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Sample records for channel photoacoustic microscopy

  1. Photoacoustic microscopy in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic tomography (PAT is an attractive modality for noninvasive, volumetric imaging of scattering media such as biological tissues. By choosing the ultrasonic detection frequency, PAT enables scalable spatial resolution with an imaging depth of up to ∼7 cm while maintaining a high depth-to-resolution ratio of ∼200 and consistent optical absorption contrasts. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM, the microscopic embodiment of PAT, aims to image at millimeter depth and micrometer-scale resolution. PAM is well-suited for characterizing three-dimensional scaffold-based samples, including scaffolds themselves, cells, and blood vessels, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Here we review our previous work on applications of PAM in tissue engineering and then discuss its future developments.

  2. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon, E-mail: hsh860504@gmail.com; Kim, Sehui, E-mail: sehui0916@nate.com; Kim, Jeehyun, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changho, E-mail: ch31037@postech.edu; Jeon, Mansik, E-mail: msjeon@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulhong, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14221 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  3. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  4. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of diabetic vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Arie; Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    We used functional photoacoustic microscopy to image diabetes-induced damage to the microvasculature. To produce an animal model for Type 1 diabetes, we used streptozotocin (STZ), which is particularly toxic to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in mammals. A set number of ND4 Swiss Webster mice received intraperitoneal injections of STZ for five consecutive days at 50 mg/kg. Most mice developed a significant rise in blood glucose level (~400 mg/dL) within three weeks of the first injection. Changes in vasculature and hemodynamics were monitored for six weeks. The mouse ear was imaged with an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope at a main blood vessel branch from the root of the ear. There are noticeable and measurable changes associated with the disease, including decreased vessel diameter and possible occlusion due to vessel damage and polyurea. We also observed an increase in the blood flow speed in the vein and a decrease in the artery, which could be due to compensation for the dehydration and vessel diameter changes. Functional and metabolic parameters such as hemoglobin oxygen saturation, oxygen extraction fraction, and oxygen consumption rate were also measured, but showed no significant change.

  5. Monitoring photodynamic therapy with photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Peng; Chapman, David W.; Moore, Ronald B.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on examining the feasibility of monitoring photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced vasculature change with acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Verteporfin, an FDA-approved photosensitizer for clinical PDT, was utilized. With a 60-μm-resolution PAM system, we demonstrated the capability of PAM to monitor PDT-induced vasculature variations in a chick chorioallantoic membrane model with topical application and in a rat ear with intravenous injection of the photosensitizer. We also showed oxygen saturation change in target blood vessels due to PDT. Success of the present approach may potentially lead to the application of PAM imaging in evaluating PDT efficacy, guiding treatment, and predicting responders from nonresponders.

  6. Photoacoustic microscopy by photodeformation applied to thermal diffusivity determination

    OpenAIRE

    Balageas, Daniel; Boscher, Daniel; Déom, Alain; Enguehard, Franck

    1991-01-01

    International audience In this paper, an original technique is proposed to measure the thermal diffusivity at local scale using a photoacoustic microscopy set-up. Several experimental results collected on thin metallic layers are presented.

  7. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Krumholz, Arie; VanVickle-Chavez, Sarah J.; Yao, Junjie; Fleming, Timothy P.; Gillanders, William E.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid modality based on optical absorption excitation and ultrasonic detection. It is sensitive to melanin, one of the primary absorbers in skin. For cells that do not naturally contain melanin, melanin production can be induced by introducing the gene for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy was used in the ex vivo study reported here, where the signal from transfe...

  8. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Arie; Vanvickle-Chavez, Sarah J.; Yao, Junjie; Fleming, Timothy P.; Gillanders, William E.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid modality based on optical absorption excitation and ultrasonic detection. It is sensitive to melanin, one of the primary absorbers in skin. For cells that do not naturally contain melanin, melanin production can be induced by introducing the gene for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy was used in the ex vivo study reported here, where the signal from transfected cells increased by more than 10 times over wild-type cells. A subsequent in vivo experiment was conducted to demonstrate the capability of photoacoustic microscopy to spectrally differentiate between tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin and various other absorbers in tissue.

  9. Introduction: Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X; Beard, P.C.; Georgakoudi, I.

    2010-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, “Advances in Optical Coherence Tomography, Photoacoustic Imaging, and Microscopy,” which combines three technical areas from the 2010 Optical Society of America (OSA), Biomedical Optics (BIOMED) Topical Meeting held on 11–14 April in Miami, Florida, and includes contributions from conference attendees.

  10. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies.

  11. Bessel beam Grueneisen photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction-free, provides a long focal depth, but its side-lobes may deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic signals in ORPAM. Here, we present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples.

  12. A novel fiber laser development for photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Seydi; Aytac-Kipergil, Esra; Arabul, Mustafa U.; Erkol, Hakan; Akcaalan, Onder; Eldeniz, Y. Burak; Ilday, F. Omer; Unlu, Mehmet B.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy, as an imaging modality, has shown promising results in imaging angiogenesis and cutaneous malignancies like melanoma, revealing systemic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, tracing drug efficiency and assessment of therapy, monitoring healing processes such as wound cicatrization, brain imaging and mapping. Clinically, photoacoustic microscopy is emerging as a capable diagnostic tool. Parameters of lasers used in photoacoustic microscopy, particularly, pulse duration, energy, pulse repetition frequency, and pulse-to-pulse stability affect signal amplitude and quality, data acquisition speed and indirectly, spatial resolution. Lasers used in photoacoustic microscopy are typically Q-switched lasers, low-power laser diodes, and recently, fiber lasers. Significantly, the key parameters cannot be adjusted independently of each other, whereas microvasculature and cellular imaging, e.g., have different requirements. Here, we report an integrated fiber laser system producing nanosecond pulses, covering the spectrum from 600 nm to 1100 nm, developed specifically for photoacoustic excitation. The system comprises of Yb-doped fiber oscillator and amplifier, an acousto-optic modulator and a photonic-crystal fiber to generate supercontinuum. Complete control over the pulse train, including generation of non-uniform pulse trains, is achieved via the AOM through custom-developed field-programmable gate-array electronics. The system is unique in that all the important parameters are adjustable: pulse duration in the range of 1-3 ns, pulse energy up to 10 μJ, repetition rate from 50 kHz to 3 MHz. Different photocoustic imaging probes can be excited with the ultrabroad spectrum. The entire system is fiber-integrated; guided-beam-propagation rendersit misalignment free and largely immune to mechanical perturbations. The laser is robust, low-cost and built using readily available components.

  13. Realtime Photoacoustic Microscopy of Murine Cardiovascular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    R.J. Zemp; Song, L; Bitton, R.; Shung, K. K.; Wang, L. V.

    2008-01-01

    Non-invasive visualization of cardiovascular dynamics in small animals is challenging due to their rapid heart-rates. We present a realtime photoacoustic imaging system consisting of a 30-MHz ultrasound array transducer, receive electronics, a high-repetition-rate laser, and a multicore-computer, and demonstrate its ability to image optically-absorbing structures of the beating hearts of young athymic nude mice at rates of ∼50 frames per second with 100 μm × 25 μm spatial resolution. To our k...

  14. Label-free oxygen-metabolic photoacoustic microscopy in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    Almost all diseases, especially cancer and diabetes, manifest abnormal oxygen metabolism. Accurately measuring the metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2) can be helpful for fundamental pathophysiological studies, and even early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Current techniques either lack high resolution or rely on exogenous contrast. Here, we propose label-free metabolic photoacoustic microscopy (mPAM) with small vessel resolution to noninvasively quantify MRO2in vivo in absolute units. mPAM i...

  15. Characterization of seeds with different moisture content by photoacoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoacoustic (PA) technique has important applications for material characterization and nondestructive evaluation of opaque solid materials. PA microscopy allows the acquisition of information of samples with inhomogeneous structures as agricultural seeds. A determining factor for seed safe storage is their moisture content. Seeds stored at high moisture content exhibit increased respiration, heating, and fungal invasion resulting in poor seed vigor and viability. Low moisture content, in the seed to be stored, is the best prevention for these problems. In this study, Photoacoustic Microscopy (PAM) was used to characterize seeds with different moisture content. In the PAM experimental setup the photoacoustic cell and its sensor, an electret microphone, are mounted on an x-y stage of mobile axes, with spatial resolution of 70 μm. The excitation light source is a fiber coupled laser diode, at 650 nm wavelength, modulated in intensity at 1 Hz of frequency, by the reference oscillator of a lock-in amplifier. By using a microscope objective the laser beam was focused on the seed surface. The resolution was enough to obtain differences in the obtained images, which are dependent on the moisture content. This method, to study differences in the seed moisture content, is nondestructive and could be useful for a sustainable Agriculture.

  16. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Shi, Junhui; Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) can achieve submicron lateral resolution by tightly focusing the excitation light, while the axial resolution is still limited by the frequency bandwidth of the ultrasonic transducer. The Grueneisen relaxation effect, in which the Grueneisen parameter changes within the thermal relaxation time following a laser impulse heating, can provide excellent axial resolution due to its optical sectioning property. Based on this effect, Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM) was developed and demonstrated ex vivo. Here, we present for the first time in vivo imaging of mouse brains with improved axial resolution based on GR-PAM. An intensity-modulated continuous-wave (CW) 532 nm laser thermally heated the in-focus absorber. Another 532 nm pulsed laser, which is aligned confocally with the CW laser, generated the photoacoustic (PA) signal from the absorber. The difference between the amplitudes of the photoacoustic signals with and without heating was used for image reconstruction. The achieved axial resolution is ~12.5 µm, which is fivefold better than the acoustically determined value for a 20 MHz-bandwidth ultrasound transducer. The system was demonstrated by imaging a blood-filled tube ex vivo and blood vessels of mouse brains in vivo. The blood-filled tube diameter obtained from the PA image by GR-PAM is 105 µm, which is much closer to its actual diameter (100 µm) than the value from conventional OR-PAM (160 µm). This axial resolution improvement was further validated in imaging mouse brains in vivo, and yielded significantly narrower axial profiles of the vessels. This in vivo demonstration of imaging by GR-PAM might inspire more applications in PA biomedical imaging and sensing.

  17. Acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy imaging of single leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    An acoustic/photoacoustic microscope was used to create micrometer resolution images of stained cells from a blood smear. Pulse echo ultrasound images were made using a 1000 MHz transducer with 1 μm resolution. Photoacoustic images were made using a fiber coupled 532 nm laser, where energy losses through stimulated Raman scattering enabled output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm. The laser was focused onto the sample using a 20x objective, and the laser spot co-aligned with the 1000 MHz transducer opposite the laser. The blood smear was stained with Wright-Giemsa, a common metachromatic dye that differentially stains the cellular components for visual identification. A neutrophil, lymphocyte and a monocyte were imaged using acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy at two different wavelengths, 532 nm and 600 nm. Unique features in each imaging modality enabled identification of the different cell types. This imaging method provides a new way of imaging stained leukocytes, with applications towards identifying and differentiating cell types, and detecting disease at the single cell level.

  18. Photoacoustic microscopy for quantitative evaluation of angiogenesis inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Burnett, Joseph; Sun, Duxin; Xie, Zhixing; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    We present the photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for evaluation of angiogenesis inhibitors on a chick embryo model. Microvasculature in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick embryos was imaged by PAM, and the optical microscopy (OM) images of the same set of CAMs were also acquired for comparisons, serving for validation of the results from PAM. The angiogenesis inhibitors, Sunitinib, with different concentrations applied to the CAM result in the change in microvascular density, which was quantified by both PAM and OM imaging. Similar change in microvascular density from PAM and OM imaging in response to angiogenesis inhibitor at different doses was observed, demonstrating that PAM has potential to provide objective evaluation of anti-angiogenesis medication. Besides, PAM is advantageous in three-dimensional and functional imaging compared with OM so that the emerging PAM technique may offer unique information on the efficacy of angiogenesis inhibitors and could benefit applications related to antiangiogenesis treatments.

  19. Label-free oxygen-metabolic photoacoustic microscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-07-01

    Almost all diseases, especially cancer and diabetes, manifest abnormal oxygen metabolism. Accurately measuring the metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2) can be helpful for fundamental pathophysiological studies, and even early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Current techniques either lack high resolution or rely on exogenous contrast. Here, we propose label-free metabolic photoacoustic microscopy (mPAM) with small vessel resolution to noninvasively quantify MRO2 in vivo in absolute units. mPAM is the unique modality for simultaneously imaging all five anatomical, chemical, and fluid-dynamic parameters required for such quantification: tissue volume, vessel cross-section, concentration of hemoglobin, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and blood flow speed. Hyperthermia, cryotherapy, melanoma, and glioblastoma were longitudinally imaged in vivo. Counterintuitively, increased MRO2 does not necessarily cause hypoxia or increase oxygen extraction. In fact, early-stage cancer was found to be hyperoxic despite hypermetabolism.

  20. Thermal Images of Seeds Obtained at Different Depths by Photoacoustic Microscopy (PAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Cruz-Orea, A.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to obtain thermal images of a broccoli seed ( Brassica oleracea) by photoacoustic microscopy, at different modulation frequencies of the incident light beam ((0.5, 1, 5, and 20) Hz). The thermal images obtained in the amplitude of the photoacoustic signal vary with each applied frequency. In the lowest light frequency modulation, there is greater thermal wave penetration in the sample. Likewise, the photoacoustic signal is modified according to the structural characteristics of the sample and the modulation frequency of the incident light. Different structural components could be seen by photothermal techniques, as shown in the present study.

  1. In vivo sub-femtoliter resolution photoacoustic microscopy with higher frame rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Szu-Yu; Lai, Yu-Hung; Huang, Kai-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-10-01

    Microscopy based on non-fluorescent absorption dye staining is widely used in various fields of biomedicine for 400 years. Unlike its fluorescent counterpart, non-fluorescent absorption microscopy lacks proper methodologies to realize its in vivo applications with a sub-femtoliter 3D resolution. Regardless of the most advanced high-resolution photoacoustic microscopy, sub-femtoliter spatial resolution is still unattainable, and the imaging speed is relatively slow. In this paper, based on the two-photon photoacoustic mechanism, we demonstrated a in vivo label free laser-scanning photoacoustic imaging modality featuring high frame rates and sub-femtoliter 3D resolution simultaneously, which stands as a perfect solution to 3D high resolution non-fluorescent absorption microscopy. Furthermore, we first demonstrated in vivo label-free two-photon acoustic microscopy on the observation of non-fluorescent melanin distribution within mouse skin.

  2. Noninvasive, in vivo imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Erich W.; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive, high resolution imaging of mouse brain activity is poised to provide clinically translatable insights into human neurological disease progression. Toward noninvasive imaging of brain activity through the hemodynamic response, the dark-field photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) technique was enhanced to image the cortex vasculature of the mouse brain in vivo using endogenous hemoglobin contrast. Specifically, the PAM system was redesigned to efficiently collect photoacoustic waves origi...

  3. Engineering Dark Chromoprotein Reporters for Photoacoustic Microscopy and FRET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Wu, Jiahui; Shao, Peng; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2016-03-01

    A subset of the family of fluorescent proteins are the non-fluorescent chromoproteins which are promising probe molecules for use in photoacoustic imaging and as acceptor chromophores in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors. Typical approaches for fluorescent protein optimization by screening of large libraries of variants cannot be effectively applied to chromoproteins due to their characteristic lack of fluorescence. To address this challenge, we have developed a directed evolution method to iteratively screen large libraries of protein variants on the basis of their photoacoustic signal levels. By applying this procedure to the promising Ultramarine and cjBlue chromoprotein templates, we were able to identify improved variants with a 02-04 fold increase in photoacoustic signal-to-noise ratio after only a few evolutionary steps. These improved variants enable more accurate spectral de-mixing and localization of protein-producing bacteria in vivo and serve as effective FRET acceptors for both fluorescence- and photoacoustic-based detection of protease activity.

  4. Photo-imprint super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Combining the absorption-based photoacoustic effect and intensity-dependent photobleaching effect, we demonstrate a simple method for super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples. Our method is based on a double-excitation process, where the first excitation pulse partially and inhomogeneously bleaches the molecules in the diffraction-limited excitation volume, thus biasing the signal contributions from a second excitation pulse striking the same region. By scanning the excitation beam, we performed three-dimensional sub-diffraction imaging of varied fluorescent and non-fluorescent species. A lateral resolution of 80 nm and an axial resolution of 370 nm have been demonstrated. This technique has the potential to enable label-free super-resolution imaging, and can be transferred to other optical imaging modalities or combined with other super-resolution methods.

  5. Characterizing intestinal strictures with acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hao; Xu, Guan; Liu, Shengchun; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease, which may cause obstructing intestinal strictures due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Identifying the different stages of the disease progression is still challenging. In this work, we indicated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI), utilizing the uniquely optical absorption of hemoglobin and collagen. Surgically removed human intestinal stricture specimens were investigated with a prototype PAI system. 2D PA images with acoustic resolution at wavelength 532, 1210 and 1310 nm were formulated, and furthermore, the PA histochemical components images which show the microscopic distributions of histochemical components were solved. Imaging experiments on surgically removed human intestinal specimens has demonstrated the solved PA images were significantly different associated with the presence of fibrosis, which could be applied to characterize the intestinal strictures for given specimens.

  6. Towards ultrahigh resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain using photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Ali; Bely, Nicholas; Chen, Chen; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing high-resolution functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing both mechanical and optical scanning in the photoacoustic microscopy, we can image spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images is going to be acquired noninvasively with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. We developed an optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) with diode laser. Laser light was raster scanned due to XY-stage movement. Images from ultra-high OR-PAM can then be used to study brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy.

  7. In vivo photoacoustic microscopy of human cutaneous microvasculature and a nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Jassim, Omar; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    In several human volunteers, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has been utilized for noninvasive cutaneous imaging of the skin microvasculature and a melanocytic nevus. Microvascular networks in both acral and nonacral skin were imaged, and multiple features within the skin have been identified, including the stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal junction, and subpapillary vascular plexus. Several vascular and structural differences between acral and nonacral skin were also observed in the photoacoustic images. In addition, a nevus was photoacoustically imaged, excised, and histologically analyzed. The photoacoustic images allowed for in vivo measurement of tumor thickness, depth, and microvasculature-values confirmed by histologic examination. The presented images demonstrate the potential of PAM to aid in the study and evaluation of cutaneous microcirculation and analysis of pigmented lesions. Through its ability to three-dimensionally image the structure and function of the microvasculature and pigmented lesions, PAM can have a clinical impact in diagnosis and assessment of systemic diseases that affect the microvasculature such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, cutaneous malignancies such as melanoma, and potentially other skin disorders.

  8. In vivo photoacoustic microscopy of human cutaneous microvasculature and a nevus

    OpenAIRE

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Jassim, Omar; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    In several human volunteers, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has been utilized for noninvasive cutaneous imaging of the skin microvasculature and a melanocytic nevus. Microvascular networks in both acral and nonacral skin were imaged, and multiple features within the skin have been identified, including the stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal junction, and subpapillary vascular plexus. Several vascular and structural differences between acral and nonacral skin were also observed in the photoacou...

  9. In vivo functional chronic imaging of a small animal model using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has been validated as a valuable tool for label-free volumetric microvascular imaging. More importantly, the advantages of noninvasiveness and measurement consistency suggest the use of OR-PAM for chronic imaging of intact microcirculation. Here, such chronic imaging is demonstrated for the first time by monitoring the healing process of laser-induced microvascular lesions in a small animal model in vivo. The central part of a 1 mm by 1 mm ...

  10. High-speed label-free functional photoacoustic microscopy of mouse brain in action

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    We present fast functional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for three-dimensional high-resolution, high-speed imaging of the mouse brain, complementary to other imaging modalities. We implemented a single-wavelength pulse-width-based method with a one-dimensional imaging rate of 100 kHz to image blood oxygenation with capillary-level resolution. We applied PAM to image the vascular morphology, blood oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen metabolism in both resting and stimulated states in the mouse...

  11. High energy supercontinuum sources using tapered photonic crystal fibers for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondu, Magalie; Brooks, Christopher; Jakobsen, Christian; Oakes, Keith; Moselund, Peter Morten; Leick, Lasse; Bang, Ole; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a record bandwidth high energy supercontinuum source suitable for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy. The source has more than 150 nJ/10 nm bandwidth over a spectral range of 500 to 1600 nm. This performance is achieved using a carefully designed fiber taper with large-core input for improved power handling and small-core output that provides the desired spectral range of the supercontinuum source.

  12. High energy supercontinuum sources using tapered photonic crystal fibers for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondu, Magalie; Brooks, Christopher; Jakobsen, Christian; Oakes, Keith; Moselund, Peter Morten; Leick, Lasse; Bang, Ole; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a record bandwidth high energy supercontinuum source suitable for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy. The source has more than 150  nJ/10  nm bandwidth over a spectral range of 500 to 1600 nm. This performance is achieved using a carefully designed fiber taper with large-core input for improved power handling and small-core output that provides the desired spectral range of the supercontinuum source. PMID:26836298

  13. Realtime photoacoustic microscopy in vivo with a 30-MHz ultrasound array transducer

    OpenAIRE

    Zemp, Roger J.; Song, Liang; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel high-frequency photoacoustic microscopy system capable of imaging the microvasculature of living subjects in realtime to depths of a few mm. The system consists of a high-repetition-rate Q-switched pump laser, a tunable dye laser, a 30-MHz linear ultrasound array transducer, a multichannel high-frequency data acquisition system, and a shared-RAM multi-core-processor computer. Data acquisition, beamforming, scan conversion, and display are implemented in realtime at 50 frame...

  14. Delay-multiply-and-sum-based synthetic aperture focusing in photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongin; Jeon, Seungwan; Meng, Jing; Song, Liang; Lee, Jin S.; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We propose an improved version of a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) based on a delay-multiply-and-sum algorithm for acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM). In this method, the photoacoustic (PA) signals from multiple scan-lines are combinatorially coupled, multiplied, and then summed. This process can be considered a correlation operation of the PA signals in each scan-line, so the spatial coherent information between the PA signals can be efficiently extracted. By applying this method in conventional AR-PAM, lateral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in out-of-focus regions are much improved compared with those estimated from the previously developed SAFT, respectively, thereby achieving the extension of the imaging focal region. Our phantom and in vivo imaging experiments prove the validity of our proposed method.

  15. Bessel-beam Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-11-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction free, provides a long focal depth, but its side lobes deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic (PA) signals in OR-PAM. We present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in PA imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples. PMID:26524679

  16. Delay-multiply-and-sum-based synthetic aperture focusing in photoacoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongin; Jeon, Seungwan; Meng, Jing; Song, Liang; Lee, Jin S; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We propose an improved version of a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) based on a delay-multiply-and-sum algorithm for acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM). In this method, the photoacoustic (PA) signals from multiple scan-lines are combinatorially coupled, multiplied, and then summed. This process can be considered a correlation operation of the PA signals in each scan-line, so the spatial coherent information between the PA signals can be efficiently extracted. By applying this method in conventional AR-PAM, lateral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in out-of-focus regions are much improved compared with those estimated from the previously developed SAFT, respectively, thereby achieving the extension of the imaging focal region. Our phantom and in vivo imaging experiments prove the validity of our proposed method. PMID:27020602

  17. Photoacoustic microscopy of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-02-01

    Assessments of vascularity are important when assessing inflammation changes in tendon injuries since Achilles tendinitis is often accompanied with neovascularization or hypervascularity. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging in noninvasive monitoring of morphological and vascular changes in Achilles tendon injuries. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis model of mice was adopted here. During collagenase-induced tendinitis, a 25-MHz photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to image micro-vascular changes in Achilles tendons longitudinally up to 23 days. The positions of vessels imaged by PAM were identified by co-registration of PAM Bmode images with 25-MHz ultrasound (USM) ones. Morphological changes in Achilles tendons due to inflammation and edema were revealed by the PAM and USM images. Proliferation of new blood vessels within the tendons was also observed. Observed micro-vascular changes during tendinitis were similar to the findings in the literatures. This study demonstrates that photoacoustic imaging, owning required sensitivity and penetration, has the potential for high sensitive diagnosis and assessment of treatment performance in tendinopathy.

  18. Novel fibre lasers as excitation sources for photoacoustic tomography and microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T. J.; Berendt, M. O.; Spurrell, J.; Alam, S. U.; Zhang, E. Z.; Richardson, D. J.; Beard, P. C.

    2016-03-01

    Two custom fibre lasers have been developed. One is designed for widefield photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and uses a custom drawn large core diameter fibre (100μm) to provide high pulse energies (5mJ). It also provides a variable pulse repetition frequency (100Hz-400Hz) and pulse duration (10-150ns) and is compact (of comparable dimensions to a desktop PC) and does not require external water cooling. This system was used to acquire in vivo images of the subcutaneous microvasculature in the human palm. The second laser is designed for Optical Resolution Photoacoustic Microscopy (OR-PAM) and provides a high quality beam (M21μJ with a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) up to 2MHz, and a 532nm emission wavelength. The high PRF of this laser was exploited for ultra-fast image acquisition. The compact size and enhanced functionality of these lasers offers a major opportunity to facilitate the translation of photoacoustic imaging to practical applications in medicine and biology.

  19. High-speed Label-free Functional Photoacoustic Microscopy of Mouse Brain in Action

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    We present fast functional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which is capable of three-dimensional high-resolution high-speed imaging of the mouse brain, complementary to other imaging modalities. A single-wavelength pulse-width-based method was implemented to image blood oxygenation with capillary-level resolution and a one-dimensional imaging rate of 100 kHz. We applied PAM to image the vascular morphology, blood oxygenation, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in the brain in both resting and ...

  20. High energy supercontinuum sources using tapered photonic crystal fibers for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondu, Magalie; Brooks, Christopher; Jakobsen, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a record bandwidth high energy supercontinuum source suitable for multispectral photoacoustic microscopy. The source has more than 150  nJ/10  nm150  nJ/10  nm bandwidth over a spectral range of 500 to 1600 nm. This performance is achieved using a carefully designed fiber taper with...... large-core input for improved power handling and small-core output that provides the desired spectral range of the supercontinuum source....

  1. DMD-based random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinyang; Zhou, Yong; Winkler, Amy W.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The scanning mechanism is a major technical focus in optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Flexible scanning access with fast scanning speed is desired to monitor biological and physiological dynamics with high temporal resolution. We developed random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (RA-OR-PAM) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). Each micromirror on the DMD can be independently controlled, allowing imaging of regions of interest with arbitrary user-selected shapes without extraneous information. A global structural image is first acquired, and the regions of interest are selected. The laser beam then scans these regions exclusively, resulting in a faster frame rate than in a conventional raster scan. This system can rapidly scan arbitrarily shaped regions of interest with a lateral resolution of 3.6 μm within a 40×40 μm2 imaging area, a size comparable to the focal spot size of a 50 MHz ultrasound transducer. We demonstrated the random-access ability of RA-OR-PAM by imaging a monolayer of red blood cells. This system was then used to monitor blood flow in vivo within user-selected capillaries in a mouse ear. By imaging only the capillary of interest, the frame rate was increased by up to 13.3 times.

  2. Functional connectivity in the mouse brain imaged by B-mode photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we imaged spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images were acquired noninvasively in B-scan mode with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. At a location relative to the bregma 0, correlations were investigated inter-hemispherically between bilaterally homologous regions, as well as intra-hemispherically within the same functional regions. The functional connectivity in different functional regions was studied. The locations of these regions agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. The functional connectivity map obtained in this study can then be used in the investigation of brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy. Our experiments show that photoacoustic microscopy is capable to detect connectivities between different functional regions in B-scan mode, promising a powerful functional imaging modality for future brain research.

  3. Real-time Near-infrared Virtual Intraoperative Surgical Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed a near infrared (NIR virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy (NIR-VISPAM system that combines a conventional surgical microscope and an NIR light photoacoustic microscopy (PAM system. NIR-VISPAM can simultaneously visualize PA B-scan images at a maximum display rate of 45 Hz and display enlarged microscopic images on a surgeon's view plane through the ocular lenses of the surgical microscope as augmented reality. The use of the invisible NIR light eliminated the disturbance to the surgeon's vision caused by the visible PAM excitation laser in a previous report. Further, the maximum permissible laser pulse energy at this wavelength is approximately 5 times more than that at the visible spectral range. The use of a needle-type ultrasound transducer without any water bath for acoustic coupling can enhance convenience in an intraoperative environment. We successfully guided needle and injected carbon particles in biological tissues ex vivo and in melanoma-bearing mice in vivo.

  4. Fully integrated reflection-mode photoacoustic/two-photon microscopy in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liang; Song, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Using a water-immersion optical objective in conjunction with a miniature 40-MHz ultrasonic transducer, we developed reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy with a transverse resolution as high as 320 nm. Here, we further integrated two-photon microscopy capability into the system to enable multimodality in vivo biomedical imaging at submicron resolution. As a result, the system is capable of tri-modality label-free imaging of microvasculature, collagen, and cell morphology, based on the contrast of optical absorption, second-harmonic generation, and autofluorescence, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated simultaneous microscopic imaging of neuron and microvasculature in the brain cortex of a living mouse, which may offer new opportunities for studying the mechanisms of neurovascular coupling.

  5. Blood oxygen flux estimation with a combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy system: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, an important indicator of tissue metabolism, can be expressed as the change of net blood oxygen flux into and out of a tissue region per 100 g of tissue. In this work, we propose a photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound method for imaging local blood oxygen flux of a single vessel. An imaging system for combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy is presented. This system uses a swept-scan 25-MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Since the mean flow speed can be measured by color Doppler ultrasound, the vessel cross-sectional area can be measured by power Doppler or structural photoacoustic imaging, and multi-wavelength photoacoustic methods can be used to estimate oxygen saturation (sO2) and total concentration of haemoglobin (CHb), all of the parameters necessary for oxygen flux estimation can be provided. The accuracy of the flow speed and sO2 estimation has been investigated. In vitro sheep blood phantom experiments have been performed at different sO2 levels and mean flow speeds. Blood oxygen flux has been estimated, and the uncertainty of the measurement has been quantified.

  6. Noninvasive quantification of metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2) by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Many diseases, normal decay and physiological functions are closely related to alterations in the metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2). In this study, we demonstrate that all the parameters for MRO2 quantification can be simultaneously obtained by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). MRO2 of the mouse ear under normothermia (31 °C skin temperature) and controlled systematic hyperthermia (42 °C skin temperature) was studied. As a result of hyperthermia, the MRO2 increased by 34.1%. The tumor hypermetabolism was also demonstrated by longitudinally monitoring a melanoma growing on a mouse ear. The results show that OR-PAM, as a single noninvasive imaging modality, is well suited for quantitative MRO2 measurement in microenvironments.

  7. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy based on plasmonic detection of broadband ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianxiong; Cao, Rui; Ning, Bo; Dixon, Adam J.; Hossack, John A.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Zhou, Qifa; Wang, Anbo; Hu, Song

    2015-10-01

    We report on an implementation of all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which capitalizes on the effect of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for optical detection of ultrasound. The SPR sensor in our all-optical PAM shows, experimentally, a linear response to the acoustic pressure from 5.2 kPa to 2.1 MPa, an ultra-flat frequency response (±0.7 dB) from 680 kHz to 126 MHz, and a noise-equivalent pressure sensitivity of 3.3 kPa. With the broadband ultrasonic detection, our SPR-PAM has achieved high spatial resolution with relatively low anisotropy (i.e., 2.0 μm laterally and 8.4 μm axially). Three-dimensional high-resolution imaging of a single melanoma cell is demonstrated.

  8. Submicron-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of endogenous light-absorbing biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi

    Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine has the unique advantage of probing endogenous light absorbers at various length scales with a 100% relative sensitivity. Among the several modalities of photoacoustic imaging, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) can achieve high spatial resolution, on the order of optical wavelength, at high spatial resolution in 3D. The lateral resolution was improved by using optical objectives with high numerical apertures for optical focusing. The axial resolution was improved by using broadband ultrasonic transducers for ultrasound detection. We achieved 220 nm lateral resolution in transmission mode, 0.43 microm lateral resolution in reflection mode, 7.6 microm axial resolution in normal tissue, and 5.8 microm axial resolution with silicone oil immersion/injection. The achieved lateral resolution and axial resolution were the finest reported at the time. With high-resolution in 3D, PAM was demonstrated to resolve cellular and subcellular structures in vivo, such as red blood cells and melanosomes in melanoma cells. Compared with previous PAM systems, our high-resolution PAM could resolve capillaries in mouse ears more clearly. As an example application, we demonstrated intracellular temperature imaging, assisted by fluorescence signal detection, with sub-degree temperature resolution and sub-micron lateral resolution. The second part of this dissertation describes the exploration of endogenous light-absorbing biomolecules for PAM. We demonstrated cytochromes and myoglobin as new absorption contrasts for PAM and identified the corresponding optimal wavelengths for imaging. Fixed fibroblasts on slides and mouse ear sections were imaged by PAM at 422 nm and 250 nm wavelengths to reveal cytoplasms and nuclei, respectively, as confirmed by standard hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology. By imaging a blood-perfused mouse heart at 532 nm down to 150 microm in depth, we derived the myocardial sheet thickness and the cleavage

  9. Label-free imaging of gold nanoparticles in single live cells by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Qian, Wei; Shao, Xia; Xie, Zhixing; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Shengchun; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Bing; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored as a model nanostructure in nanomedicine and have been widely used to provide advanced biomedical research tools in diagnostic imaging and therapy. Due to the necessity of targeting AuNPs to individual cells, evaluation and visualization of AuNPs in the cellular level is critical to fully understand their interaction with cellular environment. Currently imaging technologies, such as fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy all have advantages and disadvantages. In this paper, we synthesized AuNPs by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation, modified their surface chemistry through sequential bioconjugation, and targeted the functionalized AuNPs with individual cancer cells. Based on their high optical absorption contrast, we developed a novel, label-free imaging method to evaluate and visualize intracellular AuNPs using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Preliminary study shows that the PAM imaging technique is capable of imaging cellular uptake of AuNPs in vivo at single-cell resolution, which provide an important tool for the study of AuNPs in nanomedicine.

  10. Continuous, high-speed, volumetric photoacoustic microscopy via a field programmable gate array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Scott P.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Maxson, Ryan T.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to collect data in real time is important in all biological imaging modalities that aim to image dynamic processes. Photoacoustic Microscopy (PAM) is a rapidly growing biomedical imaging technique that is often used to image microvasculature and melanoma, and is capable of fully rendering three-dimensional images. However, due to the bi-polar nature of the PAM signal, post processing through demodulation is required to accurately display morphological data. Typically, demodulation requires post processing of the data, limiting its use in real-time applications. This results in many PAM systems displaying data through maximum amplitude projection (MAP) images, completely ignoring the axial dimension of their scans and throwing away useful data. We overcome this processing limit by utilizing a configurable integrated circuit known as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The FPGA allows us to perform quadrature demodulation of the photoacoustic signal as it is being collected. The result is a PAM system capable of producing continuous, morphologically accurate B-scans and volumes at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the laser. This allows us to generate accurately rendered volumes at the same speed as MAP images. With a 100 KHz actively q-switched laser we are able to generate 200 by 200 pixel b-scans at a rate of 500 Hz. The imaging potential of the system has been demonstrated in volumes of human hair phantoms and chick embryo vasculature. This system is capable of 50 x 50 x 50 volume stacks processed and displayed at better than video rate.

  11. Optical coherence photoacoustic microscopy (OC-PAM) with an intensity-modulated continuous-wave broadband light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Wen, Rong; Li, Yiwen; Jiao, Shuliang

    2016-06-01

    We developed an optical coherence photoacoustic microscopy system using an intensity-modulated continuous-wave superluminescent diode with a center wavelength of 840 nm. The system can accomplish optical coherence tomography (OCT) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) simultaneously. Compared to the system with a pulsed light source, this system is able to achieve OCT imaging with quality as high as conventional spectral-domain OCT. Since both of the OCT and PAM images are generated from the same group of photons, they are intrinsically registered in the lateral directions. The system was tested for multimodal imaging the vasculature of mouse ear in vivo by using gold nanorods as contrast agent for PAM, as well as excised porcine eyes ex vivo. The OCT and PAM images showed complimentary information of the sample.

  12. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a Blu-ray DVD pickup head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Lin; Wang, Po-Hsun

    2014-03-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has been shown as a promising tool for label-free microvascular and single-cell imaging in clinical and bioscientific applications. However, most OR-PAM systems are realized by using a bulky laser for photoacoustic excitation. The large volume and high price of the laser may restrain the popularity of OR-PAM. In this study, we attempt to develop a compact, portable, and low cost OR-PAM based on a consumer Blu-ray (405 nm) DVD pickup head for label-free micro-vascular imaging and red-blood-cell related blood examination. According to the high optical absorption of the hemoglobin at 405 nm, the proposed OR-PAM has potential to be an alternative for the conventional optical microscopy in the examinations of hematological morphology for blood routine. We showed that the Blu-ray DVD pickup head owns the required laser energy and focusing optics for OR-PAM. The firmware of a Blu-ray DVD drive was modified to allow its pickup head to generate nano-second laser pulses with a tunable pulse repetition rate of >30 kHz and a tunable pulse width ranging from 10 to 30 ns. The laser beam was focused onto the target after passing through a transparent cover slide, and then aligned to be confocal with a 50-MHz focused ultrasonic transducer in forward mode. To keep the target on focus, a scan involving auto-tracking procedure was performed. The measured maximum achievable lateral resolution was 1 μm which was mainly limited by the minimum step size of the used motorized stage. A blood smear was imaged without any staining. The red blood cells were well resolved and the biconcave structure could be clearly visualized. In addition, to verify the in vivo imaging capability of the proposed OR-PAM, the micro-vasculature of a mouse ear was imaged without any contrast agent. The results showed that it performed better than a 200x digital optical microscope in terms of image contrast and vascular morphology. In summaries, the proposed OR

  13. Seeing Through the Surface: Non-invasive Characterization of Biomaterial-Tissue Interactions Using Photoacoustic Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Wang, Lihong V; Xia, Younan

    2016-03-01

    At the intersection of life sciences, materials science, engineering, and medicine, regenerative medicine stands out as a rapidly progressing field that aims at retaining, restoring, or augmenting tissue/organ functions to promote the human welfare. While the field has witnessed tremendous advancements over the past few decades, it still faces many challenges. For example, it has been difficult to visualize, monitor, and assess the functions of the engineered tissue/organ constructs, particularly when three-dimensional scaffolds are involved. Conventional approaches based on histology are invasive and therefore only convey end-point assays. The development of volumetric imaging techniques such as confocal and ultrasonic imaging has enabled direct observation of intact constructs without the need of sectioning. However, the capability of these techniques is often limited in terms of penetration depth and contrast. In comparison, the recently developed photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has allowed us to address these issues by integrating optical and ultrasonic imaging to greatly reduce the effect of tissue scattering of photons with one-way ultrasound detection while retaining the high optical absorption contrast. PAM has been successfully applied to a number of studies, such as observation of cell distribution, monitoring of vascularization, and interrogation of biomaterial degradation. In this review article, we highlight recent progress in non-invasive and volumetric characterization of biomaterial-tissue interactions using PAM. We also discuss challenges ahead and envision future directions. PMID:26471785

  14. In vivo functional human imaging using photoacoustic microscopy: response to ischemic and thermal stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher; Maslov, Konstantin; Cornelius, Lynn; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    We report results of two in vivo functional human imaging experiments using photoacoustic microscopy. In Experiment 1, the hemodynamic response to an ischemic event was measured. The palm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while periodic arterial occlusions were administered using a blood pressure cuff wrapped around the upper arm and inflated to ~280 mmHg. Significant relative decreases in oxygen saturation (sO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) were observed during periods of ischemia. Upon release of the occlusion, significant relative increases in sO2 and HbT due to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia were recorded. Experiment 2 explored the vascular response to a local, external thermal stimulus. Thermal hyperemia is a common physiological phenomenon and thermoregulation function in which blood flow to the skin is increased to more efficiently exchange heat with the ambient environment. The forearm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while the imaged surface was exposed to an elevated temperature of ~46°C. Due to thermal hyperemia, relative increases in sO2 and HbT were measured as the temperature of the surface was raised. These results may contribute as clinically relevant measures of vascular functioning for detection and assessment of vascular related diseases.

  15. Toward Fourier interferometry fluorescence excitation/emission imaging of malignant cells combined with photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Berry, John P.; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Ornek, Ceren; Monti, Marco; Leblanc, Roger M.; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Haroon, Sumaira

    2003-10-01

    Dual excitation fluorescence imaging has been used as a first step towards multi-wavelength excitation/emission fluorescence spectral imaging. Target cells are transformed keratinocytes, and other osteosarcoma, human breast and color cancer cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes, e.g. TMRM (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester), Mitotracker Green (Molecular Probes, Inc., Eugene OR,USA; a recently synthesized mitochondrial oxygen probe, [PRE,P1"- pyrene butyl)-2-rhodamine ester] allow dual excitation in the UV plus in teh blue-green spectral regions. Also, using the natural endogenous probe NAD(P)H, preliminary results indicate mitochondrial responses to metabolic challenges (e.g. glucose addition), plus changes in mitochonrial distribution and morphology. In terms of application to biomedicine (for diagnostiscs, prognostsics and drug trials) three parameters have been selected in addition to the natural probe NAD(P)H, i.e. vital fluorescence probing of mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus. It is hoped that such a multiparameter approach will allow malignant cell characterization and grading. A new area being introduced is the use of similar methodology for biotechnical applications such as the study of the hydrogen-producing alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, and possible agricultural applications, such as Saccharomyces yeast for oenology. Complementation by Photoacoustic Microscopy is also contemplated, to study the internal conversion component which follows the excitation by photons.

  16. A PDMS-Based 2-Axis Waterproof Scanner for Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM is an imaging tool to provide in vivo optically sensitive images in biomedical research. To achieve a small size, fast imaging speed, wide scan range, and high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs in a water environment, we introduce a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-based 2-axis scanner for a flexible and waterproof structure. The design, theoretical background, fabrication process and performance of the scanner are explained in details. The designed and fabricated scanner has dimensions of 15 × 15 × 15 mm along the X, Y and Z axes, respectively. The characteristics of the scanner are tested under DC and AC conditions. By pairing with electromagnetic forces, the maximum scanning angles in air and water are 18° and 13° along the X and Y axes, respectively. The measured resonance frequencies in air and water are 60 and 45 Hz along the X axis and 45 and 30 Hz along the Y axis, respectively. Finally, OR-PAM with high SNRs is demonstrated using the fabricated scanner, and the PA images of micro-patterned samples and microvasculatures of a mouse ear are successfully obtained with high-resolution and wide-field of view. OR-PAM equipped with the 2-axis PDMS based waterproof scanner has lateral and axial resolutions of 3.6 μm and 26 μm, respectively. This compact OR-PAM system could potentially and widely be used in preclinical and clinical applications.

  17. In vivo photoacoustic microscopy of human cuticle microvasculature with single-cell resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsun-Chia; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-05-01

    As a window on the microcirculation, human cuticle capillaries provide rich information about the microvasculature, such as its morphology, density, dimensions, or even blood flow speed. Many imaging technologies have been employed to image human cuticle microvasculature. However, almost none of these techniques can noninvasively observe the process of oxygen release from single red blood cells (RBCs), an observation which can be used to study healthy tissue functionalities or to diagnose, stage, or monitor diseases. For the first time, we adapted single-cell resolution photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PA flowoxigraphy) to image cuticle capillaries and quantified multiple functional parameters. Our results show more oxygen release in the curved cuticle tip region than in other regions of a cuticle capillary loop, associated with a low of RBC flow speed in the tip region. Further analysis suggests that in addition to the RBC flow speed, other factors, such as the drop of the partial oxygen pressure in the tip region, drive RBCs to release more oxygen in the tip region.

  18. Signal-Characteristic analysis with respect to backing material of PVDF-based high-frequency ultrasound for photoacoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Su; Chang, Jin Ho [Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Photoacoustic microscopy is capable of providing high-resolution molecular images, and its spatial resolution is typically determined by ultrasonic transducers used to receive the photoacoustic signals. Therefore, ultrasonic transducers for photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) should have a high operating frequency, broad bandwidth, and high signal-reception efficiency. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is a suitable material. To take full advantage of this material, the selection of the backing material is crucial, as it influences the center frequency and bandwidth of the transducer. Therefore, we experimentally determined the most suitable backing material among EPO-TEK 301, E-Solder 3022, and RTV. For this, three PVDF high-frequency single-element transducers were fabricated with each backing material. The center frequency and -6 dB bandwidth of each transducer were ascertained by a pulse-echo test. The spatial resolution of each transducer was examined using wire-target images. The experimental results indicated that EPO-TEK 301 is the most suitable backing material for a PAM transducer. This material provides the highest signal magnitude and a reasonable bandwidth because a large portion of the energy propagates toward the front medium, and the PVDF resonates in the half-wave mode.

  19. Photoacoustic microscopy of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-1) after stellate ganglion blocks in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Yi, Xiaobin; Xing, Wenxin; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We used photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to assist diagnoses and monitor the progress and treatment outcome of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1). Blood vasculature and oxygen saturation (sO2) were imaged by PAM in eight adult patients with CRPS-1. Patients' hands and cuticles were imaged both before and after stellate ganglion block (SGB) for comparison. For all patients, both the vascular structure and sO2 could be assessed by PAM. In addition, more vessels and stronger signals were observed after SGB.

  20. Realtime photoacoustic microscopy of murine cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Song, Liang; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-02-01

    While photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality in recent years, a key drawback of practical and widespread use of the technique has been slow imaging rates. We present a 30-MHz array-based photoacoustic imaging system that can acquire and display photoacoustic images in realtime. Realtime display is very helpful and provides the system operator the ability to better navigate and position the probe for selecting a desired anatomical field of view. The system is capable of imaging at 50 frames per second to depths of a few mm in tissue. We used this system to successfully image the beating hearts of young athymic nude mice in vivo. Also of interest was the ability to visualize microvascular changes during respiration.

  1. Early-Stage Imaging of Nanocarrier-Enhanced Chemotherapy Response in Living Subjects by Scalable Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Conventional evaluation methods of chemotherapeutic efficacy such as tissue biopsy and anatomical measurement are either invasive with potential complications or dilatory to capture the rapid pathological changes. Here, a sensitive and resolution-scalable photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with theranostic nanoformulation was developed to noninvasively monitor the therapy response in a timely manner. Ultrasmall graphene oxide nanosheets were designed as both drug-loading vehicle and photoacoustic signal amplifier to the tumor. With the signal enhancement by the injected contrast agents, the subtle microvascular changes of the chemotherapy response in tumor were advantagely revealed by our PAM system, which was much earlier than the morphological measurement by standard imaging techniques. High tumor uptake of the enhanced nanodrug with Cy5.5 labeling was validated by fluorescence imaging. At different observation scales, PAM offered unprecedented sensitivity of optical absorption and high spatial resolution over optical imaging. Our studies demonstrate the PAM system with synergistic theranostic strategy to be a multiplexing platform for tumor diagnosis, drug delivery, and chemotherapy response monitoring at a very early stage and in an effective way. PMID:25406986

  2. Miniature probe integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and ultrasound imaging: proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xianjin; Xi, Lei; Duan, Can; Yang, Hao; Xie, Huikai; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-06-15

    In this Letter, we present a novel tri-modal miniature side-view probe, through which optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and pulse-echo ultrasound (US) images can be coaxially acquired and displayed simultaneously. The probe consists of a common optical path for OR-PAM (light delivery) and OCT (light delivery/detection), and a 40-MHz unfocused ultrasound transducer for OR-PAM (photoacoustic detection) and US (ultrasound transmission/receiving) with an overall diameter of 2 mm. Combining OR-PAM, OCT, and US would provide complementary information including optical absorption (OR-PAM), optical back-scattering (OCT), and deep tissue structures (US) about biological tissue. Based on an integrated imaging system consisting of OR-PAM, time-domain OCT, and US, phantom images and in vivo images of rat ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of the integrated tri-modality imaging probe. The probe yields a lateral resolution of 13.6 μm for OR-PAM and OCT, and an axial resolution of 43 μm for OR-PAM and US. Currently, for a scanning area of 1 ×1  mm, it took ∼25  min to acquire data for tri-modal volumetric imaging. PMID:26076296

  3. Dual-wavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy for cells with gold nanoparticle bioconjugates in three-dimensional cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Yi; Liu, Wei-Wen; Chen, Shu-Ching; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models bridge the gap between typical two-dimensional cultures and in vivo conditions. However, conventional optical imaging methods such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy cannot accurately depict cellular processing in 3D models due to limited penetration of photons. We developed a dualwavelength optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), which provides sufficient penetration depth and spatial resolution, for studying CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) trafficking in an in vitro 3D tumor microenvironment. CTLs play a cardinal role in host defense against tumor. Efficient trafficking of CTLs to the tumor microenvironment is a critical step for cancer immunotherapy. For the proposed system, gold nanospheres and indocyanine green (ICG) have been remarkable choices for contrast agents for photoacoustic signals due to their excellent biocompatibility and high optical absorption. With distinct absorption spectrums, targeted cells with gold nanospheres and ICG respectively can be identified by switching 523-nm and 800-nm laser irradiation. Moreover, we use an x-y galvanometer scanner to obtain high scanning rate. In the developed system, lateral and axial resolutions were designed at 1.6 μm and 5 μm, respectively. We successfully showed that dual-spectral OR-PAM can map either the distribution of CTLs with gold nanospheres at a visible wavelength of 523 nm or the 3D structure of tumor spheres with ICG in an in vitro 3D microenvironment. Our OR-PAM can provide better biological relevant information in cellular interaction and is potential for preclinical screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  4. Improvement and evaluation of a low-cost laser diode photoacoustic microscopy system for ovarian tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Salehi, Hassan S.; Kumavor, Patrick; Zhu, Quing

    2016-03-01

    We present a laser diode-based photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system with a minimized light intensity loss for ovarian tissue imaging. A 905 nm, 650 W output peak power pulsed laser diode (PLD) is utilized as the light source. The intrinsic properties and the construction of this PLD typically make it challenging to focus its beam to a small spot size with a lowloss optical system. An optical system comprising a combination of aspheric and cylindrical lenses is presented that allows a low-loss collimation and tight focusing of the light beam. The lateral resolution of this PAM system is measured to be 40 μm using edge spread function estimation. Images of black human hairs, polyethylene tubes filled with rat blood, ex vivo mouse ear and ex vivo porcine ovary are presented.

  5. Label-free optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of superficial microvasculature using a compact visible laser diode excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lvming; Piao, Zhonglie; Huang, Shenghai; Jia, Wangcun; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-11-30

    We have developed laser-diode-based optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (LD-OR-PAM) of superficial microvasculature which has the desirable properties of being compact, low-cost, and label-free. A 300-mW visible pulsed laser diode was operated at a 405 ± 5 nm wavelength with a pulse energy as low as 52 nJ. By using a 3.6 MHz ultrasound transducer, the system was tested on carbon fibers with a lateral resolution of 0.95 µm and an SNR of 38 dB. The subcutaneous microvasculature on a mouse back was imaged without an exogenous contrast agent which demonstrates the potential of the proposed prototype for skin chromophores. Our eventual goal is to offer a practical and affordable multi-wavelength functional LD-OR-PAM instrument suitable for clinical applications. PMID:26698732

  6. In vivo dynamic process imaging using real-time optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Shao, Peng; Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J.

    2013-02-01

    The authors demonstrate in vivo dynamic process imaging using a label-free real-time optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope (OR-PAM). This reflection-mode system takes advantage of a 532-nm fiber laser source with a high pulse repetition rate of up to 600 kHz combined with a fast-scanning mirror system. Microvasculature in SCID mouse ears is imaged at near real-time (0.5 fps) for a 1×1 mm2 field of view (FOV) with micron-scale lateral resolution. We also demonstrate imaging of cardiac-induced microhemodynamics in murine microvasculature at real-time frame-rates (30 fps) over a 250×250 μ FOV using real-time C-scan OR-PAM with ability to provide sustained imaging with near real-time feedback for focusing and positioning.

  7. Single molecule microscopy on Store-Operated Calcium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Store-Operated Calcium Entry is essential for many signaling processes in non-excitable cells. The best studied Store-Operated Calcium current is the Calcium-Release-Activated-Calcium (CRAC) current in T-cells and mast cells, with Orai1 representing the essential pore forming subunit. Functional CRAC channels in store-depleted cells are composed of four Orai1 subunits. However, the stoichiometric composition in resting cells is still discussed controversially: both a tetrameric and a dimeric stoichiometry of resting-state Orai1 have been reported for immobilized or immobile Orai1 proteins. The aim of this thesis was to design a more versatile approach that allows reliable determination of the subunit stoichiometry of mobile Orai1 channels. The motive for this approach is that mobile sub-fractions of the entire Orai1 population provide the cleanest pool of data, devoid of contributions e.g. from immobile Orai1 clusters or Orai1-loaded vesicles attached to the plasma membrane. Moreover, resting-state Orai1 is predominantly mobile, and mobility appears critical for the lateral redistribution which occurs upon store depletion. The method per se is based on single molecule fluorescence microscopy and brightness analysis. Orai1 proteins were fused to a monomeric variant of Green Fluorescent Protein (mGFP) and over-expressed in a human cell line (T24). The 1:1 labeling stoichiometry allows using the brightness of individual Orai1-mGFP channels as a direct measure of the pore stoichiometry. Due to over-expression a potential mixing with endogenous Orai1 can be neglected. However, over-expression of Orai1-mGFP results in channel densities that are too high to allow for resolving single channels using diffraction limited optical microscopy. In order to overcome this challenge, I developed an experimental strategy that allows reduction of the density of actively fluorescent Orai1-mGFP channels without altering the labeling stoichiometry. In order to reduce the surface density

  8. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT’s basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications. PMID:27086868

  9. Fast and compact optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a water-proofing two-axis MEMS scanner, and a step forward to clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel microscopic tool to provide in vivo optically sensitive images in biomedical research. Conventional OR-PAM systems are typically slow and bulky because of the linear scanning stages with stepping motors. For practical purposes, however, fast imaging speed and small footprint are crucial. To address these issues, we have developed a real-time compact OR-PAM system equipped with a waterproof two-axis MEMS scanner. The OR-PAM system consists of key components such as an ultrasonic transducer with a bandwidth of 50 MHz, an opto-acoustic beam combiner (BC), and an MEMS scanner. These are all installed inside a small water tank, with dimensions of 30 mm × 90 mm × 30 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. A pulsed laser with a repetition rate of 50 kHz is confocally aligned with the photoacoustic (PA) waves in the BC to maximize the SNRs. The fast scanning ability of the MEMS scanner fully utilizes the A-scan speed of 50 kHz. For instance, the B- and C-scan imaging speeds are 125 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively, when the acquired PA maximum amplitude projection image has 200 × 200 pixels along the x- and y-axes, respectively. The measured lateral resolution of 3.6 μm and axial resolution of 27 μm are sufficient to resolve the small capillaries. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of iris microvasculatures in mice. This real-time and compact OR-PAM system is optimized to examine small animals in clinical studies.

  10. Structure and Permeability of Ion-channels by Integrated AFM and Waveguide TIRF Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan Ramachandran; Fernando Teran Arce; Patel, Nirav R.; Quist, Arjan P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Ratnesh Lal

    2014-01-01

    Membrane ion channels regulate key cellular functions and their activity is dependent on their 3D structure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images 3D structure of membrane channels placed on a solid substrate. Solid substrate prevents molecular transport through ion channels thus hindering any direct structure-function relationship analysis. Here we designed a ~70 nm nanopore to suspend a membrane, allowing fluidic access to both sides. We used these nanopores with AFM and total internal refle...

  11. Dual interference channel quantitative phase microscopy of live cell dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Shaked, Natan T.; Rinehart, Matthew T.; Wax, Adam

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and experimentally demonstrate a new fast and accurate method for quantitative imaging of the dynamics of live biological cells. Using a dual-channel interferometric setup, two phase-shifted interferograms of nearly-transparent biological samples are acquired in a single digital camera exposure, and digitally processed into the phase profile of the sample. Since two interferograms of the same sample are acquired simultaneously, most of the common phase noise is eliminated, enabli...

  12. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinger, Zdeněk; Střižík, Michal

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 2008 - (Lackner, M.), s. 227-254 ISBN 978-3-527-31997-8 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : lasers * chemistry * photoacoustic spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. Spectroscopy and microscopy of single molecules in nanoscopic channels: spectral behavior vs. confinement depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmeiner, Benjamin; Maser, Andreas; Utikal, Tobias; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2016-07-20

    We perform high-resolution spectroscopy and localization microscopy to study single dye molecules confined to nanoscopic dimensions in one direction. We provide the fabrication details of our nanoscopic glass channels and the procedure for filling them with organic matrices. Optical data on hundreds of molecules in different channel depths show a clear trend from narrow stable lines in deep channels to broader linewidths in ultrathin matrices. In addition, we observe a steady blue shift of the center of the inhomogeneous band as the channels become thinner. Furthermore, we use super-resolution localization microscopy to correlate the positions and orientations of the individual dye molecules with the lateral landscape of the organic matrix, including cracks and strain-induced dislocations. Our results and methodology are useful for a number of studies in various fields such as physical chemistry, solid-state spectroscopy, and quantum nano-optics. PMID:27327379

  14. Actively Biased p-Channel MOSFET Studied with Scanning Capacitance Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE WOLF,P.; DODD,PAUL E.; HETHERINGTON,DALE L.; NAKAKURA,CRAIG Y.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    1999-09-22

    Scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) was used to study the cross section of an operating p-channel MOSFET. We discuss the novel test structure design and the modifications to the SCM hardware that enabled us to perform SCM while applying dc bias voltages to operate the device. The results are compared with device simulations performed with DAVINCI.

  15. An interactive visualization tool for multi-channel confocal microscopy data in neurobiology research

    KAUST Repository

    Yong Wan,

    2009-11-01

    Confocal microscopy is widely used in neurobiology for studying the three-dimensional structure of the nervous system. Confocal image data are often multi-channel, with each channel resulting from a different fluorescent dye or fluorescent protein; one channel may have dense data, while another has sparse; and there are often structures at several spatial scales: subneuronal domains, neurons, and large groups of neurons (brain regions). Even qualitative analysis can therefore require visualization using techniques and parameters fine-tuned to a particular dataset. Despite the plethora of volume rendering techniques that have been available for many years, the techniques standardly used in neurobiological research are somewhat rudimentary, such as looking at image slices or maximal intensity projections. Thus there is a real demand from neurobiologists, and biologists in general, for a flexible visualization tool that allows interactive visualization of multi-channel confocal data, with rapid fine-tuning of parameters to reveal the three-dimensional relationships of structures of interest. Together with neurobiologists, we have designed such a tool, choosing visualization methods to suit the characteristics of confocal data and a typical biologist\\'s workflow. We use interactive volume rendering with intuitive settings for multidimensional transfer functions, multiple render modes and multi-views for multi-channel volume data, and embedding of polygon data into volume data for rendering and editing. As an example, we apply this tool to visualize confocal microscopy datasets of the developing zebrafish visual system.

  16. Structure and permeability of ion-channels by integrated AFM and waveguide TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Patel, Nirav R; Quist, Arjan P; Cohen, Daniel A; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Membrane ion channels regulate key cellular functions and their activity is dependent on their 3D structure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images 3D structure of membrane channels placed on a solid substrate. Solid substrate prevents molecular transport through ion channels thus hindering any direct structure-function relationship analysis. Here we designed a ~70 nm nanopore to suspend a membrane, allowing fluidic access to both sides. We used these nanopores with AFM and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) for high resolution imaging and molecular transport measurement. Significantly, membranes over the nanopore were stable for repeated AFM imaging. We studied structure-activity relationship of gap junction hemichannels reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Individual hemichannels in the membrane overlying the nanopore were resolved and transport of hemichannel-permeant LY dye was visualized when the hemichannel was opened by lowering calcium in the medium. This integrated technique will allow direct structure-permeability relationship of many ion channels and receptors. PMID:24651823

  17. Integrative analysis of T cell motility from multi-channel microscopy data using TIAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayya, Viveka; Neiswanger, Willie; Medina, Ricardo; Wiggins, Chris H; Dustin, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analytical approaches are needed to study and understand T cell motility as it is a highly coordinated and complex process. Several computational algorithms and tools are available to track motile cells in time-lapse microscopy images. In contrast, there has only been limited effort towards the development of tools that take advantage of multi-channel microscopy data and facilitate integrative analysis of cell-motility. We have implemented algorithms for detecting, tracking, and analyzing cell motility from multi-channel time-lapse microscopy data. We have integrated these into a MATLAB-based toolset we call TIAM (Tool for Integrative Analysis of Motility). The cells are detected by a hybrid approach involving edge detection and Hough transforms from transmitted light images. Cells are tracked using a modified nearest-neighbor association followed by an optimization routine to join shorter segments. Cell positions are used to perform local segmentation for extracting features from transmitted light, reflection and fluorescence channels and associating them with cells and cell-tracks to facilitate integrative analysis. We found that TIAM accurately captures the motility behavior of T cells and performed better than DYNAMIK, Icy, Imaris, and Volocity in detecting and tracking motile T cells. Extraction of cell-associated features from reflection and fluorescence channels was also accurate with less than 10% median error in measurements. Finally, we obtained novel insights into T cell motility that were critically dependent on the unique capabilities of TIAM. We found that 1) the CD45RO subset of human CD8 T cells moved faster and exhibited an increased propensity to attach to the substratum during CCL21-driven chemokinesis when compared to the CD45RA subset; and 2) attachment area and arrest coefficient during antigen-induced motility of the CD45A subset is correlated with surface density of integrin LFA1 at the contact. PMID:25445324

  18. Channeling contrast microscopy of GaN and InGaN thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development of blue and green light emitting diodes (LED) based on single quantum well structures made from GaN and related materials (AlGaN, InGaN) has created many efforts to achieve a complete characterisation of devices grown under various conditions. Here we report on CCM measurements on GaN thin films (d=0.7-3.0 μm) grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and on 500 A InGaN films grown epitaxially on top of the GaN thin films. The samples were analysed by broad beam channeling and channeling contrast microscopy (CCM), using 1-2 MeV H+ and He+ ions. Generally, very low minimum yields were found (χmin=2-4%), indicating nearly perfect crystal structures. The susceptibility to ion-beam induced damage was assessed by random and channeled 1 MeV He+ irradiation and subsequent CCM analysis. CCM also revealed the presence μm-sized regions in the InGaN films with increased In signal strength. The channeling PIXE data for 500 A thin films are found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding RBS results, allowing the determination of channeling yields of elements for which RBS data is difficult to obtain

  19. Channeling contrast microscopy of GaN and InGaN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipowicz, T. E-mail: phyto@leonis.nus.edu.sg; Chiam, S.Y.; Watt, F.; Li, G.; Chua, S.J

    1999-09-02

    The recent development of blue and green light emitting diodes (LED) based on single quantum well structures made from GaN and related materials (AlGaN, InGaN) has created many efforts to achieve a complete characterisation of devices grown under various conditions. Here we report on CCM measurements on GaN thin films (d=0.7-3.0 {mu}m) grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and on 500 A InGaN films grown epitaxially on top of the GaN thin films. The samples were analysed by broad beam channeling and channeling contrast microscopy (CCM), using 1-2 MeV H{sup +} and He{sup +} ions. Generally, very low minimum yields were found ({chi}{sub min}=2-4%), indicating nearly perfect crystal structures. The susceptibility to ion-beam induced damage was assessed by random and channeled 1 MeV He{sup +} irradiation and subsequent CCM analysis. CCM also revealed the presence {mu}m-sized regions in the InGaN films with increased In signal strength. The channeling PIXE data for 500 A thin films are found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding RBS results, allowing the determination of channeling yields of elements for which RBS data is difficult to obtain.

  20. Monolithic Chip System with a Microfluidic Channel for In Situ Electron Microscopy of Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eric; Burrows, Andrew; Mølhave, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Electron microscopy of enclosed liquid samples requires the thinnest possible membranes as enclosing windows as well as nanoscale liquid sample thickness to achieve the best possible resolution. Today liquid sample systems for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are typically made from two...... flow geometry, and a better space angle for auxiliary detectors such as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We explain the system design and fabrication and show the first successful TEM images of liquid samples in the chips....... sandwiched microchips with thin membranes. We report on a new microfabricated chip system based on a monolithic design that enables membrane geometry on the scale of a few micrometers. The design is intended to reduce membrane deflection when the system is under pressure, a micro fluidic channel for improved...

  1. Dual-channel phase-shifting interferometry for microscopy with second wavelength assistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juanjuan Zheng; Baoli Yao; Romano A. Rupp; Tong Ye; Peng Gao; Junwei Min; Rongli Guo

    2012-01-01

    Dual-channel phase-shifting interferometry for simultaneous phase microscopy is presented.Red and blue light beams are used for microscope illumination. A 45° tilted beamsplitter replicates the object and reference waves in red light together with the object wave in blue light into two parallel beams. The two resulting quadrature phase-shifting interferograms in red light and the object waves in blue light are generated in the two channels.The two interferograms are recorded simultaneously by a color chargecoupled device (CCD) camera,and can be separated via RGB components of the recorded color patterns without crosstalk. As a result,the phase of tested specimen can be retrieved.The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by test performed on a microscopic specimen.

  2. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  3. Study of the structure of the particles of channel black of phase-contrasting electron microscopy of high resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlakov, V.P.; Fialkov, A.S.; Smirnov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of channel black, DG-100, in the initial and graphitized states has been studied by phase-contrasting electron microscopy with a direct resolution of the carbon layers. An individual carbon layer is the main structural element of carbon black. The structure of channel black in the graphitized state looks like a hollow closed polyhedron made up of bundles of continuous carbon layers which can bend and become deformed to a great extent, testifying to the polymeric nature of the structure of channel black. The authors give an interpretation of the roentgen values of the 'dimensions of crystallites' in channel black.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustics promises to revolutionize medical imaging and may well make as dramatic a contribution to modern medicine as the discovery of the x-ray itself once did. Combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically, photoacoustics can provide deep speckle-free imaging with high electromagnetic contrast at high ultrasonic resolution and without any health risk. While photoacoustic imaging is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology, this book is the first comprehensive volume in this emerging field covering both the physics and the remarkable noninvasive applic

  5. Fast Photoacoustic Imaging of Blood Vessels Based on an Annular Transducer Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a photoacoustic imaging system for rapid high-resolution photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels based on an annular transducer array. The annular transducer array consists of 256 elements arranged along a 300° arc with a 50-mm radius of curvature, using piezocomposite technology for high sensitivity and high signal-to-noise ratio. An eight-channel data acquisition system is applied to capture the photoacoustic signals using multiplexing and a limited-view filtered back projection algorithm is used to reconstruct the photoacoustic images. The experiments with phantom and blood vessels of a chicken are performed and clear photoacoustic images are obtained. The results demonstrate that the photoacoustic imaging system using the annular transducer array holds the potential application in monitoring neovascularization in tumor angiogenesis

  6. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  7. Photoacoustics with coherent light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Bossy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in the mid-nineties, photoacoustic imaging of biological tissue has been one of the fastest growing biomedical imaging modality, and its basic principles are now considered as well established. In particular, light propagation in photoacoustic imaging is generally considered from the perspective of transport theory. However, recent breakthroughs in optics have shown that coherent light propagating through optically scattering medium could be manipulated towards novel imaging approaches. In this article, we first provide an introduction to the relevant concepts in the field, and then review the recent works showing that it is possible to exploit the coherence of light in conjunction with photoacoustics. We illustrate how the photoacoustic effect can be used as a powerful feedback mechanism for optical wavefront shaping in complex media, and conversely show how the coherence of light can be exploited to enhance photoacoustic imaging, for instance in terms of spatial resolution or for designing minimally invasive endoscopic devices. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and perspectives down the road towards practical applications in the field of photoacoustic imaging.

  8. Photoacoustics with coherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossy, Emmanuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-03-01

    Since its introduction in the mid-nineties, photoacoustic imaging of biological tissue has been one of the fastest growing biomedical imaging modality, and its basic principles are now considered as well established. In particular, light propagation in photoacoustic imaging is generally considered from the perspective of transport theory. However, recent breakthroughs in optics have shown that coherent light propagating through optically scattering medium could be manipulated towards novel imaging approaches. In this article, we first provide an introduction to the relevant concepts in the field, and then review the recent works showing that it is possible to exploit the coherence of light in conjunction with photoacoustics. We illustrate how the photoacoustic effect can be used as a powerful feedback mechanism for optical wavefront shaping in complex media, and conversely show how the coherence of light can be exploited to enhance photoacoustic imaging, for instance in terms of spatial resolution or for designing minimally invasive endoscopic devices. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and perspectives down the road towards practical applications in the field of photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27069874

  9. Kelvin probe force microscopy study on operating In-Sn-O-channel ferroelectric-gate thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface potentials of an operating In-Sn-O channel ferroelectric-gate transistor (FGT) were mapped by Kelvin probe force microscopy. We clearly observed a gradual transition within the channel from linear potential profile to superlinear ones when drain voltage approaches and overcomes gate voltage, which is related to the physics of electronic transport under field-effect doping. The dependence of field-effect mobility on gate-bias and lateral field, as well as the effect of source/drain electrode materials on transport properties, was also elucidated. This study provides useful information for optimizing the FGT performance and for understanding its underlying physics

  10. Kelvin probe force microscopy study on operating In-Sn-O-channel ferroelectric-gate thin-film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tue, P. T., E-mail: phan-tt@jaist.ac.jp; Tokumitsu, E.; Shimoda, T. [ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Green Devices Research Center, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1211 (Japan); Miyasako, T. [Yokkaichi Research Center, JSR Corporation, Yokkaichi 510-8552 (Japan)

    2014-03-14

    Surface potentials of an operating In-Sn-O channel ferroelectric-gate transistor (FGT) were mapped by Kelvin probe force microscopy. We clearly observed a gradual transition within the channel from linear potential profile to superlinear ones when drain voltage approaches and overcomes gate voltage, which is related to the physics of electronic transport under field-effect doping. The dependence of field-effect mobility on gate-bias and lateral field, as well as the effect of source/drain electrode materials on transport properties, was also elucidated. This study provides useful information for optimizing the FGT performance and for understanding its underlying physics.

  11. Probing conformational changes of gramicidin ion channels by single-molecule patch-clamp fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Gregory S.; Orr, Galya; Montal, Mauricio; Thrall, Brian D.; Colson, Steve D.; Lu, H Peter

    2003-09-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes often regulate the dynamics of ion channels. Such inhomogeneity makes it difficult, if not impossible; to be characterized not only by ensemble-averaged experiments by also by single-channel patch recording that does not specifically probe the associated conformational changes. Here, we report on our work using a new approach combining single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and single-channel patch recording to investigate conformational changes of individual gramicidin ion channels. We observed fluorescence self-quenching and single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) from dye-labeled gramicidin dimmers within the channel was open. We also observed that the efficiency of self-quenching and spFRETS is widely distributed when the channel is closed. Our results strongly suggest a hitherto undetectable correlation of multiple conformational states of the gramicidin channel associated with closed and open states under physiologically-related conditions.

  12. PHOTOACOUSTIC IMAGING: AN ORCHESTRA OF LIGHT AND SOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namitha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Photoacoustic imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical i maging modality based on the use of laser - generated ultrasound. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high - contrast and spectroscopy based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a Photoacoustic i mage can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a result, it offers greater specificity than conventional sonographic imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light - absorbing chromophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. In addition to visualizing anatomica l structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information such as blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. These attributes make photoacoustic imaging applicable in clinical medicine, preclinical research and early detecti on of cancer, cardiovascular disease and abnormalities of microcirculation. Photoacoustic microscopy is a promising tool for imaging both dental decay and dental pulp. Using photoacoustics, near - infrared optical contrast between sound and carious dental ti ssues can be detected relatively easily and accurately at ultrasound resolution and may ultimately allow for continuous monitoring of caries before and during treatment. Photoacousting imaging compares favorably to other imaging modalities with its precise depth information, submillimeter resolution, and nanomolar sensitivity. With further improvement in background reduction, as well as the use of lasers with high - repetition rates, it is likely that Photoacoustic imaging will find wide use in the future in both basic research and clinical care. It is a highly vibrant research field in the

  13. Computationally intelligent pulsed photoacoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the application of computational intelligence in pulsed photoacoustics is discussed. Feedforward multilayer perception networks are applied for real-time simultaneous determination of the laser beam spatial profile and vibrational-to-translational relaxation time of the polyatomic molecules in gases. Networks are trained and tested with theoretical data adjusted for a given experimental set-up. Genetic optimization has been used for calculation of the same parameters, fitting the photoacoustic signals with a different number of generations. Observed benefits from the application of computational intelligence in pulsed photoacoustics and advantages over previously developed methods are discussed, such as real-time operation, high precision and the possibility of finding solutions in a wide range of parameters, similar to in experimental conditions. In addition, the applicability for practical uses, such as the real-time in situ measurements of atmospheric pollutants, along with possible further developments of obtained results, is argued. (paper)

  14. Bioinspired Protein Channel-Based Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (Bio-SICM) for Simultaneous Conductance and Specific Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macazo, Florika C; White, Ryan J

    2016-03-01

    The utility of stochastic single-molecule detection using protein nanopores has found widespread application in bioanalytical sensing as a result of the inherent signal amplification of the resistive pulse method. Integration of protein nanopores with high-resolution scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) extends the utility of SICM by enabling selective chemical imaging of specific target molecules, while simultaneously providing topographical information about the net ion flux through a pore under a concentration gradient. In this study, we describe the development of a bioinspired scanning ion conductance microscopy (bio-SICM) approach that couples the imaging ability of SICM with the sensitivity and chemical selectivity of protein channels to perform simultaneous pore imaging and specific molecule mapping. To establish the framework of the bio-SICM platform, we utilize the well-studied protein channel α-hemolysin (αHL) to map the presence of β-cyclodextrin (βCD) at a substrate pore opening. We demonstrate concurrent pore and specific molecule imaging by raster scanning an αHL-based probe over a glass membrane containing a single 25-μm-diameter glass pore while recording the lateral positions of the probe and channel activity via ionic current. We use the average channel current to create a conductance image and the raw current-time traces to determine spatial localization of βCD. With further optimization, we believe that the bio-SICM platform will provide a powerful analytical methodology that is generalizable, and thus offers significant utility in a myriad of bioanalytical applications. PMID:26848947

  15. Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopy methods can be effectively applied to the analysis of microparticles in condensed matter. A more violent photothermal conversion phenomenon of a particle, laser breakdown and accompanying plasma and acoustic emission, was applied to individual detection and analysis of ultrafine particles in ultrapure water. Laser-like nonlinear emission from the plasma was observed. (author)

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of voltage signals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bin; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of brain voltage signals is significantly limited in depth due to optical scattering and the absorptive property of brain tissue. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging promises to break this hard limit by utilizing both ballistic and diffused photons. To demonstrate the feasibility of PA, we used an in vivo mouse model. The brain cortex tissue was stained with dipicrylamine dye, electrically stimulated, and imaged with a customized dual-isosbestic-wavelength PA microscope (DIW-PAM). DIW-PAM separates voltage-induced PA signals from blood-induced PA signals and thereby allows recording the voltage response of mouse cortex tissue without interference from hemoglobin responses. The resting state PA voltage response signal exhibited a noise-like signal in the frequency domain. Upon 3 Hz electrical stimulation, the PA voltage response signal showed frequency peaks of 3.2 Hz and 6.3 Hz (Fig. 1). Although dipicrylamine dye is not fast enough for recording neuron action potentials, it served well for the purpose of this feasibility study. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated in vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse brain voltage signals for the first time. If a fast voltage-sensitive dye is available, using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) instead of PA microscopy could allow acquiring full-field PA action potential images at a speed limited only by the laser pulse repetition rate.

  17. Scanning ion conductance microscopy measurement of paracellular channel conductance in tight junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chiao-Chen; Zhou, Yi; Morris, Celeste A.; Hou, Jianghui; Baker, Lane A.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of epithelial transport across transcellular or paracellular pathways promises to advance the present understanding of ion transport and enables regulation of cell junctions critical to the cell and molecular biology of the epithelium. Here we demonstrate a new instrumental technique potentiometric scanning ion conductance microscopy (P-SICM) that utilizes a nanoscale pipette to differentiate paracellular and transcellular transport processes at high spatial resolution. The techni...

  18. Towards nonionizing photoacoustic cystography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chulhong; Jeon, Mansik; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Normally, urine flows down from kidneys to bladders. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the abnormal flow of urine from bladders back to kidneys. VUR commonly follows urinary tract infection and leads to renal infection. Fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography and direct radionuclide voiding cystography have been clinical gold standards for VUR imaging, but these methods are ionizing. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel and nonionizing process for VUR mapping in vivo, called photoacoustic cystography (PAC). Using a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system, we have successfully imaged a rat bladder filled with clinically being used methylene blue dye. An image contrast of ~8 was achieved. Further, spectroscopic PAC confirmed the accumulation of methylene blue in the bladder. Using a laser pulse energy of less than 1 mJ/cm2, bladder was clearly visible in the PA image. Our results suggest that this technology would be a useful clinical tool, allowing clinicians to identify bladder noninvasively in vivo.

  19. High-throughput miniaturized microfluidic microscopy with radially parallelized channel geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Bhat, Bindu Prabhath; Nirupa Julius, Lourdes Albina; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present a novel approach to throughput enhancement in miniaturized microfluidic microscopy systems. Using the presented approach, we demonstrate an inexpensive yet high-throughput analytical instrument. Using the high-throughput analytical instrument, we have been able to achieve about 125,880 cells per minute (more than one hundred and twenty five thousand cells per minute), even while employing cost-effective low frame rate cameras (120 fps). The throughput achieved here is a notable progression in the field of diagnostics as it enables rapid quantitative testing and analysis. We demonstrate the applicability of the instrument to point-of-care diagnostics, by performing blood cell counting. We report a comparative analysis between the counts (in cells per μl) obtained from our instrument, with that of a commercially available hematology analyzer. PMID:26781098

  20. Dual channel rank-based intensity weighting for quantitative co-localization of microscopy images

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2011-10-21

    Abstract Background Accurate quantitative co-localization is a key parameter in the context of understanding the spatial co-ordination of molecules and therefore their function in cells. Existing co-localization algorithms consider either the presence of co-occurring pixels or correlations of intensity in regions of interest. Depending on the image source, and the algorithm selected, the co-localization coefficients determined can be highly variable, and often inaccurate. Furthermore, this choice of whether co-occurrence or correlation is the best approach for quantifying co-localization remains controversial. Results We have developed a novel algorithm to quantify co-localization that improves on and addresses the major shortcomings of existing co-localization measures. This algorithm uses a non-parametric ranking of pixel intensities in each channel, and the difference in ranks of co-localizing pixel positions in the two channels is used to weight the coefficient. This weighting is applied to co-occurring pixels thereby efficiently combining both co-occurrence and correlation. Tests with synthetic data sets show that the algorithm is sensitive to both co-occurrence and correlation at varying levels of intensity. Analysis of biological data sets demonstrate that this new algorithm offers high sensitivity, and that it is capable of detecting subtle changes in co-localization, exemplified by studies on a well characterized cargo protein that moves through the secretory pathway of cells. Conclusions This algorithm provides a novel way to efficiently combine co-occurrence and correlation components in biological images, thereby generating an accurate measure of co-localization. This approach of rank weighting of intensities also eliminates the need for manual thresholding of the image, which is often a cause of error in co-localization quantification. We envisage that this tool will facilitate the quantitative analysis of a wide range of biological data sets

  1. Germanium Collimating micro-Channel Arrays For High Resolution, High Energy Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Agyeman-Budu, David N; Coulthard, Ian; Gordon, Robert; Hallin, Emil; Woll, Arthur R

    2016-01-01

    Confocal x-ray fluorescence microscopy (CXRF) allows direct detection of x-ray fluorescence from a micron-scale 3D volume of an extended, unthinned sample. We have previously demonstrated the use of a novel collection optic, fabricated from silicon, that improves the spatial resolution of this approach by an order of magnitude over CXRF using polycapillaries. The optic, called a collimating channel array (CCA), consists of micron-scale, lithographically-fabricated arrays of collimating channels, all directed towards a single source position. Due to the limited absorbing power of silicon, the useful energy range of these optics was limited to fluorescence emission below about 10 keV. Here, we report fabrication of CCAs from germanium substrates, and demonstrate their practical use for CXRF up to 20 keV. Specifically we demonstrate a nearly energy-independent critical spatial resolution $d_R$ of 2.1$\\pm$0.17 \\um from 2-20 keV, as well as excellent background reduction compared to silicon-based CCAs throughout t...

  2. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Stewart, Andrew P. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1PD (United Kingdom); Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph [Institut für Zelluläre und Molekulare Physiologie, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Waldstrasse 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Edwardson, J. Michael, E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1PD (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. - Highlights: • There is evidence for a close association between ASIC and ENaC. • We used AFM to test whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits form cross-clade ion channels. • Isolated proteins were incubated with subunit-specific antibodies and Fab fragments. • Some proteins were doubly decorated at ∼120° by an antibody and a Fab fragment. • Our results indicate the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers.

  3. Oscillatory Dynamics and In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging Performance of Plasmonic Nanoparticle-Coated Microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Adam J; Hu, Song; Klibanov, Alexander L; Hossack, John A

    2015-07-01

    Microbubbles bearing plasmonic nanoparticles on their surface provide contrast enhancement for both photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. In this work, the responses of microbubbles with surface-bound gold nanorods-termed AuMBs-to nanosecond pulsed laser excitation are studied using high-speed microscopy, photoacoustic imaging, and numerical modeling. In response to laser fluences below 5 mJ cm(-2) , AuMBs produce weak photoacoustic emissions and exhibit negligible microbubble wall motion. However, in reponse to fluences above 5 mJ cm(-2) , AuMBs undergo dramatically increased thermal expansion and emit nonlinear photoacoustic waves of over 10-fold greater amplitude than would be expected from freely dispersed gold nanorods. Numerical modeling suggests that AuMB photoacoustic responses to low laser fluences result from conductive heat transfer from the surface-bound nanorods to the microbubble gas core, whereas at higher fluences, explosive boiling may occur at the nanorod surface, producing vapor nanobubbles that contribute to rapid AuMB expansion. The results of this study indicate that AuMBs are capable of producing acoustic emissions of significantly higher amplitude than those produced by conventional sources of photoacoustic contrast. In vivo imaging performance of AuMBs in a murine kidney model suggests that AuMBs may be an effective alternative to existing contrast agents for noninvasive photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging applications. PMID:25703465

  4. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  5. Photoacoustic studies on iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photoacoustic cavity was constructed which employs a temperature-controlled cylindrical cavity with optical windows at either end. It was operated in the lowest longitudinal mode using a small electret microphone for detecting the acoustic signal and a photomultiplier tube for detecting the optical signal. Molecular Iodine was used as the specimen gas and argon as the buffer gas. The photoacoustic characteristics of the system were studied. Iodine molecules, excited periodically by intensity modulated optical radiation (xenon discharge), de-excited by non-radiative processes which result in pressure waves having the same modulation frequency as that of the light. These pressure waves are detected as acoustical pulses by the microphone situated in the wall of the cavity. Studies were conducted for different pressures of buffer gas (100 torr to 800 torr) at several different iodine pressures in the range between 0.3 and 1 torr. The longitudinal mode of excitation provides an opportunity to compare the response of the cavity under acoustical excitation with that under optical excitation. The relevant parameters in the investigation were: Q, the quality factor of the cavity; the resonant frequency, partial pressures of argon and iodine; temperature; and the signal amplitude. It was found that the Q of the cavity was well-behaved following the theoretically predicted dependence on √P and on T/sup-3/4)/. The absorption coefficient of iodine determined photometrically, increased with increasing argon pressure up to a limiting value of pressure that depended on iodine concentration

  6. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography

  7. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V., E-mail: LHWANG@WUSTL.EDU [Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  8. Multiple-illumination photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Quinn M.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    Previously we described the potential for multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography to provide quantitative reconstructions, however this work used only simulated data. We have developed a custom photoacoustic-ultrasound tomography system capable of multiple illuminations and parallel acquisition from a 256 element 5 MHz transducer ring array with 8-cm diameter. The multiple illumination scheme uses a free-space light delivery geometry where a rotational stage scans a pulsed laser beam onto different incident locations around the sample. For each illumination location a photoacoustic image is reconstructed using a modified backprojection algorithm. Images from different source locations have the potential to be combined to form an improved deep-tissue image using our previously developed iterative algorithms. We complement the photoacoustic imaging data with unique ultrasound imaging data. Most previous ultrasound tomography methods have used migration algorithms, iterative ray-based analysis, wave-equation modeling, or frequency-based algorithms that all demand large amounts of data and computational power. We propose a new UST method that offers isotropic resolution, provides scattering contrast, as well as the potential for measuring ultrasound scattering anisotropy and decoupling density and compressibility contributions. The imaging system is driven by a Verasonics scan engine and programmed for both ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging modes. Resolution has been measured to be 150 μm for ultrasound and 200 μm for photoacoustic images. Imaging capabilities are demonstrated on phantoms with custom-tailored ultrasound scattering and optical properties, as well as in murine models.

  9. Photoacoustic Effect and the Physics of Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, F. Alan

    1980-01-01

    Discussions are presented for implementing photoacoustic spectroscopy as a technique for describing the photoacoustic effect. This technique makes it possible to study optical absorption in samples which are usually difficult to study. It is suggested that this approach makes understanding of the photoacoustic effect accessible even at the…

  10. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  11. Neurovascular photoacoustic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular coupling refers to the relationship between neuronal activities and downstream hemodynamic responses. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT, enabling comprehensive label-free imaging of hemodynamic activities with highly scalable penetration and spatial resolution, has great potential in the study of neurovascular coupling. In this review, we first introduce the technical basis of hemodynamic PAT—including label-free quantification of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygenation, and blood flow—as well as its applications in hemodynamic monitoring. Then, we demonstrate the potential application of PAT in neurovascular imaging by highlighting representative studies on cerebral vascular responses to whisker stimulation and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, potential research directions and associated technical challenges are discussed.

  12. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  13. Photoacoustic point spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-06-14

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a photoacoustic spectrum in an open or closed environment with reduced noise. A source may emit a beam to a target substance coated on a detector that measures acoustic waves generated as a result of a light beam being absorbed by the target substance. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target substance on the detector, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance as the wavelength of light is changed. Rejection may decrease the intensity of the acoustic waves on the detector while absorption may increase the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  14. Investigation of zinc stannate synthesis using photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivetić T.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixtures of ZnO and SnO2 powders, with molar ratio of 2:1, were mechanically activated for 40, 80 and 160 minutes in a planetary ball mill. The resulting powders were compacted into pellets and non-isothermally sintered up to 1200°C with a heating rate of 5°C/min. X-ray diffraction analysis of obtained powders and sintered samples was performed in order to investigate changes of the phase composition. The microstructure of sintered samples was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The photoacoustic phase and amplitude spectra of sintered samples were measured as a function of the laser beam modulating frequency using a transmission detection configuration. Fitting of experimental data enabled determination of photoacoustic properties including thermal diffusivity. Based on the results obtained a correlation between thermal diffusivity and experimental conditions as well the samples microstructure characteristics was discussed. .

  15. Photoacoustic investigation of copaiba oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. G.; Silveira, L. B.; Olenka, L.; Oliveira, A. C.; Rodriguez, A. F. R.; Garg, V.; Bento, A. C.; Oliveira, R. G.; Morais, P. C.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate the usefulness of the Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) in the investigation of copaiba oil obtained from Copaifera tree, located in a site within Rondônia State, Amazon region, Brazil. Pure copaiba oil sample was diluted in 98% ethanol providing 10 different samples at volume concentration in the range of 5 to 50% vv. The observed photoacoustic spectral features from pure copaiba oil and the corresponding diluted samples, in the 0.18 to 4.00 μm wavelength region, are discussed in terms of five distinct bands (C, S, L, K, and X bands). Photoacoustic peak intensity was investigated as a function of the copaiba oil concentration in the 5 to 50% v.v.

  16. Photoacoustic Tomography System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Martínez-Ramírez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the pulsed photoacoustic effect, we set up an experimental system to obtain bi-dimensional images of optically-opaque samples embedded within the bulk of turbid medium. The turbid medium was made of agar gel mixed with single-sized nanoparticles; with these materials we induce an optical absorption and an optical scattering like that appearing in human tissues. The PA signals are generated from the absorption processes in the buried target, and then traveling through the bulk of scatter medium. The optical absorption properties and the shape of target, defines the amplitude and shape of the PA signals. This time the laser pulses are set from a pulsed Nd: YAG laser, with pulse width of 10 ns, at rate repetition of 10 Hz and wavelength set at 1064 nm. The signals generated in this way are registered by means of an ultrasonic transducer with resonance cut at 10 MHz. The sample was rotated to obtain as many as 36 projections which are used to feed an image reconstruction forward-projection algorithm based on the Radon Transform. As result we obtain 2D tomographic slices of three different samples.

  17. Photoacoustics meets ultrasound: micro-Doppler photoacoustic effect and detection by ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, photoacoustics has attracted intensive research for both anatomical and functional biomedical imaging. However, the physical interaction between photoacoustic generated endogenous waves and an exogenous ultrasound wave is a largely unexplored area. Here, we report the initial results about the interaction of photoacoustic and external ultrasound waves leading to a micro-Doppler photoacoustic (mDPA) effect, which is experimentally observed and consistently modelled. It is base...

  18. One laser pulse generates two photoacoustic signals

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying the stress confinement, the dual photoacoustic signals are generated following the positive and negative edges of the long laser pulse. More interestingly, the first expansion-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits positive waveform due to the initial sharp rising of temperature. On the contrary, the second contraction-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits exactly negative waveform due to the falling of temperature, as well as pulse-width-dependent, signal amplitude which is caused by the concurrent heat accumulation and ...

  19. Repositioning Clofazimine as a Macrophage-Targeting Photoacoustic Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Rahul K; Tian, Chao; Peryea, Tyler; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding; Rosania, Gus R

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) is a deep-tissue imaging modality, with potential clinical applications in the diagnosis of arthritis, cancer and other disease conditions. Here, we identified Clofazimine (CFZ), a red-pigmented dye and anti-inflammatory FDA-approved drug, as a macrophage-targeting photoacoustic (PA) imaging agent. Spectroscopic experiments revealed that CFZ and its various protonated forms yielded optimal PAT signals at wavelengths -450 to 540 nm. CFZ's macrophage-targeting chemical and structural forms were detected with PA microscopy at a high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR > 22 dB) as well as with macroscopic imaging using synthetic gelatin phantoms. In vivo, natural and synthetic CFZ formulations also demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity. Finally, the injection of CFZ was monitored via a real-time ultrasound-photoacoustic (US-PA) dual imaging system in a live animal and clinically relevant human hand model. These results demonstrate an anti-inflammatory drug repurposing strategy, while identifying a new PA contrast agent with potential applications in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. PMID:27000434

  20. Photoacoustic and spectroscopic characterization of the ablation process in orthogonal double-pulse configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobral, H; Sanchez-Ake, C; Sangines, R [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico DF. 04360 (Mexico); Alvarez-Zauco, E [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, (Mexico); Jimenez-Duran, K, E-mail: martin.sobral@ccadet.unam.mx [Unidad de Servicios de Apoyo a la Investigacion, Facultad de Quimica. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-03-02

    A photoacoustic technique was used as an alternative method to monitor the crater volume and its role in the emission line intensification in double-pulse pre-ablation configuration. The crater volume was measured using confocal microscopy and correlated with the changes in the photoacoustic signal. Laser emission spectroscopy was used to characterize the emission enhancement as a function of the delay between lasers and the first pulse energy. Optimum delay was found to be in the microsecond timescale corresponding to the maximum of the crater volume and the largest change between the single- and the double-pulse photoacoustic signals. Only a slight intensification was detected with increasing first pulse energy above the first pulse ablation threshold; however, the crater volume did not significantly change and the possible involved mechanisms are discussed.

  1. Deep in vivo photoacoustic imaging of mammalian tissues using a tyrosinase-based genetic reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathoul, Amit P.; Laufer, Jan; Ogunlade, Olumide; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Zhang, Edward; Johnson, Peter; Pizzey, Arnold R.; Philip, Brian; Marafioti, Teresa; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin A.; Beard, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging allows absorption-based high-resolution spectroscopic in vivo imaging at a depth beyond that of optical microscopy. Until recently, photoacoustic imaging has largely been restricted to visualizing the vasculature through endogenous haemoglobin contrast, with most non-vascularized tissues remaining invisible unless exogenous contrast agents are administered. Genetically encodable photoacoustic contrast is attractive as it allows selective labelling of cells, permitting studies of, for example, specific genetic expression, cell growth or more complex biological behaviours in vivo. In this study we report a novel photoacoustic imaging scanner and a tyrosinase-based reporter system that causes human cell lines to synthesize the absorbing pigment eumelanin, thus providing strong photoacoustic contrast. Detailed three-dimensional images of xenografts formed of tyrosinase-expressing cells implanted in mice are obtained in vivo to depths approaching 10 mm with a spatial resolution below 100 μm. This scheme is a powerful tool for studying cellular and genetic processes in deep mammalian tissues.

  2. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging with a clinical two-dimensional matrix ultrasound transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpelding, Todd N.; Wang, Yu; Jankovic, Ladislav; Guo, Zijian; Robert, Jean-Luc; David, Guillaume; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography provides both structural and functional imaging in vivo based on optical absorption contrast. A novel imaging system that incorporates a two-dimensional matrix ultrasound probe for combined photoacoustic and ultrasonic three-dimensional (3D) volumetric imaging is presented. The system consists of a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, a commercial ultrasound imaging system (Philips iU22) with a two-dimensional matrix transducer (Philips X7-2, 2500 elements, 2-7 MHz), and a multichannel data acquisition system which allows us to acquire RF channel data. Compared with alternative 3D techniques, this system is attractive because it can generate co-registered 3D photoacoustic and ultrasound images without mechanical scanning. Moreover, the lateral resolution along the azimuth and elevational directions are measured to be 0.77 +/- 0.06 mm and 0.96 +/- 0.06 mm, respectively, based on reconstructed photoacoustic images of phantoms containing individual human hairs. Finally, in vivo 3D photoacoustic sentinel lymph node mapping using methylene blue dye in a rat model is demonstrated.

  3. In vivo photoacoustic neuronal imaging of odor-evoked calcium signals in the drosophila brain (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiying; Rao, Bin; Rong, Haoyang; Raman, Baranidharan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Neural scientists can benefit greatly from imaging tools that can penetrate thick brain tissue. Compared with traditional optical microscopy methods, photoacoustic imaging can beat the optical diffusion limit and achieve such deep tissue imaging with high spatial resolution. In this study, we used an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the odor-evoked neuronal activities in a drosophila model. Drosophila brain neurons stably express GCaMP5G, a calcium-sensitive fluorescent protein whose optical absorption coefficient changes with calcium influx during action potentials. We recorded an ~20% odor-evoked fractional photoacoustic signal increase at all depths of the drosophila brain in vivo, with and without removal of the brain cuticle, at a recording rate of 1 kHz. Our results were confirmed by concurrent fluorescent recordings. Furthermore, by performing fast 2D scanning, we imaged the antenna lobe region, which is of particular interest in neuroscience, at a volumetric rate of ~1 Hz with a sub-neuron resolution of 3 μm. Unlike optical imaging, which requires surgical removal of the scattering brain cuticle, our photoacoustic system can image through the cuticle and measure neuronal signals of the whole drosophila brain without invasive surgery, enabling minimal disturbance to the animal's behaviors. In conclusion, we have demonstrated photoacoustic imaging of calcium signals in drosophila brains for the first time. Utilizing the deep imaging capability of photoacoustic tomography, our methods could potentially be extended to in vivo imaging of neuronal activities from deep brains in other animal models.

  4. Integrated photoacoustic, confocal, and two-photon microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bin; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The invention of green fluorescent protein and other molecular fluorescent probes has promoted applications of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy in biology and medicine. However, exogenous fluorescence contrast agents may affect cellular structure and function, and fluorescence microscopy cannot image nonfluorescent chromophores. We overcome this limitation by integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy into a modern Olympus IX81 confocal, two-photon, fluorescence microscope setup to provide complementary, label-free, optical absorption contrast. Automatically coregistered images can be generated from the same sample. Imaging applications in ophthalmology, developmental biology, and plant science are demonstrated. For the first time, in a familiar microscopic fluorescence imaging setting, this trimodality microscope provides a platform for future biological and medical discoveries. PMID:24589986

  5. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  6. Multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy in mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Wei; Wei, Qing; Feng, Liang; Sarthy, Vijay; Jiao, Shuliang; LIU, XIAORONG; Zhang, Hao F.

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) is a novel imaging technology that measures optical absorption in the retina. The capability of PAOM can be further enhanced if it could image mouse eyes, because mouse models are widely used for various retinal diseases. The challenges in achieving high-quality imaging of mouse retina, however, come from the much smaller eyeball size. Here, we report an optimized imaging system, which integrates PAOM, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), ...

  7. Multiple-bandwidth photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoacoustic tomography, also referred to as optoacoustic tomography, employs short laser pulses to generate ultrasonic waves in biological tissues. The reconstructed images can be characterized by the convolution of the structure of samples, the laser pulse and the impulse response of the ultrasonic transducer used for detection. Although the laser-induced ultrasonic waves cover a wide spectral range, a single transducer can receive only part of the spectrum because of its limited bandwidth. To systematically analyse this problem, we constructed a photoacoustic tomographic system that uses multiple ultrasonic transducers simultaneously, each at a different central frequency. The photoacoustic images associated with the different transducers were compared and analysed. The system was tested by imaging both mouse brains and phantom samples. The vascular vessels in the brain were revealed by all of the transducers, but the image resolutions differed. The higher frequency detectors provided better image resolution while the lower frequency detectors delineated the major structural traits with a higher signal-noise ratio

  8. The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine enhances Ag+ uptake: A scanning electrochemical microscopy study of single living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Dongping; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Bard, Allen J.

    2008-01-01

    We report that silver ion (Ag+) uptake is enhanced by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a well known voltage-sensitive potassium ion channel (Kv) blocker. Both bacterial (Escherichia coli) and mammalian (3T3 fibroblast) cells were used as model systems. Ag+ uptake was monitored with a scanning electrochemical microscope with an amperometric Ag+ ion-selective electrode (Ag+-ISE) and the respiration rates of E. coli cells were measured by oxygen reduction at an ultramicroelectrode. The results showed tha...

  9. Photoacoustic phasoscopy super-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phasoscopy is a recently proposed concept correlating electromagnetic (EM) absorption and scattering properties based on energy conservation. Phase information can be extracted from EM absorption induced acoustic wave and scattered EM wave for biological tissue characterization. In this paper, an imaging modality, termed photoacoustic phasoscopy imaging (PAPS), is proposed and verified experimentally based on phasoscopy concept with laser illumination. Both endogenous photoacoustic wave and scattered photons are collected simultaneously to extract the phase information. The PAPS images are then reconstructed on vessel-mimicking phantom and ex vivo porcine tissues to show significantly improved contrast than conventional photoacoustic imaging.

  10. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eichenfield, Matthew S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffin, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harvey, Heidi Alyssa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nielson, Gregory N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Okandan, Murat [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Langlois, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Resnick, Paul James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shaw, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Young, Ian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Givler, Richard C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reinke, Charles M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  11. Hybrid photoacoustic and optical imaging of pigments in vegetative tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tserevelakis, George J; Tsagkaraki, Margarita; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2016-09-01

    Pigments in vegetative tissues have been a subject of intense research during the previous decades, since they play an active role in several molecular mechanisms regarding plants' physiology and function. Towards this direction, the imaging modality that has been extensively employed and represents the state of the art for mapping pigments' distribution is confocal microscopy. Despite the advantage of a high spatial resolution however, confocal microscopy provides a rather limited imaging depth and requires necessarily strong fluorescence properties from the specimen under observation. To overcome such limitations, we propose a hybrid, photoacoustic and optical imaging methodology for the delineation of various vegetative pigments, such as chlorophylls, anthocyanins and betalains in different plant species. The superior sensitivity and the high contrast complementarity of the hybrid technique, render it a powerful alternative to the conventional fluorescence imaging modalities, significantly expanding the current state of the art. PMID:27019381

  12. Visualization of trapped charges being ejected from organic thin-film transistor channels by Kelvin-probe force microscopy during gate voltage sweeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kei; Noda, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-02-01

    Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KFM) has been widely used to evaluate the localized charge trap states in the organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) channels. However, applicability of the KFM has been limited to the trapped charges whose lifetime is typically longer than several minutes because of the temporal resolution of the KFM. Therefore, it has not long been employed for studying the dynamics of the trapped charges in the OTFTs. Here, we demonstrate a method to visualize the transient distribution of the trapped charge carriers in operating OTFTs. The method allows visualizing the dynamics of the trapped charges during the gate voltage sweeps on a time scale of several hundreds of milliseconds. The experimental results performed on dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (DNTT) OTFTs indicate that, immediately after a bias voltage applied to a device was turned off, the primary discharging of the channel region around the electrode edges started and it limited the ejection process of the remaining accumulated charges to the electrodes, resulting in an increased density of long-lived trapped charges in a region distant from the electrodes. The presented results suggest that the method is useful to study the electrical connections at the interface between the DNTT grains and electrodes, or those between the grains.

  13. The 3D flow structures generated by a pair of cubic roughness elements in a turbulent channel flow resolved using holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    In studies of turbulent flows over rough walls, considerable efforts have been put on the overall effects of roughness parameters such as roughness height and spatial arrangement on the mean profiles and turbulence statistics. However there is very little experimental data on the generation, evolution, and interaction among roughness-initiated turbulent structures, which are essential for elucidating the near-wall turbulence production. As a first step, we approach this problem experimentally by applying digital holographic microscopy (DHM) to measure the flow and turbulence around a pair of cubic roughness elements embedded in the inner part of a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 2000 - 5000). The ratio of half-channel height (h) to cube height (a) is 25, and the cubes are aligned in the spanwise direction, and separated by 1.5 a. DHM provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) three-component (3C) velocity distributions. The presentation discusses methods to improve the data accuracy, both during the hologram acquisition and particle tracking phases. First, we compare and mutually validate velocity fields obtained from a two-view DHM system. Subsequently, during data processing, the seven criteria used for particle tracking is validated and augmented by planar tracking of particle image projections. Sample results reveal instantaneous 3D velocity fields and vortical structures resolved in fine details of several wall units. Funded by NSF and ONR.

  14. The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine enhances Ag+ uptake: a scanning electrochemical microscopy study of single living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Dongping; Fan, Fu-Ren F; Bard, Allen J

    2008-08-26

    We report that silver ion (Ag(+)) uptake is enhanced by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a well known voltage-sensitive potassium ion channel (K(v)) blocker. Both bacterial (Escherichia coli) and mammalian (3T3 fibroblast) cells were used as model systems. Ag(+) uptake was monitored with a scanning electrochemical microscope with an amperometric Ag(+) ion-selective electrode (Ag(+)-ISE) and the respiration rates of E. coli cells were measured by oxygen reduction at an ultramicroelectrode. The results showed that not only the amount but also the rate of silver uptake by the cells increased significantly when 4-AP was added to the solution. For fibroblasts, the Ag(+) uptake rate was 4.8 x 10(7) ions per cell per sec without 4-AP compared with 1.0 x 10(8) ions per cell per sec with 0.2 mM 4-AP. For E. coli cells, the uptake rate was 1.5 x 10(4) ions per cell per sec without 4-AP vs. 3.5 x 10(4) ions per cell per sec with 0.5 mM 4-AP and 5.9 x 10(4) ions per cell per sec with 1 mM 4-AP. Thus, 4-AP might be useful where silver is used as antimicrobial agent to speed its uptake. PMID:18719098

  15. Photoacoustic tomography imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yixiong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Xu, Kexin; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Jianquan

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography is attracting more and more attentions in the biomedical optical imaging field. This imaging modality takes the advantages in that the tomography image has the optical contrast similar to the optical techniques while enjoying the high spatial resolution comparable to the ultrasound. Currently, its biomedical applications are mainly focused on breast cancer diagnosis and small animal imaging. In this paper, we report in detail a photoacoustic tomography experiment system constructed in our laboratory. In our system, a Q-switched ND:YAG pulse laser operated at 532nm with a 10ns pulse width is employed to generate photoacoustic signal. A tissue-mimicking phantom was built to test the system. When imaged, the phantom and detectors were immersed in a water tank to facilitate the acoustic detection. Based on filtered back-projection process of photoacoustic imaging, the two-dimension distribution of optical absorption in tissue phantom was reconstructed.

  16. Photoacoustic Multicomponent Analyzer for Atmospheric Compounds Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a compact, rugged field-deployable laser photoacoustic spectrometric (LPAS) sensor for continuous, real-time measurements of multiple chemical...

  17. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800 000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1–1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine hemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV–vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV–vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm−1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV–vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Edward B.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Custer, John R.; Beerntsen, Brenda; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800 000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1-1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine hemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV-vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm-1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV-vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  19. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  20. Finite Element Simulation of Photoacoustic Pressure in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell Using Lossy Boundary Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lopes, Natasha; Willatzen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) is used to simulate the photoacoustic signal in a cylindrical resonant photoacoustic cell. Simulations include loss effects near the cell walls that appear in the boundary conditions for the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation governing the acoustic pressure. Reasonably...

  1. Synthetic-aperture based photoacoustic re-beamforming (SPARE) approach using beamformed ultrasound data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K; Bell, Muyinatu A Lediju; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M

    2016-08-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been developed for various clinical and pre-clinical applications, and acquiring pre-beamformed channel data is necessary to reconstruct these images. However, accessing these pre-beamformed channel data requires custom hardware to enable parallel beamforming, and is available for a limited number of research ultrasound platforms. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, our goal is to devise a new PA reconstruction approach that uses ultrasound post-beamformed radio frequency (RF) data rather than raw channel data, because this type of data is readily available in both clinical and research ultrasound systems. In our proposed Synthetic-aperture based photoacoustic re-beamforming (SPARE) approach, post-beamformed RF data from a clinical ultrasound scanner are considered as input data for an adaptive synthetic aperture beamforming algorithm. When receive focusing is applied prior to obtaining these data, the focal point is considered as a virtual element, and synthetic aperture beamforming is implemented assuming that the photoacoustic signals are received at the virtual element. The resolution and SNR obtained with the proposed method were compared to that obtained with conventional delay-and-sum beamforming with 99.87% and 91.56% agreement, respectively. In addition, we experimentally demonstrated feasibility with a pulsed laser diode setup. Results indicate that the post-beamformed RF data from any commercially available ultrasound platform can potentially be used to create PA images. PMID:27570697

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Ruiying; Xu, Song; Li, Guo; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma, one of the most common types of skin cancer, has a high mortality rate, mainly due to a high propensity for tumor metastasis. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential predictor for metastasis. Label-free imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo provides rich information on tumor progress. Here we present photoacoustic microscopy of single melanoma cells in living animals. We used a fast-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the microvasculature in mouse ears. The imaging system has sub-cellular spatial resolution and works in reflection mode. A fast-scanning mirror allows the system to acquire fast volumetric images over a large field of view. A 500-kHz pulsed laser was used to image blood and CTCs. Single circulating melanoma cells were imaged in both capillaries and trunk vessels in living animals. These high-resolution images may be used in early detection of CTCs with potentially high sensitivity. In addition, this technique enables in vivo study of tumor cell extravasation from a primary tumor, which addresses an urgent pre-clinical need.

  3. Inverse diffusion theory of photoacoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes the reconstruction of diffusion and absorption parameters in an elliptic equation from knowledge of internal data. In the application of photoacoustics, the internal data are the amount of thermal energy deposited by high frequency radiation propagating inside a domain of interest. These data are obtained by solving an inverse wave equation, which is well studied in the literature. We show that knowledge of two internal data based on well-chosen boundary conditions uniquely determines two constitutive parameters in diffusion and Schrödinger equations. Stability of the reconstruction is guaranteed under additional geometric constraints of strict convexity. No geometric constraints are necessary when 2n internal data for well-chosen boundary conditions are available, where n is spatial dimension. The set of well-chosen boundary conditions is characterized in terms of appropriate complex geometrical optics solutions

  4. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyszka, K. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Św. A. Boboli 8, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland); Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Tabe, M., E-mail: romtabe@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Jabłoński, R. [Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Św. A. Boboli 8, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-06-28

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots.

  5. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots

  6. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszka, K.; Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Jabłoński, R.; Tabe, M.

    2015-06-01

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., "donor-atom" quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., "donor-cluster" quantum dots. The potential depth of these "donor-cluster" quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots.

  7. A handheld optical fiber parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) probe for photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young; Chang, Cheung-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2014-03-01

    In current photoacoustic tomography (PAT), l-D or 2-D ultrasound arrays and multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are used to detect the photoacoustic signals simultaneously for "real-time" image construction. However, as the number of transducer elements and DAQ channels increase, the construction and operation of the ultrasound receiving system will become complex and costly. This situation can be addressed by using parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create true time delays in multiple PA signal channels. The time-delayed PA signals will reach the ultrasound transducer at different times and therefore can be received by one single-element transducer without mixing with each other. In this paper, we report the development of the first miniaturized PADL probe suitable for handheld operations. Fusedsilica optical fibers with low acoustic attenuation were used to construct the 16 PADLs with specific time delays. The handheld probe structure was fabricated using precision laser-micromachining process to provide robust mechanical support and accurate alignment of the PADLs with minimal acoustic distortion and inter-channel coupling. The 16 optical-fiber PADLs were arranged to form one input port and two output ports. Photoacoustic imaging of a black-ink target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was successfully conducted using the handheld PADL probe with two single-element transducers and two DAQ channels (equal to a channel reduction ratio of 8:1). Our results show that the PADL technique and the handheld probe could provide a promising solution for real-time PAT with significantly reduced complexity and cost of the ultrasound receiver system.

  8. Enhanced photoacoustic signal from DNA assembled gold nanoparticle networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an experimental finding of photoacoustic signal enhancement from finite sized DNA–gold nanoparticle networks. We synthesized DNA-functionalized hollow and solid gold nanospheres (AuNS) to form finite sized networks, which were characterized by means of optical extinction spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and scanning electron microscopy in transmission mode. It is shown that the signal amplification scales with network size for networks comprising either hollow or solid AuNS as well as networks consisting of both types of nanoparticles. The laser intensities applied in our multispectral setup (λ = 650 nm, 850 nm, 905 nm) were low enough to maintain the structural integrity of the networks. This reflects that the binding and recognition properties of the temperature-sensitive cross-linking DNA-molecules are retained. (paper)

  9. Functional photoacoustic imaging to observe regional brain activation induced by cocaine hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-09-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to detect small animal brain activation in response to drug abuse. Cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution was injected into the blood stream of Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. The rat brain functional change in response to the injection of drug was then monitored by the PAM technique. Images in the coronal view of the rat brain at the locations of 1.2 and 3.4 mm posterior to bregma were obtained. The resulted photoacoustic (PA) images showed the regional changes in the blood volume. Additionally, the regional changes in blood oxygenation were also presented. The results demonstrated that PA imaging is capable of monitoring regional hemodynamic changes induced by drug abuse.

  10. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Springeling, Geert; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; van Soest, Gijs

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerotic plaque. We specifically imaged lipid content, a key factor in vulnerable plaques that may lead to myocardial infarction. An integrated intravascular photoacoustics (IVPA) and ultrasound (IVUS) catheter with an outer diameter of 1.25 mm was developed. The catheter comprises an angle-polished optical fiber adjacent to a 30 MHz single-element transducer. The ultrasonic transducer was optically isolated to eliminate artifacts in the PA image. We performed measurements on a cylindrical vessel phantom and isolated point targets to demonstrate its imaging performance. Axial and lateral point spread function widths were 110 μm and 550 μm, respectively, for PA and 89 μm and 420 μm for US. We imaged two fresh human coronary arteries, showing different stages of disease, ex vivo. Specific photoacoustic imaging of lipid content, is achieved by spectroscopic imaging at different wavelengths between 1180 and 1230 nm.

  11. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  12. Reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography using a genetically encoded near-infrared phytochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Li, Lei; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lidai; Li, Guo; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of genetically encoded probes has revolutionized biomedical studies by providing valuable information about targeted biological processes. Here, we report a novel imaging technique, termed reversibly switchable photoacoustic tomography (RS-PAT), which exhibits large penetration depth, high detection sensitivity, and super-resolution. RS-PAT combines advanced photoacoustic imaging techniques with, for the first time, a nonfluorescent photoswitchable bacterial phytochrome. This bacterial phytochrome is the most near-infrared shifted genetically encoded probe reported so far. Moreover, this bacterial phytochrome is reversibly photoconvertible between its far-red and near-infrared light absorption states. Taking maximum advantage of the powerful imaging capability of PAT and the unique photochemical properties of the phytochrome, RS-PAT has broken through both the optical diffusion limit for deep-tissue imaging and the optical diffraction limit for super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, with RS-PAT we have achieved an unprecedented detection sensitivity of ~2 μM, or as few as ~20 tumor cells, at a centimeter depth. Such high sensitivity is fully demonstrated in our study by monitoring tumor growth and metastasis at whole-body level with ~100 μm resolution. Moreover, our microscopic implementation of RS-PAT is capable of imaging mammalian cells with a sub-diffraction lateral resolution of ~140 nm and axial resolution of ~400 nm, which are respectively ~2-fold and ~75-fold finer than those of our conventional photoacoustic microscopy. Overall, RS-PAT is a new and promising imaging technology for studying biological processes at different length scales.

  13. Compressed sensing and sparsity in photoacoustic tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Haltmeier, Markus; Moon, Sunghwan; Burgholzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the imaging speed is a central aim in photoacoustic tomography. In this work we address this issue using techniques of compressed sensing. We demonstrate that the number of measurements can significantly be reduced by allowing general linear measurements instead of point wise pressure values. A main requirement in compressed sensing is the sparsity of the unknowns to be recovered. For that purpose we develop the concept of sparsifying temporal transforms for three dimensional photoacoustic tomography. Reconstruction results for simulated and for experimental data verify that the proposed compressed sensing scheme allows to significantly reducing the number of spatial measurements without reducing the spatial resolution.

  14. Photoacoustic tomography of water in biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhun; Li, Changhui; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    As an emerging imaging technique that combines high optical contrast and ultrasonic detection, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has been widely used to image optically absorptive objects in both human and animal tissues. PAT overcomes the depth limitation of other high-resolution optical imaging methods, and it is also free from speckle artifacts. To our knowledge, water has never been imaged by PAT in biological tissue. Here, for the first time, we experimentally imaged water in both tissue phantoms and biological tissues using a near infrared (NIR) light source. The differences among photoacoustic images of water with different concentrations indicate that laser-based PAT can usefully detect and image water content in tissue.

  15. Reflection-artifact-free photoacoustic imaging using PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a main challenge to deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients generated by the skin surface and superficial vasculature will propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts can cause problems in image interpretation and limit imaging depth. In its basic version, PAFUSion mimics the inward travelling wave-field from blood vessel-like PA sources by applying focused ultrasound pulses, and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reflection artifact correction in addition to identification, towards obtaining an artifact-free photoacoustic image. In view of clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion in which photoacoustic data is backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wave-field and thus the reflection artifacts of a more arbitrary distribution of PA sources that also includes the skin melanin layer. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. We present a phantom experiment and initial in vivo measurements on human volunteers where we demonstrate significant reflection artifact reduction using our technique. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can reduce these artifacts significantly to improve the deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  16. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, L. V.; Zou, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT.

  17. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  18. Molecular Photoacoustic Tomography with Colloidal Nanobeacons**

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pramanik, Manojit; Senpan, Angana; Yang, Xinmai; Song, Kwang H.; Scott, Mike J.; Zhang, Huiying; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Wickline, Samuel A; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    Vascularly constrained, “soft” colloidal gold nanobeacons (GNB) demonstrate for the first time that GNBs can be characterized as exogenous photoacoustic contrast agents for targeted detection of fibrin, a major biochemical feature of thrombus. Fibrin-targeted GNBs provide a more than tenfold signal enhancement in photo acoustic tomography (PAT) in the NIR wavelength window, indicating their potential for diagnostic imaging with PAT.

  19. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Jelena; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajashekar; Bohndiek, Sarah;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the potential of targeted photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive method for detection of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Experimental Design We determined the presence and activity of two members of matrix metalloproteinase family (MMP), MMP-2 and MMP-9, suggested as biomarkers...

  20. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of a neoplastic cell strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoacoustic spectrum from lyophilized samples of a neoplastic cell strain (human colon adenocarcinoma HCT-8R) has been obtained at room temperature. The spectra present four absorption peaks corresponding to four different chromophores. Work is in progress to identify the absorbing structures

  1. Nonlinear frequency-mixing photoacoustic imaging of a crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigarev, N.; Zakrzewski, J.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2009-08-01

    We present a technique for nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of cracks by laser excitation with intensity modulation at two fundamental frequencies combined with detection at mixed frequencies. By exploiting the strong dependence of the photoacoustic emission efficiency on the state—open or closed—of the contacts between the crack faces, remarkably enhanced image contrast is observed, ˜20 times higher than in linear photoacoustic images at the highest of the fundamental frequencies.

  2. Super-resolution photoacoustic fluctuation imaging with multiple speckle illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Chaigne, Thomas; Allain, Marc; Katz, Ori; Gigan, Sylvain; Sentenac, Anne; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    In deep tissue photoacoustic imaging, the spatial resolution is inherently limited by acoustic diffraction. Moreover, as the ultrasound attenuation increases with frequency, resolution is often traded-off for penetration depth. Here we report on super-resolution photoacoustic imaging by use of multiple speckle illumination. Specifically, we show that the analysis of second-order fluctuations of the photoacoustic images combined with image deconvolution enables resolving optically absorbing structures beyond the acoustic diffraction limit. A resolution increase of almost a factor 2 is demonstrated experimentally. Our method introduces a new framework that could potentially lead to deep tissue photoacoustic imaging with sub-acoustic resolution.

  3. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  4. FPGA-based reconfigurable processor for ultrafast interlaced ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Aguirre, Andrés; Zhu, Quing

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we report, to the best of our knowledge, a unique field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based reconfigurable processor for real-time interlaced co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging and its application in imaging tumor dynamic response. The FPGA is used to control, acquire, store, delay-and-sum, and transfer the data for real-time co-registered imaging. The FPGA controls the ultrasound transmission and ultrasound and photoacoustic data acquisition process of a customized 16-channel module that contains all of the necessary analog and digital circuits. The 16-channel module is one of multiple modules plugged into a motherboard; their beamformed outputs are made available for a digital signal processor (DSP) to access using an external memory interface (EMIF). The FPGA performs a key role through ultrafast reconfiguration and adaptation of its structure to allow real-time switching between the two imaging modes, including transmission control, laser synchronization, internal memory structure, beamforming, and EMIF structure and memory size. It performs another role by parallel accessing of internal memories and multi-thread processing to reduce the transfer of data and the processing load on the DSP. Furthermore, because the laser will be pulsing even during ultrasound pulse-echo acquisition, the FPGA ensures that the laser pulses are far enough from the pulse-echo acquisitions by appropriate time-division multiplexing (TDM). A co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system consisting of four FPGA modules (64-channels) is constructed, and its performance is demonstrated using phantom targets and in vivo mouse tumor models. PMID:22828830

  5. Invasive and transcranial photoacoustic imaging of the vascular response to brain electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Yao, Junjie; Hu, Song; Li, Li; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Advances in the brain functional imaging greatly facilitated the understanding of neurovascular coupling. For monitoring of the microvascular response to the brain electrical stimulation in vivo we used optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) through the cranial openings as well as transcranially. Both types of the vascular response, vasoconstriction and vasodilatation, were clearly observed with good spatial and temporal resolution. Obtained results confirm one of the primary points of the neurovascular coupling theory that blood vessels could present vasoconstriction or vasodilatation in response to electrical stimulation, depending on the balance between inhibition and excitation of the different parts of the elements of the neurovascular coupling system.

  6. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Patimisco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis.

  7. Photoacoustic and Photothermal Effects in Particulate Suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, Gerald, J.

    2009-04-30

    A summary of the research areas investigated by the author during the grant period is given. Experiments and theory have been carried out on the photoacoustic effect arising from a number of physical and chemical processes. A number of studies of the photoacoustic effect as it occurs in transient grating experiments have been completed. The research done with the Ludwig-Soret effect on the generation of shock waves is reported. Other research, such as that carried out on interferometric and beam deflection microphones, the use of microphones in vacuum as momentum flux detectors, and chemical generation of sonoluminescence is listed. A list of published research including selected publications, a complete list of journal articles, books, review articles, and reviews are given.

  8. Mathematics of Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The chapter surveys the mathematical models, problems, and algorithms of the thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT). TAT and PAT represent probably the most developed of the several novel “hybrid” methods of medical imaging. These new modalities combine different physical types of waves (electromagnetic and acoustic in case of TAT and PAT) in such a way that the resolution and contrast of the resulting method are much higher than those achievable using only acoustic or electromagnetic measurements.

  9. Absolute Photoacoustic Thermometry in Deep Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) thermography is a promising tool for temperature measurement in deep tissue. Here, we propose an absolute temperature measurement method based on the dual temperature dependences of the Grüneisen parameter and the speed of sound in tissue. By taking ratiometric measurements at two adjacent temperatures, we can eliminate the factors that are temperature irrelevant but difficult to correct for in deep tissue. To validate our method, absolute temperatures of blood-filled tubes...

  10. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA...

  11. Photoacoustic Characterization of Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh ...

  12. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process

  13. Phase transition in L-alaninium oxalate by photoacoustics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sivabarathy; S Natarajan; S K Ramakrishnan; K Ramachandran

    2004-10-01

    Phase transition in L-alaninium oxalate is studied by using TG, DTA and photoacoustic spectroscopy. A sharp transition at 378 K by photoacoustics is observed whereas at the same temperature the endothermic energy change observed by TG and DTA is not very sharp. This is discussed in detail with reference to the other known data for the organic crystals.

  14. Hands-on resonance-enhanced photoacoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Manfred

    2001-10-01

    The design of an improved photoacoustic converter cell using kitchen equipment is described. It operates by changing manually the Helmholtz resonance frequency of bottles by adjusting the distance between the bottleneck and the outer ear. The experiment helps to gain insights in ear performance, in photoacoustic detection methods, in resonance phenomena and their role for detecting small periodic signals in the presence of noise.

  15. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M.; Varela, J.; Hernández, L.; González, A.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process.

  16. Near Infrared Photoacoustic Detection of Heptane in Synthetic Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Albu, Mihaela; Willatzen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    Trace contaminations of n-heptane in synthetic air is measured in the parts-per-billion (ppb) range using near infrared photoacoustic detection. We describe the fundamental theory used in the design of the photoacoustic cell for trace gas analysis and determine the detection limit of the cell. On...

  17. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  18. Photoacoustic and Colorimetric Visualization of Latent Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Huang, Peng; Yi, Chenglin; Ning, Bo; Hu, Song; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2015-12-22

    There is a high demand on a simple, rapid, accurate, user-friendly, cost-effective, and nondestructive universal method for latent fingerprint (LFP) detection. Herein, we describe a combination imaging strategy for LFP visualization with high resolution using poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride)-b-polystyrene (PSMA-b-PS) functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). This general approach integrates the merits of both colorimetric imaging and photoacoustic imaging. In comparison with the previous methods, our strategy is single-step and does not require the signal amplification by silver staining. The PSMA-b-PS functionalized GNPs have good stability, tunable color, and high affinity for universal secretions (proteins/polypeptides/amino acids), which makes our approach general and flexible for visualizing LFPs on different substrates (presumably with different colors) and from different people. Moreover, the unique optical property of GNPs enables the photoacoustic imaging of GNPs-deposited LFPs with high resolution. This allows observation of level 3 hyperfine features of LFPs such as the pores and ridge contours by photoacoustic imaging. This technique can potentially be used to identify chemicals within LFP residues. We believe that this dual-modality imaging of LFPs will find widespread use in forensic investigations and medical diagnostics. PMID:26528550

  19. An optimized ultrasound detector for photoacoustic breast tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Wenfeng; Van Hespen, Johan; Van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; Van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has proven to be able to detect vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast associated with tumors. In order to detect breast tumors located a few centimeter deep in tissue, a sensitive ultrasound detector is of crucial importance for photoacoustic mammography. Further, because the expected photoacoustic frequency bandwidth (a few MHz to tens of kHz) is inversely proportional to the dimensions of light absorbing structures (0.5 to 10+ mm), proper choices of materials and their geometries, and proper considerations in design have to be made for optimal photoacoustic detectors. In this study, we design and evaluate a specialized ultrasound detector for photoacoustic mammography. Based on the required detector sensitivity and its frequency response, a selection of active material and matching layers and their geometries is made leading to a functional detector models. By iteration between simulation of detector performances, fabrication and experimental characterization of functional...

  20. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  1. Influence of nanoscale temperature rises on photoacoustic generation: discrimination between optical absorbers based on nonlinear photoacoustics at high frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Simandoux, Oliver; Gâteau, Jérôme; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    In the thermoelastic regime, photoacoustic sensing of optical absorption relies on conversion from light to acoustic energy via the coefficient of thermal expansion \\beta. In this work, we confront confront experimental measurements to theoretical predictions of nonlinear photoacoustic generation based on the dynamic variation of \\beta(T) during the optical excitation of absorbers in aqueous solution. The photoacoustic generation from solutions of organic dye and gold nanospheres (with same optical densities), illuminated with 532 nm nanosecond pulses, was detected using a high frequency ultrasound transducer (center frequency 20 MHz). Photoacoustic emission was observed with gold nanospheres at low fluence (a few mJ/cm2) for an equilibrium temperature around 4{\\deg}C, where the linear photoacoustic effect in water vanishes, highlighting the nonlinear emission from the solution of nanospheres. Under the same condition, no emission was observed with the absorbing organic dye. At a fixed fluence of 5 mJ/cm2, th...

  2. Simultaneous optical recording in multiple cells by digital holographic microscopy of chloride current associated to activation of the ligand-gated chloride channel GABA(A receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Jourdain

    Full Text Available Chloride channels represent a group of targets for major clinical indications. However, molecular screening for chloride channel modulators has proven to be difficult and time-consuming as approaches essentially rely on the use of fluorescent dyes or invasive patch-clamp techniques which do not lend themselves to the screening of large sets of compounds. To address this problem, we have developed a non-invasive optical method, based on digital holographic microcopy (DHM, allowing monitoring of ion channel activity without using any electrode or fluorescent dye. To illustrate this approach, GABA(A mediated chloride currents have been monitored with DHM. Practically, we show that DHM can non-invasively provide the quantitative determination of transmembrane chloride fluxes mediated by the activation of chloride channels associated with GABA(A receptors. Indeed through an original algorithm, chloride currents elicited by application of appropriate agonists of the GABA(A receptor can be derived from the quantitative phase signal recorded with DHM. Finally, chloride currents can be determined and pharmacologically characterized non-invasively simultaneously on a large cellular sampling by DHM.

  3. Photoacoustic Imaging of the Breast Using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope: Present Status and Future Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Piras; W. Xia; W. Steenbergen; T.G. van Leeuwen; S. Manohar

    2010-01-01

    The Twente photoacoustic mammoscope (PAM) uses pulsed light at 1064 nm to excite PA signals. Detection is using a planar 590-element ultrasound (US) sensor matrix. Image reconstruction uses a delay-and-sum beamforming algorithm. Measurements are performed in the forward mode, with mild compression o

  4. Atomic force microscopy and MD simulations reveal pore-like structures of all-D-enantiomer of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide: relevance to the ion channel mechanism of AD pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Laura; Jang, Hyunbum; Arce, Fernando Teran; Capone, Ricardo; Kotler, Samuel A; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Kagan, Bruce L; Nussinov, Ruth; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a protein misfolding disease characterized by a buildup of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide as senile plaques, uncontrolled neurodegeneration, and memory loss. AD pathology is linked to the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis and involves Aβ peptide-plasma membrane interactions. In principle, there are two possible ways through which disturbance of the ionic homeostasis can take place: directly, where the Aβ peptide either inserts into the membrane and creates ion-conductive pores or destabilizes the membrane organization, or, indirectly, where the Aβ peptide interacts with existing cell membrane receptors. To distinguish between these two possible types of Aβ-membrane interactions, we took advantage of the biochemical tenet that ligand-receptor interactions are stereospecific; L-amino acid peptides, but not their D-counterparts, bind to cell membrane receptors. However, with respect to the ion channel-mediated mechanism, like L-amino acids, D-amino acid peptides will also form ion channel-like structures. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we imaged the structures of both D- and L-enantiomers of the full length Aβ(1-42) when reconstituted in lipid bilayers. AFM imaging shows that both L- and D-Aβ isomers form similar channel-like structures. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations support the AFM imaged 3D structures. Previously, we have shown that D-Aβ(1-42) channels conduct ions similarly to their L- counterparts. Taken together, our results support the direct mechanism of Aβ ion channel-mediated destabilization of ionic homeostasis rather than the indirect mechanism through Aβ interaction with membrane receptors. PMID:22217000

  5. Photoacoustic Imaging: Semiconducting Oligomer Nanoparticles as an Activatable Photoacoustic Probe with Amplified Brightness for In Vivo Imaging of pH (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qingqing; Lyu, Yan; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2016-05-01

    Despite the great potential of photoacoustic imaging in the life sciences, the development of smart activatable photoacoustic probes remains elusive. On page 3662, K. Pu and co-workers report a facile nanoengineering approach based on semiconducting oligomer nano-particles to develop ratiometric photoacoustic probes with amplified brightness and enhanced sensing capability for accurate photoacoustic mapping of pH in the tumors of living mice. PMID:27167028

  6. Effective thermal diffusivity study of powder biocomposites via photoacoustic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariucci, V.V.G.; Cruz, J.A. da; Bonadio, T.G.M.; Picolloto, A.M.; Weinand, W.R.; Lima, W.M.; Medina, A.N.; Bento, A.C., E-mail: vgmariucci@hotmail.com, E-mail: pg51508@uem.br [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2015-10-15

    The effective thermal diffusivity for biocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) on powder form was studied via photoacoustic method adapted for porous materials. The concentration of each element was accompanied with the results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A theoretical model for the thermal coupling of a three layered sample, designed to contain the powder material is proposed. The method for mixtures obeyed the formula [(1 - x)HAp + (x)Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}] for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Experimental results for effective thermal diffusivity ranged between (6.4 ± 0.3) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} and (9.8 ± 0.4) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} for x ≤ 0.7. Values of the effective thermal diffusivity have decreased sharply to (0.70 ± 0.03) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2} s{sup -1} for x > 0.7. SEM micrographs showed a coating of HAp over the particles of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} for some mixtures. (author)

  7. Effective thermal diffusivity study of powder biocomposites via photoacoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective thermal diffusivity for biocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) on powder form was studied via photoacoustic method adapted for porous materials. The concentration of each element was accompanied with the results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A theoretical model for the thermal coupling of a three layered sample, designed to contain the powder material is proposed. The method for mixtures obeyed the formula [(1 - x)HAp + (x)Nb2O5] for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Experimental results for effective thermal diffusivity ranged between (6.4 ± 0.3) x 10-6 m2 s-1 and (9.8 ± 0.4) x 10-6 m2 s-1 for x ≤ 0.7. Values of the effective thermal diffusivity have decreased sharply to (0.70 ± 0.03) x 10-6 m2 s-1 for x > 0.7. SEM micrographs showed a coating of HAp over the particles of Nb2O5 for some mixtures. (author)

  8. Effective Thermal Diffusivity Study of Powder Biocomposites via Photoacoustic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariucci, V. V. G.; da Cruz, J. A.; Bonadio, T. G. M.; Picolloto, A. M.; Weinand, W. R.; Lima, W. M.; Medina, A. N.; Bento, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    The effective thermal diffusivity for biocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) on powder form was studied via photoacoustic method adapted for porous materials. The concentration of each element was accompanied with the results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A theoretical model for the thermal coupling of a three layered sample, designed to contain the powder material is proposed. The method for mixtures obeyed the formula [(1 - x) H A p + ( x) N b 2O5] for 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Experimental results for effective thermal diffusivity ranged between (6.4 ± 0.3) × 10-6 m2 s-1 and (9.8 ± 0.4) × 10-6 m2 s-1 for x ≤ 0.7. Values of the effective thermal diffusivity have decreased sharply to (0.7 ± 0.03) ×10-6 m2 s-1 for x > 0.7. SEM micrographs showed a coating of HAp over the particles of Nb2O5 for some mixtures.

  9. Analytical calibration of linear transducer arrays for photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Fournelle, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Tomographic photoacoustic imaging (PAT) allows to overcome the anisotropic image resolution of conventional reflection mode imaging. In order to achieve high-resolution, tomographic images, precise information on the position of each detector element is required. PAT systems that acquire signals from rotating linear transducer arrays come with inevitable transducer misalignments. Up to now, transducer orientation (x/y-tilt) and radial distance uncertainty were measured experimentally or have not been considered. Uncalibrated, these systems suffer from characteristic artifacts yielding misinterpretations of anatomic structures. Herein, we derive the artifact mathematically and investigate an analytical calibration method that enables the calculation and compensation of important transducer positioning parameters: the rotational radius and in-plane tilt. We studied the approach theoretically and evaluated the performance of the developed algorithm both on numerical and experimental data. A PAT system based on a 5-MHz linear transducer array, a multichannel electronics platform with channel data access, a NIR-emitting laser system and a rotating samples is used to demonstrate the benefit of the transducer calibration method providing isotropic resolution of 160 μm.

  10. Combined Photoacoustic-Acoustic Technique for Crack Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Chigarev, N.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear imaging of a crack by combination of a common photoacoustic imaging technique with additional acoustic loading has been performed. Acoustic signals at two different fundamental frequencies were launched in the sample, one photoacoustically through heating of the sample surface by the intensity-modulated scanning laser beam and another by a piezoelectrical transducer. The acoustic signal at mixed frequencies, generated due to system nonlinearity, has been detected by an accelerometer. Different physical mechanisms of the nonlinearity contributing to the contrast in linear and nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of the crack are discussed.

  11. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Springston, S [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Koontz, A [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Aiken, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  12. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  13. Cytotoxic Induction and Photoacoustic Imaging of Breast Cancer Cells Using Astaxanthin-Reduced Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniyan Bharathiraja

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a kind of photosynthetic pigment, was employed for gold nanoparticle formation. Nanoparticles were characterized using Ulteraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction, and the possible presence of astaxanthin functional groups were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The cytotoxic effect of synthesized nanoparticles was evaluated against MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer cells using a tetrazolium-based assay, and synthesized nanoparticles exhibited dose-dependent toxicity. The morphology upon cell death was differentiated through fluorescent microscopy using different stains that predicted apoptosis. The synthesized nanoparticles were applied in ultrasound-coupled photoacoustic imaging to obtain good images of treated cells. Astaxanthin-reduced gold nanoparticle has the potential to act as a promising agent in the field of photo-based diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Photoacoustic, Photothermal, and Diffusion-Wave Sciences in the Twenty-First Century: Triumphs of the Past Set the Trends for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    A handful of early breakthroughs in photoacoustic science and engineering since its modern-day (scientific) renaissance in the 1970s has defined directions in the development of the photoacoustic, photothermal, and diffusion-wave fields in the past 40 years that have shaped modern day developments and have led to an impressive range of vibrant and unique technologies in the third millennium (technological renaissance). A power-point presentation on the ICPPP-16 opening plenary talk focuses on the historical roots of what I perceive to be some of today's most successful and unique technologies, while readily acknowledging the impossibility to be all inclusive. It can be found under the url: http://cadift.mie.utoronto.ca/History_of_Photoacoustics-Photothermics.ppt. The thematic areas in question include historical reviews selected among the following topics: Piezoelectric photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) which, along with early gas-phase PA spectroscopic studies of biomaterials such as blood haemoglobin and progress in the physics of photon diffusion waves, has led to the modern-day explosion in biomedical photoacoustic imaging technologies with future trends for photoacoustic and ultrasound co-registered imagers; Thermoreflectance, piezoelectric, and gas-phase PA imaging of semiconductors which, along with developments in photocarrier diffusion wave physics, led to photocarrier radiometry, nanolayer diagnostics, carrierographic imaging of optoelectronic materials, and devices with industrial trends in solar cell inspection and control; Photoacoustic gas-phase and infrared radiometric probing and scanning imaging NDE which led to lock-in thermography and have spawned industrial and biomedical technologies; Thermal-wave interferometry and the quest for thermal coherence which led to thermal-wave cavities, the thermal-wave radar, and derivative depth profiling technologies, and, very recently, thermal coherence tomography. This review is meant to be a growing public

  15. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  16. Photoacoustic microtomography using optical interferometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuster, Robert; Holotta, Markus; Kremser, Christian; Grossauer, Harald; Burgholzer, Peter; Paltauf, Günther

    2010-03-01

    A device for three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography with resolution in the range of tens of micrometers is presented that uses a light beam for interferometric detection of acoustic waves. Reconstruction of the 3-D initial pressure distribution from the signals representing line integrals of the acoustic field is a two-step process. It uses an inversion of 2-D wave propagation to obtain line projections of the initial pressure distribution and the inverse Radon transform. The light beam, propagating freely in a water bath, is scanned either in an arc- or box-shaped curve around the object. Simulations are performed to compare the two scanning procedures. The projection images are obtained either using the filtered back projection algorithm for the π-arc scanning mode or the frequency domain algorithm for the box scanning mode. While the former algorithm provides slightly better image quality, the latter is about 20 times faster. The ability of the photoacoustic tomography device to create 3-D images with constant resolution throughout the reconstruction volume is demonstrated experimentally using a human hair phantom. These measurements revealed a 3-D resolution below 100 μm. In a second experiment, 3-D imaging of an isolated mouse heart is demonstrated to show the applicability for preclinical and biological research.

  17. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of vascular elasticity can help detect thrombosis and prevent life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Here, we propose vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) to measure vascular elasticity in humans. VE-PAT was developed by incorporating a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system with a customized compression stage. By measuring the deformation of blood vessels under uniaxial loading, VE-PAT was able to quantify the vascular compliance. We first demonstrated the feasibility of VE-PAT in blood vessel phantoms. In large vessel phantoms, VE-PAT detected a decrease in vascular compliance due to simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. In small blood vessel phantoms embedded 3 mm deep in gelatin, VE-PAT detected elasticity changes at depths that are difficult to image using other elasticity imaging techniques. We then applied VE-PAT to assess vascular compliance in a human subject and detected a decrease in vascular compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point, demonstrating the potential of VE-PAT in clinical applications such as detection of deep venous thrombosis.

  18. Photoacoustic tomography of vascular compliance in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-12-01

    Characterization of blood vessel elastic properties can help in detecting thrombosis and preventing life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) is proposed to measure blood vessel compliance in humans. Implemented on a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system, VE-PAT can quantify blood vessel compliance changes due to simulated thrombosis and occlusion. The feasibility of the VE-PAT system was first demonstrated by measuring the strains under uniaxial loading in perfused blood vessel phantoms and quantifying their compliance changes due to the simulated thrombosis. The VE-PAT system detected a decrease in the compliances of blood vessel phantoms with simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. The VE-PAT system was then applied to assess blood vessel compliance in a human subject. Experimental results showed a decrease in compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point in the blood vessels, demonstrating VE-PAT's potential for clinical thrombosis detection.

  19. The Application of Quality Identification in Honey by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wen-ting; Yuan, Ping; Guo, Wen-juan; Liu, Jian-en

    2015-05-01

    The photoacoustic spectrum of glucose, sucrose and honey solutions in the visible range are measured by using the single-light photoacoustic spectrometer, and are compared with the spectra from spedtrophotometry method. The spectral characteristics of the above solutions show that the spectral background intensity and spectral profile have some differences for different kinds of solutions. The spectra of the three kinds of solutions all have strong peak value at 485 and 655 nm, but the intensity ratios between the two peaks are different. Besides, there are characteristic peak at 475, 576 and 630 nm for glucose, and the sucrose has apparent characteristic peak at 632 nm, these characteristic peaks can be used for detecting whether the natural honey has been added glucose or sucrose. By comparing two kinds of spectrum of the same solution, the intensity of photoacoustic spectrum is more responsive to the wavelength, indicating photoacoustic spectrometry has a higher sensitivity in the test of material composition. PMID:26415423

  20. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluru, Keerthi S; Wilson, Katheryne E; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-08-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429141

  1. Dual Modality Noncontact Photoacoustic and Spectral Domain OCT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Hochreiner, Armin; Hollinger, Philipp; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a multimodal imaging system, combining noncontact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Photoacoustic signals are recorded without contact to the specimens’ surface by using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized within a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. The fiber-optic network allows the integration of a fiber-based OCT system operating at a wavelength region around 1310 nm. Light from the fiber laser and...

  2. Modification of a commercial spectrophotometer for photoacoustic measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note describes how a commercial UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer may be adapted to function as a double beam photoacoustic spectrophotometer operating at visible wavelengths. Modification of a Varian Cary 17 spectrophotometer was carried out first by dismounting the photomultiplier tube detector module and the cell compartment of the spectrophotometer. The sample and the reference beams were focused through two externally mounted quartz lenses onto the sample and reference photoacoustic cells, respectively

  3. Circulating tumor cell detection using photoacoustic spectral methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-03-01

    A method to detect and differentiate circulating melanoma tumor cells (CTCs) from blood cells using ultrasound and photoacoustic signals with frequencies over 100 MHz is presented. At these frequencies, the acoustic wavelength is similar to the dimensions of a cell, which results in unique features in the signal; periodically varying minima and maxima occur throughout the power spectrum. The spacing between minima depends on the ratio of the size to sound speed of the cell. Using a 532 nm pulsed laser and a 375 MHz center frequency wide-bandwidth transducer, the ultrasound and photoacoustic signals were measured from single cells. A total of 80 cells were measured, 20 melanoma cells, 20 white blood cells (WBCs) and 40 red blood cells (RBCs). The photoacoustic spectral spacing Δf between minima was 95 +/- 15 MHz for melanoma cells and greater than 230 MHz for RBCs. No photoacoustic signal was detected from WBCs. The ultrasonic spectral spacing between minima was 46 +/- 9 MHz for melanoma cells and 98 +/- 11 for WBCs. Both photoacoustic and ultrasound signals were detected from melanoma cells, while only ultrasound signals were detected from WBCs. RBCs showed distinct photoacoustic spectral variations in comparison to any other type of cell. Using the spectral spacing and signal amplitudes, each cell type could be grouped together to aid in cell identification. This method could be used for label-free counting and classifying cells in a sample.

  4. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using clinical ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a potential hybrid imaging modality which is gaining attention in the field of medical imaging. Typically a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to excite the tissue and generate photoacoustic signals. But, they are not suitable for clinical applications owing to their high cost, large size. Also, their low pulse repetition rate (PRR) of few tens of hertz prevents them from being used in real-time PAT. So, there is a growing need for an imaging system capable of real-time imaging for various clinical applications. In this work, we are using a nanosecond pulsed laser diode as an excitation source and a clinical ultrasound imaging system to obtain the photoacoustic imaging. The excitation laser is ~803 nm in wavelength with energy of ~1.4 mJ per pulse. So far, the reported frame rate for photoacoustic imaging is only a few hundred Hertz. We have demonstrated up to 7000 frames per second framerate in photoacoustic imaging (B-mode) and measured the flow rate of fast moving obje ct. Phantom experiments were performed to test the fast imaging capability and measure the flow rate of ink solution inside a tube. This fast photoacoustic imaging can be used for various clinical applications including cardiac related problems, where the blood flow rate is quite high, or other dynamic studies.

  5. Imaging and detection of early stage dental caries with an all-optical photoacoustic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooth decay, at its earliest stages, manifests itself as small, white, subsurface lesions in the enamel. Current methods for detection in the dental clinic are visual and tactile investigations, and bite-wing X-ray radiographs. These techniques suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease due to the small size (<100μm) of the lesion. A fine-resolution (600 nm) ultra-broadband (200 MHz) all-optical photoacoustic microscopy system was is used to image the early signs of tooth decay. Ex-vivo tooth samples exhibiting white spot lesions were scanned and were found to generate a larger (one order of magnitude) photoacoustic (PA) signal in the lesion regions compared to healthy enamel. The high contrast in the PA images potentially allows lesions to be imaged and measured at a much earlier stage than current clinical techniques allow. PA images were cross referenced with histology photographs to validate our experimental results. Our PA system provides a noncontact method for early detection of white-spot lesions with a high detection bandwidth that offers advantages over previously demonstrated ultrasound methods. The technique provides the sensing depth of an ultrasound system, but with the spatial resolution of an optical system

  6. Photoacoustic injury and bone healing following 193nm excimer laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustmann, J; Ulmansky, M; Fuxbrunner, A; Lewis, A

    1992-01-01

    The argon-fluoride excimer laser was investigated as a cutting-ablating tool for bone surgery. A total of 52 rats were divided into two experimental groups and two control groups. In one experimental group cortical bone defects were made; in another experimental group defects penetrating into the medullary space were performed. In the two control groups similar defects were achieved using water-cooled carbide burs. The rats were sacrificed on each of the 3, 7, 10, 20, 30, and 40 postoperative day. The cortical bone, the medullary space, and the extrabony tissue were examined by means of light microscopy. In both experimental groups, bone damage, represented by osteocyte destruction, extended to 1,050-1,450 microns ahead from the irradiated site, and bone healing was very much impaired. In the control groups no histological changes could be identified and bone healing appeared to be within normal limits. We believe this extensive bone damage, following 193 nm irradiation, to be a result of photoacoustic waves propagating in the bone following each pulse. In view of our results we feel that excimer lasers presently in use are not suitable for bone surgery. This problem of photoacoustic damage can be overcome in one of two ways: by designing a CW excimer laser or by reducing the pulse width to the picosecond regime. PMID:1495367

  7. Photoacoustic determination of blood vessel diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Hopman, Jeroen C. W.; de Mul, Frits F. M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Thijssen, Johan M.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2004-10-01

    A double-ring sensor was applied in photoacoustic tomographic imaging of artificial blood vessels as well as blood vessels in a rabbit ear. The peak-to-peak time (tgrpp) of the laser (1064 nm) induced pressure transient was used to estimate the axial vessel diameter. Comparison with the actual vessel diameter showed that the diameter could be approximated by 2ctgrpp, with c the speed of sound in blood. Using this relation, the lateral diameter could also precisely be determined. In vivo imaging and monitoring of changes in vessel diameters was feasible. Finally, acoustic time traces were recorded while flushing a vessel in the rabbit ear with saline, which proved that the main contribution to the laser-induced pressure transient is caused by blood inside the vessel and that the vessel wall gives only a minor contribution.

  8. Photoacoustic determination of blood vessel diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double-ring sensor was applied in photoacoustic tomographic imaging of artificial blood vessels as well as blood vessels in a rabbit ear. The peak-to-peak time (τpp) of the laser (1064 nm) induced pressure transient was used to estimate the axial vessel diameter. Comparison with the actual vessel diameter showed that the diameter could be approximated by 2cτpp, with c the speed of sound in blood. Using this relation, the lateral diameter could also precisely be determined. In vivo imaging and monitoring of changes in vessel diameters was feasible. Finally, acoustic time traces were recorded while flushing a vessel in the rabbit ear with saline, which proved that the main contribution to the laser-induced pressure transient is caused by blood inside the vessel and that the vessel wall gives only a minor contribution

  9. Multi-quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; Yu, Xin; Yu, Guang; Li, Xudong; Zhang, Jingbo; Chen, Deying; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-07-01

    A multi-quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (M-QEPAS) sensor system for trace gas detection is reported. Instead of a single quartz tuning fork (QTF) as used in QEPAS technique, a dual QTF sensor platform was adopted in M-QEPAS to increase the signal strength by the addition of the detected QEPAS signals. Water vapor was selected as the target analyte. M-QEPAS realized a 1.7 times signal enhancement as compared to the QEPAS method for the same operating conditions. A minimum detection limit of 23.9 ppmv was achieved for the M-QEPAS sensor, with a calculated normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 5.95 × 10-8 cm-1W/√Hz. The M-QEPAS sensor performance can be further improved when more QTFs are employed or an acoustic micro-resonator architecture is used.

  10. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  11. Resolution enhancement in nonlinear photoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear processes can be exploited to gain access to more information than is possible in the linear regime. Nonlinearity modifies the spectra of the excitation signals through harmonic generation, frequency mixing, and spectral shifting, so that features originally outside the detector range can be detected. Here, we present an experimental study of resolution enhancement for photoacoustic imaging of thin metal layers immersed in water. In this case, there is a threshold in the excitation below which no acoustic signal is detected. Above threshold, the nonlinearity reduces the width of the active area of the excitation beam, resulting in a narrower absorption region and thus improved spatial resolution. This gain is limited only by noise, as the active area of the excitation can be arbitrarily reduced when the fluence becomes closer to the threshold. Here, we demonstrate a two-fold improvement in resolution and quantify the image quality as the excitation fluence goes through threshold

  12. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  13. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  14. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  15. Tetragonal ZrO2:Nd3+ nanosphere: Combustion synthesis, luminescence and photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Santosh K.; Chandrasekhar, D.; Kadam, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Nanocrystalline ZrO2:Nd3+ was synthesised using gel-combustion method and characterized systematically using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Through this route we can stabilize metastable tetragonal phase at 500 °C through addition of 1 mol % Nd3+ which is technologically more important. Optical characterization of the sample was done using photoluminescence (PL) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). PL studies shows an intense and optimum stimulated emission cross section of 1065 nm peak corresponding to 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 which and thus it can be a probable laser material. PAS is used to investigate electronic absorption of Nd3 in zirconia. Various covalency parameters like nephelauxetic ratio (β), covalency factor (b1/2) and Sinha parameter (δ) were evaluated for pure oxide powder and as well as for Nd3+ doped zirconia.

  16. Photoacoustic and SEM analysis of fracture bone callus to different consolidation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomelí Mejia, P. A.; Urriolagoitia, G.; Jiménez Pérez, J. L.; Cruz Orea, A.; Lecona Butron, H.; Villegas Castrejón, H.

    2005-06-01

    The Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to perform a study of fractured bone callus to different consolidation times. From these techniques we obtained optical absorption spectra and pictures of male rat fractured bones at different consolidation times. From these spectra it was possible to observe the presence of p-Nitrophenylphosphatase, characteristic phosphatase in rat fractured bones through their absorption peaks which were compared with characteristic reported peaks in the literature for this phosphatase. In this study we showed that p-Nitrophenylphosphatase could be considered as an indicator of the repair process of bone fractures. Through the complementary SEM analysis it was possible to obtain different pictures as the callus grows in the time.

  17. Open Photoacoustic Cell Configuration Applied to the Thermal Characterization of Liquid CdS Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Nastaran; Mahmood Mat Yunus, W.; Kharazmi, Alireza; Saion, Elias; Behzad, Kasra

    2014-01-01

    CdS nanofluids were prepared by the gamma-radiation method at different radiation doses. The samples were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The open cell photoacoustic technique was used to measure the thermal effusivity of the CdS nanocomposites. In this technique a He-Ne laser was used as the excitation source and was operated at 632.8 nm with an output power of 70 mW. The precision and accuracy of this technique were initially established by measuring the thermal effusivity of distilled water and ethylene glycol. The thermal-effusivity values of these two samples were found to be close to the values reported in the literature. The thermal effusivity of CdS nanofluids decreased from (0.453 to 0.268) with increased dosage of gamma radiation.

  18. A 2.5-mm diameter probe for photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Chen, Ruimin; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Li, Chiye; Hu, Zhilin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-10-01

    We have created a 2.5-mm outer diameter integrated photo-acoustic and ultrasonic mini-probe which can be inserted into a standard video endoscope's instrument channel. A small-diameter focused ultrasonic transducer made of PMN-PT provides adequate signal sensitivity, and enables miniaturization of the probe. Additionally, this new endoscopic probe utilizes the same scanning mirror and micromotor-based built-in actuator described in our previous reports; however, the length of the rigid distal section of the new probe has been further reduced to ~35 mm. This paper describes the technical details of the mini-probe and presents experimental results that both quantify the imaging performance and demonstrate its in vivo imaging capability, which suggests that it could work as a mini-probe for certain clinical applications. PMID:23188360

  19. Photoacoustic detection of blood in dental pulp by using short-time Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Azusa; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    A method based on photoacoustic analysis is proposed to diagnose dental pulp vitality. Photoacoustic analysis enables to get signal from deeper tissues than other optical analyses and therefore, signal detection from root canal of thick dental tissues such as molar teeth is expected. As a light source for excitation of photoacoustic waves, a microchip Q-switched YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm was used and owing to large penetration depth of the near infrared laser, photoacoustic signals from dental root were successfully obtained. It was found that the photoacoustic signals from the teeth containing hemoglobin solution in the pulp cavity provide vibration in high frequency region. It was also shown that the intensities of the high frequency component have correlation with the hemoglobin concentration of solution. We applied short-time Fourier transform for evaluation of photoacoustic signals and this analysis clearly showed photoacoustic signals from dental root.

  20. Intravital microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Milberg, Oleg; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Sramkova, Monika; Wigand, Tim; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Weigert, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an extremely powerful tool that enables imaging several biological processes in live animals. Recently, the ability to image subcellular structures in several organs combined with the development of sophisticated genetic tools has made possible extending this approach to investigate several aspects of cell biology. Here we provide a general overview of intravital microscopy with the goal of highlighting its potential and challenges. Specifically, this review is geared...

  1. Correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  2. Simultaneous three-dimensional laser-ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzinger, Gerhild; Nuster, Robert; Schmitner, Nicole; Gratt, Sibylle; Paltauf, Günther

    2013-06-01

    A purely optical setup for simultaneous photoacoustic (PA) and laser-ultrasound (US) tomography is presented. It is shown that combined imaging can be achieved by using the same laser pulse for photoacoustic generation and for launching a broadband ultrasound pulse from an optically absorbing target. Detection of the laser-generated plane waves that have been scattered at the imaging object and of the photoacoustic signals emitted from the sample is done interferometrically. This way data for PA and US imaging are acquired within one single measurement. Distinction between the signals is possible due to their different times of flight. After data separation, image reconstruction is done using standard back-projection algorithms. The resolution of the setup was estimated and images of a zebra fish are shown, demonstrating the complementary information of the two imaging modalities.

  3. Reconstructing absorption and scattering distributions in quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative photoacoustic tomography is a novel hybrid imaging technique aiming at estimating optical parameters inside tissues. The method combines (functional) optical information and accurate anatomical information obtained using ultrasound techniques. The optical inverse problem of quantitative photoacoustic tomography is to estimate the optical parameters within tissue when absorbed optical energy density is given. In this paper we consider reconstruction of absorption and scattering distributions in quantitative photoacoustic tomography. The radiative transport equation and diffusion approximation are used as light transport models and solutions in different size domains are investigated. The simulations show that scaling of the data, for example by using logarithmic data, can be expected to significantly improve the convergence of the minimization algorithm. Furthermore, both the radiative transport equation and diffusion approximation can give good estimates for absorption. However, depending on the optical properties and the size of the domain, the diffusion approximation may not produce as good estimates for scattering as the radiative transport equation. (paper)

  4. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Qiu, Yishen; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  5. Photoacoustic Study of Fungal Disease of Acai ( Euterpe oleracea) Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Denise V.; Nunes, O. A. C.; Oliveira, A. C.

    2009-10-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is introduced as a promising experimental technique to investigate fungus infected Acai ( Euterpe oleracea) seeds. Photoacoustic spectra of healthy and infected Acai seeds with the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were recorded firstly in the modulation frequency range of 5Hz to 700 Hz, while keeping the wavelength of excitation radiation of a Xe arc-lamp constant, to ascertain the depth of penetration of infection within the seed and secondly, at variable wavelength (wavelength scanning) in the interval 250nm to 1,000 nm, while keeping the modulation frequency constant. In the former, the photoacoustic signal strength from the infected seed was found higher than that of the healthy one, and has been associated with the appearance of new biomolecules associated with the pathogen infection. In the latter, characteristics peaks and bands were observed in the range from 650 nm to 900 nm ascribed to organic compounds with carboxylates and amines (functional groups) forming the typical metabolic structures of the fungus.

  6. Fabrication of a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell for Samples Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Kapil

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive treatment of a sample in photoacoustic spectroscopy is helpful in the study of thermal and optical properties of ice and snow. In the present study, a  low-temperature resonant photoacoustic cell, based on Helmholtz resonator model, has been designed and fabricated for the study of samples like ice or snow. Its performance has also been studied using carbon black as a standard sample and various other samples like water, ice, glass, plexi-glass, polycarbonate, etc. Thermal diffusivity of ice, water, and many other transparent materials has been determined by varying chopping frequency and recording corresponding phase changes in the photoacoustic signal. The results obtained are in good agreement with those predicted by Rosencwaig-Gersho (R-G' theory.

  7. Photoacoustic monitoring of real time blood and hemolymph sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Gutíerrez-Juárez, G.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of blood and hemolymph sedimentation is studied in real time using the photoacoustic technique. A modified configuration of a conventional photoacoustic cell is used, where the advantage of this methodology is that the sample is not illuminated directly and that the process can be monitored through the measurement of the thermal contact between a reference material and the blood. It is demonstrated that during the process the thermal effusivity decreases at the region of contact between the sample and the reference materials. The usefulness of these results in real time monitoring using photothermal techniques is discussed.

  8. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of tyrosinase expressing tumours in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Jathoul, Amit; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Lythgoe, Mark; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin; Beard, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Two human tumour cell lines (K562, 293T) were stably transfected to achieve the genetic expression of tyrosinase, which is involved in the production of the pigment eumelanin. The cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumour xenografts, which were imaged over a period of up to 26 days using an all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. 3D photoacoustic images of the tumours and the surrounding vasculature were acquired at excitation wavelengths ranging from 600nm to 770nm. The images showed tumour growth and continued tyrosinase expression over the full 26 day duration of the study. These findings were confirmed by histological analysis of excised tumour samples.

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of early inflammatory response using gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; O'Donnell, Matthew; Agarwal, Ashish; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Denny, Michael F.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2007-05-01

    Gold nanorods have unusually strong absorption in near infrared, which can be utilized for an optical imaging with nanocolloids. The feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory responses using bioconjugated gold nanorods is demonstrated. To target the stimulated cells, gold nanorods were conjugated to anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) which binds to cell surfaces over expressing ICAM-1. A monolayer of stimulated endothelial cells labeled with bioconjugated gold nanorods was scanned using a high frequency transducer. Photoacoustic images differentiated inflamed cells from control cells and matched well with fluorescence images. This technology may permit identification of critical inflammation sites such as blood vessels.

  10. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of surface defects states of semiconductor samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliński, M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Firszt, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents both theoretical and experimental issues connected with measurements and numerical analysis of the microphone amplitude and phase photoacoustic spectra of semiconductor samples exhibiting surface absorption connected with defects states located on their surfaces. The analytical model of surface absorption in semiconductors is described and the results of computations are compared with experimental amplitude and phase spectra for Zn{0.965}Be{0.035}Se crystal samples. This paper shows the importance of the phase spectra for the proper interpretation of the PA (photoacoustic) results.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging: current status and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Jiang, Jingying; Su, Yixiong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Jianquan

    2006-09-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography(PAT) is a new ultrasound-mediated biomedical imaging technology which combines the advantages of high optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution. In theory, PAT can image object embedded several centimeters under the surface of sample with the resolution of tens of microns. In this paper, several representative image reconstruction algorithms are discussed. Because the PA signal is wide band signal, it is hard to get the whole frequency spectrum due to the tremendous calculation needed. Therefore, the most applicable reconstruction algorithms are all performed in time domain such as "delay-and-sum" and "back projection". The current research methods have been focused on optical detecting and piezoelectric detecting. The optical method has the advantage of high spatial sensitivity due to the short wavelength of the probe laser beam. PA signal detecting using piezoelectric sensor has two main modes i.e. using unfocused transducer or transducer array or using focused transducer array or linear transducer array. When a focused transducer array is used, the "delay-and-sum" method is often used for image reconstruction. The advantage of the method is that its data acquisition time can be reduced to several minutes or even several seconds by employing the phase control linear scan technique. The future development in PAT research and its potential clinic application is also presented.

  12. Intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borri, S., E-mail: simone.borri@ino.it; Galli, I.; Mazzotti, D.; Giusfredi, G.; De Natale, P. [CNR-INO UOS Sesto Fiorentino and LENS, via Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino FI (Italy); Patimisco, P.; Scamarcio, G.; Spagnolo, V. [CNR-IFN UOS Bari and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari e Politecnico di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari BA (Italy); Akikusa, N. [Development Bureau Laser Device R and D Group, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan); Yamanishi, M. [Central Research Laboratories, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We report on a spectroscopic technique named intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (I-QEPAS) employed for sensitive trace-gas detection in the mid-infrared spectral region. It is based on a combination of QEPAS with a buildup optical cavity. The sensor includes a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.33 μm. We achieved a laser optical power buildup factor of ∼500, which corresponds to an intracavity laser power of ∼0.75 W. CO{sub 2} has been selected as the target molecule for the I-QEPAS demonstration. We achieved a detection sensitivity of 300 parts per trillion for 4 s integration time, corresponding to a noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.4 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup −1} and a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 3.2 × 10{sup −10} W cm{sup −1} Hz{sup −1/2}.

  13. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging. PMID:26757620

  14. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  15. A photoacoustic immunoassay for biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Cao, Mingfeng; McClelland, John F; Shao, Zengyi; Lu, Meng

    2016-11-15

    Challenges in protein biomarker analysis include insufficient sensitivity for detecting low-abundance biomarkers, poor measurement reproducibility, and the high costs and large footprints of detection systems. To address these issues, a new detection modality was developed for analyzing protein biomarkers based on the plasmon-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) effect. The detection modality employed a heterogeneous immunoassay scheme and used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal reporter. Due to their localized plasmon resonance, AuNPs can strongly interact with intensity-modulated laser excitation and generate strong PA signals, which are subsequently sensed and quantified using a microphone. As an example, the performance of the PA immunoassay was evaluated by detecting the human interleukin 8 chemokine. The PA immunoassay provided approximately 143× lower limit of detection (LOD) than observed with the gold standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay - a decrease from 23pg/mL to 0.16pg/mL. In addition to the significant performance improvement in terms of the LOD, the PA immunoassay also offers advantages in terms of compatibility with low-cost instruments and the long-term stability of assay results. PMID:27183276

  16. Using high-power light emitting diodes for photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, René Skov

    the experiment consists of a 3mm high x 5mm wide slice of green colored gelatine overlaid by a 3cm layer of colorless gelatine. The light pulses from the LED is focused on the green gelatine. The photoacoustic response from the green gelatine is detected by a single transducer on the opposite (top...

  17. Photoacoustic elastic bending in thin film—Substrate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical model for optically excited two-layer elastic plate, which includes plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms, is given in order to study the dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending signal on the optical, thermal, and elastic properties of thin film—substrate system. Thin film-semiconductor sample (in our case Silicon) is modeled by simultaneous analysis of the plasma, thermal, and elastic wave equations. Multireflection effects in thin film are included in theoretical model and analyzed. Relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic bending in the optically excited two-layer mechanically-supported circular plate are derived. Theoretical analysis of the thermodiffusion, plasmaelastic, and thermoelastic effects in a sample-gas-microphone photoacoustic detection configuration is given. Two normalization procedures of the photoacoustic elastic bending signal in function of the modulation frequency of the optical excitation are established. Given theoretical model can be used for various photoacoustic detection configurations, for example, in the study of optical, thermal, and elastic properties of the dielectric-semiconductor or metal-semiconductor structure, etc., Theoretical analysis shows that it is possible to develop new noncontact and nondestructive experimental method—PA elastic bending method for thin film study, with possibility to obtain the optical, thermal, and elastic parameters of the film thinner than 1 μm

  18. Transurethral Photoacoustic Endoscopy for Prostate Cancer: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanshan; Chen, Jian; Samant, Pratik; Stratton, Kelly; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the configuration of a photoacoustic endoscope (PAE) for prostate cancer detection and therapy monitoring. The placement of optical fiber bundles and ultrasound detectors was chosen to maximize the photoacoustic imaging penetration depth. We performed both theoretical calculations and simulations of this optimized PAE configuration on a prostate-sized phantom containing tumor and various photosensitizer concentrations. The optimized configuration of PAE with transurethral light delivery simultaneously increases the imaging penetration depth and improves image quality. Thermal safety, investigated via COMSOL Multiphysics, shows that there is only a 4 mK temperature rise in the urethra during photoacoustic imaging, which will cause no thermal damage. One application of this PAE has been demonstrated for quasi-quantifying photosensitizer concentrations during photodynamic therapy. The sensitivity of the photoacoustic detection for TOOKAD was 0.18 ng/mg at a 763 nm laser wavelength. Results of this study will greatly enhance the potential of prostate PAE for in vivo monitoring of drug delivery and guidance of the laser-induced therapy for future clinical use. PMID:26886974

  19. Photoacoustic trace gas sensing : application to fruit and insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persijn, Stefan Timotheüs

    2001-01-01

    A novel photoacoustic spectrometer has been applied to study trace gas emissions by fruit and insects. The spectrometer is based on a newly designed CO laser that can operate on 400 laser lines between 5.1-8.0 and 2.8-4.1 micrometer (delta v=1 and 2 mode, respectively). The spectrometer is equipped

  20. Integrated diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic tomography: phantom validations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaoqi; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Ruixin; Yao, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2011-01-01

    We designed, fabricated and tested a novel imaging system that fuses diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) in a single platform. This platform takes advantages of both DOT and PAT, and can potentially provide dual-modality two dimensional functional and cellular images of the breast quantitatively. Here we describe this integrated platform along with initial tissue phantom validations.

  1. Photoacoustic study of nanocrystalline silicon produced by mechanical grinding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical grinding (MG) was used to produce nanocrystalline silicon and its thermal and transport properties were investigated by photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental results suggest that in as-milled nanocrystalline silicon for 10 h the heat transfer through the crystalline and interfacial components is similar, and after annealed at 470 oC the heat transfer is controlled by crystalline component.

  2. Photoacoustic monitoring of life cycles of Leishmania Mexicana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguello, C.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Vargas, H.

    1999-03-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is used to monitor in situ, the difference between the two forms of the protozoan Leishmania Mexicana. Differences are the result of changes in the respiratory chain and could be attributed, according to our results, to the presence of cytochrome b in promastigotes and cytochrome c in amastigotes.

  3. Reflection mode photoacoustic measurement of speed of sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Leeuwen, van Ton G.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to determine the speed of sound in tissue using a double-ring photoacoustic sensor working in reflection mode. This method uses the cross-correlation between the laser-induced ultrasound waves detected by two concentric ring shaped sensors, while a priori information about the de

  4. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  5. Multi-view Hilbert transformation in full-ring-transducer-array based photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of absorbed optical energy density within tissue. Based on the photoacoustic effect, PAT directly and quantitatively measures specific optical absorption. A full-ring ultrasonic transducer array based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system was recently developed for small animal whole-body imaging with a full-view detection angle and high in-plane resolution (100 µm). However, due to the band-pass frequency response of the piezoelectric transducer elements, the reconstructed images present bipolar (both positive and negative) pixel values, which is artificial and counterintuitive for physicians and biologists seeking to interpret the image. Moreover, bipolar pixel values hinder quantification of physiological parameters, such as oxygen saturation and blood flow speed. Unipolar images can be obtained by deconvolving the raw channel data with the transducer's electrical impulse response and applying non-negativity during iteration, but this process requires complex transducer modeling and time-consuming computation. Here, we present a multi-view Hilbert transformation method to recover the unipolar initial pressure for full-ring PACT. Multi-view Hilbert transformation along the acoustic wave propagation direction minimizes reconstruction artifacts during envelope extraction and maintains the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. The in-plane isotropic spatial resolution of this method was quantified to 168 μm within a 20 × 20 mm2 field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was first validated by numerical simulations and then demonstrated with ex-vivo mouse brain structural imaging and in-vivo mouse wholebody imaging.

  6. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  7. Handheld array-based photoacoustic probe for guiding needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chulhong; Todd N. Erpelding; Maslov, Konstantin; Jankovic, Ladislav; Akers, Walter J.; Liang SONG; Achilefu, Samuel; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Pashley, Michael D.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    By modifying a clinical ultrasound array system, we develop a novel handheld photoacoustic probe for image-guided needle biopsy. The integration of optical fiber bundles for pulsed laser light delivery enables photoacoustic image-guided insertion of a needle into rat axillary lymph nodes with accumulated indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic contrast of the needle is achieved. After subcutaneous injection of the dye in the left forepaw, sentinel lymph nodes are easily detected, in viv...

  8. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Almon Fisher; Paul Pellegrino; John Bender; Ellen Holthoff

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm-1 to 1240 cm-1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infr...

  9. Design and evaluation of a laboratory prototype system for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, W; Piras, D; Singh, M. K. A.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; Van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W Van; Manohar, S.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can visualize vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast with great potential for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. State-of-the-art photoacoustic breast imaging systems are promising but are limited either by only a 2D imaging capability or by an insufficient imaging field-of-view (FOV). We present a laboratory prototype system designed for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography, and comprehensively characterize it and evaluate its performance in imaging p...

  10. Improving Photoacoustic-guided Focusing in Scattering Media by Spectrally Filtered Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Chaigne, Thomas; Gateau, Jérôme; Boccara, Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically study the potential of photoacoustic-guiding for light focusing through scattering samples via wavefront-shaping and iterative optimization. We experimentally demonstrate that the focusing efficiency on an extended absorber can be improved by iterative optimization of the high frequency components of the broadband photoacoustic signal detected with a spherically focused transducer. We demonstrate more than 8-fold increase in the photoacoustic signal generated by a 30 microns wire using a narrow frequency band around 60MHz. We numerically confirm that such optimization leads to a smaller optical focus than using the low frequency content of the photoacoustic feedback.

  11. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging at 7000 frames per second using clinical ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography, a hybrid imaging modality combining optical and ultrasound imaging, is gaining attention in the field of medical imaging. Typically, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to excite the tissue and generate photoacoustic signals. But, such photoacoustic imaging systems are difficult to translate into clinical applications owing to their high cost, bulky size often requiring an optical table to house such lasers. Moreover, the low pulse repetition rate of few tens of hertz prevents them from being used in high frame rate photoacoustic imaging. In this work, we have demonstrated up to 7000 Hz photoacoustic imaging (B-mode) and measured the flow rate of a fast moving object. We used a ~140 nanosecond pulsed laser diode as an excitation source and a clinical ultrasound imaging system to capture and display the photoacoustic images. The excitation laser is ~803 nm in wavelength with ~1.4 mJ energy per pulse. So far, the reported 2-dimensional photoacoustic B-scan imaging is only a few tens of frames per second using a clinical ultrasound system. Therefore, this is the first report on 2-dimensional photoacoustic B-scan imaging with 7000 frames per second. We have demonstrated phantom imaging to view and measure the flow rate of ink solution inside a tube. This fast photoacoustic imaging can be useful for various clinical applications including cardiac related problems, where the blood flow rate is quite high, or other dynamic studies. PMID:26977342

  12. Energy efficiency of near infrared cobalt luminscence in ZnSe:Co determined by a photoacoustic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobak, Ł.; Maliński, M.; Strzałkowski, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents results of computations of the energy efficiency of the cobalt luminescence in ZnSe:Co determined by the photoacoustic method. The transmission spectra, photoacoustic experimental and theoretical spectra, and the frequency dependence on the photoacoustic amplitude characteristics are presented. From them, the energy efficiency of Co2+ the near infrared luminescence (3200 nm) was computed in the frame of new proposed photoacoustic model of computations of the luminescence energy efficiency.

  13. Comparison of Deconvolution Filters for Photoacoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Sompel, Dominique; Sasportas, Laura S.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we compare the merits of three temporal data deconvolution methods for use in the filtered backprojection algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). We evaluate the standard Fourier division technique, the Wiener deconvolution filter, and a Tikhonov L-2 norm regularized matrix inversion method. Our experiments were carried out on subjects of various appearances, namely a pencil lead, two man-made phantoms, an in vivo subcutaneous mouse tumor model, and a perfused and excised mouse brain. All subjects were scanned using an imaging system with a rotatable hemispherical bowl, into which 128 ultrasound transducer elements were embedded in a spiral pattern. We characterized the frequency response of each deconvolution method, compared the final image quality achieved by each deconvolution technique, and evaluated each method’s robustness to noise. The frequency response was quantified by measuring the accuracy with which each filter recovered the ideal flat frequency spectrum of an experimentally measured impulse response. Image quality under the various scenarios was quantified by computing noise versus resolution curves for a point source phantom, as well as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of selected image features such as dots and linear structures in additional imaging subjects. It was found that the Tikhonov filter yielded the most accurate balance of lower and higher frequency content (as measured by comparing the spectra of deconvolved impulse response signals to the ideal flat frequency spectrum), achieved a competitive image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio, and yielded the greatest robustness to noise. While the Wiener filter achieved a similar image resolution, it tended to underrepresent the lower frequency content of the deconvolved signals, and hence of the reconstructed images after backprojection. In addition, its robustness to noise was poorer than that of the Tikhonov filter. The

  14. Photoacoustic reconstruction using beamformed RF data: a synthetic aperture imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is becoming an important tool for various clinical and pre-clinical applications. Acquiring pre-beamformed channel ultrasound data is essential to reconstruct PA images. Accessing these pre-beamformed channel data requires custom hardware to allow parallel beam-forming, and is available for only few research ultrasound platforms. However, post-beamformed radio frequency (RF) data is readily available in real-time and in several clinical and research ultrasound platforms. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, our goal is to devise new PA reconstruction approach based on these post-beamformed RF data. In this paper, we propose to generate PA image by using a single receive focus beamformed RF data. These beamformed RF data are considered as pre-beamformed input data to a synthetic aperture beamforming algorithm, where the focal point per received RF line is a virtual element. The image resolution is determined by the fixed focusing depth as well as the aperture size used in fixed focusing. In addition, the signal-to-noise (SNR) improvement is expected because beamforming is performed twice with different noise distribution. The performance of the proposed method is analyzed through simulation, the practical feasibility is validated experimentally. The results indicate that the post-beamformed RF data has potential to be re-beamformed to a PA image using the proposed synthetic aperture beamformer.

  15. Photoacoustic methods for in vitro study of kinetics progesterone release from the biodegradation of polyhydroxybutyrate/polycaprolactone used as intravaginal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Filho, N. E. [Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Departamento de Física, Grupo de Estudos dos Fenômenos Fototérmicos-GEFF/DFI/UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, Maringá-PR (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Eng. Acústica, Av. Roraima 1000, CEP 97105–900, Santa Maria-RS (Brazil); Mariucci, V. V. G.; Dias, G. S.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C. [Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Departamento de Física, Grupo de Estudos dos Fenômenos Fototérmicos-GEFF/DFI/UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, Maringá-PR (Brazil); Miguez, P. H. P.; Madureira, E. H. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Reprodução Animal–VRA/USP, Av. Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques Paiva 87, São Paulo–SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-30

    Intravaginal devices composed of polyhydroxybutyrate/polycaprolactone blends incorporating progesterone were used over eight days in crossbred cow ovariectomized, and then analyzed with photoacoustic methods, measuring the absorption spectra, thermal diffusivity, and inspecting its degradation by means of scanning electron microscopy. The characteristic time found for progesterone release was TR ∼ 53 h, and the typical time found for biodegradation was TB ∼ 30 h. Morphological analysis complements the study showing that release of progesterone and biodegradation of the blend occurs on sample surface.

  16. Photoacoustic methods for in vitro study of kinetics progesterone release from the biodegradation of polyhydroxybutyrate/polycaprolactone used as intravaginal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Filho, N. E.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Dias, G. S.; Szpak, W.; Miguez, P. H. P.; Madureira, E. H.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.

    2013-09-01

    Intravaginal devices composed of polyhydroxybutyrate/polycaprolactone blends incorporating progesterone were used over eight days in crossbred cow ovariectomized, and then analyzed with photoacoustic methods, measuring the absorption spectra, thermal diffusivity, and inspecting its degradation by means of scanning electron microscopy. The characteristic time found for progesterone release was TR ˜ 53 h, and the typical time found for biodegradation was TB ˜ 30 h. Morphological analysis complements the study showing that release of progesterone and biodegradation of the blend occurs on sample surface.

  17. A micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Y.; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2015-03-01

    To achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT), massive transducer arrays and data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are needed to receive the PA signals simultaneously, which results in complex and high-cost ultrasound receiver systems. To address this issue, we have developed a new PA data acquisition approach using acoustic time delay. Optical fibers were used as parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create different time delays in multiple channels of PA signals. This makes the PA signals reach a single-element transducer at different times. As a result, they can be properly received by single-channel DAQ electronics. However, due to their small diameter and fragility, using optical fiber as acoustic delay lines poses a number of challenges in the design, construction and packaging of the PADLs, thereby limiting their performances and use in real imaging applications. In this paper, we report the development of new silicon PADLs, which are directly made from silicon wafers using advanced micromachining technologies. The silicon PADLs have very low acoustic attenuation and distortion. A linear array of 16 silicon PADLs were assembled into a handheld package with one common input port and one common output port. To demonstrate its real-time PAT capability, the silicon PADL array (with its output port interfaced with a single-element transducer) was used to receive 16 channels of PA signals simultaneously from a tissue-mimicking optical phantom sample. The reconstructed PA image matches well with the imaging target. Therefore, the silicon PADL array can provide a 16× reduction in the ultrasound DAQ channels for real-time PAT.

  18. Optical pyrometer based on the gas phase photoacoustic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangling; Diebold, Gerald J

    2016-05-15

    A photoacoustic cell containing an infrared active gas and equipped with a pair of infrared transmitting windows that alternately views two bodies at different temperatures through a pair of chopping wheels acts as a differential detector of the radiation emitted by the two bodies. A theory for the photoacoustic signal shows that the device acts to monitor the difference in the incidances between the two bodies integrated over the absorptions of the gas in the cell. Experiments are reported showing that the response of the pyrometer depends on the relative temperatures of heated bodies, the absorption coefficient of the gas in the cell, and the modulation frequency of the chopping wheels. The instrument is shown to be a sensitive detector of a null in the integrated incidance of the two bodies. PMID:27176967

  19. Photoacoustic molecular imaging for in vivo liver iron quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarinelli, Federica; Carmona, Fernando; Regoni, Maria; Arosio, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    A recent study showed that ferritin is a suitable endogenous contrast agent for photoacoustic molecular imaging in cultured mammalian cells. We have therefore tested whether this imaging technique can be used for in vivo quantification of iron in mouse livers. To verify this hypothesis, we used multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) to image albino CD1 mice before and after experimental iron loading. Postmortem assays showed that the iron treatment caused a 15-fold increase in liver iron and a 40-fold increase in liver ferritin levels, while in vivo longitudinal analysis using MSOT revealed just a 1.6-fold increase in the ferritin/iron photoacoustic signal in the same animals. We conclude that MSOT can monitor changes in ferritin/iron levels in vivo, but its sensitivity is much lower than that of ex vivo iron assays.

  20. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging of blood perfusion in tissue and phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilatou, Magdalena C.; Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Bolt, Rene A.; de Mul, Frits F. M.

    2001-06-01

    To localize and monitor the blood content in tissue we developed a very sensitive photo-acoustical detector. PVDF has been used as piezo-electric material. In this detector also fibers for the illumination of the sample are integrated. Resolution is about 20 (m in depth and about 50-100 m laterally). We use 532 nm light. We will show how photoacoustics can be used for measuring the thickness of tissue above bone. We will also report measurements on tissue phantoms: e.g. a vessel delta from the epigastric artery branching of a Wistar rat, filled with an artificial blood-resembling absorber. The measurements have been carried out on phantoms containing vessels at several depths. Signal processing was enhanced by Fourier processing of the data.

  2. Spectroscopic intravascular photoacoustic imaging of neovasculature: phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jimmy L.; Wang, Bo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2009-02-01

    An acceleration of angiogenesis in the adventitial vasa-vasorum is usually associated with vulnerable, thin-cap fibroatheroma in atherosclerotic plaques. Angiogenesis creates microvasculature too small to be detected and differentiated using conventional imaging techniques. However, by using spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging, we take advantage of the wavelength-dependent optical absorption properties of blood. We used a vessel-mimicking phantom with micro blood vessels. The phantom was imaged with intravascular photoacoustic imaging across a range of wavelengths. The image intensities were cross-correlated with the known absorption spectra of blood. The resulting cross-correlation image was able to reveal the location of the artificial blood vessels differentiated from non-blood vessel components.

  3. Miniature fibre optic probe for minimally invasive photoacoustic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Sunish J.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Beard, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    A miniature (175 μm) all-optical photoacoustic probe has been developed for minimally invasive sensing and imaging applications. The probe comprises a single optical fibre which delivers the excitation light and a broadband 50 MHz Fabry-Pérot (F-P) ultrasound sensor at the distal end for detecting the photoacoustic waves. A graded index lens proximal to the F-P sensor is used to reduce beam walk-off and thus increase sensitivity as well as confine the excitation beam in order to increase lateral spatial resolution. The probe was evaluated in non-scattering media and found to provide lateral and axial resolutions of blood vessel mimicking phantom at distances up to 7 mm from the tip was demonstrated in order to illustrate its potential suitability for needle guidance applications.

  4. Initial results of finger imaging using Photoacoustic Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    van Es, Peter; Moens, Hein J Bernelot; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2014-01-01

    We present a photoacoustic computed tomography investigation on a healthy human finger, to image blood vessels with a focus on vascularity across the interphalangeal joints. The cross-sectional images were acquired using an imager specifically developed for this purpose. The images show rich detail of the digital blood vessels with diameters between 100 $\\mu$m and 1.5 mm in various orientations and at various depths. Different vascular layers in the skin including the subpapillary plexus could also be visualized. Acoustic reflections on the finger bone of photoacoustic signals from skin were visible in sequential slice images along the finger except at the location of the joint gaps. Not unexpectedly, the healthy synovial membrane at the joint gaps was not detected due to its small size and normal vascularization. Future research will concentrate on studying digits afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis to detect the inflamed synovium with its heightened vascularization, whose characteristics are potential marke...

  5. Nonlinear quantitative photoacoustic tomography with two-photon absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon photoacoustic tomography (TP-PAT) is a non-invasive optical molecular imaging modality that aims at inferring two-photon absorption property of heterogeneous media from photoacoustic measurements. In this work, we analyze an inverse problem in quantitative TP-PAT where we intend to reconstruct optical coefficients in a semilinear elliptic PDE, the mathematical model for the propagation of near infra-red photons in tissue-like optical media with two-photon absorption, from the internal absorbed energy data. We derive uniqueness and stability results on the reconstructions of single and multiple optical coefficients, and present some numerical reconstruction results based on synthetic data to complement the theoretical analysis.

  6. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Viegas, Mark G.; Malinsky, Taras I.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models.

  7. Accelerated High-Resolution Photoacoustic Tomography via Compressed Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Arridge, Simon; Betcke, Marta; Cox, Ben; Huynh, Nam; Lucka, Felix; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Current 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems offer either high image quality or high frame rates but are not able to deliver high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously, which limits their ability to image dynamic processes in living tissue. A particular example is the planar Fabry-Perot (FP) scanner, which yields high-resolution images but takes several minutes to sequentially map the photoacoustic field on the sensor plane, point-by-point. However, as the spatio-temporal complexity of many absorbing tissue structures is rather low, the data recorded in such a conventional, regularly sampled fashion is often highly redundant. We demonstrate that combining variational image reconstruction methods using spatial sparsity constraints with the development of novel PAT acquisition systems capable of sub-sampling the acoustic wave field can dramatically increase the acquisition speed while maintaining a good spatial resolution: First, we describe and model two general spatial sub-sampling schemes. Then...

  8. Photoacoustic imaging in both soft and hard biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, most Photoacoustic (PA) imaging results have been from soft biotissues. In this study, a PA imaging system with a near-infrared pulsed laser source has been applied to obtain 2-D and 3-D images from both soft tissue and post-mortem dental samples. Imaging results showed that the PA technique has the potential to image human oral disease, such as early-stage teeth decay. For non-invasive photoacoustic imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. Several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict initial temperature and pressure fields within a tooth sample. Predicted initial temperature and pressure rises are below corresponding safety limits.

  9. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Viegas, Mark G.; Malinsky, Taras I.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models. PMID:26979811

  10. Thermal property of biological tissues characterized by piezoelectric photoacoustic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chunming; ZHANG Shuyi; CHEN Yan; SHUI Xiuji; YANG Yuetao

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic piezoelectric method based on a simplified thermoelastic theory is employed to determine thermal diffusivities of biological tissues. The thermal diffusivities of porcine tissues with different preparation conditions, including fresh, dry and specially prepared conditions, are characterized. Comparing the experimental evaluated diffusivities of the tissues in three conditions with each other, it can be seen that the diffusivities of the fresh tissues are the biggest and the diffusivities of the specially prepared tissues are bigger than that of the dry ones generally. The results show that the piezoelectric photoacoustic method is especially effective for determining macro-effective (average) thermal diffusivities of biological materials with micro- inhomogeneity and easy to be performed, which can provide useful information for researching thermal characters of biological tissues.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging in both soft and hard biological tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T; Dewhurst, R J, E-mail: richard.dewhurst@manchester.ac.u [Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    To date, most Photoacoustic (PA) imaging results have been from soft biotissues. In this study, a PA imaging system with a near-infrared pulsed laser source has been applied to obtain 2-D and 3-D images from both soft tissue and post-mortem dental samples. Imaging results showed that the PA technique has the potential to image human oral disease, such as early-stage teeth decay. For non-invasive photoacoustic imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. Several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict initial temperature and pressure fields within a tooth sample. Predicted initial temperature and pressure rises are below corresponding safety limits.

  12. Ferritin as a Novel Reporter Gene for Photoacoustic Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Seung Han; Carson, Andrew R.; Kim, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Reporter genes may serve as endogenous contrast agents in the field of photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging (PMI), enabling greater characterization of detailed cellular processes and disease progression. To demonstrate the feasibility of using ferritin as a reporter gene, human melanoma SK-24 (SK-MEL-24) cells were co-transfected with plasmid expressing human heavy chain ferritin (H-FT) and plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C1) using lipofectamine™ 2000. Non-transf...

  13. Percutaneous permeation measurement of topical phthalocyanine by photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emanoel P. O.; Barja, Paulo R.; Cardoso, Luiz E.; Beltrame, Milton

    2012-11-01

    This investigation have studied photoacoustic (PA) technique to percutaneous permeation of topical hydroxy-(29H,31H-phthalocyaninate) aluminum (PcAlOH) on pig ear skin. The PcAlOH was incorporated in an emulsion (O/W) (1 mg/dl) with assessed stability parameters of: pH, short and long term stability tests (in the several conditions). The skin was prepared through a heat separation technique, and with a scalpel, the outer skin of the cartilage was removed. The skins were then cut into 4 cm2 pieces and treated with sodium bromide 2 mol/L for 6 h at 37 °C. The epidermis layer was washed with purified water, dried, and stored under reduced pressure until use. The skin permeation kinetics was determined by photoacoustic technique in an open photoacoustic cell. Short (after preparation) and long-term stability tests showed no phase separation. The emulsion developed pH 7.6 and after incorporating the pH was unchanged. The typical times for percutaneous permeation of the emulsion base and emulsion + PcAlOH were 182 (±6) and 438 (±3) s, respectively. This study indicated that the formulations containing PcAlOH have stabile characteristics and show promising results in absorption into the skin. The presence of the photosensitive agent in the formulation contributed significantly to the greater absorption time than observed in the base formulation. The used photoacoustic technical to examine the penetration kinetics of PcAlOH in pig ear skin was adequate and may be employed in the determination of the percutaneous permeation of phthalocyanines.

  14. An algorithm for total variation regularized photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yiqiu; Görner, Torsten; Kunis, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of image data from photoacoustic measurements asks for the inversion of the spherical mean value operator. In contrast to direct inversion methods for specific geometries, we consider a semismooth Newton scheme to solve a total variation regularized least squares problem. During the...... iteration, each matrix vector multiplication is realized in an efficient way using a recently proposed spectral discretization of the spherical mean value operator. All theoretical results are illustrated by numerical experiments....

  15. Experiments of glucose solution measurement based on the tunable pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Xiong, Zhihua; Huang, Zhen

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a hybrid, well-established and promising detection technique that has widely applied into a lot of fields such as bio-medical, material and environment monitoring etc. PAS has high contrast and resolution because of combining the advantages of the pure-optical and the pure-acoustic. In this paper, a photoacoustic experiment of glucose solution induced by 532nm pumped Nd:YAG tunable pulsed laser with repetition rate of 20Hz and pulse width of 10ns is performed. The time-resolved photoacoustic signals of glucose solution induced by pulsed laser in the average time of 512 are obtained. And the photoacoustic experiments of different concentrations of glucose solutions and different wavelengths of pulsed laser are carried out in this paper. Experimental results demonstrate that the bipolar sine-wave profiles for the time-resolved photoacoustic signal of glucose solution are in good agreement with the past reported literatures. And the different absorbing coefficients of glucose solution can be gotten according to the slope of the first part of the time-resolved photoacoustic signals. In addition, the different acoustic velocities of glucose solution can also be gotten according to the shift change of the time-resolved photoacoustic peak values. Research results illustrate that the characteristic wavelengths, different optical and acoustic properties of glucose solution can be interpreted by the time-resolved and peak-to-peak photoacoustic signals induced by the pulsed laser.

  16. Photoacoustic-guided ultrasound therapy with a dual-mode ultrasound array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prost, Amaury; Funke, Arik; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustics has recently been proposed as a potential method to guide and/or monitor therapy based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a HIFU lesion at the location of an optical absorber, by use of photoacoustic signals emitted by the absorber detected on a dual mode transducer array. To do so, a dedicated ultrasound array intended to both detect photoacoustic waves and emit HIFU with the same elements was used. Such a dual-mode array provides automatically coregistered reference frames for photoacoustic detection and HIFU emission, a highly desired feature for methods involving guidance or monitoring of HIFU by use of photoacoustics. The prototype is first characterized in terms of both photoacoustic and HIFU performances. The probe is then used to perform an idealized scenario of photoacoustic-guided therapy, where photoacoustic signals generated by an absorbing thread embedded in a piece of chicken breast are used to automatically refocus a HIFU beam with a time-reversal mirror and necrose the tissue at the location of the absorber.

  17. Multimodality Raman and photoacoustic imaging of surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering-targeted tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Paproski, Robert J.; Shao, Peng; Forbrich, Alexander; Lewis, John D.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-02-01

    A multimodality Raman and photoacoustic imaging system is presented. This system has ultralow background and can detect tumor cells labeled with modified surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering (SERS) nanoparticles in vivo. Photoacoustic imaging provides microvascular context and can potentially be used to guide magnetic trapping of circulating tumor cells for SERS detection in animal models.

  18. Dual Modality Noncontact Photoacoustic and Spectral Domain OCT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Hochreiner, Armin; Hollinger, Philipp; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a multimodal imaging system, combining noncontact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Photoacoustic signals are recorded without contact to the specimens’ surface by using an interferometric technique. The interferometer is realized within a fiber-optic network using a fiber laser at 1550 nm as source. The fiber-optic network allows the integration of a fiber-based OCT system operating at a wavelength region around 1310 nm. Light from the fiber laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber using wavelength-division multiplexing. The same focusing optics is used for both modalities. Back-reflected light from the sample is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. As the same optical components are used for OCT and photoacoustic imaging, the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically in lateral direction. Three-dimensional imaging is implemented by hybrid galvanometer and mechanical scanning. To allow fast B-scan measurements, scanning of the interrogation beam along one dimension is executed by a galvanometer scanner. Slow-axis scanning, perpendicular to the fast axis, is performed utilizing a linear translational stage. We demonstrate two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging on agarose phantoms. PMID:25900968

  19. An automated breast ultrasound scanner with integrated photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Corey J.; Moradi, Hamid; Salcudean, Septimiu E.

    2016-03-01

    We have integrated photo-acoustic imaging into an automated breast ultrasound scanner (ABUS) with the goal of simultaneously performing ultrasound (US) and multi-spectral photo-acoustic tomography (PAT). This was accomplished with minimal change to the existing automated scanner by coupling laser light into an optical fiber for flexible and robust light delivery. We present preliminary tomography data acquired with this setup, including a simple resolution-testing geometry and a tissue phantom. Integrating PAT into the ABUS such that breast imaging is possible will require illumination from below the transducer dome. To that end, we are moving towards a fiber-based, localized illumination geometry which is fixed relative to the transducer. By illuminating locally (only near the current acquisition slice), this approach reduces overall light exposure at the tissue surface, allowing higher light intensity per acquisition (which translates to higher absorber contrast), while remaining below safe exposure thresholds. We present time-domain simulations of photo-acoustic imaging under non-uniform illumination conditions, and test one potential weighting scheme which can be used to extract absorber locations.

  20. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Quantum Cascade Lasers for Trace Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Scamarcio

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Various applications, such as pollution monitoring, toxic-gas detection, noninvasive medical diagnostics and industrial process control, require sensitive and selectivedetection of gas traces with concentrations in the parts in 109 (ppb and sub-ppb range.The recent development of quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs has given a new aspect toinfrared laser-based trace gas sensors. In particular, single mode distributed feedback QCLsare attractive spectroscopic sources because of their excellent properties in terms of narrowlinewidth, average power and room temperature operation. In combination with these lasersources, photoacoustic spectroscopy offers the advantage of high sensitivity and selectivity,compact sensor platform, fast time-response and user friendly operation. This paper reportsrecent developments on quantum cascade laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for tracegas detection. In particular, different applications of a photoacoustic trace gas sensoremploying a longitudinal resonant cell with a detection limit on the order of hundred ppb ofozone and ammonia are discussed. We also report two QC laser-based photoacousticsensors for the detection of nitric oxide, for environmental pollution monitoring andmedical diagnostics, and hexamethyldisilazane, for applications in semiconductormanufacturing process.

  1. Wood pulp characterization by a novel photoacoustic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we introduce a novel photoacoustic sensing technique that captures a photoacoustic signal excited by a laser light pulse after the light has propagated through a turbid medium. Simultaneously, the ultrasonic sound wave is captured after it has propagated through the same turbid medium. By combining the two signals, more information on the investigated medium can be obtained. Applications can be found in the pulp and paper industry where monitoring wood pulp compositions is of interest. Depending on its origin, pulp suspension contains different compositions of fibres and fibre fragments (fines). Poor control of the pulp composition leads to an unstable process that compromises the production, quality and energy efficiency in the pulp mill. The result shows the feasibility of the photoacoustic sensor in monitoring the mass fractions of fibres and fines in a pulp suspension. The first received echo, corresponding to the light interaction with the sample, showed a stronger correlation to the fines mass fraction compared to fibre mass fraction. The second echo, corresponding to the sound wave interaction with the sample, showed a much stronger correlation to fibre mass fraction than to fines mass fraction. Hence, it is proposed that by combining these two echoes, more information about the pulp suspension could be extracted than from any other sensor built on a single sensing principle. (paper)

  2. A direct method for photoacoustic tomography with inhomogeneous sound speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhachmi, Zakaria; Glatz, Thomas; Scherzer, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    The standard approach for photoacoustic imaging with variable speed of sound is time reversal, which consists of solving a well-posed final-boundary value problem for the wave equation backwards in time. This paper investigates the iterative Landweber regularization algorithm, where convergence is guaranteed by standard regularization theory, notably also in cases of trapping sound speed or for short measurement times. We formulate and solve the direct and inverse problem on the whole Euclidean space, which is common in standard photoacoustic imaging, but not for time reversal algorithms, where the problems are considered on a domain enclosed by the measurement devices. We formulate both the direct and adjoint photoacoustic operator as the solution of an interior and an exterior differential equation which are coupled by transmission conditions. The former is solved numerically using a Galerkin scheme in space and finite difference discretization in time, while the latter consists of solving a boundary integral equation. We therefore use a boundary element method/finite element method approach for numerical solution of the forward operators. We analyze this method, prove convergence, and provide numerical tests. Moreover, we compare the approach to time reversal.

  3. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry in blood-mimicking fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry provides a major opportunity to overcome limitations of existing blood flow measuring methods. By enabling measurements with high spatial resolution several millimetres deep in tissue, it could probe microvascular blood flow abnormalities characteristic of many different diseases. Although previous work has demonstrated feasibility in solid phantoms, measurements in blood have proved significantly more challenging. This difficulty is commonly attributed to the requirement that the absorber spatial distribution is heterogeneous relative to the minimum detectable acoustic wavelength. By undertaking a rigorous study using blood-mimicking fluid suspensions of 3 μm absorbing microspheres, it was discovered that the perceived heterogeneity is not only limited by the intrinsic detector bandwidth; in addition, bandlimiting due to spatial averaging within the detector field-of-view also reduces perceived heterogeneity and compromises velocity measurement accuracy. These detrimental effects were found to be mitigated by high-pass filtering to select photoacoustic signal components associated with high heterogeneity. Measurement under-reading due to limited light penetration into the flow vessel was also observed. Accurate average velocity measurements were recovered using “range-gating”, which furthermore maps the cross-sectional velocity profile. These insights may help pave the way to deep-tissue non-invasive mapping of microvascular blood flow using photoacoustic methods.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  5. Characterization of bone microstructure using photoacoustic spectrum analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ting; Perosky, Joseph E; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Xu, Guan; Cheng, Qian; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X; Wang, Xueding

    2015-09-21

    Osteoporosis is a progressive bone disease that is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and the deterioration in bone microarchitecture. This study investigates the feasibility of characterizing bone microstructure by analyzing the frequency spectrum of the photoacoustic (PA) signal from the bone. Modeling and numerical simulation of PA signal were performed on trabecular bone simulations and CT scans with different trabecular thicknesses. The resulting quasi-linear photoacoustic spectra were fittted by linear regression, from which the spectral parameter slope was quantified. The simulation based on two different models both demonstrate that bone specimens with thinner trabecular thicknesses have higher slope. Experiment on osteoporotic rat femoral heads with different mineral content was conducted. The finding from the experiment was in good agreement with the simulation, demonstrating that the frequency-domain analysis of PA signals can provide an objective assessment of bone microstructure and deterioration. Considering that PA measurement is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and has sufficient penetration in both calcified and non-calcified tissues, this new bone evaluation method based on photoacoustic spectral analysis holds potential for clinical management of osteoporosis and other bone diseases. PMID:26406719

  6. Low-cost, portable photoacoustic setup for solid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a low-cost, portable photoacoustic instrument. The device consists of a detection unit comprising a photoacoustic cell with an embedded laser diode or a light-emitting diode, a photodiode, an electret microphone (60 × 40 × 40 mm3), and a signal processing and power supply unit in a box containing batteries and electronics (160 × 140 × 60 mm3). A PC or portable computer is required to operate the device and for data processing. The weight of the instrument without the computer is 1.70 kg. The computer, or more precisely, its sound card is the essential part of the apparatus because it generates the signal for the laser diode or light-emitting diode modulation and processes signals from the microphone and photodiode. The computer sound card is used as a dual-phase lock-in amplifier. The software used for the control of the setup was also developed in course of this work. The photoacoustic instrument presented here allows measurements and quantitative analysis of numerous solid-state samples. It is simple in design and use, having a reasonable weight and portability

  7. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging: in vitro studies of magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of rare circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been demonstrated to be a promising modality in molecular imaging for detection of nanoparticle-targeted diseased cells or tissues. However, intrinsic absorbers, such as blood, produce strong PA background signals that severely degrade the detection sensitivity and specificity of targeted objects. Magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging, a newly developed molecular imaging modality, introduced dynamic manipulation into traditional PA imaging. Unlike conventional PA imaging, magnetomotive manipulation with simultaneous ultrasound/PA imaging of agents incorporating magnetic nanoparticles enables direct visualization of the signal generating object and can dramatically reduce background signals from strong optical absorbers. This paper briefly reviews recent developments in mmPA imaging, including uses of composite contrast agent, design of magnet system, and data processing for motion filtering. The use of mmPA imaging in detecting rare circulating tumor cells in blood vessels, which remains a big challenge for real-time in vivo examination using current methodologies, was also addressed. PMID:23420803

  8. Photoacoustic generation by a gold nanosphere: from the linear to the nonlinear thermoelastic regime

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the photoacoustic generation by a gold nanosphere in water in the thermoelastic regime. Photoacoustic signals are predicted numerically based on the successive resolution of a thermal diffusion problem and a thermoelastic problem, taking into account the finite size of the gold nanosphere, thermoelastic and elastic properties of both water and gold, and the temperature-dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient of water. For sufficiently high illumination fluences, this temperature dependence yields a nonlinear relationship between the photoacoustic amplitude and the fluence. For nanosecond pulses in the linear regime, we show that more than $90\\ \\%$ of the emitted photoacoustic energy is generated in water, and the thickness of the generating layer around the particle scales close to the square root of the pulse duration. The amplitude of the photoacoustic waves in the linear regime are accurately predicted by the point-absorber model introduced by Calasso and Diebold, but o...

  9. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of subcutaneous vasculature and vascular anomalies in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Yeqi; Zhou, Feifan; Wang, Huiying

    2008-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a noninvasive, nonionizing imaging modality that combines the merits of high optical contrast, good ultrasonic resolution and satisfactory imaging depth. These features make it suitable for detecting the pathological changes of subcutaneous vasculature. A setup of photoacoustic imaging system was employed to achieve images of subcutaneous vasculature and subcutaneous tumor-related vascular anomalies in mice in vivo. The networks of subcutaneous vasculature are clearly identified in the photoacoustic images, blood vessels which are invisible to the naked eye under the skin surface and tumor-related abnormal vasculature are also revealed by the photoacoustic system. Moreover, micro blood vessels correlated with the high frequency signals become evident after digital image processing based on high-pass filtering. This work demonstrates that photoacoustic imaging could potentially provide a valuable tool for monitoring the pathological changes of subcutaneous vasculature in early stage.

  10. Frequency domain photoacoustic correlation (radar) imaging: a novel methodology for non-invasive imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telenkov, Sergey A.; Alwi, Rudolf; Mandelis, Andreas; Shi, Willa; Chen, Emily; Vitkin, Alex I.

    2012-02-01

    We report the development of a novel frequency-domain biomedical photoacoustic (PA) system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern for spatially-resolved imaging of biological tissues. The feasibility of using relatively long duration and low optical power laser sources for spatially-resolved PA imaging is presented. We demonstrate that B-mode PA imaging can be performed using an ultrasonic phased array coupled with multi-channel correlation processing and a frequency-domain beamforming algorithm. Application of the frequency-domain PA correlation methodology is shown using tissue-like phantoms with embedded optical contrast, tissue ex-vivo samples and a small animal model in-vivo.

  11. Mechanism of charge transport in ligand-capped crystalline CdTe nanoparticles according to surface photovoltaic and photoacoustic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining surface photovoltaic and photoacoustic techniques, we probed the photogenerated charge transport channels of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)- and 2-mercaptoethylamine (MA)-capped crystalline CdTe nanoparticles on illumination with UV-near IR light. The results experimentally confirmed the presence of a CdS shell outside the CdTe core that formed through the self-assembly and decomposition of mercapto ligands during CdTe preparation. The data revealed that the CdS layer was partly responsible for the deexcitation behavior of the photogenerated carriers, which is related to the quantum tunnel effect. Experiments demonstrated that two quantum wells were located at wavelengths of 440 and 500 nm in buried interfacial space-charge regions, whereas the formation of a ligand layer obstructed charge transfer transitions of the core CdTe nanoparticles to a certain extent.

  12. Photoacoustic image reconstruction from ultrasound post-beamformed B-mode image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    A requirement to reconstruct photoacoustic (PA) image is to have a synchronized channel data acquisition with laser firing. Unfortunately, most clinical ultrasound (US) systems don't offer an interface to obtain synchronized channel data. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, we propose a PA image reconstruction algorithm utilizing US B-mode image, which is readily available from clinical scanners. US B-mode image involves a series of signal processing including beamforming, followed by envelope detection, and end with log compression. Yet, it will be defocused when PA signals are input due to incorrect delay function. Our approach is to reverse the order of image processing steps and recover the original US post-beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data, in which a synthetic aperture based PA rebeamforming algorithm can be further applied. Taking B-mode image as the input, we firstly recovered US postbeamformed RF data by applying log decompression and convoluting an acoustic impulse response to combine carrier frequency information. Then, the US post-beamformed RF data is utilized as pre-beamformed RF data for the adaptive PA beamforming algorithm, and the new delay function is applied by taking into account that the focus depth in US beamforming is at the half depth of the PA case. The feasibility of the proposed method was validated through simulation, and was experimentally demonstrated using an acoustic point source. The point source was successfully beamformed from a US B-mode image, and the full with at the half maximum of the point improved 3.97 times. Comparing this result to the ground-truth reconstruction using channel data, the FWHM was slightly degraded with 1.28 times caused by information loss during envelope detection and convolution of the RF information.

  13. RFI channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A class of channel models is presented which exhibit varying burst error severity much like channels encountered in practice. An information-theoretic analysis of these channel models is made, and conclusions are drawn that may aid in the design of coded communication systems for realistic noisy channels.

  14. Tunable, biodegradable gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for computed tomography and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Ezzibdeh, Rami M; Chhour, Peter; Pulaparthi, Kumidini; Kim, Johoon; Jurcova, Martina; Hsu, Jessica C; Blundell, Cassidy; Litt, Harold I; Ferrari, Victor A; Allcock, Harry R; Sehgal, Chandra M; Cormode, David P

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been proposed for many applications in medicine. Although large AuNP (>5.5 nm) are desirable for their longer blood circulation and accumulation in diseased tissues, small AuNP (nanoparticles (Au-PCPP) can perform their function as contrast agents, then subsequently break down into harmless byproducts and release the AuNP for swift excretion. Homogeneous Au-PCPP were synthesized using a microfluidic device. The size of the Au-PCPP can be controlled by the amount of polyethylene glycol-polylysine (PEG-PLL) block co-polymer in the formulation. Synthesis of Au-PCPP nanoparticles and encapsulation of AuNP in PCPP were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy and their biocompatibility and biodegradability confirmed in vitro. The Au-PCPP nanoparticles were found to produce strong computed tomography contrast. The UV-Vis absorption peak of Au-PCPP can be tuned into the near infrared region via inclusion of varying amounts of AuNP and controlling the nanoparticle size. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated the potential of Au-PCPP as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Therefore, Au-PCPP nanoparticles have high potency as contrast agents for two imaging modalities, as well as being biocompatible and biodegradable, and thus represent a platform with potential for translation into the clinic. PMID:27322961

  15. Microstructural and Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Human Cortical Bone with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chunju; Katti, Dinesh R.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2016-04-01

    The molecular basis of bone disease osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and the mineralization of hydroxyapatite in OI bone have been of significant research interest. To further investigate the mechanism of OI disease and bone mineralization, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) are used in the present study to describe the structural and compositional differences between OI and healthy bone. OI bone exhibits more porous, fibrous features, abnormal collagen fibrils, and abnormal mineral deposits. Likewise, photoacoustic-FTIR experiments indicate an aberrant collagen structure and an altered mineral structure in OI. In contrast, there is neither significant difference in the non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) composition observed nor apparent change in the crystal structure between OI and healthy bone minerals as shown in XRD and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results. This observation indicates that the biomineralization process is more controlled by the bone cells and non-collagenous phosphorylated proteins. The present study also confirms that there is an orientational influence on the stoichiometry of the mineral in OI bone. Also, a larger volume of the hydrated layer in the transverse plane than the longitudinal plane of the mineral crystal structure is proposed. The appearance of a new C-S band in the FTIR spectra in OI bone suggests the substitution of glycine by cysteine in collagen molecules or/and an increased amount of cysteine-rich osteonectin that relates to mineral nucleation and mineral crystal formation.

  16. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  17. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  18. Nanoparticle-enhanced spectral photoacoustic tomography: effect of oxygen saturation and tissue heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging for breast cancer detection, infectious disease diagnostics and preclinical animal research may be achievable through combined use of targeted exogenous agents - such as nanoparticles - and spectral Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT). However, tissue heterogeneity can alter fluence distributions and acoustic propagation, corrupting measured PAT absorption spectra and complicating in vivo nanoparticle detection and quantitation. Highly absorptive vascular structures represent a common confounding factor, and variations in vessel hemoglobin saturation (SO2) may alter spectral content of signals from adjacent/deeper regions. To evaluate the impact of this effect on PAT nanoparticle detectability, we constructed heterogeneous phantoms with well-characterized channel-inclusion geometries and biologically relevant optical and acoustic properties. Phantoms contained an array of tubes at several depths filled with hemoglobin solutions doped with varying concentrations of gold nanorods with an absorption peak at 780 nm. Both overlying and target network SO2 was tuned using sodium dithionite. Phantoms were imaged from 700 to 900 nm using a custom PAT system comprised of a tunable pulsed laser and a research-grade ultrasound system. Recovered nanoparticle spectra were analyzed and compared with results from both spectrophotometry and PAT data from waterimmersed tubes containing blood and nanoparticle solutions. Results suggested that nanoparticle selection for a given PAT application should take into account expected oxygenation states of both target blood vessel and background tissue oxygenation to achieve optimal performance.

  19. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mei, Jianguo; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Bao, Zhenan; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging holds great promise for the visualization of physiology and pathology at the molecular level with deep tissue penetration and fine spatial resolution. To fully utilize this potential, photoacoustic molecular imaging probes have to be developed. Here, we introduce near-infrared light absorbing semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as a new class of contrast agents for photoacoustic molecular imaging. These nanoparticles can produce a stronger signal than the commonly used single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods on a per mass basis, permitting whole-body lymph-node photoacoustic mapping in living mice at a low systemic injection mass. Furthermore, the semiconducting polymer nanoparticles possess high structural flexibility, narrow photoacoustic spectral profiles and strong resistance to photodegradation and oxidation, enabling the development of the first near-infrared ratiometric photoacoustic probe for in vivo real-time imaging of reactive oxygen species--vital chemical mediators of many diseases. These results demonstrate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles to be an ideal nanoplatform for developing photoacoustic molecular probes. PMID:24463363

  20. A non-contact and online ink thickness sensor for printing machines using the photoacoustic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an ink thickness sensor by employing a photoacoustic technique in order to enable the online measurement of ink thickness for printing machines such as a sheet-fed press. This sensor enables the online measurement of black ink thickness, which was impossible using the conventional methods. In order to detect the photoacoustic signals from the ink on a rotating ink roller using a non-contact technique, the halogen light chopping frequency was made to coincide with the pipe acoustical resonance frequency of the photoacoustic cell. With this method, even though the photoacoustic cell is an open cell, the sensitivity of the photoacoustic cell could be improved as compared to the conventional non-resonant closed cell. Further, it was clarified both experimentally and theoretically that the photoacoustic signal strength of black ink corresponds to an ink film thickness when the optimum halogen light chopping frequency is selected. In addition, a study is made on the characteristics of the photoacoustic signal strength variation for the clearance between the resonance tube and the ink roller

  1. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber

    2003-04-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photo-acoustic signals in an off-line configuration. This system was assembled and used to test parameters thought important to photo-acoustic signal output. A standard modulation frequency was chosen based upon signal to noise data gained from experimentation. Testing in the sixth quarter focused on initial testing for a magnetic photo-acoustic effect, loss tests and photo-acoustic tests on coal samples, and extending the testing range for the photo-acoustic effect over the octave of 900 MHz to 1800 MHz. Previous testing on this project was done at 1 GHz. In parallel with the photo-acoustic testing, some preliminary design considerations were investigated for the on-line monitor to be fabricated and testing in phase three of this project.

  2. Detection of Melanoma Metastases in Resected Human Lymph Nodes by Noninvasive Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Cornelis Langhout

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sentinel node biopsy in patients with cutaneous melanoma improves staging, provides prognostic information, and leads to an increased survival in node-positive patients. However, frozen section analysis of the sentinel node is not reliable and definitive histopathology evaluation requires days, preventing intraoperative decision-making and immediate therapy. Photoacoustic imaging can evaluate intact lymph nodes, but specificity can be hampered by other absorbers such as hemoglobin. Near infrared multispectral photoacoustic imaging is a new approach that has the potential to selectively detect melanin. The purpose of the present study is to examine the potential of multispectral photoacoustic imaging to identify melanoma metastasis in human lymph nodes. Methods. Three metastatic and nine benign lymph nodes from eight melanoma patients were scanned ex vivo using a Vevo LAZR© multispectral photoacoustic imager and were spectrally analyzed per pixel. The results were compared to histopathology as gold standard. Results. The nodal volume could be scanned within 20 minutes. An unmixing procedure was proposed to identify melanoma metastases with multispectral photoacoustic imaging. Ultrasound overlay enabled anatomical correlation. The penetration depth of the photoacoustic signal was up to 2 cm. Conclusion. Multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging allowed for selective identification of melanoma metastases in human lymph nodes.

  3. An experimental and theoretical approach to the study of the photoacoustic signal produced by cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pérez Solano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The distinctive spectral absorption characteristics of cancer cells make photoacoustic techniques useful for detection in vitro and in vivo. Here we report on our evaluation of the photoacoustic signal produced by a series of monolayers of different cell lines in vitro. Only the melanoma cell line HS936 produced a detectable photoacoustic signal in which amplitude was dependent on the number of cells. This finding appears to be related to the amount of melanin available in these cells. Other cell lines (i.e. HL60, SK-Mel-1, T47D, Hela, HT29 and PC12 exhibited values similar to a precursor of melanin (tyrosinase, but failed to produce sufficient melanin to generate a photoacoustic signal that could be distinguished from background noise. To better understand this phenomenon, we determined a formula for the time-domain photoacoustic wave equation for a monolayer of cells in a non-viscous fluid on the thermoelastic regime. The theoretical results showed that the amplitude and profile of the photoacoustic signal generated by a cell monolayer depended upon the number and distribution of the cells and the location of the point of detection. These findings help to provide a better understanding of the factors involved in the generation of a photoacoustic signal produced by different cells in vitro and in vivo.

  4. An experimental and theoretical approach to the study of the photoacoustic signal produced by cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Rafael Pérez; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I.; Castorena-Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Anell, Edgar Alvarado; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Gerardo; Polo-Parada, Luis

    2012-03-01

    The distinctive spectral absorption characteristics of cancer cells make photoacoustic techniques useful for detection in vitro and in vivo. Here we report on our evaluation of the photoacoustic signal produced by a series of monolayers of different cell lines in vitro. Only the melanoma cell line HS936 produced a detectable photoacoustic signal in which amplitude was dependent on the number of cells. This finding appears to be related to the amount of melanin available in these cells. Other cell lines (i.e. HL60, SK-Mel-1, T47D, Hela, HT29 and PC12) exhibited values similar to a precursor of melanin (tyrosinase), but failed to produce sufficient melanin to generate a photoacoustic signal that could be distinguished from background noise. To better understand this phenomenon, we determined a formula for the time-domain photoacoustic wave equation for a monolayer of cells in a non-viscous fluid on the thermoelastic regime. The theoretical results showed that the amplitude and profile of the photoacoustic signal generated by a cell monolayer depended upon the number and distribution of the cells and the location of the point of detection. These findings help to provide a better understanding of the factors involved in the generation of a photoacoustic signal produced by different cells in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of gene expression using tyrosinase as a reporter gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Forbrich, Alexander; Harrison, Tyler; Hitt, Mary; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical reporter genes, such as green fluorescence protein, are powerful research tools that allow visualization of gene expression. We have successfully used tyrosinase as a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging. Tyrosinase is the key regulatory enzyme in the production of melanin which has a broad optical absorption spectrum. MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with tyrosinase under the control of an inducible promoter. For photoacoustic experiments, MCF-7 cells were resuspended at 108 cells/mL and injected in 700 μm (inner diameter) plastic tubing. Photoacoustic signal of MCF-7 cells expressing tyrosinase were >20-fold greater than those of untransfected MCF-7 cells. Photoacoustic signal of tyrosinaseexpressing MCF-7 cells were approximately 2-fold lesser and greater than those of blood at 576 and 650 nm, respectively, suggesting that photoacoustic signal from blood and tyrosinase-expressing cells can be separated by dualwavelength analysis. Photoacoustic signal from tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 cells covered by chicken tissue could even be detected at a laser penetration depth of 4 cm, suggesting that tyrosinase can be used to image gene expression in relatively deep tissues. The current data suggests that tyrosinase is a strong reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging.

  6. Investigation of the photoacoustic effect in micellar solutions by the picosecond transient grating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanni

    1997-12-01

    This thesis comprises studies of viscosity and thermal conductivity effects on the photoacoustic wave from a droplet, generation of photoacoustic waves from reversed micellar solutions, and acoustic attenuation in reverse micellar solutions at GHz frequencies. In the first part of the thesis, the coupled equations for pressure and temperature, that describe the photoacoustic effect, are solved for a laser irradiated droplet surrounded by a second fluid to determine the effects of heat conduction and viscosity on the emitted ultrasonic wave. A numerical method of solving the coupled equations is used to give frequency domain expressions for the photoacoustic wave emitted by the droplet. The results show that the range of diameters over which the solution to the wave equation remains valid is quite large, and that deviations from the wave equation solution in experimentally recorded photoacoustic waveforms is not expected until the diameter of the droplet is so small as to approach the viscous or thermal heat conduction lengths of the fluid. Photoacoustic waves can be generated by submicron sized particles that absorb radiation and transmit heat to a surrounding fluid. When the thermal expansion coefficient of the absorbing body is small, a photoacoustic effect is not produced until heat diffuses into the surrounding fluid. Effects of the micelle size, acoustic wave-length and the thermal conductivity ratio on the generation of photoacoustic waves are discussed. The qualitative results both from theory and experiment show that the photoacoustic technique should thus form a diagnostic technique for determining particle radii and two thermal parameters for dilute slurries of particulate matter that can be excited by optical radiation. The propagation properties of ultrasonic waves have been studied by a picosecond transient grating method in AOT reversed micellar solutions. Ultrasonic attenuation exhibits peak values. Experiments show that peak values appear at the GHz

  7. Fiber optic photoacoustic probe with ultrasonic tracking for guiding minimally invasive procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Mari, Jean Martial; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    In a wide range of clinical procedures, accurate placement of medical devices such as needles and catheters is critical to optimize patient outcomes. Ultrasound imaging is often used to guide minimally invasive procedures, as it can provide real-time visualization of patient anatomy and medical devices. However, this modality can provide low image contrast for soft tissues, and poor visualization of medical devices that are steeply angled with respect to the incoming ultrasound beams. Photoacoustic sensors can provide information about the spatial distributions of tissue chromophores that could be valuable for guiding minimally invasive procedures. In this study, a system for guiding minimally invasive procedures using photoacoustic sensing was developed. This system included a miniature photoacoustic probe with three optical fibers: one with a bare end for photoacoustic excitation of tissue, a second for photoacoustic excitation of an optically absorbing coating at the distal end to transmit ultrasound, and a third with a Fabry-Perot cavity at the distal end for receiving ultrasound. The position of the photoacoustic probe was determined with ultrasonic tracking, which involved transmitting pulses from a linear-array ultrasound imaging probe at the tissue surface, and receiving them with the fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in the photoacoustic probe. The axial resolution of photoacoustic sensing was better than 70 μm, and the tracking accuracy was better than 1 mm in both axial and lateral dimensions. By translating the photoacoustic probe, depth scans were obtained from different spatial positions, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using a frequency-domain algorithm.

  8. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We conducted an approved canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Brachytherapy seeds coated with black ink were inserted into the canine prostate using methods similar to a human procedure. A transperineal, interstitial, fiber optic light delivery method, coupled to a 1064 nm laser, was utilized to irradiate the prostate and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. The fiber was inserted into a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy needle that acted as a light-diffusing sheath, enabling radial light delivery from the tip of the fiber inside the sheath. The axis of the fiber was located at a distance of 4-9 mm from the long axis of the cylindrical seeds. Ultrasound images acquired with the transrectal probe and post-operative CT images of the implanted seeds were analyzed to confirm seed locations. In vivo limitations with insufficient light delivery within the ANSI laser safety limit (100 mJ/cm2) were overcome by utilizing a short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer, which provided average seed contrasts of 20-30 dB for energy densities ranging 8-84 mJ/cm2. The average contrast was improved by up to 20 dB with SLSC beamforming compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamforming. There was excellent agreement between photoacoustic, ultrasound, and CT images. Challenges included visualization of photoacoustic artifacts that corresponded with locations of the optical fiber and hyperechoic tissue structures.

  9. Detection and isolation of circulating melanoma cells using photoacoustic flowmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; DeSouza, Thiago; Cook, Aaron; Viator, John A

    2011-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that have separated from a macroscopic tumor and spread through the blood and lymph systems to seed secondary tumors(1,2,3). CTCs are indicators of metastatic disease and their detection in blood samples may be used to diagnose cancer and monitor a patient's response to therapy. Since CTCs are rare, comprising about one tumor cell among billions of normal blood cells in advanced cancer patients, their detection and enumeration is a difficult task. We exploit the presence of pigment in most melanoma cells to generate photoacoustic, or laser induced ultrasonic waves in a custom flow cytometer for detection of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs)(4,5). This process entails separating a whole blood sample using centrifugation and obtaining the white blood cell layer. If present in whole blood, CMCs will separate with the white blood cells due to similar density. These cells are resuspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and introduced into the flowmeter. Rather than a continuous flow of the blood cell suspension, we induced two phase flow in order to capture these cells for further study. In two phase flow, two immiscible liquids in a microfluidic system meet at a junction and form alternating slugs of liquid(6,7). PBS suspended white blood cells and air form microliter slugs that are sequentially irradiated with laser light. The addition of a surfactant to the liquid phase allows uniform slug formation and the user can create different sized slugs by altering the flow rates of the two phases. Slugs of air and slugs of PBS with white blood cells contain no light absorbers and hence, do not produce photoacoustic waves. However, slugs of white blood cells that contain even single CMCs absorb laser light and produce high frequency acoustic waves. These slugs that generate photoacoustic waves are sequestered and collected for cytochemical staining for verification of CMCs. PMID:22143421

  10. Molecular application of spectral photoacoustic imaging in pancreatic cancer pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Minalini; Hupple, Clinton; Lohse, Ines; Hedley, David; Needles, Andrew; Theodoropoulos, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Spectral imaging is an advanced photo-acoustic (PA) mode that can discern optical absorption of contrast agent(s) in the tissue micro-environment. This advancement is made possible by precise control of optical wavelength using a tunable pulsed laser, ranging from 680-970 nm. Differential optical absorption of blood oxygenation states makes spectral imaging of hemoglobin ideal to investigate remodeling of the tumor microenvironment- a molecular change that renders resistance to standard cancer treatment. Approach: Photo-acoustic imaging was performed on the Vevo® LAZR system (VisualSonics) at 5-20 Hz. Deep abdominal imaging was accomplished with a LZ250D probe at a center frequency of 21MHz and an axial resolution of 75 μm. The tumor model was generated in an immune compromised mouse by surgical implantation of primary patient derived tumors, in the pancreas. Results: Spectral imaging for oxygen saturation at 750 nm and 850 nm characterized this tumor with a poorly oxygenated core surrounded by a well oxygenated periphery. Multispectral imaging identified a sub region in the core with a four-fold signal exclusively at 750 and 800 nm. A co-registered 2D image of this region was shown to be echogenic and calcification was suspected. Perfusion imaging with contrast enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles (Vevo MicroMarker® contrast agents, VisualSonics) identified functional vessels towards this sub region. Histology confirmed calcification and vascularization in the tumor core. Taken together, non-invasive characterization of the tumor microenvironment using photo-acoustics rendered spectral imaging a sensitive tool to monitor molecular changes representative of progression of pancreatic cancer that kills within 6 months of diagnosis.

  11. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  12. Thermal Effusivity Measurement of Virgin Coconut Oil-Methanol Mixtures using Photoacoustic Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas K.M. Al-asfoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal effusivity of virgin coconut oil-methanol mixtures were measured using open photoacoustic cell technique. The samples were prepared by simply mixing virgin coconut oil and methanol using similar procedure applied for preparation of biodisel. Thermal effusivity of the sample was obtained by fitting the experimental data of photoacoustic amplitude signal to the expression of photoacoustic signal as a function of chopping frequency. Thermal effusivity of mixtures decrease between 0.0851 W s1/2 K-1 cm-2 (pure virgin coconut oil and 0.0644 W s1/2 K-1 cm-2 (pure methanol with the increasing of methanol in the mixture.

  13. In vivo melanoma depth detection by a handheld photoacoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Xing, Wenxin; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We developed a handheld photoacoustic microscope (PAM) to detect melanoma and determine tumor depth in nude mice in vivo. Compared to our previous PAM system for melanoma imaging, a new light delivery mechanism is introduced to improve light penetration. We show that melanomas with 4.1 mm and 3.3 mm thicknesses can be successfully detected in phantom and in vivo experiments, respectively. With its deep melanoma imaging ability and novel handheld design, this system is promising for clinical melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical planning for patients at the bedside.

  14. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  15. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  16. The performance and application of laser-induced photoacoustic spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced photoacoustic spectrometer (LIPAS) is a key instrument can be used in the investigation of radionuclides migration behaviors due to its higher sensitivity for the detection and identification of radionuclides speciation in aqueous solutions. The speciation of radionuclides such as oxidation states and complexation may be determined directly by using this specific non-contact and nondestructive analytical technique, and the sensitivity of LIPAS surpasses that of conventional absorption spectroscopy by one to two orders of magnitude. In the present work, LIPAS system was established at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), and the principle, performance and preliminary application of LIPAS are also be presented. (authors)

  17. Photoacoustic Tomography using a Michelson Interferometer with Quadrature Phase Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Speirs, Rory W

    2013-01-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on a Michelson interferometer, for use in photoacoustic tomography. Quadrature phase detection is employed allowing measurement at any point on the mirror surface without having to retune the interferometer, as is typically required by Fabry-Perot type detectors. This opens the door to rapid full surface detection, which is necessary for clinical applications. Theory relating acoustic pressure to detected acoustic particle displacements is used to calculate the detector sensitivity, which is validated with measurement. Proof-of-concept tomographic images of blood vessel phantoms have been taken with sub-millimeter resolution at depths of several millimeters.

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy with quantum cascade distributed-feedback lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstetter, Daniel; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme; Nägele, Markus; Sigrist, Markus W

    2008-01-01

    We present photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy measurements of carbon dioxide, methanol, and ammonia. The light source for the excitation was a single-mode quantum cascade distributed-feedback laser, which was operated in pulsed mode at moderate duty cycle and slightly below room temperature. Temperature tuning resulted in a typical wavelength range of 3 cm-1at a linewidth of 0.2 cm-1. The setup was based on a Herriott multipass arrangement around the PA cell; the cell was equipped with a radial ...

  19. Photoacoustic and transmission studies of SiC polytypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. de Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical bandgap energies (OBGE of 3C, 15R, 6H and 4H-SiC have been investigate experimentally by transmission and photoacoustic spectroscopies. The measurements were performed on 470 mum thick wafers. The OBGE obtained from both spectroscopies for different polytypes show very good agreement. In order to have a better understanding of these materials calculations of eletronic band structure were performed by the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW method. For the OBGE the results are compared to the measurements agreeing closely over the energies of those polytypes.

  20. An indigenously developed photoacoustic spectrometer for study of actinide spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photoacoustic spectrometer has been designed and fabricated. The indigenously developed unit has been successfully tested for its performance features and compares well with the commercially available units. Due to the modular nature of the spectrometer assembly, the instrument can be easily adapted to study actinide spectroscopy. The unit is being extensively used to record absorption spectra of opaque solids. Apart from the normal use to study non-radiative spectral transitions, the spectrometer is fruitfully utilized in speciation studies for uranium and for studying structural phase transitions in Lisub(1-x)HxNbO3. (author). 11 refs., 10 figs

  1. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Right-Angle Prism

    OpenAIRE

    Yongning Liu; Jun Chang; Jie Lian; Zhaojun Liu; Qiang Wang; Zengguang Qin

    2016-01-01

    A right-angle prism was used to enhance the acoustic signal of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) system. The incident laser beam was parallelly inverted by the right-angle prism and passed through the gap between two tuning fork prongs again to produce another acoustic excitation. Correspondingly, two pairs of rigid metal tubes were used as acoustic resonators with resonance enhancement factors of 16 and 12, respectively. The QEPAS signal was enhanced by a factor of 22.4 co...

  2. Compensation for air voids in photoacoustic computed tomography image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Most image reconstruction methods in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) assume that the acoustic properties of the object and the surrounding medium are homogeneous. This can lead to strong artifacts in the reconstructed images when there are significant variations in sound speed or density. Air voids represent a particular challenge due to the severity of the differences between the acoustic properties of air and water. In whole-body small animal imaging, the presence of air voids in the lungs, stomach, and gastrointestinal system can limit image quality over large regions of the object. Iterative reconstruction methods based on the photoacoustic wave equation can account for these acoustic variations, leading to improved resolution, improved contrast, and a reduction in the number of imaging artifacts. However, the strong acoustic heterogeneities can lead to instability or errors in the numerical wave solver. Here, the impact of air voids on PACT image reconstruction is investigated, and procedures for their compensation are proposed. The contributions of sound speed and density variations to the numerical stability of the wave solver are considered, and a novel approach for mitigating the impact of air voids while reducing the computational burden of image reconstruction is identified. These results are verified by application to an experimental phantom.

  3. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of BiOCl Photocatalyst Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. J.; Fang, J. W.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-06-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) was used for the first time to investigate the optical properties and photocatalysis reaction of BiOCl powder. The results of PAS measurements showed that the photoacoustic (PA) amplitude increased gradually in the visible light region and the white BiOCl powder became black when the measurements were repeated many times. Further studies showed that the occurrence of ultraviolet (UV) light-induced oxygen vacancies was the reason for the formation of black BiOCl and increasing visible light absorption. PAS also showed that oxygen vacancies only appeared when the white BiOCl powder was irradiated by UV light with a wavelength smaller than the absorption threshold wavelength. The formation of oxygen vacancies under UV irradiation was focused in the initial 0.5 h. Moreover, photochemical reactions of RhB dye absorbed on the BiOCl powder were studied by means of PAS. The results showed that the oxygen vacancy formation and photocatalytic reaction occurred simultaneously under UV excitation.

  4. Photoacoustic tomography in absorbing acoustic media using time reversal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reconstruction of photoacoustic images typically neglects the effect of acoustic absorption on the measured time domain signals. Here, a method to compensate for acoustic absorption in photoacoustic tomography is described. The approach is based on time-reversal image reconstruction and an absorbing equation of state which separately accounts for acoustic absorption and dispersion following a frequency power law. Absorption compensation in the inverse problem is achieved by reversing the absorption proportionality coefficient in sign but leaving the equivalent dispersion parameter unchanged. The reconstruction is regularized by filtering the absorption and dispersion terms in the spatial frequency domain using a Tukey window. This maintains the correct frequency dependence of these parameters within the filter pass band. The method is valid in one, two and three dimensions, and for arbitrary power law absorption parameters. The approach is verified through several numerical experiments. The reconstruction of a carbon fibre phantom and the vasculature in the abdomen of a mouse are also presented. When absorption compensation is included, a general improvement in the image magnitude and resolution is seen, particularly for deeper features

  5. Photoacoustic tomography of pathological tissue in ex vivo mouse hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holotta, Markus; Grossauer, Harald; Kremser, Christian; Torbica, Pavle; Völkl, Jakob; Degenhart, Gerald; Esterhammer, Regina; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Günther; Jaschke, Werner

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluate the applicability of ex-vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in organs of small animals. We used photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to visualize infarcted areas within mouse hearts and compared it to other imaging techniques (MRI and μCT). In order to induce ischemia an in-vivo ligation of the Ramus interventricularis anterior (RIVA, left anterior descending, LAD) was performed on nine wild type C41 mice. After varying survival periods the mice were sacrificed. The hearts were excised and immediately transferred into a formaldehyde solution for conservation. Various wavelengths in the visible and near infrared region (500 nm - 1000 nm) had been tested to find the best representation of the ischemic regions. Samples were illuminated with nanosecond laser pulses delivered by an Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator. Ultrasound detection was achieved by an optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer working as an integrating line detector. For acoustic coupling the samples were located inside a water tank. The voxel data are computed from the measurement data by a Fourier-domain based reconstruction algorithm, followed by a sequence of inverse Radon transforms. Results clearly show the capability of PAI to detect pathological tissue and the possibility to produce three-dimensional images with resolutions well below 100 μm. Different wavelengths allow the representation of structure inside an organ or on the surface even without contrast enhancing tracers.

  6. Dual plasmonic gold nanoparticles for multispectral photoacoustic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Vijay; Subhash, Hrebesh; Breathnach, Aedán.; Leahy, Martin; Dockery, Peter; Olivo, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular targeted imaging have widespread interest in diagnostic applications with cellular resolution, specificity and selectivity for visualization and assessment of various disease processes. Of particular interest is gold nanoparticle owing to its tunability of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and its relative inertness. Here we present the synthesis of anisotropic multi-branched star shaped gold nanoparticles exhibiting dual-band plasmon absorption peaks and its application as a contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. The transverse plasmon absorption peak of the synthesised dual plasmonic gold nanostar (DPGNS) was around 700 nm and that of longitudinal plasmon absorption in the longer wavelength region around 1050-1150 nm. Unlike most reported PA contrast agent with surface plasmon absorption in the range of 700 to 800 nm showing moderate tissue penetration, 1050-1200 nm range lies in the farther region of the optical window of biological tissue where scattering and the intrinsic optical extinction of endogenous chromophores is at its minimum. We also present a proof of principle demonstration of DPGNS as contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic animal imaging. Our results show that DPGNS are promising for PA imaging with extended-depth imaging applications.

  7. A Bayesian approach to spectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Bayesian approach to the optical reconstruction problem associated with spectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography is presented. The approach is derived for commonly used spectral tissue models of optical absorption and scattering: the absorption is described as a weighted sum of absorption spectra of known chromophores (spatially dependent chromophore concentrations), while the scattering is described using Mie scattering theory, with the proportionality constant and spectral power law parameter both spatially-dependent. It is validated using two-dimensional test problems composed of three biologically relevant chromophores: fat, oxygenated blood and deoxygenated blood. Using this approach it is possible to estimate the Grüneisen parameter, the absolute chromophore concentrations, and the Mie scattering parameters associated with spectral photoacoustic tomography problems. In addition, the direct estimation of the spectral parameters is compared to estimates obtained by fitting the spectral parameters to estimates of absorption, scattering and Grüneisen parameter at the investigated wavelengths. It is shown with numerical examples that the direct estimation results in better accuracy of the estimated parameters. (papers)

  8. Stable phantoms for characterization of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Bodapati, Sandhya; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging modality that combines the high contrast of optical imaging, with the spatial resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound, by exploiting the photoacoustic effect. As with any new imaging modality, reliable physical phantoms are needed to: calibrate instruments; validate performance; optimize signal-to-noise; perform routine quality control; and compare systems. Phantom materials for testing small animal PAT systems should also mimic both the optical and acoustic properties of soft tissue, while for calibration purposes should be resistant to degradation over long time periods. We show here that polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) phantoms enable calibration and performance validation using two PAT systems with distinct designs (Visualsonics Vevo LAZR and Endra Nexus 128) across a wavelength range of 680 nm - 950 nm. Inclusions between 2 and 3.2 mm in diameter were fabricated from PVCP using a range of dye concentrations (0 % to 0.256 % Black Plastic Color, BPC) in a custom mold. A calibration phantom was imaged repeatedly on both systems, over time scales of minutes, hours and days, to assess system stability. Both systems demonstrated good reproducibility over time, with the coefficient of variation in the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) being less than 15% over the course of 30 days. Imaging performance was optimized by plotting SNR as a function of different system parameters. The visualization of objects embedded in optically absorbing and scattering backgrounds was also assessed. PVCP is easy to work with and provides stable phantoms for assessing PAT system performance.

  9. Portable multiwavelength laser diode source for handheld photoacoustic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Celine; Laugustin, Arnaud; Kohl, Andreas; Rabot, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The ageing population faces today an increase of chronic diseases such as rheumatism/arthritis, cancer and cardio vascular diseases for which appropriate treatments based on a diagnosis at an early-stage of the disease are required. Some imaging techniques are already available in order to get structural information. Within the non-invasive group, ultrasound images are common in these fields of medicine. However, there is a need for a point-of-care device for imaging smaller structures such as blood vessels that cannot be observed with purely ultrasound based devices. Photoacoustics proved to be an attractive candidate. This novel imaging technique combines pulsed laser light for excitation of tissues and an ultrasound transducer as a receptor. Introduction of this technique into the clinic requires to drastically shrink the size and cost of the expensive and bulky nanosecond lasers generally used for light emission. In that context, demonstration of ultra-short pulse emission with highly efficient laser diodes in the near-infrared range has been performed by Quantel, France. A multi-wavelength laser source as small as a hand emitted more than 1 mJ per wavelength with four different wavelengths available in pulses of about 90 ns. Such a laser source can be integrated into high sensitivity photoacoustic handheld systems due to their outstanding electrical-to-optical efficiency of about 25 %. Further work continues to decrease the pulse length as low as 40 ns while increasing the pulse energy to 2 mJ.

  10. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10-20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans.

  11. Predicting photodynamic therapy efficacy with photoacoustic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Khan, Amjad P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemistry based cytotoxic technique that imparts cellular damage via excitation of a photosensitizer with drug-specific wavelength of light. The dose at the treatment site for type II PDT is determined by three factors: photosensitizer (PS) concentration, oxygenation status and delivered light irradiance. Most of the FDA approved photosensitizers in their triplet-excited state generate cytotoxic species by reacting with the ground state oxygen that is available in the surrounding environment. Given the inter- and intra-subject variability in the uptake of the photosensitizer and the distribution of oxygen in the tumor, understanding the interplay between these dose parameters could aid in determining photodynamic therapy efficacy. Previously several studies have discussed the interplay between the dose parameters using shown point measurements and 2D imaging systems. Using various subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models we will demonstrate the utility of a non-invasive non-ionizing photoacoustic imaging modality to determine efficacy and predict treatment response in Benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD) or Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based PDT. We further compare the predictive capability of photoacoustic imaging with the more predominantly used fluorescence imaging and immunohistochemistry techniques.

  12. Deconvolution based photoacoustic reconstruction for directional transducer with sparsity regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Hamid; Tang, Shuo; Salcudean, Septimiu E.

    2016-03-01

    We define a deconvolution based photoacoustic reconstruction with sparsity regularization (DPARS) algorithm for image restoration from projections. The proposed method is capable of visualizing tissue in the presence of constraints such as the specific directivity of sensors and limited-view Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT). The directivity effect means that our algorithm treats the optically-generated ultrasonic waves based on which direction they arrive at the transducer. Most PA image reconstruction methods assume that sensors have omni-directional response; however, in practice, the sensors show higher sensitivity to the ultrasonic waves coming from one specific direction. In DPARS, the sensitivity of the transducer to incoming waves from different directions are considered. Thus, the DPARS algorithm takes into account the relative location of the absorbers with respect to the transducers, and generates a linear system of equations to solve for the distribution of absorbers. The numerical conditioning and computing times are improved by the use of a sparse Discrete Fourier Transform (DCT) representation of the distribution of absorption coefficients. Our simulation results show that DPARS outperforms the conventional Delay-and-Sum reconstruction method in terms of CNR and RMS errors. Experimental results confirm that DPARS provides images with higher resolution than DAS.

  13. Photoacoustic Characterization of Randomly Oriented Silver Nanowire Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Voti, R.; Leahu, G.; Larciprete, M. C.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Nefedov, I.; Anoshkin, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the photoacoustic characterization in the UV/Vis range of randomly oriented silver nanowire films deposited onto either a quartz or polymeric substrate is presented. This study was performed for a set of films differing in both metallic nanowire dimensions, as well as metal content. Samples were prepared starting from suspensions of Ag nanowires in isopropanol (IPA) , differing in both the length and diameter of the nanowires. The obtained films were characterized by scanning electron micrography (SEM) images; thus, the metal filling factor was retrieved with MATLAB software based on a visual method. Following the morphological characterization, both spectrophotometry and the photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique were employed to investigate in detail the absorbance spectra of silver nanowire films, in order to evidence their peculiar properties in the UV/Vis spectral range. Specifically, this photothermal technique is particularly useful to investigate a film that may exhibit relevant scattering phenomena, as for metallic nanowire films. The obtained experimental results show that the choice of the metal filling factor may affect the absorbance spectra of the resulting mesh.

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation of multispectral photoacoustic osteoporosis detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Idan; Hershkovich, Hadas Sara; Gannot, Israel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a widespread disorder, which has a catastrophic impact on patients lives and overwhelming related to healthcare costs. Recently, we proposed a multispectral photoacoustic technique for early detection of osteoporosis. Such technique has great advantages over pure ultrasonic or optical methods as it allows the deduction of both bone functionality from the bone absorption spectrum and bone resistance to fracture from the characteristics of the ultrasound propagation. We demonstrated the propagation of multiple acoustic modes in animal bones in-vitro. To further investigate the effects of multiple wavelength excitations and of induced osteoporosis on the PA signal a multispectral photoacoustic system is presented. The experimental investigation is based on measuring the interference of multiple acoustic modes. The performance of the system is evaluated and a simple two mode theoretical model is fitted to the measured phase signals. The results show that such PA technique is accurate and repeatable. Then a multiple wavelength excitation is tested. It is shown that the PA response due to different excitation wavelengths revels that absorption by the different bone constitutes has a profound effect on the mode generation. The PA response is measured in single wavelength before and after induced osteoporosis. Results show that induced osteoporosis alters the measured amplitude and phase in a consistent manner which allows the detection of the onset of osteoporosis. These results suggest that a complete characterization of the bone over a region of both acoustic and optical frequencies might be used as a powerful tool for in-vivo bone evaluation.

  15. Enhanced photoacoustic stability of gold nanorods by silica matrix confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Wei, Chen-Wei; Souris, Jeffrey S.; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Chen, Chin-Tu; Yang, Chung-Shi; Li, Pai-Chi; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has garnered much attention for its high contrast and excellent spatial resolution of perfused tissues. Gold nanorods (GNRs) have been employed to further enhance the imaging contrast of PAT. However, the photon fluences typically needed for PA wave induction often also result in GNR shape changes that significantly reduce the efficiency of acoustic wave generation. In this work, we propose, synthesize, and evaluate amorphous silica-coated gold nanorods (GNR-Si) in an effort to improve contrast agent stability and ameliorate efficiency loss during photoacoustic (PA) wave induction. TEM and optical absorption spectra measurements of GNR and GNR-Si show that encasing GNRs within amorphous silica provides substantial protection of nanorod conformation from thermal deformation. PA signals generated by GNR-Si demonstrate considerably greater resistance to degradation of signal intensity with repetitive pulsing than do uncoated GNRs, thereby enabling much longer, high-contrast imaging sessions than previously possible. The prolongation of high-contrast imaging, and biocompatibility and easy surface functionalization for targeting ligands afforded by amorphous silica, suggest GNR-Si to be potentially significant for the clinical translation of PAT.

  16. Methodology of Pulsed Photoacoustics and Its Application to Probe Photosystems and Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey J.M. Hou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We review recent advances in the methodology of pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics and its application to studies of photosynthetic reaction centers and membrane receptors such as the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. The experimental parameters accessible to photoacoustics include molecular volume change and photoreaction enthalpy change. Light-driven volume change secondary to protein conformational changes or electrostriction is directly related to the photoreaction and thus can be a useful measurement of activity and function. The enthalpy changes of the photochemical reactions observed can be measured directly by photoacoustics. With the measurement of enthalpy change, the reaction entropy can also be calculated when free energy is known. Dissecting the free energy of a photoreaction into enthalpic and entropic components may provide critical information about photoactivation mechanisms of photosystems and photoreceptors. The potential limitations and future applications of time-resolved photoacoustics are also discussed.

  17. Identification and measurement of intermolecular interaction in polyester/polystyrene blends by FTIR-photoacoustic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectrometry was used to reveal and identify n-p type intermolecular interaction formed in plastic comprising binary blends of polystyrene and a biodegradable polymer, either polylactic acid, polycaprolactone or poly(tetramethyleneadipate-co-terephthalate)....

  18. Photo-acoustic imaging of coronary arteries with polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Broadway, Christian; Lamela, Horacio;

    2014-01-01

    less blood to flow through the arteries hence the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. Worse, a plaque can suddenly rupture. As a result, blood clot over the rapture and suddenly cut off the hearts’ blood supply, causing permanent heart dama ge or stroke [1]. Photo-acoustic imaging...... is useful for detection of plaques for prevention of rupture of vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques in the arteries can be distinguished using photo-acoustic imaging based on lipid accumulation with different characteristics of optical absorption. The basic principle of this imaging technique...... relies on exposing lipids to a laser capable of inducing photo-acoustic effect and a sensor affected by the induced pressure. Polymer optical fibre Bragg grating and Fabry-Perot sensors will be developed for detection of photo-acoustic signal in collaboration of Optoelectronics and Laser technology group...

  19. Nonlinear photoacoustic response of opaque media in gas microphone signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madvaliev, U.; Salikhov, T. Kh.; Sharifov, D. M.; Khan, N. A.

    2006-03-01

    We have theoretically studied the effect of thermal nonlinearity, due to the temperature dependence of the thermophysical and optical parameters for thermally thick opaque media, on the characteristics of the fundamental photoacoustic signal when the signal is detected by a gas microphone. We have shown that the dependence of the amplitude of the nonlinear component of the signal on the intensity of the incident radiation I0 is expressed by means of the dependence of the temperature rise for the irradiated sample surface Θ0 on I0, and the thermal nonlinearity does not affect the phase of the photoacoustic signal. We propose a theory for generation of the second harmonic of the photoacoustic signal. We have established that the phase shift of the photoacoustic signal is equal to 3π/4, while its amplitude depends on the frequency (˜ω-3/2) and the intensity (˜ I{0/2}).

  20. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almon Fisher

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm-1 to 1240 cm-1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infrared spectra for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate was observed. Partial least-squares (PLS regression was used to develop an algorithm for classification of these compounds based solely on photoacoustic spectra.

  1. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Trace Vapor Detection and Molecular Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, Ellen; Bender, John; Pellegrino, Paul; Fisher, Almon

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-scale photoacoustic sensor for the detection of trace gases. A mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) was used to determine detection limits for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate. The source was continuously tunable from 1015 cm−1 to 1240 cm−1, allowing for the collection of photoacoustic vibrational spectra for these gases. Exceptional agreement between the measured photoacoustic spectra and the infrared spectra for acetic acid, acetone, 1,4-dioxane, and vinyl acetate was observed. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression was used to develop an algorithm for classification of these compounds based solely on photoacoustic spectra. PMID:22294910

  2. Feasibility of noncontact piezoelectric detection of photoacoustic signals in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Blomme, Erik; Cool, Tijl; Bilcke, Mattias; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Grimbergen, Kees A.; den Heeten, Gerard J.

    2010-09-01

    The feasibility of air-coupled ultrasound transducers to detect laser-induced ultrasound from artificial blood vessels embedded in an optically scattering phantom is demonstrated. These air-coupled transducers allow new applications in biomedical photoacoustic imaging where contact with tissue is not preferred. One promising application of such transducers is the addition of photoacoustic imaging to the regular x-ray mammographic screening procedure.

  3. Feasibility of noncontact piezoelectric detection of photoacoustic signals in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kolkman, Roy G.M.; Blomme, Erik; Cool, Tijl; Bilcke, Mattias; Leeuwen, van, P.W.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Grimbergen, Kees A.; Heeten, den, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of air-coupled ultrasound transducers to detect laser-induced ultrasound from artificial blood vessels embedded in an optically scattering phantom is demonstrated. These air-coupled transducers allow new applications in biomedical photoacoustic imaging where contact with tissue is not preferred. One promising application of such transducers is the addition of photoacoustic imaging to the regular x-ray mammographic screening procedure. (C) 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrume...

  4. Exact solution for a photoacoustic wave from a finite-length cylindrical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalev, Jason; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-04-01

    In wide-field pulsed photoacoustics, a nearly instantaneous source of electromagnetic energy is applied uniformly to an absorbing medium to create an acoustic wave. In this work, an exact solution is derived for the photoacoustic wave originating from a finite-length solid cylindrical source in terms of known analytic functions involving elliptic integrals of canonical form. The solution is compared with the output of a finite-element simulation. PMID:25920820

  5. Patterned thin metal film for the lateral resolution measurement of photoacoustic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Do-Hyun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image quality assessment method of photoacoustic tomography has not been completely standardized yet. Due to the combined nature of photonic signal generation and ultrasonic signal transmission in biological tissue, neither optical nor ultrasonic traditional methods can be used without modification. An optical resolution measurement technique was investigated for its feasibility for resolution measurement of photoacoustic tomography. Methods A patterned thin metal film deposited on silica glass provides high contrast in optical imaging due to high reflectivity from the metal film and high transmission from the glass. It provides high contrast when it is used for photoacoustic tomography because thin metal film can absorb pulsed laser energy. An US Air Force 1951 resolution target was used to generate patterned photoacoustic signal to measure the lateral resolution. Transducer with 2.25 MHz bandwidth and a sample submerged in water and gelatinous block were tested for lateral resolution measurement. Results Photoacoustic signal generated from a thin metal film deposited on a glass can propagate along the surface or through the surrounding medium. First, a series of experiments with tilted sample confirmed that the measured photoacoustic signal is what is propagating through the medium. Lateral resolution of the photoacoustic tomography system was successfully measured for water and gelatinous block as media: 0.33 mm and 0.35 mm in water and gelatinous material, respectively, when 2.25 MHz transducer was used. Chicken embryo was tested for biomedical applications. Conclusions A patterned thin metal film sample was tested for its feasibility of measuring lateral resolution of a photoacoustic tomography system. Lateral resolutions in water and gelatinous material were successfully measured using the proposed method. Measured resolutions agreed well with theoretical values.

  6. Pulsed photoacoustic techniques and glucose determination in human blood and tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Determination of blood glucose level is a frequently occurring procedure in diabetes care. As the most common method involves collecting blood drops for chemical analysis, it is invasive and liable to afflict a degree of pain and cause a skin injury. To eliminate these disadvantages, this thesis focuses on pulsed photoacoustic techniques, which have potential ability in non-invasive blood glucose measurement. The fundamental theory of photoacoustics in liquid and soft tissue ...

  7. Low temperature thermal diffusivity of LiKSO4 obtained using the photoacoustic phase lag method

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge M.P.P.M.; Vieira M.M.F.; Mendes Filho J.; Oliveira A.C.; Vieira Jr. N.D.; Morato S.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the determination of the thermal diffusivity of LiKSO4 crystals using the photoacoustic phase lag method, in the 77 K to 300 K temperature interval. This method is quite simple and fast and when it is coupled to a specially designed apparatus, that includes a resonant photoacoustic cell, allows for the determination of the thermal diffusivity at low temperatures. The thermal diffusivity is an important parameter that depends on the temperature, and no values of this para...

  8. Small-Size Resonant Photoacoustic Cell of Inclined Geometry for Gas Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Gorelik, A. V.; Ulasevich, A. L.; Nikonovich, F. N.; Zakharich, M. P.; Chebotar, A. I.; V. A. Firago; Stetsik, V. M.; Kazak, N. S.; Starovoitov, V. S.

    2009-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell intended for laser detection of trace gases is represented. The cell is adapted so as to enhance the gas-detection performance and, simultaneously, to reduce the cell size. The cell design provides an efficient cancellation of the window background (a parasite response due to absorption of laser beam in the cell windows) and acoustic isolation from the environment for an acoustic resonance of the cell. The useful photoacoustic response from a detected gas, window backgrou...

  9. Detection of CO2 in N2 and H2O using photoacoustics

    OpenAIRE

    Holm, Vårin Renate Andvik

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a technique where absorbed modulated light is released as heat, causing thermal expansion which can be detected using an acoustic transducer. It can be used to determine the absorption spectra or the concentration of a material. In this project, photoacoustic spectroscopy is performed on CO2 in N2 gas and on CO2 dissolved in water in the 2003 - 2006 nm range. Studies on CO2 concentrations can be used in environmental research and fish industries, to mention some ...

  10. Photoacoustic investigation of Cd1-xMnxTe mixed crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Firszt, F.; ŁÈ©gowski, S.; MÈ©czyńska, H.; Marasek, A.; Pawlak, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ternary diluted magnetic semiconductors Cd1-xMnxTe obtained by Bridgman method in the range of composition 0⩽x⩽0.7 were investigated. The photoacoustic spectroscopy with a piezoelectric transducer was employed to evaluate the energy gaps of Cd1-xMnxTe bulk mixed crystals at room temperature. A linear increase of energy gap with increasing x value has been observed. Photoacoustic data were correlated with ellipsometric measurements.

  11. Photoacoustic study of Cd{1-x-y}BexMnyTe mixed crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Firszt, F.; Legowski, S.; Męczyńska, H.; Marasek, A.; Pawlak, M.

    2003-06-01

    Quaternary diluted niagnetic semiconductors Cd{1-x-y}BexMnyTe obtained by Bridgman method for x=0.01 and 0leq yleq 0.15 were investigated. The photoacoustic spectroscopy with a piezoelectric transducer was employed to evaluate the energy gaps of Cd{1-x-y}BexMnyTe bulk mixed crystals at room temperature. The increase of the energy gap with increasing x value has been observed. Characteristic features of amplitude and phase photoacoustic spectra were discussed.

  12. Photoacoustic image patterns of breast carcinoma and comparisons with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and vascular stained histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Brinkhuis, M.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; van den Engh, F. M.; van der Schaaf, M.; Klaase, J. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging can visualize vasculature deep in tissue using the high contrast of hemoglobin to light, with the high-resolution possible with ultrasound detection. Since angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, leads to increased vascularity, photoacoustics holds promise in imaging breast cancer as shown in proof-of-principle studies. Here for the first time, we investigate if there are specific photoacoustic appearances of breast malignancies which can be related to the tumor vascularity, using an upgraded research imaging system, the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope. In addition to comparisons with x-ray and ultrasound images, in subsets of cases the photoacoustic images were compared with MR images, and with vascular staining in histopathology. We were able to identify lesions in suspect breasts at the expected locations in 28 of 29 cases. We discovered generally three types of photoacoustic appearances reminiscent of contrast enhancement types reported in MR imaging of breast malignancies, and first insights were gained into the relationship with tumor vascularity.

  13. Comparison of Photoacoustic Signals in Photosynthetic and Nonphotosynthetic Leaf Tissues of Variegated Pelargonium zonale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljović-Jovanović, S.; Vidović, M.; Morina, F.; Prokić, Lj.; Todorović, D. M.

    2016-09-01

    Green-white variegated leaves of Pelargonium zonale were studied using the photoacoustic method. Our aim was to characterize photosynthetically active green tissue and nonphotosynthetically active white tissue by the photoacoustic amplitude signals. We observed lower stomatal conductance and higher leaf temperature in white tissue than in green tissue. Besides these thermal differences, significantly higher absorbance in green tissue was based on chlorophyll and carotenoids which were absent in white tissue. However, optical properties of epidermal layers of both tissues were equal. The photoacoustic amplitude of white tissue was over four times higher compared to green tissue, which was correlated with lower stomatal conductance. In addition, at frequencies >700 Hz, the significant differences between the photoacoustic signals of green and white tissue were obtained. We identified the photoacoustic signal deriving from photosynthetic oxygen evolution in green tissue, using high intensity of red light modulated at 10 Hz. Moreover, the photoacoustic amplitude of green tissue increased progressively with time which corresponded to the period of induction of photosynthetic oxygen evolution. For the first time, very high frequencies (1 kHz to 5 kHz) were applied on leaf material.

  14. Twin-Photon Confocal Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, D S

    2010-01-01

    A recently introduced two-channel confocal microscope with correlated detection promises up to 50% improvement in transverse spatial resolution [Simon, Sergienko, Optics Express {\\bf 18}, 9765 (2010)]. Here we move further by introducing a triple-confocal correlated microscope, exploiting the correlations present in optical parametric amplifiers. It is based on tight focusing of pump radiation onto a thin sample positioned in front of a nonlinear crystal, followed by coincidence detection of signal and idler photons, each focused onto a pinhole. This approach offers further resolution enhancement in microscopy.

  15. Photoacoustic section imaging with an integrating cylindrical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratt, Sibylle; Passler, Klaus; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2011-07-01

    A piezoelectric detector with cylindrical shape for photoacoustic section imaging is characterized. This detector is larger than the imaging object in direction of the cylinder axis, giving rise to its integrating properties. Its focal volume has the shape of a slice and the acquisition of signals for one section image requires rotation of an object about an axis perpendicular to this slice. Image reconstruction from the signals requires the application of the inverse Radon transform. It is shown that implementing the Abel transform is a suitable step in data processing, allowing speeding up the data acquisition since the scanning angle can be reduced. The resolution of the detector was estimated in directions perpendicular and parallel to the detection plane. An upper limit for the out of plane resolution is given and section images of a zebra fish are shown.

  16. Simple model of a photoacoustic system as a CR circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce the photoacoustic educational system (PAES), by which we can identify which gas causes the greenhouse effect in a classroom (Kaneko et al 2010 J. Chem. Educ. 87 202-4). PAES is an experimental system in which a pulse of infrared (IR) is absorbed into gas as internal energy, an oscillation of pressure (sound) appears, and then we can measure the absorptance of IR by the strength of sound. In this paper, we construct a simple mathematical model for PAES which is equivalent to the CR circuit. The energy absorption of an IR pulse into gas corresponds to the charge of a condenser and the heat diffusion to the outside corresponds to the energy dissipation by electric resistance. We analyse the experimental results by using this simple model, and check its validity. Although the model is simple, it explains phenomena occurring in PAES and can be a good educational resource. (paper)

  17. Fabrication of indigenous computer controlled photoacoustic spectrometer for actinide spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) monitoring the non-radiative de-excitation process is a powerful tool for investigating the absorption spectra of almost any type of samples like opaque solids, turbid solutions etc. Actinide compounds due to high probability of non-radiative relaxation process are good candidates for PAS investigations and also without any need for good optical quality crystals of these compounds. In addition, this technique is extremely useful for determination of thermal properties like thermal conductivity, diffusivity and related properties like phase transitions, thickness of thin film etc. In the present paper details of fabrication of indigenous PAS unit using low cost easily available components and interfacing this unit to a personal computer are given

  18. Improved Tuning Fork for Terahertz Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Giglio, Marilena; Vitiello, Miriam S; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) sensor for methanol (CH₃OH) detection employing a novel quartz tuning fork (QTF), specifically designed to enhance the QEPAS sensing performance in the terahertz (THz) spectral range. A discussion of the QTF properties in terms of resonance frequency, quality factor and acousto-electric transduction efficiency as a function of prong sizes and spacing between the QTF prongs is presented. The QTF was employed in a QEPAS sensor system using a 3.93 THz quantum cascade laser as the excitation source in resonance with a CH₃OH rotational absorption line located at 131.054 cm(-1). A minimum detection limit of 160 ppb in 30 s integration time, corresponding to a normalized noise equivalent absorption NNEA = 3.75 × 10(-11) cm(-1)W/Hz(½), was achieved, representing a nearly one-order-of-magnitude improvement with respect to previous reports. PMID:27023552

  19. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. S., E-mail: jingsong-li@ahu.edu.cn; Yu, B. [Key Laboratory of Opto-Electronic Information Acquisition and Manipulation of Ministry of Education, Anhui University, Hefei (China); Fischer, H. [Department of Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Chen, W. [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l’Atmosphére, Université du Littoral Côte d’Opale, Dunkerque (France); Yalin, A. P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1374 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  20. Contributed review: quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J S; Yu, B; Fischer, H; Chen, W; Yalin, A P

    2015-03-01

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade. PMID:25832204

  1. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade

  2. Improved Tuning Fork for Terahertz Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Giglio, Marilena; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) sensor for methanol (CH3OH) detection employing a novel quartz tuning fork (QTF), specifically designed to enhance the QEPAS sensing performance in the terahertz (THz) spectral range. A discussion of the QTF properties in terms of resonance frequency, quality factor and acousto-electric transduction efficiency as a function of prong sizes and spacing between the QTF prongs is presented. The QTF was employed in a QEPAS sensor system using a 3.93 THz quantum cascade laser as the excitation source in resonance with a CH3OH rotational absorption line located at 131.054 cm−1. A minimum detection limit of 160 ppb in 30 s integration time, corresponding to a normalized noise equivalent absorption NNEA = 3.75 × 10−11 cm−1W/Hz½, was achieved, representing a nearly one-order-of-magnitude improvement with respect to previous reports. PMID:27023552

  3. Thermophysical investigation of Gafchromic EBT2 films using photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydarous, A.; Abdallah, S.; Towairqi, M. Al

    2014-07-01

    The thermophysical properties of EBT2 films exposed to different doses of x-ray were investigated. The doses ranged from 2 to 818 cGy. The films were irradiated by a Varian linear accelerator using a 6 MV photon beam. The thermal conductivity (k) was obtained by measuring the thermal diffusivity (α) and thermal effusivity (e) using the photoacoustic (PA) technique. The α, e, and k values clearly indicated their dependence on the dose from 0 to 818 cGy. The results demonstrate that the PA technique can detect variations in the thermal diffusivity at doses as low as approximately 3 cGy. The thermal conductivity for the film exposed to 818 cGy of radiation increased by a factor of approximately 3.70 compared to the non-exposed film. The PA spectroscopic technique displayed good reproducibility, with a relative standard deviation of less than 5%.

  4. In vitro photoacoustic sensing of calcium dynamics with arsenazo III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, N.; Fowler, R. A.; Allen, A.; Zoldan, J.; Suggs, L.; Emelianov, S.

    2016-07-01

    Imaging of cellular electric potential via calcium-ion sensitive contrast agents is a useful tool, but current techniques lack sufficient depth penetration. We explore contrast-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging, using Arsenazo III dye, to visualize cardiac myocyte depolarization in vitro. Phantom results show strong linearity of PA signal with dye concentration (R 2  >  0.95), and agree spectrally with extinction measurements with varying calcium concentration. Cell studies indicate a significant (>100-fold) increase in PA signal for dye-treated cells, as well as a 10-fold increase in peak-to-peak variation during a 30 s window. This suggests contrast-enhanced PA imaging may have sufficient sensitivity and specificity for depth-resolved visualization of tissue depolarization in real-time.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new tool for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding

    2012-12-01

    The potential application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology to diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis has been explored. The feasibility of our bench-top joint imaging systems in delineating soft articular tissue structures in a noninvasive manner was validated first on rat models and then on human peripheral joints. Based on the study on commonly used arthritis rat models, the capability of PAI to differentiate arthritic joints from the normal was also examined. With sufficient imaging depth, PAI can realize tomographic imaging of a human peripheral joint or a small-animal joint as a whole organ noninvasively. By presenting additional optical contrast and tissue functional information such as blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, PAI may provide an opportunity for early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, and for monitoring of therapeutic outcomes with improved sensitivity and accuracy.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging driven by an interstitial irradiation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Mitcham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA imaging has shown tremendous promise in providing valuable diagnostic and therapy-monitoring information in select clinical procedures. Many of these pursued applications, however, have been relatively superficial due to difficulties with delivering light deep into tissue. To address this limitation, this work investigates generating a PA image using an interstitial irradiation source with a clinical ultrasound (US system, which was shown to yield improved PA signal quality at distances beyond 13 mm and to provide improved spectral fidelity. Additionally, interstitially driven multi-wavelength PA imaging was able to provide accurate spectra of gold nanoshells and deoxyhemoglobin in excised prostate and liver tissue, respectively, and allowed for clear visualization of a wire at 7 cm in excised liver. This work demonstrates the potential of using a local irradiation source to extend the depth capabilities of future PA imaging techniques for minimally invasive interventional radiology procedures.

  7. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. S.; Yu, B.; Fischer, H.; Chen, W.; Yalin, A. P.

    2015-03-01

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  8. On multi-spectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography in diffusive regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of quantitative photoacoustic tomography (qPAT) is to reconstruct the diffusion, absorption and Grüneisen thermodynamic coefficients of heterogeneous media from knowledge of the interior absorbed radiation. It has been shown in Bal and Ren (2011 Inverse Problems 27 075003), based on diffusion theory, that with data acquired at one given wavelength, all three coefficients cannot be reconstructed uniquely. In this work, we study the multi-spectral qPAT problem and show that when multiple wavelength data are available, all coefficients can be reconstructed simultaneously under minor prior assumptions. Moreover, the reconstructions are shown to be very stable. We present some numerical simulations that support the theoretical results. (paper)

  9. A Practical Guide to Photoacoustic Tomography in the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong V.; Yao, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    The life sciences can benefit greatly from imaging technologies that connect microscopic discoveries with macroscopic observations. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a highly sensitive modality for imaging rich optical absorption contrast over a wide range of spatial scales at high speed, is uniquely positioned for this need. In PAT, endogenous contrast reveals tissue’s anatomical, functional, metabolic, and histologic properties, and exogenous contrast provides molecular and cellular specificity. The spatial scale of PAT covers organelles, cells, tissues, organs, and small-animal organisms. Consequently, PAT is complementary to other imaging modalities in contrast mechanism, penetration, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution. We review the fundamentals of PAT and provide practical guidelines to the broad life science community for matching PAT systems with research needs. We also summarize the most promising biomedical applications of PAT, discuss related challenges, and envision its potential to lead to further breakthroughs. PMID:27467726

  10. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  11. Narrow Absorption NIR Wavelength Organic Nanoparticles Enable Multiplexed Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hoang D; Wilson, Brian K; Heinmiller, Andrew; Faenza, Bill; Hejazi, Shahram; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-06-15

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging hybrid optical-ultrasound based imaging technique that can be used to visualize optical absorbers in deep tissue. Free organic dyes can be used as PA contrast agents to concurrently provide additional physiological and molecular information during imaging, but their use in vivo is generally limited by rapid renal clearance for soluble dyes and by the difficulty of delivery for hydrophobic dyes. We here report the use of the block copolymer directed self-assembly process, Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP), to form series of highly hydrophobic optical dyes into stable, biocompatible, and water-dispersible nanoparticles (NPs) with sizes from 38 to 88 nm and with polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings suitable for in vivo use. The incorporation of dyes with absorption profiles within the infrared range, that is optimal for PA imaging, produces the PA activity of the particles. The hydrophobicity of the dyes allows their sequestration in the NP cores, so that they do not interfere with targeting, and high loadings of >75 wt % dye are achieved. The optical extinction coefficients (ε (mL mg(-1) cm(-1))) were essentially invariant to the loading of the dye in NP core. Co-encapsulation of dye with vitamin E or polystyrene demonstrates the ability to simultaneously image and deliver a second agent. The PEG chains on the NP surface were functionalized with folate to demonstrate folate-dependent targeting. The spectral separation of different dyes among different sets of particles enables multiplexed imaging, such as the simultaneous imaging of two sets of particles within the same animal. We provide the first demonstration of this capability with PA imaging, by simultaneously imaging nontargeted and folate-targeted nanoparticles within the same animal. These results highlight Flash NanoPrecipitation as a platform to develop photoacoustic tools with new diagnostic capabilities. PMID:27153806

  12. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Beard, P. C.; Cox, B. T.

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP’s acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be Γ   =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated.

  13. Real-time sono-photoacoustic imaging of gold nanoemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Perez, Camilo; Lombardo, Michael; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Phase transition contrast agents were first introduced in ultrasound (US) in the form of perfluorocarbon droplets. When their size is reduced to the nanoscale, surface tension dominates their stability and high pressure is required to vaporize them using long US emissions at high frequencies. Our group recently showed that nanoemulsion beads (100-300 nm) coated with gold nanopsheres could be used as non-linear contrast agents. Beads can be vaporized with light only, inducing stronger photoacoustic signals by increasing thermal expansion. A photoacoustic cavitation threshold study (US: 1.2 MHz, Laser 750 nm and 10-ns pulse) shows that the vaporization thresholds of NEB-GNS can be greatly reduced using simultaneous light and US excitations. The resulting signal is driven only by the pressure amplitude for a fluence higher than 2.4 mJ/cm2. At diagnostic exposures, it is possible to capture very high signals from the vaporized beads at concentrations reduced to 10 pM with optical absorption smaller than 0.01 cm-1. A real-time imaging mode selectively isolating vaporization signals was implemented on a Verasonics system. A linear US probe (L74, 3 MHz) launched short US bursts before light was emitted from the laser. Vaporization of NEB-GNS resulted in a persistent 30-dB signal enhancement compared to a dye with the same absorption. Specific vaporization signals were retrieved in phantom experiments with US scatterers. This technique, called sonophotoacoustics, has great potential for targeted molecular imaging and therapy using compact nanoprobes with potentially high-penetrability into tissue.

  14. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M; Zeqiri, B; Beard, P C; Cox, B T

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP's acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be [Formula: see text]  =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated. PMID:27286411

  15. Modelling, verification, and calibration of a photoacoustics based continuous non-invasive blood glucose monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Praful P.; Sanki, Pradyut K.; Sarangi, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Swapna

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the use of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at an excitation wavelength of 905 nm for making continuous non-invasive blood glucose measurements. The theoretical background of the measurement technique is verified through simulation. An apparatus is fabricated for performing photoacoustic measurements in vitro on glucose solutions and in vivo on human subjects. The amplitude of the photoacoustic signals measured from glucose solutions is observed to increase with the solution concentration, while photoacoustic amplitude obtained from in vivo measurements follows the blood glucose concentration of the subjects, indicating a direct proportionality between the two quantities. A linear calibration method is applied separately on measurements obtained from each individual in order to estimate the blood glucose concentration. The estimated glucose values are compared to reference glucose concentrations measured using a standard glucose meter. A plot of 196 measurement pairs taken over 30 normal subjects on a Clarke error grid gives a point distribution of 82.65% and 17.35% over zones A and B of the grid with a mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) of 11.78% and a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 15.27 mg/dl (0.85 mmol/l). The results obtained are better than or comparable to those obtained using photoacoustic spectroscopy based methods or other non-invasive measurement techniques available. The accuracy levels obtained are also comparable to commercially available continuous glucose monitoring systems.

  16. Gold nano-rods as a targeting contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A.; Huang, S.-W.; Day, K. C.; O'Donnell, M.; Day, M.; Kotov, N.; Ashkenazi, S.

    2007-02-01

    We have studied the potential of gold nanorods to target cancer cells and provide contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The elongated "rod" shape of these nanoparticles provides a mechanism to tune their plasmon peak absorption wavelength. The absorption peak is shifted to longer wavelengths by increasing the aspect ratio of the rods. Particles 15 nm in diameter and 45 nm long were prepared using a seed mediated growth method. Their plasmon absorption peak was designed to be at 800 nm for increased penetration depth into biological tissue. They were conjugated with a specific antibody to target prostate cancer cells. We have applied photoacoustics to image a prostate cell culture targeted by conjugated gold particles. Images confirm the efficiency of conjugated particle binding to the targeted cell membranes. Photoacoustic detection of a single cell layer is demonstrated. To evaluate the applicability of the technique to clinical prostate cancer detection, we have imaged phantom objects mimicking a real tissue with small (2 mm size) inclusions of nanoparticle gel solution. Our photoacoustic imaging setup is based on a modified commercial ultrasonic scanner which makes it attractive for fast implementation in cancer diagnosis in clinical application. In addition, the setup allows for dual mode operation where a photoacoustic image is superimposed on a conventional B-mode ultrasound image. Dual mode operation is demonstrated by imaging a mouse with gold nanorod gel solution implanted in its hind limb.

  17. Development of sensitive analytical technique by Laser-Induced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A LIPAS (Laser-Induced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy) system has been developed for sensitive and remote analysis of neptunium which diffuse in low concentration range in reprocessing. The correction technique of background which disturbs sensitive analysis has been studied in visible to infrared range. And optical fiber system which is important for light operation has been also investigated for remote analysis in PUREX process. In visible range, the double-cell system, which has two photoacoustic cells in series, has been studied. The detection limit absorptivity was 4.47 x 10-5cm-1, this system has two orders higher sensitivity than that of absorption spectroscopy. This system was applied to measure photoacoustic spectrum of Pr(III), Nd(III), Er(III) and Np(V) in low concentration range in water. On photoacoustic spectrum of Np(V), the absorption peak at 614nm, which was not observed in low pH range, was identified. In near infrared range, analytical system which has parallel cells using alexandrite laser has been investigated. It was obtained that detection limit concentration of Np(V) is one order lower than that in visible range. The optical fiber system for application of LIPAS to reprocessing has been examined. The sensitivity of fiber-PAS is two times higher than that of absorption spectroscopy. However it is necessary to develop a beam operation system and a photoacoustic cell optimized for optical fiber system. (author)

  18. Appearance of breast cysts in planar geometry photoacoustic mammography using 1064-nm excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; Maartens, Erik; Huisman, Erik J. J.; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-12-01

    In the search for improved imaging modalities for detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, a high negative prediction value is also important. Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) imaging is a relatively new technique that has high potential for visualizing breast malignancies, but little is known about the photoacoustic appearance of benign lesions. In this work, we investigate the visibility of benign breast cysts in forward-mode photoacoustic mammography using 1064-nm light, as currently applied in the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope. Results from (Monte Carlo and k-wave) simulations and phantom measurements were used to interpret results from patient measurements. There was a strong agreement among the results from simulations, phantom, and patient measurements. Depending on the absorption contrast between cyst and breast tissue, cysts were visible as either one or two confined high-contrast areas representing the front and the back of the cyst, respectively. This edge enhancement is most likely the consequence of the local sudden change in the absorbed energy density and Grüneisen coefficients. Although the current forward-mode single-wavelength photoacoustic mammoscope cannot always unambiguously discriminate cysts from malignancies, this study reveals specific features of cysts compared to malignancies, which can be exploited for discrimination of the two abnormalities in future modifications of the imager.

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  20. Multi-acoustic lens design methodology for a low cost C-scan photoacoustic imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinni, Bhargava; Han, Zichao; Brown, Nicholas; Vallejo, Pedro; Jacobs, Tess; Knox, Wayne; Dogra, Vikram; Rao, Navalgund

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and implemented a novel acoustic lens based focusing technology into a prototype photoacoustic imaging camera. All photoacoustically generated waves from laser exposed absorbers within a small volume get focused simultaneously by the lens onto an image plane. We use a multi-element ultrasound transducer array to capture the focused photoacoustic signals. Acoustic lens eliminates the need for expensive data acquisition hardware systems, is faster compared to electronic focusing and enables real-time image reconstruction. Using this photoacoustic imaging camera, we have imaged more than 150 several centimeter size ex-vivo human prostate, kidney and thyroid specimens with a millimeter resolution for cancer detection. In this paper, we share our lens design strategy and how we evaluate the resulting quality metrics (on and off axis point spread function, depth of field and modulation transfer function) through simulation. An advanced toolbox in MATLAB was adapted and used for simulating a two-dimensional gridded model that incorporates realistic photoacoustic signal generation and acoustic wave propagation through the lens with medium properties defined on each grid point. Two dimensional point spread functions have been generated and compared with experiments to demonstrate the utility of our design strategy. Finally we present results from work in progress on the use of two lens system aimed at further improving some of the quality metrics of our system.

  1. Methodical study on plaque characterization using integrated vascular ultrasound, strain and spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Iulia M.; Su, Jimmy; Yeager, Doug; Amirian, James; Smalling, Richard; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2011-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis has been identified as a potential risk factor for cerebrovascular events, but information about its direct effect on the risk of recurrent stroke is limited due to incomplete diagnosis. The combination of vascular ultrasound, strain rate and spectroscopic photoacoustics could improve the timely diagnosis of plaque status and risk of rupturing. Current ultrasound techniques can noninvasively image the anatomy of carotid arteries. The spatio-temporal variation in displacement of different regions within the arterial wall can be derived from ultrasound radio frequency data; therefore an ultrasound based strain rate imaging modality can be used to reveal changes in arterial mechanical properties. Additionally, spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging can provide information on the optical absorption properties of arterial tissue and it can be used to identify the location of specific tissue components, such as lipid pools. An imaging technique combining ultrasound, strain rate and spectroscopic photoacoustics was tested on an excised atherosclerotic rabbit aorta. The ultrasound image illustrates inhomogeneities in arterial wall thickness, the strain rate indicates the arterial segment with reduced elasticity and the spectroscopic photoacoustic image illustrates the accumulation of lipids. The results demonstrated that ultrasound, strain rate and spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging are complementary. Thus the integration of the three imaging modalities advances the characterization of atherosclerotic plaques.

  2. In vivo imaging of inducible tyrosinase gene expression with an ultrasound array-based photoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the production of melanin, has shown promise as a reporter of genetic activity. While green fluorescent protein has been used extensively in this capacity, it is limited in its ability to provide information deep in tissue at a reasonable resolution. As melanin is a strong absorber of light, it is possible to image gene expression using tyrosinase with photoacoustic imaging technologies, resulting in excellent resolutions at multiple-centimeter depths. While our previous work has focused on creating and imaging MCF-7 cells with doxycycline-controlled tyrosinase expression, we have now established the viability of these cells in a murine model. Using an array-based photoacoustic imaging system with 5 MHz center frequency, we capture interleaved ultrasound and photoacoustic images of tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 tumors both in a tissue mimicking phantom, and in vivo. Images of both the tyrosinase-expressing tumor and a control tumor are presented as both coregistered ultrasound-photoacoustic B-scan images and 3-dimensional photoacoustic volumes created by mechanically scanning the transducer. We find that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible with a signal level 12dB greater than that of the control tumor in vivo. Phantom studies with excised tumors show that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible at depths in excess of 2cm, and have suggested that our imaging system is sensitive to a transfection rate of less than 1%.

  3. Virus-mimicking nano-constructs as a contrast agent for near infrared photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Vullev, Valentine I.; Wang, Lihong V.; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-02-01

    We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice.We report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of photoacoustic imaging using a contrast agent composed of a plant virus protein shell, which encapsulates indocyanine green (ICG), the only FDA-approved near infrared chromophore. These nano-constructs can provide higher photoacoustic signals than blood in tissue phantoms, and display superior photostability compared to non-encapsulated ICG. Our preliminary results suggest that the constructs do not elicit an acute immunogenic response in healthy mice. Electronic supplemental information (ESI) available: Information on experimental procedure for fabrication of the nano-constructs, photoacoustic imaging, and immunogenic studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34124k

  4. Planar waveguide light transmission modality for backward-mode photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Mason W.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Hunt, Heather K.

    2016-03-01

    Prior research in photoacoustic tomography has consistently demonstrated its ability to image structures near the surface of tissue with a high degree of optical contrast. However, despite significant advancements in the field, there has been little to no development of clinical applications for photoacoustic tomography, principally due to the requirement for backwardmode operation, i.e., it must detect the photoacoustic signal on the same side of the tissue as the incident laser light. This results in the standard ultrasonic transducer occluding the path of the inciting laser beam. Therefore, developing a technique to deliver light into the tissue, while incorporating commonly available ultrasonic detection equipment without occluding the beam propagation or modifying the equipment in any way, would provide a significant benefit to the field, and potentially improve its clinical applicability. Here, we propose a new method to accomplish this aim, using planar optical waveguides that employ the optical tunneling phenomenon to transmit light directly into tissue (pig skin) through physical contact with the sample. A commercially available, 10MHz, unfocused ultrasonic transducer was positioned on the rear face of the waveguide and was used to detect photoacoustic signals generated within the tissue as the signals propagated perpendicularly through the waveguide substrate. Unlike alternative solutions to the occlusion problem, this modality does not necessitate the use of custom manufactured transducers, expensive dichroics, or additional laser systems, and thereby represents a viable approach for the easy implementation of photoacoustic tomography in a clinical setting.

  5. Forward-viewing photoacoustic imaging probe with bundled ultra-thin hollow optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, A.; Iwai, K.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A photoacoustic imaging system composed of a flexible bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers is proposed for endoscopic diagnosis. In this system, a bundle of 127 hollow-optical fibers with an inner diameter of 100 μm was fabricated. The total diameter of the bundle was 2.1 mm, and the minimum bending radius was around 10 mm. Owing to the small numerical aperture of hollow optical fibers, a high resolution image was obtained without using a lens array at the distal end. In the imaging system, the hollow fibers in the bundle were aligned at the input end, so the hollow fibers were sequentially excited by linearly scanning the laser beam at the input end. Photoacoustic imaging systems consisting of the bundled fibers for excitation of acoustic wave and piezoelectric probes for detection of photoacoustic signals were built. By using the systems, photoacoustic images of blood vessels in the ovarian membrane of fish were taken to test the feasibility of the system. As a result, photoacoustic images of the vessel were successfully obtained with a laser fluence of around 6.6 mJ cm‑2.

  6. Thermoacoustic and photoacoustic characterizations of few-layer graphene by pulsed excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Witte, Russell S.; Xin, Hao

    2016-04-01

    We characterized the thermoacoustic and photoacoustic properties of large-area, few-layer graphene by pulsed microwave and optical excitations. Due to its high electric conductivity and low heat capacity per unit area, graphene lends itself to excellent microwave and optical energy absorption and acoustic signal emanation due to the thermoacoustic effect. When exposed to pulsed microwave or optical radiation, distinct thermoacoustic and photoacoustic signals generated by the few-layer graphene are obtained due to microwave and laser absorption of the graphene, respectively. Clear thermoacoustic and photoacoustic images of large-area graphene sample are achieved. A numerical model is developed and the simulated results are in good accordance with the measured ones. This characterization work may find applications in ultrasound generator and detectors for microwave and optical radiation. It may also become an alternative characterization approach for graphene and other types of two-dimensional materials.

  7. A numerical model for the study of photoacoustic imaging of brain tumours

    CERN Document Server

    Firouzi, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has shown great promise for medical imaging, where optical energy absorption by blood haemoglobin is used as the contrast mechanism. A numerical method was developed for the in-silico assessment of the photoacoustic image reconstruction of the brain. Image segmentation techniques were used to prepare a digital phantom from MR images. Light transport through brain tissue was modelled using a Finite Element approach. The resulting acoustic pressure was then estimated by pulsed photoacoustics considerations. The forward acoustic wave propagation was modelled by the linearized coupled first order wave equations and solved by an acoustic k-space method. Since skull bone is an elastic solid and strongly attenuates ultrasound (due to both scattering and absorption), a k-space method was developed for elastic media. To model scattering effects, a new approach was applied based on propagation in random media. In addition, absorption effects were incorporated using a power law. Finally, the acoust...

  8. Nonlinear photoacoustic wavefront shaping (PAWS) for single speckle-grain optical focusing in scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Puxiang; Tay, Jian Wei; Wang, Lihong V

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasively focusing light into strongly scattering media, such as biological tissue, is highly desirable but challenging. Recently, wavefront shaping technologies guided by ultrasonic encoding or photoacoustic sensing have been developed to address this limitation. So far, these methods provide only acoustic diffraction-limited optical focusing. Here, we introduce nonlinear photoacoustic wavefront shaping (PAWS), which achieves optical diffraction-limited (i.e. single-speckle-grain) focusing in scattering media. We develop an efficient dual-pulse excitation approach to generate strong nonlinear photoacoustic (PA) signals based on the Grueneisen memory effect. These nonlinear PA signals are used as feedback to guide iterative wavefront optimization. By maximizing the amplitude of the nonlinear PA signal, light is effectively focused to a single optical speckle grain. Experimental results demonstrate a clear optical focus on the scale of 5-7 micrometers, which is ~10 times smaller than the acoustic focus in...

  9. Thermal diffusivity measurement for p-Si and Ag/p-Si by photoacoustic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal diffusivity (TD) of p-Si and Ag/p-Si samples were measured by photoacoustic technique using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples were annealed by heating them at 960, 1050, 1200, and 1300 °C for 3 h in air. The thermal diffusivity of Ag-coated samples was obtained by fitting the photoacoustic experimental data to the thermally thick equation for Rosencwaig and Gersho (RG) theory. For the single layer samples, the thermal diffusivity can be obtained by fitting as well as by obtaining the critical frequency fc. In this study, the thermal diffusivity of the p-Si samples increased with increasing the annealing temperature. The thermal diffusivity of the Ag/p-Si samples, after reaching the maximum value of about 2.73 cm2/s at a temperature of 1200 °C, decreased due to the silver complete melt in the surface of the silicon. (author)

  10. In vivo cell characteristic extraction and identification by photoacoustic flow cytography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guo; Xu, Dong; Qin, Huan; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2015-10-01

    We present a photoacoustic flow cytography with fast cross-sectional (B-scan) imaging to precisely identify specific cells in vivo. The B-scan imaging speed of the system is up to 200 frame/s with a lateral resolution of 1.5 μm, which allows to dynamically image the flowing cells within the microvascular. The shape, size and photoacoustic intensity of the target cells are extracted from streaming images and integrated into a standard pattern to distinguish cell types. Circulating red blood cells and melanoma cells in blood vessels are simultaneously identified on melanoma-bearing mouse model. The results demonstrate that in vivo photoacoustic flow cytography can provide cells characteristics analysis and cell type's visual identification, which will be applied for noninvasively monitoring circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and analyzing hematologic diseases. PMID:26504626

  11. Thermal diffusivity measurement for p-Si and Ag/p-Si by photoacoustic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Mohammed Jabbar; Yunus, W. Mahmood Mat; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed; Zakaria, Azmi, E-mail: mohammed55865@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti PutraMalaysia (UPM), Serdang (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Thermal diffusivity (TD) of p-Si and Ag/p-Si samples were measured by photoacoustic technique using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples were annealed by heating them at 960, 1050, 1200, and 1300 °C for 3 h in air. The thermal diffusivity of Ag-coated samples was obtained by fitting the photoacoustic experimental data to the thermally thick equation for Rosencwaig and Gersho (RG) theory. For the single layer samples, the thermal diffusivity can be obtained by fitting as well as by obtaining the critical frequency f{sub c.} In this study, the thermal diffusivity of the p-Si samples increased with increasing the annealing temperature. The thermal diffusivity of the Ag/p-Si samples, after reaching the maximum value of about 2.73 cm{sup 2}/s at a temperature of 1200 °C, decreased due to the silver complete melt in the surface of the silicon. (author)

  12. Study of the diffusion of some emulsions in the human skin by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously used pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy (PPAS) to quantify sunscreen diffusion into human skin, and suggested a methodology to evaluate the time and the depth diffusion profile. These results were obtained by the analysis of the photoacoustic maximum response signal Pmax decrease, the time delay tmax and the Fourier transform representation of the photoacoustic signal. In this study we present the results obtained for diffusion of four typical emulsions used in sunscreen compositions that show, for the first time, a particular behaviour for one of these emulsions due to a chemical reaction inside the skin during the diffusion process. This result provides a particularly interesting technique through the PPAS, to evaluate in situ the eventual chemical reactions that can occur during drug diffusion into human skin

  13. Study of the diffusion of some emulsions in the human skin by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahjomri, F.; Benamar, N.; Chatri, E.; Leblanc, R. M.

    2003-08-01

    We previously used pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy (PPAS) to quantify sunscreen diffusion into human skin, and suggested a methodology to evaluate the time and the depth diffusion profile. These results were obtained by the analysis of the photoacoustic maximum response signal Pmax decrease, the time delay tmax and the Fourier transform representation of the photoacoustic signal. In this study we present the results obtained for diffusion of four typical emulsions used in sunscreen compositions that show, for the first time, a particular behaviour for one of these emulsions due to a chemical reaction inside the skin during the diffusion process. This result provides a particularly interesting technique through the PPAS, to evaluate in situ the eventual chemical reactions that can occur during drug diffusion into human skin.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging by using a bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, A.; Iwai, K.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a photoacoustic imaging system composed of a flexible bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers that enables endoscopic diagnosis. The hollow-fiber bundle involves 37 fibers with an inner diameter of 100 μm and the total diameter of the bundle is 1.2 mm. A laser beam for photoacoustic excitation is scanned at the input end of fiber bundle and therefore, no scanning mechanism is necessary at the distal end. In addition, owing to the small numerical aperture of hollow optical fibers, a high resolution image is obtained without using a micro-lens array at the end. By using the fiber bundle probe, photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels in the ovarian membrane of fish were successfully obtained with a laser fluence of around 2.8 mJ/cm2.

  15. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography using forward and adjoint Monte Carlo models of radiance

    CERN Document Server

    Hochuli, Roman; Arridge, Simon; Cox, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Forward and adjoint Monte Carlo (MC) models of radiance are proposed for use in model-based quantitative photoacoustic tomography. A 2D radiance MC model using a harmonic angular basis is introduced and validated against analytic solutions for the radiance in heterogeneous media. A gradient-based optimisation scheme is then used to recover 2D absorption and scattering coefficients distributions from simulated photoacoustic measurements. It is shown that the functional gradients, which are a challenge to compute efficiently using MC models, can be calculated directly from the coefficients of the harmonic angular basis used in the forward and adjoint models. This work establishes a framework for transport-based quantitative photoacoustic tomography that can fully exploit emerging highly parallel computing architectures.

  16. Self-normalized photoacoustic technique for thermo-optical characterization of samples mounted between transparent media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Díaz-Reyes, J.; Jaime-Fonseca, M. R.; Martínez-Pérez, L.; Pescador-Rojas, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    A self-normalized photoacoustic technique for thermo-optical characterization of materials, mounted between transparent media, is presented. It involves a complex ratio of photoacoustic signals in transmission and front configurations, taking the modulation frequency as the only variable. The analytical solutions for the corresponding 1D heat diffusion problems are analyzed to provide suitable methodologies for measuring the optical absorption coefficients and thermal diffusivity of such samples. This methodology was tested by measuring the optical absorption coefficient, at 660 nm, of methylene blue solutions at various concentrations and the thermal diffusivity of a black drawing ink sample. In addition, an approximated range of optical absorption coefficients, where this photoacoustic methodology is adequate, was established.

  17. Self-normalized photoacoustic technique for thermo-optical characterization of samples mounted between transparent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-normalized photoacoustic technique for thermo-optical characterization of materials, mounted between transparent media, is presented. It involves a complex ratio of photoacoustic signals in transmission and front configurations, taking the modulation frequency as the only variable. The analytical solutions for the corresponding 1D heat diffusion problems are analyzed to provide suitable methodologies for measuring the optical absorption coefficients and thermal diffusivity of such samples. This methodology was tested by measuring the optical absorption coefficient, at 660 nm, of methylene blue solutions at various concentrations and the thermal diffusivity of a black drawing ink sample. In addition, an approximated range of optical absorption coefficients, where this photoacoustic methodology is adequate, was established. (paper)

  18. Photoacoustical and pyroelectric dosimetry of X-ray radiation in diagnostic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three new types of radiation dosimeters, designed to measure X rays in its diagnostic region are described: the pulsed photoacoustical radiation dosimeter, the pyroelectric radiation dosimeter and the pulsed pyroelectric radiation dosimeter. The photoacoustical radiation dosimeter with the scope of to compare its carachteristics with the carachteristics of the new developed dosimeters is also studied. A methodology for calibration of a photoacoustical dosimeter which doesn't require the calibration of its response in a known field of ionizing radiation is proposed. A theoretical model to explain the results produced by the pulsed pyroelectric radiation dosimeter is presented. The obtained results show that the developed dosimeters are of calorimetric type, being linear its response with the X ray energy fluence rate. (author)

  19. High resolution three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging of human finger joints in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for noninvasively imaging the hand joints using a three-dimensional (3D) photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system. This 3D PAI system utilizes cylindrical scanning in data collection and virtual-detector concept in image reconstruction. The maximum lateral and axial resolutions of the PAI system are 70 μm and 240 μm. The cross-sectional photoacoustic images of a healthy joint clearly exhibited major internal structures including phalanx and tendons, which are not available from the current photoacoustic imaging methods. The in vivo PAI results obtained are comparable with the corresponding 3.0 T MRI images of the finger joint. This study suggests that the proposed method has the potential to be used in early detection of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  20. The photoacoustic spectroscopic investigations of the surface preparation of ZnSe crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobak, Ł.; Maliński, M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Strzałkowski, K.

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents results of the photoacoustic (PA) spectral studies of a series of ZnSe crystals with differently prepared surfaces. All samples exhibited the surface absorption connected with defects states located on their surfaces. The quality of the surface preparation is expressed by the surface absorption coefficient spectra of the samples times the thickness of a damaged layer. In this paper both theoretical and experimental photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra as also the corresponding computed surface and volume optical absorption coefficient spectra of the samples with differently prepared surfaces are presented and discussed. This is the first attempt of the quantitative evaluation of the surface quality of the samples from the photoacoustic experimental spectra.

  1. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Andrew A. Suby

    2003-01-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photo-acoustic signals in an off-line configuration. This system was assembled and used to test parameters thought important to photo-acoustic signal output. A standard modulation frequency was chosen based upon signal to noise data gained from experimentation. Sample heterogeneity was tested and found not to be influential. Further testing showed that sample compression and photo-acoustic volume do affect photo-acoustic signal with photoacoustic volume being the most influential. Testing in the fifth quarter focused on microwave power stability. Simultaneously, a second instrument is being constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but also expands the capabilities of the first instrument by allowing a spectrum of microwave frequencies to be tested up to 10 GHz. The power amplifiers for this second instrument were completed and tested. Improvements were made to the current leveling loop, which will stabilize the microwave power. This loop is currently in operation with the single frequency cell. Discriminatory measurements are continuing in an attempt to differentiate between magnetic contaminants such as iron and non-magnetic contaminants such as carbon. A short coaxial test fixture was fabricated and tested showing the promise of another microwave based test method for determining carbon content in fly ash. Preliminary design iterations for the third on-line instrument (based on the experiences of the first two instruments) have begun.

  2. Use of the photoacoustic spectroscopy for characterization of magnetic fluid based on mamona oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L. B.; Webler, G. D.; Oliveira, A. C.; Garg, V. K.; Santos, J. G.; Morais, P. C.

    2010-03-01

    In this study the photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to investigate the interaction between colloidal suspended nanosized maghemite particles and molecules present in mamona oil (ricinus communis L.). Maghemite nanoparticles were used to produce a magnetic fluid sample dispersed in mamona oil (MF-Mamona oil). In the L-band region (600 to 900 nm) of the photoacoustic spectra we found the photoacustic signal of sample MF-Mamona oil enhanced with respect to the signal of the purified mamona oil. This finding is claimed to be the signature of the strong interaction between the mamona oil's molecules and the solid surface provided by the suspended nanosized maghemite particles.

  3. Time Reversal Reconstruction Algorithm Based on PSO Optimized SVM Interpolation for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging is an innovative imaging technique to image biomedical tissues. The time reversal reconstruction algorithm in which a numerical model of the acoustic forward problem is run backwards in time is widely used. In the paper, a time reversal reconstruction algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO optimized support vector machine (SVM interpolation method is proposed for photoacoustics imaging. Numerical results show that the reconstructed images of the proposed algorithm are more accurate than those of the nearest neighbor interpolation, linear interpolation, and cubic convolution interpolation based time reversal algorithm, which can provide higher imaging quality by using significantly fewer measurement positions or scanning times.

  4. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mario Lugarà

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 mm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm-1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 seconds time constant and 4 mW laser power. Measurements in ambient air will require water vapour filters.

  5. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro Mario Lugarà; Gaetano Scamarcio; Vincenzo Spagnolo; Cinzia Di Franco; Angela Elia

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O) using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 mm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm-1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 secon...

  6. Photoacoustic analysis of bone osteogenesis to different doses of laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, P. A. Lomelí; Jiménez Pérez, J. L.; Orea, A. Cruz; Castrejón, H. Villegas; Butron, H. Lecona; Lira, M. Meléndez

    2005-07-01

    The photoacoustic analysis of fractured bone callus to different consolidation times in the presence of laser irradiation was performed. In this study we take into account the fractured tibias of sacrified Wistar rats. By using the photoacoustic spectroscopy technique it was possible to determine, for different doses of laser irradiation (doses of 25 J cm-2) the presence of characteristic absorption band of p-Nitrophenylphosphatase (p-Npp) in the fractured bone callus. The evolution of bone consolidation was accelerated by laser radiation when compared with nonirradiated fractured bones.

  7. Precise diagnosis in different scenarios using photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging with dual-modality nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong; Du, Yang; Shi, Yiwen; Mao, Duo; Jia, Xiaohua; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yukun; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging and fluorescence molecular imaging are emerging as important research tools for biomedical studies. Photoacoustic imaging offers both strong optical absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution, and fluorescence molecular imaging provides excellent superficial resolution, high sensitivity, high throughput, and the ability for real-time imaging. Therefore, combining the imaging information of both modalities can provide comprehensive in vivo physiological and pathological information. However, currently there are limited probes available that can realize both fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging, and advanced biomedical applications for applying this dual-modality imaging approach remain underexplored. In this study, we developed a dual-modality photoacoustic-fluorescence imaging nanoprobe, ICG-loaded Au@SiO2, which was uniquely designed, consisting of gold nanorod cores and indocyanine green with silica shell spacer layers to overcome fluorophore quenching. This nanoprobe was examined by both PAI and FMI for in vivo imaging on tumor and ischemia mouse models. Our results demonstrated that the nanoparticles can specifically accumulate at the tumor and ischemic areas and be detected by both imaging modalities. Moreover, this dual-modality imaging strategy exhibited superior advantages for a precise diagnosis in different scenarios. The new nanoprobe with the dual-modality imaging approach holds great potential for diagnosis and stage classification of tumor and ischemia related diseases.Photoacoustic imaging and fluorescence molecular imaging are emerging as important research tools for biomedical studies. Photoacoustic imaging offers both strong optical absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution, and fluorescence molecular imaging provides excellent superficial resolution, high sensitivity, high throughput, and the ability for real-time imaging. Therefore, combining the imaging information of both modalities can provide

  8. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9× dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ˜20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between <1 and 20 mm apart from each other, and imaged with the appropriate imaging modality. Photoacoustic imaging could resolve the two tubes of melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and

  9. Monitoring the non-radiative relaxation time of PpIX solution with Au nanoparticles using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we have used the Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) to determine in vitro the non-radiative relaxation time (NRRT) of a protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) standard solution and samples of PpIX(1), PpIX(2) and PpIX(3) with Au nanoparticle concentrations of 0.001008, 0.00504 and 0.01008 mmol in 25 mL of water respectively. We have used PpIX disodium salt (DS) solution of 25% HCl. The results show that the NRRT average values, obtained for each one of the solution were: τ = 29 ± 0.001, 84 ± 0.001 and 62 ± 0.009 ms for PpIX(1), PpIX(2) and PpIX(3), respectively. These values were compared with some NRRT of triplet states reported in the literature for molecules with tetrapyrrolic structure, increasing the NRRT considerably. From each solution it was obtained its PAS signal phase as a function of the light modulation frequency from 17 to 80 Hz. UV-vis spectrophotometer, photoluminescence spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used in order to obtain the optical absorption spectra, the photoluminescence intensities, and the gold nanoparticle sizes respectively. Our investigations are devoted to improve the thermal treatments of drugs the porphyrins as photosensitizers used in image photodynamic therapy

  10. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  11. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  12. CARS microscopy for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical microscopy grows in its importance with the development of modern nanotechnology, biotechnology, methods of diagnostics and treatment of most dangerous diseases for mankind. There are several important goals of optical microscopy for biomedical studies among which the next three may be distinguished: fast imaging with high lateral spatial resolution, 3-D sectioning capability and high contrast for chemical selectivity. To meet these specific requirements, various types of both linear and nonlinear optical microscopy were elaborated. (authors)

  13. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  14. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  15. Enhancement of photoacoustic detection of inhomogeneities in polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Grondona

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a series of experiments on laser pulsed photoacoustic excitationin turbid polymer samples addressed to evaluate the sound speed inthe samples and the presence of inhomogeneities in the bulk. We describea system which allows the direct measurement of the speed of the detectedwaves by engraving the surface of the piece under study with a fiduciarypattern of black lines..We also describe how this pattern helps toenhance the sensitivity for the detection of an inhomogeneity in the bulk. These two facts are useful for studies in soft matter systems including, perhaps, biological samples. We have performed an experimental analysis on Grilon® samples in differentsituations and we show the limitations of the method. Received: 7 December 2012, Accepted: 19 June 2013; Reviewed by: V. Lakshminarayanan, Waterloo University, Canada; Edited by: J. J. Niemela; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.050005Cite as: P. Grondona, H. O. Di Rocco, D. I. Iriarte, J. A. Pomarico, H. F. Ranea-Sandoval, G. M. Bilmes, Papers in Physics 5, 050005 (2013

  16. Deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging of internal organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwang Hyun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-02-01

    A deep reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging system was developed and demonstrated to possess a maximum imaging depth up to 38 mm in chicken breast tissue. Using this system, structures in the thoracic cavity and vasculature in cervical area of rats were clearly imaged. Particularly, part of the heart was imaged. In the thoracic cavity, the right atrium imaged, which is one of deepest, was situated ~7 mm deep. In the cervical area, common carotid artery and jugular vein were imaged, which are appropriate for the study of oxygenation between artery and vein. In the abdominal cavity, the embedded structures of a kidney, spinal cord, and vena cava inferior were also clearly imaged in situ and in vivo. The depth of the vena cava inferior was as deep as ~15 mm in vivo. This study shows the depth capability of the system in animals. This imaging modality can be a useful tool to diagnose the disease of organs by assessing the morphological and functional changes in the blood vessels and the organs.

  17. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  18. Wearable scanning photoacoustic brain imaging in behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianbo; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-06-01

    A wearable scanning photoacoustic imaging (wPAI) system is presented for noninvasive brain study in behaving rats. This miniaturized wPAI system consists of four pico linear servos and a single transducer-based PAI probe. It has a dimension of 50 mm × 35 mm × 40 mm, and a weight of 26 g excluding cablings. Phantom evaluation shows that wPAI achieves a lateral resolution of ∼0.5 mm and an axial resolution of ∼0.1 mm at a depth of up to 11 mm. Its imaging ability is also tested in a behaving rat, and the results indicate that wPAI is able to image blood vessels at a depth of up to 5 mm with intact scalp and skull. With its noninvasive, deep penetration, and functional imaging ability in behaving animals, wPAI can be used for behavior, cognition, and preclinical brain disease studies. PMID:26777064

  19. Applications of laser-photoacoustic gas analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Stenberg, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of a circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB) was studied using two high speed gas analysis systems during combustion of coal, peat and wood chips. Time resolved concentrations of some pollutants (SO{sub 2}, NO, NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S) were measured using laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPS). A zirkonia cell based probe (lambda-probe) was used in synchronization with the LIPS-probe to measure fluctuations between reducing and oxidizing conditions. The two probes were positioned in the same measurement volume on the center-line of the combustion chamber of the CFB. The purpose of the measurements was to investigate the behavior of the LIPS in a combustion chamber containing large amounts of other unburnt hydrocarbons. The correlations between oxidizing and reducing conditions and concentrations at three locations in the combustion chamber are presented. The best correlations were found in the upper part of the CFB combustion chamber. In some cases the correlations between reducing conditions and the LIPS signal were caused by hydrocarbons. Comparison of the average values obtained by the LIPS-system for NO and SO{sub 2} with the result from a sampling probe system connected to on-line analysers was also carried out. (author)

  20. Authentication of Concentrated Orange Essential Oils Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Muñoz, G. A.; Balderas López, J. A.; López González, R. F.

    2012-11-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PS) was used to study the thermal diffusivity and its relation with the composition in folded (concentrated) cold-pressed Mexican orange essential oils. A linear relation between the amplitude (on a semi-log scale) and phase, as functions of the sample thickness, for PS was obtained through a theoretical model to fit the experimental data for thermal-diffusivity measurements in concentrated orange essential oils. Experimental results showed a linear increase in thermal-diffusivity values with the folding degree: 5-fold, 10-fold, 20-fold, and 35-fold due to a decrease in terpenes (mainly D-limonene) related with the folding process that can be correlated with the thermal diffusivity of the orange essential oils. The obtained values in this study and those previously reported (see Int. J. Thermophys. 32, 1066, 2011) showed the possibility of using this thermal property to make distinctions between citrus oils obtained by different extraction processes and also between concentrated citrus oils. This provides the viability of a new complementary method for this purpose, contrasting with the use of density and refraction index, physical properties commonly used in the authentication of citrus essential oils.

  1. Photoacoustic image-guided drug delivery in the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanshan; Chen, Jian; Samant, Pratik; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-03-01

    Image guided drug delivery is a novel strategy that combines the effect of therapy and visibility into one system. Here we apply photoacoustic (PA) imaging to visualize the drug delivery process, and perform a simulation study on monitoring the photosensitizer concentration in a prostate tumor during photodynamic therapy (PDT). A 3D optical model of the human prostate is developed, and the light absorption distribution in the prostate is estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The filtered back-projection algorithm is used to reconstruct PA images. PA images of transurethral laser/transrectal ultrasound are compared to those of transrectal laser/ultrasound. Results show that the transurethral laser has a better penetration depth in the prostate compared with transrectal one. Urethral thermal safety is investigated via COMSOL Multiphysics, and the results show that the proposed pulsed transurethral laser will cause no thermal damage on the urethral surface. Regression analysis for PA signal amplitude and drug concentration demonstrates that the PA technique has the potential to monitor drug distributions in PDT, as well as in other laser-based prostate therapy modalities.

  2. Photo-acoustic analysis of dental materials and tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeleva, Pavlina Jetchkova

    2005-11-01

    The goal of the presented study is the investigation of the feasibility of using optically generated acoustic waves for analysis of dental material below laser-ablation threshold. The temperature rise of dental material and tissue has been modeled analytically and numerically, and measured experimentally. Following interactions with nano- and femto-second laser radiation the temperature rises at a rate of typically 1°C per J/cm 2, along with the generation of an acoustical wave. The results from the models agree with the experiment. The acoustic measurements show differences in the acoustic signal strength and the frequency spectrum when the canal in the porcelain phantom is empty or filled with intralipid solution. The photo-acoustic technique is found to be suitable for detection of liquids under a layer of dental porcelain material, consequently it can be the basis for building an imaging tool for dental diagnostic applications. By generating sound waves in the pulp, one would be able to evaluate it's state and the overall health of the tooth. This is of vital importance for diagnosing initial-stage inflammation.

  3. Improving the signal analysis for in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhenyu; Yang, Ping; Wei, Dan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    At early stage of cancer, a small number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear in the blood circulation. Thus, early detection of malignant circulating tumor cells has great significance for timely treatment to reduce the cancer death rate. We have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of CTCs and record the signals from target cells. Information of target cells which is helpful to the early therapy would be obtained through analyzing and processing the signals. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The PAFC technique can detect signals from circulating tumor cells or other particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly.

  4. Photoacoustic monitoring of circulating tumor cells released during medical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    Many cancer deaths are related to metastasis to distant organs due to dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the primary tumor. For many years, oncologists believed some medical procedures may provoke metastasis; however, no direct evidence has been reported. We have developed a new, noninvasive technology called in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC), which provides ultrasensitive detection of CTCs. When CTCs with strongly light-absorbing intrinsic melanin pass through a laser beam aimed at a peripheral blood vessel, laser-induced acoustic waves from CTCs were detected using an ultrasound transducer. We focused on melanoma as it is one of the most metastatically aggressive malignancies. The goal of this research was to determine whether melanoma manipulation, like compression, incisional biopsy, or tumor excision, could enhance penetration of cancer cells from the primary tumor into the circulatory system. The ears of nude mice were inoculated with melanoma cells. Blood vessels were monitored for the presence of CTCs using in vivo PAFC. We discovered some medical procedures, like compression of the tumor, biopsy, and surgery may either initiate CTC release in the blood which previously contained no CTCs, or dramatically increased (10-30-fold) CTC counts above the initial level. Our results warn oncologists to use caution during physical examination, and surgery. A preventive anti-CTC therapy during or immediately after surgery, by intravenous drug administration could serve as an option to treat the resulting release of CTCs.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in subdermal islet transplant sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-03-01

    Exogenous insulin administration is the mainstay treatment therapy for patients with Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, for select patients, clinical islet transplantation is an alternative therapeutic treatment. In this procedure, islets are transplanted into the hepatic portal vein, and despite improved success within the last decade, obstacles are still associated with this approach. It has been discovered that the subcutaneous space may be an effective alternative site for islet transplantation, and may provide advantages of easy access and potential for simple monitoring. The ability to monitor islet viability and the transplant microenvironment may be key to future success in islet transplantation. A subcutaneous device-less technique has been developed to facilitate angiogenesis in the islet transplant site, however, a method for monitoring the potential engraftment site have yet to be explored fully. Here we demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis in mice with 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks post-catheter implant on both sides of the abdomen using a FujiFilm VisualSonics Vevo-LAZR system. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities exhibited gradual vessel growth successfully induced by catheter implantation. Our study demonstrates the ability of employing photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound imaging to track angiogenesis around the catheter site prior to islet transplantation.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging of the excited state lifetime of fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using pump-probe excitation has been shown to allow the detection and visualization of fluorescent contrast agents. The technique relies upon inducing stimulated emission using pump and probe pulses at excitation wavelengths that correspond to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. By changing the time delay between the pulses, the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore is modulated to vary the amount of thermalized energy, and hence PA signal amplitude, to provide fluorophore-specific PA contrast. In this study, this approach was extended to the detection of differences in the excited state lifetime of fluorophores. PA waveforms were measured in solutions of a near-infrared fluorophore using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. The lifetime of the fluorophore solutions was varied by using different solvents and quencher concentrations. By calculating difference signals and by plotting their amplitude as a function of pump-probe time delay, a correlation with the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore was observed. The results agreed with the output of a forward model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores. The application of this method to tomographic PA imaging of differences in the excited state lifetime was demonstrated in tissue phantom experiments.

  7. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  8. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  9. Localization of Transcranial Targets for Photoacoustic-Guided Endonasal Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A; Ostrowski, Anastasia K; Li, Ke; Kazanzides, Peter; Boctor, Emad M

    2015-06-01

    Neurosurgeries to remove pituitary tumors using the endonasal, transsphenoidal approach often incur the risk of patient death caused by injury to the carotid arteries hidden by surrounding sphenoid bone. To avoid this risk, we propose intraoperative photoacoustic vessel visualization with an optical fiber attached to the surgical tool and an external ultrasound transducer placed on the temple. Vessel detection accuracy is limited by acoustic propagation properties, which were investigated with k-Wave simulations. In a two-layer model of temporal bone (3200 m/s sound speed, 1-4 mm thickness) and surrounding tissues, the localization error was ≤2 mm in the tranducer's axial dimension, while temporal bone curvature further degraded target localization. Phantom experiments revealed that multiple image targets (e.g. sphenoid bone and vessels) can be visualized, particularly with coherence-based beamforming, to determine tool-to-vessel proximity despite expected localization errors. In addition, the potential flexibility of the fiber position relative to the transducer and vessel was elucidated. PMID:26236644

  10. Localization of Transcranial Targets for Photoacoustic-Guided Endonasal Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurosurgeries to remove pituitary tumors using the endonasal, transsphenoidal approach often incur the risk of patient death caused by injury to the carotid arteries hidden by surrounding sphenoid bone. To avoid this risk, we propose intraoperative photoacoustic vessel visualization with an optical fiber attached to the surgical tool and an external ultrasound transducer placed on the temple. Vessel detection accuracy is limited by acoustic propagation properties, which were investigated with k-Wave simulations. In a two-layer model of temporal bone (3200 m/s sound speed, 1-4 mm thickness and surrounding tissues, the localization error was ≤2 mm in the tranducer's axial dimension, while temporal bone curvature further degraded target localization. Phantom experiments revealed that multiple image targets (e.g. sphenoid bone and vessels can be visualized, particularly with coherence-based beamforming, to determine tool-to-vessel proximity despite expected localization errors. In addition, the potential flexibility of the fiber position relative to the transducer and vessel was elucidated.

  11. Prostate cancer characterization by optical contrast enhanced photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Qin, Ming; Mukundan, Ananya; Siddiqui, Javed; Takada, Marilia; Vilar-Saavedra, Paulo; Tomlins, Scott A.; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    During the past decades, prostate cancer (PCa), with an annual incident rate much higher than any other cancer, is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men. PCa has a relatively low progression rate yet the survival percentage decreases dramatically once the cancer has metastasized. Identifying aggressive from indolent PCa to prevent metastasis and death is critical to improving outcomes for patients with PCa. Standard procedure for assessing the aggressiveness of PCa involves the removal of tumor tissues by transrectal (TR) ultrasound (US) guided needle biopsy. The microscopic architecture of the biopsied tissue is visualized by histological or immunohistochemical staining procedures. The heterogeneity of the microscopic architecture is characterized by a Gleason score, a quantitative description of the aggressiveness of PCa. Due to the inability to identify the cancer cells, most noninvasive imaging modalities can only provide diagnosis of PCa at limited accuracy. This study investigates the feasibility of identifying PCa tumors and characterizing the aggressiveness of PCa by photoacoustic imaging assisted by cancer targeting polyacrylamide (PAA) nanoparticles (NPs). PAA is a biocompatible material used in clinics for the past 20 years. PAA NPs can protect capsulated optical contrast agents from interference by enzymes and enable prolonged systematic circulation in the living biological environment. The cancer targeting mechanism is achieved by conjugating the NPs to F3 peptides, which trace nucleolin overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells. Preliminary studies have shown that the NPs are capable of staining the PCa cells in vivo.

  12. Study of surface energy budget and test of a newly developed fast photoacoustic spectroscopy based hygrometer in field campaign Szeged (Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatrai, David; Nikov, Daniella; Zsolt Jász, Ervin; Bozóki, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Weidinger, Tamás; András Gyöngyösi, Zénó; Kiss, Melinda; Józsa, János; Simó Diego, Gemma; Cuxart Rodamilans, Joan; Wrenger, Burkhart; Bottyán, Zsolt

    2014-05-01

    A micrometeorological field measurement campaign dedicated to study the surface energy budget and the structure of the boundary layer focusing on the transient layer forming periods during night-time was organized in the period of 10th of November to 3rd of December 2013 in the nearby of Szeged, Hungary. A temporary micrometeorological measurement station was set up at the coordinates N:46.239943; E:20.089758, approximately 1700 m far from a national meteorology station (N:46.255711; E:20.09052). In the experimental micrometeorological site different types of instruments were installed to measure numerous parameters: standard meteorological measurements (p, T, wet, wind speed and direction at three different levels, relative humidity at two levels and absolute humidity at one level) radiation budget components surface temperature and leaf wetness soil temperature, moisture and heat flux into the deeper soil layer eddy-covariance measurements (t, H, LE CO2) at 3 m level using Campbell open-path IRGA (EC150) system. At the national meteorology station (http://adatok.geo.u-szeged.hu/?lang=eng) besides their standard measurement equipment and measurement routine a SODAR was installed and continuously operated. These ground based measurements were combined with and supported by UAV, quadcopter and tethered balloon based vertical profile measurements of p, T, rh. For this measurement campaign as a modification of a previously developed airborne ready dual channel hygrometer, a fast photoacoustic spectroscopy based hygrometer was developed for absolute humidity measurements. The estimated response time of the system is faster than 15 Hz, which was achieved by the replacement of the data acquisition system and by recording the raw photoacoustic signal sampled at rate of 48 kHz for post-processing. During the campaign this new system was compared to a TDL system commercially available at Li-COR Inc. Besides the testing of the newly developed fast photoacoustic hygrometer

  13. Theory of generation of second harmonics of nonlinear photoacoustic signal of two-layer semitransparent samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of generation of second harmonics of nonlinear photoacoustic signal of two-layer semitransparent solid samples is presented in this work. The general expression for acoustic pressure fluctuation in gaseous medium is defined. The expressions for the amplitude and phase of the signal and the dependence of these values on frequency modulation of incident laser beam are found.

  14. Noninvasive functional photoacoustic tomography of blood-oxygen saturation in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Ku, Geng; Xie, Xueyi; Wang, Yiwen; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2004-07-01

    Since optical contrast is sensitive to functional parameters, including the hemoglobin oxygen saturation and the total concentration of hemoglobin, imaging based on optical contrast has been widely employed for the real-time monitoring of tissue oxygen consumption and hemodynamics in biological tissues. However, due to the overwhelming scattering of light in tissues, traditional optical imaging modalities cannot provide satisfactory spatial resolution. Functional photoacoustic tomography is a novel technique that combines high optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution. Here, we present our study of a laser-based photoacoustic technique that, for the first time to our knowledge, monitors blood oxygenation in the rat brain in vivo. The cerebral blood oxygenation in the rat brain was imaged by photoacoustic detection at two wavelengths. The change in the hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the brain vessels as a result of the alternation from hyperoxia status to hypoxia status was visualized successfully with satisfactory spatial resolution. This work demonstrates that photoacoustic technique, based on the spectroscopic absorption of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, can provide accurate functional imaging of cerebral blood oxygenation in the small-animal brain non-invasively with the skin and skull intact.

  15. Multicontrast photoacoustic in vivo imaging using near-infrared fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Arie; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive imaging of biological processes in vivo is invaluable in advancing biology. Photoacoustic tomography is a scalable imaging technique that provides higher resolution at greater depths in tissue than achievable by purely optical methods. Here we report the application of two spectrally distinct near-infrared fluorescent proteins, iRFP670 and iRFP720, engineered from bacterial phytochromes, as photoacoustic contrast agents. iRFPs provide tissue-specific contrast without the need for delivery of any additional substances. Compared to conventional GFP-like red-shifted fluorescent proteins, iRFP670 and iRFP720 demonstrate stronger photoacoustic signals at longer wavelengths, and can be spectrally resolved from each other and hemoglobin. We simultaneously visualized two differently labeled tumors, one with iRFP670 and the other with iRFP720, as well as blood vessels. We acquired images of a mouse as 2D sections of a whole animal, and as localized 3D volumetric images with high contrast and sub-millimeter resolution at depths up to 8 mm. Our results suggest iRFPs are genetically-encoded probes of choice for simultaneous photoacoustic imaging of several tissues or processes in vivo.

  16. Study of gas exchange in insects by sensitive laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Wijkamp, I.; Mitrayana, L.

    2006-01-01

    Although quantifying gas exchange in small insect species is of great biological interest, the progress in this field of research is hampered by the inability of most gas detectors to monitor the low emission rates from these insects. Recently, laser based photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) has emerg

  17. Feasibility of noncontact piezoelectric detection of photoacoustic signals in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Blomme, E.; Cool, T.; Bilcke, M.; Van Leeuwen, T.G.; Steenbergen, W.; Grimbergen, K.A.; Den Heeten, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of air-coupled ultrasound transducers to detect laser-induced ultrasound from artificial blood vessels embedded in an optically scattering phantom is demonstrated. These air-coupled transducers allow new applications in biomedical photoacoustic imaging where contact with tissue is no

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in living mice via silica-coated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Thangaraj, Mridhula; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging is crucial for stem cell therapy to monitor the location(s), numbers, and state of the implanted cells. Real-time imaging in particular can ensure proper cell delivery for best engraftment. However, established imaging tools such as MRI are limited by their temporal resolution for guidance during delivery. In contrast, photoacoustic imaging is ideally suited for real time, image-guided therapy. Here, we use silica-coated gold nanorods as photoacoustic contrast agents and deploy them to image and quantitate mesenchymal stem cells during implant into the muscle tissue of live mice. Silica-coated gold nanorods (SiGNRs) were created with standard methods and loaded into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) without transfection agents. There was no significant (pmuscular dystrophy patient. Mice (N=5) treated with these SiGNRlabeled MSCs exhibited no adverse events and implants up to 5 mm deep were easily visualized. The in vivo detection limit was 90,000 cells in a 100 uL bolus in mouse thigh muscle. Here, the B-mode signal is useful for orienting the treatment area and visualizing the delivery catheter while the photoacoustic mode offers cell-specific content. The photoacoustic signal was validated with histology a long-term fluorescent tracking dye after MSC transplant.

  19. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  20. An interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging platform for the guidance of minimally invasive procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    Precise and efficient guidance of medical devices is of paramount importance for many minimally invasive procedures. These procedures include fetal interventions, tumor biopsies and treatments, central venous catheterisations and peripheral nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used for guidance, but it often provides insufficient contrast with which to identify soft tissue structures such as vessels, tumors, and nerves. In this study, a hybrid interventional imaging system that combines ultrasound imaging and multispectral photoacoustic imaging for guiding minimally invasive procedures was developed and characterized. The system provides both structural information from ultrasound imaging and molecular information from multispectral photoacoustic imaging. It uses a commercial linear-array ultrasound imaging probe as the ultrasound receiver, with a multimode optical fiber embedded in a needle to deliver pulsed excitation light to tissue. Co-registration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images is achieved with the use of the same ultrasound receiver for both modalities. Using tissue ex vivo, the system successfully discriminated deep-located fat tissue from the surrounding muscle tissue. The measured photoacoustic spectrum of the fat tissue had good agreement with the lipid spectrum in literature.

  1. Clinical experiences with photoacoustic breast imaging: the appearance of suspicious lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes photoacoustic (PA) imaging of suspicious breast lesions. In PA imaging, the tissue of interest is illuminated by short pulses of laser light, usually in the near infrared (NIR) regime. Upon absorption by primarily the tumor vasculature, the light causes a small temperature incr

  2. Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles containing multiple nanopores for enhanced photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisoo; Kang, Heesung; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Tae Geol; Wi, Jung-Sub

    2016-08-25

    Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution and containing multiple nanopores have been utilized as photothermal converters and imaging contrast agents. Nanopores within the gold nanoparticles make it possible to increase the light-absorption cross-section and consequently exhibit distinct improvements in photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging efficiencies. PMID:27527067

  3. Coherence-based photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds implanted in a canine prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Visualization of individual brachytherapy seed locations assists with intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Photoacoustic imaging is advantageous when compared to current ultrasound imaging methods, due to its superior sensitivity to metal surrounded by tissue. However, photoacoustic images suffer from poor contrast with insufficient laser fluence. A short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer was implemented to enhance these low-contrast photoacoustic signals. Photoacoustic imaging was performed with a transrectal ultrasound probe and an optical fiber surrounded by a light-diffusing sheath, placed at a distance of approximately 4-5 mm from the location of seeds implanted in an in vivo canine prostate. The average energy density through the tip of the sheath was varied from 8 to 167 mJ/cm2. When compared to a fast Fourier transform (FFT)- based reconstruction method, the mean contrast and signal-to-noise ratios were improved by up to 22 dB and a factor of 4, respectively, with the SLSC beamformer (12% of the receive aperture elements were included in the short-lag sum). Image artifacts that were spatially coherent had spatial frequency spectra that were quadrantally symmetric about the origin, while the spatial frequency spectra of the seed signals possessed diagonal symmetry. These differences were utilized to reduce artifacts by 9-14 dB after applying a bandpass filter with diagonal symmetry. Results indicate that advanced methods, such as SLSC beamforming or frequency-based filters, hold promise for intraoperative localization of prostate brachytherapy seeds

  4. Aortic atherosclerotic plaque detection using a multiwavelength handheld photoacoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Susumu; Namita, Takeshi; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Patients affected by diseases caused by arteriosclerosis are increasing. Atherosclerosis, which is becoming an especially difficult health problem, forms plaques from lipids such as cholesterol located in walls of the aorta, cerebral artery, and coronary artery. Because lipid-rich plaques are vulnerable and because arterial rupture causes acute vascular occlusion, early detection is crucially important to prevent plaque growth and rupture. Ultrasound systems can detect plaques but cannot discriminate between vulnerable and equable plaques. To evaluate plaques non-invasively and easily, we developed a handheld photoacoustic imaging device. Its usefulness was verified in phantom experiments with a bovine aorta in which mimic plaque had been embedded. Photoacoustic images taken at wavelengths that produce high light absorbance by lipids show strong photoacoustic signals from the boundary of the mimic plaque. Results confirmed that our system can evaluate plaque properties by analysis with the photoacoustic spectrum. The effects of surrounding tissues and tissue components on plaque evaluation were investigated using a layered phantom. The mimic plaque located under a 6 mm blood layer was also evaluated. Results of these analyses demonstrate the system's usefulness.

  5. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeff Sweterlitsch

    2004-10-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photoacoustic signals in an off-line configuration. A second off-line instrument was constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but which also expands the capabilities of the first instrument. Improvements include a control loop to allow more constant microwave power output and an ability to operate over a range of microwave frequencies. The third instrument, the on-line version of the fly ash monitor, has been designed, constructed, and initial efficiency tests have been conducted on the monitor's electrical components. Off-line photoacoustic microwave spectra of fly ash and coal were collected and analyzed, and the spectra demonstrated a linear correlation between the photoacoustic response and the carbon content in either fly ash or coal. Modifications were made to the on-line fly ash monitor to incorporate a dual-accelerometer system that would provide active noise control. Several experiments were conducted with flowing and non-flowing fly ash samples.

  6. Precise diagnosis in different scenarios using photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging with dual-modality nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dong; Du, Yang; Shi, Yiwen; Mao, Duo; Jia, Xiaohua; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yukun; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2016-08-14

    Photoacoustic imaging and fluorescence molecular imaging are emerging as important research tools for biomedical studies. Photoacoustic imaging offers both strong optical absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution, and fluorescence molecular imaging provides excellent superficial resolution, high sensitivity, high throughput, and the ability for real-time imaging. Therefore, combining the imaging information of both modalities can provide comprehensive in vivo physiological and pathological information. However, currently there are limited probes available that can realize both fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging, and advanced biomedical applications for applying this dual-modality imaging approach remain underexplored. In this study, we developed a dual-modality photoacoustic-fluorescence imaging nanoprobe, ICG-loaded Au@SiO2, which was uniquely designed, consisting of gold nanorod cores and indocyanine green with silica shell spacer layers to overcome fluorophore quenching. This nanoprobe was examined by both PAI and FMI for in vivo imaging on tumor and ischemia mouse models. Our results demonstrated that the nanoparticles can specifically accumulate at the tumor and ischemic areas and be detected by both imaging modalities. Moreover, this dual-modality imaging strategy exhibited superior advantages for a precise diagnosis in different scenarios. The new nanoprobe with the dual-modality imaging approach holds great potential for diagnosis and stage classification of tumor and ischemia related diseases. PMID:27406825

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace vapor detection and standoff detection of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Marcus, Logan S.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2016-05-01

    The Army is investigating several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., infrared spectroscopy) that could allow for an adaptable sensor platform. Current sensor technologies, although reasonably sized, are geared to more classical chemical threats, and the ability to expand their capabilities to a broader range of emerging threats is uncertain. Recently, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), employed in a sensor format, has shown enormous potential to address these ever-changing threats. PAS is one of the more flexible IR spectroscopy variants, and that flexibility allows for the construction of sensors that are designed for specific tasks. PAS is well suited for trace detection of gaseous and condensed media. Recent research has employed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell designs. The continuous tuning capability of QCLs over a broad wavelength range in the mid-infrared spectral region greatly expands the number of compounds that can be identified. We will discuss our continuing evaluation of QCL technology as it matures in relation to our ultimate goal of a universal compact chemical sensor platform. Finally, expanding on our previously reported photoacoustic detection of condensed phase samples, we are investigating standoff photoacoustic chemical detection of these materials. We will discuss the evaluation of a PAS sensor that has been designed around increasing operator safety during detection and identification of explosive materials by performing sensing operations at a standoff distance. We investigate a standoff variant of PAS based upon an interferometric sensor by examining the characteristic absorption spectra of explosive hazards collected at 1 m.

  8. Photorespiration and temperature dependence of oxygen evolution in tomato plants monitored by open photoacoustic cell technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Luna, M.; Madueño, L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Sosa, M.; González-Solís, J. L.; Sánchez-Rocha, S.; Olalde-Portugal, V.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Campos, P.

    2003-01-01

    The open photoacoustic cell was used to monitor the evolution rate of oxygen from tomato leaves. Estimates of the relative amount of released oxygen in vivo and in situ conditions as influenced by ambient temperature are being presented. Photorespiration phenomenon is shown to dominate above a critical temperature. The evolution of this critical point is analyzed as a function of the environmental temperature.

  9. High speed photoacoustic tomography system with low cost portable pulsed diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a potential hybrid imaging modality that has attracted great attention in the fields of medical imaging. In order to generate photoacoustic signal efficiently Q-switched Nd:YAG pump lasers capable of generating tens of millijoules of nanosecond laser pulses have been widely used. However, PAT systems using such lasers have limitations in clinical applications because of their high cost, large size, and cooling requirements. Furthermore, the low pulse repetition rate (PRR) of tens of hertz is not suitable for real-time PAT. So, there is a need for inexpensive, compact, simple, fast imaging system for clinical applications. Nanosecond pulsed laser diodes could meet these requirements. In this work, we present a high-speed photoacoustic tomography imaging system that uses a compact and yet relatively powerful near-infrared pulsed laser diode. The PAT system was tested on phantoms to verify its potential imaging speed. Photoacoustic reconstructed images at different scanning speeds are presented. With single ultrasound detector scanning, the system could provide PA image ~10 times faster than the Nd:YAG laser based systems.

  10. Percutaneous Permeation of Topical Phtalocyanine Studied by Photoacoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E. P. O.; Beltrame, M.; Cardoso, L. E.; Barja, P. R.

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the percutaneous permeation of topical hydroxy-(29 H,31 H-phthalocyaninato)aluminum (PcAlOH) on pig ear skin employing photoacoustic (PA) measurements. The PcAlOH was incorporated in an emulsion with assessed stability parameters of pH and short- and long-term stability tests. Pig skin was prepared through a heat separation technique, and the outer skin of the cartilage was removed with a scalpel. Skin samples were then cut and treated with sodium bromide 2 mol . L-1 for 6 h at 37 °C. The epidermis layer was washed with purified water, dried, and stored under reduced pressure until use. The skin permeation kinetics were determined by PA measurements as a function of time, performed with an open PA cell developed at Universidade do Vale do Paraíba. Short- and long-term stability tests showed no phase separation. A significant difference was found between the typical times for percutaneous permeation of the emulsion base and the emulsion + PcAlOH. The study showed two absorption transients due to the physical diffusion of molecules in the skin sample. The first is attributed to the penetration of molecules that promptly passed through the lipid barrier, while the second is related to the molecules that had greater difficulty of passing through. This slower component in the absorption curves is attributed to the penetration of PcAlOH, a planar molecule whose percutaneous penetration is more difficult. The study indicates that the formulations containing PcAlOH have stable characteristics and show promising results in absorption into the skin. The presence of the photosensitive agent in the formulation contributed significantly to the larger time constant observed. PA measurements allowed the evaluation of the penetration kinetics of PcAlOH in pig ear skin; the methodology employed may be used in the determination of the percutaneous permeation of phthalocyanines in further studies.

  11. Dynamic manipulation of magnetic contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Congxian; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Seo, Chi Hyung; Hu, Xiaoge; Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used extensively ex vivo for cellular and molecular separations. We recently showed that a coupled nanoparticle combining a superparamagnetic core with a thin, isolated gold shell providing strong absorption in the near infrared can be used for magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging (mmPA), a new technique in which magnetic manipulation of the particle during PA imaging greatly enhances molecular contrast specificity. This particle can also be biologically targeted for in vivo applications, where mmPA imaging provides a spatially localized readout of magnetic manipulations. As an initial test of potential in vivo molecular assays and integrated molecular therapeutics using magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles, we present experiments demonstrating PA readout of trapped magnetic particles in a flow field. An aqueous solution containing a concentration of 0.05-mg/ml 10-μM superparamagnetic iron oxide particles flowed in a 1.65-mm diameter Zeus PTFE (Teflon) sublite wall tubing at three velocities of 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0-mm/s. Opposed permanent magnets separated by 40-mm were positioned on both sides of the tube. As expected, the targeted objects can be magnetically captured and accumulated locally. By translating the magnets, a dynamic magnetic field (0.1-0.3-T) was alternately generated on the side of the tube closest to one of the magnets and created a synchronous PA motion from accumulated targeted objects. This synchronized motion can be used to differentiate the stationary background or other PA sources moving asynchronously with magnetic manipulations (e.g., moving blood) from targeted cells moving synchronously with the magnetic field. This technology can potentially provide sensitive molecular assays of cellular targets travelling in the vasculature (e.g., metastatic tumor cells).

  12. Dual-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of a photoswitchable reporter protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortay, Hakan; Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Zhang, Edward; Grötzinger, Carsten; Hildebrandt, Peter; Friedrich, Thomas; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been shown to provide detailed 3-D images of genetically expressed reporters, such as fluorescent proteins and tyrosinase-induced melanin. Their unambiguous detection in vivo is a vital prerequisite for molecular imaging of biological processes at a cellular and molecular level. This typically requires multiwavelength imaging and spectral unmixing techniques, which can be computationally expensive. In addition, fluorescent proteins often exhibit fluence-dependent ground state depopulation and photobleaching which can adversely affect the specificity of unmixing methods. To overcome these problems, a phytochrome-based reporter protein and a dual-wavelength excitation method have been developed to obtain reporter-specific PA contrast. Phytochromes are non-fluorescent proteins that exhibit two isomeric states with different absorption spectra. Using dual-wavelength excitation pulses in the red and near-infrared wavelength region, these states can be switched, resulting in a modulation of the total absorption coefficient, and hence the PA signal amplitude. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, signals acquired using simultaneous pulses can be subtracted from the sum of signals obtained from separate pulses to provide a reporterspecific contrast mechanism and elimination of the tissue background. PA signals measured in protein solutions using separate and simultaneous excitation pulses at 670 nm and 755 nm (< 6 mJ cm-2) showed a difference in amplitude of a factor of five. Photobleaching was not observed. To demonstrate suitability for in vivo applications, mammalian cells were transduced virally to express phytochrome, and imaged in tissue phantoms and in mice in an initial preclinical study. The results show that this method has the potential to enable deep-tissue PA reporter gene imaging with high specificity.

  13. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Tao, Chao; Cai, Peng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-01

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  14. Monitoring molecular orientational order in NLO push-pull based polymeric films via photoacoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Zúñiga, V.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; Morales-Saavedra, O. G.; Pérez-Martínez, A. L.; Ogawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    The pulsed-laser photoacoustic-technique (PLPA) was implemented to characterize molecular orientational order and anisotropy in push-pull poled polymeric films as function of temperature and laser polarization. Traditionally, photoacoustic signals are considered to be directly proportional to the linear optical absorption in amorphous media. In this work, however, it is shown that photoacoustic signals can also be highly sensitive to the material anisotropy when convenient polarization dependent photoacoustic analyses are performed. Thus, variation of the molecular orientation in organic films, comprising rod-like polar chromophores, can be unambiguously monitored via rms-analyses performed on the amplitude of the generated opto-acoustical PLPA-signals as function of the incident laser polarization. This result can be useful for the characterization of organic-based nonlinear optical (NLO) poled films and, in general, in studies of anisotropic materials. In fact, in this work we were able to accurately determine the molecular order parameter ( ϕ) of a NLO-active spin-coated polymeric film containing optically active push-pull chromophores. These molecules, previously oriented via an electrical-poling procedure, are capable to exhibit strong second harmonic generation (SHG) effects. The PLPA-measurements were systematically compared to the linear UV-vis optical absorbance spectra while heating the poled film sample in order to monitor the thermally induced molecular disorder, so that the order parameter may be photo-acoustically evaluated via the PLPA-signals generated from the poled to the unpoled film phase. These PLPA-experiments were performed taking into account the UV-vis reference spectra for calibration and comparison purposes in the evaluation of the order parameter. A significant advantage of the PLPA-technique over commonly used optical spectral methodologies is its convenient applicability in samples exhibiting poor or null optical transmission.

  15. Characterisation of a PVCP-based tissue-mimicking phantom for quantitative photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Martina; Zeqiri, Bajram; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can provide high resolution images of tissue structure, pathology and function. As these images can be obtained at multiple wavelengths, quantitatively accurate, spatially resolved, estimates for chromophore concentration, for example, may be obtainable. Such a capability would find a wide range of clinical and pre-clinical applications. However, despite a growing body of theoretical papers on how this might be achieved, there is a noticeable lack of studies providing validated evidence that it can be achieved experimentally, either in vitro or in vivo. Well-defined, versatile and stable phantom materials are essential to assess the accuracy, robustness and applicability of multispectral Quantitative Photoacoustic Imaging (qPAI) algorithms in experimental scenarios. This study assesses the potential of polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) as a phantom material for qPAI, building on previous work that focused on using PVCP for quality control. Parameters that might be controlled or tuned to assess the performance of qPAI algorithms were studied: broadband acoustic properties, multiwavelength optical properties with added absorbers and scatterers, and photoacoustic efficiency. The optical and acoustic properties of PVCP can be tuned to be broadly representative of soft tissue. The Grüneisen parameter is larger than expected in tissue, which is an advantage as it increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the photoacoustic measurements. Interestingly, when the absorption was altered by adding absorbers, the absorption spectra measured using high peak power nanosecond-pulsed sources (typical in photoacoustics) were repeatably different from the ones measured using the low power source in the spectrophotometer, indicative of photochemical reactions taking place.

  16. Gold nanorods combine photoacoustic and Raman imaging for detection and treatment of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Cole, Adam J.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) were synthesized with surfactant templating and coated with IR792 to produce surface-enhanced Raman signal (SERS). Subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor models were created in nude mice using the OV2008 cell line, and a Nexus128 scanner from Endra LifeSciences was used to collect the photoacoustic data. We used GNRs with resonance at 756 nm, and the Raman signal was 10-fold larger than 60 nm gold core/silica shell nanoparticles. This signal was stable for over 24 hours in 50% serum. The batch-to-batch reproducibility was 15.5% and 3.6% in the SERS and photoacoustic modalities for n=4 batches. Animals were injected with 200 μL of 2.5, 5.4, and 16.8 nM GNRs. Relative to baseline photoacoustic signal, these concentrations increased tumor signal 1.3-, 1.6-, and 2.5-fold, respectively. The maximum signal increase occurred within 2 hours of injection persisted for at least 24 hours and was significant at panimals. Assaying for gold in the tumors validated signal—we found a strong correlation (R2>0.90) between tumor gold concentration and photoacoustic signal. By 24 hours, free GNRs had been sequestered to the liver and spleen with 2%ID/g immobilized in the tumor. The same GNRs produced SERS signal, and Raman maps were created with least squares analysis. We used the Raman signal to identify tumor margins and also to monitor resection and ensure complete removal of tumor tissue. Thus, the GNRs allow pre-surgical photoacoustic visualization for tumor staging and intra-operative Raman imaging to guide resection. Future work will study GNRs targeted to cell surface proteins to increase tumor accumulation.

  17. Channel function reconstitution and re-animation: a single-channel strategy in the postcrystal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2015-06-15

    The most essential properties of ion channels for their physiologically relevant functions are ion-selective permeation and gating. Among the channel species, the potassium channel is primordial and the most ubiquitous in the biological world, and knowledge of this channel underlies the understanding of features of other ion channels. The strategy applied to studying channels changed dramatically after the crystal structure of the potassium channel was resolved. Given the abundant structural information available, we exploited the bacterial KcsA potassium channel as a simple model channel. In the postcrystal age, there are two effective frameworks with which to decipher the functional codes present in the channel structure, namely reconstitution and re-animation. Complex channel proteins are decomposed into essential functional components, and well-examined parts are rebuilt for integrating channel function in the membrane (reconstitution). Permeation and gating are dynamic operations, and one imagines the active channel by breathing life into the 'frozen' crystal (re-animation). Capturing the motion of channels at the single-molecule level is necessary to characterize the behaviour of functioning channels. Advanced techniques, including diffracted X-ray tracking, lipid bilayer methods and high-speed atomic force microscopy, have been used. Here, I present dynamic pictures of the KcsA potassium channel from the submolecular conformational changes to the supramolecular collective behaviour of channels in the membrane. These results form an integrated picture of the active channel and offer insights into the processes underlying the physiological function of the channel in the cell membrane. PMID:25833254

  18. Phase modulated multiphoton microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karki, Khadga Jung; Pullerits, Tonu

    2015-01-01

    We show that the modulation of the phases of the laser beams of ultra-short pulses leads to modulation of the two photon fluorescence intensity. The phase modulation technique when used in multi-photon microscopy can improve the signal to noise ratio. The technique can also be used in multiplexing the signals in the frequency domain in multi-focal raster scanning microscopy. As the technique avoids the use of array detectors as well as elaborate spatiotemporal multiplexing schemes it provides a convenient means to multi-focal scanning in axial direction. We show examples of such uses. Similar methodology can be used in other non-linear scanning microscopies, such as second or third harmonic generation microscopy.

  19. Clinical specular microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  20. Magnetic microscopy guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Brune

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Microscopy of Nanostructures is an excellent introduction for newcomers and, for those working in the field, can be used as a guide before seeking more up-to-date literature, saysHarald Brune.

  1. Magnetic microscopy guide

    OpenAIRE

    Harald Brune

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Microscopy of Nanostructures is an excellent introduction for newcomers and, for those working in the field, can be used as a guide before seeking more up-to-date literature, saysHarald Brune.

  2. International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Oral, Ahmet; Ozer, Mehmet; InterM; INTERM2013

    2014-01-01

    The International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress (INTERM2013) was organized on October 10-13, 2013. The aim of the congress was to bring together scientists from various branches to discuss the latest advances in the field of microscopy. The contents of the congress have been broadened to a more "interdisciplinary" scope, so as to allow all scientists working on related subjects to participate and present their work. These proceedings include 39 peer-reviewed technical papers, submitted by leading academic and research institutions from over 12 countries and representing some of the most cutting-edge research available. The 39 papers are grouped into the following sections: - Applications of Microscopy in the Physical Sciences - Applications of Microscopy in the Biological Sciences

  3. Performance characterization of low-cost, high-speed, portable pulsed laser diode photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system

    OpenAIRE

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography systems that uses Q-switched Nd:YAG/OPO pulsed lasers are expensive, bulky, and hence limits its use in clinical applications. The low pulse repetition rate of these lasers makes it unsuitable for real-time imaging when used with single-element ultrasound detector. In this work, we present a pulsed laser diode photoacoustic tomography (PLD-PAT) system that integrates a compact PLD inside a single-detector circular scanning geometry. We compared its performance against...

  4. Laser diffraction microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Schall, P.

    2009-01-01

    Crystals composed of micrometer size colloidal particles diffract light and are both of fundamental interest as well as having important applications as filters, sensors and photonic devices. Laser light is used to diffract from these crystals in close analogy to x-ray or electron diffraction used for atomic crystals. Laser diffraction microscopy explores optical diffraction contrast to image crystals and crystal defects in analogy to the transmission electron microscopy technique used to ima...

  5. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light–sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved onl...

  6. Quantitative dispersion microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Yaqoob, Zahid; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refractive index dispersion is an intrinsic optical property and a useful source of contrast in biological imaging studies. In this report, we present the first dispersion phase imaging of living eukaryotic cells. We have developed quantitative dispersion microscopy based on the principle of quantitative phase microscopy. The dual-wavelength quantitative phase microscope makes phase measurements at 310 nm and 400 nm wavelengths to quantify dispersion (refractive index increment ratio) of live...

  7. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  8. Enhancement of photoacoustic tomography in the tissue with speed-of-sound variance using ultrasound computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程任翔; 陶超; 刘晓峻

    2015-01-01

    The speed-of-sound variance will decrease the imaging quality of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomo-geneous tissue. In this study, ultrasound computed tomography is combined with photoacoustic tomography to enhance the photoacoustic tomography in this situation. The speed-of-sound information is recovered by ultrasound computed to-mography. Then, an improved delay-and-sum method is used to reconstruct the image from the photoacoustic signals. The simulation results validate that the proposed method can obtain a better photoacoustic tomography than the conventional method when the speed-of-sound variance is increased. In addition, the influences of the speed-of-sound variance and the fan-angle on the image quality are quantitatively explored to optimize the image scheme. The proposed method has a good performance even when the speed-of-sound variance reaches 14.2%. Furthermore, an optimized fan angle is revealed, which can keep the good image quality with a low cost of hardware. This study has a potential value in extending the biomedical application of photoacoustic tomography.

  9. Enhancement of photoacoustic tomography in the tissue with speed-of-sound variance using ultrasound computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ren-Xiang; Chao, Tao; Xiao-Jun, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The speed-of-sound variance will decrease the imaging quality of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue. In this study, ultrasound computed tomography is combined with photoacoustic tomography to enhance the photoacoustic tomography in this situation. The speed-of-sound information is recovered by ultrasound computed tomography. Then, an improved delay-and-sum method is used to reconstruct the image from the photoacoustic signals. The simulation results validate that the proposed method can obtain a better photoacoustic tomography than the conventional method when the speed-of-sound variance is increased. In addition, the influences of the speed-of-sound variance and the fan-angle on the image quality are quantitatively explored to optimize the image scheme. The proposed method has a good performance even when the speed-of-sound variance reaches 14.2%. Furthermore, an optimized fan angle is revealed, which can keep the good image quality with a low cost of hardware. This study has a potential value in extending the biomedical application of photoacoustic tomography. Projection supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11422439, 11274167, and 11274171), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20120091110001).

  10. Channel Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rigon, Riccardo

    This review proceeds from Luna Leopold's and Ronald Shreve's lasting accomplishments dealing with the study of random-walk and topologically random channel networks. According to the random perspective, which has had a profound influence on the interpretation of natural landforms, nature's resiliency in producing recurrent networks and landforms was interpreted to be the consequence of chance. In fact, central to models of topologically random networks is the assumption of equal likelihood of any tree-like configuration. However, a general framework of analysis exists that argues that all possible network configurations draining a fixed area are not necessarily equally likely. Rather, a probability P(s) is assigned to a particular spanning tree configuration, say s, which can be generally assumed to obey a Boltzmann distribution: P(s) % e^-H(s)/T, where T is a parameter and H(s) is a global property of the network configuration s related to energetic characters, i.e. its Hamiltonian. One extreme case is the random topology model where all trees are equally likely, i.e. the limit case for T6 4 . The other extreme case is T 6 0, and this corresponds to network configurations that tend to minimize their total energy dissipation to improve their likelihood. Networks obtained in this manner are termed optimal channel networks (OCNs). Observational evidence suggests that the characters of real river networks are reproduced extremely well by OCNs. Scaling properties of energy and entropy of OCNs suggest that large network development is likely to effectively occur at zero temperature (i.e. minimizing its Hamiltonian). We suggest a corollary of dynamic accessibility of a network configuration and speculate towards a thermodynamics of critical self-organization. We thus conclude that both chance and necessity are equally important ingredients for the dynamic origin of channel networks---and perhaps of the geometry of nature.

  11. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Scott Carney, P.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light-sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy.

  12. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  13. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  14. Multiphoton microscopy in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Winfried

    2002-06-01

    The study of the nervous system requires to an exceptional extent observation of and experimentation on intact tissue. There, in particular, high-resolution optical microscopy benefits from the inherent advantages of multi-photon fluorescence excitation. Several cases will be presented from a number of different tissues and organisms, where multi-photon excited laser scanning fluorescence microscopy has been an essential experimental tool. Those examples include the discovery of biochemical coincidence detection in synaptic spines and the clarification of the underlying mechanism; the observation of sensory evoked dendritic signaling in intact animals and the observation of light induced calcium signals in the intact retina. Recently a fiber coupled two-photon microscopy has been developed that allows the imaging in moving animal.

  15. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  16. Magnetic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principles of the operation of the magnetic force microscope are considered. The main areas of application of magnetic force microscopy are characterised. The prospects are shown of using this method for solving problems of materials science, including the most topical problem, viz., the creation of magnetic recording media with ultrahigh recording density. Unique potentials for investigation of nanostructures using a combination of magnetic force microscopy with electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance are pointed out. Primary attention is focused on the description of experimental techniques. The bibliography includes 27 references.

  17. Functional photoacoustic micro-imaging of cerebral hemodynamic changes in single blood vessels after photo-induced brain stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lun-De; Chen, You-Yin; Lin, Chin-Teng; Li, Meng-Lin

    2013-03-01

    Studying the functional hemodynamic roles of individual cerebral cortical arterioles in maintaining both the structure and function of cortical regions during and after brain stroke in small animals is an important issue. Recently, functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) has been proved as a reliable imaging technique to probe the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) in single cerebral blood vessels of rats. Here, we report the application of fPAM associated with electrophysiology recordings to investigating functional hemodynamic changes in single cortical arterioles of rats with electrical forepaw stimulation after photo-induced ischemic stroke. Because of the weak optical focusing nature of our fPAM system, photo-induced ischemic stroke targeting single cortical arterioles can be easily conducted with simple adaptation. Functional HbT, CBV and SO2 changes associated with the induced stroke in selected arterioles from the anterior cerebral artery system were imaged with 36 x 65-μm spatial resolution. Experimental results showed that after photo-occlusion of a single arteriole, the functional changes of nearby arterioles in cerebral cortex only can be observed immediately after the stroke. After a few minutes of stroke onset, there are no significant functional changes under the forepaw stimulation, suggesting that alternate blood flow routes are not actively recruited. The fPAM with electrophysiology recordings complements existing imaging techniques and has the potential to offer a favorable tool for explicitly studying cerebral hemodynamics in small animal models of photo-indcued ischemic stroke.

  18. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  19. A method for delineation of bone surfaces in photoacoustic computed tomography of the finger

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Samir; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging of interphalangeal peripheral joints is of interest in the context of using the synovial membrane as a surrogate marker of rheumatoid arthritis. Previous work has shown that ultrasound produced by absorption of light at the epidermis reflects on the bone surfaces within the finger. When the reflected signals are backprojected in the region of interest, artifacts are produced, confounding interpretation of the images. In this work, we present an approach where the photoacoustic signals known to originate from the epidermis, are treated as virtual ultrasound transmitters, and a separate reconstruction is performed as in ultrasound reflection imaging. This allows us to identify the bone surfaces. Further, the identification of the joint space is important as this provides a landmark to localize a region-of-interest in seeking the inflamed synovial membrane. The ability to delineate bone surfaces allows us not only to identify the artifacts, but also to identify the interphalangeal joint spa...

  20. Non-invasive imaging of epileptic seizures in vivo using photoacoustic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qizhi; Carney, Paul R; Yuan Zhen; Jiang Huabei [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Liu Zhao [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Chen Huanxin; Roper, Steven N [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0265 (United States)], E-mail: hjiang@bme.ufl.edu

    2008-04-07

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that has the potential to image the dynamic function of the brain due to its unique ability of imaging biological tissues with high optical contrast and ultrasound resolution. Here we report the first application of our finite-element-based PAT for imaging of epileptic seizures in an animal model. In vivo photoacoustic images were obtained in rats with focal seizures induced by microinjection of bicuculline, a GABA{sub A} antagonist, into the neocortex. The seizure focus was accurately localized by PAT as confirmed with gold-standard electroencephalogram (EEG). Compared to the existing neuroimaging modalities, PAT not only has the unprecedented advantage of high spatial and temporal resolution in a single imaging modality, but also is portable and low in cost, making it possible to bring brain imaging to the bedside.

  1. A constrained variable projection reconstruction method for photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate knowledge of transducer responses

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Qiwei; Matthews, Thomas P; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is an emerging computed imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of the absorbed optical energy density within tissue. When the imaging system employs conventional piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers, the ideal photoacoustic (PA) signals are degraded by the transducers' acousto-electric impulse responses (EIRs) during the measurement process. If unaccounted for, this can degrade the accuracy of the reconstructed image. In principle, the effect of the EIRs on the measured PA signals can be ameliorated via deconvolution; images can be reconstructed subsequently by application of a reconstruction method that assumes an idealized EIR. Alternatively, the effect of the EIR can be incorporated into an imaging model and implicitly compensated for during reconstruction. In either case, the efficacy of the correction can be limited by errors in the assumed EIRs. In this work, a joint optimization approach to PACT image r...

  2. Investigation of a dual modal method for bone pathologies using quantitative ultrasound and photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Idan; Gannot, Israel; Eyal, Avishay

    2015-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a widespread disease that has a catastrophic impact on patient's lives and overwhelming related healthcare costs. In recent works, we have developed a multi-spectral, frequency domain photoacoustic method for the evaluation of bone pathologies. This method has great advantages over pure ultrasonic or optical methods as it provides both molecular information from the bone absorption spectrum and bone mechanical status from the characteristics of the ultrasound propagation. These characteristics include both the Speed of Sound (SOS) and Broadband Ultrasonic Attenuation (BUA). To test the method's quantitative predictions, we have constructed a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic setup. Here, we experimentally present a dual modality system, and compares between the methods on bone samples in-vitro. The differences between the two modalities are shown to provide valuable insight into the bone structure and functional status.

  3. Differential photoacoustic cell to study the wetting process during porous silicon formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Edificio de Posgrado, Coyoacan, CP 04530, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Velazquez-Hernandez, Ruben [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Cerro de las Campanas, CP 76010, Queretaro, Qro (Mexico); Petricioli-Carranco, Julio; Quintero-Torres, Rafael; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario Enrique [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    This paper shows the in-situ study of the wetting process in Silicon during anodization process using an electrochemical Differential photoacoustic Cell (DPC). The Photoacoustic amplitude and phase signals were obtained for samples in air, ethanol, ethanol/HF and finally air. According to these results ethanol is responsible for a mechanical contact reducing the superficial tension and ethanol/HF produce the removing of the SiO{sub x} and SiO{sub 2}species on the Silicon surface. It was found that the DPC is a powerful technique to study the wet surface before the formation of the porous silicon layer (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Multi-target photoacoustic molecular imaging of cardiovascular inflammatory biomarkers using bioconjugated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, S.; Tripathy, S.; Carson, A.; Lavery, L. L.; Zhang, H.; Agarwal, A.; Kotov, N.; Villanueva, F. S.; Kim, K.

    2011-03-01

    Multiple cardiovascular inflammatory biomarkers were simultaneously imaged in vivo using antibody conjugated gold nanorods (GNRs) injected into a mouse model of vascular injury stimulated by a photochemical reaction of Rose Bengal dye to green light. Mixed solutions of ICAM-1 antibody conjugated GNRs (715 nm) and E-selectin antibody conjugated GNRs (800 nm) were injected to bind to their respective inflammatory markers on the luminal surface of the inferior vena cava of a mouse. Photoacoustic intensity was measured by a commercial ultrasound probe synchronized to a pulsed laser (10-18 mJ/cm2) at 715 nm or 800 nm clearly identified the upregulation of targeted biomarkers. Histopathology on the harvested tissues confirmed inflammation. The feasibility of simultaneous photoacoustic molecular imaging of inflammation responses in cardiovascular system using a commercial ultrasound system has been demonstrated in vivo.

  5. Advanced photoacoustic and thermoacoustic sensing and imaging beyond pulsed absorption contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we review the recent progress in the photoacoustic (PA) and thermoacoustic (TA) imaging domain. Going beyond the conventional investigation of optical/microwave absorption contrast, this review will focus more on the new developments of PA and TA imaging towards multi-contrast mechanisms, such as multimodal PA/TA imaging, viscosity imaging, temperature monitoring, Doppler detection of flow speed, etc. In addition, several interesting techniques utilizing PA/TA will be reviewed, including photoacoustic-guided optical focusing, electrical circuit modeling of PA/TA effect, TA imaging with coherent continuous-wave (CW) magnetic and radio-frequency (RF) excitations, as well as its nonlinear effect. Finally, some prospects about the further improvement of PA/TA imaging techniques are suggested, followed by the conclusion.

  6. Quantum cascade laser photoacoustic detection of nitrous oxide released from soils for biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, F. M.; Sthel, M. S.; Castro, M. P. P.; da Silva, M. G.; Rocha, M. V.; Tavares, J. R.; Veiga, C. F. M.; Vargas, H.

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the generation of greenhouse gases in sugarcane ethanol production chain, a comparative study of N2O emission in artificially fertilized soils and soils free from fertilizers was carried out. Photoacoustic spectroscopy using quantum cascade laser with an emission ranging from 7.71 to 7.88 µm and differential photoacoustic cell were applied to detect nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas emitted from soils cultivated with sugar cane. Owing to calibrate the experimental setup, an initial N2O concentration was diluted with pure nitrogen and detection limit of 50 ppbv was achieved. The proposed methodology was selective and sensitive enough to detect N2O from no fertilized and artificially fertilized soils. The measured N2O concentration ranged from ppmv to ppbv.

  7. Photoacoustic analysis of the ultrasonic irradiation effect in the photosynthetic activity in aquatic lirium plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report, the application of the photoacoustic technique for monitoring the photosynthesis evolution in aquatic lirium (Eichhornia Crassipes), before and after it was exposed to ultrasonic irradiations. We obtained the disappearance of the phototobaric contribution in the PA signal measured for the irradiated samples with ultrasound of 17 kHz, and therefore of a possible damage in the centers producing the photosynthesis, due to the irradiation. These results show the utility of the ultrasonic irradiation, as well as, of the photosynthesis monitoring by means of the photoacoustic technique, for the elaboration and establishment of methodologies in the control of this aquatic plant, whose propagation causes many consequences extremely unfavorable for the environment, as well as for the diverse human activities that are developed in the bodies of water in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world

  8. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helion Vargas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that it has a radiative forcing of 0.52 W/m2. This work compares two photoacoustic spectrometers, one coupled to a CO2 laser and another one coupled to a Quantum Cascade (QC laser, for the detection of SF6. The laser photoacoustic spectrometers described in this work have been developed for gas detection at small concentrations. Detection limits of 20 ppbv for CO2 laser and 50 ppbv for quantum cascade laser were obtained.

  9. Noncontact photoacoustic tomography imaging using a low-coherence interferometer with rapid detection of phase modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Tang, Zhilie; Tang, Hongchun; Wu, Yongbo; Wang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    A photoacoustic tomography imaging system using a low-coherence interferometer with rapid detection of phase modulation was designed, fabricated, and tested for biologic imaging. A noncontact probing technique was applied to improve the practicability of the system. The technique is experimentally verified by the image of a simulated tissue sample and the blood vessels within a mouse ear flap (pinna) in vivo. The system's axial and lateral resolutions are evaluated at 45 and ~15 μm, respectively. The system's imaging depth is 1mm in a special phantom. The results show that the system has the feasibility to be used as a photoacoustic tomography imaging method, and it may provide a kind of possibility of noncontact real-time PAT.

  10. Remote mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy with a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Markus; Hochreiner, Armin; Langer, Gregor; Märzinger, Wolfgang; Burgholzer, Peter; Lendl, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate non-contact remote photoacoustic spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region. A room-temperature-operated pulsed external-cavity quantum cascade laser is used to excite photoacoustic waves within a semitransparent sample. The ultrasonic waves are detected remotely on the opposite side of the sample using a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, thereby avoiding problems associated with acoustic attenuation in air. We present the theoretical background of the proposed technique and demonstrate measurements on a thin polystyrene film. The obtained absorption spectrum in the region of 1030-1230  cm(-1) is compared to a spectrum obtained by attenuated total reflection, showing reasonable agreement. PMID:26258336

  11. Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Photoacoustic Sensor for Trace Detection of Formaldehyde Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Angela; Di Franco, Cinzia; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of a photoacoustic sensor for the detection of formaldehyde (CH2O) using a thermoelectrically cooled distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser operating in pulsed mode at 5.6 μm. A resonant photoacoustic cell, equipped with four electret microphones, is excited in its first longitudinal mode at 1,380 Hz. The absorption line at 1,778.9 cm−1 is selected for CH2O detection. A detection limit of 150 parts per billion in volume in nitrogen is achieved using a 10 seconds time constant and 4 mW laser power. Measurements in ambient air will require water vapour filters. PMID:22574040

  12. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Mila; Sthel, Marcelo; Lima, Guilherme; da Silva, Marcelo; Schramm, Delson; Miklós, András; Vargas, Helion

    2010-01-01

    The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that it has a radiative forcing of 0.52 W/m2. This work compares two photoacoustic spectrometers, one coupled to a CO2 laser and another one coupled to a Quantum Cascade (QC) laser, for the detection of SF6. The laser photoacoustic spectrometers described in this work have been developed for gas detection at small concentrations. Detection limits of 20 ppbv for CO2 laser and 50 ppbv for quantum cascade laser were obtained. PMID:22163412

  13. Small-Size Resonant Photoacoustic Cell of Inclined Geometry for Gas Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelik, A V; Nikonovich, F N; Zakharich, M P; Chebotar, A I; Firago, V A; Stetsik, V M; Kazak, N S; Starovoitov, V S

    2009-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell intended for laser detection of trace gases is represented. The cell is adapted so as to enhance the gas-detection performance and, simultaneously, to reduce the cell size. The cell design provides an efficient cancellation of the window background (a parasite response due to absorption of laser beam in the cell windows) and acoustic isolation from the environment for an acoustic resonance of the cell. The useful photoacoustic response from a detected gas, window background and noise are analyzed in demonstration experiments as functions of the modulation frequency for a prototype cell with the internal volume ~ 0.5 cm^3. The minimal detectable absorption for the prototype is estimated to be ~ 1.2 10^{-8} cm^{-1} W Hz^{-1/2}.

  14. Photoacoustic Tomography of Biological Sample Using Phase-controlled Focus Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡万绍; 邢达; 唐志列; 钱盛友

    2002-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a new imaging modality, which converts pressure signals received by a scanning detector to a local distribution of electromagnetic absorption density. In this paper an experiment result of a photoacoustic tomography to depths of ~7 mm for a real tissue is presented, using a 532-nm pulse YAG laser. The time-resolved stress detection technique was used for PA signal detection with a high temporal resolution. A phase-controlled focus algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Images of different depth profiles in tissue were obtained. The depth resolution was 30 μm and could be up to 10 μm using a wide-band tranducer.

  15. Ex vivo evaluation of the percutaneous penetration of proanthocyanidin extracts from Guazuma ulmifolia using photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, J C B; Pedrochi, F; Hernandes, L; de Mello, J C P; Baesso, M L

    2007-03-21

    In this work photoacoustic spectroscopy has been applied to determine ex vivo the percutaneous penetration of proanthocyanidins present in extracts obtained from Guazuma ulmifolia, in rats. Lotion formulations containing 0.0663 mg of procyanidin B2 day(-1)animal(-1) were topically applied during 7, 10 and 13 days in each group of the animals. After the end of treatment the animals were killed, the skin dissected to remove the basal content, and the measurements were carried out as a function of the period of time of treatment. The results showed that despite the very low concentration of the active principle (procyanidin B2) in the lotion, the photoacoustic method was able to show the presence of optical absorption bands from this substance in the dermis region, evidencing once again that this method may be useful for studies of topically applied formulations of interest in the pharmacokinetic area. PMID:17386764

  16. In vivo evaluation of drug delivery after ultrasound application: A new use for the photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barja, P. R.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Rompe, P. C. B.; Dos Anjos, F. H.; Marciano, F. R.; da Silva, M. D.

    2005-06-01

    Ultrasound application is a therapeutical resource widely employed in physiotherapy. One of its applications is the phonophoresis, a technique in which the ultrasound radiation is utilized to deliver drugs through the skin to soft tissues. The proposal of our study was to employ the Photoacoustic Technique to evaluate the efficacy of such treatment, analyzing if phonophoresis could enhance drug delivery through skin when compared to the more traditional method of manual massage. The configuration of the system employed was such that it was possible to perform in vivo measurements, which is a pre-requisite for this kind of study. The changes observed in the photoacoustic signal amplitude after each form of drug application were attributed to changes in the thermal effusivity of the system, due to penetration of the drug. The technique was able to detect differences in drug delivery between the specified physiotherapy treatments, indicating that phonophoresis enhances drug absorption by tissue.

  17. Laser Doppler velocimetry based on the photoacoustic effect in a CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a simple laser Doppler velocimeter in which the photoacoustic effect was used to measure the rotation wheel speed. A Doppler signal, caused by mixing a returning wave with an originally existing wave inside the CO2 laser cavity, was detected using a microphone in the laser tube. Frequency of the microphone output was in proportion to the rotation speed of a wheel and is dependent on the cosine of the angle between the direction of the laser beam and tangent of wheel velocity. A Doppler-shifted frequency as high as 34 kHz was detected using this method. A frequency response of a few megahertz is expected from the laser Doppler velocimeter based on the photoacoustic effect in a CO2 laser by using a wider bandwidth microphone

  18. Quantitative photoacoustics to measure single cell melanin production and nanoparticle attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Eshein, Adam; Chandrasekhar, Anand; Viator, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustics can be used as a label-free spectroscopic method of identifying pigmented proteins and characterizing their intracellular concentration over time in a single living cell. The authors use a microscopic laser irradiation system with a 5 ns, Q-switched laser focused onto single cells in order to collect photoacoustic responses of melanoma cells from the HS936 cell line and gold nanoparticle labeled breast cancer cells from the T47D cell line. The volume averaged intracellular concentration of melanin is found to range from 29-270 mM for single melanoma cells and the number of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is shown to range from 850-5900 AuNPs/cell. Additionally, the melanin production response to UV-A light stimulus is measured in four melanoma cells to find a mass production rate of 5.7 pg of melanin every 15 min.

  19. Thermal diffusivity and electron transport properties of NTC samples obtained by the photoacoustic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savic, S.M. [Institute of Technical Sciences of SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Aleksic, O.S. [Center for Multidisciplinary Studies of the University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Nikolic, M.V. [Center for Multidisciplinary Studies of the University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Lukovic, D.T. [Institute of Technical Sciences of SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Pejovic, V.Z. [Center for Multidisciplinary Studies of the University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Nikolic, P.M. [Institute of Technical Sciences of SASA, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)]. E-mail: nikolic@sanu.ac.yu

    2006-07-15

    Thermal diffusivity and electron transport parameters of sintered NTC samples were determined by the photoacoustic (PA) technique. Powder mixtures composed of MnO, NiO, CoO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were milled to nanometer particle size. NTC discs were dry powder pressed and sintered at different temperatures in the range from 900 deg. C to 1300 deg. C for 30 min. A second group of NTC discs was sintered at 1200 deg. C with the sintering time varying from 30 min to 360 min. These NTC samples were polished and exposed to a chopped laser beam in order to plot a response in the acoustic range. The thermal diffusivity of sintered NTC layers based on a metal oxide powder mixture was measured at room temperature by the photoacoustic technique. An increase of thermal diffusivity with the sintering temperature and time of sintering was observed.

  20. Optimization of the Acoustic Pressure Distribution in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈柏; 陈兰荣; 范薇; 林尊琪

    2001-01-01

    The size of a cylindrical photoacoustic cell with suitable size was selected so that the resonant frequency of the first radial mode was equal to that of a longitudinal higher mode. By maintaining two thin coaxial tubes at each end, a enhanced photoacoustic cell was constructed with two tubes of 1/2 and 1/4 of the wavelength. In this enhanced photoacoustie cell, both the first radial resonance and the higher longitudinal resonance were excited adequately. Coupling of two acoustic modes makes the acoustic energy concentrating in the middle of the cell. The surface loss was decreased, the acoustic quality factor and pressure amplitude increased obviously as compared with conventional cylindrical cell.