated K + (BK) channels. Each spike triggered Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ release (CICR) from the ER immediately beneath somatic, but not axonal or dendritic, plasma membrane. Moreover, immunolabeling demonstrated close apposition of ryanodine receptors and BK channels. Double-nanodomain coupling between somatic plasma membrane and hypolemmal ER cisterns provides a unique mechanism for rapid control of action potentials on the millisecond timescale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-feature classifiers for burst detection in single EEG channels from preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, X.; Porée, F.; Kuchenbuch, M.; Chavez, M.; Beuchée, Alain; Carrault, G.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. The study of electroencephalographic (EEG) bursts in preterm infants provides valuable information about maturation or prognostication after perinatal asphyxia. Over the last two decades, a number of works proposed algorithms to automatically detect EEG bursts in preterm infants, but they were designed for populations under 35 weeks of post menstrual age (PMA). However, as the brain activity evolves rapidly during postnatal life, these solutions might be under-performing with increasing PMA. In this work we focused on preterm infants reaching term ages (PMA  ⩾36 weeks) using multi-feature classification on a single EEG channel. Approach. Five EEG burst detectors relying on different machine learning approaches were compared: logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k-nearest neighbors (kNN), support vector machines (SVM) and thresholding (Th). Classifiers were trained by visually labeled EEG recordings from 14 very preterm infants (born after 28 weeks of gestation) with 36-41 weeks PMA. Main results. The most performing classifiers reached about 95% accuracy (kNN, SVM and LR) whereas Th obtained 84%. Compared to human-automatic agreements, LR provided the highest scores (Cohen’s kappa  =  0.71) using only three EEG features. Applying this classifier in an unlabeled database of 21 infants  ⩾36 weeks PMA, we found that long EEG bursts and short inter-burst periods are characteristic of infants with the highest PMA and weights. Significance. In view of these results, LR-based burst detection could be a suitable tool to study maturation in monitoring or portable devices using a single EEG channel.

  6. A burst-mode photon counting receiver with automatic channel estimation and bit rate detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Hemonth G.; DeVoe, Catherine E.; Fletcher, Andrew S.; Gaschits, Igor D.; Hakimi, Farhad; Hamilton, Scott A.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Ingwersen, John G.; Kaminsky, Richard D.; Moores, John D.; Scheinbart, Marvin S.; Yarnall, Timothy M.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a multi-rate burst-mode photon-counting receiver for undersea communication at data rates up to 10.416 Mb/s over a 30-foot water channel. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of burst-mode photon-counting communication. With added attenuation, the maximum link loss is 97.1 dB at λ=517 nm. In clear ocean water, this equates to link distances up to 148 meters. For λ=470 nm, the achievable link distance in clear ocean water is 450 meters. The receiver incorporates soft-decision forward error correction (FEC) based on a product code of an inner LDPC code and an outer BCH code. The FEC supports multiple code rates to achieve error-free performance. We have selected a burst-mode receiver architecture to provide robust performance with respect to unpredictable channel obstructions. The receiver is capable of on-the-fly data rate detection and adapts to changing levels of signal and background light. The receiver updates its phase alignment and channel estimates every 1.6 ms, allowing for rapid changes in water quality as well as motion between transmitter and receiver. We demonstrate on-the-fly rate detection, channel BER within 0.2 dB of theory across all data rates, and error-free performance within 1.82 dB of soft-decision capacity across all tested code rates. All signal processing is done in FPGAs and runs continuously in real time.

  7. Studying the formation of non-linear bursts in fully turbulent channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encinar, Miguel P.; Jimenez, Javier

    2017-11-01

    Linear transient growth has been suggested as a possible explanation for the intermittent behaviour, or `bursting', in shear flows with a stable mean velocity profile. Analysing fully non-linear DNS databases yields a similar Orr+lift-up mechanism, but acting on spatially localised wave packets rather than on monochromatic infinite wavetrains. The Orr mechanism requires the presence of backwards-leaning wall-normal velocity perturbations as initial condition, but the linear theory fails to clarify how these perturbations are formed. We investigate the latter in a time-resolved wavelet-filtered turbulent channel database, which allows us to assign an amplitude and an inclination angle to a flow region of selected size. This yields regions that match the dynamics of linear Orr for short times. We find that a short streamwise velocity (u) perturbation (i.e. a streak meander) consistently appears before the burst, but disappears before the burst reaches its maximum amplitude. Lift-up then generates a longer streamwise velocity perturbation. The initial streamwise velocity is also found to be backwards-leaning, contrary to the averaged energy-containing scales, which are known to be tilted forward. Funded by the ERC COTURB project.

  8. Bursting Events in Pressure Flushing with Expanding Bottom Outlet Channel within Dam Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    soheila Tofighi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Currently, large dams in the world, due to the high amount of sediments in the reservoir, especially around the intake, have operational problems. One of the solutions for this problem is pressure flushing. In this type of flushing, a mixture of water and sediment is removed from bottom outlets form dam reservoir and a funnel shaped crater is created in the vicinity of the outlet opening. In laboratory experiments carried out in this study, pressure flushing with the expansion of bottom outlet within the reservoir and its statistical analysis of bursting events were investigated. The structure of the turbulent flow is not fully understood due to their complexity and random nature. Klein et al. Introduced the turbulence bursting in this kind of flow and Nezo and Nakagora suggested that the events resulting from turbulence bursting has a significant effect of transferring the sediment particles. Materials and Methods: For the purposes of this study, the experiments were conducted with a physical model with 7m length, 1.4m width, and 1.5m height, consisting of three parts namely the inlet of the model, the main reservoir, and settling basin. The main reservoir of the model was 5m long and the sediments were placed within this part of the model. The sediment particles were non-cohesive silica with uniform size and with median diameter (d50 1.15mm and geometrics standard deviation (σg 1.37. Experiments carried out with different discharges and water depths above the bottom outlet in different expansion size of outlet channel in constant sediment level of 20cm above the center of the outlet channel. The model was slowly filled with water until the water surface elevation reached to a desired level. The bottom outlet was manually opened, after a while sedimentwere discharged with the water flow in very high concentrations through the outlet channel (sudden discharge and a funnel shaped crater was formed in front of it. After the run of

  9. Disguising quantum channels by mixing and channel distance trade-off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Chau, H F

    2014-01-01

    We consider the reverse problem of the distinguishability of two quantum channels, which we call the disguising problem. Given two quantum channels, the goal here is to make the two channels identical by mixing with some other channels with minimal mixing probabilities. This quantifies how much one channel can disguise as the other. In addition, the possibility to trade-off between the two mixing probabilities allows one channel to be more preserved (less mixed) at the expense of the other. We derive lower- and upper-bounds of the trade-off curve and apply them to a few example channels. Optimal trade-off is obtained in one example. We relate the disguising problem and the distinguishability problem by showing that the former can lower and upper bound the diamond norm. We also show that the disguising problem gives an upper-bound on the key generation rate in quantum cryptography. (paper)

  10. On S-mixing entropy of quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Watanabe, Noboru

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, an S-mixing entropy of quantum channels is introduced as a generalization of Ohya's S-mixing entropy. We investigate several properties of the introduced entropy. Moreover, certain relations between the S-mixing entropy and the existing map and output entropies of quantum channels are investigated as well. These relations allowed us to find certain connections between separable states and the introduced entropy. Hence, there is a sufficient condition to detect entangled states. Moreover, several properties of the introduced entropy are investigated. Besides, entropies of qubit and phase-damping channels are calculated.

  11. Localised burst reconstruction from space-time PODs in a turbulent channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, Adrian; Jimenez, Javier

    2017-11-01

    The traditional proper orthogonal decomposition of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in a channel is extended to time under the assumption that the attractor is statistically stationary and can be treated as periodic for long-enough times. The objective is to extract space- and time-localised eddies that optimally represent the kinetic energy (and two-event correlation) of the flow. Using time-resolved data of a small-box simulation at Reτ = 1880 , minimal for y / h 0.25 , PODs are computed from the two-point spectral-density tensor Φ(kx ,kz , y ,y' , ω) . They are Fourier components in x, z and time, and depend on y and on the temporal frequency ω, or, equivalently, on the convection velocity c = ω /kx . Although the latter depends on y, a spatially and temporally localised `burst' can be synthesised by adding a range of PODs with specific phases. The results are localised bursts that are amplified and tilted, in a time-periodic version of Orr-like behaviour. Funded by the ERC COTURB project.

  12. Fractal-Markovian scaling of turbulent bursting process in open channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavarzi, Ali Reza; Ziaei, Ali Naghi; Homayoun, Emdad; Shirvani, Amin

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent coherent structure of flow in open channel is a chaotic and stochastic process in nature. The coherence structure of the flow or bursting process consists of a series of eddies with a variety of different length scales and it is very important for the entrainment of sediment particles from the bed. In this study, a fractal-Markovian process is applied to the measured turbulent data in open channel. The turbulent data was measured in an experimental flume using three-dimensional acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADV). A fractal interpolation function (FIF) algorithm was used to simulate more than 500,000 time series data of measured instantaneous velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stress. The fractal interpolation functions (FIF) enables to simulate and construct time series of u', v', and u'v' for any particular movement and state in the Markov process. The fractal dimension of the bursting events is calculated for 16 particular movements with the transition probability of the events based on 1st order Markov process. It was found that the average fractal dimensions of the streamwise flow velocity (u') are; 1.73, 1.74, 1.71 and 1.74 with the transition probability of 60.82%, 63.77%, 59.23% and 62.09% for the 1-1, 2-2, 3-3 and 4-4 movements, respectively. It was also found that the fractal dimensions of Reynold stress u'v' for quadrants 1, 2, 3 and 4 are 1.623, 1.623, 1.625 and 1.618, respectively

  13. Probing the quantumness of channels with mixed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeseler, Hauke; Luetkenhaus, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    We present an alternative approach to the derivation of benchmarks for quantum channels, such as memory or teleportation channels. Using the concept of effective entanglement and the verification thereof, a testing procedure is derived which demands very few experimental resources. The procedure is generalized by allowing for mixed test states. By constructing optimized measure and reprepare channels, the benchmarks are found to be very tight in the considered experimental regimes.

  14. Mixed convection in a baffled grooved channel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 16 May 2014; revised 19 October 2014; accepted 06 November 2014. Abstract. In the present numerical work, flow structure and heat transfer charac- teristics are investigated in a baffled grooved channel, differentially heated from the sides. The baffle is placed vertically downward from the top wall of grooved ...

  15. Microfluidic mixing in a Y-junction open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Nee Tan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the laminar regimes typical of microfluidic systems’, mixing is governed by molecular diffusion; however this process is slow in nature. Consequently, passive or active methods are usually sought for effective mixing. In this work, open fluidic channels will be investigated; these channels are bounded on all but one face by an air/fluid interface. Firstly, it will be shown that flow in open channels can merge at a Y-junction in a stable manner; hence two fluids can be brought into contact with each other. Secondly, the mixing of these two fluids will be studied. At high flow rates (>300 μl/min mixing occurs at the junction without need for additional intervention, this mixing is far swifter than can be expected from molecular diffusion. At lower flow rates, intervention is required. A major motivation for open fluidic channels is the ability to interact with the surrounding air environment; this feature is used to effect the desired mixing. It is shown that by blowing an air jet across the junction, shear stresses at the air/fluid interface causes a flow profile within the fluid inductive to rapid mixing of the fluids.

  16. Chaotic mixing in a planar, curved channel using periodic slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, P.; Picardo, J. R.; Pushpavanam, S.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel strategy for designing chaotic micromixers using curved channels confined between two flat planes. The location of the separatrix between the Dean vortices, induced by centrifugal forces, is dependent on the location of the maxima of axial velocity. An asymmetry in the axial velocity profile can change the location of the separatrix. This is achieved physically by introducing slip alternatingly at the top and bottom walls. This leads to streamline crossing and Lagrangian chaos. An approximate analytical solution of the velocity field is obtained using perturbation theory. This is used to find the Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles. Poincare sections taken at periodic locations in the axial direction are used to study the extent of chaos. We study two microchannel designs, called circlet and serpentine, in which the Dean vortices in adjacent half cells are co-rotating and counter-rotating, respectively. The extent of mixing, at low Re and low slip length, is shown to be greater in the serpentine case. Wide channels are observed to have much better mixing than tall channels; an important observation not made for separatrix flows till now. Eulerian indicators are used to gauge the extent of mixing, with varying slip length, and it is shown that an optimum slip length exists which maximizes the mixing in a particular geometry. Once the parameter space of relatively high mixing is identified, detailed variance computations are carried out to identify the detailed features

  17. Chaotic mixing in a planar, curved channel using periodic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, P.; Picardo, J. R.; Pushpavanam, S.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel strategy for designing chaotic micromixers using curved channels confined between two flat planes. The location of the separatrix between the Dean vortices, induced by centrifugal forces, is dependent on the location of the maxima of axial velocity. An asymmetry in the axial velocity profile can change the location of the separatrix. This is achieved physically by introducing slip alternatingly at the top and bottom walls. This leads to streamline crossing and Lagrangian chaos. An approximate analytical solution of the velocity field is obtained using perturbation theory. This is used to find the Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles. Poincare sections taken at periodic locations in the axial direction are used to study the extent of chaos. We study two microchannel designs, called circlet and serpentine, in which the Dean vortices in adjacent half cells are co-rotating and counter-rotating, respectively. The extent of mixing, at low Re and low slip length, is shown to be greater in the serpentine case. Wide channels are observed to have much better mixing than tall channels; an important observation not made for separatrix flows till now. Eulerian indicators are used to gauge the extent of mixing, with varying slip length, and it is shown that an optimum slip length exists which maximizes the mixing in a particular geometry. Once the parameter space of relatively high mixing is identified, detailed variance computations are carried out to identify the detailed features.

  18. Turbulent mixed convection in asymmetrically heated vertical channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Ameni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an investigation of mixed convection from vertical heated channel is undertaken. The aim is to explore the heat transfer obtained by adding a forced flow, issued from a flat nozzle located in the entry section of a channel, to the up-going fluid along its walls. Forced and free convection are combined studied in order to increase the cooling requirements. The study deals with both symmetrically and asymmetrically heated channel. The Reynolds number based on the nozzle width and the jet velocity is assumed to be 3 103 and 2.104; whereas, the Rayleigh number based on the channel length and the wall temperature difference varies from 2.57 1010 to 5.15 1012. The heating asymmetry effect on the flow development including the mean velocity and temperature the local Nusselt number, the mass flow rate and heat transfer are examined.

  19. Self-mixing differential vibrometer based on electronic channel subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donati, Silvano; Norgia, Michele; Giuliani, Guido

    2006-01-01

    An instrument for noncontact measurement of differential vibrations is developed, based on the self-mixing interferometer. As no reference arm is available in the self-mixing configuration, the differential mode is obtained by electronic subtraction of signals from two (nominally equal) vibrometer channels, taking advantage that channels are servo stabilized and thus insensitive to speckle and other sources of amplitude fluctuation. We show that electronic subtraction is nearly as effective as field superposition. Common-mode suppression is 25-30 dB, the dynamic range (amplitude) is in excess of 100 μm, and the minimum measurable (differential) amplitude is 20 nm on aB=10 kHz bandwidth. The instrument has been used to measure vibrations of two metal samples kept in contact, revealing the hysteresis cycle in the microslip and gross-slip regimes, which are of interest in the study of friction induced vibration damping of gas turbine blades for aircraft applications

  20. Bud burst and flowering phenology in a mixed oak forest from Eastern Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Nicoleta Chesnoiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bud burst and flowering phenology have been observed in year 2008 in a natural white oak species complex situated in eastern Romania. A total of 300 mature individuals was mapped and identified based on leaf morphology. The community consists of four oak species: Quercus pedunculiflora, Q. robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petraea. A set of 28 individuals could not be unambiguously classified to one or another species. Data on bud burst showed a normal distribution and the differences among species were small. The "very late" flushing was recorded on 15th of April, three weeks later when compared to early flushing individuals. The time period between the bud burst and the complete development of leaves was nearly the same in all oak species, varying on average, between 18.4 and 20.6 days. The spatial distribution of phenological groups within the complex appears to be non-randomly, because in many parts of the study plot exist groups in which most of the trees belong to the same phenological category. Our results indicate an overlap in flowering time for all oak species which occur in the area. The data support the hypothesis that interspecific gene flow is possible between closely related oak species.

  1. Bud burst and flowering phenology in a mixed oak forest from Eastern Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Nicoleta Chesnoiu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Bud burst and flowering phenology have been observed in year 2008 ina natural white oak species complex situated in eastern Romania. A total of 300 mature individuals was mapped and identified based on leaf morphology. The community consists of four oak species: Quercus pedunculiflora, Q. robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petraea. A set of 28 individuals could not be unambiguously classified to one or another species. Data on bud burst showed a normal distribution and the differences among species were small. The "very late" flushing was recorded on 15th of April, three weeks later when compared to early flushing individuals. The time period between the bud burst and the complete development of leaves was nearly the same in all oak species, varying on average, between 18.4 and 20.6 days. The spatialdistribution of phenological groups within the complex appears to be non-randomly, because in many parts of the study plot exist groups in which most of the trees belong to the same phenological category. Our results indicate an overlap in flowering time for all oak species which occur in the area. The data support the hypothesis that interspecific gene flow is possible between closely related oak species.

  2. A review on the analysis and experiment of fluid flow and mixing in micro-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sang Mo; Suh, Yong Kweon; Jayaraj, Simon

    2007-01-01

    The studies with respect to micro-channels and micro-mixers are expanding in many dimensions. Most significant area of micro-mixer study is the flow analysis in various micro-channel configurations. The flow phenomena in microchannel devices are quite different from that of the macro-scale devices. An attempt is made here to review the important recent literature available in the area of micro-channel flow analysis and mixing. The topics covered include the physics of flow in micro-channels and integrated simulation of the micro-channel flow. Also, the flow control models and electro-kinetically driven micro-channel flows are dealt in detail. A survey of important numerical methods, which are currently popular for micro-channel flow analysis, is carried out. Different options for mixing in microchannels are provided, in sufficient detail

  3. On-line gas mixing and multi-channel distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmani, S.D.; Mondal, N.K.; Satyanarayana, B.; Verma, P.; Joshi, Avinash

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, we describe a mass-flow controller based on-line gas mixing unit with the multi-channel distribution system. We highlight different aspects such as requirement, design, calibration, control and operation of this system. This unit has the capability to mix up to four different input gases and distribute over 16 output channels. Output in individual channels is controlled accurately by using capillary-based system. At present, we are using this gas mixing unit for prototype of iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector of India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO).

  4. Experiments and CFD Modelling of Turbulent Mass Transfer in a Mixing Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertager Osenbroch, Lene Kristin; Hjertager, Bjørn H.; Solberg, Tron

    2006-01-01

    . Three different flow cases are studied. The 2D numerical predictions of the mixing channel show that none of the k-ε turbulence models tested is suitable for the flow cases studied here. The turbulent Schmidt number is reduced to obtain a better agreement between measured and predicted mean......Experiments are carried out for passive mixing in order to obtain local mean and turbulent velocities and concentrations. The mixing takes place in a square channel with two inlets separated by a block. A combined PIV/PLIF technique is used to obtain instantaneous velocity and concentration fields...... and fluctuating concentrations. The multi-peak presumed PDF mixing model is tested....

  5. Teleportation with an Arbitrary Mixed Resource as a Trace-Preserving Quantum Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergio Albeverio; FEI Shao-Ming; YANG Wen-Li

    2002-01-01

    General conditions are given in order to perform a perfect teleportation process in the case where theHilbert spaces involved have different dimensions. An explicit expression is obtained for the quantum channel associatedwith the standard teleportation protocol To with an arbitrary mixed state resource. The transmission fidelity of thecorresponding quantum channel is given.

  6. Covert Channels and Simple Timed Mix-Firewalls

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Traditional methods for evaluating the amount of anonymity afforded by various Mix configurations have depended on either measuring the size of the set of possible senders of a particular message (anonymity set size...

  7. Salt Intrusion, Tides and Mixing in Multi-channel Estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-channel estuaries, such as the Mekong Delta in Vietnam and the Scheldt in the Netherlands, have characteristics of both the river and the sea, forming a unique environment influenced by tidal movements of the sea and freshwater flow of the river. This study addresses a number of knowledge gaps

  8. Participants Provide Mixed Reports about Learning from Channel One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Janice M.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates Channel One's educational benefits to teachers and students. Finds benefits are a student-heightened interest in geography, current events, and pop quizzes; and disadvantages are the commercials, superficial programming, intrusion into the school day, lack of integration into the curriculum, and limited availability of the equipment…

  9. Investigation of Size Effects to the Mixing Performance on the X-shaped Micro-Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the developing of micro-electro-mechanical-system, MEMS, the fabrication of the microminiaturization devices becomes obviously important. The advances in the basic understanding of fluid physics have opened an era of application of fluid dynamics systems using microchannels. The purpose of this study is to research the flow transport phenomenon by employing different kinds of micro-channel sizing in X-shaped micro-channels. As the working fluid, water is injected to microchannel at different mass flow rate. Over a wide range of flow condition, 1.06 < Re < 514, in X-shaped micro-channels, the mixture performances of numerical simulation, flow visualization, and temperature distribution remain the same. At the same mass flow rate as the Reynolds number below 112.53, the biggest channel size had the slowest flow velocity and got the best mixing performance; as the Reynolds number above 112.53, the smaller the channel sizing, the lower the pressure drops and the faster velocity becomes. The transition form early from laminar flow, the unsteady flow is an advantage for mixing in the limited mixing area, therefore 0.7 mm got the best mixing performance. It is clear that the size of the channel plays an important role in the X-shaped micro-channels.

  10. CFD analysis of supercritical water flow and heat transfer in single channel with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Guoping; Xie Hongyan; Yu Tao

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional rectangular channel with the mixing wane in supercritical water reactor is investigated with CFX. The mixing vane elevation influenced on temperature distribution and flow field are simulated in the model. The results showed the mixing vane cause fluid circumferential flow, making flow hot and cold fluids mixed and fluid temperature uniform distribution, effectively improve the fuel rod surface temperature distribution and reduced hot temperature. Among the mixing wing elevation of 15, 30, 45, 50, 60 and 70 angle, the 30 angle is the best case in improving temperature distribution. (authors)

  11. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-12-16

    channel types participate in action potential repolarization about equally, they have contrasting and partially opposite effects in regulating neuronal firing at frequencies typical of bursting. Our analysis shows that this results from their different kinetic properties, with fast-activating BK channels serving to short-circuit activation of Kv2 channels, which tend to slow firing by producing a deep afterhyperpolarization. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3516404-14$15.00/0.

  12. Covert Channels and Simple Timed Mix-Firewalls

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newman, Richard

    2004-01-01

    .... Initial work considered a simple model where an observer (Eve) was restricted to counting the number of messages leaving a Mix configured as a firewall guarding the enclave with one malicious sender (Alice) and some other naive senders (Clueless's). Here, we consider the case where Eve can distinguish between multiple destinations, and the senders can select to which destination their message (if any) is sent each clock tick.

  13. Defensin-like ZmES4 mediates pollen tube burst in maize via opening of the potassium channel KZM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suseno Amien

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to animals and lower plant species, sperm cells of flowering plants are non-motile and are transported to the female gametes via the pollen tube, i.e. the male gametophyte. Upon arrival at the female gametophyte two sperm cells are discharged into the receptive synergid cell to execute double fertilization. The first players involved in inter-gametophyte signaling to attract pollen tubes and to arrest their growth have been recently identified. In contrast the physiological mechanisms leading to pollen tube burst and thus sperm discharge remained elusive. Here, we describe the role of polymorphic defensin-like cysteine-rich proteins ZmES1-4 (Zea mays embryo sac from maize, leading to pollen tube growth arrest, burst, and explosive sperm release. ZmES1-4 genes are exclusively expressed in the cells of the female gametophyte. ZmES4-GFP fusion proteins accumulate in vesicles at the secretory zone of mature synergid cells and are released during the fertilization process. Using RNAi knock-down and synthetic ZmES4 proteins, we found that ZmES4 induces pollen tube burst in a species-preferential manner. Pollen tube plasma membrane depolarization, which occurs immediately after ZmES4 application, as well as channel blocker experiments point to a role of K(+-influx in the pollen tube rupture mechanism. Finally, we discovered the intrinsic rectifying K(+ channel KZM1 as a direct target of ZmES4. Following ZmES4 application, KZM1 opens at physiological membrane potentials and closes after wash-out. In conclusion, we suggest that vesicles containing ZmES4 are released from the synergid cells upon male-female gametophyte signaling. Subsequent interaction between ZmES4 and KZM1 results in channel opening and K(+ influx. We further suggest that K(+ influx leads to water uptake and culminates in osmotic tube burst. The species-preferential activity of polymorphic ZmES4 indicates that the mechanism described represents a pre-zygotic hybridization

  14. Defensin-Like ZmES4 Mediates Pollen Tube Burst in Maize via Opening of the Potassium Channel KZM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márton, Mihaela L.; Debener, Thomas; Geiger, Dietmar; Becker, Dirk; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to animals and lower plant species, sperm cells of flowering plants are non-motile and are transported to the female gametes via the pollen tube, i.e. the male gametophyte. Upon arrival at the female gametophyte two sperm cells are discharged into the receptive synergid cell to execute double fertilization. The first players involved in inter-gametophyte signaling to attract pollen tubes and to arrest their growth have been recently identified. In contrast the physiological mechanisms leading to pollen tube burst and thus sperm discharge remained elusive. Here, we describe the role of polymorphic defensin-like cysteine-rich proteins ZmES1-4 (Zea mays embryo sac) from maize, leading to pollen tube growth arrest, burst, and explosive sperm release. ZmES1-4 genes are exclusively expressed in the cells of the female gametophyte. ZmES4-GFP fusion proteins accumulate in vesicles at the secretory zone of mature synergid cells and are released during the fertilization process. Using RNAi knock-down and synthetic ZmES4 proteins, we found that ZmES4 induces pollen tube burst in a species-preferential manner. Pollen tube plasma membrane depolarization, which occurs immediately after ZmES4 application, as well as channel blocker experiments point to a role of K+-influx in the pollen tube rupture mechanism. Finally, we discovered the intrinsic rectifying K+ channel KZM1 as a direct target of ZmES4. Following ZmES4 application, KZM1 opens at physiological membrane potentials and closes after wash-out. In conclusion, we suggest that vesicles containing ZmES4 are released from the synergid cells upon male-female gametophyte signaling. Subsequent interaction between ZmES4 and KZM1 results in channel opening and K+ influx. We further suggest that K+ influx leads to water uptake and culminates in osmotic tube burst. The species-preferential activity of polymorphic ZmES4 indicates that the mechanism described represents a pre-zygotic hybridization barrier and may be a

  15. Numerical study of mixed convection heat transfer enhancement in a channel with active flow modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billah, Md. Mamun; Khan, Md Imran; Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur; Alam, Muntasir; Saha, Sumon; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2017-06-01

    A numerical study of steady two dimensional mixed convention heat transfer phenomena in a rectangular channel with active flow modulation is carried out in this investigation. The flow in the channel is modulated via a rotating cylinder placed at the center of the channel. In this study the top wall of the channel is subjected to an isothermal low temperature while a discrete isoflux heater is positioned on the lower wall. The fluid flow under investigation is assumed to have a Prandtl number of 0.71 while the Reynolds No. and the Grashof No. are varied in wide range for four different situations such as: i) plain channel with no cylinder, ii) channel with stationary cylinder, iii) channel with clockwise rotating cylinder and iv) channel with counter clockwise rotating cylinder. The results obtained in this study are presented in terms of the distribution of streamlines, isotherms in the channel while the heat transfer process from the heat source is evaluated in terms of the local Nusselt number, average Nusselt number. The outcomes of this study also indicate that the results are strongly dependent on the type of configuration and direction of rotation of the cylinder and that the average Nusselt number value rises with an increase in Reynolds and Grashof numbers but the correlation between these parameters at higher values of Reynolds and Grashof numbers becomes weak.

  16. Channel coupling in heavy quarkonia: Energy levels, mixing, widths, and new states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilkin, I. V.; Simonov, Yu. A.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of channel coupling via decay products is used to study energy shifts, level mixing as well as the possibility of new near-threshold resonances in cc, bb systems. The Weinberg eigenvalue method is formulated in the multichannel problems, which allows one to describe coupled-channel resonances and wave functions in a unitary way, and to predict new states due to channel coupling. Realistic wave functions for all single-channel states and decay matrix elements computed earlier are exploited, and no new fitting parameters are involved. Examples of level shifts, widths, and mixings are presented; the dynamical origin of X(3872) and the destiny of the single-channel 2 3 P 1 (cc) state are clarified. As a result a sharp and narrow peak in the state with quantum numbers J PC =1 ++ is found at 3.872 GeV, while the single-channel resonance originally around 3.940 GeV becomes increasingly broad and disappears with growing coupling to open channels.

  17. Experimental and Computational Studies of Turbulent Mass Transfer in a Mixing Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertager, Lene Kristin; Hjertager, Bjørn H.; Solberg, Tron

    2008-01-01

    . Three different flow cases are studied. The 2D numerical predictions of the mixing channel show that none of the k- ε turbulence models tested is suitable for the flow cases studied here. The turbulent Schmidt number is reduced to obtain a better agreement between measured and predicted mean...

  18. Mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a vertical wavy channel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a vertical wavy channel filled with porous and fluid layers is studied analytically. The flow in the porous medium is modeled using Darcy-Brinkman equation. The coupled non-linear partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved ...

  19. Effect of flow rate distribution at the inlet on hydrodynamic mixing in narrow rectangular multi-channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianjun; Chen Bingde; Wang Xiaojun

    2008-01-01

    Flow and heat transfer in the narrow rectangular multi-channel is widely en- countered in the engineering application, hydrodynamic mixing in the narrow rectangular multi-channel is one of the important concerns. With the help of the Computational Fluid Dynamics code CFX, the effect of flow rate distribution of the main channel at the inlet on hydrodynamic mixing in the narrow rectangular multi-channel is numerical simulated. The results show that the flow rate distributions at the inlet have a great effect on hydrodynamics mixing in multi-channel, the flow rate in the main channel doesn't change with increasing the axial mixing section when the average flow rate at the inlet is set. Hydrodynamic mixing will arise in the mixing section when the different ratio of the flow rate distribution at the inlet is set, and hydrodynamic mixing increases with the difference of the flow rate distribution at the inlet increase. The trend of the flow rate distribution of the main channel is consistent during the whole axial mixing section, and hydrodynamic mixing in former 4 mixing section is obvious. (authors)

  20. Mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic flow in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fully developed mixed convection flow in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field has been studied. Closed form solutions for the fluid temperature, velocity and induced magnetic field are obtained for both the buoyancy-aided and -opposed flows. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper, aluminium oxide and titanium dioxide are taken into consideration. Effects of the pertinent parameters on the nanofluid temperature, velocity, and induced magnetic field as well as the shear stress and the rate of heat transfer at the channel wall are shown in figures and tables followed by a quantitative discussion. It is found that the magnetic field tends to enhance the nanofluid velocity in the channel. The induced magnetic field vanishes in the cental region of the channel. The critical Rayleigh number at onset of instability of flow is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of nanoparticles and the magnetic field.

  1. Seasonal variability of the diapycnal mixing in the Canary Islands channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Santana, Angel; Marrero-Díaz, Angeles; Machín, Francisco Jose; García-Weil, Luis; Sangrà, Pablo; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Estrada-Allis, Sheila

    2014-05-01

    Trimonthly surveys of XBT and XCTD (Expandable Bathytermograph and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth) crossing the whole Canary Islands channels were carried out (projects TRAMIC and PROMECA) from November 2012 until September 2013 using opportunity ships (Naviera Armas Ferries). With this data set and using salinity analytical relationships (Machín et al, 2010), vertical sections of temperature and potential density were obtained for each channel and season. In order to estimate the intensity of the diapycnal mixing in the first 500 m of the pycnocline, vertical sections of Thorpe length scale, Turner angle and gradient Richardson number (from the geostrophic vertical shear) were calculated for all the cases. The first results show how the diapycnal mixing due to the vertical shear instabilities is more intense close to the islands and in summer when the seasonal pycnocline is present. Mixing due to double diffusion processes (salt fingers) was found without sizable changes in the permanent pycnocline. Net turbulence diffusivities and diapycnal diffusive fluxes with their variability spatial and temporal will be estimate for each channel taking into account that processes of double diffusion and turbulence induced by vertical shear are present at the same time. Additionally the results obtained from hydrographic data from the cruise RAPROCAN-2013 (IEO) (October 2013) around Canary Islands will be used to compare them with the channels results. This work was co-funded by Canary Government (TRAMIC project: PROID20100092), European Union (FEDER) and Spanish Government (PROMECA: CTM2008-04057/MAR and CTM2009-06993-E/MAR)

  2. Thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of forced and mixed convection flow through vertical rectangular channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi Abdalla S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical studies for the case of turbulent forced and mixed convection flow of water through narrow vertical rectangular channel. The channel is composed of two parallel plates which are heated at a uniform heat flux, whereas, the other two sides of the channel are thermally insulated. The plates are of 64 mm in width, 800 mm in height, and separated from each other at a narrow gap of 2.7 mm. The Nusselt number distribution along the flow direction normalized by the Nusselt number for the case of turbulent forced convection flow is obtained experimentally with a comparison with the numerical results obtained from a commercial computer code. The quantitative determination of the nor- malized Nusselt number with respect to the dimension-less number Z = (Gr/Re21/8Pr0.5 is presented with a comparison with previous experimental results. Qualitative results are presented for the normalized temperature and velocity profiles in the transverse direction with a comparison between the forced and mixed convection flow for both the cases of upward and downward flow directions. The effect of the axial locations and the parameter Gr/Re on the variation of the normalized temperature profiles in the transverse direction for both the regions of forced and mixed convection and for both of the upward and downward flow directions are obtained. The normalized velocity profiles in the transverse directions are also determined at different inlet velocity and heat fluxes for the previous cases. It is found that the normalized Nusselt number is greater than one in the mixed convection region for both the cases of upward and downward flow and correlated well with the dimension-less parameter Z for both of the forced and mixed convection regions. The temperature profiles increase with increasing the axial location along the flow direction or the parameter Gr/Re for both of the forced and mixed convection regions, but this increase is

  3. Experimental and numerical studies on the mixing at the intersection of millimetric channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etcheverry, F; Cachile, M [LIA-Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de Ingenieria, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gomba, J M [Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco, UNCPBA, Tandil (Argentina); Wolluschek, C, E-mail: mcachil@fi.uba.ar [Mecanica de Fluidos e Ingenieria Termica, Centro tecnologico Cemitec, Noain, Navarra (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical results on the effect of diffusion and geometrical dispersion on the mixing of confluent flows are presented. Two channels with an internal diameter D{sub h} = 4 mm intersect with an angle {alpha} = 30,60,90,120,150,180{sup 0}. The experimental setup allows to accurately control the flow rate and assures a constant flow at both inlets. The mixing properties are studied by injecting pure water in one inlet and colored water at the other. The effects of the inlet flow and the intersection angle on the diffusion of ink is analyzed. We observed that the mixing by convection is only important for {alpha} = 180{sup 0}. For other angles, diffusion is the main mechanism for mixing.

  4. Experimental and numerical studies on the mixing at the intersection of millimetric channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etcheverry, F; Cachile, M; Gomba, J M; Wolluschek, C

    2011-01-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical results on the effect of diffusion and geometrical dispersion on the mixing of confluent flows are presented. Two channels with an internal diameter D h = 4 mm intersect with an angle α = 30,60,90,120,150,180 0 . The experimental setup allows to accurately control the flow rate and assures a constant flow at both inlets. The mixing properties are studied by injecting pure water in one inlet and colored water at the other. The effects of the inlet flow and the intersection angle on the diffusion of ink is analyzed. We observed that the mixing by convection is only important for α = 180 0 . For other angles, diffusion is the main mechanism for mixing.

  5. Plasma streams mixing in two-channel t-shaped magnetic filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.; Aksenov, I.I.; Luchaninov, A.A.; Reshetnyak, E.N.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    Ti-Al-N films were deposited by vacuum arc method. T-shaped magnetic filter with two channels was used for films preparation. Deposition was performed after aluminum and titanium separate plasma streams from two plasma sources were mixed into single one inside plasma duct having weakened magnetic field near its output. Obtained films have uniform distribution of composition and thickness on 180 mm diameter substrate surface. It was found that mixing and homogenization degree depends on nitrogen pressure, output magnetic field intensity and output- to-substrate distance. Film self-sputtering and aluminum preferential sputtering were observed for elevated negative substrate bias potentials.

  6. Investigating the Lateral Mixing Coefficient in a Compound Channel with Emergent Vegetation over the Floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein hamidifar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Water quality control is very important for people, animals and plants. Predicting the spread of contaminants is important for managing and protecting rivers and streams to the balance of the ecosystem. Pollutants are introduced into waterways, though a variety of sources such as point and non-point sources. Under steady state conditions, where longitudinal mixing is not significant, studying the lateral mixing is essential in evaluating the influence of pollutants on water quality. Lateral or transverse mixing is the hydraulic process by which a plume of contaminant spreads laterally and dilutes. In water quality management, the transverse mixing is more significant than either vertical or longitudinal dispersion, especially, when dealing with the release of wastes from point sources. Hence, a wide range of field, laboratory and numerical modelling approaches, including laboratory and field measurements, and analytical and numerical investigations have been developed, to quantify the lateral mixing coefficient. However, most of the researchers have ignored the effects of vegetation on the lateral mixing process in their studies. Many studies have shown that the flow characteristics through vegetation are different from those in non-vegetated waterways. For example, laboratory studies have revealed that flow velocity and large-scale turbulence tend to be greatly decreased within a plant canopy, because the resistance to flow by the vegetation. Also, vegetation affects the transport of dissolved and particulate material, such as sediment, nutrients and pollutants. In this study, the effect of the floodplain vegetation on lateral mixing coefficient in compound channels is investigated experimentally. Also, a comparison is made between the results of the present study with those obtained by previous researchers. Materials and Methods: Experiments were carried out in a laboratory flume 18m long, 0.9m wide and 0.6m high with an

  7. Effect of flow and peristaltic mixing on bacterial growth in a gut-like channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Jonas; Segota, Igor; Yang, Chih-yu; Arnoldini, Markus; Sauls, John T.; Zhang, Zhongge; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Hwa, Terence

    2016-01-01

    The ecology of microbes in the gut has been shown to play important roles in the health of the host. To better understand microbial growth and population dynamics in the proximal colon, the primary region of bacterial growth in the gut, we built and applied a fluidic channel that we call the “minigut.” This is a channel with an array of membrane valves along its length, which allows mimicking active contractions of the colonic wall. Repeated contraction is shown to be crucial in maintaining a steady-state bacterial population in the device despite strong flow along the channel that would otherwise cause bacterial washout. Depending on the flow rate and the frequency of contractions, the bacterial density profile exhibits varying spatial dependencies. For a synthetic cross-feeding community, the species abundance ratio is also strongly affected by mixing and flow along the length of the device. Complex mixing dynamics due to contractions is described well by an effective diffusion term. Bacterial dynamics is captured by a simple reaction–diffusion model without adjustable parameters. Our results suggest that flow and mixing play a major role in shaping the microbiota of the colon. PMID:27681630

  8. Mixed-Modality Stimulation to Evoke Two Modalities Simultaneously in One Channel for Electrocutaneous Sensory Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyunghwan; Kim, Pyungkang; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2017-12-01

    One of the long-standing challenges in upper limb prosthetics is restoring the sensory feedback that is missing due to amputation. Two approaches have previously been presented to provide various types of sensory information to users, namely, multi-modality sensory feedback and using an array of single-modality stimulators. However, the feedback systems used in these approaches were too bulky to be embedded in prosthesis sockets. In this paper, we propose an electrocutaneous sensory feedback method that is capable of conveying two modalities simultaneously with only one electrode. The stimulation method, which we call mixed-modality stimulation, utilizes the phenomenon in which the superposition of two electric pulse trains of different frequencies is able to evoke two different modalities (i.e., pressure and tapping) at the same time. We conducted psychophysical experiments in which healthy subjects were required to recognize the intensity of pressure or the frequency of tapping from mixed-modality or two-channel stimulations. The results demonstrated that the subjects were able to discriminate the features of the two modalities in one electrode during mixed-modality stimulation and that the accuracies of successful recognitions (mean ± standard deviation) for the two feedback variables were 84.3 ± 7% for mixed-modality stimulation and 89.5 ± 6% for two-channel dual-modality stimulation, showing no statistically significant difference. Therefore, mixed-modality stimulation is an attractive method for modulating two modalities independently with only one electrode, and it could be used for implementing a compact sensory feedback system that is able to provide two different types of sensory information from prosthetics.

  9. The golden-mean surface pattern to enhance flow mixing in micro-channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J F; Liu, Y; Xu, Y S

    2009-04-01

    Mixing of analytes and reagents in microfluidic devices is often crucial to the effective functioning of lab-on-a-chip. It is possible to affect the mixing in microfluidics by intelligently controlling the thermodynamic and chemical properties of the substrate surface. Numerous studies have shown that the phase behavior of mixtures is significantly affected by surface properties of microfluidics. For example, the phase separation between the fluids can be affected by heterogeneous patterns on the substrate. The patterned substrate can offer an effective means to control fluid behavior and in turn to enhance mixing. The golden mean is a ratio that is present in the growth patterns of many biological systems--the spiral formed by a shell or the curve of a fern, for example. The golden mean or golden section was derived by the ancient Greeks. Like "pi" the golden mean ratio is an irrational number 1.618, or (square root{5} + 1) / 2. It was found that the golden mean was an optimum ratio in natural convection heat transfer problem (Liu and Phan-Thien, Numer Heat Transf 37:613-630, 2000). In this study, we numerically studied the effect of optimum surface pattern on mixing in a micro channel and found that the flow oscillation and chaotic mixing were enhanced apparently when the ratio of hydrophobic and hydrophilic boundary follows the golden mean.

  10. Effects of elevated line sources on turbulent mixing in channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    Fluids mixing in turbulent flows has been studied extensively, due to the importance of this phenomena in nature and engineering. Convection effects along with motion of three-dimensional coherent structures in turbulent flow disperse a substance more efficiently than molecular diffusion does on its own. We present here, however, a study that explores the conditions under which turbulent mixing does not happen, when different substances are released into the flow field from different vertical locations. The study uses a method which combines Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) with Lagrangian Scalar Tracking (LST) to simulate a turbulent channel flow and track the motion of passive scalars with different Schmidt numbers (Sc). The particles are released from several instantaneous line sources, ranging from the wall to the center region of the channel. The combined effects of mean velocity difference, molecular diffusion and near-wall coherent structures lead to the observation of different concentrations of particles downstream from the source. We then explore in details the conditions under which particles mixing would not happen. Results from numerical simulation at friction Reynolds number of 300 and 600 will be discussed and for Sc ranging from 0.1 to 2,400.

  11. Transient mixed convection in a channel with an open cavity filled with porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomo, B; Cresci, G; Manca, O; Mesolella, P; Nardini, S

    2012-01-01

    In this work transient mixed convection in a porous medium in a horizontal channel with a open cavity below is studied numerically. The cavity presents a heated wall at uniform heat flux and the other walls of the cavity and the channel are assumed adiabatic. Air flows through the horizontal channel. The heated wall of the cavity experiences a uniform heat flux in such a way that the forced flow is perpendicular to the motion due to natural convection. The study is carried out employing Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy model and two energy equations due to the local thermal non-equilibrium assumption. The flow in the channel is assumed to be two-dimensional, laminar, incompressible. Boussinesq approximation is considered. The thermophysical properties of the fluid are evaluated at the ambient temperature. The results for stream function and temperature distribution given at different times are obtained. Wall temperature value are given and also, the velocity and temperature profiles in several sections of the cavity are presented. In addition, the Nusselt number, both local and average, is presented along with the temporal variations of the average Nusselt number.

  12. The initial study on supercritical water flow and heat transfer in square rod bundle channel with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Guoping; Cao Can; Yu Tao

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional rectangular channel with the mixing wine in supercritical water reactor was studied in the paper using the FLUENT software. The mixing wing elevation influence on temperature distribution and flow field were studied in the model. The results showed the mixing wing caused fluid circumferential flow, making flow hot and cold fluids mixed and fluid temperature uniform distribution, effectively improved the fuel rod surface temperature distribution and reduced hot temperature. Among the four cases of mixing wing elevation of 15, 30, 45 and 50 angle, 30 angle is the best case in improving temperature distribution. (authors)

  13. Burst activity and ultrafast activation kinetics of CaV1.3 Ca²⁺ channels support presynaptic activity in adult gerbil hair cell ribbon synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Valeria; Johnson, Stuart L; Franz, Christoph; Knipper, Marlies; Holley, Matthew C; Magistretti, Jacopo; Masetto, Sergio; Marcotti, Walter

    2013-08-15

    Auditory information transfer to afferent neurons relies on precise triggering of neurotransmitter release at the inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapses by Ca²⁺ entry through CaV1.3 Ca²⁺ channels. Despite the crucial role of CaV1.3 Ca²⁺ channels in governing synaptic vesicle fusion, their elementary properties in adult mammals remain unknown. Using near-physiological recording conditions we investigated Ca²⁺ channel activity in adult gerbil IHCs. We found that Ca²⁺ channels are partially active at the IHC resting membrane potential (-60 mV). At -20 mV, the large majority (>70%) of Ca²⁺ channel first openings occurred with an estimated delay of about 50 μs in physiological conditions, with a mean open time of 0.5 ms. Similar to other ribbon synapses, Ca²⁺ channels in IHCs showed a low mean open probability (0.21 at -20 mV), but this increased significantly (up to 0.91) when Ca²⁺ channel activity switched to a bursting modality. We propose that IHC Ca²⁺ channels are sufficiently rapid to transmit fast signals of sound onset and support phase-locking. Short-latency Ca²⁺ channel opening coupled to multivesicular release would ensure precise and reliable signal transmission at the IHC ribbon synapse.

  14. Mixed convection heat transfer from confined tandem square cylinders in a horizontal channel

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Zhu

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the two-dimensional laminar mixed convective flow and heat transfer around two identical isothermal square cylinders arranged in tandem and confined in a channel. The spacing between the cylinders is fixed with four widths of the cylinder and the blockage ratio and the Prandtl number are fixed at 0.1 and 0.7 respectively. The mixed convective flow and heat transfer is simulated by high accuracy multidomain pseudospectral method. The Reynolds number (Re) is studied in the range 80 ≤ Re ≤ 150, the Richardson number (Ri) demonstrating the influence of thermal buoyancy ranges from 0 to 1. Numerical results reveal that, with the thermal buoyancy effect, the mixed convective flow sheds vortex behind the cylinders and keeps periodic oscillating. The variations of characteristic quantities related to flow and heat transfer processes, such as the overall drag and lift coefficients and the Nusselt numbers, are presented and discussed. Furthermore, the influence of thermal buoyancy on the fluid flow and heat transfer are discussed and analysed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Probability density function modeling of scalar mixing from concentrated sources in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.; Franzese, P.; Boybeyi, Z.

    2007-11-01

    Dispersion of a passive scalar from concentrated sources in fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied with the probability density function (PDF) method. The joint PDF of velocity, turbulent frequency and scalar concentration is represented by a large number of Lagrangian particles. A stochastic near-wall PDF model combines the generalized Langevin model of Haworth and Pope [Phys. Fluids 29, 387 (1986)] with Durbin's [J. Fluid Mech. 249, 465 (1993)] method of elliptic relaxation to provide a mathematically exact treatment of convective and viscous transport with a nonlocal representation of the near-wall Reynolds stress anisotropy. The presence of walls is incorporated through the imposition of no-slip and impermeability conditions on particles without the use of damping or wall-functions. Information on the turbulent time scale is supplied by the gamma-distribution model of van Slooten et al. [Phys. Fluids 10, 246 (1998)]. Two different micromixing models are compared that incorporate the effect of small scale mixing on the transported scalar: the widely used interaction by exchange with the mean and the interaction by exchange with the conditional mean model. Single-point velocity and concentration statistics are compared to direct numerical simulation and experimental data at Reτ=1080 based on the friction velocity and the channel half width. The joint model accurately reproduces a wide variety of conditional and unconditional statistics in both physical and composition space.

  16. Role of mixed boundaries on flow in open capillary channels with curved air-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjuan; Wang, Lian-Ping; Or, Dani; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan

    2012-09-04

    Flow in unsaturated porous media or in engineered microfluidic systems is dominated by capillary and viscous forces. Consequently, flow regimes may differ markedly from conventional flows, reflecting strong interfacial influences on small bodies of flowing liquids. In this work, we visualized liquid transport patterns in open capillary channels with a range of opening sizes from 0.6 to 5.0 mm using laser scanning confocal microscopy combined with fluorescent latex particles (1.0 μm) as tracers at a mean velocity of ∼0.50 mm s(-1). The observed velocity profiles indicate limited mobility at the air-water interface. The application of the Stokes equation with mixed boundary conditions (i.e., no slip on the channel walls and partial slip or shear stress at the air-water interface) clearly illustrates the increasing importance of interfacial shear stress with decreasing channel size. Interfacial shear stress emerges from the velocity gradient from the adjoining no-slip walls to the center where flow is trapped in a region in which capillary forces dominate. In addition, the increased contribution of capillary forces (relative to viscous forces) to flow on the microscale leads to increased interfacial curvature, which, together with interfacial shear stress, affects the velocity distribution and flow pattern (e.g., reverse flow in the contact line region). We found that partial slip, rather than the commonly used stress-free condition, provided a more accurate description of the boundary condition at the confined air-water interface, reflecting the key role that surface/interface effects play in controlling flow behavior on the nanoscale and microscale.

  17. Robust Multiparty Quantum Secret Key Sharing Over Two Collective-Noise Channels via Three-Photon Mixed States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhangyin; Yuan Hao; Gao Gan; Shi Shouhua

    2006-01-01

    We present a robust (n,n)-threshold scheme for multiparty quantum secret sharing of key over two collective-noise channels (i.e., the collective dephasing channel and the collective rotating channel) via three-photon mixed states. In our scheme, only if all the sharers collaborate together can they establish a joint key with the message sender and extract the secret message from the sender's encrypted message. This scheme can be implemented using only a Bell singlet, a one-qubit state and polarization identification of single photon, so it is completely feasible according to the present-day technique.

  18. Experimental study on the effects of channel gap size on mixed convection heat transfer characteristics in vertical rectangular channels heated from both sides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.; Kaminaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of channel gap size on mixed forced and free convective heat transfer characteristics were experimentally investigated for water flowing near atmospheric pressure in a 750 mm long and 50 mm wide channel heated from both sides. The channel gap sizes investigated were 2.5, 6, 18 and 50 mm. Experiments were carried out for both aiding and opposing forced convective flows with a Reynolds number Re x of 4x10 to 6x10 6 and a Grashof number Gr x of 2x10 4 to 6x10 11 , where the distance x from the inlet of the channel is adopted as the characteristic length in Re x and Gr x . As for the results, the following were revealed for the parameters ranges investigated in this study. (1) When the dimensionless parameter, Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is less than 10 -4 , the flow shows the nature of forced convective heat transfer for a channel with any channel gap size in both aiding and opposing flows. (2) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is larger than 10 -2 , the flow shows the nature of free convective heat transfer for a channel with any channel gap size in both aiding and opposing flows. (3) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is between 10 -4 and 10 -2 for the channel with a channel gap size equal to or larger than 6 mm, the heat transfer coefficients in both aiding and opposing flows become, on the average, higher than those predicted by the previous correlations for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the pure free convection, and can be expressed in simple forms with a combination of Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 and the previous correlation for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the free convection along a flat plate. (4) When Gr x /Re x 21/8 Pr 1/2 is between 10 -4 and 10 -2 for the channel with a channel gap size of 2.5 mm, the heat transfer coefficients in both aiding and opposing flows also become, on the average, higher than those predicted by the previous correlations for either the pure turbulent forced convection or the pure free convection. (orig./GL)

  19. Turbulent mixed convection in vertical and inclined flat channels with aiding flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskas, P.; Vilemas, J.; Adomaitis, J.E.; Bartkus, G.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of turbulent mixed convection heat transfer for aiding flows in a vertical ({phi}=90{degrees}), inclined ({phi}=60{degrees},30{degrees}), and horizontal ({phi}=0{degrees}) flat channels with symmetrical heating and a ratio of height h to width b of about 1:10 and with length about 4 m (x/2h about 44). The study covered Re from 4x10{sup 3} to 5x10{sup 4} and Gr{sub q} from 5x10{sup 7}to 3x10{sup 10}. For the upper wall, a region of impaired heat transfer was found for all angular positions (from vertical to horizontal) and for bottom wall the augmentation of heat transfer in comparison to forced convection was revealed in the region of {phi}=0{degrees}-60{degrees}. Different characteristic buoyancy parameters were found for regions of impaired and enhanced heat transfer. General relations are suggested to predict the heat transfer for fully-developed-flow conditions and different angular positions.

  20. Estimation of Flow Channel Parameters for Flowing Gas Mixed with Air in Atmospheric-pressure Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Saito, Hidetoshi

    2017-12-01

    When the working gas of an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium (cold) plasma flows into free space, the diameter of the resulting flow channel changes continuously. The shape of the channel is observed through the light emitted by the working gas of the atmospheric-pressure plasma. When the plasma jet forms a conical shape, the diameter of the cylindrical shape, which approximates the conical shape, defines the diameter of the flow channel. When the working gas flows into the atmosphere from the inside of a quartz tube, the gas mixes with air. The molar ratio of the working gas and air is estimated from the corresponding volume ratio through the relationship between the diameter of the cylindrical plasma channel and the inner diameter of the quartz tube. The Reynolds number is calculated from the kinematic viscosity of the mixed gas and the molar ratio. The gas flow rates for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow are determined by the corresponding Reynolds numbers estimated from the molar ratio. It is confirmed that the plasma jet length and the internal plasma length associated with strong light emission increase with the increasing gas flow rate until the rate for the upper limit of laminar flow and the lower limit of turbulent flow, respectively. Thus, we are able to explain the increasing trend in the plasma lengths with the diameter of the flow channel and the molar ratio by using the cylindrical approximation.

  1. Vanishing viscosity limits of mixed hyperbolic–elliptic systems arising in multilayer channel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaefthymiou, E S; Papageorgiou, D T

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the spatially periodic initial value problem of 2 × 2 quasi-linear parabolic systems in one space dimension having quadratic polynomial flux functions. These systems arise physically in the interfacial dynamics of viscous immiscible multilayer channel flows. The equations describe the spatiotemporal evolution of phase-separating interfaces with dissipation arising from surface tension (fourth-order) and/or stable stratification effects (second-order). A crucial mathematical aspect of these systems is the presence of mixed hyperbolic–elliptic flux functions that provide the only source of instability. The study concentrates on scaled spatially 2π-periodic solutions as the dissipation vanishes, and in particular the behaviour of such limits when generalized dissipation operators (spanning second to fourth-order) are considered. Extensive numerical computations and asymptotic analysis suggest that the existence (or not) of bounded vanishing viscosity solutions depends crucially on the structure of the flux function. In the absence of linear terms (i.e. homogeneous flux functions) the vanishing viscosity limit does not exist in the L ∞ -norm. On the other hand, if linear terms in the flux function are present the computations strongly suggest that the solutions exist and are bounded in the L ∞ -norm as the dissipation vanishes. It is found that the key mechanism that provides such boundedness centres on persistent spatiotemporal hyperbolic–elliptic transitions. Strikingly, as the dissipation decreases, the flux function becomes almost everywhere hyperbolic except on a fractal set of elliptic regions, whose dimension depends on the order of the regularized operator. Furthermore, the spatial structures of the emerging weak solutions are found to support an increasing number of discontinuities (measure-valued solutions) located in the vicinity of the fractally distributed elliptic regions. For the unscaled problem, such spatially

  2. Suppression of the four-wave-mixing background noise in a quantum memory retrieval process by channel blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Guo, Jinxian; Chen, L. Q.; Yuan, Chunhua; Ou, Z. Y.; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-09-01

    In a quantum memory scheme with the Raman process, the read process encounters noise from four-wave mixing (FWM), which can destroy the nonclassical properties of the generated quantum fields. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the noise from FWM can be greatly suppressed by simply reducing the FWM transition channels with a circularly polarized read beam while at the same time retaining relatively high retrieval efficiency.

  3. Hyperonic mixing in five-baryon double-strangeness hypernuclei in a two-channel treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lanskoy, D. E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Properties of hypernuclei $_{\\Lambda \\Lambda}^5$H and $_{\\Lambda \\Lambda }^5$He are studied in a two-channel approach with explicit treatment of coupling of channels ^3\\text{Z}+\\Lambda+\\Lambda and \\alpha+\\Xi. Diagonal \\Lambda\\Lambda and coupling \\Lambda\\Lambda-\\Xi N interactions are derived within G-matrix procedure from Nijmegen meson-exchange models. Bond energy \\Delta B_{\\Lambda\\Lambda} in $_{\\Lambda \\Lambda}^5$He exceeds significantly that in $_{\\Lambda \\Lambda}^5$H due to the channel cou...

  4. FILTRES: a 128 channels VLSI mixed front-end readout electronic development for microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstotz, F.; Hu, Y.; Michel, J.; Sohler, J.L.; Lachartre, D.

    1998-01-01

    We present a VLSI digital-analog readout electronic chain for silicon microstrip detectors. The characteristics of this circuit have been optimized for the high resolution tracker of the CERN CMS experiment. This chip consists of 128 channels at 50 μm pitch. Each channel is composed by a charge amplifier, a CR-RC shaper, an analog memory, an analog processor, an output FIFO read out serially by a multiplexer. This chip has been processed in the radiation hard technology DMILL. This paper describes the architecture of the circuit and presents test results of the 128 channel full chain chip. (orig.)

  5. Flow Reversal of Fully-Developed Mixed MHD Convection in Vertical Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H.; Hashim, I.

    2010-01-01

    The present analysis is concerned with flow reversal phenomena of the fully-developed laminar combined free and forced MHD convection in a vertical parallel-plate channel. The effect of viscous dissipation is taken into account. Flow reversal adjacent to the cold (or hot) wall is found to exist within the channel as Gr/Re is above (or below) a threshold value. Parameter zones for the occurrence of reversed flow are presented. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  6. User's Guide for Mixed-Size Sediment Transport Model for Networks of One-Dimensional Open Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James P.

    2001-01-01

    This user's guide describes a mathematical model for predicting the transport of mixed sizes of sediment by flow in networks of one-dimensional open channels. The simulation package is useful for general sediment routing problems, prediction of erosion and deposition following dam removal, and scour in channels at road embankment crossings or other artificial structures. The model treats input hydrographs as stepwise steady-state, and the flow computation algorithm automatically switches between sub- and supercritical flow as dictated by channel geometry and discharge. A variety of boundary conditions including weirs and rating curves may be applied both external and internal to the flow network. The model may be used to compute flow around islands and through multiple openings in embankments, but the network must be 'simple' in the sense that the flow directions in all channels can be specified before simulation commences. The location and shape of channel banks are user specified, and all bedelevation changes take place between these banks and above a user-specified bedrock elevation. Computation of sediment-transport emphasizes the sand-size range (0.0625-2.0 millimeter) but the user may select any desired range of particle diameters including silt and finer (user may set the original bed-sediment composition of any number of layers of known thickness. The model computes the time evolution of total transport and the size composition of bed- and suspended-load sand through any cross section of interest. It also tracks bed -surface elevation and size composition. The model is written in the FORTRAN programming language for implementation on personal computers using the WINDOWS operating system and, along with certain graphical output display capability, is accessed from a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI provides a framework for selecting input files and parameters of a number of components of the sediment-transport process. There are no restrictions in the

  7. Mixed convective thermally radiative micro nanofluid flow in a stretchable channel with porous medium and magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk; Shahzad, S. A.; Meraj, M. A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M. K. [Department of CASPAM, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Raza, J. [School of Quantitative Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, 06010, Sintok, Kedah (Malaysia)

    2016-03-15

    A numerical study is carried out for two dimensional steady incompressible mixed convective flow of electrically conductive micro nanofluid in a stretchable channel. The flow is generated due to the stretching walls of the channel immersed in a porous medium. The magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the walls. The impact of radiation, viscous dissipation, thermophoretic and Brownian motion of nanoparticles appear in the energy equation. A numerical technique based on Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order (RFK45) method is used to express the solutions of velocity, microrotation, temperature and concentration fields. The dimensionless physical parameters are discussed both in tabular and graphical forms. The results are also found in a good agreement with previously published literature work.

  8. On the performance of two-way multiuser mixed RF/FSO relay networks with opportunistic scheduling & asymmetric channel gains

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Eryani, Yasser F.; Salhab, Anas M.; Zummo, Salam A.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of two-way relaying (TWR) multiuser mixed radio frequency/free space optical (RF/FSO) relay networks with opportunistic user scheduling and asymmetric channel fading is studied. First, closed-form expressions for the exact outage probability, asymptotic (high signal-to-noise ration (SNR)) outage probability, and average ergodic channel capacity are derived assuming heterodyne detection (HD) scheme. Additionally, impacts of several system parameters including number of users, pointing errors, and atmospheric turbulence conditions on the overall network performance are investigated. All the theoretical results are validated by Monte-Carlo simulations. The results show that the TWR scheme almost doubles the network ergodic capacity compared to that of one-way relaying (OWR) scheme with the same outage performance. Additionally, the overall diversity order of the network is shown to be affected not only by the number of users, but it is also a function of the pointing error and atmospheric turbulence conditions.

  9. On the performance of two-way multiuser mixed RF/FSO relay networks with opportunistic scheduling & asymmetric channel gains

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Eryani, Yasser F.

    2017-07-20

    In this paper, the performance of two-way relaying (TWR) multiuser mixed radio frequency/free space optical (RF/FSO) relay networks with opportunistic user scheduling and asymmetric channel fading is studied. First, closed-form expressions for the exact outage probability, asymptotic (high signal-to-noise ration (SNR)) outage probability, and average ergodic channel capacity are derived assuming heterodyne detection (HD) scheme. Additionally, impacts of several system parameters including number of users, pointing errors, and atmospheric turbulence conditions on the overall network performance are investigated. All the theoretical results are validated by Monte-Carlo simulations. The results show that the TWR scheme almost doubles the network ergodic capacity compared to that of one-way relaying (OWR) scheme with the same outage performance. Additionally, the overall diversity order of the network is shown to be affected not only by the number of users, but it is also a function of the pointing error and atmospheric turbulence conditions.

  10. Time evolution of the coarse-graining-smoothed Wigner operator in an amplitude dissipative channel: from a pure state to a mixed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Rui; Fan, Hong-yi

    2014-01-01

    Based on the solution to the master equation of the density operator describing the amplitude dissipative channel, we derive the time evolution law of the coarse-graining-smoothed Wigner operator in this channel, which demonstrates how an initial pure state evolves into a mixed state, exhibiting decoherence

  11. Microfluidic channel structures speed up mixing of multiple emulsions by a factor of ten

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, KJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available mixing, to over- come these limitations. Many methods to achieve this have been proposed and studied, and a number of reviews give a complete overview of the methods and the main issues associated with mixing at the microscale.1–3 Active mixing, which... for a limited range of flow parameters or require active control, for example, via electrical impulses. In order to determine whether any of these well established methods would be viable, vari- ous experiments were performed, specifically studying...

  12. Exploring Visualisation of Channel Activity, Levels and EQ for User Interfaces Implementing the Stage Metaphor for Music Mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Uhrenholt, Anders Kirk

    2016-01-01

    This short précis outlines a collection of different strategies for visualising simple audio features for a GUI- based audio mixing interface that uses the stage metaphor control scheme. Audio features such as activity, loudness and spectral centroid are extracted in real-time and mapped...... to different visual cues that can be adapted to the circular widgets most often found in implementations of the stage metaphor. An initial evaluation suggests that while the visualisations are generally intuitive and provide information about activity of audio channels, they are not used directly. When...... implementing these kinds of dynamic graphical visualisations it is thus important to consider how intrusive they are compared to their usefulness in a real mixing context....

  13. Investigating the Lateral Mixing Coefficient in a Compound Channel with Emergent Vegetation over the Floodplain

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein hamidifar; Mohammad hossein Ommid; Mehdi Bahrami; Mohammad javad Amiri

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Water quality control is very important for people, animals and plants. Predicting the spread of contaminants is important for managing and protecting rivers and streams to the balance of the ecosystem. Pollutants are introduced into waterways, though a variety of sources such as point and non-point sources. Under steady state conditions, where longitudinal mixing is not significant, studying the lateral mixing is essential in evaluating the influence of pollutants on water qual...

  14. Contribution to the determination of the mixing length in a channel; Contribution a la determination de la longueur de bon melange dans un canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitalnik, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-04-15

    A formula giving the mixing length in a rectangular channel is established. The value of that mixing length depends on the geometrical dimensions of the channel, the longitudinal, lateral and vertical diffusion coefficients, and the water average velocity in the channel. (author) [French] On etablit une formule permettant de calculer la longueur de bon melange dans un canal rectangulaire. La valeur de cette longueur depend des donnees geometriques du canal, des coefficients de diffusion longitudinal, transversal et vertical, et de la vitesse moyenne de l'eau dans le canal. (auteur)

  15. Voltage interval mappings for an elliptic bursting model

    OpenAIRE

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    We employed Poincar\\'e return mappings for a parameter interval to an exemplary elliptic bursting model, the FitzHugh-Nagumo-Rinzel model. Using the interval mappings, we were able to examine in detail the bifurcations that underlie the complex activity transitions between: tonic spiking and bursting, bursting and mixed-mode oscillations, and finally, mixed-mode oscillations and quiescence in the FitzHugh-Nagumo-Rinzel model. We illustrate the wealth of information, qualitative and quantitati...

  16. Mixed convection heat transfer simulation in a rectangular channel with a variable speed rotational cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Imran; Billah, Md. Mamun; Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulation of steady two-dimensional heat transfer in a rectangular channel with a centered variable speed cylinder has been performed in this paper. In this setup, an isoflux heater is placed at the bottom wall of the channel while the upper wall is kept isothermal with a low temperature. The cylinder's peripheral speed to maximum inlet fluid velocity ratio (ξ) is varied from 0.5 to 1.5 for both clockwise and anticlockwise rotational cases. Air has been considered as working fluid while other system parameters such as Grashof and Reynolds numbers are varied. The effects of rotational speed, Grashof and Reynolds numbers on the streamline pattern, isothermal lines, local and average Nusselt number are analyzed and presented. It is observed the cylinder's rotational direction and speed has a significant effect on the flow pattern, temperature distribution as well as heat transfer characteristics.

  17. Probability density function modeling of scalar mixing from concentrated sources in turbulent channel flow

    OpenAIRE

    Bakosi, J.; Franzese, P.; Boybeyi, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersion of a passive scalar from concentrated sources in fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied with the probability density function (PDF) method. The joint PDF of velocity, turbulent frequency and scalar concentration is represented by a large number of Lagrangian particles. A stochastic near-wall PDF model combines the generalized Langevin model of Haworth & Pope with Durbin's method of elliptic relaxation to provide a mathematically exact treatment of convective and viscous ...

  18. Mixed convection heat transfer from confined tandem square cylinders in a horizontal channel

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Zhu; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Suping

    2013-01-01

    with four widths of the cylinder and the blockage ratio and the Prandtl number are fixed at 0.1 and 0.7 respectively. The mixed convective flow and heat transfer is simulated by high accuracy multidomain pseudospectral method. The Reynolds number (Re

  19. Cosmic gamma bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehstulin, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A brief consideration is being given to the history of cosmic gamma burst discovery and modern knowledge of their properties. The time dependence of gamma bursts is described and their possible sources are discussed

  20. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2008-01-01

    of exceptional burst events lasting more than ~10 minutes. Half of the dozen so-called intermediate long bursts registered so far have been observed by INTEGRAL. The goal is to derive a comprehensive picture of the relationship between the nuclear ignition processes and the accretion states of the system leading...... up to such long bursts. Depending on the composition of the accreted material, these bursts may be explained by either the unstable burning of a large pile of mixed hydrogen and helium, or the ignition of a thick pure helium layer. Intermediate long bursts are particularly expected to occur at very...

  1. Lithologic and hydrologic controls of mixed alluvial-bedrock channels in flood-prone fluvial systems: bankfull and macrochannels in the Llano River watershed, central Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmuller, Frank T.; Hudson, Paul F.; Asquith, William H.

    2015-01-01

    The rural and unregulated Llano River watershed located in central Texas, USA, has a highly variable flow regime and a wide range of instantaneous peak flows. Abrupt transitions in surface lithology exist along the main-stem channel course. Both of these characteristics afford an opportunity to examine hydrologic, lithologic, and sedimentary controls on downstream changes in channel morphology. Field surveys of channel topography and boundary composition are coupled with sediment analyses, hydraulic computations, flood-frequency analyses, and geographic information system mapping to discern controls on channel geometry (profile, pattern, and shape) and dimensions along the mixed alluvial-bedrock Llano River and key tributaries. Four categories of channel classification in a downstream direction include: (i) uppermost ephemeral reaches, (ii) straight or sinuous gravel-bed channels in Cretaceous carbonate sedimentary zones, (iii) straight or sinuous gravel-bed or bedrock channels in Paleozoic sedimentary zones, and (iv) straight, braided, or multithread mixed alluvial–bedrock channels with sandy beds in Precambrian igneous and metamorphic zones. Principal findings include: (i) a nearly linear channel profile attributed to resistant bedrock incision checkpoints; (ii) statistically significant correlations of both alluvial sinuosity and valley confinement to relatively high f (mean depth) hydraulic geometry values; (iii) relatively high b (width) hydraulic geometry values in partly confined settings with sinuous channels upstream from a prominent incision checkpoint; (iv) different functional flow categories including frequently occurring events (< 1.5-year return periods) that mobilize channel-bed material and less frequent events that determine bankfull channel (1.5- to 3-year return periods) and macrochannel (10- to 40-year return periods) dimensions; (v) macrochannels with high f values (most ≤ 0.45) that develop at sites with unit stream power values in excess

  2. Mixing, Hydrography, and Flow in the eastern Channel of the Lucky Strike Segment

    OpenAIRE

    Tippenhauer, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Diapycnal mixing in the deep ocean is known to be much stronger in the vicinity of rough topography of mid-ocean ridges than over abyssal plains. In this thesis a microstructure probe attached to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) was used to infer the spatial distribution of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy in the central valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This represents the first successful realization of a horizontal, AUV-based, deep-ocean microstructure survey. The stu...

  3. Dynamic encoding of natural luminance sequences by LGN bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Lesica

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN of the thalamus, visual stimulation produces two distinct types of responses known as tonic and burst. Due to the dynamics of the T-type Ca(2+ channels involved in burst generation, the type of response evoked by a particular stimulus depends on the resting membrane potential, which is controlled by a network of modulatory connections from other brain areas. In this study, we use simulated responses to natural scene movies to describe how modulatory and stimulus-driven changes in LGN membrane potential interact to determine the luminance sequences that trigger burst responses. We find that at low resting potentials, when the T channels are de-inactivated and bursts are relatively frequent, an excitatory stimulus transient alone is sufficient to evoke a burst. However, to evoke a burst at high resting potentials, when the T channels are inactivated and bursts are relatively rare, prolonged inhibitory stimulation followed by an excitatory transient is required. We also observe evidence of these effects in vivo, where analysis of experimental recordings demonstrates that the luminance sequences that trigger bursts can vary dramatically with the overall burst percentage of the response. To characterize the functional consequences of the effects of resting potential on burst generation, we simulate LGN responses to different luminance sequences at a range of resting potentials with and without a mechanism for generating bursts. Using analysis based on signal detection theory, we show that bursts enhance detection of specific luminance sequences, ranging from the onset of excitatory sequences at low resting potentials to the offset of inhibitory sequences at high resting potentials. These results suggest a dynamic role for burst responses during visual processing that may change according to behavioral state.

  4. Numerical investigations of opposing mixed convection heat transfer in vertical flat channel 2. Vortex flow in case of symmetrical heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvydas, A.; Poskas, R.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results on numerical investigation of the local opposing mixed convection heat transfer in a vertical flat channel with symmetrical heating at low Reynolds numbers. Numerical two-dimensional simulation was performed for the same channel and for the same conditions as in the experiment using the FLUENT 6.1 code. The unsteady flow investigations were performed in airflow for the experimental conditions at the Reynolds number 2130 and Grashof number 6.2* 10 8 . Quasi-steady flow investigations were performed for two Reynolds numbers (2130 and 4310) and the Grashof number up to 3.1*10 9 in order to simulate the buoyancy effect on the flow structure. In both steady and quasi-steady modelling cases the results demonstrated that under the high buoyancy effect the chequerwise local circular flow took place near the heated walls. This made velocity profiles asymmetrical and caused pulsations of the wall temperature. Wall temperature had a pulsatory character, however, the resulting averaged values correlated rather well with experimental data for steady and quasi-steady cases for Re in = 2130. For Re in = 4310, the resulting averaged values for x/d e ≤25 correlated rather well with experimental data. When x/d e > 25, the difference between the experimental and the calculated wall temperature was increasing, increasing, possibly due to a steady flow and heat transfer modelling. (author)

  5. Precise outage analysis of mixed RF/unified-FSO DF relaying with HD and 2 IM-DD channel models

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ebraheemy, Omer Mahmoud S.; Salhab, Anas M.; Chaaban, Anas; Zummo, Salam A.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    This paper derives and analyzes the outage probability of mixed radio frequency (RF)/unified free space optical (FSO) dual-hop decode-and-forward (DF) relaying scheme, where heterodyne detection (HD) and intensity modulation-direct detection (IM-DD) are considered for FSO detection. In doing that, we correctly utilize, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a precise channel capacity result for the IM-DD channel. Moreover, this is the first time that not only the (IM-DD input-independent) but also the (IM-DD cost-dependent) AWGN channel is considered in such system analysis. This work assumes that the first hop (RF link) follows Naka-gami-m fading, while the second hop (FSO link) follows Málaga (M) turbulence with pointing error. These fading and turbulence models include other ones (such as Rayleigh fading and Gamma-Gamma turbulence) as special cases, so our analysis can be considered as a generalized one from both RF and FSO fading models point of view. Additionally, the system outage probability is investigated asymptotically in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime, where a new non-reported diversity order and coding gain analysis are shown. Interestingly, we find that in the FSO hop, based on SNR, the HD or IM-DD cost-dependent results in a same diversity order which is twice the one of IM-DD input-independent. However, based on transmitted power all these FSO detectors result in a same diversity order. Furthermore, we offer simulation results which confirm the derived exact and asymptotic expressions.

  6. Precise outage analysis of mixed RF/unified-FSO DF relaying with HD and 2 IM-DD channel models

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ebraheemy, Omer Mahmoud S.

    2017-07-20

    This paper derives and analyzes the outage probability of mixed radio frequency (RF)/unified free space optical (FSO) dual-hop decode-and-forward (DF) relaying scheme, where heterodyne detection (HD) and intensity modulation-direct detection (IM-DD) are considered for FSO detection. In doing that, we correctly utilize, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a precise channel capacity result for the IM-DD channel. Moreover, this is the first time that not only the (IM-DD input-independent) but also the (IM-DD cost-dependent) AWGN channel is considered in such system analysis. This work assumes that the first hop (RF link) follows Naka-gami-m fading, while the second hop (FSO link) follows Málaga (M) turbulence with pointing error. These fading and turbulence models include other ones (such as Rayleigh fading and Gamma-Gamma turbulence) as special cases, so our analysis can be considered as a generalized one from both RF and FSO fading models point of view. Additionally, the system outage probability is investigated asymptotically in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime, where a new non-reported diversity order and coding gain analysis are shown. Interestingly, we find that in the FSO hop, based on SNR, the HD or IM-DD cost-dependent results in a same diversity order which is twice the one of IM-DD input-independent. However, based on transmitted power all these FSO detectors result in a same diversity order. Furthermore, we offer simulation results which confirm the derived exact and asymptotic expressions.

  7. Bs0 → Ds-α1+ (Ds- → φπ-, Ds- → K*0K-)-decay channel in the ATLAS Bs0-mixing studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, A.V.; Shelkov, G.A.; Silagadze, Z.K.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown, using a track-level simulation, that the use of the D s - → K *0 K - - decay channel for D s - reconstruction, in addition with the previously studied D s - → φπ - mode, enables two fold gain in the ATLAS B s 0 -mixing signal statistics through B s 0 → D s - α 1 B s 0 -decay channel. A new modification of the amplitude fit method is suggested for the x s -determination

  8. Lithologic and hydrologic controls of mixed alluvial-bedrock channels in flood-prone fluvial systems: bankfull and macrochannels in the Llano River watershed, central Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmuller, Frank T.; Hudson, Paul F.; Asquith, William H.

    2015-01-01

    The rural and unregulated Llano River watershed located in central Texas, USA, has a highly variable flow regime and a wide range of instantaneous peak flows. Abrupt transitions in surface lithology exist along the main-stem channel course. Both of these characteristics afford an opportunity to examine hydrologic, lithologic, and sedimentary controls on downstream changes in channel morphology. Field surveys of channel topography and boundary composition are coupled with sediment analyses, hydraulic computations, flood-frequency analyses, and geographic information system mapping to discern controls on channel geometry (profile, pattern, and shape) and dimensions along the mixed alluvial-bedrock Llano River and key tributaries. Four categories of channel classification in a downstream direction include: (i) uppermost ephemeral reaches, (ii) straight or sinuous gravel-bed channels in Cretaceous carbonate sedimentary zones, (iii) straight or sinuous gravel-bed or bedrock channels in Paleozoic sedimentary zones, and (iv) straight, braided, or multithread mixed alluvial–bedrock channels with sandy beds in Precambrian igneous and metamorphic zones. Principal findings include: (i) a nearly linear channel profile attributed to resistant bedrock incision checkpoints; (ii) statistically significant correlations of both alluvial sinuosity and valley confinement to relatively high f (mean depth) hydraulic geometry values; (iii) relatively high b (width) hydraulic geometry values in partly confined settings with sinuous channels upstream from a prominent incision checkpoint; (iv) different functional flow categories including frequently occurring events (high f values (most ≤ 0.45) that develop at sites with unit stream power values in excess of 200 watts per square meter (W/m2); and (vi) downstream convergence of hydraulic geometry exponents for bankfull and macrochannels, explained by co-increases of flood magnitude and noncohesive sandy sediments that collectively

  9. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  10. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  11. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators

  12. Mixed Convective Fully Developed Flow in a Vertical Channel in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Viscous Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad K.V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation on a combined free and forced convective flow in a vertical channel is investigated for a fully developed flow regime. Boussinesq and Roseseland approximations are considered in the modeling of the conduction radiation heat transfer with thermal boundary conditions (isothermal-thermal, isoflux-thermal, and isothermal-flux. The coupled nonlinear governing equations are also solved analytically using the Differential Transform Method (DTM and regular perturbation method (PM. The results are analyzed graphically for various governing parameters such as the mixed convection parameter, radiation parameter, Brinkman number and perturbation parameter for equal and different wall temperatures. It is found that the viscous dissipation enhances the flow reversal in the case of a downward flow while it counters the flow in the case of an upward flow. A comparison of the Differential Transform Method (DTM and regular perturbation method (PM methods shows the versatility of the Differential Transform Method (DTM. The skin friction and the wall temperature gradient are presented for different values of the physical parameters and the salient features are analyzed.

  13. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  14. The impact of the multi-channel retail mix on online store choice: Does online experience matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Melis, Kristina; Campo, Katia; Breugelmans, Els; Lamey, Lien

    2015-01-01

    More and more grocery retailers are becoming multi-channel retailers, as they are opening an online alternative next to their traditional offline supermarkets. While the number of multi-channel grocery shoppers is also expanding at a fast growth rate, there are still large differences in online shopping frequency, and as a result, in the levels of experience with buying in the online grocery channel. This study wants to (i) identify the underlying drivers of online store choice and (ii) explo...

  15. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  16. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the accreted material, these bursts may be explained by either the unstable burning of a large pile of mixed hydrogen and helium, or the ignition of a thick pure helium layer. Long duration bursts are particularly expected at very low accretion rates and make possible to study the transition from a hydrogen......Thermonuclear bursts on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries have been studied for many years and have in a few cases confirmed theoretical models of nuclear ignition and burning mechanisms. The large majority of X-ray bursts last less than 100s. A good number......-rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime. Moreover, a handful of long bursts have shown, before the extended decay phase, an initial spike similar to a normal short X-ray burst. Such twofold bursts might be a sort of link between short and super-bursts, where the premature ignition of a carbon layer could...

  17. Understanding the Generation of Network Bursts by Adaptive Oscillatory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Fardet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies have revealed that isolated populations of oscillatory neurons can spontaneously synchronize and generate periodic bursts involving the whole network. Such a behavior has notably been observed for cultured neurons in rodent's cortex or hippocampus. We show here that a sufficient condition for this network bursting is the presence of an excitatory population of oscillatory neurons which displays spike-driven adaptation. We provide an analytic model to analyze network bursts generated by coupled adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that, for strong synaptic coupling, intrinsically tonic spiking neurons evolve to reach a synchronized intermittent bursting state. The presence of inhibitory neurons or plastic synapses can then modulate this dynamics in many ways but is not necessary for its appearance. Thanks to a simple self-consistent equation, our model gives an intuitive and semi-quantitative tool to understand the bursting behavior. Furthermore, it suggests that after-hyperpolarization currents are sufficient to explain bursting termination. Through a thorough mapping between the theoretical parameters and ion-channel properties, we discuss the biological mechanisms that could be involved and the relevance of the explored parameter-space. Such an insight enables us to propose experimentally-testable predictions regarding how blocking fast, medium or slow after-hyperpolarization channels would affect the firing rate and burst duration, as well as the interburst interval.

  18. Wall-cooling-induced mixed-convection flow recirculation in a vertical square-array multi-rod channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangdilok, W.; Todreas, N.E.

    1989-01-01

    This work investigated the structure of penetrative flow recirculation and associated flow conditions in a multi-rod channel induced by interassembly heat transfer that causes cooling through channel walls. Three investigation approaches, experimental, numerical, and analytical were employed in a complimentary fashion. Physical experiments involved water flow visualization and temperature measurement in a 4x4 rod square channel. Numerical experiments involved 3-dimensional simulations of water and sodium flow in a 2x2-rod channels. An approximate reverse flow model including Prandtl number effect was developed. A correlating equation based on the model and experiments was verified for water to correctly predict the trend of the 4x4-rod experimental penetration depth data. (orig.)

  19. Single-channel in-ear-EEG detects the focus of auditory attention to concurrent tone streams and mixed speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Lorenz; Wöstmann, Malte; Graversen, Carina; Brandmeyer, Alex; Lunner, Thomas; Obleser, Jonas

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Conventional, multi-channel scalp electroencephalography (EEG) allows the identification of the attended speaker in concurrent-listening (‘cocktail party’) scenarios. This implies that EEG might provide valuable information to complement hearing aids with some form of EEG and to install a level of neuro-feedback. Approach. To investigate whether a listener’s attentional focus can be detected from single-channel hearing-aid-compatible EEG configurations, we recorded EEG from three electrodes inside the ear canal (‘in-Ear-EEG’) and additionally from 64 electrodes on the scalp. In two different, concurrent listening tasks, participants (n  =  7) were fitted with individualized in-Ear-EEG pieces and were either asked to attend to one of two dichotically-presented, concurrent tone streams or to one of two diotically-presented, concurrent audiobooks. A forward encoding model was trained to predict the EEG response at single EEG channels. Main results. Each individual participants’ attentional focus could be detected from single-channel EEG response recorded from short-distance configurations consisting only of a single in-Ear-EEG electrode and an adjacent scalp-EEG electrode. The differences in neural responses to attended and ignored stimuli were consistent in morphology (i.e. polarity and latency of components) across subjects. Significance. In sum, our findings show that the EEG response from a single-channel, hearing-aid-compatible configuration provides valuable information to identify a listener’s focus of attention.

  20. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the continuous-time Itô semi-martingale model in such a way that the fundamental arbitrage-free property is preserved......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  1. Cosmic gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takamasa

    1985-01-01

    Ballon experiments for searching gamma-ray burst were carried out by employing rotating-cross modulation collimators. From a very long observation of total 315 hours during 1975 to 1979, three gamma-ray intensity anomalies were observed which were speculated as a gamma-ray burst. As for the first gamma-ray intensity anomaly observed in 1975, the burst source could be located precisely but the source, heavenly body, could not be specified. Gamma-ray burst source estimation was made by analyzing distribution of burst source in the celestial sphere, burst size distribution, and burst peak. Using the above-mentioned data together with previously published ones, apparent inconsistency was found between the observed results and the adopted theory that the source was in the Galaxy, and this inconsistency was found due to the different time profiles of the burst observed with instruments of different efficiency. It was concluded by these analysis results that employment of logN - logP (relation between burst frequency and burst count) was better than that of logN - logS (burst size) in the examination of gamma-ray burst because the former was less uncertain than the latter. Analyzing the author's observed gamma-ray burst data and the related published data, it was clarified that the burst distribution was almost P -312 for the burst peak value larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec. The author could indicate that the calculated celestial distribution of burst source was consistent with the observed results by the derivation using the logN - logP relationship and that the burst larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec happens about one thousand times a year, about ten times of the previous value. (Takagi, S.)

  2. Nanolensed Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, David

    2017-12-01

    It is suggested that fast radio bursts can probe gravitational lensing by clumpy dark matter objects that range in mass from 10-3 M ⊙-102 M ⊙. They may provide a more sensitive probe than observations of lensings of objects in the Magellanic Clouds, and could find or rule out clumpy dark matter with an extended mass spectrum.

  3. Flow reversal in combined laminar mixed convection heat and mass transfer with phase change in a vertical channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oulaid, Othmane; Benhamou, Brahim; Galanis, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    This paper, deals with a numerical study of the effects of buoyancy forces on an upward, steady state, laminar flow of humid air in a vertical parallel-plate channel. The plates are wetted by a thin liquid water film and maintained at a constant temperature which is lower than that of the air entering the channel. A 2D fully elliptical model, associated with the Boussinesq assumption, is used to take into account axial diffusion. The solution of this mathematical model is based on the finite volume method and the velocity-pressure coupling is handled by the SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results show that buoyancy forces have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic, thermal and mass fraction fields. Additionally, these forces induce flow reversal for high air temperatures and mass fractions at the channel entrance. It is established that heat transfer associated with phase change is, sometimes, more significant than sensible heat transfer. Furthermore, this importance depends on the mass fraction gradient. The conditions for the existence of flow reversal are presented in charts and analytical expressions specifying the critical thermal Grashof number as a function of the Reynolds number for different values of the solutal Grashof number and different aspect ratios of the channel.

  4. Multi-rod burst behavior under a loss-of-coolant accident condition, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Masao; Otomo, Takashi; Furuta, Teruo; Kawasaki, Satoru; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    1980-12-01

    Multi-rod burst tests have been planned since 1977 to estimate quantitative channel restriction during a LOCA transient in LWRs. For this purpose, many bundle tests have been making to burst in a steam in varying a few parameters which influence the degree of channel restriction. The purpose of this report is to provide a background document for final reports to be published in the future. This report includes the results of No. 7805 bundle test, namely temperature, internal pressure, burst behavior of rods and channel restriction of the bundle. (author)

  5. MHD Mixed Convection Flow in a Rotating Channel in the Presence of an Inclined Magnetic Field with the Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A.; Sharma, B. K.

    2017-11-01

    A numerical study of an oscillatory unsteady MHD flow and heat and mass transfer in a vertical rotating channel with an inclined uniform magnetic field and the Hall effect is carried out. The conservation equations of momentum, energy, and species are formulated in a rotating frame of reference with inclusion of the buoyancy effects and Lorentz forces. The Lorentz forces are determined by using the generalized Ohm law with the Hall parameter taken into account. The obtained coupled partial differential equations are nondimensionalized and solved numerically by using the explicit finite difference method. The effects of various model parameters, like the Hall parameter, Hartmann number, wall suction/injection parameter, rotation parameter, angle of magnetic field inclination, Prandtl number, Schmidt number, etc., on the channel velocities, skin friction coefficients, Nusselt number, and the Sherwood number are examined. It is found that the influence of the Hartmann number and Hall parameter on the channel velocities and skin friction coefficients is dependent on the value of the wall suction/injection parameter.

  6. Mixed convection heat transfer to carbon dioxide flowing upward and downward in a vertical tube and an annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Yoon Y.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Experimental results of heat transfer at a supercritical pressure for a tube with an inner diameter of 4.57 mm and a corresponding annular channel (8 mm x 10 mm, 1 mm gap) were compared each other. → Effect of various parameters such as pressure, flow direction, diameter, channel shape, was investigated. → Existing correlation for supercritical heat transfer were evaluated against the experimental data. → Some unusual characteristics of supercritical heat transfer, such as overshoot and non-monotonic behavior against buoyancy parameter, were discussed. → New correlations were proposed based on the experimental data. - Abstract: This paper addresses three main subjects in supercritical heat transfer: (1) difference in thermal characteristics between upward and downward flows; (2) effect of simulating flow channel shape; (3) evaluation of the existing supercritical heat transfer correlations. To achieve the objectives, a series of experiments was carried out with CO 2 flowing upward and downward in a circular tube with an inner diameter of 4.57 mm and an annular channel created between a tube with an inner diameter of 10 mm and a heater rod with an outer diameter of 8 mm. The working fluid, CO 2 , has been regarded as an appropriate modeling fluid for water, primarily because of their similarity in property variations against reduced temperatures. The mass flux ranged from 400 to 1200 kg/m 2 s. The heat flux was varied between 30 and 140 kW/m 2 so that the pseudo-critical point was located in the middle of the heated section at a given mass flux. The measurements were made at a pressure of 8.12 MPa, which corresponds to 110% of the critical pressure of CO 2 . The difference between the upward and downward flows was observed clearly. The heat transfer deterioration was observed in the downward flow through an annular subchannel over the region beyond the critical point. Several well-known correlations were evaluated against the experimental

  7. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  8. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  9. Numerical simulations of natural or mixed convection in vertical channels: comparisons of level-set numerical schemes for the modeling of immiscible incompressible fluid flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research dissertation is at studying natural and mixed convections of fluid flows, and to develop and validate numerical schemes for interface tracking in order to treat incompressible and immiscible fluid flows, later. In a first step, an original numerical method, based on Finite Volume discretizations, is developed for modeling low Mach number flows with large temperature gaps. Three physical applications on air flowing through vertical heated parallel plates were investigated. We showed that the optimum spacing corresponding to the peak heat flux transferred from an array of isothermal parallel plates cooled by mixed convection is smaller than those for natural or forced convections when the pressure drop at the outlet keeps constant. We also proved that mixed convection flows resulting from an imposed flow rate may exhibit unexpected physical solutions; alternative model based on prescribed total pressure at inlet and fixed pressure at outlet sections gives more realistic results. For channels heated by heat flux on one wall only, surface radiation tends to suppress the onset of re-circulations at the outlet and to unify the walls temperature. In a second step, the mathematical model coupling the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the Level-Set method for interface tracking is derived. Improvements in fluid volume conservation by using high order discretization (ENO-WENO) schemes for the transport equation and variants of the signed distance equation are discussed. (author)

  10. Multirods burst tests under loss-of-coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Uetsuka, H.; Furuta, T.

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the upper limit of coolant flow area restriction in a fuel assembly under loss-of-coolant accidents in LWRs, burst tests of fuel bundles were performed. Each bundle consisted of 49 rods(7x7 rods), and bursts were conducted in flowing steam. In some cases, 4 rods were replaced by control rods with guide tubes in a bundle. After the burst, the ballooning behavior of each rod and the degree of coolant flow area restriction in the bundle were measured. Ballooning behavior of rods and degree of coolant flow channel restriction in bundles with control rods were not different from those without control rods. The upper limit of coolant flow channel restriction under loss-of-coolant conditions was estimated to be about 80%. (author)

  11. Three dimensional numerical investigation of flow mixing in curved tubes and mass transfer in T-channel junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Pradeep; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional flow patterns appearing in geometries such as curved pipes and T-channel junctions have important applications and are attractive for research. Unlike the flow in a straight tube, fluid motion in a curved tube is not parallel to the axis of bend, owing to the presence of centrifugal effects. It is characterized by a secondary flow in a cross-sectional plane normal to the main flow. Consequently, secondary flow separation near the inner wall is observed in the developing region. The strength of the secondary flow is greatly influenced by the curvature ratio and in turn, a non-dimensional parameter called the Dean Number. Secondary flow increases flow resistance, resulting in a larger pressure drop along the bend. The location of the maximum axial velocity gets shifted towards the outer wall. Flow in a T-channel junction is also a configuration of great significance. The simulations of the present work show that flow at low Reynolds numbers (Re ≤ 115) is steady and symmetric. For low Reynolds numbers, flow in the downstream channel remains highly segregated about the centerline. The appearance of vortices in the T-channel junction does little to redistribute concentration when flow remains symmetric. With increasing Reynolds number, transition takes place towards asymmetric flow. The incoming flow field gets redistributed at the center-plane and the dividing streamline becomes increasingly distorted. The flow field is characterized by thin elongated fluid interfaces across which momentum diffusion takes place. Flow at higher Reynolds numbers (Re ≥ 250) becomes unsteady in which unstable stagnation stream traces move periodically leftward and rightward at top and bottom walls. Trajectories of mass-less particles show greater dwelling in the junction as compared to those of finite mass particle. The numerical simulation is carried out in the present work using ANUPRAVAHA, a general purpose CFD solver developed at IIT Kanpur in collaboration with

  12. A Review of Nanoscale Channel and Gate Engineered FINFETs for VLSI Mixed Signal Applications Using Zirconium-di-Oxide Dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Nirmal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past, most of the research and development efforts in the area of CMOS and IC’s are oriented towards reducing the power and increasing the gain of the circuits. While focusing the attention on low power and high gain in the device, the materials of the device also been taken into consideration. In the present technology, Computationally intensive devices with low power dissipation and high gain are becoming a critical application domain. Several factors have contributed to this paradigm shift. The primary driving factor being the increase in scale of integration, the chip has to accommodate smaller and faster transistors than their predecessors. During the last decade semiconductor technology has been led by conventional scaling. Scaling, has been aimed towards higher speed, lower power and higher density of the semiconductor devices. However, as scaling approached its physical limits, it has become more difficult and challenging for fabrication industry. Therefore, tremendous research has been carried out to investigate the alternatives, and this led to the introduction of new Nano materials and concepts to overcome the difficulties in the device fabrications. In order to reduce the leakage current and parasitic capacitance in devices, gate oxide high-k dielectric materials are explored. Among the different high-k materials available the nano size Zirconium dioxide material is suggested as an alternate gate oxide material for devices due to its thermal stability and small grain size of material. To meet the requirements of ITRS roadmap 2012, the Multi gate devices are considered to be one of the most promising technologies for the future microelectronics industry due to its excellent immunity to short channel effects and high value of On current. The double gate or multi gate devices provide a better scalability option due to its excellent immunity to short-channel effects. Here the different high-k materials are replaced in different

  13. Thermonuclear Bursts with Short Recurrence Times from Neutron Stars Explained by Opacity-driven Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keek, L. [X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Heger, A., E-mail: laurens.keek@nasa.gov [Monash Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2017-06-20

    Thermonuclear flashes of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars produce the frequently observed Type I X-ray bursts. It is the current paradigm that almost all material burns in a burst, after which it takes hours to accumulate fresh fuel for the next burst. In rare cases, however, bursts are observed with recurrence times as short as minutes. We present the first one-dimensional multi-zone simulations that reproduce this phenomenon. Bursts that ignite in a relatively hot neutron star envelope leave a substantial fraction of the fuel unburned at shallow depths. In the wake of the burst, convective mixing events driven by opacity bring this fuel down to the ignition depth on the observed timescale of minutes. There, unburned hydrogen mixes with the metal-rich ashes, igniting to produce a subsequent burst. We find burst pairs and triplets, similar to the observed instances. Our simulations reproduce the observed fraction of bursts with short waiting times of ∼30%, and demonstrate that short recurrence time bursts are typically less bright and of shorter duration.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizza, L. J.

    Gamma-ray bursts are the brightest transient sources in the gamma-ray sky. Since their discovery in the late 1960s, the investigation of the astrophysical sys- tems in which these phenomena take place, and the physical mechanisms that drive them, has become a vast and prolific area of modern astrophysics. In this work I will briefly describe the most relevant observations of these sources, and the models that describe their nature, emphasizing on the in- vestigations about the progenitor astrophysical systems. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  15. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  16. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events

  17. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E [Livermore, CA; Pratt, Garth C [Discovery Bay, CA; Haugen, Peter C [Livermore, CA; Zumstein, James M [Livermore, CA; Vigars, Mark L [Livermore, CA; Romero, Carlos E [Livermore, CA

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  18. Experiments on simulation of coolant mixing in fuel assembly head and core exit channel of WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar, L.L; Oleksyuk, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' has performed coolant mixing investigation in a head of a full-size simulator of WWER-440 fuel assembly. The experiments were focused on obtaining the data important for investigating the trends in temperature difference between the value registered by a ICIS thermocouple and the value of average temperature. The completed experiments ensure representative of configuration simulation by reproducing every construction peculiar feature of flow part of fuel assembly in the domain between the lower spacing grid and thermocouple location, and also by slightly modified fuel assembly regular elements (or analogues thereof). For the purpose of effectiveness of coolant mixing assessment within the head cross section of FA simulator, we measured coolant temperature distribution both in the place where coolant flow leaves the rod bundle simulator (in 39 data points along the cross section) and in the cross section location of regular ICIS thermocouple simulator (30 data points). The testing was conducted with pressure of (90 - 95) bar, mass coolant flow rates up to 2000 kg/(m 2 .s), temperature of coolant heating in 'hot' parts of the bundle up to 35.. and differences between coolant temperature extremes measured in rod bundle simulator outlet up to 20... Temperature fields were registered in 63 conditions that differ in coolant flow and inlet coolant temperature, electrical heating rate of FA simulator, and radial coolant distribution. In certain registered conditions we simulated coolant leakage to the space between the fuel assemblies. The received test data may be important both for investigation of dependencies between the coolant temperature in regular thermocouple location or average outlet temperature in assembly head, and for validation of CFD codes or subchannel codes (Authors)

  19. 'Too much, too late': mixed methods multi-channel video recording study of computerized decision support systems and GP prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, James; Thomson, Fionagh; Milne, Heather; Buckingham, Susan; Sheikh, Aziz; Fernando, Bernard; Cresswell, Kathrin; Williams, Robin; Pinnock, Hilary

    2013-06-01

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSS) are commonly deployed to support prescribing, although over-riding of alerts by prescribers remains a concern. We aimed to understand how general practitioners (GPs) interact with prescribing CDSS in order to inform deliberation on how better to support prescribing decisions in primary care. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of interactions between GPs, patients, and computer systems using multi-channel video recordings of 112 primary care consultations with eight GPs in three UK practices. 132 prescriptions were issued in the course of 73 of the consultations, of which 81 (61%) attracted at least one alert. Of the total of 117 alerts, only three resulted in the GP checking, but not altering, the prescription. CDSS provided information and safety alerts at the point of generating a prescription. This was 'too much, too late' as the majority of the 'work' of prescribing occurred prior to using the computer. By the time an alert appeared, the GP had formulated the problem(s), potentially spent several minutes considering, explaining, negotiating, and reaching agreement with the patient about the proposed treatment, and had possibly given instructions and printed an information leaflet. CDSS alerts do not coincide with the prescribing workflow throughout the whole GP consultation. Current systems interrupt to correct decisions that have already been taken, rather than assisting formulation of the management plan. CDSS are likely to be more acceptable and effective if the prescribing support is provided much earlier in the process of generating a prescription.

  20. Neutron stars as X-ray burst sources. II. Burst energy histograms and why they burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baan, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    In this work we explore some of the implications of a model for X-ray burst sources where bursts are caused by Kruskal-Schwarzschild instabilities at the magnetopause of an accreting and rotating neutron star. A number of simplifying assumptions are made in order to test the model using observed burst-energy histograms for the rapid burster MXB 1730--335. The predicted histograms have a correct general shape, but it appears that other effects are important as well, and that mode competition, for instance, may suppress the histograms at high burst energies. An explanation is ventured for the enhancement in the histogram at the highest burst energies, which produces the bimodal shape in high accretion rate histograms. Quantitative criteria are given for deciding when accreting neutron stars are steady sources or burst sources, and these criteria are tested using the X-ray pulsars

  1. On the performance of dual-hop mixed RF/FSO wireless communication system in urban area over aggregated exponentiated Weibull fading channels with pointing errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Wang, Ping; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cao, Tian

    2018-03-01

    The performance of decode-and-forward dual-hop mixed radio frequency / free-space optical system in urban area is studied. The RF link is modeled by the Nakagami-m distribution and the FSO link is described by the composite exponentiated Weibull (EW) fading channels with nonzero boresight pointing errors (NBPE). For comparison, the ABER results without pointing errors (PE) and those with zero boresight pointing errors (ZBPE) are also provided. The closed-form expression for the average bit error rate (ABER) in RF link is derived with the help of hypergeometric function, and that in FSO link is obtained by Meijer's G and generalized Gauss-Laguerre quadrature functions. Then, the end-to-end ABERs with binary phase shift keying modulation are achieved on the basis of the computed ABER results of RF and FSO links. The end-to-end ABER performance is further analyzed with different Nakagami-m parameters, turbulence strengths, receiver aperture sizes and boresight displacements. The result shows that with ZBPE and NBPE considered, FSO link suffers a severe ABER degradation and becomes the dominant limitation of the mixed RF/FSO system in urban area. However, aperture averaging can bring significant ABER improvement of this system. Monte Carlo simulation is provided to confirm the validity of the analytical ABER expressions.

  2. Thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of approx. 10 12 gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of approx. 13 M 0 yr -1 is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the hot CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 10 20 to 10 22 g km -2 . Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into 56 Ni releases from 10 38 to 10 40 erg km -2 and pushes hot plasma with β > 1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard γ-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most γ-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for Jacobson-like transients is also offered

  3. The event-mixing technique for modeling the tt background in a search for supersymmetry in the Di-lepton channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schettler, Hannes

    2013-09-01

    In this thesis a search for Supersymmetry in the opposite-sign same-flavor di-lepton channel is presented. Data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC accelerator corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 12.2 fb -1 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is analyzed. Events with at least two muons or two electrons with opposite charge, a significant transverse momentum imbalance, and at least one or at least two jets are selected. Supersymmetric particle decays are expected to form an edge-like structure in the di-lepton mass spectrum. The main background from Standard-Model processes is t anti t pair production. This background is estimated in a data-driven way using the event-mixing technique. Since event mixing is novel to estimate t anti t events, the method is validated in detail. In the analyzed data no significant excess w.r.t. the event-mixing prediction is observed. In a counting experiment as well as in a fit of the shape of the distribution the data is in agreement with the expectations from the Standard Model. Hence, exclusion limits are calculated in terms of number of events forming an edge in the di-lepton mass spectrum. Additionally, the results are interpreted within a simplified model spectrum, assuming direct gaugino production and a decay chainlike χ 2 0 →l ± l -+ →χ 1 0 l + l - . Limits are set on the masses of the supersymmetric particles. (orig.)

  4. The event-mixing technique for modeling the t anti t background in a search for supersymmetry in the Di-lepton channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schettler, Hannes

    2013-09-15

    In this thesis a search for Supersymmetry in the opposite-sign same-flavor di-lepton channel is presented. Data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC accelerator corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 12.2 fb{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is analyzed. Events with at least two muons or two electrons with opposite charge, a significant transverse momentum imbalance, and at least one or at least two jets are selected. Supersymmetric particle decays are expected to form an edge-like structure in the di-lepton mass spectrum. The main background from Standard-Model processes is t anti t pair production. This background is estimated in a data-driven way using the event-mixing technique. Since event mixing is novel to estimate t anti t events, the method is validated in detail. In the analyzed data no significant excess w.r.t. the event-mixing prediction is observed. In a counting experiment as well as in a fit of the shape of the distribution the data is in agreement with the expectations from the Standard Model. Hence, exclusion limits are calculated in terms of number of events forming an edge in the di-lepton mass spectrum. Additionally, the results are interpreted within a simplified model spectrum, assuming direct gaugino production and a decay chainlike {chi}{sub 2}{sup 0}{yields}l{sup {+-}}l{sup -+}{yields}{chi}{sub 1}{sup 0}l{sup +}l{sup -}. Limits are set on the masses of the supersymmetric particles. (orig.)

  5. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  6. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS. This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  7. Solar microwave bursts - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; Vlahos, L.

    1982-01-01

    Observational and theoretical results on the physics of microwave bursts that occur in the solar atmosphere are reviewed. Special attention is given to the advances made in burst physics over the last few years with the great improvement in spatial and time resolution, especially with instruments like the NRAO three-element interferometer, the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, and more recently the Very Large Array. Observations made on the preflare build-up of an active region at centimeter wavelengths are reviewed. Three distinct phases in the evolution of cm bursts, namely the impulsive phase, the post-burst phase, and the gradual rise and fall, are discussed. Attention is also given to the flux density spectra of centimeter bursts. Descriptions are given of observations of fine structures with temporal resolution of 10-100 ms in the intensity profiles of cm-wavelength bursts. High spatial resolution observations are analyzed, with special reference to the one- and two-dimensional maps of cm burst sources.

  8. Spatial variation in automated burst suppression detection in pharmacologically induced coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jingzhi; Jonnalagadda, Durga; Moura, Valdery; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Westover, M Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression is actively studied as a control signal to guide anesthetic dosing in patients undergoing medically induced coma. The ability to automatically identify periods of EEG suppression and compactly summarize the depth of coma using the burst suppression probability (BSP) is crucial to effective and safe monitoring and control of medical coma. Current literature however does not explicitly account for the potential variation in burst suppression parameters across different scalp locations. In this study we analyzed standard 19-channel EEG recordings from 8 patients with refractory status epilepticus who underwent pharmacologically induced burst suppression as medical treatment for refractory seizures. We found that although burst suppression is generally considered a global phenomenon, BSP obtained using a previously validated algorithm varies systematically across different channels. A global representation of information from individual channels is proposed that takes into account the burst suppression characteristics recorded at multiple electrodes. BSP computed from this representative burst suppression pattern may be more resilient to noise and a better representation of the brain state of patients. Multichannel data integration may enhance the reliability of estimates of the depth of medical coma.

  9. Swift-BAT: The First Year of Gamma-Ray Burst Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, Hans A.

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift has been detecting gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since Dec. 17,2004 and automated burst alerts have been distributed since Feb. 14,2005. Since commissioning the BAT has triggered on more than 100 GRBs, nearly all of which have been followed up by the narrow-field instruments on Swift through automatic repointing, and by ground and other satellite telescopes after rapid notification. Within seconds of a trigger the BAT produces and relays to the ground a position good to three arc minutes and a four channel light curve. A full ten minutes of event data follows on subsequent ground station passes. The burst archive has allowed us to determine ensemble burst parameters such as fluence, peak flux and duration. An overview of the properties of BAT bursts and BAT'S performance as a burst monitor will be presented in this talk. BAT is a coded aperture imaging system with a wide (approx.2 sr) field of view consisting of a large coded mask located 1 m above a 5200 cm2 array of 32.768 CdZnTe detectors. All electronics and other hardware systems on the BAT have been operating well since commissioning and there is no sign of any degradation on orbit. The flight and ground software have proven similarly robust and allow the real time localization of all bursts and the rapid derivation of burst light curves, spectra and spectral fits on the ground.

  10. Properties of gamma-ray burst time profiles using pulse decomposition analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.

    2000-02-08

    The time profiles of many gamma-ray bursts consist of distinct pulses, which offers the possibility of characterizing the temporal structure of these bursts using a relatively small set of pulse shape parameters. This pulse decomposition analysis has previously been performed on a small sample of bright long bursts using binned data from BATSE, which comes in several data types, and on a sample of short bursts using the BATSE Time-Tagged Event (TTE) data type. The authors have developed an interactive pulse-fitting program using the phenomenological pulse model of Norris, et. al. and a maximum-likelihood fitting routine. They have used this program to analyze the Time-to-Spill (TTS) data for all bursts observed by BATSE up through trigger number 2000, in all energy channels for which TTS data is available. They present statistical information on the attributes of pulses comprising these bursts, including relations between pulse characteristics through the course of a burst. They carry out simulations to determine the biases that their procedures may introduce. They find that pulses tend to have shorter rise times than decay times, and tend to be narrower and peak earlier at higher energies. They also find that pulse brightness, pulse width, and pulse hardness ratios do not evolve monotonically within bursts, but that the ratios of pulse rise times to decay times tends to decrease with time within bursts.

  11. Phenomenological vessel burst investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippelein, K.W.; Julisch, P.; Muz, J.; Schiedermaier, J.

    1985-07-01

    Fourteen burst experiments have been carried out using vessels with circumferential and longitudinal flaws, for investigation of the fracture behaviour, i.e. the time-related fracture opening. The vessels had dimensions (outer diameter x wall thickness = 800 x 47 mm) which correspond to the dimensions of the main coolant piping of a 1300 MW e PWR. The test specimens had been made of the base-safe material 20 MnMoNi 55 and of a special, 22 NiMoCr 37 base alloy. The experimental conditions with regard to pressure and temperature have been chosen so as to correspond to normal operating conditions of a PWR (p∝17.5 MPa, T∝300 0 C), i.e. the flaws have been so dimensioned that failure was to be expected at a pressure of p∝17.5 MPa. As a rule, water has been used as the pressure medium, or in some cases air, in order to influence the time-dependent pressure decrease. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations have also been made. In order to determine the impact of a fast propagating crack on the leak-to-fracture curve, which normally is defined by quasistationary experiments, suitable tests have been made with large-volume, cylindrical vessels (outer diameter x wall thickness x length = 3000 x 21 x 14000 mm) made of the material WSt E 43. The leak-before-fracture criterion has been confirmed. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Solar X-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urnov, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In the popular form the consideration is given to the modern state tasks and results of X-ray spectrometry of solar bursts. The operation of X-ray spectroheliograph is described. Results of spectral and polarization measurings of X-ray radiation of one powerful solar burst are presented. The conclusion has been drawn that in the process of burst development three characteristic stages may be distingwished: 1) the initial phase; just in this period processes which lead to observed consequences-electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation are born; 2) the impulse phase, or the phase of maximum, is characterised by sharp increase of radiation flux. During this phase the main energy content emanates and some volumes of plasma warm up to high temperatures; 3) the phase of burst damping, during which plasma cools and reverts to the initial condition

  13. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  14. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  15. Intrinsic and cosmological signatures in gamma-ray burst time profiles: Time dilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.

    2000-02-08

    The time profiles of many gamma-ray bursts consist of distinct pulses, which offers the possibility of characterizing the temporal structure of these bursts using a relatively small set of pulse shape parameters. The authors have used a pulse decomposition procedure to analyze the Time-to-Spill (TTS) data for all bursts observed by BATSE up through trigger number 2000, in all energy channels for which TTS data is available. The authors obtain amplitude, rise and decay timescales, a pulse shape parameter, and the fluencies of individual pulses in all of the bursts. The authors investigate the correlations between brightness measures (amplitude and fluence) and timescale measures (pulse width and separation) which may result from cosmological time dilation of bursts, or from intrinsic properties of burst sources or from selection effects. The effects of selection biases are evaluated through simulations. The correlations between these parameters among pulses within individual bursts give a measure of the intrinsic effects while the correlations among bursts could result both from intrinsic and cosmological effects. The authors find that timescales tend to be shorter in bursts with higher peak fluxes, as expected from cosmological time dilation effects, but also find that there are non-cosmological effects contributing to this inverse correlation. The authors find that timescales tend to be longer in bursts with higher total fluences, contrary to what is expected from cosmological effects. The authors also find that peak fluxes and total fluences of bursts are uncorrelated, indicating that they cannot both be good distance indicators for bursts.

  16. Detection circuit for gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki; Yamagami, Takamasa; Mori, Kunishiro; Uchiyama, Sadayuki.

    1982-01-01

    A new gamma-ray burst detection system is described. The system was developed as an environmental monitor of an accelerator, and can be used as the burst detection system. The system detects the arrival time of burst. The difference between the arrival times detected at different places will give information on the burst source. The frequency of detecting false burst was estimated, and the detection limit under the estimated frequency of false burst was also calculated. Decision whether the signal is false or true burst was made by the statistical treatment. (Kato, T.)

  17. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  18. Solar Drift-Pair Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A.; Volvach, Ya.; Konovalenko, A.; Koval, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a new sight on the study of solar bursts historically called drift pairs (DPs) is presented. Having a simple morphology on dynamic spectra of radio records (two short components separated in time, and often they are very similar) and discovered at the dawn of radio astronomy, their features remain unexplained totally up to now. Generally, the DPs are observed during the solar storms of type III bursts, but not every storm of type III bursts is linked with DPs. Detected by ground-based instruments at decameter and meter wavelengths, the DP bursts are limited in frequency bandwidth. They can drift from high frequencies to low ones and vice versa. Their frequency drift rate may be both lower and higher than typical rates of type III bursts at the same frequency range. The development of low-frequency radio telescopes and data processing provide additional possibilities in the research. In this context the fresh analysis of DPs, made from recent observations in the summer campaign of 2015, are just considered. Their study was implemented by updated tools of the UTR-2 radio telescope at 9-33 MHz. During 10-12 July of 2015, DPs forming the longest patterns on dynamic spectra are about 7% of the total number of recorded DPs. Their marvelous resemblance in frequency drift rates with the solar S-bursts is discussed.

  19. X-ray bursts: Observation versus theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Results of various observations of common type I X-ray bursts are discussed with respect to the theory of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Topics covered include burst profiles; irregular burst intervals; rise and decay times and the role of hydrogen; the accuracy of source distances; accuracy in radii determination; radius increase early in the burst; the super Eddington limit; temperatures at burst maximum; and the role of the magnetic field.

  20. Spiking and bursting patterns of fractional-order Izhikevich model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teka, Wondimu W.; Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Mondal, Argha

    2018-03-01

    Bursting and spiking oscillations play major roles in processing and transmitting information in the brain through cortical neurons that respond differently to the same signal. These oscillations display complex dynamics that might be produced by using neuronal models and varying many model parameters. Recent studies have shown that models with fractional order can produce several types of history-dependent neuronal activities without the adjustment of several parameters. We studied the fractional-order Izhikevich model and analyzed different kinds of oscillations that emerge from the fractional dynamics. The model produces a wide range of neuronal spike responses, including regular spiking, fast spiking, intrinsic bursting, mixed mode oscillations, regular bursting and chattering, by adjusting only the fractional order. Both the active and silent phase of the burst increase when the fractional-order model further deviates from the classical model. For smaller fractional order, the model produces memory dependent spiking activity after the pulse signal turned off. This special spiking activity and other properties of the fractional-order model are caused by the memory trace that emerges from the fractional-order dynamics and integrates all the past activities of the neuron. On the network level, the response of the neuronal network shifts from random to scale-free spiking. Our results suggest that the complex dynamics of spiking and bursting can be the result of the long-term dependence and interaction of intracellular and extracellular ionic currents.

  1. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  2. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels, Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of ∼2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (∼6x10 -10 erg cm -2 s -1 ) is ∼>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (∼60,000 s) is ∼30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  3. An effective implementation scheme of just-in-time protocol for optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guiling; Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hui

    2005-02-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) has been emerging as a promising technology that can effectively support the next generation IP-oriented transportation networks. JIT signaling protocol for OBS is relatively simple and easy to be implemented by hardware. This paper presented an effective scheme to implement the JIT protocol, which not only can effectively implement reservation and release of optical channels based on JIT, but also can process the failure of channel reservation and release due to loss of burst control packets. The scheme includes: (1) a BHP (burst head packet) path table is designed and built at each OBS node. It is used to guarantee the corresponding burst control packet, i.e. BHP, BEP (burst end packet) and BEP_ACK (BEP acknowledgement), to be transmitted in the same path. (2) The timed retransmission of BEP and the reversed deletion of the item in BHP path tables triggered by the corresponding BEP_ACK are combined to solve the problems caused by the loss of the signaling messages in channel reservation and release process. (3) Burst head packets and BEP_ACK are transmitted using "best-effort" method. Related signaling messages and their formats for the proposed scheme are also given.

  4. Optical observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Fynbo, J.P.U.

    2004-01-01

    We briefly review the status and recent progress in the field of optical observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows. We will focus on the fundamental observational evidence for the relationship between gamma-ray bursts and the final evolutionary phases of massive stars. In particular, we will address (i) gamma-ray burst host galaxies, (ii) optically dark gamma-ray burst afterglows, (iii) the gamma-ray burst-supernova connection, and (iv) the relation between X-ray flashes, gamma-ray bursts, and supernovae

  5. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the essential aspects of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenon, with emphasis on the more recent results. GRBs are introduced by their time histories, which provide some evidence for a compact object origin. The energy spectra of bursts are presented and they are seen to demonstrate practically unambiguously that the origin of some GRBs involves neutron stars. Counterpart searches are reviewed briefly and the statistical properties of bursters treated. This paper presents a review of the three known repeating bursters (the Soft Gamma Repeaters). Extragalactic and galactic models are discussed and future prospects are assessed

  6. Fast Burst Synchronization for Power Line Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampe Lutz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast burst synchronization is an important requirement in asynchronous communication networks, where devices transmit short data packets in an unscheduled fashion. Such a synchronization is typically achieved by means of a preamble sent in front of the data packet. In this paper, we study fast burst synchronization for power line communication (PLC systems operating below 500 kHz and transmitting data rates of up to about 500 kbps as it is typical in various PLC network applications. In particular, we are concerned with the receiver processing of the preamble signal and the actual design of preambles suitable for fast burst synchronization in such PLC systems. Our approach is comprehensive in that it takes into account the most distinctive characteristics of the power line channel, which are multipath propagation, highly varying path loss, and disturbance by impulse noise, as well as important practical constraints, especially the need for spectral shaping of the preamble signal and fast adjustment of the automatic gain control (AGC. In fact, we regard the explicit incorporation of these various requirements into the preamble design as the main contribution of this work. We devise an optimization criterion and a stochastic algorithm to search for suitable preamble sequences. A comprehensive performance comparison of a designed and two conventional preambles shows that the designed sequence is superior in terms of (a fast burst synchronization in various transmission environments, (b fast AGC adjustment, and (c compliance of its spectrum with the spectral mask applied to the data transmit signal.

  7. Automatic burst detection for the EEG of the preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennekens, Ward; Ruijs, Loes S; Lommen, Charlotte M L; Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Pasman, Jaco W; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne H J M; Wijn, Pieter F F; van Pul, Carola; Andriessen, Peter

    2011-10-01

    To aid with prognosis and stratification of clinical treatment for preterm infants, a method for automated detection of bursts, interburst-intervals (IBIs) and continuous patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is developed. Results are evaluated for preterm infants with normal neurological follow-up at 2 years. The detection algorithm (MATLAB®) for burst, IBI and continuous pattern is based on selection by amplitude, time span, number of channels and numbers of active electrodes. Annotations of two neurophysiologists were used to determine threshold values. The training set consisted of EEG recordings of four preterm infants with postmenstrual age (PMA, gestational age + postnatal age) of 29-34 weeks. Optimal threshold values were based on overall highest sensitivity. For evaluation, both observers verified detections in an independent dataset of four EEG recordings with comparable PMA. Algorithm performance was assessed by calculation of sensitivity and positive predictive value. The results of algorithm evaluation are as follows: sensitivity values of 90% ± 6%, 80% ± 9% and 97% ± 5% for burst, IBI and continuous patterns, respectively. Corresponding positive predictive values were 88% ± 8%, 96% ± 3% and 85% ± 15%, respectively. In conclusion, the algorithm showed high sensitivity and positive predictive values for bursts, IBIs and continuous patterns in preterm EEG. Computer-assisted analysis of EEG may allow objective and reproducible analysis for clinical treatment.

  8. Bursting and critical layer frequencies in minimal turbulent dynamics and connections to exact coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Sung; Shekar, Ashwin; Graham, Michael D.

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of the turbulent near-wall region is known to be dominated by coherent structures. These near-wall coherent structures are observed to burst in a very intermittent fashion, exporting turbulent kinetic energy to the rest of the flow. In addition, they are closely related to invariant solutions known as exact coherent states (ECS), some of which display nonlinear critical layer dynamics (motions that are highly localized around the surface on which the streamwise velocity matches the wave speed of ECS). The present work aims to investigate temporal coherence in minimal channel flow relevant to turbulent bursting and critical layer dynamics and its connection to the instability of ECS. It is seen that the minimal channel turbulence displays frequencies very close to those displayed by an ECS family recently identified in the channel flow geometry. The frequencies of these ECS are determined by critical layer structures and thus might be described as "critical layer frequencies." While the bursting frequency is predominant near the wall, the ECS frequencies (critical layer frequencies) become predominant over the bursting frequency at larger distances from the wall, and increasingly so as Reynolds number increases. Turbulent bursts are classified into strong and relatively weak classes with respect to an intermittent approach to a lower branch ECS. This temporally intermittent approach is closely related to an intermittent low drag event, called hibernating turbulence, found in minimal and large domains. The relationship between the strong burst and the instability of the lower branch ECS is further discussed in state space. The state-space dynamics of strong bursts is very similar to that of the unstable manifolds of the lower branch ECS. In particular, strong bursting processes are always preceded by hibernation events. This precursor dynamics to strong turbulence may aid in development of more effective control schemes by a way of anticipating dynamics

  9. The experimental optical burst switching system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wu, Guiling; Wang, Hui; Lu, Jialin; Ye, Ailun

    2005-02-01

    The first optical burst switching (OBS) system has been demonstrated in China, which includes three edge routers and one core-node. A kind of fast wavelength selective optical switching was used in the system. The core OBS node consists of a kind of wavelength selective optical switch we developed. It consists of two SOA switches and one wavelength selective thin film filter with centre wavelength at one wavelength. There are one input optical fiber and two output fibers, each fiber carries two wavelengths. The Dell PE2650 servers act as the edge OBS routers. The wavelength of each data channel is located in C-band and the bit rate is at 1.25Gbps. The control channel uses bit rate of 100Mbps at wavelength of 1310 nm. A novel effective scheme for Just-In-Time (JIT) protocol was proposed and implemented. OBS services, such as Video on Demand (VOD) and file transfer protocol (FTP), have been demonstrated. Assembling and scheduling methods that are capable to guarantee the QoS (quality of service) of the transported service are studied.

  10. BATSE/OSSE Rapid Burst Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matz, S. M; Grove, J. E; Johnson, W. N; Kurfess, J. D; Share, G. H; Fishman, G. J; Meegan, Charles A

    1995-01-01

    ...) slew the OSSE detectors to burst locations determined on-board by BATSE. This enables OSSE to make sensitive searches for prompt and delayed post-burst line and continuum emission above 50 keV...

  11. US Army Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, R.F.

    1980-07-01

    The Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS) was developed to meet the Army requirements of an unattended, automatic nuclear burst reporting system. It provides pertinent data for battlefield commanders on a timely basis with high reliability

  12. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Observations have revealed that long bursts, with recorded afterglow, tend to reside in the star forming regions of normal galaxies. Moreover, GRB 980425 ... observer is negligible due to the special relativistic time dilation. However, because of deceleration, eventually Γ−1 > θj and thereafter, sideways expansion becomes.

  13. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett...

  14. Dark gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2017-03-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p -wave process than for s -wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to standard model particles later, the annihilation burst results in a flash of gamma rays accompanying the supernova. For a galactic supernova, this "dark gamma-ray burst" may be observable in the Čerenkov Telescope Array.

  15. Stellar Sources of Gamma-ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Luchkov, B. I.

    2011-01-01

    Correlation analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby star locations (catalog Gliese) reveals 4 coincidences with good angular accuracy. The random probability is 4\\times 10^{-5}, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. Some additional search of stellar gamma-ray bursts is discussed.

  16. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  17. Fine structure in fast drift storm bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.; Ellis, G.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations with high time resolution of fast drift storm (FDS) solar bursts are described. A new variety of FDS bursts characterised by intensity maxima regularly placed in the frequency domain is reported. Possible interpretations of this are mentioned and the implications of the short duration of FDS bursts are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, H.; Ong, W.-J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    X-ray burst model predictions of light curves and the final composition of the nuclear ashes are affected by uncertain nuclear masses. However, not all of these masses are determined experimentally with sufficient accuracy. Here we identify the remaining nuclear mass uncertainties in X-ray burst models using a one-zone model that takes into account the changes in temperature and density evolution caused by changes in the nuclear physics. Two types of bursts are investigated—a typical mixed H/He burst with a limited rapid proton capture process (rp-process) and an extreme mixed H/He burst with an extended rp-process. When allowing for a 3 σ variation, only three remaining nuclear mass uncertainties affect the light-curve predictions of a typical H/He burst ({sup 27}P, {sup 61}Ga, and {sup 65}As), and only three additional masses affect the composition strongly ({sup 80}Zr, {sup 81}Zr, and {sup 82}Nb). A larger number of mass uncertainties remain to be addressed for the extreme H/He burst, with the most important being {sup 58}Zn, {sup 61}Ga, {sup 62}Ge, {sup 65}As, {sup 66}Se, {sup 78}Y, {sup 79}Y, {sup 79}Zr, {sup 80}Zr, {sup 81}Zr, {sup 82}Zr, {sup 82}Nb, {sup 83}Nb, {sup 86}Tc, {sup 91}Rh, {sup 95}Ag, {sup 98}Cd, {sup 99}In, {sup 100}In, and {sup 101}In. The smallest mass uncertainty that still impacts composition significantly when varied by 3 σ is {sup 85}Mo with 16 keV uncertainty. For one of the identified masses, {sup 27}P, we use the isobaric mass multiplet equation to improve the mass uncertainty, obtaining an atomic mass excess of −716(7) keV. The results provide a roadmap for future experiments at advanced rare isotope beam facilities, where all the identified nuclides are expected to be within reach for precision mass measurements.

  19. Solar radio bursts and their relation of coronal magnetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattenberg, A.

    1981-01-01

    Following a general introduction, chapters II and III describe a model for coronal flux tubes. The model tube is a cylindrically symmetric localized force free current, that is embedded in a potential field. In both chapters the growth rates and sizes of the kink mode instability are calculated by solving the linearized equation of motion. In chapters IV and V, observations of solar Type-I radio bursts are presented and analysed. The observations were gathered with the 60-channel radio spectrograph in Dwingeloo. Chapters VI, VII, VIII, IX and X are concerned with observations of solar microwave bursts. The observations, with high time resolution (0.1 s) and high one-dimensional angular resolution (max. 4'') were made with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. (Auth.)

  20. Effective preemptive scheduling scheme for optical burst-switched networks with cascaded wavelength conversion consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingbo

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a new preemptive scheduling technique for next-generation optical burst switching (OBS) networks considering the impact of cascaded wavelength conversions. It has been shown that when optical bursts are transmitted all optically from source to destination, each wavelength conversion performed along the lightpath may cause certain signal-to-noise deterioration. If the distortion of the signal quality becomes significant enough, the receiver would not be able to recover the original data. Accordingly, subject to this practical impediment, we improve a recently proposed fair channel scheduling algorithm to deal with the fairness problem and aim at burst loss reduction simultaneously in OBS environments. In our scheme, the dynamic priority associated with each burst is based on a constraint threshold and the number of already conducted wavelength conversions among other factors for this burst. When contention occurs, a new arriving superior burst may preempt another scheduled one according to their priorities. Extensive simulation results have shown that the proposed scheme further improves fairness and achieves burst loss reduction as well.

  1. Solar Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk,

    2012-01-01

    Radio bursts from the Sun are produced by electron accelerated to relativistic energies by physical processes on the Sun such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The radio bursts are thus good indicators of solar eruptions. Three types of nonthermal radio bursts are generally associated with CMEs. Type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines. The electrons are thought to be accelerated at the reconnection region beneath the erupting CME, although there is another view that the electrons may be accelerated at the CME-driven shock. Type II bursts are due to electrons accelerated at the shock front. Type II bursts are also excellent indicators of solar energetic particle (SEP) events because the same shock is supposed accelerate electrons and ions. There is a hierarchical relationship between the wavelength range of type /I bursts and the CME kinetic energy. Finally, Type IV bursts are due to electrons trapped in moving or stationary structures. The low frequency stationary type IV bursts are observed occasionally in association with very fast CMEs. These bursts originate from flare loops behind the erupting CME and hence indicate tall loops. This paper presents a summary of radio bursts and their relation to CMEs and how they can be useful for space weather predictions.

  2. Some polarization features of solar microwave bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uralov, A M; Nefed' ev, V P [AN SSSR, Irkutsk. Sibirskij Inst. Zemnogo Magnetizma Ionosfery i Rasprostraneniya Radiovoln

    1977-01-01

    Consequences of the thermal microwave burst model proposed earlier have been considered. According to the model the centimeter burst is generated at the heat propagation to the upper atmosphere. The polarization features of the burst are explained: a change of the polarization sign in a frequency range, a rapid change of the polarization sign in the development of a burst at a fixed frequency, a lack of time coincidence of the moments of the burst maximum of the polarization and of the total flux. From the model the consequences are obtained, which are still not confirmed by experiment. An ordinary-type wave prevails in the burst radiation, in the course of which the polarization degree falls on the ascending branch of bursts development. At the change of the polarization sign at the fixed frequency prior to the sign change an ordinary-type wave should be present in excess and later an extreordinary type wave.

  3. Stimulus induced bursts in severe postanoxic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjepkema-Cloostermans, Marleen C; Wijers, Elisabeth T; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-11-01

    To report on a distinct effect of auditory and sensory stimuli on the EEG in comatose patients with severe postanoxic encephalopathy. In two comatose patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with severe postanoxic encephalopathy and burst-suppression EEG, we studied the effect of external stimuli (sound and touch) on the occurrence of bursts. In patient A bursts could be induced by either auditory or sensory stimuli. In patient B bursts could only be induced by touching different facial regions (forehead, nose and chin). When stimuli were presented with relatively long intervals, bursts persistently followed the stimuli, while stimuli with short intervals (encephalopathy can be induced by external stimuli, resulting in stimulus-dependent burst-suppression. Stimulus induced bursts should not be interpreted as prognostic favourable EEG reactivity. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting rock bursts in mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, H.

    1979-01-01

    In terms of lives lost, rock bursts in underground mines can be as hazardous as earthquakes on the surface. So it is not surprising that fo the last 40 years the U.S Bureau of Mines has been using seismic methods for detecting areas in underground mines where there is a high differential stress which could lead to structural instability of the rock mass being excavated.

  5. Impairments due to Burst-Mode Transmission in a Raman-based Long Reach PON Link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Rasmus; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2007-01-01

    A recently proposed passive-optical-network (PON) link based on distributed Raman amplification is tested with disturbing burst-mode traffic. The resulting impairments are quantified through penalty measurements on a single surviving data channel as a function of the disturbing channel power. When...... the disturbing channels co- or counter propagate with the data channel, penalties of less than 1 dB are found for disturbing input powers up to 7 and 11 dBm, respectively. The penalty is further reduced when a moderate amount of continuous-wave light is used to clamp the gain. The results indicate...

  6. NICER Eyes on Bursting Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    What happens to a neutron stars accretion disk when its surface briefly explodes? A new instrument recently deployed at the International Space Station (ISS) is now watching bursts from neutron stars and reporting back.Deploying a New X-Ray MissionLaunch of NICER aboard a Falcon 9 rocket in June 2017. [NASA/Tony Gray]In early June of 2017, a SpaceX Dragon capsule on a Falcon 9 rocket launched on a resupply mission to the ISS. The pressurized interior of the Dragon contained the usual manifest of crew supplies, spacewalk equipment, and vehicle hardware. But the unpressurized trunk of the capsule held something a little different: the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER).In the two weeks following launch, NICER was extracted from the SpaceX Dragon capsule and installed on the ISS. And by the end of the month, the instrument was already collecting its first data set: observations of a bright X-ray burst from Aql X-1, a neutron star accreting matter from a low-mass binary companion.Impact of BurstsNICERs goal is to provide a new view of neutron-star physics at X-ray energies of 0.212 keV a window that allows us to explore bursts of energy that neutron stars sometimes emit from their surfaces.Artists impression of an X-ray binary, in which a compact object accretes material from a companion star. [ESA/NASA/Felix Mirabel]In X-ray burster systems, hydrogen- and helium-rich material from a low-mass companion star piles up in an accretion disk around the neutron star. This material slowly funnels onto the neutron stars surface, forming a layer that gravitationally compresses and eventually becomes so dense and hot that runaway nuclear fusion ignites.Within seconds, the layer of material is burned up, producing a burst of emission from the neutron star that outshines even the inner regions of the hot accretion disk. Then more material funnels onto the neutron star and the process begins again.Though we have a good picture of the physics that causes these bursts

  7. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  8. Study of b→e channel and measurement of B0-antiB0 mixing parameter with L3 parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezequel, S.

    1992-04-01

    This thesis is based on the analysis of the 1990 and 1991 LEP data taken with the L3 detector. It measures the mixing parameter of the B 0 - anti B 0 system. It consists on the comparison of the relative numbers of dileptons with same signs. After having recalled the theoretical background and previous measurements, it describes precisely the selection of prompt electrons from B hadrons. The muon's one is recalled. Different methods are presented to extract the mixing parameter

  9. Constant system for by-channel thermal-hydraulic calculation of fuel assembly operational conditions in reactors with natural and mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogatyrev, I.L.; Bogoslovskaya, G.P.; Zhukov, A.V.; Sorokin, A.P.; Titov, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    System of constants for mass, impulse and energy conservation equations (drag, mixing, heat transfer coefficients, azimuthal unquality of temperature) is reported in region with small Re number for wide range of geometrical assembly parameters. This system can be used in subchannel calculations of assemblies with natural and mixed convection under conditions with loss of flow accident. The formulae are compared with experimental data. 30 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the hybrid and the FAT algorithms in terms of burst end-to-end delay, packet end-to-end delay, and packet loss ratio.

  11. Spike and burst coding in thalamocortical relay cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur Zeldenrust

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian thalamocortical relay (TCR neurons switch their firing activity between a tonic spiking and a bursting regime. In a combined experimental and computational study, we investigated the features in the input signal that single spikes and bursts in the output spike train represent and how this code is influenced by the membrane voltage state of the neuron. Identical frozen Gaussian noise current traces were injected into TCR neurons in rat brain slices as well as in a validated three-compartment TCR model cell. The resulting membrane voltage traces and spike trains were analyzed by calculating the coherence and impedance. Reverse correlation techniques gave the Event-Triggered Average (ETA and the Event-Triggered Covariance (ETC. This demonstrated that the feature selectivity started relatively long before the events (up to 300 ms and showed a clear distinction between spikes (selective for fluctuations and bursts (selective for integration. The model cell was fine-tuned to mimic the frozen noise initiated spike and burst responses to within experimental accuracy, especially for the mixed mode regimes. The information content carried by the various types of events in the signal as well as by the whole signal was calculated. Bursts phase-lock to and transfer information at lower frequencies than single spikes. On depolarization the neuron transits smoothly from the predominantly bursting regime to a spiking regime, in which it is more sensitive to high-frequency fluctuations. The model was then used to elucidate properties that could not be assessed experimentally, in particular the role of two important subthreshold voltage-dependent currents: the low threshold activated calcium current (IT and the cyclic nucleotide modulated h current (Ih. The ETAs of those currents and their underlying activation/inactivation states not only explained the state dependence of the firing regime but also the long-lasting concerted dynamic action of the two

  12. Transitions to Synchrony in Coupled Bursting Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamala, Mukeshwar; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding, Mingzhou

    2004-01-01

    Certain cells in the brain, for example, thalamic neurons during sleep, show spike-burst activity. We study such spike-burst neural activity and the transitions to a synchronized state using a model of coupled bursting neurons. In an electrically coupled network, we show that the increase of coupling strength increases incoherence first and then induces two different transitions to synchronized states, one associated with bursts and the other with spikes. These sequential transitions to synchronized states are determined by the zero crossings of the maximum transverse Lyapunov exponents. These results suggest that synchronization of spike-burst activity is a multi-time-scale phenomenon and burst synchrony is a precursor to spike synchrony.

  13. Transitions to synchrony in coupled bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhamala, Mukeshwar; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding Mingzhou

    2004-01-01

    Certain cells in the brain, for example, thalamic neurons during sleep, show spike-burst activity. We study such spike-burst neural activity and the transitions to a synchronized state using a model of coupled bursting neurons. In an electrically coupled network, we show that the increase of coupling strength increases incoherence first and then induces two different transitions to synchronized states, one associated with bursts and the other with spikes. These sequential transitions to synchronized states are determined by the zero crossings of the maximum transverse Lyapunov exponents. These results suggest that synchronization of spike-burst activity is a multi-time-scale phenomenon and burst synchrony is a precursor to spike synchrony

  14. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Okada, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts, and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. This paper describes the spectral models and the ground calibration experiments used to determine the BAT response to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies

  15. Nonlinear Equalization in 40/112/224 Gbit/s Mixed Line Rate 15-Channel DP-QPSK and DP-16QAM Contiguous Spectrum Based Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Rameez

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated that in-line non-linear compensation schemes decrease the com- plexity of digital back-propagation and enhance the perfor mance of 40/112/224Gbit/s mixed line rate network. Both grouped and un-grouped spectral all ocation schemes are investigated.......We evaluated that in-line non-linear compensation schemes decrease the com- plexity of digital back-propagation and enhance the perfor mance of 40/112/224Gbit/s mixed line rate network. Both grouped and un-grouped spectral all ocation schemes are investigated....

  16. Fast Radio Burst/Gamma-Ray Burst Cosmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, He; Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Bing

    2014-06-01

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM_{IGM} as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value \\lt {DM_IGM} (z)\\gt and luminosity distance (D L(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate \\lt {DM_IGM} (z)\\gt using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  17. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM IGM as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D L (z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  18. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Li, Zhuo, E-mail: gaohe@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-20

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM{sub IGM} as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D {sub L}(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  19. Chaotic bursting in semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Stefan; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamic mechanisms for low frequency fluctuations in semiconductor lasers subjected to delayed optical feedback, using the Lang-Kobayashi model. This system of delay differential equations displays pronounced envelope dynamics, ranging from erratic, so called low frequency fluctuations to regular pulse packages, if the time scales of fast oscillations and envelope dynamics are well separated. We investigate the parameter regions where low frequency fluctuations occur and compute their Lyapunov spectra. Using the geometric singular perturbation theory, we study this intermittent chaotic behavior and characterize these solutions as bursting slow-fast oscillations.

  20. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  1. MILLIHERTZ QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM TERZAN 5: A SHOWCASE OF BURNING REGIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam and Center for High-Energy Astrophysics, P.O. BOX 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cumming, A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Keek, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The increase in burst rate that we found during its 2010 outburst, when persistent luminosity rose from 0.1 to 0.5 times the Eddington limit, is in qualitative agreement with thermonuclear burning theory yet contrary to all previous observations of thermonuclear bursts. Thermonuclear bursts gradually evolved into a mHz QPO when the accretion rate increased, and vice versa. The mHz QPOs from IGR J17480-2446 resemble those previously observed in other accreting NSs, yet they feature lower frequencies (by a factor {approx}3) and occur when the persistent luminosity is higher (by a factor 4-25). We find four distinct bursting regimes and a steep (close to inverse cubic) decrease of the burst recurrence time with increasing persistent luminosity. We compare these findings to nuclear burning models and find evidence for a transition between the pure helium and mixed hydrogen/helium ignition regimes when the persistent luminosity was about 0.3 times the Eddington limit. We also point out important discrepancies between the observed bursts and theory, which predicts brighter and less frequent bursts, and suggest that an additional source of heat in the NS envelope is required to reconcile the observed and expected burst properties. We discuss the impact of NS magnetic field and spin on the expected nuclear burning regimes, in the context of this particular pulsar.

  2. Neutrino burst identification in underground detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulgione, W.; Mengotti-Silva, N.; Panaro, L.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the problem of neutrino burst identification in underground ν-telescopes. First the usual statistical analysis based on the time structure of the events is reviewed, with special attention to the statistical significance of burst candidates. Next, we propose a second level analysis that can provide independent confirmation of burst detection. This exploits the spatial distribution of the single events of a burst candidate, and uses the formalism of the entropy of information. Examples of both techniques are shown, based on the LVD experiment at Gran Sasso. (orig.)

  3. Windowless microfluidic platform based on capillary burst valves for high intensity x-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vig, Asger Laurberg; Enevoldsen, Nikolaj; Thilsted, Anil Haraksingh; Eriksen, Johan; Kristensen, Anders; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2009-01-01

    We propose and describe a microfluidic system for high intensity x-ray measurements. The required open access to a microfluidic channel is provided by an out-of-plane capillary burst valve (CBV). The functionality of the out-of-plane CBV is characterized with respect to the diameter of the windowless access hole, ranging from 10 to 130 μm. Maximum driving pressures from 22 to 280 mbar corresponding to refresh rates of the exposed sample from 300 Hz to 54 kHz is demonstrated. The microfluidic system is tested at beamline ID09b at the ESRF synchrotron radiation facility in Grenoble, and x-ray scattering measurements are shown to be feasible and to require only very limited amounts of sample, <1 ml/h of measurements without recapturing of sample. With small adjustments of the present chip design, scattering angles up to 30 deg. can be achieved without shadowing effects and integration on-chip mixing and spectroscopy appears straightforward.

  4. Analysis of historic bursts and burst detection in water supply areas of different size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Trietsch, E.A.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in water distribution networks lead to water losses and a risk of damaging the urban environment. We studied hydraulic data and customer contact records of 44 real bursts for a better understanding of the phenomena. We found that most bursts were reported to the water company shortly

  5. Alfvén wave filamentation and dispersive phase mixing in a high-density channel: Landau fluid and hybrid simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borgogno, D.; Hellinger, Petr; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2009), s. 275-285 ISSN 1023-5809 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517; CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Alfven wave * phase mixing * filamentation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.152, year: 2009 http://www.nonlin-processes-geophys.net/16/275/2009/npg-16-275-2009.pdf

  6. Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, J.

    1995-01-01

    Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

  7. Observations of short gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Derek B; Roming, Peter W A

    2007-05-15

    We review recent observations of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. The launch and successful ongoing operations of the Swift satellite, along with several localizations from the High-Energy Transient Explorer mission, have provoked a revolution in short-burst studies: first, by quickly providing high-quality positions to observers; and second, via rapid and sustained observations from the Swift satellite itself. We make a complete accounting of Swift-era short-burst localizations and proposed host galaxies, and discuss the implications of these observations for the distances, energetics and environments of short bursts, and the nature of their progenitors. We then review the physical modelling of short-burst afterglows: while the simplest afterglow models are inadequate to explain the observations, there have been several notable successes. Finally, we address the case of an unusual burst that threatens to upset the simple picture in which long bursts are due to the deaths of massive stars, and short bursts to compact-object merger events.

  8. Neutrino bursts and gravitational waves experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnoli, C; Galeotti, P; Saavedra, O [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica

    1978-05-01

    Several experiments have been performed in many countries to observe gravitational waves or neutrino bursts. Since their simultaneous emission may occur in stellar collapse, the authors evaluate the effect of neutrino bursts on gravitational wave antennas and suggest the usefulness of a time correlation among the different detectors.

  9. Polarization of a periodic solar microwave burst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, P [Universidade Mackenzie, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Radio-Astronomia e Astrofisica

    1976-09-01

    No fluctuations in polarization have been found during a 7 GHz solar burst showing 17s periodic pulses in intensity. Polarization effects can be produced by the propagation media in the active centre, which are not affected directly by the burst source, but situated more deeply than the observed heights at that microwave frequency.

  10. Cognitive digital receiver for burst mode phase modulated radio over fiber links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    A novel cognitive receiver for modulation format recognition with reconfigurable carrier recovery scheme is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for phase modulated radio-over-fibre links. Demodulation of burst-mode mixed modulation formats (PSK and QAM) is demonstrated after 40km...

  11. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  12. Bursting synchronization in scale-free networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, C.A.S.; Batista, A.M.; Pontes, J.C.A. de; Lopes, S.R.; Viana, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal networks in some areas of the brain cortex present the scale-free property, i.e., the neuron connectivity is distributed according to a power-law, such that neurons are more likely to couple with other already well-connected ones. Neuron activity presents two timescales, a fast one related to action-potential spiking, and a slow timescale in which bursting takes place. Some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of the bursting activity in a weak sense, meaning the adjustment of the bursting phase due to coupling. Hence it has been proposed that an externally applied time-periodic signal be applied in order to control undesirable synchronized bursting rhythms. We investigated this kind of intervention using a two-dimensional map to describe neurons with spiking-bursting activity in a scale-free network.

  13. X-Ray Bursts from NGC 6652

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Edward

    The possibly transient X-ray Source in the globular cluster NGC 6652 has been seen by BeppoSax and the ASM on RXTE to undergo X-ray bursts, possibly Type I. Very little is known about this X-ray source, and confirmation of its bursts type-I nature would identify it as a neutron star binary. Type I bursts in 6 other sources have been shown to exhibit intervals of millisecond ocsillation that most likely indicate the neutron star spin period. Radius-expansion bursts can reveal information about the mass and size of the neutron star. We propose to use the ASM to trigger an observation of this source to maximize the probability of catching a burst in the PCA.

  14. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  15. Single-channel kinetics of BK (Slo1 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan eGeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-channel kinetics has proven a powerful tool to reveal information about the gating mechanisms that control the opening and closing of ion channels. This introductory review focuses on the gating of large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK or Slo1 channels at the single-channel level. It starts with single-channel current records and progresses to presentation and analysis of single-channel data and the development of gating mechanisms in terms of discrete state Markov (DSM models. The DSM models are formulated in terms of the tetrameric modular structure of BK channels, consisting of a central transmembrane pore-gate domain (PGD attached to four surrounding transmembrane voltage sensing domains (VSD and a large intracellular cytosolic domain (CTD, also referred to as the gating ring. The modular structure and data analysis shows that the Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating considered separately can each be approximated by 10-state two-tiered models with 5 closed states on the upper tier and 5 open states on the lower tier. The modular structure and joint Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating are consistent with a 50 state two-tiered model with 25 closed states on the upper tier and 25 open states on the lower tier. Adding an additional tier of brief closed (flicker states to the 10-state or 50-state models improved the description of the gating. For fixed experimental conditions a channel would gate in only a subset of the potential number of states. The detected number of states and the correlations between adjacent interval durations are consistent with the tiered models. The examined models can account for the single-channel kinetics and the bursting behavior of gating. Ca2+ and voltage activate BK channels by predominantly increasing the effective opening rate of the channel with a smaller decrease in the effective closing rate. Ca2+ and depolarization thus activate by mainly destabilizing the closed states.

  16. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  17. Swift: A gamma ray burst MIDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Swift is a first of its kind multiwavelength transient observatory for gamma-ray burst astronomy. It has the optimum capabilities for the next breakthroughs in determining the origin of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows as well as using bursts to probe the early Universe. Swift will also perform the first sensitive hard X-ray survey of the sky. The mission is being developed by an international collaboration and consists of three instruments, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the X-ray Telescope (XRT), and the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). The BAT, a wide-field gamma-ray detector, will detect ∼1 gamma-ray burst per day with a sensitivity 5 times that of BATSE. The sensitive narrow-field XRT and UVOT will be autonomously slewed to the burst location in 20 to 70 seconds to determine 0.3-5.0 arcsec positions and perform optical, UV, and X-ray spectrophotometry. On-board measurements of redshift will also be done for hundreds of bursts. Swift will incorporate superb, low-cost instruments using existing flight-spare hardware and designs. Strong education/public outreach and follow-up programs will help to engage the public and astronomical community. Swift has been selected by NASA for development and launch in late 2003

  18. Possible galactic origin of. gamma. -ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchanda, R K; Ramsden, D [Southampton Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics

    1977-03-31

    It is stated that extragalactic models for the origin of non-solar ..gamma..-ray bursts include supernova bursts in remote galaxies, and the collapse of the cores of active stars, whilst galactic models are based on flare stars, thermonuclear explosions in neutron stars and the sudden accretion of cometary gas on to neutron stars. The acceptability of any of these models may be tested by the observed size spectrum of the ..gamma..-ray bursts. The extragalactic models predict a power law spectrum with number index -1.5, whilst for the galactic models the number index will be -1. Experimental data on ..gamma..-ray bursts is, however, still meagre, and so far only 44 confirmed events have been recorded by satellite-borne instruments. The number spectrum of the observed ..gamma..-ray bursts indicates that the observed distribution for events with an energy < 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/ is flat; this makes the choice of any model completely arbitrary. An analysis of the observed ..gamma..-ray events is here presented that suggests very interesting possibilities for their origin. There appears to be a preferred mean energy for ..gamma..-ray bursts; some 90% of the recorded events show a mean energy between 5 x 10/sup -5/ and 5 x 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/, contrary to the predicted characteristics of the number spectrum of various models. A remarkable similarity is found between the distribution of ..gamma..-ray bursts and that of supernova remnants, suggesting a genetic relationship between the two and the galactic origin of the ..gamma..-ray bursts, and the burst source could be identified with completely run down neutron stars, formed during supernova explosions.

  19. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  20. Channel's Concurrence and Quantum Teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Yin-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    Concurrence can measure the entanglement property of a system. If the channel is a pure state, positive concurrence state can afford the good performance in the teleportation process. If the channel ia a mixed state, positive concurrence state cannot assure the good performance in the teleportation. The conditions of the positive concurrence and the quantum teleportation in the Heisenberg spin ring is derived.

  1. Relativistic motion in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolik, J.H.; Pier, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fundamental problems affect models of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the energy source, the ability of high-energy photons to escape the radiation region, and the comparative weakness of X-ray emission. It is indicated that relativistic bulk motion of the gamma-ray-emitting plasma generically provides a solution to all three of these problems. Results show that, if the plasma that produces gamma-ray bursts has a bulk relativistic velocity with Lorentz factor gamma of about 10, several of the most troubling problems having to do with gamma-ray bursts are solved. 42 refs

  2. Frequency chirping during a fishbone burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, V.S.; Reznik, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that frequency chirping during fishbone activity can be attributed to the reactive torque exerted on the plasma during the instability burst, which slows down plasma rotation inside the q = 1 surface and reduces the mode frequency in the lab frame. Estimates show that the peak value of this torque can exceed the neutral beam torque in modern tokamaks. The simple line-broadened quasilinear burst model (Berk et al 1995 Nucl. Fusion 35 1661), properly adapted for the fishbone case, is capable of reproducing the key features of the bursting mode. (letter)

  3. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are propo...... are proposing Ballerina, a small satellite to provide accurate positions and new data on the gamma-ray bursts. We anticipate a detection rate an order of magnitude larger than obtained from Beppo-SAX....

  4. Upgrading a marketing channels role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tišma-Borota Ankica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the marketing mix instruments, marketing channels were usually behind other instruments (product, price and promotion. Many companies regarded marketing channels as something that was 'left' after more important strategies of price, product and promotion were created. In recent past, things have changed and marketing channels became more interesting for research. This change came as a result of change in global market functioning especially in competitive advantage, distributors' strength and increasing technology.

  5. Revisiting the Correlations of Peak Luminosity with Spectral Lag and Peak Energy of the Observed Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-A Jo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of light curves and spectra of observed gamma-ray bursts in gamma-ray ranges is frequently demanded because the prompt emission contains immediate details regarding the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs. We have revisited the relationship between the collimation-corrected peak luminosity and the spectral lag, investigating the lag-luminosity relationships in great detail by focusing on spectral lags resulting from all possible combinations of channels. Firstly, we compiled the opening angle data and demonstrated that the distribution of opening angles of 205 long GRBs is represented by a double Gaussian function having maxima at ~ 0.1 and ~ 0.3 radians. We confirmed that the peak luminosity and the spectral lag are anti-correlated, both in the observer frame and in the source frame. We found that, in agreement with our previous conclusion, the correlation coefficient improves significantly in the source frame. It should be noted that spectral lags involving channel 2 (25-50 keV yield high correlation coefficients, where Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT has four energy channels (channel 1: 15-25 keV, channel 2: 25-50 keV, channel 3: 50-100 keV, channel 4: 100-200 keV. We also found that peak luminosity is positively correlated with peak energy.

  6. One-dimensional Turbulence Models of Type I X-ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Chen [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-01-06

    Type I X-ray bursts are caused by thermonuclear explosions occurring on the surface of an accreting neutron star in a binary star system. Observations and simulations of these phenomena are of great importance for understanding the fundamental properties of neutron stars and dense matter because the equation of state for cold dense matter can be constrained by the mass-radius relationship of neutron stars. During the bursts, turbulence plays a key role in mixing the fuels and driving the unstable nuclear burning process. This dissertation presents one-dimensional models of photospheric radius expansion bursts with a new approach to simulate turbulent advection. Compared with the traditional mixing length theory, the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model represents turbulent motions by a sequence of maps that are generated according to a stochastic process. The light curves I obtained with the ODT models are in good agreement with those of the KEPLER model in which the mixing length theory and various diffusive processes are applied. The abundance comparison, however, indicates that the differences in turbulent regions and turbulent diffusivities result in more 12C survival during the bursts in the ODT models, which can make a difference in the superbursts phenomena triggered by unstable carbon burning.

  7. One-dimensional Turbulence Models of Type I X-ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Type I X-ray bursts are caused by thermonuclear explosions occurring on the surface of an accreting neutron star in a binary star system. Observations and simulations of these phenomena are of great importance for understanding the fundamental properties of neutron stars and dense matter because the equation of state for cold dense matter can be constrained by the mass-radius relationship of neutron stars. During the bursts, turbulence plays a key role in mixing the fuels and driving the unstable nuclear burning process. This dissertation presents one-dimensional models of photospheric radius expansion bursts with a new approach to simulate turbulent advection. Compared with the traditional mixing length theory, the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model represents turbulent motions by a sequence of maps that are generated according to a stochastic process. The light curves I obtained with the ODT models are in good agreement with those of the KEPLER model in which the mixing length theory and various diffusive processes are applied. The abundance comparison, however, indicates that the differences in turbulent regions and turbulent diffusivities result in more 12 C survival during the bursts in the ODT models, which can make a difference in the superbursts phenomena triggered by unstable carbon burning.

  8. The genesis of period-adding bursting without bursting-chaos in the Chay model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhuoqin; Lu Qishao; Li Li

    2006-01-01

    According to the period-adding firing patterns without chaos observed in neuronal experiments, the genesis of the period-adding 'fold/homoclinic' bursting sequence without bursting-chaos is explored by numerical simulation, fast/slow dynamics and bifurcation analysis of limit cycle in the neuronal Chay model. It is found that each periodic bursting, from period-1 to period-7, is separately generated by the corresponding periodic spiking pattern through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via a Hopf bifurcation. Consequently, it can be revealed that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure with transitions from spiking to bursting, which is closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence

  9. The genesis of period-adding bursting without bursting-chaos in the Chay model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhuoqin; Lu Qishao; Li Li

    2006-01-01

    According to the period-adding firing patterns without chaos observed in neuronal experiments, the genesis of the period-adding 'fold/homoclinic' bursting sequence without bursting-chaos is explored by numerical simulation, fast/slow dynamics and bifurcation analysis of limit cycle in the neuronal Chay model. It is found that each periodic bursting, from period-1 to 7, is separately generated by the corresponding periodic spiking pattern through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via a Hopf bifurcation. Consequently, it can be revealed that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure with transitions from spiking to bursting, which is closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence

  10. Ketamine blocks bursting in the lateral habenula to rapidly relieve depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Cui, Yihui; Sang, Kangning; Dong, Yiyan; Ni, Zheyi; Ma, Shuangshuang; Hu, Hailan

    2018-02-14

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine has attracted enormous interest in mental health research owing to its rapid antidepressant actions, but its mechanism of action has remained elusive. Here we show that blockade of NMDAR-dependent bursting activity in the 'anti-reward center', the lateral habenula (LHb), mediates the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine in rat and mouse models of depression. LHb neurons show a significant increase in burst activity and theta-band synchronization in depressive-like animals, which is reversed by ketamine. Burst-evoking photostimulation of LHb drives behavioural despair and anhedonia. Pharmacology and modelling experiments reveal that LHb bursting requires both NMDARs and low-voltage-sensitive T-type calcium channels (T-VSCCs). Furthermore, local blockade of NMDAR or T-VSCCs in the LHb is sufficient to induce rapid antidepressant effects. Our results suggest a simple model whereby ketamine quickly elevates mood by blocking NMDAR-dependent bursting activity of LHb neurons to disinhibit downstream monoaminergic reward centres, and provide a framework for developing new rapid-acting antidepressants.

  11. Thermal-hydraulics of helium cooled First Wall channels and scoping investigations on performance improvement by application of ribs and mixing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: frederik.arbeiter@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion – Programme Management Unit, Garching (Germany); Chen, Yuming; Ilić, Milica; Schwab, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sieglin, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wenninger, Ronald [EUROfusion – Programme Management Unit, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Existing first wall designs and expected plasma heat loads are reviewed. • Heat transfer enhancement methods are investigated by CFD. • The results for heat transfer and friction are given, compared and explained. • Relations for needed pumping power and gained thermal heat are shown. • A range for the maximum permissible heat loads from the plasma is estimated. - Abstract: The first wall (FW) of DEMO is a component with high thermal loads. The cooling of the FW has to comply with the material's upper and lower temperature limits and requirements from stress assessment, like low temperature gradients. Also, the cooling has to be integrated into the balance-of-plant, in a sense to deliver exergy to the power cycle and require a limited pumping power for coolant circulation. This paper deals with the basics of FW cooling and proposes optimization approaches. The effectiveness of several heat transfer enhancement techniques is investigated for the use in helium cooled FW designs for DEMO. Among these are wall-mounted ribs, large scale mixing devices and modified hydraulic diameter. Their performance is assessed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are compared. Based on the results, an extrapolation to high heat fluxes is tried to estimate the higher limits of cooling capabilities.

  12. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  13. Complex transitions between spike, burst or chaos synchronization states in coupled neurons with coexisting bursting patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Hua-Guang; Chen Sheng-Gen; Li Yu-Ye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the synchronization dynamics of a coupled neuronal system composed of two identical Chay model neurons. The Chay model showed coexisting period-1 and period-2 bursting patterns as a parameter and initial values are varied. We simulated multiple periodic and chaotic bursting patterns with non-(NS), burst phase (BS), spike phase (SS), complete (CS), and lag synchronization states. When the coexisting behavior is near period-2 bursting, the transitions of synchronization states of the coupled system follows very complex transitions that begins with transitions between BS and SS, moves to transitions between CS and SS, and to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting while only a few lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting. When the coexisting behavior is near period-1 bursting, the transitions begin with NS, move to transitions between SS and BS, to transitions between SS and CS, and then to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting but a few lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting. The BS was identified as chaos synchronization. The patterns for NS and transitions between BS and SS are insensitive to initial values. The patterns for transitions between CS and SS and the CS state are sensitive to them. The number of spikes per burst of non-CS bursting increases with increasing coupling strength. These results not only reveal the initial value- and parameter-dependent synchronization transitions of coupled systems with coexisting behaviors, but also facilitate interpretation of various bursting patterns and synchronization transitions generated in the nervous system with weak coupling strength. (paper)

  14. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, Erik; Groen, Oeyvind

    1999-01-01

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  15. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Rositsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996–2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  16. Bursts from the very early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.; Stodolsky, L.

    2006-01-01

    Bursts of weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or even more weakly interacting particles such as wimps and gravitons from the very early universe would offer a much deeper 'look back time' to early epochs than is possible with photons. We consider some of the issues related to the existence of such bursts and their detectability. Characterizing the burst rate by a probability P per Hubble four-volume we find, for events in the radiation-dominated era, that the natural unit of description is the present intensity of the CMB times P. The existence of such bursts would make the observation of phenomena associated with very early times in cosmology at least conceptually possible. One might even hope to probe the transplanckian epoch if complexes more weakly interacting than the graviton can exist. Other conceivable applications include the potential detectability of the formation of 'pocket universes' in a multiverse

  17. Bursts from the very early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Stodolsky, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: les@mppmu.mpg.de

    2006-07-27

    Bursts of weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or even more weakly interacting particles such as wimps and gravitons from the very early universe would offer a much deeper 'look back time' to early epochs than is possible with photons. We consider some of the issues related to the existence of such bursts and their detectability. Characterizing the burst rate by a probability P per Hubble four-volume we find, for events in the radiation-dominated era, that the natural unit of description is the present intensity of the CMB times P. The existence of such bursts would make the observation of pheno associated with very early times in cosmology at least conceptually possible. One might even hope to probe the transplanckian epoch if complexes more weakly interacting than the graviton can exist. Other conceivable applications include the potential detectability of the formation of 'pocket universes' in a multiverse.

  18. Observations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Observational data on gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Information is grouped into temporal properties, energy fluxes and spectral properties, and directions and distributions of the sources in space. (BJG)

  19. Damping of type III solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, B.N.

    1982-01-01

    The meter- and decameter-wavelength damping of type III bursts may be attributable to stabilization of the Langmuir-wave instability of the fast-electron streams through excitation of cyclotron-branch plasma waves

  20. Nature of gamma-ray burst sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, J.

    1983-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that gamma ray bursts have a local galactic origin involving neutron stars. In this light we make a critical review of physics of the thermonuclear runaway model placing emphasis on self-consistency. We further show that some of the proposed models can be observationally excluded in the light of existing data from the Einstein Observatory. The possibility of gamma bursts arising in low mass binaries is finally discussed in the light of evolutionary scenarios leading to low luminosity systems

  1. A Fast Radio Burst Host Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, E. F.; Johnston, S.; Bhandari, S.; Barr, E.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Caleb, M.; Flynn, C.; Jameson, A.; Kramer, M.; Petroff, E.; Possenti, A.; van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, millisecond duration radio signals originating from distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called Fast Radio Bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. While every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, none before now have had a redshift measurement, due to the difficulty in...

  2. Balloon observation of gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Jun; Fujii, Masami; Yamagami, Takamasa; Oda, Minoru; Ogawara, Yoshiaki

    1978-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray burst is an interesting high energy astrophysical phenomenon, but the burst mechanism has not been well understood. Since 1975, long duration balloon flight has been conducted to search for gamma-ray bursts and to determine the source locations. A rotating cross-modulation collimator was employed to determine the locations of sources, and four NaI(Tl) scintillation counters were employed to detect hard X-ray with energy from 20 to 200 keV. The balloon light was performed at altitude of 8.3 mb from September 28, 1977, and the observation time of 79 hours was achieved. In this experiment, the monitor counter was not mounted. The count increase was observed at 16 h 22 m 31 s JST on October 1, 1977. The event disappeared after 1 sec. The total flux is estimated to be 1.6 x 10 -6 erg/cm 2 sec at the top of the atmosphere. When this event was observed, the solar-terrestrial environment was also quiet. Thus, this event was attributed to a small gamma-ray burst. Unfortunately, the duration of the burst was so short that the position of the burst source was not able to be determined. (Yoshimori, M.)

  3. Gamma Ray Bursts-Afterglows and Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J

    1998-01-01

    Several breakthrough discoveries were made last year of x-ray, optical and radio afterglows and counterparts to gamma-ray bursts, and a redshift has been associated with at least one of these. These discoveries were made possible by the fast, accurate gamma-ray burst locations of the BeppoSAX satellite. It is now generally believed that the burst sources are at cosmological distances and that they represent the most powerful explosions in the Universe. These observations also open new possibilities for the study of early star formation, the physics of extreme conditions and perhaps even cosmology. This session will concentrate on recent x-ray, optical and radio afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts, associated redshift measurements, and counterpart observations. Several review and theory talks will also be presented, along with a summary of the astrophysical implications of the observations. There will be additional poster contributions on observations of gamma-ray burst source locations at wavelengths other than gamma rays. Posters are also solicited that describe new observational capabilities for rapid follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Coherifying quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzekwa, Kamil; Czachórski, Stanisław; Puchała, Zbigniew; Życzkowski, Karol

    2018-04-01

    Is it always possible to explain random stochastic transitions between states of a finite-dimensional system as arising from the deterministic quantum evolution of the system? If not, then what is the minimal amount of randomness required by quantum theory to explain a given stochastic process? Here, we address this problem by studying possible coherifications of a quantum channel Φ, i.e., we look for channels {{{Φ }}}{ \\mathcal C } that induce the same classical transitions T, but are ‘more coherent’. To quantify the coherence of a channel Φ we measure the coherence of the corresponding Jamiołkowski state J Φ. We show that the classical transition matrix T can be coherified to reversible unitary dynamics if and only if T is unistochastic. Otherwise the Jamiołkowski state {J}{{Φ }}{ \\mathcal C } of the optimally coherified channel is mixed, and the dynamics must necessarily be irreversible. To assess the extent to which an optimal process {{{Φ }}}{ \\mathcal C } is indeterministic we find explicit bounds on the entropy and purity of {J}{{Φ }}{ \\mathcal C }, and relate the latter to the unitarity of {{{Φ }}}{ \\mathcal C }. We also find optimal coherifications for several classes of channels, including all one-qubit channels. Finally, we provide a non-optimal coherification procedure that works for an arbitrary channel Φ and reduces its rank (the minimal number of required Kraus operators) from {d}2 to d.

  5. Advances in gamma-ray burst astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.

    1976-01-01

    Work at Goddard is presently being carried out in three major areas of gamma-ray burst research: (1) A pair of simultaneously operating 0.8-m 2 burst detectors were successfully balloon-borne at locations 800 miles apart on 9 May, 1975, each to atmospheric depths of 3 to 4 g cm -2 , for a 20-h period of coincident data coverage. This experiment investigates the size spectrum of bursts in the 10 -7 to 10 -6 erg cm -2 size region where dozens of events per day are expected on a -1.5 index integral power-law extrapolation. Considerable separation in latitude was used to avoid possible atmospheric and auroral secondary effects. Its results are not yet available. (2) A deep-space burst detector, the first spacecraft instrument built specifically for gamma-ray burst studies, was recently successfully integrated into the Helios-B space probe. Its use at distances of up to 2 AU will make possible the first high-resolution directional study of gamma-ray burst source locations. Similar modifications to several other space vehicles are also being prepared. (3) The gamma-ray instrument on the IMP-7 satellite is presently the most sensitive burst detector still operating in orbit. Its results have shown that all measured event-average energy spectra are consistent with being alike. Using this characteristic spectrum to select IMP-7 candidate events of smaller size than those detected using other spacecraft in coincidence, a size spectrum is constructed which fits the -1.5 index power law down to 2.5 x 10 -5 erg cm -2 per event, at an occurrence rate of about once per month. (Auth.)

  6. Coronal mass ejections and solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of coronal mass ejection (CME) events and their radio signatures are discussed. These signatures are mostly in the form of type II and type IV burst emissions. Although type II bursts are temporally associated with CMEs, it is shown that there is no spatial relationship between them. Type II's associated with CMEs have in most cases a different origin, and they are not piston-driven by CMEs. Moving type IV and type II bursts can be associated with slow CMEs with speeds as low as 200 km/s, contrary to the earlier belief that only CMEs with speeds >400 km/s are associated with radio bursts. A specific event has been discussed in which the CME and type IV burst has nearly the same speed and direction, but the type II burst location was behind the CME and its motion was transverse. The speed and motion of the type II burst strongly suggest that the type II shock was decoupled from the CME and was probably due to a flare behind the limb. Therefore only the type IV source could be directly associated with the slow CME. The electrons responsble for the type IV emission could be produced in the flare or in the type II and then become trapped in a plasmoid associated with the CME. The reconnected loop could then move outwards as in the usual palsmoid model. Alternatively, the type IV emission could be interpreted as due to electrons produced by acceleration in wave turbulence driven by currents in the shock front driven by the CME. The lower-hybrid model Lampe and Papadopoulos (1982), which operates at both fast and slow mode shocks, could be applied to this situation. (author). 31 refs., 12 figs

  7. Reconfigurable virtual electrowetting channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ananda; Kreit, Eric; Liu, Yuguang; Heikenfeld, Jason; Papautsky, Ian

    2012-02-21

    Lab-on-a-chip systems rely on several microfluidic paradigms. The first uses a fixed layout of continuous microfluidic channels. Such lab-on-a-chip systems are almost always application specific and far from a true "laboratory." The second involves electrowetting droplet movement (digital microfluidics), and allows two-dimensional computer control of fluidic transport and mixing. The merging of the two paradigms in the form of programmable electrowetting channels takes advantage of both the "continuous" functionality of rigid channels based on which a large number of applications have been developed to date and the "programmable" functionality of digital microfluidics that permits electrical control of on-chip functions. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time programmable formation of virtual microfluidic channels and their continuous operation with pressure driven flows using an electrowetting platform. Experimental, theoretical, and numerical analyses of virtual channel formation with biologically relevant electrolyte solutions and electrically-programmable reconfiguration are presented. We demonstrate that the "wall-less" virtual channels can be formed reliably and rapidly, with propagation rates of 3.5-3.8 mm s(-1). Pressure driven transport in these virtual channels at flow rates up to 100 μL min(-1) is achievable without distortion of the channel shape. We further demonstrate that these virtual channels can be switched on-demand between multiple inputs and outputs. Ultimately, we envision a platform that would provide rapid prototyping of microfluidic concepts and would be capable of a vast library of functions and benefitting applications from clinical diagnostics in resource-limited environments to rapid system prototyping to high throughput pharmaceutical applications.

  8. Swift pointing and gravitational-wave bursts from gamma-ray burst events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Patrick J; Finn, Lee Samuel; Krishnan, Badri

    2003-01-01

    The currently accepted model for gamma-ray burst phenomena involves the violent formation of a rapidly rotating solar-mass black hole. Gravitational waves should be associated with the black-hole formation, and their detection would permit this model to be tested. Even upper limits on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray bursts could constrain the gamma-ray burst model. This requires joint observations of gamma-ray burst events with gravitational and gamma-ray detectors. Here we examine how the quality of an upper limit on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray bursts depends on the relative orientation of the gamma-ray-burst and gravitational-wave detectors, and apply our results to the particular case of the Swift Burst-Alert Telescope (BAT) and the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors. A result of this investigation is a science-based 'figure of merit' that can be used, together with other mission constraints, to optimize the pointing of the Swift telescope for the detection of gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts

  9. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M.S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R.M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F.; Bhat, P.N.; Burgess, J.M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M.M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B..B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the

  10. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  11. Scientific Applications Performance Evaluation on Burst Buffer

    KAUST Repository

    Markomanolis, George S.

    2017-10-19

    Parallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing, especially in storing and processing very large datasets, such as the case of seismic imaging, CFD, combustion and weather modeling. The storage hierarchy includes nowadays additional layers, the latest being the usage of SSD-based storage as a Burst Buffer for I/O acceleration. We present an in-depth analysis on how to use Burst Buffer for specific cases and how the internal MPI I/O aggregators operate according to the options that the user provides during his job submission. We analyze the performance of a range of I/O intensive scientific applications, at various scales on a large installation of Lustre parallel file system compared to an SSD-based Burst Buffer. Our results show a performance improvement over Lustre when using Burst Buffer. Moreover, we show results from a data hierarchy library which indicate that the standard I/O approaches are not enough to get the expected performance from this technology. The performance gain on the total execution time of the studied applications is between 1.16 and 3 times compared to Lustre. One of the test cases achieved an impressive I/O throughput of 900 GB/s on Burst Buffer.

  12. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhdanov D.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4–8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with EUV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrence, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates, whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to those at other frequencies.

  13. Bursting synchronization in clustered neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hai-Tao; Wang Jiang; Deng Bin; Wei Xi-Le

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in the brain exhibit the modular (clustered) property, i.e., they are composed of certain subnetworks with differential internal and external connectivity. We investigate bursting synchronization in a clustered neuronal network. A transition to mutual-phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled neurons, while on the spiking time scale, they behave asynchronously. This synchronization transition can be induced by the variations of inter- and intracoupling strengths, as well as the probability of random links between different subnetworks. Considering that some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of bursting neurons in the brain, we analyze the control of bursting synchronization by using a time-periodic external signal in the clustered neuronal network. Simulation results show a frequency locking tongue in the driving parameter plane, where bursting synchronization is maintained, even in the presence of external driving. Hence, effective synchronization suppression can be realized with the driving parameters outside the frequency locking region. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  14. Neutrino emission from gamma-ray burst fireballs, revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hümmer, Svenja; Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2012-06-08

    We review the neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts, which is estimated from gamma-ray observations and used for the interpretation of recent IceCube data, from a particle physics perspective. We numerically calculate the neutrino flux for the same astrophysical assumptions as the analytical fireball neutrino model, including the dominant pion and kaon production modes, flavor mixing, and magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We demonstrate that taking into account the full energy dependencies of all spectra, the normalization of the expected neutrino flux reduces by about one order of magnitude and the spectrum shifts to higher energies, where we can pin down the exact origin of the discrepancies by the recomputation of the analytical models. We also reproduce the IceCube-40 analysis for exactly the same bursts and same assumptions and illustrate the impact of uncertainties. We conclude that the baryonic loading of the fireballs, which is an important control parameter for the emission of cosmic rays, can be constrained significantly with the full-scale experiment after about ten years.

  15. Fuzzy correlations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, D.H.; Linder, E.V.; Blumenthal, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts is not known, both in the sense of the nature of the source emitting the radiation and literally, the position of the burst on the sky. Lacking unambiguously identified counterparts in any wavelength band studied to date, statistical approaches are required to determine the burster distance scale. Angular correlation analysis is one of the most powerful tools in this regard. However, poor detector resolution gives large localization errors, effectively beam smearing the positions. The resulting fuzzy angular correlation function is investigated and the generic isotropization that smearing induces on any intrinsic clustering is discussed. In particular, the extent to which gamma-ray burst observations by the BATSE detector aboard the Gamma-Ray Observatory might recover an intrinsic source correlation is investigated. 16 refs

  16. Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Murakami, Toshio; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Gunji, Shuichi; Kubo, Shin

    2013-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP: GAmma-ray burst Polarimeter), which had been almost handcrafted by scientists, has succeeded in working normally in interplanetary space, and in detecting the polarization of the gamma-ray from a mysterious astronomical object 'gamma-ray burst'. It is the first result of the detectors in the world exclusively aiming at detecting gamma-ray polarization. We mainly describe the hardware of our GAP equipment and show the method of preparing equipment to work in the cosmic space with a tight budget. The mechanical structure, the electronic circuits, the software on the equipment, the data analysis on the earth, and the scientific results gained by the observation just over one year, are presented after explaining the principle of gamma-ray polarization detection. Our design to protect equipment against mechanical shock and cosmic radiation may provide useful information for future preparation of compact satellite. (J.P.N.)

  17. Gamma-ray burst theory after Swift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Tsvi; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2007-05-15

    Afterglow observations in the pre-Swift era confirmed to a large extend the relativistic blast wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Together with the observations of properties of host galaxies and the association with (type Ic) SNe, this has led to the generally accepted collapsar origin of long GRBs. However, most of the afterglow data was collected hours after the burst. The X-ray telescope and the UV/optical telescope onboard Swift are able to slew to the direction of a burst in real time and record the early broadband afterglow light curves. These observations, and in particular the X-ray observations, resulted in many surprises. While we have anticipated a smooth transition from the prompt emission to the afterglow, many observed that early light curves are drastically different. We review here how these observations are changing our understanding of GRBs.

  18. High sensitivity neutron bursts detecting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, A.; Kaushik, T.C.; Srinivasan, M.; Kulkarni, L.V.

    1993-01-01

    Technique and instrumentation to detect multiplicity of fast neutrons, emitted in sharp bursts, has been developed. A bank of 16 BF 3 detectors, in an appropriate thermalising assembly, efficiency ∼ 16%, is used to detect neutron bursts. The output from this setup, through appropriate electronics, is divided into two paths. The first is directly connected to a computer controlled scalar. The second is connected to another similar scalar through a delay time unit (DTU). The DTU design is such that once it is triggered by a count pulse than it does not allow any counts to be recorded for a fixed dead time set at ∼ 100 μs. The difference in counts recorded directly and through DTU gives the total number of neutrons produced in bursts. This setup is being used to study lattice cracking, anomalous effects in solid deuterium systems and various reactor physics experiments. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  20. Localised Microwave Bursts During ELMs on MAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freethy Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bursts of microwave emission are observed during ELM events on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak. In agreement with observations on other machines, these bursts are up to 3 orders of magnitude more intense than the thermal background, but are electron cyclotron in nature. The peak in microwave emission is ~20μ before the peak in midplane Dα emission. Using the Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging radiometer, we are able to demonstrate that these bursts are often highly spatially localised and preferentially occur at the tokamak midplane. It is hypothesised that the localisation is a result of Doppler resonance broadening for electron Bernstein waves and the high perpendicular electron energies could be the result of pitch angle scattering in high collisionality regions of the plasma.

  1. Frequency Chirping during a Fishbone Burst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, V.; Reznik, S., E-mail: march@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: It is shown that gradual (more than a factor of two, in some cases - down to zero in the lab frame) reduction of the mode frequency (the so called frequency chirping) can be attributed to the reactive torque exerted on the plasma during the fishbone instability burst, which slows down the plasma rotation inside the q = 1 surface and reduces the mode frequency in the lab frame, while frequency in the plasma frame remains constant. This torque arises due to imbalance between the power transfered to the mode by energeric ions and the power of the mode dissipation by thermal species. Estimates show that the peak value of this torque exceeds the neutral beam torque in modern tokamaks and in ITER. The line-broadened quasilinear burst model, properly adapted for the fishbone case, is capable of reproducing the key features of the bursting mode. (author)

  2. Interaction function of coupled bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xia; Zhang Jiadong

    2016-01-01

    The interaction functions of electrically coupled Hindmarsh–Rose (HR) neurons for different firing patterns are investigated in this paper. By applying the phase reduction technique, the phase response curve (PRC) of the spiking neuron and burst phase response curve (BPRC) of the bursting neuron are derived. Then the interaction function of two coupled neurons can be calculated numerically according to the PRC (or BPRC) and the voltage time course of the neurons. Results show that the BPRC is more and more complicated with the increase of the spike number within a burst, and the curve of the interaction function oscillates more and more frequently with it. However, two certain things are unchanged: ϕ = 0, which corresponds to the in-phase synchronization state, is always the stable equilibrium, while the anti-phase synchronization state with ϕ = 0.5 is an unstable equilibrium. (paper)

  3. New decoding methods of interleaved burst error-correcting codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Kasahara, M.; Namekawa, T.

    1983-04-01

    A probabilistic method of single burst error correction, using the syndrome correlation of subcodes which constitute the interleaved code, is presented. This method makes it possible to realize a high capability of burst error correction with less decoding delay. By generalizing this method it is possible to obtain probabilistic method of multiple (m-fold) burst error correction. After estimating the burst error positions using syndrome correlation of subcodes which are interleaved m-fold burst error detecting codes, this second method corrects erasure errors in each subcode and m-fold burst errors. The performance of these two methods is analyzed via computer simulation, and their effectiveness is demonstrated.

  4. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  5. Dynamic radio bursts associated with important flare activity in Hale region 16923 and the problem of the relative locations of type II 'slow drift' bursts and coronal transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mckenna-Lawlor, S.M.P.

    1983-03-01

    Seven type-II radio bursts associated with solar flares in the Hale region 16923 on June 27-29, 1980, are characterized on the basis of data from dynamic radio spectra, white-light observations, radioheliograms, SMM-C/P observations, and Helios I magnetic-field and solar-wind measurements. The data are summarized in tables and graphs and discussed in terms of transient events occurring in the same region. The magnetic shock waves recorded during the period by Helios are described, and channeling effects which may have prevented the detection of type-II burst shocks are examined.

  6. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  7. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  8. Identifying the neutrino mass spectrum from a supernova neutrino burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dighe, A.S.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1999-12-01

    We study the role that the future detection of the neutrino burst from a galactic supernova can play in the reconstruction of the neutrino mass spectrum. We consider all possible 3ν mass and flavor spectra which describe the solar and atmospheric neutrino data. For each of these spectra we find the observable effects of the supernova neutrino conversions both in the matter of the star and the earth. We show that studies of the electron neutrino and antineutrino spectra as well as observations of the neutral current effects from supernova will allow us (i) to identify the solar neutrino solution, (ii) to determine the type of mass hierarchy (normal or inverted) and (iii) to probe the mixing vertical bar U e3 vertical bar 2 to values as low as 10 -4 - 10 -3 . (author)

  9. INVESTIGATION OF PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE BURSTS USING INTERPLANETARY NETWORK GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukwatta, T. N. [Director' s Postdoctoral Fellow, Space and Remote Sensing (ISR-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); MacGibbon, J. H. [Department of Physics, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal' shin, V. D. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kozyrev, A. S. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A.; Kienlin, A. von; Zhang, X. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Yamaoka, K. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan); Ohno, M. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Ohmori, N. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki-shi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Feroci, M. [INAF/IAPS-Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133, Roma (Italy); Frontera, F., E-mail: tilan@lanl.gov [Department of Physics and Earth Science, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); and others

    2016-07-20

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10{sup 13}–10{sup 18} cm (7–10{sup 5} au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  10. Bursting Smoke as an Infrared Countermeasure

    OpenAIRE

    Amarjit Singh; P. J. Kamale; S. A. Joshi; L. K. Bankar

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental setup for the evaluation of bursting smoke for anti-infrared role using SR-5000 spectroradiometer and a source of IR radiation (8-13 micrometer) using cadmium-mercury-telluride (CMI) detector cooled by liquid nitrogen. The particle size and shape of the powders used in the bursting smokes were determined microscopically using Carl Zeiss Jena Neophot- 21. Highest attenuation of 97 -lOO percent was produced for about 12 s using a mixture of bronze fl...

  11. Radon and rock bursts in deep mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulashevich, Yu.P.; Utkin, V.I.; Yurkov, A.K.; Nikolaev, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Variation fields of radon concentration in time to ascertain stress-strain state of the North Ural bauxite mines have been studied. It is shown that dynamic changes in the stress-strain state of the rocks prior to the rock burst bring about variations in radon concentration in the observation wells. Depending on mutual positioning of the observation points and the rock burst epicenter, the above-mentioned variations differ in principle, reduction of radon concentration in the near zone and its increase in the far zone are observed [ru

  12. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  13. Ion channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramli, H.; Blondiaux, G.

    1994-01-01

    Channeling phenomenon was predicted, many years ago, by stark. The first channeling experiments were performed in 1963 by Davies and his coworkers. Parallely Robinson and Oen have investigated this process by simulating trajectories of ions in monocrystals. This technique has been combined with many methods like Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (R.B.S.), Particles Induced X-rays Emission (P.I.X.E) and online Nuclear Reaction (N.R.A.) to localize trace elements in the crystal or to determine crystalline quality. To use channeling for material characterization we need data about the stopping power of the incident particle in the channeled direction. The ratios of channeled to random stopping powers of silicon for irradiation in the direction have been investigated and compared to the available theoretical results. We describe few applications of ion channeling in the field of materials characterization. Special attention is given to ion channeling combined with Charged Particle Activation Analysis (C.P.A.A.) for studying the behaviour of oxygen atoms in Czochralski silicon lattices under the influence of internal gettering and in different gaseous atmospheres. Association between ion channeling and C.P.A.A was also utilised for studying the influence of the growing conditions on concentration and position of carbon atoms at trace levels in the MOVPE Ga sub (1-x) Al sub x lattice. 6 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs. (author)

  14. A FAST RADIO BURST IN THE DIRECTION OF THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, V.; Shannon, R. M.; Jameson, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the real-time discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB 131104) with the Parkes radio telescope in a targeted observation of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The dispersion measure of the burst is 779 cm –3  pc, exceeding predictions for the maximum line-of-sight Galactic contribution by a factor of 11. The temporal structure of the burst is characterized by an exponential scattering tail with a timescale of 2.0 −0.5 +0.8  ms at 1582 MHz that scales as frequency to the power –4.4 −1.8 +1.6 (all uncertainties represent 95% confidence intervals). We bound the intrinsic pulse width to be <0.64 ms due to dispersion smearing across a single spectrometer channel. Searches in 78 hr of follow-up observations with the Parkes telescope reveal no additional sporadic emission and no evidence for associated periodic radio emission. We hypothesize that the burst is associated with the Carina dwarf galaxy. Follow-up observations at other wavelengths are necessary to test this hypothesis

  15. A FAST RADIO BURST IN THE DIRECTION OF THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, V. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Shannon, R. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jameson, A., E-mail: v.vikram.ravi@gmail.com [Swinburne University of Technology, Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Mail H39, P.O. Box 218, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-01-20

    We report the real-time discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB 131104) with the Parkes radio telescope in a targeted observation of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The dispersion measure of the burst is 779 cm{sup –3} pc, exceeding predictions for the maximum line-of-sight Galactic contribution by a factor of 11. The temporal structure of the burst is characterized by an exponential scattering tail with a timescale of 2.0{sub −0.5}{sup +0.8} ms at 1582 MHz that scales as frequency to the power –4.4{sub −1.8}{sup +1.6} (all uncertainties represent 95% confidence intervals). We bound the intrinsic pulse width to be <0.64 ms due to dispersion smearing across a single spectrometer channel. Searches in 78 hr of follow-up observations with the Parkes telescope reveal no additional sporadic emission and no evidence for associated periodic radio emission. We hypothesize that the burst is associated with the Carina dwarf galaxy. Follow-up observations at other wavelengths are necessary to test this hypothesis.

  16. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  17. Prompt burst energetics experiments: fresh oxide/sodium series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reil, K.O.; Young, M.F.

    1978-08-01

    A series of in-pile experiments has been performed to provide information on thermal energy to work conversion under prompt burst excursion (PBE) conditions. These consisted of single pin tests using fresh uranium oxide or uranium carbide fuel in a capsule geometry, with either stagnant sodium or helium in the coolant channel. The experiments were irradiated with single or double pulses in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) to provide energy depositions up to 2900 J/g. This report covers the seven single and five double pulse UO 2 sodium-in tests. Experimental data includes pressure and linear motion transducer histories, measured work-energy conversion efficiencies, and post-irradiation examination. Analysis includes derived work-energy conversion efficiencies (up to 0.54%), pin failure modeling, hydrodynamic analysis of pressure pulse propagation in the channel, and piston stopping effects. Initial pressure events in the single pulse experiments appear to be dominated by fuel vapor pressure. Definite fuel-coolant interactions were observed in several experiments, including some that were coincident with stopping of the linear motion transducer piston, suggesting a possible triggering effect by the deceleration pressure

  18. Hydraulic jumps in a channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonn, D.; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of hydraulic jumps with flow predominantly in one direction, created either by confining the flow to a narrow channel with parallel walls or by providing an inflow in the form of a narrow sheet. In the channel flow, we find a linear height profile upstream of the jump as expected......'s mixing-length theory with a mixing length that is proportional to the height of the fluid layer. Using averaged boundary-layer equations, taking into account the friction with the channel walls and the eddy viscosity, the flow both upstream and downstream of the jump can be understood. For the downstream...... subcritical flow, we assume that the critical height is attained close to the channel outlet. We use mass and momentum conservation to determine the position of the jump and obtain an estimate which is in rough agreement with our experiment. We show that the averaging method with a varying velocity profile...

  19. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ai Hong

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of the γ-ray burst phenomena are presented. History of the γ-ray bursts, characteristics, and three radiation mechanisms of thermal bremsstrahlung, thermal synchrotron, and inverse Compton scattering processes are considered.

  20. THE FIVE YEAR FERMI/GBM MAGNETAR BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazzi, A. C. [SciTec, Inc., 100 Wall Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Horst, A. J. van der; Younes, G. A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raanana 43537 (Israel); Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Chaplin, V. L. [School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue S, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Huppenkothen, D. [Center for Data Science, New York University, 726 Broadway, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Watts, A. L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H., E-mail: acollazzi@scitec.com [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550–5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  1. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R.; Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Beklen, E.; Von Kienlin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 ± 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  2. Channel box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    In a channel box of a BWR type reactor, protruding pads are disposed in axial position on the lateral side of a channel box opposing to a control rod and facing the outer side portion of the control rod in a reactor core loaded state. In the initial loading stage of fuel assemblies, channel fasteners and spacer pads are abutted against each other in the upper portion between the channel boxes sandwiching the control rod therebetween. Further, in the lower portion, a gap as a channel for the movement of the control rod is ensured by the support of fuel support metals. If the channel box is bent toward the control rod along with reactor operation, the pads are abutted against each other to always ensure the gap through which the control rod can move easily. Further, when the pads are brought into contact with each other, the bending deformation of the channel box is corrected by urging to each other. Thus, the control rod can always be moved smoothly to attain reactor safety operation. (N.H.)

  3. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs

  4. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive

  5. Robust Bayesian detection of unmodelled bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, Antony C; Sutton, Patrick J; Tinto, Massimo; Woan, Graham

    2008-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian treatment of the problem of detecting unmodelled gravitational wave bursts using the new global network of interferometric detectors. We also compare this Bayesian treatment with existing coherent methods, and demonstrate that the existing methods make implicit assumptions on the distribution of signals that make them sub-optimal for realistic signal populations

  6. Extragalactic dispersion measures of fast radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Han, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts show large dispersion measures, much larger than the Galactic dispersion measure foreground. Therefore, they evidently have an extragalactic origin. We investigate possible contributions to the dispersion measure from host galaxies. We simulate the spatial distribution of fast radio bursts and calculate the dispersion measures along the sightlines from fast radio bursts to the edge of host galaxies by using the scaled NE2001 model for thermal electron density distributions. We find that contributions to the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts from the host galaxy follow a skew Gaussian distribution. The peak and the width at half maximum of the dispersion measure distribution increase with the inclination angle of a spiral galaxy, to large values when the inclination angle is over 70°. The largest dispersion measure produced by an edge-on spiral galaxy can reach a few thousand pc cm −3 , while the dispersion measures from dwarf galaxies and elliptical galaxies have a maximum of only a few tens of pc cm −3 . Notice, however, that additional dispersion measures of tens to hundreds of pc cm −3 can be produced by high density clumps in host galaxies. Simulations that include dispersion measure contributions from the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Andromeda Galaxy are shown as examples to demonstrate how to extract the dispersion measure from the intergalactic medium. (paper)

  7. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lekshmi Resmi

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... ments on-board high energy missions like BeppoSAX1,. CGRO2, HETE3, .... rest energy of a solar mass object (GRB 080916C; Abdo et al. 2009). ..... Though the same afterglow physics applies to short bursts too, there are.

  8. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter, E-mail: jingluan@caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10{sup 3} pc cm{sup –3}. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  9. Magnetized environs of a repeating radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-03-01

    One of the astrophysical sources that gives rise to the mysterious transients known as fast radio bursts is embedded in a highly magnetized environment, such as the vicinity of an accreting massive black hole or the birth nebula of a highly magnetized neutron star.

  10. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10 3 pc cm –3 . Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period

  11. Multi-rod burst test under a loss-of coolant accident condition, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otomo, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masao; Kawasaki, Satoru; Furuta, Teruo; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    1983-06-01

    Multi-rod burst test of No.7808 bundle was performed in steam to estimate quantitative coolant flow channel restriction caused by the ballooning of zircaloy claddings in a fuel assembly during a LOCA transient in LWRs. The test was conducted under the condition that the initial internal pressure in each rod was 35kg/cm 2 (RT) and the heating rate was 9 0 C/s in steam with flow rate of 0.4g/cm 2 .min. The following results were obtained; (1) Maximum and burst pressures in rods were in the range 45 to 48kg/cm 2 and 41 to 45kg/cm 2 , respectively. The burst temperature of cladding were estimated to be 850 to 880 0 C. (2) Axial portions of tubes with greater than 34% strain were observed in the range 0 to 40mm in most rod. The mean length was 19mm in the bundle. (3) The degree of maximum increase in cross-sectional area is 54.2% in the bundle(7 x 7) and 66.9% in the internal rods(5 x 5). (4) Maximum channel area restriction was 40.5% in the bundle(7 x 7) and 51.4% in the internal rods(5 x 5). (author)

  12. 3rd Interplanetary Network Gamma-Ray Burst Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kevin

    1998-05-01

    We announce the opening of the 3rd Interplanetary Network web site at http://ssl.berkeley.edu/ipn3/index.html This site presently has four parts: 1. A bibliography of over 3000 publications on gamma-ray bursts, 2. IPN data on all bursts triangulated up to February 1998, 3. A master list showing which spacecraft observed which bursts, 4. Preliminary IPN data on the latest bursts observed.

  13. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  14. Imaging assessment of vertebral burst fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jianlin; Liang Lihua; Wang Yujia

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of radiography, CT and MRI in diagnosis of vertebral burst fracture. Methods: 51 patients with vertebral burst fracture were evaluated with X-ray, CT and MRI, including 3 cases in cervical vertebra, 18 cases in thoracic vertebra, and 30 cases in lumbar vertebra. The imaging features were comparatively studied. Results: Radiography showed decreased height of the vertebral body, increased antero-posterior diameter and the transverse diameter, and/or the widened interpedicle distance, the inter-spinous distance, as well as the bony fragment inserted into the vertebral canal in 28 cases(54.90%). X-ray findings similar to the compression fracture were revealed in 20 cases(39.21%). And missed diagnosis was made in 3 cases (5.88%). CT clearly demon-strated the vertebral body vertically or transversely burst crack in 49 cases (96.07%); bony fragment inserted into the vertebral canal and narrowed vertebral canal in 35 cases(68. 62% ); fracture of spinal appendix in 22 cases(43.14%). Meanwhile MRI showed abnormal signals within the spinal cord in 35 cases (68.62%),injured intervertebral disk in 29 cases(56.86% ), extradural hematoma in 12 cases(23.52% ) and torn posterior longitudinal ligament in 6 cases (11.76%). Conclusions: Radiography is the routine examination, while with limited diagnostic value in vertebral burst fracture. These patients who have nervous symptoms with simple compression fracture or unremarkable on X-ray should receive the CT or MRI examination. CT is better than MRI in demonstrating the fracture and the displaced bony fragment, while MRI is superior to CT in showing nervous injuries. CT and MRI will provide comprehensive information guiding clinical treatment of vertebral burst fracture. (authors)

  15. Gamma-ray burst observations: the present situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedrenne, G.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results in gamma ray burst investigations concerning the spectral variability on a short time scale, precise locations, and the discovery of optical flashes in gamma ray burst positions on archival plates are presented. The implications of optical and X-ray observations of gamma ray burst error boxes are also discussed. 72 references

  16. Gamma ray bursts: Current status of observations and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, C.A.

    1990-04-01

    Gamma ray bursts display a wide range of temporal and spectral characteristics, but typically last several seconds and emit most of their energy in a low energy, gamma ray region. The burst sources appear to be isotropically distributed on the sky. Several lines of evidence suggest magnetic neutron stars as sources for bursts. A variety of energy sources and emission mechanisms are proposed

  17. Heuristic burst detection method using flow and pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Roer, Van de M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  18. IGR J17254-3257, a new bursting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The study of the observational properties of uncommonly long bursts from low luminosity sources is important when investigating the transition from a hydrogen - rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning as predicted by current burst theories. On ...

  19. A search for optical bursts from the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, L. K.; Dhillon, V. S.; Spitler, L. G.; Littlefair, S. P.; Ashley, R. P.; De Cia, A.; Green, M. J.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Keane, E. F.; Kerry, P.; Kramer, M.; Malesani, D.; Marsh, T. R.; Parsons, S. G.; Possenti, A.; Rattanasoon, S.; Sahman, D. I.

    2017-12-01

    We present a search for optical bursts from the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 using simultaneous observations with the high-speed optical camera ULTRASPEC on the 2.4-m Thai National Telescope and radio observations with the 100-m Effelsberg Radio Telescope. A total of 13 radio bursts were detected, but we found no evidence for corresponding optical bursts in our 70.7-ms frames. The 5σ upper limit to the optical flux density during our observations is 0.33 mJy at 767 nm. This gives an upper limit for the optical burst fluence of 0.046 Jy ms, which constrains the broad-band spectral index of the burst emission to α ≤ -0.2. Two of the radio pulses are separated by just 34 ms, which may represent an upper limit on a possible underlying periodicity (a rotation period typical of pulsars), or these pulses may have come from a single emission window that is a small fraction of a possible period.

  20. Surface channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizmann, R.; Varelas, C.

    1976-01-01

    There is experimental evidence that swift light ions incident at small angles towards single crystalline surfaces can lose an appreciable fraction of their kinetic energy during reflection. It is shown that these projectiles penetrate into the bulk surface region of the crystal. They can travel as channeled particles along long paths through the solid (surface channeling). The angular distribution and the depth history of the re-emerged projectiles are investigated by computer simulations. A considerable fraction of the penetrating projectiles re-emerges from the crystal with constant transverse energy if the angle of incidence is smaller than the critical angle for axial channeling. Analytical formulae are derived based on a diffusion model for surface channeling. A comparison with experimental data exhibits the relevance of the analytical solutions. (Auth.)

  1. Spark Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydon, S. C. [Department of Physics, University of New England, Armidale, NSW (Australia)

    1968-04-15

    A brief summary is given of the principal methods used for initiating spark channels and the various highly time-resolved techniques developed recently for studies with nanosecond resolution. The importance of the percentage overvoltage in determining the early history and subsequent development of the various phases of the growth of the spark channel is discussed. An account is then given of the recent photographic, oscillographic and spectroscopic investigations of spark channels initiated by co-axial cable discharges of spark gaps at low [{approx} 1%] overvoltages. The phenomena observed in the development of the immediate post-breakdown phase, the diffuse glow structure, the growth of the luminous filament and the final formation of the spark channel in hydrogen are described. A brief account is also given of the salient features emerging from corresponding studies of highly overvolted spark gaps in which the spark channel develops from single avalanche conditions. The essential differences between the two types of channel formation are summarized and possible explanations of the general features are indicated. (author)

  2. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin modulates the firing 1 properties of the reticular thalamic nucleus bursting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albéri, Lavinia; Lintas, Alessandra; Kretz, Robert; Schwaller, Beat; Villa, Alessandro E P

    2013-06-01

    The reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) of the mouse is characterized by an overwhelming majority of GABAergic neurons receiving afferences from both the thalamus and the cerebral cortex and sending projections mainly on thalamocortical neurons. The RTN neurons express high levels of the "slow Ca(2+) buffer" parvalbumin (PV) and are characterized by low-threshold Ca(2+) currents, I(T). We performed extracellular recordings in ketamine/xylazine anesthetized mice in the rostromedial portion of the RTN. In the RTN of wild-type and PV knockout (PVKO) mice we distinguished four types of neurons characterized on the basis of their firing pattern: irregular firing (type I), medium bursting (type II), long bursting (type III), and tonically firing (type IV). Compared with wild-type mice, we observed in the PVKOs the medium bursting (type II) more frequently than the long bursting type and longer interspike intervals within the burst without affecting the number of spikes. This suggests that PV may affect the firing properties of RTN neurons via a mechanism associated with the kinetics of burst discharges. Ca(v)3.2 channels, which mediate the I(T) currents, were more localized to the somatic plasma membrane of RTN neurons in PVKO mice, whereas Ca(v)3.3 expression was similar in both genotypes. The immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed that Ca(v)3.2 channels were localized at active axosomatic synapses, thus suggesting that the differential localization of Ca(v)3.2 in the PVKOs may affect bursting dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis of simultaneously recorded neurons from the same electrode tip showed that about one-third of the cell pairs tended to fire synchronously in both genotypes, independent of PV expression. In summary, PV deficiency does not affect the functional connectivity between RTN neurons but affects the distribution of Ca(v)3.2 channels and the dynamics of burst discharges of RTN cells, which in turn regulate the activity in the thalamocortical circuit.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Fermi-GBM three-year X-ray burst catalog (Jenke+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, P. A.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Beklen, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky monitor whose primary objective is to extend the energy range over which gamma-ray bursts are observed in the Large Area Telescope on Fermi (Meegan et al. 2009ApJ...702..791M). GBM consists of 12 NaI detectors with a diameter of 12.7 cm and a thickness of 1.27 cm and two bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors with a diameter and thickness of 12.7 cm. GBM has three continuous data types: CTIME data with nominal 0.256 s time resolution and 8-channel spectral resolution used for event detection and localization, CSPEC data with nominal 4.096 s time resolution and 128-channel spectral resolution, which are used for spectral modeling, and CTTE (continuous-time tagged event) data with time stamps (2 μs precision) on individual events at full 128-channel spectral resolution, which were made available in 2012 November. The Fermi-GBM X-ray Burst Monitor relies on daily inspection of CTIME channel 1 (12-25 keV) data and began operations on 2010 March 12. (3 data files).

  4. Diagnostics from three rising submillimeter bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Li, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts that occurred sequentially in Super Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu GHz −1 (corresponding to spectral index α of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of the 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, but it attained values of 235 sfu GHz −1 (α = 4.8) in the 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of highly relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV, but it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than in the microwave (MW) source. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20%–50% during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW source increased by 28% for the 2003 November 2 event. In the paper we will present a formula that can be used to calculate the energy released by ultrarelativistic electrons, taking the relativistic correction into account for the first time. We find that the energy released by energetic electrons in the THz source exceeds that in the MW source due to the strong GS radiation loss in the THz range, although the modeled THz source area is 3–4 orders smaller than the modeled MW source one. The total energies released by energetic electrons via the GS radiation in radio sources are estimated, respectively, to be 5.2 × 10 33 , 3.9 × 10 33 and 3.7 × 10 32 erg for the October 28, November 2 and 4 bursts, which are 131, 76 and 4 times as large as the thermal energies of 2.9 × 10 31 , 2.1 × 10 31 and 5.2 × 10 31 erg estimated from soft X-ray GOES observations. (paper)

  5. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Finger, Mark H.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert; Chaplin, Vandiver; Bhat, Narayan; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Gehrels, Neil; Harding, Alice

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T 90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T 90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E peak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10 -6 erg cm -2 s -1 , increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, L iso , corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 10 40 erg s -1 ).

  6. Hierarchic Analysis Method to Evaluate Rock Burst Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reasonably evaluate the risk of rock bursts in mines, the factors impacting rock bursts and the existing grading criterion on the risk of rock bursts were studied. By building a model of hierarchic analysis method, the natural factors, technology factors, and management factors that influence rock bursts were analyzed and researched, which determined the degree of each factor’s influence (i.e., weight and comprehensive index. Then the grade of rock burst risk was assessed. The results showed that the assessment level generated by the model accurately reflected the actual risk degree of rock bursts in mines. The model improved the maneuverability and practicability of existing evaluation criteria and also enhanced the accuracy and science of rock burst risk assessment.

  7. Impulsive EUV bursts observed in C IV with OSO-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant Athay, R.; White, O.R.; Lites, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Time sequences of profiles of the lambda 1548 line of C IV containing 51 EUV bursts observed in or near active regions are analyzed to determine the brightness. Doppler shift and line broadening characteristics of the bursts. The bursts have mean lifetimes of approximately 150s, and mean increases in brightness at burst maximum of four-fold as observed with a field of view of 2'' x 20''. Mean burst diameters are estimated to be 3'', or smaller. All but three of the bursts show Doppler shift with velocities sometimes exceeding 75 km s -1 ; 31 are dominated by red shifts and 17 are dominated by blue shifts. Approximately half of the latter group have red-shifted precursors. We interpret the bursts as prominence material, such as surges and coronal rain, moving through the field of view of the spectrometer. (orig.)

  8. Burst Mode ASIC-Based Modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is sponsoring the Advanced Communication Technology Insertion (ACTION) for Commercial Space Applications program. The goal of the program is to expedite the development of new technology with a clear path towards productization and enhancing the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers. The industry has made significant investment in developing ASIC-based modem technology for continuous-mode applications and has made investigations into East, reliable acquisition of burst-mode digital communication signals. With rapid advances in analog and digital communications ICs, it is expected that more functions will be integrated onto these parts in the near future. In addition custom ASIC's can also be developed to address the areas not covered by the other IC's. Using the commercial chips and custom ASIC's, lower-cost, compact, reliable, and high-performance modems can be built for demanding satellite communication application. This report outlines a frequency-hop burst modem design based on commercially available chips.

  9. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov—Maxwell system. A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma. It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light, as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction. The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period. The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade, which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures. For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation, higher-harmonic generation and wave—wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter. In addition, stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  10. A review of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25 years, are now coming into focus. They involve extraordinary power outputs, and highly relativistic dynamics. The 'trigger' involves stellar-mass compact objects. The most plausible progenitors, ranging from neutron star binary mergers to collapsars (sometimes called 'hypernovae') eventually lead to the formation of a black hole with a torus of hot neutron-density material around it, the extractable energy being up to 10 sup 5 sup 4 ergs. Magnetic fields may exceed 10 sup 1 sup 5 G and particles may be accelerated up to > or approx. 10 sup 2 sup 0 eV. Details of the afterglow may be easier to understand than the initial trigger. Bursts at very high redshift can be astronomically-important as probes of the distant universe.

  11. Environmental Effects of Gamma Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Osmel; Zarauza, Dario; Cardenas, Rolando

    2007-01-01

    Gamma rays bursts, coming from very massive stars, are the most powerful explosions in our Universe. Some authors have linked them to some of the climatic changes and consequent biological mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic eon. However, the consequences of their direct impact on primitive Earth, is today a hot topic of debate. On the other hand, it is usually assumed that they were more common in earlier stages of our galaxy. So it is important to evaluate its potential effects on terrestrial paleoenvironments. We outline some simple models to estimate their influence mainly on the primordial atmospheric chemistry of Earth and on the climate in general. To do that, we consider different scenarios where the atmospheric composition diverges substantially from the atmosphere today, and compute the evolution of principal chemical species under the intense radiational stress of a gamma ray burst. Furthermore, the possible impact on the isotopic composition, geochemistry and the biosphere are mentioned in general way

  12. Coherent combining pulse bursts in time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanauskas, Almantas

    2018-01-09

    A beam combining and pulse stacking technique is provided that enhances laser pulse energy by coherent stacking pulse bursts (i.e. non-periodic pulsed signals) in time domain. This energy enhancement is achieved by using various configurations of Fabry-Perot, Gires-Tournois and other types of resonant cavities, so that a multiple-pulse burst incident at either a single input or multiple inputs of the system produces an output with a solitary pulse, which contains the summed energy of the incident multiple pulses from all beams. This disclosure provides a substantial improvement over conventional coherent-combining methods in that it achieves very high pulse energies using a relatively small number of combined laser systems, thus providing with orders of magnitude reduction in system size, complexity, and cost compared to current combining approaches.

  13. Explaining fast radio bursts through Dicke's superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Martin; Mathews, Abhilash; Rajabi, Fereshteh

    2018-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs), characterized by strong bursts of radiation intensity at radio wavelengths lasting on the order of a millisecond, have yet to be firmly associated with a family, or families, of astronomical sources. It follows that despite the large number of proposed models, no well-defined physical process has been identified to explain this phenomenon. In this paper, we demonstrate how Dicke's superradiance, for which evidence has recently been found in the interstellar medium, can account for the characteristics associated with FRBs. Our analysis and modelling of previously detected FRBs suggest they could originate from regions in many ways similar to those known to harbour masers or megamasers, and result from the coherent radiation emanating from populations of molecules associated with large-scale entangled quantum mechanical states. We estimate this entanglement to involve as many as ˜1030 to ˜1032 molecules over distances spanning 100-1000 au.

  14. Separation of Particles in Channels Rotary Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zyatikov Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the separation of particles in channels with different relative length. It is shown that the intensity of turbulence at the inlet section of the channel varies considerably in its length. The dependence of the turbulence damping along the channel expressing by fraction of the distance is shown. The ratio of the particle separation efficiency out the gas flow in the rotor channel is defined. The values of particle separation efficiency in the channel for the angle α=π/4 in turbulent aerosol flow is shows, including without mixing the particles.

  15. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts - a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tudose, Valeriu; Biermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a short general introduction into the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) research, summarizing the past and the present status. We give an general view of the GRBs observations to date, both in the prompt emission phase as well as in the afterglow phase, and a brief primer into the theory, mainly in the frame-work of the fireball model. (authors)

  17. The behaviour of neutron bursts in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syros, C.

    1978-01-01

    An exact method is developed for solving the time-dependent linear transport equation for neutrons. The problem of finding the behaviour of neutron bursts in matter have been considered. The method leads to a new kind of perturbation theory applicable to the transport theoretical reactor dynamics. Applications of the theory are given for discontinuously or continuously distributed initial values of the neutron population. The boundary and initial conditions are exactly fulfilled. (author)

  18. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  19. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  20. Burst firing enhances neural output correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Ka eChan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons communicate and transmit information predominantly through spikes. Given that experimentally observed neural spike trains in a variety of brain areas can be highly correlated, it is important to investigate how neurons process correlated inputs. Most previous work in this area studied the problem of correlation transfer analytically by making significant simplifications on neural dynamics. Temporal correlation between inputs that arises from synaptic filtering, for instance, is often ignored when assuming that an input spike can at most generate one output spike. Through numerical simulations of a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF neurons receiving correlated inputs, we demonstrate that neurons in the presence of synaptic filtering by slow synapses exhibit strong output correlations. We then show that burst firing plays a central role in enhancing output correlations, which can explain the above-mentioned observation because synaptic filtering induces bursting. The observed changes of correlations are mostly on a long time scale. Our results suggest that other features affecting the prevalence of neural burst firing in biological neurons, e.g., adaptive spiking mechanisms, may play an important role in modulating the overall level of correlations in neural networks.

  1. Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hetao; Hu Zhenmin; Shi Yuxin

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stability of the fifth lumber vertebra after burst fracture. Methods: 7 patients with burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra were examined by X-ray and CT, and followed for 6-36 months. The changes of wedge index, lordosis, degree of spinal canal stenosis and neurological features were observed during the episode and followed up. Results: The three spinal column structure was disrupted in 6 of 7 patients. The anterior and mid columns were involved in 1 case. Spinal stenosis of first and second degrees was seen in 3 cases, and in one case, there was no spinal canal stenosis. Lower lumber motor-root deficits were found in 2 of 7 patients and resolved in follow up. There was no tendency of progressive collapse of the vertebral body and spinal stenosis. Conclusions: Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra was specific, most of them were stable fractures, although two or three columns of the spine were disrupted and accompanied by spinal canal stenosis

  2. Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetao, Cao; Zhenmin, Hu; Yuxin, Shi [Affiliated Hosptial of Nantong Medical College, JS, Nantong (China). Dept. of Radiology

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the stability of the fifth lumber vertebra after burst fracture. Methods: 7 patients with burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra were examined by X-ray and CT, and followed for 6-36 months. The changes of wedge index, lordosis, degree of spinal canal stenosis and neurological features were observed during the episode and followed up. Results: The three spinal column structure was disrupted in 6 of 7 patients. The anterior and mid columns were involved in 1 case. Spinal stenosis of first and second degrees was seen in 3 cases, and in one case, there was no spinal canal stenosis. Lower lumber motor-root deficits were found in 2 of 7 patients and resolved in follow up. There was no tendency of progressive collapse of the vertebral body and spinal stenosis. Conclusions: Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra was specific, most of them were stable fractures, although two or three columns of the spine were disrupted and accompanied by spinal canal stenosis

  3. Rock burst prevention at steep seam mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremov, G D

    1988-09-01

    At steep shield longwalls one method of preventing rock bursts is to avoid sharp angles during working. Stress in coal and rock body that appears when steep seams are worked where rock bursts occur at corners of set-up entries is discussed. The dynamic interaction between gas and rock pressure is assessed. Maintains that in order to avoid rock bursts at these places it is necessary to turn the protruding coal wall by 20-30 degrees towards the coal body to divert the action of shift forces. At the same time the face should also be inclined (by 10-15 degrees) to move the zones of increased stress away from the corner into the coal and rock body. Stress at workings with round cross-sections is 3-4 times lower than at square cross-sections. Recommendations are given that concern shearer loader operation (semi-spherical shape of the face), borehole drilling and water injection. Initial distance of 10-15 m between boreholes is suggested. 3 refs.

  4. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  5. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time

  6. Secured Hash Based Burst Header Authentication Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2017-12-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising technology that could meet the fast growing network demand. They are featured with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of applications that demand intensive bandwidth. OBS proves to be a satisfactory technology to tackle the huge bandwidth constraints, but suffers from security vulnerabilities. The objective of this proposed work is to design a faster and efficient burst header authentication algorithm for core nodes. There are two important key features in this work, viz., header encryption and authentication. Since the burst header is an important in optical burst switched network, it has to be encrypted; otherwise it is be prone to attack. The proposed MD5&RC4-4S based burst header authentication algorithm runs 20.75 ns faster than the conventional algorithms. The modification suggested in the proposed RC4-4S algorithm gives a better security and solves the correlation problems between the publicly known outputs during key generation phase. The modified MD5 recommended in this work provides 7.81 % better avalanche effect than the conventional algorithm. The device utilization result also shows the suitability of the proposed algorithm for header authentication in real time applications.

  7. MARKETING CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Stošić Mihajlović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Marketing channel is a set of entities and institutions, completion of distribution and marketing activities, attend the efficient and effective networking of producers and consumers. Marketing channels include the total flows of goods, money and information taking place between the institutions in the system of marketing, establishing a connection between them. The functions of the exchange, the physical supply and service activities, inherent in the system of marketing and trade. They represent paths which products and services are moving after the production, which will ultimately end up buying and eating by the user.

  8. Spatial discontinuity and temporal evolution of channel morphology along a mixed bedrock-alluvial river, upper Drôme River, southeast France: Contingent responses to external and internal controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toone, J.; Rice, S. P.; Piégay, H.

    2014-01-01

    The rehabilitation of degraded river channels is often guided by assumptions of continuity, yet in response to spatial and temporal variations in controlling conditions rivers typically display discontinuous response in space and time. This study examines the development of a 5 km reach of the Drôme River, S.E. France, characterised by alternating alluvial and bedrock zones that are separated by abrupt downstream transitions. This reach is representative of the Drôme River as a whole, and other rivers in the European Alps where braided channel planforms have been replaced by more complex, discontinuous morphologies. The primary aims are to understand how this spatial complexity has developed on the Drôme; evaluate how temporal channel changes have been affected by local factors, particularly bedrock exposures, and by long-term, catchment-scale changes in sediment supply and the flood activity; and consider the implications of this discontinuous geomorphology for reach management. The development of geomorphological zonation is examined by documenting sequential changes in channel planform between seven periods, using aerial photography (1948-2006) and by analysing change in bed elevation from profiles surveyed in 1928, 2003 and 2005. Between 1948 and 2001 bedrock exposed in the channel bed and along the floodplain margins defined discontinuities in sediment connectivity that were largely responsible for the configuration of channel zones. The impact of floods on this system was not proportional to flood magnitude. A modest flood in 1978 was an important event that, by incision and avulsion at key locations, defined a pattern of zonation that persisted until the end of the study in 2006. During the final 5 years of the study, alluvial zones that previously responded to large floods by widening underwent narrowing, despite the occurrence of a large flood, and led to an overall reduction in width variance. This resulted from progressive incision beneath and

  9. Simulating X-ray bursts during a transient accretion event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Zac; Heger, Alexander; Galloway, Duncan K.

    2018-06-01

    Modelling of thermonuclear X-ray bursts on accreting neutron stars has to date focused on stable accretion rates. However, bursts are also observed during episodes of transient accretion. During such events, the accretion rate can evolve significantly between bursts, and this regime provides a unique test for burst models. The accretion-powered millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 exhibits accretion outbursts every 2-3 yr. During the well-sampled month-long outburst of 2002 October, four helium-rich X-ray bursts were observed. Using this event as a test case, we present the first multizone simulations of X-ray bursts under a time-dependent accretion rate. We investigate the effect of using a time-dependent accretion rate in comparison to constant, averaged rates. Initial results suggest that using a constant, average accretion rate between bursts may underestimate the recurrence time when the accretion rate is decreasing, and overestimate it when the accretion rate is increasing. Our model, with an accreted hydrogen fraction of X = 0.44 and a CNO metallicity of ZCNO = 0.02, reproduces the observed burst arrival times and fluences with root mean square (rms) errors of 2.8 h, and 0.11× 10^{-6} erg cm^{-2}, respectively. Our results support previous modelling that predicted two unobserved bursts and indicate that additional bursts were also missed by observations.

  10. Slow Bursting Neurons of Mouse Cortical Layer 6b Are Depolarized by Hypocretin/Orexin and Major Transmitters of Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger Combremont, Anne-Laure; Bayer, Laurence; Dupré, Anouk; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons firing spontaneously in bursts in the absence of synaptic transmission have been previously recorded in different layers of cortical brain slices. It has been suggested that such neurons could contribute to the generation of alternating UP and DOWN states, a pattern of activity seen during slow-wave sleep. Here, we show that in layer 6b (L6b), known from our previous studies to contain neurons highly responsive to the wake-promoting transmitter hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx), there is a set of neurons, endowed with distinct intrinsic properties, which displayed a strong propensity to fire spontaneously in rhythmic bursts. In response to small depolarizing steps, they responded with a delayed firing of action potentials which, upon higher depolarizing steps, invariably inactivated and were followed by a depolarized plateau potential and a depolarizing afterpotential. These cells also displayed a strong hyperpolarization-activated rectification compatible with the presence of an I h current. Most L6b neurons with such properties were able to fire spontaneously in bursts. Their bursting activity was of intrinsic origin as it persisted not only in presence of blockers of ionotropic glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors but also in a condition of complete synaptic blockade. However, a small number of these neurons displayed a mix of intrinsic bursting and synaptically driven recurrent UP and DOWN states. Most of the bursting L6b neurons were depolarized and excited by hcrt/orx through a direct postsynaptic mechanism that led to tonic firing and eventually inactivation. Similarly, they were directly excited by noradrenaline, histamine, dopamine, and neurotensin. Finally, the intracellular injection of these cells with dye and their subsequent Neurolucida reconstruction indicated that they were spiny non-pyramidal neurons. These results lead us to suggest that the propensity for slow rhythmic bursting of this set of L6b neurons could be directly impeded by hcrt

  11. Performance study of the gamma-ray bursts polarimeter POLAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. C.; Wu, B. B.; Bao, T. W.; Batsch, T.; Bernasconi, T.; Britvitch, I.; Cadoux, F.; Cernuda, I.; Chai, J. Y.; Dong, Y. W.; Gauvin, N.; Hajdas, W.; He, J. J.; Kole, M.; Kong, M. N.; Kong, S. W.; Lechanoine-Leluc, C.; Li, Lu; Liu, J. T.; Liu, X.; Marcinkowski, R.; Orsi, S.; Pohl, M.; Produit, N.; Rapin, D.; Rutczynska, A.; Rybka, D.; Shi, H. L.; Song, L. M.; Szabelski, J.; Wang, R. J.; Wen, X.; Xiao, H. L.; Xiong, S. L.; Xu, H. H.; Xu, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L. Y.; Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, X. F.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zwolinska, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Polarimeter-POLAR is a highly sensitive detector which is dedicated to the measurement of GRB's polarization with a large effective detection area and a large field of view (FOV). The optimized performance of POLAR will contribute to the capture and measurement of the transient sources like GRBs and Solar Flares. The detection energy range of POLAR is 50 keV 500 keV, and mainly dominated by the Compton scattering effect. POLAR consists of 25 detector modular units (DMUs), and each DMU is composed of low Z material Plastic Scintillators (PS), multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMT) and multi-channel ASIC Front-end Electronics (FEE). POLAR experiment is an international collaboration project involving China, Switzerland and Poland, and is expected to be launched in September in 2016 onboard the Chinese space laboratory "Tiangong-2 (TG-2)". With the efforts from the collaborations, POLAR has experienced the Demonstration Model (DM) phase, Engineering and Qualification Model (EQM) phase, Qualification Model (QM) phase, and now a full Flight Model (FM) of POLAR has been constructed. The FM of POLAR has passed the environmental acceptance tests (thermal cycling, vibration, shock and thermal vacuum tests) and experienced the calibration tests with both radioactive sources and 100% polarized Gamma-Ray beam at ESRF after its construction. The design of POLAR, Monte-Carlo simulation analysis, as well as the performance test results will all be introduced in this paper.

  12. PWR clad ballooning: The effect of circumferential clad temperature variations on the burst strain/burst temperature relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, P.

    1983-01-01

    By experiment, it has been shown by other workers that there is a reduction in the creep ductility of Zircaloy 4 in the α+β phase transition region. Results from single rod burst tests also show a reduction in burst strain in the α+β phase region. In this report it is shown theoretically that for single rod burst tests in the presence of circumferential temperature gradients, the temperature dependence of the mean burst strain is not determined by temperature variations in creep ductility, but is governed by the temperature sensitivity of the creep strain rate, which is shown to be a maximum in the α+β phase transition region. To demonstrate this effect, the mean clad strain at burst was calculated for creep straining at different temperature levels in the α, α+β and β phase regions. Cross-pin temperature gradients were applied which produced strain variations around the clad which were greatest in the α+β phase region. The mean strain at burst was determined using a maximum local burst strain (i.e. a creep ductility) which is independent of temperature. By assuming cross-pin temperature gradients which are typical of those observed during burst tests, then the calculated mean burst strain/burst temperature relationship gave good agreement with experiment. The calculations also show that when circumferential temperature differences are present, the calculated mean strain at burst is not sensitive to variations in the magnitude of the assumed creep ductility. This reduces the importance of the assumed burst criterion in the calculations. Hence a temperature independent creep ductility (e.g. 100% local strain) is adequate as a burst criterion for calculations under PWR LOCA conditions. (author)

  13. Channel Power in Multi-Channel Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); B. Skiera (Bernd)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the literature, little attention has been paid to instances where companies add an Internet channel to their direct channel portfolio. However, actively managing multiple sales channels requires knowing the customers’ channel preferences and the resulting channel power. Two key

  14. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results...... of the observations of the time histories and spectral evolution of the detected events provided by the different instruments in different energy ranges. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts ( 2 s) events. Evidence of the existence...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...

  15. Observation of cosmic gamma ray burst by Hinotori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudaira, Kiyoaki; Yoshimori, Masato; Hirashima, Yo; Kondo, Ichiro.

    1982-01-01

    The solar gamma ray detecor (SGR) on Hinotori has no collimator, and the collimator of a hard X-ray monitor is not effective for gamma ray with energy more than 100 KeV. Accordingly, the detection system can detect cosmic gamma ray burst, and two bursts were observed. The first burst was detected on February 28, 1981, and the source of the burst was in the direction of 81 degree from Venus. The time profile and the spectrum were observed. In July 21, 1981, the second burst was detected. The time profile obtained with the SGR was compared with those of PVO (Pioneer Venus Orbiter) and LASL-ISEE. The time difference among the data of time profiles indicated that the source of the burst was not the sun. The spectrum was also measured. (Kato, T.)

  16. Gamma-Ray Bursts: 4th Huntsville Symposium. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, C.A.; Preece, R.D.; Koshut, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Fourth Huntsville Gamma-Ray Bursts Symposium held in September, 1997 in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. This conference occurred at a crucial time in the history of the gamma-ray burst research. In early 1997, 30 years after the detection of the first gamma-ray burst by the Vela satellites, counterparts to bursts were finally detected at optical and radio wavelengths. The symposium attracted about 200 scientists from 16 countries. Some of the topics discussed include gamma-ray burst spectra, x-ray observations, optical observations, radio observations, host galaxies, shocks and afterglows and models of gamma-ray bursts. There were 183 papers presented, out of these, 16 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  17. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, 152 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Cheng, Kwong-Sang [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Shiu, Gary; Tye, Henry, E-mail: yuyw@phy.ccnu.edu.cn, E-mail: hrspksc@hku.hk, E-mail: shiu@ust.hk, E-mail: iastye@ust.hk [Department of Physics and Institute for Advanced Study, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-11-01

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch.

  18. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yun-Wei; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Shiu, Gary; Tye, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch

  19. Inhibition of NMDARs in the nucleus reticularis of the thalamus produces delta frequency bursting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Zhang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Injection of NMDAR antagonist into the thalamus can produce delta frequency EEG oscillations in the thalamocortical system. It is surprising that an antagonist of an excitatory neurotransmitter should trigger such activity, and the mechanism is unknown. One hypothesis is that the antagonist blocks excitation of GABAergic cells, thus producing disinhibition. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of NMDAR antagonist (APV on cells of the nucleus reticularis (nRT in rat brain slices, a thalamic nucleus that can serve as a pacemaker for thalamocortical delta oscillations and that is composed entirely of GABAergic neurons. We found, unexpectedly, that nRT cells are hyperpolarized by APV. This occurs because these cells have an unusual form of NMDAR (probably NR2C that contributes inward current at resting potential in response to ambient glutamate. The hyperpolarization produced by APV is sufficient to deinactivate T-type calcium channels, and these trigger rhythmic bursting at delta frequency. The APV-induced delta frequency bursting is abolished by dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, indicating that dopamine and NMDAR antagonist work synergistically to stimulate delta frequency bursting. Our results have significant implications concerning the electrophysiological basis of schizophrenia and bring together the NMDAR hypofunction, dopamine, and GABA theories of the disease. Our results suggest that NMDAR hypofunction and dopamine work synergistically on the GABAergic cells of the nRT to generate the delta frequency EEG oscillations, a thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD in the awake state that is an established abnormality in schizophrenia.

  20. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  1. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  2. Near stellar sources of gamma-ray bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Luchkov, B. I.; Markin, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Correlation analysis of gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby stars, registered on 2008-2011, revealed 5 coincidences with angular accuracy better than 0.1 degree. The random probability is $7\\times 10^{-7}$, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. The proposed method should be continued in order to provide their share in common balance of cosmic gamma-ray bursts.

  3. On Burst Detection and Prediction in Retweeting Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-22

    We conduct a comprehensive empirical analysis of a large microblogging dataset collected from the Sina Weibo and report our observations of burst...whether and how accurate we can predict bursts using classifiers based on the extracted features. Our empirical study of the Sina Weibo data shows the...feasibility of burst prediction using appropriately extracted features and classic classifiers. 1 Introduction Microblogging, such as Twitter and Sina

  4. The velocities of type II solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlamicha, A.; Karlicky, M.

    1976-01-01

    A list is presented of type II radio bursts identified at Ondrejov between January 1973 and December 1974 in the frequency range of the dynamic spectrum 70 to 810 MHz. The velocities of shock waves in the individual cases of type II bursts are given using the fourfold Newkirk model. Some problems associated with type II radio bursts and with the propagation of the shock wave into the interplanetary space and into the region of the Earth are also discussed. (author)

  5. Infrared and X-ray bursts from the rapid burster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparao, K.M.V.; Chitre, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studies on sudden bursts from the cosmic X-ray sources are reported. The processes occuring from the rise in luminosity of an x-ray source to its collapse are described. Records of the x-ray burst from the globular cluster NGC 6624 and the 'Rapid Burster' are shown. The Infra-red bursts from the Rapid Burster are also explained. (A.K.)

  6. Physical characterization of the Skua fast burst assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Bounds, J.; Sanchez, R.; Miko, D.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the system design and ongoing efforts to characterize the machine physics and operating properties of the Skua fast burst assembly. The machine is currently operating up to prompt critical while we await approval for super-prompt burst operations. Efforts have centered on characterizing neutron kinetic properties, comparing calculated and measured temperature coefficients and power distributions, improving the burst reproducibility, examining the site-wide dose characteristics, and fitting the machine with cooling and filtration systems

  7. Self-regulation of turbulence bursts and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriani, E; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Sarazin, Y; Lima, R

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between turbulent bursts and transport barriers is analyzed with a simplified model of interchange turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. The turbulent bursts spread into the transport barriers and, depending on the competing magnitude of the burst and stopping capability of the barrier, can burn through. Simulations of two models of transport barriers are presented: a hard barrier where interchange turbulence modes are stable in a prescribed region and a soft barrier with external plasma biasing. The response of the transport barriers to the non-linear perturbations of the turbulent bursts, addressed in a predator–prey approach, indicates that the barriers monitor an amplification factor of the turbulent bursts, with amplification smaller than one for most bursts and, in some cases, amplification factors that can significantly exceed unity. The weak barriers in corrugated profiles and magnetic structures, as well as the standard barriers, are characterized by these transmission properties, which then regulate the turbulent burst transport properties. The interplays of barriers and turbulent bursts are modeled as competing stochastic processes. For different classes of the probability density function (PDF) of these processes, one can predict the heavy tail properties of the bursts downstream from the barrier, either exponential for a leaky barrier, or with power laws for a tight barrier. The intrinsic probing of the transport barriers by the turbulent bursts thus gives access to the properties of the barriers. The main stochastic variables are the barrier width and the spreading distance of the turbulent bursts within the barrier, together with their level of correlation. One finds that in the case of a barrier with volumetric losses, such as radiation or particle losses as addressed in our present simulations, the stochastic model predicts a leaky behavior with an exponential PDF of escaping turbulent bursts in agreement with the simulation

  8. Optical burst switching based satellite backbone network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Guo, Hongxiang; Wang, Cen; Wu, Jian

    2018-02-01

    We propose a novel time slot based optical burst switching (OBS) architecture for GEO/LEO based satellite backbone network. This architecture can provide high speed data transmission rate and high switching capacity . Furthermore, we design the control plane of this optical satellite backbone network. The software defined network (SDN) and network slice (NS) technologies are introduced. Under the properly designed control mechanism, this backbone network is flexible to support various services with diverse transmission requirements. Additionally, the LEO access and handoff management in this network is also discussed.

  9. Decay time of type III solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F.T.

    1972-01-01

    Sixty-four Type III bursts that drifted to frequencies below 600 kHz between March 1968 and February 1970 were analyzed. Decay times were measured and combined with published data ranging up to about 200 MHz. By fitting power functions to the computed and observed decay times, and using the local plasma hypothesis, it was found that the ratio rho of computed to observed values varies with radiocentric radial distance according to a power function rho = 3r 0 . 7 . (U.S.)

  10. Burst protected nuclear reactor plant with PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Michel, E.

    1978-01-01

    In the PWR, several integrated components from the steam raising unit and the main coolant pump are grouped around the reactor pressure vessel in a multiloop circuit and in a vertical arrangement. For safety reasons all primary circuit components and pipelines are situated in burst protection covers. To reduce the area of the plant straight tube steam raising units with forced circulation are used as steam raising units. The boiler pumps are connected to the vertical tubes and to the pressure vessel via double pipelines made as twin chamber pipes. (DG) [de

  11. Gamma ray bursts from extragalactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Fred; Burbidge, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    The properties of gamma ray bursts of classical type are found to be explicable in terms of high speed collisions between stars. A model is proposed in which the frequency of such collisions can be calculated. The model is then applied to the nuclei of galaxies in general on the basis that galaxies, or at least some fraction of them, originate in the expulsion of stars from creation centers. Evidence that low level activity of this kind is also taking place at the center of our own Galaxy is discussed. The implications for galactic evolution are discussed and a negative view of black holes is taken.

  12. Capabilities of the Power Burst Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Jensen, A.M.; McCardell, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The unique and diverse test capabilities of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are described in this paper. The PBF test reactor, located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, simulates normal, off-normal, and accident operating conditions of light water reactor fuel rods. An overview description is given, with specific detail on design and operating characteristics of the driver core, experiment test loop, fission product detection system, test train assembly facility, and support equipment which make the testing capability of the PBF so versatile

  13. Burst-Mode Asynchronous Controllers on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs have been mainly used to design synchronous circuits. Asynchronous design on FPGAs is difficult because the resulting circuit may suffer from hazard problems. We propose a method that implements a popular class of asynchronous circuits, known as burst mode, on FPGAs based on look-up table architectures. We present two conditions that, if satisfied, guarantee essential hazard-free implementation on any LUT-based FPGA. By doing that, besides all the intrinsic advantages of asynchronous over synchronous circuits, they also take advantage of the shorter design time and lower cost associated with FPGA designs.

  14. Prompt Emission Observations of Swift BAT Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We review the prompt emission properties of Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We present the global properties of BAT GRBs based on their spectral and temporal characteristics. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 80 and 20 s, respectively. The peak energy (Epeak) of about 60% of BAT GRBs is very likely to be less than 1.00 keV. We also present the BAT characteristics of GRBs with soft spectra, so called Xray flashes (XRFs). We will compare the BAT GRBs and XRFs parameter distribution to the other missions.

  15. Accident analysis for US fast burst reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Flanders, M.; Kazi, H.

    1994-01-01

    In the US fast burst reactor (FBR) community there has been increasing emphasis and scrutiny on safety analysis and understanding of possible accident scenarios. This paper summarizes recent work in these areas that is going on at the different US FBR sites. At this time, all of the FBR facilities have or in the process of updating and refining their accident analyses. This effort is driven by two objectives: to obtain a more realistic scenario for emergency response procedures and contingency plans, and to determine compliance with changing regulatory standards

  16. Burst Alert Robotic Telescope and Optical Afterglows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; Polášek, Cyril; Štrobl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3/4 (2009), s. 374-378 ISSN 1392-0049. [INTEGRAL/BART workshop 2009. Karlovy Vary, 26.03.2009-29.03.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; Spanish Ministry of Education and Science(ES) AP2003-1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gamma rays bursts, * observations * robotic telescopes Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.032, year: 2009

  17. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miteva, R.; Samwel, S. W.; Krupař, Vratislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7 (2017), č. článku A37. ISSN 2115-7251 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-06818Y Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar energetic particles * solar radio burst emission * solar cycle Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.446, year: 2016 https://www.swsc-journal.org/ articles /swsc/abs/2017/01/swsc170028/swsc170028.html

  18. Sneutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Y.

    1997-10-01

    In supersymmetric models with nonvanishing Majorana neutrino masses, the sneutrino and antisneutrino mix. The conditions under which this mixing is experimentally observable are studied, and mass-splitting of the sneutrino mass eigenstates and sneutrino oscillation phenomena are analyzed

  19. Frequency of fast, narrow γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.P.; Maryland Univ., College Park; Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.; Teegarden, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the existence of two γ-ray burst populations detected by the ISEE-3 experiment. Data from the distribution of 123 Venera 13 and 14 events (60 detected by both spacecraft) also suggests two γ-ray burst populations in each experiment sample, the domains separated with a minimum near 1 or 2 s. The authors point out that the results of the Goddard ISEE-3 γ-ray burst spectrometer actually enhance the appearance of two burst populations suggested in the Venera data. (author)

  20. Multiparameter Monitoring and Prevention of Fault-Slip Rock Burst

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Shan-chao; Tan, Yun-liang; Ning, Jian-guo; Guo, Wei-Yao; Liu, Xue-sheng

    2017-01-01

    Fault-slip rock burst is one type of the tectonic rock burst during mining. A detailed understanding of the precursory information of fault-slip rock burst and implementation of monitoring and early warning systems, as well as pressure relief measures, are essential to safety production in deep mines. This paper first establishes a mechanical model of stick-slip instability in fault-slip rock bursts and then reveals the failure characteristics of the instability. Then, change rule of mining-i...

  1. Type III bursts in interplanetary space - Fundamental or harmonic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1984-01-01

    ISEE-3 spacecraft observation of 120 relatively simple, isolated bursts in the 30-1980 kHz range are the basis of the present study of Type III bursts in the solar wind. Several characteristics are identified for many of these bursts which imply that the mode of emission changes from predominantly fundamental plasma radiation during the rise phase to predominantly second harmonic during decay. The fundamental emission begins in time coincidence with the start of Langmuir waves, confirming the conventional belief in these waves' causation of Type III bursts. Attention is given to the characteristics of fundamental components, by comparison to harmonics, at km-wavelengths.

  2. Coupled hydro-neutronic calculations for fast burst reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.; McGhee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for determining the fully coupled neutronic/hydrodynamic response of fast burst reactors (FBR) under disruptive accident conditions. Two code systems, PAD (1 -D Lagrangian) and NIKE-PAGOSA (3-D Eulerian) were used to accomplish this. This is in contrast to the typical methodology that computes these responses by either single point kinetics or in a decoupled manner. This methodology is enabled by the use of modem supercomputers (CM-200). Two examples of this capability are presented: an unreflected metal fast burst assembly, and a reflected fast burst assembly typical of the Skua or SPR-III class of fast burst reactor

  3. Limits of the memory coefficient in measuring correlated bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Hiraoka, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    Temporal inhomogeneities in event sequences of natural and social phenomena have been characterized in terms of interevent times and correlations between interevent times. The inhomogeneities of interevent times have been extensively studied, while the correlations between interevent times, often called correlated bursts, are far from being fully understood. For measuring the correlated bursts, two relevant approaches were suggested, i.e., memory coefficient and burst size distribution. Here a burst size denotes the number of events in a bursty train detected for a given time window. Empirical analyses have revealed that the larger memory coefficient tends to be associated with the heavier tail of the burst size distribution. In particular, empirical findings in human activities appear inconsistent, such that the memory coefficient is close to 0, while burst size distributions follow a power law. In order to comprehend these observations, by assuming the conditional independence between consecutive interevent times, we derive the analytical form of the memory coefficient as a function of parameters describing interevent time and burst size distributions. Our analytical result can explain the general tendency of the larger memory coefficient being associated with the heavier tail of burst size distribution. We also find that the apparently inconsistent observations in human activities are compatible with each other, indicating that the memory coefficient has limits to measure the correlated bursts.

  4. X-ray echoes from gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Hurley, K.C.; Hartmann, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of an echo of reflected radiation in time histories of gamma-ray burst spectra can provide important information about the existence of binary companions or accretion disks in gamma-ray burst systems. Because of the nature of Compton scattering, the spectrum of the echo will be attenuated at gamma-ray energies compared with the spectrum of the primary burst emission. The expected temporal and spectral signatures of the echo and a search for such echoes are described, and implications for gamma-ray burst models are discussed. 35 refs

  5. Study on cosmic gamma bursts in the ''KONUS'' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazets, E.P.; Golenetskij, S.V.; Il'inskij, V.N.; Panov, V.N.; Aptekar', R.L.; Gur'yan, Yu.A.; Sokolov, I.A.; Sokolova, Z.Ya.; Kharitonova, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    Made are the investigations of cosmic gamma bursts with the help of the ''Konus'' apparatus, positioned on the ''Venera 11'' and ''Venera 12'' automatic interplanetary stations. 37 gamma bursts have been recorded in the energy range from 50 to 150 keV during the observation period from September to December 1978. Time profiles of bursts on 4, 9 and 24.11.1978 are presented. For the most events the time of burst increase and decrease constitute parts and units of seconds. Differential energy spectra are measured for all recorded bursts. In many cases the spectrum shape is similar to the grade one with the 1.5-2.3 index. In a graphical form built up are the integral distributions of gamma bursts appearence frequency in dependence on their intensity and maximum capacity in the burst peak. Galaxy coordinates of the 17-teen bursts, for which a simple localization is possible, are put on the celestial sphere map. The type of the integral distributions and the source distribution about the celestial sphere show that the gamma burst sources are whithin the Galaxy

  6. The Second SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts. (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples.. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs.

  7. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels...... and on tidal flats due to the mixing caused by currents and waves. We apply bed level data to evaluate the amount of vertical sediment reworking in modern tidal channels and at a tidal flat. Cycles of deposition and erosion are measured with a bed level sensor, and the results show that gross sedimentation...... was several times higher than net sedimentation. We propose that tidal channel sediment is bleached either on the tidal flat before it is transported to the tidal channels and incorporated in channel-fill successions or, alternatively, on the shallow intertidal part of the channel banks. Based...

  8. Star bursts and giant HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.E.J.

    1990-01-01

    Massive star formation bursts occur in a variety of galactic environments and can temporarily dominate the light output of a galaxy even when a relatively small proportion of its mass is involved. Inferences about their ages, the IMF and its dependence on chemical composition are still somewhat wobbly owing to an excess of unknowns, but certain things can be deduced from emission spectra of associated H II regions when due regard is paid to the effects of chemical composition and ionization parameter: In particular, largest ionization parameters and effective temperatures of exciting stars, at any given oxygen abundance, are anti-correlated with the abundance, and the second effect suggests an increasing proportion of more massive stars at lower abundances, although this is not yet satisfactorily quantified. A new blue compact galaxies could be very young, but it is equally possible that there is an older population of low surface brightness. Some giant H II regions may be self-polluted with nitrogen and helium due to winds from massive stars in the associated burst. (orig.)

  9. MODELING EXTRAGALACTIC EXTINCTION THROUGH GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonca, Alberto; Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Aresu, Giambattista [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare, E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: gmulas@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: garesu@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: cecchi-pestellini@astropa.inaf.it [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-09-20

    We analyze extragalactic extinction profiles derived through gamma-ray burst afterglows, using a dust model specifically constructed on the assumption that dust grains are not immutable but respond, time-dependently, to the local physics. Such a model includes core-mantle spherical particles of mixed chemical composition (silicate core, sp{sup 2}, and sp{sup 3} carbonaceous layers), and an additional molecular component in the form of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We fit most of the observed extinction profiles. Failures occur for lines of sight, presenting remarkable rises blueward of the bump. We find a tendency for the carbon chemical structure to become more aliphatic with the galactic activity, and to some extent with increasing redshifts. Moreover, the contribution of the molecular component to the total extinction is more important in younger objects. The results of the fitting procedure (either successes and failures) may be naturally interpreted through an evolutionary prescription based on the carbon cycle in the interstellar medium of galaxies.

  10. Impact of Bimodal Traffic on Latency in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the impact of bimodal traffic composition on latency in optical burst switching networks. In particular, it studies the performance degradation to short-length packets caused by longer packets, both of which are part of a heterogeneous traffic model. The paper defines a customer satisfaction index for each of the classes of traffic, and a composite satisfaction index. The impact of higher overall utilization of the network as well as that of the ratio of the traffic mix on each of the customer satisfaction indices is specifically addressed.

  11. Burst Mode Composite Photography for Dynamic Physics Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2018-01-01

    I am writing this article to raise awareness of burst mode photography as a fun and engaging way for teachers and students to experience physics demonstration activities. In the context of digital photography, "burst mode" means taking multiple photographs per second, and this is a feature that now comes standard on most digital…

  12. Observation of gamma-ray bursts with GINGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Toshio; Fujii, Masami; Nishimura, Jun

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray Burst Detector System (GBD) on board the scientific satellite 'GINGA' which was launched on Feb. 5, 1987, was realized as an international cooperation between ISAS and LANL. It has recorded more than 40 Gamma-Ray Burst candidates during 20 months observation. Although many observational evidences were accumulated in past 20 years after the discovery of gamma-ray burst by LANL scientists, there are not enough evidence to determine the origin and the production mechanism of the gamma-ray burst. GBD consists of a proportional counter and a NaI scintillation counter so that it became possible to observe energy spectrum of the gamma-ray burst with high energy resolution over wide range of energy (1.5-380 keV) together with high time resolution. As the result of observation, the following facts are obtained: (1) A large fraction of observed gamma-ray bursts has a long X-ray tail after the harder part of gamma-ray emission has terminated. (2) Clear spectral absorption features with harmonic in energy was observed in some of the energy spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. These evidences support the hypothesis that the strongly magnetized neutron star is the origin of gamma-ray burst. (author)

  13. The γ-ray burst-detection system of SPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichti, G.G.; Georgii, R.; Kienlin, A. von; Schoenfelder, V.; Wunderer, C.; Jung, H.-J.; Hurley, K.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of precise locations of γ-ray bursts is a crucial task of γ-ray astronomy. Although γ-ray burst locations can be obtained nowadays from single experiments (BATSE, COMPTEL, BeppoSax) the location of bursts via triangulation using the interplanetary network is still important because not all bursts will be located precisely enough by these single instruments. In order to get location accuracies down to arcseconds via triangulation one needs long baselines. At the beginning of the next decade several spacecrafts which explore the outer planetary system (the Mars-Surveyor-2001 Orbiter and probably Ulysses) will carry γ-ray burst instruments. INTEGRAL as a near-earth spacecraft is the ideal counterpart for these satellites. The massive anticoincidence shield of the INTEGRAL-spectrometer SPI allows the measurement of γ-ray bursts with a high sensitivity. Estimations have shown that with SPI some hundred γ-ray bursts per year on the 5σ level can be measured. This is equivalent to the BATSE sensitivity. We describe the γ-ray burst-detection system of SPI, present its technical features and assess the scientific capabilities

  14. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence...

  15. The many phases of gamma-ray burst afterglows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leventis, K.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the brightest sources in the universe. Their afterglows have been observed for about 15 years now, and their study has greatly advanced our understanding of these, mysterious until recently, events. In a way, gamma-ray bursts can be seen as huge cosmic bombs which convert

  16. Hydrodynamics of burst swimming fish larvae; a conceptual model approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J.H.G.

    2004-01-01

    Burst swimming of fish larvae is analysed from a hydrodynamic point of view. A picture of the expected flow pattern is presented based on information in literature on unsteady-flow patterns around obstacles in the intermediate Reynolds number region. It is shown that the acceleration stage of burst

  17. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  18. Multiparameter Monitoring and Prevention of Fault-Slip Rock Burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-chao Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault-slip rock burst is one type of the tectonic rock burst during mining. A detailed understanding of the precursory information of fault-slip rock burst and implementation of monitoring and early warning systems, as well as pressure relief measures, are essential to safety production in deep mines. This paper first establishes a mechanical model of stick-slip instability in fault-slip rock bursts and then reveals the failure characteristics of the instability. Then, change rule of mining-induced stress and microseismic signals before the occurrence of fault-slip rock burst are proposed, and multiparameter integrated early warning methods including mining-induced stress and energy are established. Finally, pressure relief methods targeting large-diameter boreholes and coal seam infusion are presented in accordance with the occurrence mechanism of fault-slip rock burst. The research results have been successfully applied in working faces 2310 of the Suncun Coal Mine, and the safety of the mine has been enhanced. These research results improve the theory of fault-slip rock burst mechanisms and provide the basis for prediction and forecasting, as well as pressure relief, of fault-slip rock bursts.

  19. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  20. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  1. Testing and Performance of UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rípa, Jakub; Bin Kim, Min; Lee, Jik

    2014-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory pathfinder (UFFO-p) is a new space mission dedicated to detect Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and rapidly follow their afterglows in order to provide early optical/ultraviolet measurements. A GRB location is determined in a few seconds by the UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger t...

  2. Fast Radio Burst Discovered in the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitler, L.G.; Cordes, J.M.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Lorimer, D.R.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.S.; Kaspi, V.M.; Wharton, R.S.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Freire, P.C.C.; Jenet, F.A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K.J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S.M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W.W.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities

  3. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  4. FAST TCP over optical burst switched networks: Modeling and stability analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Shihada, Basem; El-Ferik, Sami; Ho, Pin-Han

    2013-01-01

    congestion-control mechanism in bufferless Optical Burst Switched Networks (OBS). The paper first shows that random burst contentions are essential to stabilize the network, but cause throughput degradation in FAST TCP flows when a burst with all the packets

  5. BURST AND OUTBURST CHARACTERISTICS OF MAGNETAR 4U 0142+61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Göğüş, Ersin; Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Kaneko, Yuki [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Lin, Lin [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Roberts, Oliver J. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Stillorgan Road, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ranana 43537 (Israel); Horst, Alexander J. van der; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Younes, George [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Watts, Anna L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baring, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Huppenkothen, Daniela [Center for Data Science, New York University, 726 Broadway, 7th Floor, NY 10003 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    We have compiled the most comprehensive burst sample from magnetar 4U 0142+61, comprising 27 bursts from its three burst-active episodes in 2011, 2012 and the latest one in 2015 observed with Swift /Burst Alert Telescope and Fermi /Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. Bursts from 4U 0142+61 morphologically resemble typical short bursts from other magnetars. However, 4U 0142+61 bursts are less energetic compared to the bulk of magnetar bursts. We uncovered an extended tail emission following a burst on 2015 February 28, with a thermal nature, cooling over a timescale of several minutes. During this tail emission, we also uncovered pulse peak phase aligned X-ray bursts, which could originate from the same underlying mechanism as that of the extended burst tail, or an associated and spatially coincident but different mechanism.

  6. Channelling and electromagnetic radiation of channelling particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, N.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description is presented of the channelling of charged particles between atoms in the crystal lattice. The specificities are discussed of the transverse motion of channelling particles as are the origin and properties of quasi-characteristic radiation of channelling particles which accompany transfers from one band of permissible energies of the transverse motion of channelling particles to the other. (B.S.)

  7. Operational experiences with automated acoustic burst classification by neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olma, B.; Ding, Y.; Enders, R.

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of Loose Parts Monitoring System sensors for signal bursts associated with metallic impacts of loose parts has proved as an useful methodology for on-line assessing the mechanical integrity of components in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants. With the availability of neural networks new powerful possibilities for classification and diagnosis of burst signals can be realized for acoustic monitoring with the online system RAMSES. In order to look for relevant burst signals an automated classification is needed, that means acoustic signature analysis and assessment has to be performed automatically on-line. A back propagation neural network based on five pre-calculated signal parameter values has been set up for identification of different signal types. During a three-month monitoring program of medium-operated check valves burst signals have been measured and classified separately according to their cause. The successful results of the three measurement campaigns with an automated burst type classification are presented. (author)

  8. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  9. Recent achievements in the field of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tan; Dai Zigao

    2001-01-01

    Recent progresses in the field of gamma-ray bursts is briefly introduced. Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosion since the Big Bang of the universe. Within a few tens of seconds, the energy released in gamma-ray bursts could be several hundred times larger than that released form the sun in its whole life (about 10 billion years). The authors will first briefly discuss the observational facts, based on which the authors will discuss the standard fireball model, the dynamical behavior and evolution of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. Then, various observational phenomena that contradict the standard model are given and the importance of these post-standard effects are pointed out. The questions related to the energy source of gamma-ray bursts are still unanswered, and other important questions also remain to be solved

  10. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  11. Flash photoionization of gamma-ray burst environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1992-01-01

    The H-alpha line emission that a flash-photoionized region emits is calculated. Archival transients, as well as various theoretical predictions, suggest that there may be significant ionizing flux. The limits on the line flux which might be observable indicate that the density must be fairly high for the recombination radiation to be observable. The intense burst radiation is insufficient to melt the dust which will be present in such a dense medium. This dust may attenuate the observable line emission, but does not attenuate the ionizing radiation before it ionizes the neutral medium surrounding the burst source. The dust can also produce a light echo. If there are indeed gamma-ray bursts in dense clouds, then it is possible that the burst was triggered by Bondi-Hoyle accretion from the dense medium, although it is unlikely on statistical grounds that all bursts occur in clouds.

  12. Cosmology and the Subgroups of Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mészáros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Both short and intermediate gamma-ray bursts are distributed anisotropically in the sky (Mészáros, A. et al. ApJ, 539, 98 (2000, Vavrek, R. et al. MNRAS, 391, 1 741 (2008. Hence, in the redshift range, where these bursts take place, the cosmological principle is in doubt. It has already been noted that short bursts should be mainly at redshifts smaller than one (Mészáros, A. et al. Gamma-ray burst: Sixth Huntsville Symp., AIP, Vol. 1 133, 483 (2009; Mészáros, A. et al. Baltic Astron., 18, 293 (2009. Here we show that intermediate bursts should be at redshifts up to three.

  13. Analyses of resource reservation schemes for optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanska, Michaela; Scholtz, Lubomir; Ladanyi, Libor; Mullerova, Jarmila

    2017-12-01

    With growing demands of Internet Protocol services for transmission capacity and speed, the Optical Burst Switching presents the solution for future high-speed optical networks. Optical Burst Switching is a technology for transmitting large amounts of data bursts through a transparent optical switching network. To successfully transmit bursts over OBS network and reach the destination node, resource reservation schemes have to be implemented to allocate resources and configure optical switches for that burst at each node. The one-way resource reservation schemes and the performance evaluation of reservation schemes are presented. The OBS network model is performed using OMNeT++ simulation environment. During the reservation of network resources, the optical cross-connect based on semiconductor optical amplifier is used as the core node. Optical switches based on semiconductor optical amplifiers are a promising technology for high-speed optical communication networks.

  14. The voice conveys specific emotions: evidence from vocal burst displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Thomas, Emiliana R; Keltner, Dacher J; Sauter, Disa; Sinicropi-Yao, Lara; Abramson, Anna

    2009-12-01

    Studies of emotion signaling inform claims about the taxonomic structure, evolutionary origins, and physiological correlates of emotions. Emotion vocalization research has tended to focus on a limited set of emotions: anger, disgust, fear, sadness, surprise, happiness, and for the voice, also tenderness. Here, we examine how well brief vocal bursts can communicate 22 different emotions: 9 negative (Study 1) and 13 positive (Study 2), and whether prototypical vocal bursts convey emotions more reliably than heterogeneous vocal bursts (Study 3). Results show that vocal bursts communicate emotions like anger, fear, and sadness, as well as seldom-studied states like awe, compassion, interest, and embarrassment. Ancillary analyses reveal family-wise patterns of vocal burst expression. Errors in classification were more common within emotion families (e.g., 'self-conscious,' 'pro-social') than between emotion families. The three studies reported highlight the voice as a rich modality for emotion display that can inform fundamental constructs about emotion.

  15. Long X-ray burst monitoring with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binary systems. In the frame of the INTEGRAL observational Key Programme over the Galactic Center a good number of the known X-ray bursters are frequently being monitored. An international...... collaboration lead by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Center has proposed to exploit the improved sensitivity of the INTEGRAL instruments to investigate the observational properties and physics up to high energies of exceptional burst events lasting between a few tens of minutes and several hours....... Of special interest are low luminosity bursting sources that exhibit X-ray bursts of very different durations allowing to study the transition from a hydrogen-rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning. I will present results obtained from INTEGRAL archive data...

  16. Black Hole Information Problem and Wave Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Pantskhava, Lasha

    2018-06-01

    By reexamination of the boundary conditions of wave equation on a black hole horizon it is found not harmonic, but real-valued exponentially time-dependent solutions. This means that quantum particles probably do not cross the Schwarzschild horizon, but are absorbed and some are reflected by it, what potentially can solve the famous black hole information paradox. To study this strong gravitational lensing we are introducing an effective negative cosmological constant between the Schwarzschild and photon spheres. It is shown that the reflected particles can obtain their additional energy in this effective AdS space and could explain properties of some unusually strong signals, like LIGO events, gamma ray and fast radio bursts.

  17. Gravitational wave: gamma-ray burst connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Jim

    2007-05-15

    After 35 years of experimental research, we are rapidly approaching the point at which gravitational waves (GWs) from astrophysical sources may be directly detected by the long-baseline detectors LIGO (USA), GEO 600 (Germany/UK), VIRGO (Italy/France) and TAMA 300 (Japan), which are now in or coming into operation.A promising source of GWs is the coalescence of compact binary systems, events which are now believed to be the origin of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, a brief review of the state of the art in detector development and exploitation will be given, with particular relevance to a search for signals associated with GRBs, and plans for the future will be discussed.

  18. Soap films burst like flapping flags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2009-07-31

    When punctured, a flat soap film bursts by opening a hole driven by liquid surface tension. The hole rim does not, however, remain smooth but soon develops indentations at the tip of which ligaments form, ultimately breaking and leaving the initially connex film into a mist of disjointed drops. We report on original observations showing that these indentations result from a flaglike instability between the film and the surrounding atmosphere inducing an oscillatory motion out of its plane. Just like a flag edge flaps in the wind, the film is successively accelerated on both sides perpendicularly to its plane, inducing film thickness modulations and centrifuging liquid ligaments that finally pinch off to form the observed spray. This effect exemplifies how the dynamics of fragile objects such as thin liquid films is sensitive to their embedding medium.

  19. Bursting of filaments in the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratton, F.T.L.

    1976-01-01

    Photographs of the current sheath of (low energy) plasma focus show a disruption of the filaments. This phenomenon is interpreted as a vortex breakdown. Physical parameters which support this hypothesis are obtained from measurements, from the theoretical thickness of the current sheath given by Nardi and from some models of the plasma flow. The widening of a vortex due to axial velocity increase is analyzed by means of magnetohydrodynamic collinear models. The main results are: (1) the existence of a limit separating supercritical from subcritical regimes (their character changes with the ratio between kinetic and magnetic energy); (2) the existence of flow regimes where the vortex radius remains approximately constant for moderate increments of the external velocity; (3) the structure of the vortex may change substantially for a sufficiently large increment of the external velocity, even in subcritical states; (4) the possibility that a burst of the vortex may occur when the external velocity suffers a slowdown

  20. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Dainotti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism responsible for the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs is still a debated issue. The prompt phase-related GRB correlations can allow discriminating among the most plausible theoretical models explaining this emission. We present an overview of the observational two-parameter correlations, their physical interpretations, and their use as redshift estimators and possibly as cosmological tools. The nowadays challenge is to make GRBs, the farthest stellar-scaled objects observed (up to redshift z=9.4, standard candles through well established and robust correlations. However, GRBs spanning several orders of magnitude in their energetics are far from being standard candles. We describe the advances in the prompt correlation research in the past decades, with particular focus paid to the discoveries in the last 20 years.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF BURSTING WATER MASER FEATURES IN ORION KL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Tsuboi, Masato; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Yonekura, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    In 2011 February, a burst event of the H 2 O maser in Orion KL (Kleinmann-Low object) has started after a 13 year silence. This is the third time such phenomena has been detected in Orion KL, followed by the events in 1979-1985 and 1998. We have carried out astrometric observations of the bursting H 2 O maser features in Orion KL with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA), a Japanese very long baseline interferometry network dedicated for astrometry. The total flux of the bursting feature at the local standard of rest (LSR) velocity of 7.58 km s -1 reaches 4.4 x 10 4 Jy in 2011 March. The intensity of the bursting feature is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the same velocity feature in the quiescent phase in 2006. Two months later, another new feature appears at the LSR velocity of 6.95 km s -1 in 2011 May, separated by 12 mas north of the 7.58 km s -1 feature. Thus, the current burst occurs at two spatially different features. The bursting masers are elongated along the northwest-southeast direction as reported in the previous burst in 1998. We determine the absolute positions of the bursting features for the first time ever with a submilliarcsecond (mas) accuracy. Their positions are coincident with the shocked molecular gas called the Orion Compact Ridge. We tentatively detect the absolute proper motions of the bursting features toward the southwest direction. It is most likely that the outflow from the radio source I or another young stellar object interacting with the Compact Ridge is a possible origin of the H 2 O maser burst.

  2. A POSSIBLE CONNECTION BETWEEN FAST RADIO BURSTS AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    The physical nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs), a new type of cosmological transient discovered recently, is not known. It has been suggested that FRBs can be produced when a spinning supra-massive neutron star loses centrifugal support and collapses to a black hole. Here, we suggest that such implosions can happen in supra-massive neutron stars shortly (hundreds to thousands of seconds) after their births, and an observational signature of such implosions may have been observed in the X-ray afterglows of some long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Within this picture, a small fraction of FRBs would be physically connected to GRBs. We discuss possible multi-wavelength electromagnetic signals and gravitational wave signals that might be associated with FRBs, and propose an observational campaign to unveil the physical nature of FRBs. In particular, we strongly encourage a rapid radio follow-up observation of GRBs starting from 100 s after a GRB trigger

  3. Does Twitter trigger bursts in signature collections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78% of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26% was smaller than the Forum effect (52% in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. CONCLUSIONS: The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore

  4. Does Twitter trigger bursts in signature collections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Kami, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Miyano, Satoru; Yuji, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78%) of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26%) was smaller than the Forum effect (52%) in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore information hidden in social phenomena.

  5. Channel Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Arne; Schinnenburg, Marc; Gross, James; Aguiar, Ana

    For any communication system the Signal-to-Interference-plus-Noise-Ratio of the link is a fundamental metric. Recall (cf. Chapter 9) that the SINR is defined as the ratio between the received power of the signal of interest and the sum of all "disturbing" power sources (i.e. interference and noise). From information theory it is known that a higher SINR increases the maximum possible error-free transmission rate (referred to as Shannon capacity [417] of any communication system and vice versa). Conversely, the higher the SINR, the lower will be the bit error rate in practical systems. While one aspect of the SINR is the sum of all distracting power sources, another issue is the received power. This depends on the transmitted power, the used antennas, possibly on signal processing techniques and ultimately on the channel gain between transmitter and receiver.

  6. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.; Ho, Pin-Han; Wu, Bin; Tapolcai, Janos; Shihada, Basem

    2011-01-01

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  7. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2011-10-10

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  8. Channeling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelin, H.; Birgersson, L.; Widen, H.; Aagren, T.; Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1990-07-01

    Channeling of water flow and tracer transport in real fractures in a granite body at Stripa have been investigated experimentally. The experimental site was located 360 m below the ground level. Two kinds of experiments were performed. In the single hole experiments, 20 cm diameter holes were drilled about 2.5 m into the rock in the plane of the fracture. Specially designed packers were used to inject water into the fracture in 5 cm intervals all along the fracture trace in the hole. The variation of the injection flowrates along the fracture were used to determine the transmissivity variations in the fracture plane. Detailed photographs were taken from inside the hole and the visual fracture aperture was compared with the injection flowrates in the same locations. Geostatistical methods were used to evaluate the results. Five holes were measured in great detail. In addition 7 holes were drilled and scanned by simpler packer systems. A double hole experiment was performed where two parallel holes were drilled in the same fracture plane at nearly 2 m distance. Pressure pulse tests were made between the holes in both directions. Tracers were injected in 5 locations in one hole and monitored for in many locations in the other hole. The single hole experiment and the double hole experiment show that most of the fracture planes are tight but that there are open sections which form connected channels over distances of at least 2 meters. It was also found in the double hole experiment that the investigated fracture was intersected by at least one fracture between the two holes which diverted a large amount of the injected tracers to several distant locations at the tunnel wall. (authours)

  9. Microfluidic mixing through oscillatory transverse perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. W.; Xia, H. M.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhu, P.

    2018-05-01

    Fluid mixing in miniaturized fluidic devices is a challenging task. In this work, the mixing enhancement through oscillatory transverse perturbations coupling with divergent circular chambers is studied. To simplify the design, an autonomous microfluidic oscillator is used to produce the oscillatory flow. It is then applied to four side-channels that intersect with a central channel of constant flow. The mixing performance is tested at high fluid viscosities of up to 16 cP. Results show that the oscillatory flow can cause strong transverse perturbations which effectively enhance the mixing. The influence of a fluidic capacitor in the central channel is also examined, which at low viscosities can intensify the perturbations and further improve the mixing.

  10. Inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels regulate pacemaker activity in spinal nociceptive circuits during early life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Blankenship, Meredith L.; Baccei, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Pacemaker neurons in neonatal spinal nociceptive circuits generate intrinsic burst-firing and are distinguished by a lower “leak” membrane conductance compared to adjacent, non-bursting neurons. However, little is known about which subtypes of leak channels regulate the level of pacemaker activity within the developing rat superficial dorsal horn (SDH). Here we demonstrate that a hallmark feature of lamina I pacemaker neurons is a reduced conductance through inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels at physiological membrane potentials. Differences in the strength of inward rectification between pacemakers and non-pacemakers indicate the presence of functionally distinct Kir currents in these two populations at room temperature. However, Kir currents in both groups showed high sensitivity to block by extracellular Ba2+ (IC50 ~ 10 µM), which suggests the presence of ‘classical’ Kir (Kir2.x) channels in the neonatal SDH. The reduced Kir conductance within pacemakers is unlikely to be explained by an absence of particular Kir2.x isoforms, as immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 within spontaneously bursting neurons. Importantly, Ba2+ application unmasked rhythmic burst-firing in ~42% of non-bursting lamina I neurons, suggesting that pacemaker activity is a latent property of a sizeable population of SDH cells during early life. In addition, the prevalence of spontaneous burst-firing within lamina I was enhanced in the presence of high internal concentrations of free Mg2+, consistent with its documented ability to block Kir channels from the intracellular side. Collectively, the results indicate that Kir channels are key modulators of pacemaker activity in newborn central pain networks. PMID:23426663

  11. SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorgone, N. M. [Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L. [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, CSPAR, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Granot, J. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Watts, A. L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M., E-mail: A.J.VanDerHorst@uva.nl [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2012-04-20

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  12. SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during Its Most Prolific Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderHorst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gorgone, N. M.; Kaneko, Y.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Gogus, E,; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Lin, L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties.We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J15505418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E(sub peak) and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BBfits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature.We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  13. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...

  14. Burst Test Qualification Analysis of DWPF Canister-Plug Weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Gong, Chung.

    1995-02-01

    The DWPF canister closure system uses resistance welding for sealing the canister nozzle and plug to ensure leak tightness. The welding group at SRTC is using the burst test to qualify this seal weld in lieu of the shear test in ASME B ampersand PV Code, Section IX, paragraph QW-196. The burst test is considered simpler and more appropriate than the shear test for this application. Although the geometry, loading and boundary conditions are quite different in the two tests, structural analyses show similarity in the failure mode of the shear test in paragraph QW-196 and the burst test on the DWPF canister nozzle Non-linear structural analyses are performed using finite element techniques to study the failure mode of the two tests. Actual test geometry and realistic stress strain data for the 304L stainless steel and the weld material are used in the analyses. The finite element models are loaded until failure strains are reached. The failure modes in both tests are shear at the failure points. Based on these observations, it is concluded that the use of a burst test in lieu of the shear test for qualifying the canister-plug weld is acceptable. The burst test analysis for the canister-plug also yields the burst pressures which compare favorably with the actual pressure found during burst tests. Thus, the analysis also provides an estimate of the safety margins in the design of these vessels

  15. Discovery of the short gamma-ray burst GRB 050709.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor, J S; Lamb, D Q; Ricker, G R; Atteia, J-L; Kawai, N; Butler, N; Nakagawa, Y; Jernigan, J G; Boer, M; Crew, G B; Donaghy, T Q; Doty, J; Fenimore, E E; Galassi, M; Graziani, C; Hurley, K; Levine, A; Martel, F; Matsuoka, M; Olive, J-F; Prigozhin, G; Sakamoto, T; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Tamagawa, T; Vanderspek, R; Woosley, S E; Yoshida, A; Braga, J; Manchanda, R; Pizzichini, G; Takagishi, K; Yamauchi, M

    2005-10-06

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) fall into two classes: short-hard and long-soft bursts. The latter are now known to have X-ray and optical afterglows, to occur at cosmological distances in star-forming galaxies, and to be associated with the explosion of massive stars. In contrast, the distance scale, the energy scale and the progenitors of the short bursts have remained a mystery. Here we report the discovery of a short-hard burst whose accurate localization has led to follow-up observations that have identified the X-ray afterglow and (for the first time) the optical afterglow of a short-hard burst; this in turn led to the identification of the host galaxy of the burst as a late-type galaxy at z = 0.16 (ref. 10). These results show that at least some short-hard bursts occur at cosmological distances in the outskirts of galaxies, and are likely to be caused by the merging of compact binaries.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts and the Birth of Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Black holes have been predicted since the 1940's from solutions of Einstein's general relativity field equation. There is strong evidence of their existence from astronomical observations, but their origin has remained an open question of great interest. Gamma-ray bursts may the clue. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and appear to be the birth cries of black holes. The Swift and Fermi missions are two powerful NASA observatories currently in orbit that are discovering how gamma-ray bursts work. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are tremendously luminous and are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. One Swift burst at z=8.3 is the most distant object known in the universe. The talk will present the latest gamma-ray burst results from Swift and Fermi and will highlight what they are teaching us about black holes and jet outflows.

  17. Accelerating Science with the NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhimji, Wahid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bard, Debbie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Romanus, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Paul, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ovsyannikov, Andrey [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Friesen, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bryson, Matt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Correa, Joaquin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lockwood, Glenn K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsulaia, Vakho [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Byna, Suren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Farrell, Steve [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gursoy, Doga [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Daley, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beckner, Vince [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Van Straalen, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tull, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Weber, Gunther H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wright, Nicholas J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prabhat, none [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    NVRAM-based Burst Buffers are an important part of the emerging HPC storage landscape. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently installed one of the first Burst Buffer systems as part of its new Cori supercomputer, collaborating with Cray on the development of the DataWarp software. NERSC has a diverse user base comprised of over 6500 users in 700 different projects spanning a wide variety of scientific computing applications. The use-cases of the Burst Buffer at NERSC are therefore also considerable and diverse. We describe here performance measurements and lessons learned from the Burst Buffer Early User Program at NERSC, which selected a number of research projects to gain early access to the Burst Buffer and exercise its capability to enable new scientific advancements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a Burst Buffer has been stressed at scale by diverse, real user workloads and therefore these lessons will be of considerable benefit to shaping the developing use of Burst Buffers at HPC centers.

  18. Postillumination burst of carbon dioxide in crassalacean Acid metabolism plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, C E; Vines, H M; Black, C C

    1975-04-01

    Immediately following exposure to light, a postillumination burst of CO(2) has been detected in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. A detailed study with pineapple (Ananas comosus) leaves indicates that the postillumination burst changes its amplitude and kinetics during the course of a day. In air, the postillumination burst in pineapple leaves generally is exhibited as two peaks. The postillumination burst is sensitive to atmospheric CO(2) and O(2) concentrations as well as to the light intensity under which plants are grown. We propose that the CO(2) released in the first postillumination burst peak is indicative of photorespiration since it is sensitive to either O(2) or CO(2) concentration while the second CO(2) evolution peak is likely due to decarboxylation of organic acids involved in Crassulacean acid metabolism.In marked contrast to other higher plants, the postillumination burst in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants can be equal to or greater than the rate of photosynthesis. Photosynthesis in pineapple leaves also varies throughout a day. Both photosynthesis and the postillumination burst have a daily variation which apparently is a complex function of degree of leaf acidity, growth light intensity, ambient gas phase, and the time a plant has been exposed to a given gas.

  19. Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies Have "Normal" Luminosities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer

    2000-04-10

    The galactic environment of gamma-ray bursts can provide good evidence about the nature of the progenitor system, with two old arguments implying that the burst host galaxies are significantly subluminous. New data and new analysis have now reversed this picture: (1) Even though the first two known host galaxies are indeed greatly subluminous, the next eight hosts have absolute magnitudes typical for a population of field galaxies. A detailed analysis of the 16 known hosts (10 with redshifts) shows them to be consistent with a Schechter luminosity function with R*=-21.8+/-1.0, as expected for normal galaxies. (2) Bright bursts from the Interplanetary Network are typically 18 times brighter than the faint bursts with redshifts; however, the bright bursts do not have galaxies inside their error boxes to limits deeper than expected based on the luminosities for the two samples being identical. A new solution to this dilemma is that a broad burst luminosity function along with a burst number density varying as the star formation rate will require the average luminosity of the bright sample (>6x1058 photons s-1 or>1.7x1052 ergs s-1) to be much greater than the average luminosity of the faint sample ( approximately 1058 photons s-1 or approximately 3x1051 ergs s-1). This places the bright bursts at distances for which host galaxies with a normal luminosity will not violate the observed limits. In conclusion, all current evidence points to gamma-ray burst host galaxies being normal in luminosity.

  20. A Fast Radio Burst Every Second?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    How frequently do fast radio busts occur in the observable universe? Two researchers have now developed a new estimate.Extragalactic SignalsIn 2007, scientists looking through archival pulsar data discovered a transient radio pulse a flash that lasted only a few milliseconds. Since then, weve found another 22 such fast radio bursts (FRBs), yet we still dont know what causes these energetic signals.Artists illustration of the Very Large Array pinpointing the location of FRB 121102. [Bill Saxton/NRAO/AUI/NSF/Hubble Legacy Archive/ESA/NASA]Recently, some clues have finally come from FRB 121102, the only FRB ever observed to repeat. The multiple pulses detected from this source over the last five years have allowed us to confirm its extragalactic origin and pinpoint an origin for this FRB: a small, low-mass, metal-poor dwarf galaxy located about three billion light-years away.Is FRB 121102 typical? How frequently do such bursts occur, and how frequently can we hope to be able to detect them in the future? And what might these rates tell us about their origins? Two scientists from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Anastasia Fialkov and Abraham Loeb, have now taken a phenomenological approach to answering these questions.Influencing FactorsFialkov and Loeb arguethat there are three main factors that influence the rate of observable FRBs in the universe:The spectral shape of the individual FRBsFRB 121102 had a Gaussian-like spectral profile, which means it peaks in a narrow range of frequencies and may not be detectable outside of that band. If this is typical for FRBs, then signals of distant FRBs may become redshifted to outside of the frequency band that we observe, making them undetectable.FRB detection rates in the 1.253.5GHz band predicted by the authors models (red and blue solid and dashed lines), as a function of the flux limit for detection (top) and as a function of the FRB hosts redshift (bottom). Grey circles mark our detections of FRBs thus

  1. Gamma-ray bursts observed by the watch experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    After two years in orbit the WATCH instruments on the GRANAT space observatory have localized seven gamma burst sources with better than 1° accuracy. In several cases, follow‐up observations with Schmidt telescopes have been made within a few days. Some of the bursts have also been detected...... by the distant space probes PVO and ULYSSES and there are, therefore, good prospects for obtaining much improved positions using the burst arrival times. The existence of the almost concurrent Schmidt plates could then become particularly interesting....

  2. The LASL gamma-ray burst astronomy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.; Laros, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst observations performed by LASL began with the identification and initial report of the phenomenon from data acquired by the Vela satellites. The Vela instruments have recorded responses to 73 gamma-ray bursts over a ten-year interval, and are continuing to contribute toward these observations. Similar instrumentation was included aboard the NRL SOLRAD 11 spacecraft. These performed well but suffered an early demise. Recently, the LASL gamma-ray burst astronomy program has been enhanced through the implementation of experiments aboard the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and ISEF-C spacecraft. Both of these experiments are continuing to contribute data vital to trigonometric directional analyses. (orig.)

  3. Observational properties of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazets, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview of the major observational results obtained in gamma-ray burst studies is presented. Also discussed is to what extent the thermonuclear model, which appears at present to be the most plausible, can account for the observed properties of the bursts. The investigation of gamma-ray bursts should cover observations of the time histories of events, energy spectra, and their variablility, source localization, and inspection of the localization regions during the active and quiescent phases of the source in other wavelengths, as well as, evaluation of the statistical distributions of the data obtained

  4. Structural bursts produced by high energy muons in the rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, K.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Higashi, S.; Ozaki, S.

    1975-01-01

    Lateral structures of bursts produced by high energy muons in the rock have been observed at a depth 30 mw. e. underground by use of two layers of proportional counters. The running times were 7940 hr. The number of structural bursts observed, which have two cores in the both layers ( 1 >= 200, N 2 >= 20 particles) is 110, 1.6% of total events. These structural bursts have two types; 1) incident directions of two cores are parallel, 2) two cores intersect in the rock within 2 m above the roof of the tunnel. The events of this 2) type have large transverse momentum. (orig.) [de

  5. Seismic activity and environment protection in rock burst areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travnicek, L.; Holecko, J.; Knotek, S.

    1993-01-01

    The significance is pointed out of seismic activity caused by mining activities in rock burst areas of the Ostrava-Karvinna district. The need is emphasized of the monitoring of the seismic activity at the Czech-Poland border as needed by the Two-party international committee for exploitation of coal supplies on the common border. The adverse effect of rock burst on the surface is documented by examples provided by the Polish party. The technique is described of investigating the DPB seismic polygon, allowing to evaluate the adverse impact of rock burst on the environment. (author) 1 fig., 8 refs

  6. Gamma-ray bursts from black hole accretion disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.

    1975-01-01

    The suggestion was first made more than a year ago that gamma-ray bursts might originate in the neighborhood of black holes, based on some rather circumstantial evidence linking Cygnus X-1, the prime black-hole candidate, with two of the then-known gamma-ray bursts. Since then additional evidence makes the idea still more plausible. The evidence is summarized briefly, a physical model for production of gamma-ray bursts is given, and several of the more interesting consequences of such an origin are pointed out. (orig.) [de

  7. Soudan 2 muons in coincidence with BATSE bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, D.M.; Marshak, M.L.; Wagner, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the possibilities of statistically significant temporal and spatial coincidences between underground muons at Soudan 2 and Gamma Ray Bursts at the GRO-BATSE detector. Our search uses data from the April 91 to March 92 BATSE burst catalog to seek correlations within a 100 second window of coincidence. Sixteen of 180 BATSE triggers have temporally and spatially coincident muons in the Soudan 2 detector. We estimate the chance probability of each coincidence assuming the null hypothesis on the basis of a study of the multiplicities of spatially coincident muons observed over a two day period centered on the time of burst

  8. Optimal unitary dilation for bosonic Gaussian channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Filippo; Eisert, Jens; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Holevo, Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    A general quantum channel can be represented in terms of a unitary interaction between the information-carrying system and a noisy environment. In this paper the minimal number of quantum Gaussian environmental modes required to provide a unitary dilation of a multimode bosonic Gaussian channel is analyzed for both pure and mixed environments. We compute this quantity in the case of pure environment corresponding to the Stinespring representation and give an improved estimate in the case of mixed environment. The computations rely, on one hand, on the properties of the generalized Choi-Jamiolkowski state and, on the other hand, on an explicit construction of the minimal dilation for arbitrary bosonic Gaussian channel. These results introduce a new quantity reflecting ''noisiness'' of bosonic Gaussian channels and can be applied to address some issues concerning transmission of information in continuous variables systems.

  9. The potential roles of T-type Ca2+ channels in motor coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Gyun ePark

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Specific behavioral patterns are expressed by complex combinations of muscle coordination. Tremors are simple behavioral patterns and are the focus of studies investigating motor coordination mechanisms in the brain. T-type Ca2+ channels mediate intrinsic neuronal oscillations and rhythmic burst spiking, and facilitate the generation of tremor rhythms in motor circuits. Despite substantial evidence that T-type Ca2+ channels mediate pathological tremors, their roles in physiological motor coordination and behavior remain unknown. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the roles that T-type Ca2+ channels play under pathological conditions, and discuss the potential relevance of these channels in mediating physiological motor coordination.

  10. Dechanneling function for relativistic axially channeled electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralev, V.A.; Telegin, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    Behaviour of the x(t) dechanneling function depending on the depth is theoretically studied. Theoretical consideration of x(t) for axial channeled relativistic electrons in anisotropic medium results in two-dimensional kinetic equation with mixed derivatives of the parabolic type. The kinetic equation in the approximation of the continuous Lindchard model for relativistic axial channeled electrons is numerically solved. The depth dependence of the x(t) dechanneling function is obtained [ru

  11. Photon Mass Limits from Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bonetti, Luca; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Sakharov, Alexander S.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward K.G.; Spallicci, Alessandro D.A.M.

    2016-06-10

    The frequency-dependent time delays in fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to constrain the photon mass, if the FRB redshifts are known, but the similarity between the frequency dependences of dispersion due to plasma effects and a photon mass complicates the derivation of a limit on $m_\\gamma$. The redshift of FRB 150418 has been measured to $\\sim 2$% and its dispersion measure (DM) is known to $\\sim 0.1$%, but the strength of the constraint on $m_\\gamma$ is limited by uncertainties in the modelling of the host galaxy and the Milky Way, as well as possible inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Allowing for these uncertainties, the recent data on FRB 150418 indicate that $m_\\gamma \\lesssim 1.7 \\times 10^{-14}$ eV c$^{-2}$ ($4.6 \\times 10^{-50}$ kg). In the future, the different redshift dependences of the plasma and photon mass contributions to DM can be used to improve the sensitivity to $m_\\gamma$ if more FRB redshifts are measured. For a fixed fractional uncertainty in the extra-galactic cont...

  12. Fast Radio Bursts from Extragalactic Light Sails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingam, Manasvi [John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: manasvi@seas.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    We examine the possibility that fast radio bursts (FRBs) originate from the activity of extragalactic civilizations. Our analysis shows that beams used for powering large light sails could yield parameters that are consistent with FRBs. The characteristic diameter of the beam emitter is estimated through a combination of energetic and engineering constraints, and both approaches intriguingly yield a similar result that is on the scale of a large rocky planet. Moreover, the optimal frequency for powering the light sail is shown to be similar to the detected FRB frequencies. These “coincidences” lend some credence to the possibility that FRBs might be artificial in origin. Other relevant quantities, such as the characteristic mass of the light sail, and the angular velocity of the beam, are also derived. By using the FRB occurrence rate, we infer upper bounds on the rate of FRBs from extragalactic civilizations in a typical galaxy. The possibility of detecting fainter signals is briefly discussed, and the wait time for an exceptionally bright FRB event in the Milky Way is estimated.

  13. Fast Radio Bursts from Extragalactic Light Sails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    We examine the possibility that fast radio bursts (FRBs) originate from the activity of extragalactic civilizations. Our analysis shows that beams used for powering large light sails could yield parameters that are consistent with FRBs. The characteristic diameter of the beam emitter is estimated through a combination of energetic and engineering constraints, and both approaches intriguingly yield a similar result that is on the scale of a large rocky planet. Moreover, the optimal frequency for powering the light sail is shown to be similar to the detected FRB frequencies. These “coincidences” lend some credence to the possibility that FRBs might be artificial in origin. Other relevant quantities, such as the characteristic mass of the light sail, and the angular velocity of the beam, are also derived. By using the FRB occurrence rate, we infer upper bounds on the rate of FRBs from extragalactic civilizations in a typical galaxy. The possibility of detecting fainter signals is briefly discussed, and the wait time for an exceptionally bright FRB event in the Milky Way is estimated.

  14. The application of coronal scattering measurements to solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, H.M.

    1980-01-01

    The interpretation of ground based observations of solar 'plasma frequency' radio bursts has been hampered in the past by an insufficient knowledge of coronal scattering by density inhomogeneities close to the Sun. Calculations based on measuurements of the angular broadening of natural radio sources, and Woo's 1975 measurement of the angular broadening of the telemetry carrier by Helios I near occultation (Woo, 1978), indicate that plasma frequency solar bursts should undergo considerable scattering, at least near the maximum of the sunspot cycle. The calculated displacements of the apparent positions of the bursts are about equal to the observed displacements which have been attributed to the bursts occurring in dense streamers. In order to obtain more scattering data close to the Sun, interferometer measurements of the angular broadening of spacecraft signals are planned, and the important contribution which could be made with large dishes is discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Spikes matter for phase-locked bursting in inhibitory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Sajiya; Belykh, Igor; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2012-03-01

    We show that inhibitory networks composed of two endogenously bursting neurons can robustly display several coexistent phase-locked states in addition to stable antiphase and in-phase bursting. This work complements and enhances our recent result [Jalil, Belykh, and Shilnikov, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.81.045201 81, 045201(R) (2010)] that fast reciprocal inhibition can synchronize bursting neurons due to spike interactions. We reveal the role of spikes in generating multiple phase-locked states and demonstrate that this multistability is generic by analyzing diverse models of bursting networks with various fast inhibitory synapses; the individual cell models include the reduced leech heart interneuron, the Sherman model for pancreatic beta cells, and the Purkinje neuron model.

  16. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Frederick; Hughes, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; Bonnell, Jerry; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the on-ground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified

  17. Detection of pseudo gamma-ray bursts of long duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frontera, F.; Fuligni, F.; Morelli, E.; Pizzichini, G.; Ventura, G.

    1981-01-01

    It is known that the counting rate of both Na I and Cs I hard X-ray detectors can have intense enhancements of brief (< 1 s) duration, which appear like very short cosmic gamma-ray bursts but probably are due to phosphorescence in the detector itself. Unfortunately, this problem is not limited to short bursts. We present here three much longer (up to 80 s) pseudo-gamma-ray bursts observed during a transatlantic balloon flight. We conclude that detections of gamma-ray bursts (and probably also of hard X-ray source flares) based only on a rate increase by a single scintillator should always be confirmed by at least one other instrument. (orig.)

  18. Rock burst governance of working face under igneous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhenxing; Yu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    As a typical failure phenomenon, rock burst occurs in many mines. It can not only cause the working face to cease production, but also cause serious damage to production equipment, and even result in casualties. To explore how to govern rock burst of working face under igneous rock, the 10416 working face in some mine is taken as engineering background. The supports damaged extensively and rock burst took place when the working face advanced. This paper establishes the mechanical model and conducts theoretical analysis and calculation to predict the fracture and migration mechanism and energy release of the thick hard igneous rock above the working face, and to obtain the advancing distance of the working face when the igneous rock fractures and critical value of the energy when rock burst occurs. Based on the specific conditions of the mine, this paper put forward three kinds of governance measures, which are borehole pressure relief, coal seam water injection and blasting pressure relief.

  19. Burst mode trigger of STEREO in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Curtis, D.; Schroeder, P.

    2013-06-01

    Since the launch of the STEREO spacecraft, the in situ instrument suites have continued to modify their burst mode trigger in order to optimize the collection of high-cadence magnetic field, solar wind, and suprathermal electron data. This report reviews the criteria used for the burst mode trigger and their evolution with time. From 2007 to 2011, the twin STEREO spacecraft observed 236 interplanetary shocks, and 54% of them were captured by the burst mode trigger. The capture rate increased remarkably with time, from 30% in 2007 to 69% in 2011. We evaluate the performance of multiple trigger criteria and investigate why some of the shocks were missed by the trigger. Lessons learned from STEREO are useful for future missions, because the telemetry bandwidth needed to capture the waveforms of high frequency but infrequent events would be unaffordable without an effective burst mode trigger.

  20. A polarized fast radio burst at low Galactic latitude

    OpenAIRE

    Petroff, E.; Kasliwal, M.; Ravi, V.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a new fast radio burst (FRB), FRB 150215, with the Parkes radio telescope on 2015 February 15. The burst was detected in real time with a dispersion measure (DM) of 1105.6 ± 0.8 pc cm^(−3), a pulse duration of 2.8 ^(+1.2)_(−0.5)ms, and a measured peak flux density assuming that the burst was at beam centre of 0.7 ^(+0.2)_(−0.1) Jy. The FRB originated at a Galactic longitude and latitude of 24.66°, 5.28° and 25° away from the Galactic Center. The burst was found t...

  1. Fast drift kilometric radio bursts and solar proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; Kahler, S. W.; Cane, H. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Stone, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Initial results of a comparative study of major fast drift kilometric bursts and solar proton events from Sep. 1978 to Feb. 1983 are presented. It was found that only about half of all intense, long duration ( 40 min above 500 sfu) 1 MHz bursts can be associated with F 20 MeV proton events. However, for the subset of such fast drift bursts accompanied by metric Type 2 and/or 4 activity (approximately 40% of the total), the degree of association with 20 MeV events is 80%. For the reverse association, it was found that proton events with J( 20 MeV) 0.01 1 pr cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1)MeV(-1) were typically (approximately 80% of the time) preceded by intense 1 MHz bursts that exceeded the 500 sfu level for times 20 min (median duration approximately 35 min).

  2. Polarimetry of the Fast Radio Burst Source FRB121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michilli, Daniele; Seymour, Andrew; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Spitler, Laura; Gajjar, Vishal; Archibald, Anne; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, Jim; Gourdji, Kelly; Heald, George; Kaspi, Victoria; Law, Casey; Sobey, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio flashes of presumably extragalactic origin. FRB121102 is the only FRB known to repeat and the only one with a precise localization. It is co-located with a persistent radio source inside a star-forming region in a dwarf galaxy at z=0.2. While the persistent source is compatible with either a low-luminosity accreting black hole or a very energetic nebula and supernova remnant, the source of the bursts is still a mystery. We present new bursts from FRB121102 detected at relatively high radio frequencies of ~5GHz. These observations allow us to investigate the polarization properties of the bursts, placing new constraints on the environment of FRB121102.

  3. Fast drift kilometric radio bursts and solar proton events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E.W.; Kahler, S.W.; Cane, H.V.; Mcguire, R.E.; Vonrosenvinge, T.T.; Stone, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Initial results of a comparative study of major fast drift kilometric bursts and solar proton events from Sep. 1978 to Feb. 1983 are presented. It was found that only about half of all intense, long duration ( 40 min above 500 sfu) 1 MHz bursts can be associated with F 20 MeV proton events. However, for the subset of such fast drift bursts accompanied by metric Type 2 and/or 4 activity (approximately 40% of the total), the degree of association with 20 MeV events is 80%. For the reverse association, it was found that proton events with J( 20 MeV) 0.01 1 pr cm(-2)s(-1)sr(-1)MeV(-1) were typically (approximately 80% of the time) preceded by intense 1 MHz bursts that exceeded the 500 sfu level for times of approx. 20 min (median duration approximately 35 min)

  4. THE SECOND SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Krimm, H. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Markwardt, C. B.; Parsons, A. M.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Palmer, D. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2011-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters, and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs, and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8%, and 2%, respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX, and HETE-2 GRB samples. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T 90 and T 50 durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs. The time-averaged spectra of the BAT S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the L-GRBs. Whereas, the spectra of the initial short spikes of the S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the S-GRBs. We show that the BAT GRB samples are significantly softer than the BATSE bright GRBs and that the time-averaged E obs peak of the BAT GRBs peaks at 80 keV, which is significantly lower energy than those of the BATSE sample, which peak at 320 keV. The time-averaged spectral properties of the BAT GRB sample are similar to those of the HETE-2 GRB samples. By time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that only 10% of the BAT observed photon indices are outside the allowed region of the synchrotron shock model. We see no obvious observed trend in the BAT T 90 and the observed spectra with redshifts. The T 90

  5. 76 FR 28460 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Rock Burst...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... for OMB Review; Comment Request; Rock Burst Control Plan--Pertains to Underground Metal and Nonmetal... develop a rock burst plan within 90 days after a rock burst has been experienced. Stress data are normally... Administration (MSHA) sponsored information collection request (ICR) titled, ``Burst Control Plan--Pertains to...

  6. Mixed Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  7. Spectra of gamma-ray bursts at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matz, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1980 February and 1983 August the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) observed 71 gamma-ray bursts. These events form a representative subset of the class of classical gamma-ray bursts. Since their discovery more than 15 years ago, hundreds of gamma-ray bursts have been detected; however, most observations have been limited to an energy range of roughly 30 keV-1 MeV. The large sensitive area and spectral range of the GRS allow, for the first time, an investigation of the high energy (>1 MeV) behavior of a substantial number of gamma-ray bursts. It is found that high-energy emission is seen in a large fraction of all events and that the data are consistent with all bursts emitting to at least 5 MeV with no cut-offs. Further, no burst spectrum measured by GRS has a clear high-energy cut-off. The high-energy emission can be a significant part of the total burst energy on the average about 30% of the observed energy above 30 keV is contained in the >1 MeV photons. The fact that the observations are consistent with the presence of high-energy emission in all events implies a limit on the preferential beaming of high-energy photons, from any mechanism. Single-photon pair-production in a strong magnetic field produces such beaming; assuming that the low-energy emission is isotropic, the data imply an upper limit of 1 x 10 12 G on the typical magnetic field at burst radiation sites

  8. Gamma-ray bursts: astrophysical puzzle of the century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, R.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the problems of gamma-ray bursts /GRB/. As GRB became one of the greatest mysteries in modern astrophysics, this field of astrophysics is a subject of intensive research. The article covers some topical aspects of experiments related to the indentification of gamma-ray bursts. The preparation and results of experiments in the Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic are described. (Z.J.)

  9. Heating of aluminum by SPR-III burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    Real time temperature measurements were made on an aluminum cylinder exposed to radiation bursts at SPR-III at neutron levels from 10 11 cm -2 to 4.5 x 10 14 cm -2 . Precision thermistors and high speed A/D converters were used to measure temperature with .0025 degree C resolution at 20ms intervals following the burst. Temperature data is presented as a function of neutron fluence

  10. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone.

  11. Burst suppression in sleep in a routine outpatient EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Kheder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS is an electroencephalogram (EEG pattern that is characterized by brief bursts of spikes, sharp waves, or slow waves of relatively high amplitude alternating with periods of relatively flat EEG or isoelectric periods. The pattern is usually associated with coma, severe encephalopathy of various etiologies, or general anesthesia. We describe an unusual case of anoxic brain injury in which a BS pattern was seen during behaviorally defined sleep during a routine outpatient EEG study.

  12. Burst suppression in sleep in a routine outpatient EEG ?

    OpenAIRE

    Kheder, Ammar; Bianchi, Matt T.; Westover, M. Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression (BS) is an electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern that is characterized by brief bursts of spikes, sharp waves, or slow waves of relatively high amplitude alternating with periods of relatively flat EEG or isoelectric periods. The pattern is usually associated with coma, severe encephalopathy of various etiologies, or general anesthesia. We describe an unusual case of anoxic brain injury in which a BS pattern was seen during behaviorally defined sleep during a routine outpatient...

  13. High repetition rate burst-mode spark gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Reginato, L.; Hester, R.; Chesterman, A.; Cook, E.; Yokota, T.; Dexter, W.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented on the design and testing of a pressurized gas blown spark gap switch capable of high repetition rates in a burst mode of operation. The switch parameters which have been achieved are as follows: 220-kV, 42-kA, a five pulse burst at 1-kHz, 12-ns risetime, 2-ns jitter at a pulse width of 50-ns

  14. DETECTING THE SUPERNOVA BREAKOUT BURST IN TERRESTRIAL NEUTRINO DETECTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Joshua; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the distance-dependent performance of a few representative terrestrial neutrino detectors in detecting and measuring the properties of the ν e breakout burst light curve in a Galactic core-collapse supernova. The breakout burst is a signature phenomenon of core collapse and offers a probe into the stellar core through collapse and bounce. We examine cases of no neutrino oscillations and oscillations due to normal and inverted neutrino-mass hierarchies. For the normal hierarchy, other neutrino flavors emitted by the supernova overwhelm the ν e signal, making a detection of the breakout burst difficult. For the inverted hierarchy (IH), some detectors at some distances should be able to see the ν e breakout burst peak and measure its properties. For the IH, the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst can be measured at 10 kpc to accuracies of ∼30% for Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) and ∼60% for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) and Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) lack the mass needed to make an accurate measurement. For the IH, the time of the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst can be measured in Hyper-K to an accuracy of ∼3 ms at 7 kpc, in DUNE to ∼2 ms at 4 kpc, and JUNO and Super-K can measure the time of maximum luminosity to an accuracy of ∼2 ms at 1 kpc. Detector backgrounds in IceCube render a measurement of the ν e breakout burst unlikely. For the IH, a measurement of the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst could be used to differentiate between nuclear equations of state

  15. Study on Monitoring Rock Burst through Drill Pipe Torque

    OpenAIRE

    Zhonghua Li; Liyuan Zhu; Wanlei Yin; Yanfang Song

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to identify the danger of rock burst from the response of drill pipe torque during drilling process to overcome many defects of the conventional volume of drilled coal rubble method. It is based on the relationship of rock burst with coal stress and coal strength. Through theoretic analysis, the change mechanism of drill pipe torque and the relationship of drill pipe torque with coal stress, coal strength, and drilling speed are investigated. In light of the a...

  16. A polarized fast radio burst at low Galactic latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, E.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Keane, E. F.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Miller, R.; Andreoni, I.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Bernard, S. R.; Bhandari, S.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Caleb, M.; Champion, D.; Chandra, P.; Cooke, J.; Dhillon, V. S.; Farnes, J. S.; Hardy, L. K.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Johnston, S.; Kasliwal, M.; Kramer, M.; Littlefair, S. P.; Macquart, J. P.; Mickaliger, M.; Possenti, A.; Pritchard, T.; Ravi, V.; Rest, A.; Rowlinson, A.; Sawangwit, U.; Stappers, B.; Sullivan, M.; Tiburzi, C.; van Straten, W.; ANTARES Collaboration; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; de Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; di Palma, I.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Grégoire, T.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Pǎvǎlaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Saldaña, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzoca, A.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'c.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reyes, R. De Los; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schüssler, F.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Walt, D. J. Van Der; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.

    2017-08-01

    We report on the discovery of a new fast radio burst (FRB), FRB 150215, with the Parkes radio telescope on 2015 February 15. The burst was detected in real time with a dispersion measure (DM) of 1105.6 ± 0.8 pc cm-3, a pulse duration of 2.8^{+1.2}_{-0.5} ms, and a measured peak flux density assuming that the burst was at beam centre of 0.7^{+0.2}_{-0.1} Jy. The FRB originated at a Galactic longitude and latitude of 24.66°, 5.28° and 25° away from the Galactic Center. The burst was found to be 43 ± 5 per cent linearly polarized with a rotation measure (RM) in the range -9 < RM < 12 rad m-2 (95 per cent confidence level), consistent with zero. The burst was followed up with 11 telescopes to search for radio, optical, X-ray, γ-ray and neutrino emission. Neither transient nor variable emission was found to be associated with the burst and no repeat pulses have been observed in 17.25 h of observing. The sightline to the burst is close to the Galactic plane and the observed physical properties of FRB 150215 demonstrate the existence of sight lines of anomalously low RM for a given electron column density. The Galactic RM foreground may approach a null value due to magnetic field reversals along the line of sight, a decreased total electron column density from the Milky Way, or some combination of these effects. A lower Galactic DM contribution might explain why this burst was detectable whereas previous searches at low latitude have had lower detection rates than those out of the plane.

  17. Observation of a very weak gamma ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.; Polcaro, V.F.; Vialetto, G.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we report the detection of a very faint burst detected in the hard X-ray range. The burst, having a peak intensity of approx.=7 x 10 - 9 erg/cm 2 s in the 20-120 KeV range has been detected by means two of the four detectors on board the HXR-81 balloon borne hard X-ray telescope (POKER) during a transmediterranean flight devoted to a sky survey. (orig./WL)

  18. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  19. The voice conveys specific emotions: Evidence from vocal burst displays

    OpenAIRE

    Simon-Thomas, E.; Keltner, D.; Sauter, D.; Sinicropi-Yao, L.; Abramson, A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of emotion signaling inform claims about the taxonomic structure, evolutionary origins, and physiological correlates of emotions. Emotion vocalization research has tended to focus on a limited set of emotions: anger, disgust, fear, sadness, surprise, happiness, and for the voice, also tenderness. Here, we examine how well brief vocal bursts can communicate 22 different emotions: 9 negative (Study 1) and 13 positive (Study 2), and whether prototypical vocal bursts convey emotions more ...

  20. A polarized fast radio burst at low Galactic latitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petroff, E.; van Haren, H.; The ANTARES Collaboration; The H.E.S.S. Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a new fast radio burst (FRB), FRB 150215, with the Parkes radio telescope on 2015 February 15. The burst was detected in real time with a dispersion measure (DM) of 1105.6 ± 0.8 pc cm−3, a pulse duration of 2.8+1.2−0.5 ms, and a measured peak flux density assuming that

  1. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, E. F.; Jencson, J.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty i...

  2. Type III radio bursts in a flaming structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlicky, M.; Tlamicha, A.

    1977-01-01

    An interpretation is presented of the burst of 3.7.1974. The slowly drifting, fine structure in this type III burst is evidence of the existence of very fast, spatially extensive processes in the corona. The concept is presented of a rapidly varying, magnetohydrodynamically unstable, flaming structure of the magnetic field and, using this model, the intensities were computed of the magnetic field at certain altitudes and at two moments differing by 1.4 s. (author)

  3. Burst-mode manipulation of magnonic vortex crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänze, Max; Adolff, Christian F.; Weigand, Markus; Meier, Guido

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of polarization states in 4 ×4 vortex crystals using sinusoidal magnetic field bursts is investigated by means of a broadband ferromagnetic-resonance setup. Magnetic field excitation with the proper amplitude and frequency allows tuning different polarization states, which are observed in the measured absorption spectra. The variation of the sinusoidal burst width consecutively identifies the time scale of the underlying process. A memorylike polarization state writing process is demonstrated on the submicrosecond time scale.

  4. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Nakariakov, Valery M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Cho, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: pankaj.kumar@nasa.gov [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ∼664–1416 km s{sup −1}. Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ∼70 and ∼140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, i.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70–140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172–273 km s{sup −1}. The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  5. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ∼664–1416 km s −1 . Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ∼70 and ∼140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, i.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70–140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172–273 km s −1 . The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  6. Possibility of detecting magnetospheric radio bursts from Uranus and Neptune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, C.F.; Maggs, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that Earth, Jupiter and Saturn are sources of intense sporadic bursts of electromagnetic radiation, known as magnetospheric radio bursts. These bursts are here described. It is thought that the similarities in the power flux spectra, together with the burst occurrence patterns, suggest a common physical origin for these bursts in all three planets. The common mechanism may be noise amplification by field aligned currents, since it has been shown that the Earth's MRBs are associated with bright auroral arcs that involve intense field aligned currents. Such currents result from the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere and should be a general feature of the interaction between the solar wind and planetary magnetospheres. If MRBs are produced by solar wind-magnetosphere interaction their total radiated power might scale with the solar wind input into the magnetosphere, and it has been suggested that the frequency of emission scales with the polar magnetic field strength of a planet. The intensity of MRBs is here scaled to the solar wind input and the frequency of emission to the polar field strength with a view to estimating the possibility of detecting MRBs from Uranus and Neptune. It is found that scaling of MRB power to the solar wind-magnetosphere dissipation power is probably a reasonable hypothesis. It is suggested that detection of MRB bursts from Uranus and Neptune might be a reasonable radioastronomy objective on future missions to the outer Solar System. (U.K.)

  7. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit since November 20, 2004 and all hardware is performing well. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting a hundred bursts per year. sensitive narrow-field X-ray and uv/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 50-100 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. There has been a break-through in the longstanding mystery of short GRBs; they appear to be caused by merging neutron stars. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.

  8. Bursting of a bubble confined in between two plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murano, Mayuko; Kimono, Natsuki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of liquid thin films, driven by surface tension, has attracted interests of scientists for many years. It is also a daily phenomenon familiar to everyone in the form of the bursting of soap films. In recent years, many studies in confined geometries (e.g. in a Hele-Shaw cell) have revealed physical mechanisms of the dynamics of bubbles and drops. As for a liquid film sandwiched in between another liquid immiscible to the film liquid in the Hele-Shaw cell, it is reported that the thin film bursts at a constant speed and the speed depends on the viscosity of the surrounding liquid when the film is less viscous, although a rim is not formed at the bursting tip; this is because the circular symmetry of the hole in the bursting film is lost. Here, we study the bursting speed of a thin film sandwiched between air instead of the surrounding liquid in the Hele-Shaw cell to seek different scaling regimes. By measuring the bursting velocity and the film thickness of an air bubble with a high speed camera, we have found a new scaling law in viscous regime. This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan).

  9. Rock Burst Mechanics: Insight from Physical and Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vacek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock burst processes in mines are studied by many groups active in the field of geomechanics. Physical and mathematical modelling can be used to better understand the phenomena and mechanisms involved in the bursts. In the present paper we describe both physical and mathematical models of a rock burst occurring in a gallery of a coal mine.For rock bursts (also called bumps to occur, the rock has to possess certain particular rock burst properties leading to accumulation of energy and the potential to release this energy. Such materials may be brittle, or the rock burst may arise at the interfacial zones of two parts of the rock, which have principally different material properties (e.g. in the Poíbram uranium mines.The solution is based on experimental and mathematical modelling. These two methods have to allow the problem to be studied on the basis of three presumptions:· the solution must be time dependent,· the solution must allow the creation of cracks in the rock mass,· the solution must allow an extrusion of rock into an open space (bump effect. 

  10. Rock Burst Monitoring by Integrated Microseismic and Electromagnetic Radiation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelong; Wang, Enyuan; Li, Zhonghui; Liu, Zhentang; Song, Dazhao; Qiu, Liming

    2016-11-01

    For this study, microseismic (MS) and electromagnetic radiation (EMR) monitoring systems were installed in a coal mine to monitor rock bursts. The MS system monitors coal or rock mass ruptures in the whole mine, whereas the EMR equipment monitors the coal or rock stress in a small area. By analysing the MS energy, number of MS events, and EMR intensity with respect to rock bursts, it has been shown that the energy and number of MS events present a "quiet period" 1-3 days before the rock burst. The data also show that the EMR intensity reaches a peak before the rock burst and this EMR intensity peak generally corresponds to the MS "quiet period". There is a positive correlation between stress and EMR intensity. Buckling failure of coal or rock depends on the rheological properties and occurs after the peak stress in the high-stress concentration areas in deep mines. The MS "quiet period" before the rock burst is caused by the heterogeneity of the coal and rock structures, the transfer of high stress into internal areas, locked patches, and self-organized criticality near the stress peak. This study increases our understanding of coal and rock instability in deep mines. Combining MS and EMR to monitor rock burst could improve prediction accuracy.

  11. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA Swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit since November 20, 2004 and all hardware is performing well. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 50-100 sec by an autonomously controlled ``swift'' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. There has been a break-through in the long-standing mystery of short GRBs; they appear to be caused by merging neutron stars. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.

  12. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, E F; Johnston, S; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called 'missing baryons'. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts.

  13. Beyond initiation-limited translational bursting: the effects of burst size distributions on the stability of gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Arold, Stefan T.; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    solutions, previous models to capture this noise source had to assume translation to be initiation-limited, representing the burst size by a specific type of a long-tail distribution. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that the initiation

  14. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  15. THE THIRD SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, Amy; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Krimm, Hans A.; Troja, Eleonora [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sakamoto, Takanori [Department of Physics and Mathematics, College of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Barthelmy, Scott D.; Cummings, Jay R.; Gehrels, Neil; Markwardt, Craig B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chen, Kevin [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 366 LeConte Hall MC 7300, Berkeley, CA 9472 (United States); Palmer, David M.; Ukwatta, T. N. [Space and Remote Sensing (ISR-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Stamatikos, Michael [Department of Physics, Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    To date, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift has detected ∼1000 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), of which ∼360 GRBs have redshift measurements, ranging from z = 0.03 to z = 9.38. We present the analyses of the BAT-detected GRBs for the past ∼11 years up through GRB 151027B. We report summaries of both the temporal and spectral analyses of the GRB characteristics using event data (i.e., data for each photon within approximately 250 s before and 950 s after the BAT trigger time), and discuss the instrumental sensitivity and selection effects of GRB detections. We also explore the GRB properties with redshift when possible. The result summaries and data products are available at http://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/results/batgrbcat/index.html. In addition, we perform searches for GRB emissions before or after the event data using the BAT survey data. We estimate the false detection rate to be only one false detection in this sample. There are 15 ultra-long GRBs (∼2% of the BAT GRBs) in this search with confirmed emission beyond ∼1000 s of event data, and only two GRBs (GRB 100316D and GRB 101024A) with detections in the survey data prior to the starting of event data.

  16. COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF FAST RADIO BURST/GAMMA-RAY BURST ASSOCIATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: deng@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    If a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) are associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), as recently suggested by Zhang, the combination of redshift measurements of GRBs and dispersion measure (DM) measurements of FRBs opens a new window to study cosmology. At z < 2 where the universe is essentially fully ionized, detections of FRB/GRB pairs can give an independent measurement of the intergalactic medium portion of the baryon mass fraction, Ω {sub b} f {sub IGM}, of the universe. If a good sample of FRB/GRB associations are discovered at higher redshifts, the free electron column density history can be mapped, which can be used to probe the reionization history of both hydrogen and helium in the universe. We apply our formulation to GRBs 101011A and 100704A that each might have an associated FRB, and constrained Ω {sub b} f {sub IGM} to be consistent with the value derived from other methods. The methodology developed here is also applicable, if the redshifts of FRBs not associated with GRBs can be measured by other means.

  17. COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF FAST RADIO BURST/GAMMA-RAY BURST ASSOCIATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    If a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) are associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), as recently suggested by Zhang, the combination of redshift measurements of GRBs and dispersion measure (DM) measurements of FRBs opens a new window to study cosmology. At z < 2 where the universe is essentially fully ionized, detections of FRB/GRB pairs can give an independent measurement of the intergalactic medium portion of the baryon mass fraction, Ω b f IGM , of the universe. If a good sample of FRB/GRB associations are discovered at higher redshifts, the free electron column density history can be mapped, which can be used to probe the reionization history of both hydrogen and helium in the universe. We apply our formulation to GRBs 101011A and 100704A that each might have an associated FRB, and constrained Ω b f IGM to be consistent with the value derived from other methods. The methodology developed here is also applicable, if the redshifts of FRBs not associated with GRBs can be measured by other means

  18. Mosquito drinking with a burst in reserve: explaining behavior with a fluid mechanics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Souvick; Socha, Jake; Stremler, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Mosquitoes drink using a pair of in-line pumps in the head that draw liquid food through a long drinking channel, or proboscis. Experimental observations indicate two modes of drinking: a predominantly occurring continuous mode, in which the cibarial and pharyngeal pumps expand cyclically at a constant phase difference, and an isolated burst mode, in which the pharyngeal pump expansion is several orders of magnitude larger than in the continuous mode. We use a reduced order model of the fluid mechanics to hypothesize an explanation of this naturally occurring drinking behavior. Our model results show that the continuous mode is the more efficient mode in terms of energy expenditure, and the burst mode creates a large pressure difference across the proboscis. We speculate that the mosquito uses this pressure drop to clear blockages in the proboscis. We compared the two-pump system with one-pump configurations, as found in some other insects like butterflies, and show that the two pumps have unique roles in mosquito feeding.

  19. Data quality studies for burst analysis of Virgo data acquired during Weekly Science Runs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acernese, F; Amico, P; Alshourbagy, M

    2007-01-01

    Virgo started collecting science data during weekends in order to not interfere with commissioning activities. The goal of Weekly Science Runs is to ease the transition between commissioning periods and data taking periods, in addition to providing data sets exploiting the stationary behavior of the detector. The detection of gravitational wave (GW) bursts emitted by core collapse of supernovae is one of the most difficult tasks for the GW community due to the fact that there are uncertainties in the exact shape of the waveforms, as we do not have complete models. A major task for this kind of detection effort is the cleaning of the event triggers found by the detection pipelines, namely the removal of accidental transient signals due to noise source events. In order to clean our data from false GW events, we need to define a strategy for data quality cut and veto of auxiliary and environmental monitoring channels. In this paper we report on the analysis we performed on data acquired during Weekly Science Runs to explore and define the data quality cut and veto studies for burst analysis

  20. M-Burst: A Framework of SRLG Failure Localization in All-Optical Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2012-07-27

    Fast and unambiguous failure localization for shared risk link groups (SRLGs) with multiple links is essential for building a fully survivable and functional transparent all-optical mesh network. Monitoring trails (m-trails) have been proposed as an effective approach to achieve this goal. However, each m-trail traverses through each link by constantly taking a wavelength channel, causing a significant amount of resource consumption. In this paper, a novel framework of all-optical monitoring for SRLG failure localization is proposed. We investigate the feasibility of periodically launching optical bursts along each m-trail instead of assigning it a dedicated supervisory lightpath to probe the set of fiber segments along the m-trail, aiming to achieve a graceful compromise between resource consumption and failure localization latency. This paper defines the proposed framework and highlights the relevant issues regarding its feasibility. We provide theoretical justifications of the scheme. As a proof of concept, we formulate the optimal burst scheduling problem via an integer linear program (ILP) and implement the method in networks of all possible SRLGs with up to d=3 links. A heuristic method is also proposed and implemented for multiple-link SRLG failure localization, keeping all the assumptions the same as in the ILP method. Numerical results for small networks show that the scheme is able to localize single-link and multiple-link SRLG failures unambiguously with a very small amount of failure localization latency.

  1. The influence of turbulent bursting on sediment resuspension under unidirectional currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments were conducted in an open channel flume with a flat sandy bed to examine the role of turbulence on sediment resuspension. An acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV was used to measure the instantaneous three-dimensional velocity components and acoustic backscatter as a proxy to suspended sediment concentration. Estimates of sediment transport assume that there is a mean critical velocity that needs to be exceeded before sediment transport is initiated. This approach does not consider the turbulent flow field that may initiate sediment resuspension through event-based processes such as the bursting phenomenon. In this paper, laboratory measurements were used to examine the sediment resuspension processes below and above the mean critical velocity. The results within a range above and below the measured mean critical velocity suggested that (1 the contribution of turbulent bursting events remained identical in both experimental conditions, (2 ejection and sweep events contributed more to the total sediment flux than up-acceleration and down-deceleration events, and (3 wavelet transform revealed a correlation between the momentum and sediment flux in both test conditions. Such similarities in conditions above and below the measured mean critical velocity highlight the need to re-evaluate the accuracy of a single time-averaged mean critical velocity for the initiation of sediment entrainment.

  2. Neutron bursts from long laboratory sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, P.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Montanya, J.; Van Deursen, A.; Ostgaard, N.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron emission in association with thunderstorms and lightning discharges was reported by different investigators from ground-based observation platforms. In both cases such emission is explained by photonuclear reaction, since high-energy gamma-rays in sufficient fluxes are routinely detected from both, lightning and thunderclouds. The required gamma-rays are presumably generated by high-energy electrons in Bremsstrahlung process after their acceleration via cold and/or relativistic runaway mechanisms. This phenomenon attracted moderate scientific attention until fast neutron bursts (up to 10 MeV) from long 1 MV laboratory sparks have been reported. Clearly, with such relatively low applied voltage the electrons are unable to accelerate to the energies required for photo/electro disintegration. Moreover, all known elementary neutron generation processes are not capable to explain this emission right away. We performed an independent laboratory experiment on long sparks with the aim to confirm or disprove the neutron emission from them. The experimental setup was assembled at High-Voltage Laboratory in Barcelona and contained a Marx generator in a cone-cone spark gap configuration. The applied voltage was as low as 800 kV and the gap distance was only 60 cm. Two ns-fast cameras were located near the gap capturing short-exposure images of the pre-breakdown phenomenon at the expected neutron generation time. A plastic scintillation detector sensitive to neutrons was covered in 11 cm of lead and placed near the spark gap. The detector was calibrated and showed good performance in neutron detection. Apart of it, voltage, currents through both electrodes, and three X-ray detectors were also monitored in sophisticated measuring system. We will give an overview of the previous experimental and theoretical work in this topic, and present the results of our new experimental campaign. The conclusions are based on good signal-to-noise ratio measurements and are

  3. Future Cosmological Constraints From Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Anthony; Weltman, Amanda; Gaensler, B. M.; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Witzemann, Amadeus

    2018-03-01

    We consider the possible observation of fast radio bursts (FRBs) with planned future radio telescopes, and investigate how well the dispersions and redshifts of these signals might constrain cosmological parameters. We construct mock catalogs of FRB dispersion measure (DM) data and employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, with which we forecast and compare with existing constraints in the flat ΛCDM model, as well as some popular extensions that include dark energy equation of state and curvature parameters. We find that the scatter in DM observations caused by inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM) poses a big challenge to the utility of FRBs as a cosmic probe. Only in the most optimistic case, with a high number of events and low IGM variance, do FRBs aid in improving current constraints. In particular, when FRBs are combined with CMB+BAO+SNe+H 0 data, we find the biggest improvement comes in the {{{Ω }}}{{b}}{h}2 constraint. Also, we find that the dark energy equation of state is poorly constrained, while the constraint on the curvature parameter, Ω k , shows some improvement when combined with current constraints. When FRBs are combined with future baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) data from 21 cm Intensity Mapping, we find little improvement over the constraints from BAOs alone. However, the inclusion of FRBs introduces an additional parameter constraint, {{{Ω }}}{{b}}{h}2, which turns out to be comparable to existing constraints. This suggests that FRBs provide valuable information about the cosmological baryon density in the intermediate redshift universe, independent of high-redshift CMB data.

  4. Biophysical Neural Spiking, Bursting, and Excitability Dynamics in Reconfigurable Analog VLSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T; Sejnowski, T J; Cauwenberghs, G

    2011-10-01

    We study a range of neural dynamics under variations in biophysical parameters underlying extended Morris-Lecar and Hodgkin-Huxley models in three gating variables. The extended models are implemented in NeuroDyn, a four neuron, twelve synapse continuous-time analog VLSI programmable neural emulation platform with generalized channel kinetics and biophysical membrane dynamics. The dynamics exhibit a wide range of time scales extending beyond 100 ms neglected in typical silicon models of tonic spiking neurons. Circuit simulations and measurements show transition from tonic spiking to tonic bursting dynamics through variation of a single conductance parameter governing calcium recovery. We similarly demonstrate transition from graded to all-or-none neural excitability in the onset of spiking dynamics through the variation of channel kinetic parameters governing the speed of potassium activation. Other combinations of variations in conductance and channel kinetic parameters give rise to phasic spiking and spike frequency adaptation dynamics. The NeuroDyn chip consumes 1.29 mW and occupies 3 mm × 3 mm in 0.5 μm CMOS, supporting emerging developments in neuromorphic silicon-neuron interfaces.

  5. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BURST AND TRANSIENT SOURCE EXPERIMENT 5B CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.; Briggs, M. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Boynton, W.; Starr, R.; McNutt, R.; Boer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network localization information for 343 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) between the end of the 4th BATSE catalog and the end of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) mission, obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses, Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), and CGRO spacecraft. For any given burst observed by CGRO and one other spacecraft, arrival time analysis (or t riangulation ) results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between 11 arcsec and 21 0 , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the area of a factor of 20. When all three spacecraft observe a burst, the result is an error box whose area varies between 1 and 48,000 arcmin 2 , resulting in an average reduction of the BATSE error circle area of a factor of 87.

  6. AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION OF CORONAL TYPE II RADIO BURSTS: THE AUTOMATED RADIO BURST IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM METHOD AND FIRST OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobzin, Vasili V.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.; Steward, Graham; Patterson, Garth

    2010-01-01

    Major space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections are usually accompanied by solar radio bursts, which can potentially be used for real-time space weather forecasts. Type II radio bursts are produced near the local plasma frequency and its harmonic by fast electrons accelerated by a shock wave moving through the corona and solar wind with a typical speed of ∼1000 km s -1 . The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency gradually falling with time and durations of several minutes. This Letter presents a new method developed to detect type II coronal radio bursts automatically and describes its implementation in an extended Automated Radio Burst Identification System (ARBIS 2). Preliminary tests of the method with spectra obtained in 2002 show that the performance of the current implementation is quite high, ∼80%, while the probability of false positives is reasonably low, with one false positive per 100-200 hr for high solar activity and less than one false event per 10000 hr for low solar activity periods. The first automatically detected coronal type II radio burst is also presented.

  7. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic events in the Universe, but some appear curiously faint in visible light. The biggest study to date of these so-called dark gamma-ray bursts, using the GROND instrument on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla in Chile, has found that these gigantic explosions don't require exotic explanations. Their faintness is now fully explained by a combination of causes, the most important of which is the presence of dust between the Earth and the explosion. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), fleeting events that last from less than a second to several minutes, are detected by orbiting observatories that can pick up their high energy radiation. Thirteen years ago, however, astronomers discovered a longer-lasting stream of less energetic radiation coming from these violent outbursts, which can last for weeks or even years after the initial explosion. Astronomers call this the burst's afterglow. While all gamma-ray bursts [1] have afterglows that give off X-rays, only about half of them were found to give off visible light, with the rest remaining mysteriously dark. Some astronomers suspected that these dark afterglows could be examples of a whole new class of gamma-ray bursts, while others thought that they might all be at very great distances. Previous studies had suggested that obscuring dust between the burst and us might also explain why they were so dim. "Studying afterglows is vital to further our understanding of the objects that become gamma-ray bursts and what they tell us about star formation in the early Universe," says the study's lead author Jochen Greiner from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching bei München, Germany. NASA launched the Swift satellite at the end of 2004. From its orbit above the Earth's atmosphere it can detect gamma-ray bursts and immediately relay their positions to other observatories so that the afterglows could be studied. In the new study, astronomers combined Swift

  8. Mixed parentage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Appel, Helene; Singla, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increase in cross border intimate relationships and children of mixed parentage, there is little mention or scholarship about them in the area of childhood and migrancy in the Nordic countries. The international literature implies historical pathologisation, contestation and current...... of identity formation in the . They position themselves as having an “in-between” identity or “ just Danes” in their every day lives among friends, family, and during leisure activities. Thus a new paradigm is evolving away- from the pathologisation of mixed children, simplified one-sided categories...

  9. A Burst-Mode Photon-Counting Receiver with Automatic Channel Estimation and Bit Rate Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    Grein, M.E., Elgin, L.E., Robinson, B.S., Kachelmyer, A.L., Caplan , D.O., Stevens, M.L., Carney, J.J., Hamilton, S.A., and Boroson, D.M., “Demonstration...Robinson, B.S., Kerman, A.J., Dauler, E.A., Barron, R.J., Caplan , D.O., Stevens, M.L., Carney, J.J., Hamilton, S.A., Yang, J.K.W., and Berggren, K.K., “781...Mbit/s photon-counting optical communications using a superconducting nanowire detector,” Optics Letters, v. 31 no. 4 444-446 (2006). [14] Caplan

  10. The action of blocking agents applied to the inner face of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels from human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P M

    1998-09-15

    The actions of clotrimazole and cetiedil, two drugs known to inhibit the Gardos channel, have been studied on single intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels in inside out patches from human red blood cells, and compared with those of TEA and Ba2+ applied to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. TEA produced a fast block which was observed as a reduction in the amplitude of the single channel current. This effect was weakly voltage dependent with the fraction of the membrane potential sensed by TEA at its binding site (delta) of 0.18 and a Kd at 0 mV of 20.5 mM. Ba2+ was a very potent blocker of the channel, breaking the single channel activity up into bursts, inter-spersed with silent periods lasting several seconds. The effect of Ba2+ was very voltage sensitive, delta = 0.44, and a Kd at 0 mV of 0.15 microM. Clotrimazole applied to the inner face of the membrane at a concentration block resulting in bursts of channel activity separated by quiescent periods lasting many seconds. The effect of clotrimazole was mimicked by a quaternary derivative UCL 1559, in keeping with an action at the cytoplasmic face of the channel. A high concentration of cetiedil (100 microM) produced only a weak block of the channel. The kinetics of this action were very slow, with burst and inter-burst intervals lasting several minutes. While inhibition of the Gardos channel by cetiedil is unlikely to involve an intracellular site of action, if clotrimazole is able to penetrate the membrane, part of its effect may result from binding to an intracellular site on the channel.

  11. Citizens and service channels: channel choice and channel management implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterson, Willem Jan

    2010-01-01

    The arrival of electronic channels in the 1990s has had a huge impact on governmental service delivery. The new channels have led to many new opportunities to improve public service delivery, not only in terms of citizen satisfaction, but also in cost reduction for governmental agencies. However,

  12. Dust reddening and extinction curves toward gamma-ray bursts at z > 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmer, J.; Greiner, J.; Krühler, T.; Schady, P.; Ledoux, C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Levan, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Dust is known to be produced in the envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the expanded shells of supernova (SN) remnants, and in situ grain growth within the interstellar medium (ISM), although the corresponding efficiency of each of these dust formation mechanisms at different redshifts remains a topic of debate. During the first Gyr after the Big Bang, it is widely believed that there was not enough time to form AGB stars in high numbers, hence the dust at this epoch is expected to be purely from SNe or subsequent grain growth in the ISM. The time period corresponding to z 5-6 is thus expected to display the transition from SN-only dust to a mixture of both formation channels as is generally recognized at present. Aims: Here we aim to use afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts larger than z > 4 to derive host galaxy dust column densities along their line of sight and to test if a SN-type dust extinction curve is required for some of the bursts. Methods: We performed GRB afterglow observations with the seven-channel Gamma-Ray Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) at the 2.2 m MPI telescope in La Silla, Chile (ESO), and we combined these observations with quasi-simultaneous data gathered with the XRT telescope on board the Swift satellite. Results: We increase the number of measured AV values for GRBs at z > 4 by a factor of 2-3 and find that, in contrast to samples at mostly lower redshift, all of the GRB afterglows have a visual extinction of AV different scenarios. For the first time we also report a photometric redshift of zphot = 7.88-0.94+0.75 for GRB 100905A, making it one of the most distant GRBs known to date.

  13. Fermi/GBM Observations of SGRJ0501 + 4516 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGRJ0501+4516, detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the 13 days of the source activation in 2008 (August 22 to September 3). We find that the T(sub 90) durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T(sub 90)s estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two black body functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E(sub peak) decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of approx. 30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10(exp -6)erg/sq cm/s, increasing steadily afterwards. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550 - 5418 and 1806 - 20. The isotropic luminosity, L(sub iso), corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4 - l.5 x 10(exp 40) erg/s.

  14. Stress Effects on Stop Bursts in Five Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Tabain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effects of stress on the stop burst in five languages differing in number of places of articulation, as reflected in burst duration, spectral centre of gravity, and ­spectral standard deviation. The languages studied are English (three places of articulation /p t k/, the Indonesian language Makasar (four places /p t c k/, and the Central Australian languages ­Pitjantjatjara, Warlpiri (both five places /p t ʈ c k/, and Arrernte (six places /p t̪ t ʈ c k/. We find that languages differ in how they manifest stress on the consonant, with Makasar not ­showing any effect of stress at all, and Warlpiri showing an effect on burst duration, but not on the ­spectral measures. For the other languages, the velar /k/ has a “darker” quality (i.e., lower spectral centre of gravity, and/or a less diffuse spectrum (i.e., lower standard deviation under stress; while the alveolar /t/ has a “lighter” quality under stress. In addition, the dental /t̪/ has a more diffuse spectrum under stress. We suggest that this involves enhancement of the features [grave] and [diffuse] under stress, with velars being [+grave] and [–diffuse], alveolars being [–grave], and dentals being [+diffuse]. We discuss the various possible spectral effects of enhancement of these features. Finally, in the languages with five or six places of articulation, the stop burst is longer only for the palatal /c/ and the velar /k/, which have intrinsically long burst durations, and not for the anterior coronals /t̪ t ʈ/, which have intrinsically short burst durations. We suggest that in these systems, [burst duration] is a feature that separates these two groups of consonants.

  15. Arachidonic acid triggers an oxidative burst in leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompeia C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The change in cellular reducing potential, most likely reflecting an oxidative burst, was investigated in arachidonic acid- (AA stimulated leukocytes. The cells studied included the human leukemia cell lines HL-60 (undifferentiated and differentiated into macrophage-like and polymorphonuclear-like cells, Jurkat and Raji, and thymocytes and macrophages from rat primary cultures. The oxidative burst was assessed by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. AA increased the oxidative burst until an optimum AA concentration was reached and the burst decreased thereafter. In the leukemia cell lines, optimum concentration ranged from 200 to 400 µM (up to 16-fold, whereas in rat cells it varied from 10 to 20 µM. Initial rates of superoxide generation were high, decreasing steadily and ceasing about 2 h post-treatment. The continuous presence of AA was not needed to stimulate superoxide generation. It seems that the NADPH oxidase system participates in AA-stimulated superoxide production in these cells since the oxidative burst was stimulated by NADPH and inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, diphenyleneiodonium and superoxide dismutase. Some of the effects of AA on the oxidative burst may be due to its detergent action. There apparently was no contribution of other superoxide-generating systems such as xanthine-xanthine oxidase, cytochromes P-450 and mitochondrial electron transport chain, as assessed by the use of inhibitors. Eicosanoids and nitric oxide also do not seem to interfere with the AA-stimulated oxidative burst since there was no systematic effect of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase or nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, but lipid peroxides may play a role, as indicated by the inhibition of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction promoted by tocopherol.

  16. Observation of L-bursts of Jupiter decameter waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Kazumasa; Tomisawa, Ichiro

    1978-01-01

    The Jupiter decameter waves are the only information source which can be obtained on the earth for the investigation of dynamics concerning the generation of plasma waves in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. The emission of Jupiter decameter waves is modulated by the satellite Io considerably. It is observed that the emission of decameter waves fluctuated much in course of time. The duration time of bursts is 1 to 10 sec and 1 to 50 msec for L-bursts and S-bursts, respectively. The simultaneous observations were conducted at two locations from August, 1977, and at three locations from December, 1977, for searching the source of L-bursts. The relation between the appearance frequency of L-bursts and S-bursts and Io phase and system 3 longitude is explained. The observation points were Sugadaira, Chofu and Toyokawa, The minimum detectable flux density by the wave receiving network is 10 -21 W/m 2 .Hz. Concerning the observed results, the locations of observed events on the Io phase and the system 3 longitude are shown. The analytical results on the L-bursts of the main source and the early source are explained, taking ten events. The analysed dynamic cross-correlation and the spectrum analysis of the decameter intensity are shown. The relation between the origin and the emission mechanism was investigated, considering the observed data and the evaluation mentioned above for the main source and early source, and the clue was obtained to solve the riddle of emission mechanism. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  18. Lateral Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    negative (right panel c) and the kinetic energy dissipation is larger than that expected from meterological forcing alone (right panel a). This is...10.1002/grl.50919. Shcherbina, A. et al., 2014, The LatMix Summer Campaign: Submesoscale Stirring in the Upper Ocean., Bull. American Meterological

  19. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  20. Internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations

  1. Galactic distribution of X-ray burst sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, W.H.G.; Hoffman, J.A.; Doty, J.; Clark, G.W.; Swank, J.H.; Becker, R.H.; Pravdo, S.H.; Serlemitsos, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that 18 X-ray burst sources have been observed to date, applying the following definition for these bursts - rise times of less than a few seconds, durations of seconds to minutes, and recurrence in some regular pattern. If single burst events that meet the criteria of rise time and duration, but not recurrence are included, an additional seven sources can be added. A sky map is shown indicating their positions. The sources are spread along the galactic equator and cluster near low galactic longitudes, and their distribution is different from that of the observed globular clusters. Observations based on the SAS-3 X-ray observatory studies and the Goddard X-ray Spectroscopy Experiment on OSO-9 are described. The distribution of the sources is examined and the effect of uneven sky exposure on the observed distribution is evaluated. It has been suggested that the bursts are perhaps produced by remnants of disrupted globular clusters and specifically supermassive black holes. This would imply the existence of a new class of unknown objects, and at present is merely an ad hoc method of relating the burst sources to globular clusters. (U.K.)

  2. ARE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DIFFERENT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boër, M.; Gendre, B. [CNRS-ARTEMIS, Boulevard de l' Observatoire, CS 34229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Stratta, G., E-mail: michel.boer@unice.fr [Università degli Studi di Urbino Carlo Bo, I-61029 Urbino (Italy)

    2015-02-10

    The discovery of a number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with duration exceeding 1000 s has opened the debate on whether these bursts form a new class of sources, the so-called ultra-long GRBs, or if they are rather the tail of the distribution of the standard long GRB duration. Using the long GRB sample detected by Swift, we investigate the statistical properties of long GRBs and compare them with the ultra-long burst properties. We compute the burst duration of long GRBs using the start epoch of the so-called ''steep decay'' phase detected with Swift/XRT. We discuss also the differences observed in their spectral properties. We find that ultra-long GRBs are statistically different from the standard long GRBs with typical burst duration less than 100-500 s, for which a Wolf-Rayet star progenitor is usually invoked. Together with the presence of a thermal emission component we interpret this result as indication that the usual long GRB progenitor scenario cannot explain the extreme duration of ultra-long GRBs, their energetics, as well as the mass reservoir and size that can feed the central engine for such a long time.

  3. BALLERINA - Pirouettes in search of gamma burst sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Soeren; Lund, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has now been established with reasonable certainty. Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large variability in properties, which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are proposing BALLERINA, a small satellite to provide accurate gamma burst positions at a rate an order of magnitude larger than from Beppo-SAX. On the experimental side, it remains a challenge to ensure the earliest detection of the X-ray afterglow. The mission proposed here allows for the first time systematic studies of the soft X-ray emission in the time interval from only a few minutes after the onset of the burst to a few hours later. In addition to positions of GRBs with accuracy better than 1'reported to the ground within a few minutes of the burst, essential for follow-up work, BALLERINA will on its own provide observations in an uncharted region of parameter space. Secondary objectives of the BALLERINA mission includes observations of the earliest phases of the outbursts of X-ray novae and other X-ray transients. BALLERINA is one of four missions currently under study for the Danish Small Satellite Program. The selection will be announced in 1999 for a planned launch in 2002-2003

  4. Detection of gamma-ray bursts from Andromeda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulik, Tomasz; Coppi, Paolo S.; Lamb, Donald Q.

    1996-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts originate in a corona around the Milky Way, it should also be possible to detect them from a similar corona around Andromeda. Adopting a simple model of high velocity neutron star corona, we evaluate the ability of instruments on existing missions to detect an excess of bursts toward Andromeda. We also calculate the optimal properties of an instrument designed to detect such an excess. We find that if the bursts radiate isotropically, an experiment with a sampling distance d max > or approx. 500 kpc could detect a significant excess of bursts in the direction of Andromeda in a few years of observation. If the radiation is beamed along the neutron star's direction of motion, an experiment with d max > or approx. 800 kpc would detect such an excess in a similar amount of time, provided that the width of the beam is greater than 10 deg. Lack of an excess toward Andromeda would therefore be compelling evidence that the bursts are cosmological in origin if made by an instrument at least 50 times more sensitive than BATSE, given current constraints on Galactic corona models. Comparisons with detailed dynamical calculations of the spatial distribution of high velocity neutron stars in the coronae around the Milky Way and Andromeda confirm these conclusions

  5. Bursting oscillations, bifurcation and synchronization in neuronal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Haixia [School of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang Qingyun, E-mail: drwangqy@gmail.com [Department of Dynamics and Control, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu Qishao [Department of Dynamics and Control, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > We investigate bursting oscillations and related bifurcation in the modified Morris-Lecar neuron. > Two types of fast-slow bursters are analyzed in detail. > We show the properties of some crucial bifurcation points. > Synchronization transition and the neural excitability are explored in the coupled bursters. - Abstract: This paper investigates bursting oscillations and related bifurcation in the modified Morris-Lecar neuron. It is shown that for some appropriate parameters, the modified Morris-Lecar neuron can exhibit two types of fast-slow bursters, that is 'circle/fold cycle' bursting and 'subHopf/homoclinic' bursting with class 1 and class 2 neural excitability, which have different neuro-computational properties. By means of the analysis of fast-slow dynamics and phase plane, we explore bifurcation mechanisms associated with the two types of bursters. Furthermore, the properties of some crucial bifurcation points, which can determine the type of the burster, are studied by the stability and bifurcation theory. In addition, we investigate the influence of the coupling strength on synchronization transition and the neural excitability in two electrically coupled bursters with the same bursting type. More interestingly, the multi-time-scale synchronization transition phenomenon is found as the coupling strength varies.

  6. Frequency dependent characteristics of solar impulsive radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, T.K.; Das Gupta, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was made of the impulsive radio bursts observed in the frequency range 0.245 to 35 GHz. Important results obtained are: (i) Simple type 1 bursts with intensities 0 to 10 f.u. and simple type 2 bursts with intensities 10 to 500 f.u. are predominant in the frequency ranges 1.415 to 4.995 GHz and 4.995 to 8.8 GHz, respectively; (ii) With maxima around 2.7 GHz and 4 GHz for the first and second types respectively, the durations of the radio bursts decrease gradually both towards lower and higher frequencies; (iii) As regards occurrences, the first type dominates in the southern solar hemisphere peaking around 8.8 GHz, whereas the second type favours the north with no well-defined maximum in any frequency; (iv) Both types prefer the eastern hemisphere, the peak occurrences being around 8.8 GHz and 5 GHz for the two successive types, respectively; (c) The spectra of impulsive radio bursts are generally of the inverted U-type with the maximum emission intensity between 5 and 15 GHz. (author)

  7. Classifying LISA gravitational wave burst signals using Bayesian evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feroz, Farhan; Graff, Philip; Hobson, Michael P; Lasenby, Anthony; Gair, Jonathan R

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of characterization of burst sources detected by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) using the multi-modal nested sampling algorithm, MultiNest. We use MultiNest as a tool to search for modelled bursts from cosmic string cusps, and compute the Bayesian evidence associated with the cosmic string model. As an alternative burst model, we consider sine-Gaussian burst signals, and show how the evidence ratio can be used to choose between these two alternatives. We present results from an application of MultiNest to the last round of the Mock LISA Data Challenge, in which we were able to successfully detect and characterize all three of the cosmic string burst sources present in the release data set. We also present results of independent trials and show that MultiNest can detect cosmic string signals with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as low as ∼7 and sine-Gaussian signals with SNR as low as ∼8. In both cases, we show that the threshold at which the sources become detectable coincides with the SNR at which the evidence ratio begins to favour the correct model over the alternative.

  8. Ion burst event in the earth's dayside magnetosheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschalidis, N.P.; Krimigis, S.M.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Zanetti, L.J.; Sarris, E.T.; Christon, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    The MEPA instrument on the AMPTE/CCE Spacecraft provided ion angular distributions as rapidly as every 6 sec for H, He, and O at energies of 10 keV to 2 MeV in the dayside magnetosheath within 8.75 R E , the CCE apogee. In this report the authors discuss a burst of energetic particles in the subsolar magnetosheath and its association with rapid changes in the local magnetic field direction in such a way that the magnetic field connected the spacecraft to the magnetopause during the enhancement. They find that magnetosheath angular distributions outside the burst peaked at 90 degree pitch angles, whereas during the burst they exhibited field aligned streaming either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field combined with a clear earthward gradient. The clear earthward gradients at E ≥ 10 KeV, the streaming, and the slope change in the burst-time magnetosheath spectrum at ∼10 KeV suggest magnetospheric source for the burst-time ≥ 10 KeV ions and heated solar wind for E < 10 KeV

  9. Bursts generate a non-reducible spike-pattern code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo G Eyherabide

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available On the single-neuron level, precisely timed spikes can either constitute firing-rate codes or spike-pattern codes that utilize the relative timing between consecutive spikes. There has been little experimental support for the hypothesis that such temporal patterns contribute substantially to information transmission. Using grasshopper auditory receptors as a model system, we show that correlations between spikes can be used to represent behaviorally relevant stimuli. The correlations reflect the inner structure of the spike train: a succession of burst-like patterns. We demonstrate that bursts with different spike counts encode different stimulus features, such that about 20% of the transmitted information corresponds to discriminating between different features, and the remaining 80% is used to allocate these features in time. In this spike-pattern code, the "what" and the "when" of the stimuli are encoded in the duration of each burst and the time of burst onset, respectively. Given the ubiquity of burst firing, we expect similar findings also for other neural systems.

  10. Study on Monitoring Rock Burst through Drill Pipe Torque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method to identify the danger of rock burst from the response of drill pipe torque during drilling process to overcome many defects of the conventional volume of drilled coal rubble method. It is based on the relationship of rock burst with coal stress and coal strength. Through theoretic analysis, the change mechanism of drill pipe torque and the relationship of drill pipe torque with coal stress, coal strength, and drilling speed are investigated. In light of the analysis, a new device for testing drill pipe torque is developed and a series of experiments is performed under different conditions; the results show that drill pipe torque linearly increases with the increase of coal stress and coal strength; the faster the drilling speed, the larger the drill pipe torque, and vice versa. When monitoring rock burst by drill pipe torque method, the index of rock burst is regarded as a function in which coal stress index and coal strength index are principal variables. The results are important for the forecast of rock burst in coal mine.

  11. A Statistical Study of Interplanetary Type II Bursts: STEREO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Magdalenic, J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kruparova, O.; Szabo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the primary cause of the most severe and disruptive space weather events such as solar energetic particle (SEP) events and geomagnetic storms at Earth. Interplanetary type II bursts are generated via the plasma emission mechanism by energetic electrons accelerated at CME-driven shock waves and hence identify CMEs that potentially cause space weather impact. As CMEs propagate outward from the Sun, radio emissions are generated at progressively at lower frequencies corresponding to a decreasing ambient solar wind plasma density. We have performed a statistical study of 153 interplanetary type II bursts observed by the two STEREO spacecraft between March 2008 and August 2014. These events have been correlated with manually-identified CMEs contained in the Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service (HELCATS) catalogue. Our results confirm that faster CMEs are more likely to produce interplanetary type II radio bursts. We have compared observed frequency drifts with white-light observations to estimate angular deviations of type II burst propagation directions from radial. We have found that interplanetary type II bursts preferably arise from CME flanks. Finally, we discuss a visibility of radio emissions in relation to the CME propagation direction.

  12. Are There Multiple Populations of Fast Radio Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Divya; Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2018-02-01

    The repeating FRB 121102 (the “repeater”) shows repetitive bursting activities and was localized in a host galaxy at z = 0.193. On the other hand, despite dozens of hours of telescope time spent on follow-up observations, no other fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been observed to repeat. Yet, it has been speculated that the repeater is the prototype of FRBs, and that other FRBs should show similar repeating patterns. Using the published data, we compare the repeater with other FRBs in the observed time interval (Δt)–flux ratio (S i /S i+1) plane. We find that whereas other FRBs occupy the upper (large S i /S i+1) and right (large Δt) regions of the plane due to the non-detections of other bursts, some of the repeater bursts fall into the lower left region of the plot (short interval and small flux ratio) excluded by the non-detection data of other FRBs. The trend also exists even if one only selects those bursts detectable by the Parkes radio telescope. If other FRBs were similar to the repeater, our simulations suggest that the probability that none of them have been detected to repeat with the current searches would be ∼(10‑4–10‑3). We suggest that the repeater is not representative of the entire FRB population, and that there is strong evidence of more than one population of FRBs.

  13. The Musical Emotional Bursts: A validated set of musical affect bursts to investigate auditory affective processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien ePaquette

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB consist of 80 brief musical executions expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness and fear and neutrality. These musical bursts were designed to be the musical analogue of the Montreal Affective Voices (MAV – a set of brief non-verbal affective vocalizations portraying different basic emotions. The MEB consist of short (mean duration: 1.6 sec improvisations on a given emotion or of imitations of a given MAV stimulus, played on a violin (n:40 or a clarinet (n:40. The MEB arguably represent a primitive form of music emotional expression, just like the MAV represent a primitive form of vocal, nonlinguistic emotional expression. To create the MEB, stimuli were recorded from 10 violinists and 10 clarinetists, and then evaluated by 60 participants. Participants evaluated 240 stimuli (30 stimuli x 4 [3 emotions + neutral] x 2 instruments by performing either a forced-choice emotion categorization task, a valence rating task or an arousal rating task (20 subjects per task; 40 MAVs were also used in the same session with similar task instructions. Recognition accuracy of emotional categories expressed by the MEB (n:80 was lower than for the MAVs but still very high with an average percent correct recognition score of 80.4%. Highest recognition accuracies were obtained for happy clarinet (92.0% and fearful or sad violin (88.0% each MEB stimuli. The MEB can be used to compare the cerebral processing of emotional expressions in music and vocal communication, or used for testing affective perception in patients with communication problems.

  14. Revisiting the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yun-Wei, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  15. A search for fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palaniswamy, Divya; Wayth, Randall B.; Trott, Cathryn M.; Tingay, Steven J.; Reynolds, Cormac; McCallum, Jamie N.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of seven fast radio bursts (FRBs) has recently been reported. FRBs are short duration (∼1 ms), highly dispersed radio pulses from astronomical sources. The physical interpretation for the FRBs remains unclear but is thought to involve highly compact objects at cosmological distance. It has been suggested that a fraction of FRBs could be physically associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent radio observations of GRBs have reported the detection of two highly dispersed short duration radio pulses using a 12 m radio telescope at 1.4 GHz. Motivated by this result, we have performed a systematic and sensitive search for FRBs associated with GRBs. We have observed five GRBs at 2.3 GHz using a 26 m radio telescope located at the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory, Hobart. The radio telescope was automated to rapidly respond to Gamma-ray Coordination Network notifications from the Swift satellite and slew to the GRB position within ∼140 s. The data were searched for pulses up to 5000 pc cm –3 in dispersion measure and pulse widths ranging from 640 μs to 25.60 ms. We did not detect any events ≥6σ. An in depth statistical analysis of our data shows that events detected above 5σ are consistent with thermal noise fluctuations only. A joint analysis of our data with previous experiments shows that previously claimed detections of FRBs from GRBs are unlikely to be astrophysical. Our results are in line with the lack of consistency noted between the recently presented FRB event rates and GRB event rates.

  16. Revisiting the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yun-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  17. Laboratory Experiments on Meandering Meltwater Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, R.; Berens, J.; Parker, G.; Stark, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    Meandering channels of all scales and flowing over a wide variety of media have common planform patterns. Although the analogy in planform suggests there is a common underlying framework, the constitutive relations driving planform evolution through vertical incision/deposition and lateral migration differ from medium to medium. The driving processes in alluvial and mixed bedrock-alluvial meandering channels have been studied substantially over the last decades. However, this is not the case for meandering channels in other media such as ice or soluble rock. Here we present results from experiments conducted at the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on meltwater meandering channels. A rivulet is carved into an ice block and water is allowed to flow at a constant discharge. Planform evolution is analyzed with time lapse imaging and complemented with rubber molds of the channel once the experiment is over. These molds give us the full 3D structure of the meandering, including incisional overhang. Vertical incision rates are measured throughout the run by taking elevations along the channel, and these measurements are complemented with analysis from the molds. We show examples of meandering of intense amplitude with deep overhangs. Features resembling scroll bars document cyclically punctuated melting. We report on lateral migration rates, incision rates, sinuosity, channel depths, channel widths, reach averaged velocities, bend wavelengths and amplitudes and compare them to values reported in the literature for alluvial rivers.

  18. Gasdynamics of relativistically expanding gamma-ray burst sources - Kinematics, energetics, magnetic fields, and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, P.; Laguna, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    We calculate both analytically and numerically the evolution of highly relativistic fireballs through the stages of free expansion and coasting, and determine the dependence of the thermodynamic and radiation variables in the comoving and laboratory flames. The dynamics and the comoving geometry change at the (lab) expansion factors r/r(0) greater than eta and r/r(0) greater than eta-squared, respectively, where eta = E(0)/M(0)c-squared is the initial Lorentz factor. In the lab, the gas appears concentrated in a thin shell of width r(0) until r/r(0) of less than about eta-squared, and increases linearly after that. Magnetic fields may have been important in the original impulsive event. We discuss their effect on the fireball dynamics and also consider their effects on the radiation emitted when the fireball runs into an external medium and is decelerated. The inverse synchro-Compton mechanism can then yield high radiative efficiency in the reverse shock (and through turbulent instabilities and mixing also in the forward blast wave), producing a burst of nonthermal radiation mainly in the MeV to GeV range. The energy and duration depend on eta, the magnetic field strength, and the external density, and can match the range of properties observed in cosmic gamma-ray bursts.

  19. The development of a burst criterion for zircaloy fuel cladding under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neitzel, H.J.; Rossinger, H.E.

    1980-02-01

    A burst criterion model, which assumes that deformation is controlled by steady-state creep, has been developed for a thin-walled cladding, in this case Zircaloy-4, subjected to a differential pressure and high temperature. The creep equation is integrated to obtain a burst time at the singularity of the strain. Once the burst time is known, the burst temperature and burst pressure can be calculated from the known temperature and pressure histories. A further relationship between burst stress and burst temperature is used to calculate the burst strain. Comparison with measured burst data shows good agreement between theory and experiment was found that, if the heating rate is constant, the burst temperature increases with decreasing stress, and that, if the stress level is constant, the burst temperature increases with increasing heating rate. It was also found that anisotropy alters the burst temperature and burst strain, and that test conditions in the α-Zr temperature range have no influence on the burst data. (auth)

  20. Information transfer through quantum channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    all known coding theorems can be generalized from memoryless channels to forgetful memory channels. We also present examples for non-forgetful channels, and derive generic entropic upper bounds on their capacities for (private) classical and quantum information transfer. Ch. 7 provides a brief introduction to quantum information spectrum methods as a promising approach to coding theorems for completely general quantum sources and channels. We present a data compression theorem for general quantum sources and apply these results to ergodic as well as mixed sources. Finally we investigate the continuity of distillable entanglement - another key notion of the field, which characterizes the optimal asymptotic rate at which maximally entangled states can be generated from many copies of a less entangled state. We derive uniform norm bounds for all states with full support, and we extend some of these results to quantum channel capacities. (orig.)