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  1. Slow synaptic transmission mediated by TRPV1 channels in CA3 interneurons of the hippocampus.

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    Eguchi, Noriomi; Hishimoto, Akitoyo; Sora, Ichiro; Mori, Masahiro

    2016-03-11

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) modulate various neuronal functions in the central nervous system. Many studies reported that mGluRs have linkages to neuronal disorders such as schizophrenia and autism related disorders, indicating that mGluRs are involved in critical functions of the neuronal circuits. To study this possibility further, we recorded mGluR-induced synaptic responses in the interneurons of the CA3 stratum radiatum using rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. Electrical stimulation in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer evoked a slow inward current in the interneurons at a holding potential of -70mV in the presence of antagonists for AMPA/kainate receptors, NMDA receptors, GABAA receptors and GABAB receptors. The slow inward current was blocked in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting that this was a synaptic response. The slow excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) reversed near 0mV, reflecting an increase in a non-selective cationic conductance. The slow EPSC is mediated by group I mGluRs, as it was blocked by AP3, a group I mGluR antagonist. Neither a calcium chelator BAPTA nor a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 affected the slow EPSC. La(3+), a general TRP channel blocker or capsazepine, a selective TRPV1 channel antagonist significantly suppressed the slow EPSC. DHPG, a selective group I mGluRs agonist induced an inward current, which was suppressed by capsazepine. These results indicate that in the interneurons of the hippocampal CA3 stratum radiatum group I mGluRs activate TRPV1 channels independently of PLC and intracellular Ca(2+), resulting in the slow EPSC in the interneurons.

  2. Distance-dependent homeostatic synaptic scaling mediated by A-type potassium channels

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    Hiroshi T Ito

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Many lines of evidence suggest that the efficacy of synapses on CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites increases as a function of distance from the cell body. The strength of an individual synapse is also dynamically modulated by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, which raises the question as to how a neuron can reconcile individual synaptic changes with the maintenance of the proximal-to-distal gradient of synaptic strength along the dendrites. As the density of A-type potassium channels exhibits a similar gradient from proximal (low-to-distal (high dendrites, the A-current may play a role in coordinating local synaptic changes with the global synaptic strength gradient. Here we describe a form of homeostatic plasticity elicited by conventional activity blockade (with TTX coupled with a block of the A-type potassium channel. Following A-type potassium channel inhibition for 12 hrs, recordings from CA1 somata revealed a significantly higher miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC frequency, whereas in dendritic recordings, there was no change in mEPSC frequency. Consistent with mEPSC recordings, we observed a significant increase in AMPA receptor density in stratum pyramidale but not stratum radiatum. Based on these data, we propose that the differential distribution of A-type potassium channels along the apical dendrites may create a proximal-to-distal membrane potential gradient. This gradient may regulate AMPA receptor distribution along the same axis. Taken together, our results indicate that A-type potassium channels play an important role in controlling synaptic strength along the dendrites, which may help to maintain the computational capacity of the neuron.

  3. Enhanced pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn contributes to calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein-mediated spinal sensitization and behavioral hypersensitivity

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    Dickenson Anthony H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nerve injury-induced expression of the spinal calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ1 has been shown to mediate behavioral hypersensitivity through a yet identified mechanism. We examined if this neuroplasticity modulates behavioral hypersensitivity by regulating spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission in injury-free transgenic mice overexpressing the Cavα2δ1 proteins in neuronal tissues. The transgenic mice exhibited hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia similar to the spinal nerve ligation injury model. Intrathecally delivered antagonists for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA/kainate receptors, but not for the metabotropic glutamate receptors, caused a dose-dependent allodynia reversal in the transgenic mice without changing the behavioral sensitivity in wild-type mice. This suggests that elevated spinal Cavα2δ1 mediates allodynia through a pathway involving activation of selective glutamate receptors. To determine if this is mediated by enhanced spinal neuronal excitability or pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn, we examined wide-dynamic-range (WDR neuron excitability with extracellular recording and glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents with whole-cell patch recording in deep-dorsal horn of the Cavα2δ1 transgenic mice. Our data indicated that overexpression of Cavα2δ1 in neuronal tissues led to increased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory post synaptic currents mediated mainly by AMPA/kainate receptors at physiological membrane potentials, and also by NMDA receptors upon depolarization, without changing the excitability of WDR neurons to high intensity stimulation. Together, these findings support a mechanism of Cavα2δ1-mediated spinal sensitization in which elevated Cavα2δ1 causes increased pre-synaptic glutamate release that leads to reduced excitation thresholds of post-synaptic dorsal

  4. Calcium channels, neuromuscular synaptic transmission and neurological diseases.

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    Urbano, Francisco J; Pagani, Mario R; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2008-09-15

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels are essential in neuronal signaling and synaptic transmission, and their functional alterations underlie numerous human disorders whether monogenic (e.g., ataxia, migraine, etc.) or autoimmune. We review recent work on Ca(V)2.1 or P/Q channelopathies, mostly using neuromuscular junction preparations, and focus specially on the functional hierarchy among the calcium channels recruited to mediate neurotransmitter release when Ca(V)2.1 channels are mutated or depleted. In either case, synaptic transmission is greatly compromised; evidently, none of the reported functional replacements with other calcium channels compensates fully.

  5. Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels

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    Caixia Lv

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic ribbons are structures made largely of the protein Ribeye that hold synaptic vesicles near release sites in non-spiking cells in some sensory systems. Here, we introduce frameshift mutations in the two zebrafish genes encoding for Ribeye and thus remove Ribeye protein from neuromast hair cells. Despite Ribeye depletion, vesicles collect around ribbon-like structures that lack electron density, which we term “ghost ribbons.” Ghost ribbons are smaller in size but possess a similar number of smaller vesicles and are poorly localized to synapses and calcium channels. These hair cells exhibit enhanced exocytosis, as measured by capacitance, and recordings from afferent neurons post-synaptic to hair cells show no significant difference in spike rates. Our results suggest that Ribeye makes up most of the synaptic ribbon density in neuromast hair cells and is necessary for proper localization of calcium channels and synaptic ribbons.

  6. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels.

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    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-08-28

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation.

  7. Synaptic channel model including effects of spike width variation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic Channel Model Including Effects of Spike Width Variation Hamideh Ramezani Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey Ozgur B. Akan Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey ABSTRACT An accu...

  8. A Calcium-Dependent Plasticity Rule for HCN Channels Maintains Activity Homeostasis and Stable Synaptic Learning

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    Honnuraiah, Suraj; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM)-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific physiological roles

  9. Stochastic ion channel gating in dendritic neurons: morphology dependence and probabilistic synaptic activation of dendritic spikes.

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    Robert C Cannon

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity is mediated through changes in the probability of stochastic transitions between open and closed states of ion channels. While differences in morphology define neuronal cell types and may underlie neurological disorders, very little is known about influences of stochastic ion channel gating in neurons with complex morphology. We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. For typical neurons, the amplitude of membrane potential fluctuations depends on channel kinetics as well as open probability. Using a detailed model of a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that when intrinsic ion channels gate stochastically, the probability of initiation of dendritic or somatic spikes by dendritic synaptic input varies continuously between zero and one, whereas when ion channels gate deterministically, the probability is either zero or one. At physiological firing rates, stochastic gating of dendritic ion channels almost completely accounts for probabilistic somatic and dendritic spikes generated by the fully stochastic model. These results suggest that the consequences of stochastic ion channel gating differ globally between neuronal cell-types and locally between neuronal compartments. Whereas dendritic neurons are often assumed to behave deterministically, our simulations suggest that a direct consequence of stochastic gating of intrinsic ion channels is that spike output may instead be a probabilistic function of patterns of synaptic input to dendrites.

  10. M-type potassium channels modulate Schaffer collateral-CA1 glutamatergic synaptic transmission.

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    Sun, Jianli; Kapur, Jaideep

    2012-08-15

    Previous studies have suggested that muscarinic receptor activation modulates glutamatergic transmission. M-type potassium channels mediate the effects of muscarinic activation in the hippocampus, and it has been proposed that they modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We tested whether M1 muscarinic receptor activation enhances glutamatergic synaptic transmission via the inhibition of the M-type potassium channels that are present in Schaffer collateral axons and terminals. Miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) were recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons. The M1 receptor agonist, NcN-A-343, increased the frequency of mEPSCs, but did not alter their amplitude. The M-channel blocker XE991 and its analogue linopirdine also increased the frequency of mEPSCs. Flupirtine, which opens M-channels, had the opposite effect. XE991 did not enhance mEPSCs frequency in a calcium-free external medium. Blocking P/Q- and N-type calcium channels abolished the effect of XE991 on mEPSCs. These data suggested that the inhibition of M-channels increases presynaptic calcium-dependent glutamate release in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The effects of these agents on the membrane potentials of presynaptic CA3 pyramidal neurons were studied using current clamp recordings; activation of M1 receptors and blocking M-channels depolarized neurons and increased burst firing. The input resistance of CA3 neurons was increased by the application of McN-A-343 and XE991; these effects were consistent with the closure of M-channels. Muscarinic activation inhibits M-channels in CA3 pyramidal neurons and its efferents – Schaffer collateral, which causes the depolarization, activates voltage-gated calcium channels, and ultimately elevates the intracellular calcium concentration to increase the release of glutamate on CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  11. Acid-sensing ion channels: trafficking and synaptic function

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    Zha Xiang-ming

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extracellular acidification occurs in the brain with elevated neural activity, increased metabolism, and neuronal injury. This reduction in pH can have profound effects on brain function because pH regulates essentially every single biochemical reaction. Therefore, it is not surprising to see that Nature evolves a family of proteins, the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs, to sense extracellular pH reduction. ASICs are proton-gated cation channels that are mainly expressed in the nervous system. In recent years, a growing body of literature has shown that acidosis, through activating ASICs, contributes to multiple diseases, including ischemia, multiple sclerosis, and seizures. In addition, ASICs play a key role in fear and anxiety related psychiatric disorders. Several recent reviews have summarized the importance and therapeutic potential of ASICs in neurological diseases, as well as the structure-function relationship of ASICs. However, there is little focused coverage on either the basic biology of ASICs or their contribution to neural plasticity. This review will center on these topics, with an emphasis on the synaptic role of ASICs and molecular mechanisms regulating the spatial distribution and function of these ion channels.

  12. FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic information transmission by modulating action potential duration via BK channels.

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    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2013-02-20

    Loss of FMRP causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx, and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel's regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology.

  13. Apamin Boosting of Synaptic Potentials in CaV2.3 R-Type Ca2+ Channel Null Mice.

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    Wang, Kang; Kelley, Melissa H; Wu, Wendy W; Adelman, John P; Maylie, James

    2015-01-01

    SK2- and KV4.2-containing K+ channels modulate evoked synaptic potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Each is coupled to a distinct Ca2+ source that provides Ca2+-dependent feedback regulation to limit AMPA receptor (AMPAR)- and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated postsynaptic depolarization. SK2-containing channels are activated by Ca2+ entry through NMDARs, whereas KV4.2-containing channel availability is increased by Ca2+ entry through SNX-482 (SNX) sensitive CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels. Recent studies have challenged the functional coupling between NMDARs and SK2-containing channels, suggesting that synaptic SK2-containing channels are instead activated by Ca2+ entry through R-type Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, SNX has been implicated to have off target affects, which would challenge the proposed coupling between R-type Ca2+ channels and KV4.2-containing K+ channels. To reconcile these conflicting results, we evaluated the effect of SK channel blocker apamin and R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX on evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from CaV2.3 null mice. The results show that in the absence of CaV2.3 channels, apamin application still boosted EPSPs. The boosting effect of CaV2.3 channel blockers on EPSPs observed in neurons from wild type mice was not observed in neurons from CaV2.3 null mice. These data are consistent with a model in which SK2-containing channels are functionally coupled to NMDARs and KV4.2-containing channels to CaV2.3 channels to provide negative feedback regulation of EPSPs in the spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  14. Calcium channel structural determinants of synaptic transmission between identified invertebrate neurons.

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    Spafford, J David; Munno, David W; Van Nierop, Pim; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Jarvis, Scott E; Gallin, Warren J; Smit, August B; Zamponi, Gerald W; Syed, Naweed I

    2003-02-01

    We report here that unlike what was suggested for many vertebrate neurons, synaptic transmission in Lymnaea stagnalis occurs independent of a physical interaction between presynaptic calcium channels and a functional complement of SNARE proteins. Instead, synaptic transmission in Lymnaea requires the expression of a C-terminal splice variant of the Lymnaea homolog to mammalian N- and P/Q-type calcium channels. We show that the alternately spliced region physically interacts with the scaffolding proteins Mint1 and CASK, and that synaptic transmission is abolished following RNA interference knockdown of CASK or after the injection of peptide sequences designed to disrupt the calcium channel-Mint1 interactions. Our data suggest that Mint1 and CASK may serve to localize the non-L-type channels at the active zone and that synaptic transmission in invertebrate neurons utilizes a mechanism for optimizing calcium entry, which occurs independently of a physical association between calcium channels and SNARE proteins.

  15. Obesity elicits interleukin 1-mediated deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

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    Erion, Joanna R; Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena; Dey, Aditi; Hao, Shuai; Davis, Catherine L; Pollock, Norman K; Stranahan, Alexis M

    2014-02-12

    Adipose tissue is a known source of proinflammatory cytokines in obese humans and animal models, including the db/db mouse, in which obesity arises as a result of leptin receptor insensitivity. Inflammatory cytokines induce cognitive deficits across numerous conditions, but no studies have determined whether obesity-induced inflammation mediates synaptic dysfunction. To address this question, we used a treadmill training paradigm in which mice were exposed to daily training sessions or an immobile belt, with motivation achieved by delivery of compressed air on noncompliance. Treadmill training prevented hippocampal microgliosis, abolished expression of microglial activation markers, and also blocked the functional sensitization observed in isolated cells after ex vivo exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Reduced microglial reactivity with exercise was associated with reinstatement of hippocampus-dependent memory, reversal of deficits in long-term potentiation, and normalization of hippocampal dendritic spine density. Because treadmill training evokes broad responses not limited to the immune system, we next assessed whether directly manipulating adiposity through lipectomy and fat transplantation influences inflammation, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. Lipectomy prevents and fat transplantation promotes systemic and central inflammation, with associated alterations in cognitive and synaptic function. Levels of interleukin 1β (IL1β) emerged as a correlate of adiposity and cognitive impairment across both the treadmill and lipectomy studies, so we manipulated hippocampal IL1 signaling using intrahippocampal delivery of IL1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra). Intrahippocampal IL1ra prevented synaptic dysfunction, proinflammatory priming, and cognitive impairment. This pattern supports a central role for IL1-mediated neuroinflammation as a mechanism for cognitive deficits in obesity and diabetes.

  16. Persistent CaMKII activation mediates learning-induced long-lasting enhancement of synaptic inhibition.

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    Ghosh, Sourav; Reuveni, Iris; Lamprecht, Raphael; Barkai, Edi

    2015-01-07

    Training rats in a particularly difficult olfactory-discrimination task results in acquisition of high skill to perform the task superbly, termed "rule learning" or "learning set." Such complex learning results in enhanced intrinsic neuronal excitability of piriform cortex pyramidal neurons, and in their excitatory synaptic interconnections. These changes, while subserving memory maintenance, must be counterbalanced by modifications that prevent overspreading of activity and uncontrolled synaptic strengthening. Indeed, we have previously shown that the average amplitude of GABAA-mediated miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in these neurons is enhanced for several days after learning, an enhancement mediated via a postsynaptic mechanism. To unravel the molecular mechanism of this long-term inhibition enhancement, we tested the role of key second-messenger systems in maintaining such long-lasting modulation. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) blocker, KN93, significantly reduced the average mIPSC amplitude in neurons from trained rats only to the average pretraining level. A similar effect was obtained by the CaMKII peptide inhibitor, tatCN21. Such reduction resulted from decreased single-channel conductance and not in the number of activated channels. The PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, reduced the average mIPSC amplitude in neurons from naive, pseudo-trained, and trained animals, and the difference between the trained and control groups remained. Such reduction resulted from a decrease in the number of activated channels. The PKA inhibitor H89 dihydrochloride did not affect the average mIPSC amplitude in neurons from any of the three groups. We conclude that learning-induced enhancement of GABAA-mediated synaptic inhibition is maintained by persistent CaMKII activation.

  17. The computational power of astrocyte mediated synaptic plasticity

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    Rogier eMin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in the last two decades has made clear that astrocytes play a crucial role in the brain beyond their functions in energy metabolism and homeostasis. Many studies have shown that astrocytes can dynamically modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and might participate in higher brain functions like learning and memory. With the plethora of astrocyte-mediated signaling processes described in the literature today, the current challenge is to identify which of these processes happen under what physiological condition, and how this shapes information processing and, ultimately, behavior. To answer these questions will require a combination of advanced physiological, genetical and behavioral experiments. Additionally, mathematical modeling will prove crucial for testing predictions on the possible functions of astrocytes in neuronal networks, and to generate novel ideas as to how astrocytes can contribute to the complexity of the brain. Here, we aim to provide an outline of how astrocytes can interact with neurons. We do this by reviewing recent experimental literature on astrocyte-neuron interactions, discussing the dynamic effects of astrocytes on neuronal excitability and short- and long-term synaptic plasticity. Finally, we will outline the potential computational functions that astrocyte-neuron interactions can serve in the brain. We will discuss how astrocytes could govern metaplasticity in the brain, how they might organize the clustering of synaptic inputs, and how they could function as memory elements for neuronal activity. We conclude that astrocytes can enhance the computational power of neuronal networks in previously unexpected ways.

  18. The computational power of astrocyte mediated synaptic plasticity.

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    Min, Rogier; Santello, Mirko; Nevian, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Research in the last two decades has made clear that astrocytes play a crucial role in the brain beyond their functions in energy metabolism and homeostasis. Many studies have shown that astrocytes can dynamically modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and might participate in higher brain functions like learning and memory. With the plethora of astrocyte mediated signaling processes described in the literature today, the current challenge is to identify, which of these processes happen under what physiological condition, and how this shapes information processing and, ultimately, behavior. To answer these questions will require a combination of advanced physiological, genetical, and behavioral experiments. Additionally, mathematical modeling will prove crucial for testing predictions on the possible functions of astrocytes in neuronal networks, and to generate novel ideas as to how astrocytes can contribute to the complexity of the brain. Here, we aim to provide an outline of how astrocytes can interact with neurons. We do this by reviewing recent experimental literature on astrocyte-neuron interactions, discussing the dynamic effects of astrocytes on neuronal excitability and short- and long-term synaptic plasticity. Finally, we will outline the potential computational functions that astrocyte-neuron interactions can serve in the brain. We will discuss how astrocytes could govern metaplasticity in the brain, how they might organize the clustering of synaptic inputs, and how they could function as memory elements for neuronal activity. We conclude that astrocytes can enhance the computational power of neuronal networks in previously unexpected ways.

  19. The computational power of astrocyte mediated synaptic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Rogier; Santello, Mirko; Nevian, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Research in the last two decades has made clear that astrocytes play a crucial role in the brain beyond their functions in energy metabolism and homeostasis. Many studies have shown that astrocytes can dynamically modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and might participate in higher brain functions like learning and memory. With the plethora of astrocyte mediated signaling processes described in the literature today, the current challenge is to identify, which of these processes happen under what physiological condition, and how this shapes information processing and, ultimately, behavior. To answer these questions will require a combination of advanced physiological, genetical, and behavioral experiments. Additionally, mathematical modeling will prove crucial for testing predictions on the possible functions of astrocytes in neuronal networks, and to generate novel ideas as to how astrocytes can contribute to the complexity of the brain. Here, we aim to provide an outline of how astrocytes can interact with neurons. We do this by reviewing recent experimental literature on astrocyte-neuron interactions, discussing the dynamic effects of astrocytes on neuronal excitability and short- and long-term synaptic plasticity. Finally, we will outline the potential computational functions that astrocyte-neuron interactions can serve in the brain. We will discuss how astrocytes could govern metaplasticity in the brain, how they might organize the clustering of synaptic inputs, and how they could function as memory elements for neuronal activity. We conclude that astrocytes can enhance the computational power of neuronal networks in previously unexpected ways. PMID:23125832

  20. Specific functions of synaptically localized potassium channels in synaptic transmission at the neocortical GABAergic fast-spiking cell synapse.

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    Goldberg, Ethan M; Watanabe, Shigeo; Chang, Su Ying; Joho, Rolf H; Huang, Z Josh; Leonard, Christopher S; Rudy, Bernardo

    2005-05-25

    Potassium (K+) channel subunits of the Kv3 subfamily (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) display a positively shifted voltage dependence of activation and fast activation/deactivation kinetics when compared with other voltage-gated K+ channels, features that confer on Kv3 channels the ability to accelerate the repolarization of the action potential (AP) efficiently and specifically. In the cortex, the Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins are expressed prominently in a subset of GABAergic interneurons known as fast-spiking (FS) cells and in fact are a significant determinant of the fast-spiking discharge pattern. However, in addition to expression at FS cell somata, Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins also are expressed prominently at FS cell terminals, suggesting roles for Kv3 channels in neurotransmitter release. We investigated the effect of 1.0 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA; which blocks Kv3 channels) on inhibitory synaptic currents recorded in layer II/III neocortical pyramidal cells. Spike-evoked GABA release by FS cells was enhanced nearly twofold by 1.0 mM TEA, with a decrease in the paired pulse ratio (PPR), effects not reproduced by blockade of the non-Kv3 subfamily K+ channels also blocked by low concentrations of TEA. Moreover, in Kv3.1/Kv3.2 double knock-out (DKO) mice, the large effects of TEA were absent, spike-evoked GABA release was larger, and the PPR was lower than in wild-type mice. Together, these results suggest specific roles for Kv3 channels at FS cell terminals that are distinct from those of Kv1 and large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (also present at the FS cell synapse). We propose that at FS cell terminals synaptically localized Kv3 channels keep APs brief, limiting Ca2+ influx and hence release probability, thereby influencing synaptic depression at a synapse designed for sustained high-frequency synaptic transmission.

  1. Ketones prevent oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity through KATP channels.

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    Kim, Do Young; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Lee, Soo Han; O'Neill, Derek; Thompson, Roger J; Duff, Henry J; Sullivan, Patrick G; Rho, Jong M

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies are increasingly being considered for a variety of neurological disorders, based in part on growing evidence for the neuroprotective properties of the ketogenic diet (KD) and ketones. Earlier, we demonstrated that ketones afford hippocampal synaptic protection against exogenous oxidative stress, but the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that ketones may modulate neuronal firing through interactions with ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Here, we used a combination of electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical assays to determine whether hippocampal synaptic protection by ketones is a consequence of KATP channel activation. Ketones dose-dependently reversed oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity, neuronal viability, and bioenergetic capacity, and this action was mirrored by the KATP channel activator diazoxide. Inhibition of KATP channels reversed ketone-evoked hippocampal protection, and genetic ablation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit Kir6.2, a critical component of KATP channels, partially negated the synaptic protection afforded by ketones. This partial protection was completely reversed by co-application of the KATP blocker, 5-hydoxydecanoate (5HD). We conclude that, under conditions of oxidative injury, ketones induce synaptic protection in part through activation of KATP channels.

  2. Astrocytes mediate in vivo cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity.

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    Marta Navarrete

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission represents the cellular basis of learning and memory. Astrocytes have been shown to regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, their involvement in specific physiological processes that induce LTP in vivo remains unknown. Here we show that in vivo cholinergic activity evoked by sensory stimulation or electrical stimulation of the septal nucleus increases Ca²⁺ in hippocampal astrocytes and induces LTP of CA3-CA1 synapses, which requires cholinergic muscarinic (mAChR and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR activation. Stimulation of cholinergic pathways in hippocampal slices evokes astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, postsynaptic depolarizations of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and LTP of transmitter release at single CA3-CA1 synapses. Like in vivo, these effects are mediated by mAChRs, and this cholinergic-induced LTP (c-LTP also involves mGluR activation. Astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations and LTP are absent in IP₃R2 knock-out mice. Downregulating astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal by loading astrocytes with BAPTA or GDPβS also prevents LTP, which is restored by simultaneous astrocyte Ca²⁺ uncaging and postsynaptic depolarization. Therefore, cholinergic-induced LTP requires astrocyte Ca²⁺ elevations, which stimulate astrocyte glutamate release that activates mGluRs. The cholinergic-induced LTP results from the temporal coincidence of the postsynaptic activity and the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal simultaneously evoked by cholinergic activity. Therefore, the astrocyte Ca²⁺ signal is necessary for cholinergic-induced synaptic plasticity, indicating that astrocytes are directly involved in brain storage information.

  3. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

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    M. Belén Pérez-Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projection neurons (SPNs process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson’s disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit.

  4. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, M. Belén; Laville, Antonio; Tapia, Dagoberto; Lara-González, Esther; Bargas, José; Galarraga, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Striatal projection neurons (SPNs) process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson's disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit. PMID:26113994

  5. Axon initial segment Kv1 channels control axonal action potential waveform and synaptic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Maarten H P; Letzkus, Johannes J; Stuart, Greg J

    2007-08-16

    Action potentials are binary signals that transmit information via their rate and temporal pattern. In this context, the axon is thought of as a transmission line, devoid of a role in neuronal computation. Here, we show a highly localized role of axonal Kv1 potassium channels in shaping the action potential waveform in the axon initial segment (AIS) of layer 5 pyramidal neurons independent of the soma. Cell-attached recordings revealed a 10-fold increase in Kv1 channel density over the first 50 microm of the AIS. Inactivation of AIS and proximal axonal Kv1 channels, as occurs during slow subthreshold somatodendritic depolarizations, led to a distance-dependent broadening of axonal action potentials, as well as an increase in synaptic strength at proximal axonal terminals. Thus, Kv1 channels are strategically positioned to integrate slow subthreshold signals, providing control of the presynaptic action potential waveform and synaptic coupling in local cortical circuits.

  6. Arc/Arg3.1 Mediates Homeostatic Synaptic Scaling of AMPA Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shepherd, Jason D; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Wu, Jing; Chowdhury, Shoaib; Plath, Niels; Kuhl, Dietmar; Huganir, Richard L; Worley, Paul F

    2006-01-01

    .... Here, we demonstrate that Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate-early gene (IEG) that is rapidly induced by neuronal activity associated with information encoding in the brain, mediates homeostatic synaptic scaling of AMPA type glutamate receptors (AMPARs...

  7. Reconstitution of synaptic Ion channels from rodent and human brain in Xenopus oocytes: a biochemical and electrophysiological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzo, Francesca; Zwart, Ruud; Serratto, Giulia Maia; Gardinier, Kevin M; Porter, Warren; Reel, Jon; Maraula, Giovanna; Sher, Emanuele

    2016-08-01

    Disruption in the expression and function of synaptic proteins, and ion channels in particular, is critical in the pathophysiology of human neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, very little is known regarding the functional and pharmacological properties of native synaptic human ion channels, and their potential changes in pathological conditions. Recently, an electrophysiological technique has been enabled for studying the functional and pharmacological properties of ion channels present in crude membrane preparation obtained from post-mortem frozen brains. We here extend these studies by showing that human synaptic ion channels also can be studied in this way. Synaptosomes purified from different regions of rodent and human brain (control and Alzheimer's) were characterized biochemically for enrichment of synaptic proteins, and expression of ion channel subunits. The same synaptosomes were also reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes, in which the functional and pharmacological properties of the native synaptic ion channels were characterized using the voltage clamp technique. We show that we can detect GABA, (RS)-α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and NMDA receptors, and modulate them pharmacologically with selective agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Furthermore, changes in ion channel expression and function were detected in synaptic membranes from Alzheimer's brains. Our present results demonstrate the possibility to investigate synaptic ion channels from healthy and pathological brains. This method of synaptosomes preparation and injection into oocytes is a significant improvement over the earlier method. It opens the way to directly testing, on native ion channels, the effects of novel drugs aimed at modulating important classes of synaptic targets. Disruption in the expression and function of synaptic ion channels is critical in the pathophysiology of human neurodegenerative diseases. We here show that

  8. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation-independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel’s regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology. PMID:23439122

  9. Astrocytes Mediate In Vivo Cholinergic-Induced Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro studies reveal that astrocytes, classically considered supportive cells for neurons, regulate synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus and are directly involved in information storage.

  10. Distinct Domains within PSD-95 Mediate Synaptic Incorporation, Stabilization and Activity-Dependent Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Sturgill, James F.; Steiner, Pascal; Czervionke, Brian L.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2009-01-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) consists of a lattice-like array of interacting proteins that organizes and stabilizes receptors, ion channels, structural, and signaling proteins necessary for synaptic function. To study the stabilization of proteins within this structure and the contribution of these proteins to the integrity of the PSD, we tagged synaptic proteins with photoactivatable GFP (PAGFP) and used combined 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) and 2-photon laser photoactivation...

  11. Experience-Dependent Equilibration of AMPAR-Mediated Synaptic Transmission during the Critical Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Seok Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent synapse refinement is essential for functional optimization of neural circuits. However, how sensory experience sculpts excitatory synaptic transmission is poorly understood. Here, we show that despite substantial remodeling of synaptic connectivity, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission remains at equilibrium during the critical period in the mouse primary visual cortex. The maintenance of this equilibrium requires neurogranin (Ng, a postsynaptic calmodulin-binding protein important for synaptic plasticity. With normal visual experience, loss of Ng decreased AMPAR-positive synapse numbers, prevented AMPAR-silent synapse maturation, and increased spine elimination. Importantly, visual deprivation halted synapse loss caused by loss of Ng, revealing that Ng coordinates experience-dependent AMPAR-silent synapse conversion to AMPAR-active synapses and synapse elimination. Loss of Ng also led to sensitized long-term synaptic depression (LTD and impaired visually guided behavior. Our synaptic interrogation reveals that experience-dependent coordination of AMPAR-silent synapse conversion and synapse elimination hinges upon Ng-dependent mechanisms for constructive synaptic refinement during the critical period.

  12. Membrane lipids tune synaptic transmission by direct modulation of presynaptic potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Mario; Lanore, Frederic; Rebola, Nelson; Szabo, Zsolt; Da Silva, Silvia Viana; Lourenço, Joana; Verraes, Agathe; Nadler, André; Schultz, Carsten; Blanchet, Christophe; Mulle, Christophe

    2014-02-19

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are involved in action potential (AP) repolarization in excitable cells. Exogenous application of membrane-derived lipids, such as arachidonic acid (AA), regulates the gating of Kv channels. Whether membrane-derived lipids released under physiological conditions have an impact on neuronal coding through this mechanism is unknown. We show that AA released in an activity-dependent manner from postsynaptic hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells acts as retrograde messenger, inducing a robust facilitation of mossy fiber (Mf) synaptic transmission over several minutes. AA acts by broadening presynaptic APs through the direct modulation of Kv channels. This form of short-term plasticity can be triggered when postsynaptic cell fires with physiologically relevant patterns and sets the threshold for the induction of the presynaptic form of long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal Mf synapses. Hence, direct modulation of presynaptic Kv channels by activity-dependent release of lipids serves as a physiological mechanism for tuning synaptic transmission.

  13. Presynaptic calcium channels and α3-integrins are complexed with synaptic cleft laminins, cytoskeletal elements and active zone components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Steven S; Valdez, Gregorio; Sanes, Joshua R

    2010-11-01

    At chemical synapses, synaptic cleft components interact with elements of the nerve terminal membrane to promote differentiation and regulate function. Laminins containing the β2 subunit are key cleft components, and they act in part by binding the pore-forming subunit of a pre-synaptic voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(v)α) (Nishimune et al. 2004). In this study, we identify Ca(v)α-associated intracellular proteins that may couple channel-anchoring to assembly or stabilization of neurotransmitter release sites called active zones. Using Ca(v)α-antibodies, we isolated a protein complex from Torpedo electric organ synapses, which resemble neuromuscular junctions but are easier to isolate in bulk. We identified 10 components of the complex: six cytoskeletal proteins (α2/β2 spectrins, plectin 1, AHNAK/desmoyokin, dystrophin, and myosin 1), two active zone components (bassoon and piccolo), synaptic laminin, and a calcium channel β subunit. Immunocytochemistry confirmed these proteins in electric organ synapses, and PCR analysis revealed their expression by developing mammalian motor neurons. Finally, we show that synaptic laminins also interact with pre-synaptic integrins containing the α3 subunit. Together with our previous finding that a distinct synaptic laminin interacts with SV2 on nerve terminals (Son et al. 2000), our results identify three paths by which synaptic cleft laminins can send developmentally important signals to nerve terminals.

  14. Archaerhodopsin voltage imaging: synaptic calcium and BK channels stabilize action potential repolarization at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin J; Davis, Graeme W

    2014-10-29

    The strength and dynamics of synaptic transmission are determined, in part, by the presynaptic action potential (AP) waveform at the nerve terminal. The ion channels that shape the synaptic AP waveform remain essentially unknown for all but a few large synapses amenable to electrophysiological interrogation. The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a powerful system for studying synaptic biology, but it is not amenable to presynaptic electrophysiology. Here, we demonstrate that Archaerhodopsin can be used to quantitatively image AP waveforms at the Drosophila NMJ without disrupting baseline synaptic transmission or neuromuscular development. It is established that Shaker mutations cause a dramatic increase in neurotransmitter release, suggesting that Shaker is predominantly responsible for AP repolarization. Here we demonstrate that this effect is caused by a concomitant loss of both Shaker and slowpoke (slo) channel activity because of the low extracellular calcium concentrations (0.2-0.5 mM) used typically to assess synaptic transmission in Shaker. In contrast, at physiological extracellular calcium (1.5 mM), the role of Shaker during AP repolarization is limited. We then provide evidence that calcium influx through synaptic CaV2.1 channels and subsequent recruitment of Slo channel activity is important, in concert with Shaker, to ensure proper AP repolarization. Finally, we show that Slo assumes a dominant repolarizing role during repetitive nerve stimulation. During repetitive stimulation, Slo effectively compensates for Shaker channel inactivation, stabilizing AP repolarization and limiting neurotransmitter release. Thus, we have defined an essential role for Slo channels during synaptic AP repolarization and have revised our understanding of Shaker channels at this model synapse.

  15. Boosting of synaptic potentials and spine Ca transients by the peptide toxin SNX-482 requires alpha-1E-encoded voltage-gated Ca channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Giessel

    Full Text Available The majority of glutamatergic synapses formed onto principal neurons of the mammalian central nervous system are associated with dendritic spines. Spines are tiny protuberances that house the proteins that mediate the response of the postsynaptic cell to the presynaptic release of glutamate. Postsynaptic signals are regulated by an ion channel signaling cascade that is active in individual dendritic spines and involves voltage-gated calcium (Ca channels, small conductance (SK-type Ca-activated potassium channels, and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Pharmacological studies using the toxin SNX-482 indicated that the voltage-gated Ca channels that signal within spines to open SK channels belong to the class Ca(V2.3, which is encoded by the Alpha-1E pore-forming subunit. In order to specifically test this conclusion, we examined the effects of SNX-482 on synaptic signals in acute hippocampal slices from knock-out mice lacking the Alpha-1E gene. We find that in these mice, application of SNX-482 has no effect on glutamate-uncaging evoked synaptic potentials and Ca influx, indicating that that SNX-482 indeed acts via the Alpha-1E-encoded Ca(V2.3 channel.

  16. IP3-mediated octopamine-induced synaptic enhancement of crayfish LG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Makoto; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2012-08-01

    The biogenic amines, octopamine and serotonin, modulate the synaptic activity of the lateral giant interneuron (LG) circuitry of the crayfish escape behavior. Bath application of both octopamine and serotonin enhances the synaptic responses of LG to sensory stimulation. We have shown previously (Araki et al. J Neurophysiol 94:2644-2652, 2005) that a serotonin-induced enhancement of the LG response was mediated by an increase in cAMP levels following activation of adenylate cyclase; however, octopamine acts independently. Here, we clarify how octopamine enhances the LG response during sensory stimulation using physiological and pharmacological analyses. When phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 was directly injected into the LG before biogenic amine application, it abolished the enhancing effect of octopamine on direct sensory input to the LG, but did not block indirect input via sensory interneurons or the effect of serotonin. Direct injection of IP(3), and its analogue adenophostin A, into the LG increased the synaptic response of the LG to sensory stimulation. Thus, IP(3) mediates octopamine-induced synaptic enhancement of the LG, but serotonin acts independently. These results indicate that both octopamine and serotonin enhance the synaptic responses of the LG to sensory stimulation, but that they activate two different signaling cascades in the LG.

  17. UBE3A Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning and Memory by Controlling SK2 Channel Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gated solely by activity-induced changes in intracellular calcium, small-conductance potassium channels (SKs are critical for a variety of functions in the CNS, from learning and memory to rhythmic activity and sleep. While there is a wealth of information on SK2 gating, kinetics, and Ca2+ sensitivity, little is known regarding the regulation of SK2 subcellular localization. We report here that synaptic SK2 levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A, whose deficiency results in Angelman syndrome and overexpression in increased risk of autistic spectrum disorder. UBE3A directly ubiquitinates SK2 in the C-terminal domain, which facilitates endocytosis. In UBE3A-deficient mice, increased postsynaptic SK2 levels result in decreased NMDA receptor activation, thereby impairing hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. Impairments in both synaptic plasticity and fear conditioning memory in UBE3A-deficient mice are significantly ameliorated by blocking SK2. These results elucidate a mechanism by which UBE3A directly influences cognitive function.

  18. Propofol suppresses synaptic responsiveness of somatosensory relay neurons to excitatory input by potentiating GABAA receptor chloride channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein Peter A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Propofol is a widely used intravenous general anesthetic. Propofol-induced unconsciousness in humans is associated with inhibition of thalamic activity evoked by somatosensory stimuli. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of propofol in thalamic circuits are largely unknown. We investigated the influence of propofol on synaptic responsiveness of thalamocortical relay neurons in the ventrobasal complex (VB to excitatory input in mouse brain slices, using both current- and voltage-clamp recording techniques. Excitatory responses including EPSP temporal summation and action potential firing were evoked in VB neurons by electrical stimulation of corticothalamic fibers or pharmacological activation of glutamate receptors. Propofol (0.6 – 3 μM suppressed temporal summation and spike firing in a concentration-dependent manner. The thalamocortical suppression was accompanied by a marked decrease in both EPSP amplitude and input resistance, indicating that a shunting mechanism was involved. The propofol-mediated thalamocortical suppression could be blocked by a GABAA receptor antagonist or chloride channel blocker, suggesting that postsynaptic GABAA receptors in VB neurons were involved in the shunting inhibition. GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs were evoked in VB neurons by electrical stimulation of the reticular thalamic nucleus. Propofol markedly increased amplitude, decay time, and charge transfer of GABAA IPSCs. The results demonstrated that shunting inhibition of thalamic somatosensory relay neurons by propofol at clinically relevant concentrations is primarily mediated through the potentiation of the GABAA receptor chloride channel-mediated conductance, and such inhibition may contribute to the impaired thalamic responses to sensory stimuli seen during propofol-induced anesthesia.

  19. Isolated NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses express both LTP and LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X; Berger, T W; Barrionuevo, G

    1992-04-01

    1. The possibility of use-dependent, long-lasting modifications of pharmacologically isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission was examined by intracellular recordings from granule cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in vitro. In the presence of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinaxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10 microM) robust, long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials was induced by brief, high (50 Hz) and lower (10 Hz) frequency tetanic stimuli of glutamatergic afferents (60 +/- 6%, n = 8, P less than 0.001 and 43 +/- 12%, n = 3, P less than 0.05, respectively). 2. Hyperpolarization of granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 50-Hz tetanic stimuli reversibly blocked the induction of LTP (-6 +/- 2%, n = 6, P greater than 0.05) indicating that simultaneous activation of pre- and postsynaptic elements is a prerequisite for potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. In contrast, hyperpolarization of the granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 10-Hz tetanic stimuli resulted in long-term depression (LTD) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials (-34 +/- 8%, n = 8, P less than 0.01). 3. We also studied the role of [Ca2+]i in the induction of LTP and LTD of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. Before tetanization, [Ca2+]i was buffered by iontophoretic injections of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). BAPTA completely blocked the induction of LTP (3 +/- 5%, n = 13) and partially blocked LTD (-14.8 +/- 6%, n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. PLAA Mutations Cause a Lethal Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy by Disrupting Ubiquitin-Mediated Endolysosomal Degradation of Synaptic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emma A; Nahorski, Michael S; Murray, Lyndsay M; Shaheen, Ranad; Perkins, Emma; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Kristaryanto, Yosua; Jones, Ross A; Vogt, Julie; Rivagorda, Manon; Handley, Mark T; Mali, Girish R; Quidwai, Tooba; Soares, Dinesh C; Keighren, Margaret A; McKie, Lisa; Mort, Richard L; Gammoh, Noor; Garcia-Munoz, Amaya; Davey, Tracey; Vermeren, Matthieu; Walsh, Diana; Budd, Peter; Aligianis, Irene A; Faqeih, Eissa; Quigley, Alan J; Jackson, Ian J; Kulathu, Yogesh; Jackson, Mandy; Ribchester, Richard R; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Woods, C Geoffrey; Maher, Eamonn R; Mill, Pleasantine

    2017-05-04

    During neurotransmission, synaptic vesicles undergo multiple rounds of exo-endocytosis, involving recycling and/or degradation of synaptic proteins. While ubiquitin signaling at synapses is essential for neural function, it has been assumed that synaptic proteostasis requires the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We demonstrate here that turnover of synaptic membrane proteins via the endolysosomal pathway is essential for synaptic function. In both human and mouse, hypomorphic mutations in the ubiquitin adaptor protein PLAA cause an infantile-lethal neurodysfunction syndrome with seizures. Resulting from perturbed endolysosomal degradation, Plaa mutant neurons accumulate K63-polyubiquitylated proteins and synaptic membrane proteins, disrupting synaptic vesicle recycling and neurotransmission. Through characterization of this neurological intracellular trafficking disorder, we establish the importance of ubiquitin-mediated endolysosomal trafficking at the synapse. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Higher-Order Architecture of Cell Adhesion Mediated by Polymorphic Synaptic Adhesion Molecules Neurexin and Neuroligin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin (NL mediate asymmetric trans-synaptic adhesion, which is crucial for synapse development and function. It is not known whether or how individual synapse function is controlled by the interactions between variants and isoforms of these molecules with differing ectodomain regions. At a physiological concentration of Ca2+, the ectodomain complex of neurexin-1 β isoform (Nrx1β and NL1 spontaneously assembled into crystals of a lateral sheet-like superstructure topologically compatible with transcellular adhesion. Correlative light-electron microscopy confirmed extracellular sheet formation at the junctions between Nrx1β- and NL1-expressing non-neuronal cells, mimicking the close, parallel synaptic membrane apposition. The same NL1-expressing cells, however, did not form this higher-order architecture with cells expressing the much longer neurexin-1 α isoform, suggesting a functional discrimination mechanism between synaptic contacts made by different isoforms of neurexin variants.

  2. Valproic acid mediates the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance through astrocytes--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Chuan; Chen, Po See; Hsu, Chien-Wen; Wu, Shou-Jung; Lin, Chieh-Ting; Gean, Po Wu

    2012-04-27

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing agents for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. However, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms of the treatment of each disease remain unclear. Recently, the anti-epileptic effect of VPA has been found to lead to modulation of the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance. In addition, the therapeutic action of VPA has been linked to its effect on astrocytes by regulating gene expression at the molecular level, perhaps through an epigenetic mechanism as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the actions of VPA, this study investigated whether the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance could be mediated by VPA through astrocytes. First, using the primary rat neuronal, astroglial, and neuro-glial mixed culture systems, we demonstrated that VPA treatment could regulate the mRNA levels of two post-synaptic cell adhesion molecules(neuroligin-1 and neuregulin-1) and two extracellular matrices (neuronal pentraxin-1and thrombospondin-3) in primary rat astrocyte cultures in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the up-regulation effect of VPA was noted in astrocytes, but not in neurons. In addition, these regulatory effects could be mimicked by sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor, but not by lithium or two other glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta inhibitors. With the known role of these four proteins in regulating the synaptic E/I balance, we further demonstrated that VPA increased excitatory post-synaptic protein (postsynaptic density 95) and inhibitory post-synaptic protein (Gephyrin) in cortical neuro-glial mixed cultures. Our results suggested that VPA might affect the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance through its effect on astrocytes. This work provides the basis for future evaluation of the role of astroglial cell adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix on the control of excitatory and

  3. Homeostatic control of synaptic activity by endogenous adenosine is mediated by adenosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diógenes, Maria José; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Scianni, Maria; Theofilas, Panos; Lopatár, Jan; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Maggi, Laura; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Limatola, Cristina; Boison, Detlev; Sebastião, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine, a key regulator of neuronal excitability, is metabolized by astrocyte-based enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). We hypothesized that ADK might be an upstream regulator of adenosine-based homeostatic brain functions by simultaneously affecting several downstream pathways. We therefore studied the relationship between ADK expression, levels of extracellular adenosine, synaptic transmission, intrinsic excitability, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent synaptic actions in transgenic mice underexpressing or overexpressing ADK. We demonstrate that ADK: 1) Critically influences the basal tone of adenosine, evaluated by microelectrode adenosine biosensors, and its release following stimulation; 2) determines the degree of tonic adenosine-dependent synaptic inhibition, which correlates with differential plasticity at hippocampal synapses with low release probability; 3) modulates the age-dependent effects of BDNF on hippocampal synaptic transmission, an action dependent upon co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors; and 4) influences GABAA receptor-mediated currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We conclude that ADK provides important upstream regulation of adenosine-based homeostatic function of the brain and that this mechanism is necessary and permissive to synaptic actions of adenosine acting on multiple pathways. These mechanistic studies support previous therapeutic studies and implicate ADK as a promising therapeutic target for upstream control of multiple neuronal signaling pathways crucial for a variety of neurological disorders.

  4. ZD7288, a selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker, inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-xue Zhang; Xiao-chun Min; Xu-lin Xu; Min Zheng; Lian-jun Guo

    2016-01-01

    The selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimeth-yl-6-(methylamino) pyrimidinium chloride (ZD7288) blocks the induction of long-term potentiation in the perforant path–CA3 region in rat hippocampusin vivo. To explore the mechanisms underlying the action of ZD7288, we recorded excitatory postsynaptic potentials in perforant path–CA3 synapses in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We measured glutamate content in the hippocampus and in cultured hip-pocampal neurons using high performance liquid chromatography, and determined intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) using Fura-2. ZD7288 inhibited the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, and these effects were mirrored by the nonspeciifc HCN channel blocker cesium. ZD7288 also decreased glutamate release in hippocampal tissue and in cultured hippocampal neurons. Further-more, ZD7288 attenuated glutamate-induced rises in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner and reversed 8-Br-cAMP-mediated facilitation of these glutamate-induced [Ca2+]i rises. Our results suggest that ZD7288 inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity both gluta-mate release and resultant [Ca2+]i increases in rat hippocampal neurons.

  5. Selective inhibition of caspases in skeletal muscle reverses the apoptotic synaptic degeneration in slow-channel myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haipeng; Pytel, Peter; Gomez, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Slow-channel syndrome (SCS) is a congenital myasthenic disorder caused by point mutations in subunits of skeletal muscle acetylcholine receptor leading to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the postsynaptic membrane, nuclei and mitochondria of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In both SCS muscle biopsies and transgenic mouse models for SCS (mSCS), the endplate regions are shrunken, and there is evidence of DNA damage in the subsynaptic region. Activated caspase-9, -3 and -7 are intensely co-localized at the NMJ, and the Ca(2+)-activated protease, calpain, and the atypical cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk5) are overactivated in mSCS. Thus, the true mediator(s) of the disease process is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that selective inhibition of effector caspases, caspase-3 and -7, or initiator caspase, caspase-9, in limb muscle in vivo by localized expression of recombinant inhibitor proteins dramatically decreases subsynaptic DNA damage, increases endplate area and improves ultrastructural abnormalities in SCS transgenic mice. Calpain and Cdk5 are not affected by this treatment. On the other hand, inhibition of Cdk5 by expression of a dominant-negative form of Cdk5 has no effect on the degeneration. Together with previous studies, these results indicate that focal activation of caspase activity at the NMJ is the principal pathological process responsible for the synaptic apoptosis in SCS. Thus, treatments that reduce muscle caspase activity are likely to be of benefit for SCS patients.

  6. A Model of Bidirectional Synaptic Plasticity: From Signaling Network to Channel Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Gastone C.; Quinlan, Elizabeth M.; Bersani, Ferdinando; Cooper, Leon N.; Shouval, Harel Z.

    2005-01-01

    In many regions of the brain, including the mammalian cortex, the strength of synaptic transmission can be bidirectionally regulated by cortical activity (synaptic plasticity). One line of evidence indicates that long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and long-term synaptic depression (LTD), correlate with the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of…

  7. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  8. Is ATP a central synaptic mediator for certain primary afferent fibers from mammalian skin?

    OpenAIRE

    Fyffe, R E; Perl, E R

    1984-01-01

    The possibility that ATP acts as a synaptic mediator at the central terminals of primary afferent fibers was examined by applying it iontophoretically to neurons of the outer layers of the cat spinal cord in vivo. ATP proved to be selectively excitatory for a limited subset of spinal neurons. Those units consistently excited by ATP iontophoresis with very small currents (2-15 nA) responded to gentle mechanical stimulation of the skin and usually evidenced excitatory input from unmyelinated pr...

  9. Optogenetics to target actin-mediated synaptic loss in Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Atena; DeFea, Kathryn; Ethell, Iryna

    2013-03-01

    Numerous studies in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) animal models show that overproduction of Aβ peptides and their oligomerization can distort dendrites, damage synapses, and decrease the number of dendritic spines and synapses. Aβ may trigger synapse loss by modulating activity of actin-regulating proteins, such as Rac1 and cofilin. Indeed, Aβ1-42 oligomers can activate actin severing protein cofilin through calcineurin-mediated activation of phosphatase slingshot and inhibit an opposing pathway that suppresses cofilin phosphorylation through Rac-mediated activation of LIMK1. Excessive activation of actin-severing protein cofilin triggers the formation of a non-dynamic actin bundles, called rods that are found in AD brains and cause loss of synapses. Hence, regulation of these actin-regulating proteins in dendritic spines could potentially provide useful tools for preventing the synapse/spine loss associated with earlier stages of AD neuropathology. However, lack of spatiotemporal control over their activity is a key limitation. Recently, optogenetic advancements have provided researchers with convenient light-activating proteins such as photoactivatable Rac (PARac). Here, we transfected cultured primary hippocampal neurons and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells with a PARac/ mCherry-containing plasmid and the mCherry-positive cells were identified and imaged using an inverted fluorescence microscope. Rac1 activation was achieved by irradiation with blue light (480nm) and live changes in dendritic spine morphology were observed using mCherry (587nm). Rac activation was confirmed by immunostaining for phosphorylated form of effector proteinP21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and reorganization of actin. Thus, our studies confirm the feasibility of using the PA-Rac construct to trigger actin re-organization in the dendritic spines.

  10. Homer 1a gates the induction mechanism for endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Alan M; Anderson, Garret R; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Thayer, Stanley A

    2010-02-24

    At hippocampal excitatory synapses, endocannabinoids (eCBs) mediate two forms of retrograde synaptic inhibition that are induced by postsynaptic depolarization or activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). The homer family of molecular scaffolds provides spatial organization to regulate postsynaptic signaling cascades, including those activated by mGluRs. Expression of the homer 1a (H1a) immediate-early gene produces a short homer protein that lacks the domain required for homer oligomerization, enabling it to uncouple homer assemblies. Here, we report that H1a differentially modulates two forms of eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity, depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and metabotropic suppression of excitation (MSE). EPSCs were recorded from cultured hippocampal neurons and DSE evoked by a 15 s depolarization to 0 mV and MSE evoked by a type I mGluR agonist. Expression of H1a enhanced DSE and inhibited MSE at the same synapse. Many physiologically important stimuli initiate H1a expression including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Treating hippocampal cultures with BDNF increased transcription of H1a and uncoupled homer 1c-GFP (green fluorescent protein) clusters. BDNF treatment blocked MSE and enhanced DSE. Thus, physiological changes in H1a expression gate the induction pathway for eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity by uncoupling mGluR from eCB production.

  11. Controlling Ion Conductance and Channels to Achieve Synaptic-like Frequency Selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siheng Lu; Fei Zeng; Wenshuai Dong; Ao Liu; Xiaojun Li; Jingting Luo

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing ion conductance and controlling transport pathway in organic electrolyte could be used to modulate ionic kinetics to handle signals. In a Pt/Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)/Polyethylene?LiCF3SO3/Pt hetero-junction, the electrolyte layer handled at high temperature showed nano-fiber microstructures accompanied with greatly improved salt solubility. Ions with high mobility were confined in the nano-fibrous channels leading to the semiconducting polymer layer, which is favorable for modulating dynamic doping at the semiconducting polymer/electrolyte interface by pulse frequency. Such a device realized synaptic-like frequency selectivity, i.e., depression at low frequency stimulation but potentiation at high-frequency stimulation.

  12. Potentiation by histamine of synaptically mediated excitotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurones: a possible role for mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, S D; Facci, L; Kee, W J; Strijbos, P J

    2001-01-01

    Excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission, particularly when mediated by the N:-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor, is thought to underlie neuronal death in a number of neurological disorders. Histamine has been reported to potentiate NMDA receptor-mediated events under a variety of conditions. In the present study we have utilized primary hippocampal neurone cultures to investigate the effect of mast cell-derived, as well as exogenously applied, histamine on neurotoxicity evoked by excessive synaptic activity. Exposure of mature cultures for 15 min to an Mg(2+)-free/glycine-containing buffer to trigger synaptic transmission through NMDA receptors, caused a 30-35% neuronal loss over 24 h. When co-cultured with hippocampal neurones, activated mast cells increased excitotoxic injury to 60%, an effect that was abolished in the presence of histaminase. Similarly, addition of histamine during magnesium deprivation produced a concentration-dependent potentiation (+ 60%; EC(50) : 5 microM) of neuronal death which was inhibited by sodium channel blockers and NMDA receptor antagonists, although this effect did not involve known histamine receptors. The histamine effect was further potentiated by acidification of the culture medium. Cultures 'preconditioned' by sublethal (5 min) Mg(2+) deprivation exhibited less neuronal death than controls when exposed to a more severe insult. NMDA receptor activation and the extracellular regulated kinase cascade were required for preconditioning neuroprotection. The finding that histamine potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity may have important implications for our understanding of conditions where enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission is observed in conjunction with tissue acidification, such as cerebral ischaemia and epilepsy.

  13. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andrew eFrank

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response – homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors.There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies – such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other

  14. Calcium channels and synaptic transmission in familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitel, Osvaldo D; González Inchauspe, Carlota; Di Guilmi, Mariano N

    2014-03-01

    One of the outstanding developments in clinical neurology has been the identification of ion channel mutations as the origin of a wide variety of inherited disorders like migraine, epilepsy, and ataxia. The study of several channelopathies has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms, pathogenesis, and therapeutic approaches to complex neurological diseases. This review addresses the mutations underlying familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with particular interest in Cav2.1 (i.e., P/Q-type) voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel FHM type-1 mutations (FHM1). Transgenic mice harboring the human pathogenic FHM1 mutation R192Q or S218L (KI) have been used as models to study neurotransmission at several central and peripheral synapses. FHM1 KI mice are a powerful tool to explore presynaptic regulation associated with expression of Cav2.1 channels. FHM1 Cav2.1 channels activate at more hyperpolarizing potentials and show an increased open probability. These biophysical alterations may lead to a gain-of-function on synaptic transmission depending upon factors such as action potential waveform and/or Cav2.1 splice variants and auxiliary subunits. Analysis of FHM knock-in mouse models has demonstrated a deficient regulation of the cortical excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance. The resulting excessive increases in cortical excitation may be the mechanisms that underlie abnormal sensory processing together with an increase in the susceptibility to cortical spreading depression (CSD). Increasing evidence from FHM KI animal studies support the idea that CSD, the underlying mechanism of aura, can activate trigeminal nociception, and thus trigger the headache mechanisms.

  15. Modulation of fast synaptic transmission by presynaptic ligand-gated cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakh, B S; Henderson, G

    2000-07-01

    There is now considerable evidence demonstrating that ligand-gated cation channels (i.e., P2X, nicotinic, kainate, NMDA, AMPA and 5-HT(3) receptors), in addition to mediating fast excitatory neurotransmission, may be located presynaptically on nerve terminals in the peripheral and central nervous systems where they function to modulate neurotransmitter release. This modulation can be facilitation, inhibition or both. In this article, we first outline the multiple mechanisms by which activation of presynaptic ligand-gated cation channels can modulate spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release, before reviewing in detail published electrophysiological studies of presynaptic P2X, nicotinic, kainate, NMDA, AMPA and 5-HT(3) receptors.

  16. Postsynaptic Signals Mediating Induction of Long-Term Synaptic Depression in the Entorhinal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saïd Kourrich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex receives a large projection from the piriform cortex, and synaptic plasticity in this pathway may affect olfactory processing. In vitro whole cell recordings have been used here to investigate postsynaptic signalling mechanisms that mediate the induction of long-term synaptic depression (LTD in layer II entorhinal cortex cells. To induce LTD, pairs of pulses, using a 30-millisecond interval, were delivered at 1 Hz for 15 minutes. Induction of LTD was blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist APV and by the calcium chelator BAPTA, consistent with a requirement for calcium influx via NMDA receptors. Induction of LTD was blocked when the FK506 was included in the intracellular solution to block the phosphatase calcineurin. Okadaic acid, which blocks activation of protein phosphatases 1 and 2a, also prevented LTD. Activation of protein phosphatases following calcium influx therefore contributes to induction of LTD in layer II of the entorhinal cortex.

  17. Postsynaptic Signals Mediating Induction of Long-Term Synaptic Depression in the Entorhinal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourrich, Saïd; Glasgow, Stephen D.; Caruana, Douglas A.; Chapman, C. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex receives a large projection from the piriform cortex, and synaptic plasticity in this pathway may affect olfactory processing. In vitro whole cell recordings have been used here to investigate postsynaptic signalling mechanisms that mediate the induction of long-term synaptic depression (LTD) in layer II entorhinal cortex cells. To induce LTD, pairs of pulses, using a 30-millisecond interval, were delivered at 1 Hz for 15 minutes. Induction of LTD was blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist APV and by the calcium chelator BAPTA, consistent with a requirement for calcium influx via NMDA receptors. Induction of LTD was blocked when the FK506 was included in the intracellular solution to block the phosphatase calcineurin. Okadaic acid, which blocks activation of protein phosphatases 1 and 2a, also prevented LTD. Activation of protein phosphatases following calcium influx therefore contributes to induction of LTD in layer II of the entorhinal cortex. PMID:18670611

  18. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channel activity alters synaptic AMPA receptor phenotype in mouse cerebellar stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Acharjee, Shoana; Liu, Siqiong June

    2011-07-01

    Many fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons, including cerebellar stellate cells, fire brief action potentials and express α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) that are permeable to Ca(2+) and do not contain the GluR2 subunit. In a recent study, we found that increasing action potential duration promotes GluR2 gene transcription in stellate cells. We have now tested the prediction that activation of potassium channels that control the duration of action potentials can suppress the expression of GluR2-containing AMPARs at stellate cell synapses. We find that large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels mediate a large proportion of the depolarization-evoked noninactivating potassium current in stellate cells. Pharmacological blockade of BK channels prolonged the action potential duration in postsynaptic stellate cells and altered synaptic AMPAR subtype from GluR2-lacking to GluR2-containing Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPARs. An L-type channel blocker abolished an increase in Ca(2+) entry that was associated with spike broadening and also prevented the BK channel blocker-induced switch in AMPAR phenotype. Thus blocking BK potassium channels prolongs the action potential duration and increases the expression of GluR2-containing receptors at the synapse by enhancing Ca(2+) entry in cerebellar stellate cells.

  19. Alzheimer’s disease Aβ assemblies mediating rapid disruption of synaptic plasticity and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klyubin Igor

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized by episodic memory impairment that often precedes clinical diagnosis by many years. Probing the mechanisms of such impairment may provide much needed means of diagnosis and therapeutic intervention at an early, pre-dementia, stage. Prior to the onset of significant neurodegeneration, the structural and functional integrity of synapses in mnemonic circuitry is severely compromised in the presence of amyloidosis. This review examines recent evidence evaluating the role of amyloid-ß protein (Aβ in causing rapid disruption of synaptic plasticity and memory impairment. We evaluate the relative importance of different sizes and conformations of Aβ, including monomer, oligomer, protofibril and fibril. We pay particular attention to recent controversies over the relevance to the pathophysiology of AD of different water soluble Aβ aggregates and the importance of cellular prion protein in mediating their effects. Current data are consistent with the view that both low-n oligomers and larger soluble assemblies present in AD brain, some of them via a direct interaction with cellular prion protein, cause synaptic memory failure. At the two extremes of aggregation, monomers and fibrils appear to act in vivo both as sources and sinks of certain metastable conformations of soluble aggregates that powerfully disrupt synaptic plasticity. The same principle appears to apply to other synaptotoxic amyloidogenic proteins including tau, α-synuclein and prion protein.

  20. Intrinsic variability in Pv, RRP size, Ca2+ channel repertoire and presynaptic potentiation in individual synaptic boutons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo eAriel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of individual synaptic contacts is considered a key modulator of information flow across circuits. Presynaptically the strength can be parsed into two key parameters: the size of the readily-releasable pool (RRP and the probability that a vesicle in that pool will undergo exocytosis when an action potential fires (Pv. How these variables are controlled and the degree to which they vary across individual nerve terminals is crucial to understand synaptic plasticity within neural circuits. Here we report robust measurements of these parameters in rat hippocampal neurons and their variability across populations of individual synapses. We explore the diversity of presynaptic Ca2+ channel repertoires and evaluate their effect on synaptic strength at single boutons. Finally, we study the degree to which synapses can be differentially modified by a known potentiator of presynaptic function, forskolin. Our experiments revealed that both Pv and RRP spanned a large range, even for synapses made by the same axon, demonstrating that presynaptic efficacy is governed locally at the single synapse level. Synapses varied greatly in their dependence on N or P/Q type Ca2+ channels for neurotransmission, but there was no association between specific channel repertoires and synaptic efficacy. Increasing cAMP concentration using forskolin enhanced synaptic transmission in a Ca2+-independent manner that was inversely related with a synapse’s initial Pv, and independent of its RRP size. We propose a simple model based on the relationship between Pv and calcium entry that can account for the variable potentiation of synapses based on initial probability of vesicle fusion.

  1. Different forms of glycine- and GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse superficial and deep dorsal horn neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brichta Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons in superficial (SDH and deep (DDH laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn receive sensory information from skin, muscle, joints and viscera. In both regions, glycine- (GlyR and GABAA-receptors (GABAARs contribute to fast synaptic inhibition. For rat, several types of GABAAR coexist in the two regions and each receptor type provides different contributions to inhibitory tone. Recent work in mouse has discovered an additional type of GlyR, (containing alpha 3 subunits in the SDH. The contribution of differing forms of the GlyR to sensory processing in SDH and DDH is not understood. Methods and Results Here we compare fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in mouse (P17-37 SDH and DDH using patch-clamp electrophysiology in transverse spinal cord slices (L3-L5 segments, 23°C. GlyR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in 74% (25/34 and 94% (25/27 of SDH and DDH neurons, respectively. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs were detected in virtually all neurons in both regions (93%, 14/15 and 100%, 18/18. Several Gly- and GABAAR properties also differed in SDH vs. DDH. GlyR-mediated mIPSC amplitude was smaller (37.1 ± 3.9 vs. 64.7 ± 5.0 pA; n = 25 each, decay time was slower (8.5 ± 0.8 vs. 5.5 ± 0.3 ms, and frequency was lower (0.15 ± 0.03 vs. 0.72 ± 0.13 Hz in SDH vs. DDH neurons. In contrast, GABAAR-mediated mIPSCs had similar amplitudes (25.6 ± 2.4, n = 14 vs. 25. ± 2.0 pA, n = 18 and frequencies (0.21 ± 0.08 vs. 0.18 ± 0.04 Hz in both regions; however, decay times were slower (23.0 ± 3.2 vs. 18.9 ± 1.8 ms in SDH neurons. Mean single channel conductance underlying mIPSCs was identical for GlyRs (54.3 ± 1.6 pS, n = 11 vs. 55.7 ± 1.8, n = 8 and GABAARs (22.7 ± 1.7 pS, n = 10 vs. 22.4 ± 2.0 pS, n = 11 in both regions. We also tested whether the synthetic endocanabinoid, methandamide (methAEA, had direct effects on Gly- and GABAARs in each spinal cord region. MethAEA (5 μM reduced GlyR-mediated mIPSC frequency in SDH

  2. CaV2.1 voltage activated calcium channels and synaptic transmission in familial hemiplegic migraine pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitel, Osvaldo D; Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J; Di Guilmi, Mariano N

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the genetic forms of epilepsy, chronic pain, and migraine caused by mutations in ion channels have given crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms, pathogenesis, and therapeutic approaches to complex neurological disorders. In this review we focus on the role of mutated CaV2.1 (i.e., P/Q-type) voltage-activated Ca2+ channels, and on the ultimate consequences that mutations causing familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM1) have in neurotransmitter release. Transgenic mice harboring the human pathogenic FHM1 mutation R192Q or S218L (KI) have been used as models to study neurotransmission at several central and peripheral synapses. FHM1 KI mice are a powerful tool to explore presynaptic regulation associated with expression of CaV2.1 channels. Mutated CaV2.1 channels activate at more hyperpolarizing potentials and lead to a gain-of-function in synaptic transmission. This gain-of-function might underlie alterations in the excitatory/ inhibitory balance of synaptic transmission, favoring a persistent state of hyperexcitability in cortical neurons that would increase the susceptibility for cortical spreading depression (CSD), a mechanism believed to initiate the attacks of migraine with aura. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Motor dysfunction and altered synaptic transmission at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in mice lacking potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Hiroshi; Wolf, Alexander M; Matsushita, Shinichi; Joho, Rolf H; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2003-08-20

    Micelacking both Kv3.1 and both Kv3.3 K+ channel alleles display severe motor deficits such as tremor, myoclonus, and ataxic gait. Micelacking one to three alleles at the Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 loci exhibit in an allele dose-dependent manner a modest degree of ataxia. Cerebellar granule cells coexpress Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 K+ channels and are therefore candidate neurons that might be involved in these behavioral deficits. Hence, we investigated the synaptic mechanisms of transmission in the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell system. Action potentials of parallel fibers were broader in mice lacking both Kv3.1 and both Kv3.3 alleles and in mice lacking both Kv3.1 and a single Kv3.3 allele compared with those of wild-type mice. The transmission of high-frequency trains of action potentials was only impaired at 200 Hz but not at 100 Hz in mice lacking both Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 genes. However, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses was dramatically reduced in a gene dose-dependent manner in mice lacking Kv3.1 or Kv3.3 alleles. Normal PPF could be restored by reducing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration indicating that increased activity-dependent presynaptic Ca2+ influx, at least in part caused the altered PPF in mutant mice. Induction of metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated EPSCs was facilitated, whereas longterm depression was not impaired but rather facilitated in Kv3.1/Kv3.3 double-knockout mice. These results demonstrate the importance of Kv3 potassium channels in regulating the dynamics of synaptic transmission at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and suggest a correlation between short-term plasticity at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and motor performance.

  4. Histone Methylation by the Kleefstra Syndrome Protein EHMT1 Mediates Homeostatic Synaptic Scaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benevento, M; Iacono, G.; Selten, M.M; Ba, W; Oudakker, A.R; Frega, M; Keller, J.; Mancini, R.; Lewerissa, E.; Kleefstra, T; Stunnenberg, H.G.; Zhou, H.; Bokhoven, H; Nadif Kasri, N

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity, a form of synaptic plasticity, maintains the fine balance between overall excitation and inhibition in developing and mature neuronal networks. Although the synaptic mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity are well characterized, the associated transcriptional program remains po

  5. Alteration of AMPA Receptor-Mediated Synaptic Transmission by Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 in Cerebellar Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroteaux, Matthieu; Liu, Siqiong June

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 488 and 594 are commonly used to visualize dendritic structures and the localization of synapses, both of which are critical for the spatial and temporal integration of synaptic inputs. However, the effect of the dyes on synaptic transmission is not known. Here we investigated whether Alexa Fluor dyes alter the properties of synaptic currents mediated by two subtypes of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at cerebellar stellate cell synapses. In naive mice, GluA2-lacking AMPAR-mediated synaptic currents displayed an inwardly rectifying current-voltage (I-V) relationship due to blockade by cytoplasmic spermine at depolarized potentials. We found that the inclusion of 100 µm Alexa Fluor dye, but not 10 µm, in the pipette solution led to a gradual increase in the amplitude of EPSCs at +40 mV and a change in the I-V relationship from inwardly rectifying to more linear. In mice exposed to an acute stress, AMPARs switched to GluA2-containing receptors, and 100 µm Alexa Fluor 594 did not alter the I-V relationship of synaptic currents. Therefore, a high concentration of Alexa Fluor dye changed the I-V relationship of EPSCs at GluA2-lacking AMPAR synapses.

  6. Role of mast cell- and non-mast cell-derived inflammatory mediators in immunologic induction of synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.C. Albuquerque

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available We have previously discovered a long-lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission in mammal autonomic ganglia caused by immunological activation of ganglionic mast cells. Subsequent to mast cell activation, lipid and peptide mediators are released which may modulate synaptic function. In this study we determined whether some mast cell-derived mediators, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2; 1.0 µM, platelet aggregating factor (PAF; 0.3 µM and U44619 (a thromboxane analogue; 1.0 µM, and also endothelin-1 (ET-1; 0.5 µM induce synaptic potentiation in the guinea pig superior cervical ganglion (SCG, and compared their effects on synaptic transmission with those induced by a sensitizing antigen, ovalbumin (OVA; 10 µg/ml. The experiments were carried out on SCGs isolated from adult male guinea pigs (200-250 g actively sensitized to OVA, maintained in oxygenated Locke solution at 37oC. Synaptic potentiation was measured through alterations of the integral of the post-ganglionic compound action potential (CAP. All agents tested caused long-term (LTP; duration ³30 min or short-term (STP; <30 min potentiation of synaptic efficacy, as measured by the increase in the integral of the post-ganglionic CAP. The magnitude of mediator-induced potentiation was never the same as the antigen-induced long-term potentiation (A-LTP. The agent that best mimicked the antigen was PGD2, which induced a 75% increase in CAP integral for LTP (antigen: 94% and a 34% increase for STP (antigen: 91%. PAF-, U44619-, and ET-1-induced increases in CAP integral ranged for LTP from 34 to 47%, and for STP from 0 to 26%. These results suggest that the agents investigated may participate in the induction of A-LTP

  7. Classification of HIV-1-mediated neuronal dendritic and synaptic damage using multiple criteria linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Zhuang, Wei; Yan, Nian; Kou, Gang; Peng, Hui; McNally, Clancy; Erichsen, David; Cheloha, Abby; Herek, Shelley; Shi, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The ability to identify neuronal damage in the dendritic arbor during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) is crucial for designing specific therapies for the treatment of HAD. To study this process, we utilized a computer-based image analysis method to quantitatively assess HIV-1 viral protein gp120 and glutamate-mediated individual neuronal damage in cultured cortical neurons. Changes in the number of neurites, arbors, branch nodes, cell body area, and average arbor lengths were determined and a database was formed (http://dm.ist.unomaha. edu/database.htm). We further proposed a two-class model of multiple criteria linear programming (MCLP) to classify such HIV-1-mediated neuronal dendritic and synaptic damages. Given certain classes, including treatments with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glutamate, gp120 or non-treatment controls from our in vitro experimental systems, we used the two-class MCLP model to determine the data patterns between classes in order to gain insight about neuronal dendritic damages. This knowledge can be applied in principle to the design and study of specific therapies for the prevention or reversal of neuronal damage associated with HAD. Finally, the MCLP method was compared with a well-known artificial neural network algorithm to test for the relative potential of different data mining applications in HAD research.

  8. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Persistently Alters Endocannabinoid Signaling and Endocannabinoid-Mediated Excitatory Synaptic Plasticity in Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausknecht, Kathryn; Shen, Ying-Ling; Wang, Rui-Xiang; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Shen, Roh-Yu

    2017-06-14

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) leads to increased addiction risk which could be mediated by enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. Previous studies have shown that PE enhances excitatory synaptic strength by facilitating an anti-Hebbian form of long-term potentiation (LTP). In this study, we investigated the effect of PE on endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (eCB-LTD) in VTA DA neurons. Rats were exposed to moderate (3 g/kg/d) or high (6 g/kg/d) levels of ethanol during gestation. Whole-cell recordings were conducted in male offspring between 4 and 10 weeks old.We found that PE led to increased amphetamine self-administration. Both moderate and high levels of PE persistently reduced low-frequency stimulation-induced eCB-LTD. Furthermore, action potential-independent glutamate release was regulated by tonic eCB signaling in PE animals. Mechanistic studies for impaired eCB-LTD revealed that PE downregulated CB1 receptor function. Interestingly, eCB-LTD in PE animals was rescued by metabotropic glutamate receptor I activation, suggesting that PE did not impair the synthesis/release of eCBs. In contrast, eCB-LTD in PE animals was not rescued by increasing presynaptic activity, which actually led to LTP in PE animals, whereas LTD was still observed in controls. This result shows that the regulation of excitatory synaptic plasticity is fundamentally altered in PE animals. Together, PE leads to impaired eCB-LTD at the excitatory synapses of VTA DA neurons primarily due to CB1 receptor downregulation. This effect could contribute to enhanced LTP and the maintenance of augmented excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons and increased addiction risk after PE.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) is among many adverse developmental factors known to increase drug addiction risk. Increased excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons is a critical cellular mechanism for addiction risk. Our

  9. Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 mutated cav2.1 calcium channels alter inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in the lateral superior olive of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Pilati, Nadia; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Urbano, Francisco J; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Forsythe, Ian D; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2015-01-01

    CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels play a key role in triggering neurotransmitter release and mediating synaptic transmission. Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM-1) is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harbouring the pathogenic FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the principle neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem. We tested if the R192Q FHM-1 mutation differentially affects excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, disturbing the normal balance between excitation and inhibition in this nucleus. Whole cell patch-clamp was used to measure neurotransmitter elicited excitatory (EPSCs) and inhibitory (IPSCs) postsynaptic currents in wild-type (WT) and R192Q KI mice. Our results showed that the FHM-1 mutation in CaV2.1 channels has multiple effects. Evoked EPSC amplitudes were smaller whereas evoked and miniature IPSC amplitudes were larger in R192Q KI compared to WT mice. In addition, in R192Q KI mice, the release probability was enhanced compared to WT, at both inhibitory (0.53 ± 0.02 vs. 0.44 ± 0.01, P = 2.10(-5), Student's t-test) and excitatory synapses (0.60 ± 0.03 vs. 0.45 ± 0.02, P = 4 10(-6), Student's t-test). Vesicle pool size was diminished in R192Q KI mice compared to WT mice (68 ± 6 vs 91 ± 7, P = 0.008, inhibitory; 104 ± 13 vs 335 ± 30, P = 10(-6), excitatory, Student's t-test). R192Q KI mice present enhanced short-term plasticity. Repetitive stimulation of the afferent axons caused short-term depression (STD) of E/IPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice compared to WT. This supports the hypothesis of a gain-of-function of the CaV2.1 channels in R192Q KI mice, which alters the balance of excitatory/inhibitory inputs and could also have implications in the altered cortical excitability responsible for FHM

  10. Neuropeptide S-mediated facilitation of synaptic transmission enforces subthreshold theta oscillations within the lateral amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Meis

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide S (NPS receptor system modulates neuronal circuit activity in the amygdala in conjunction with fear, anxiety and the expression and extinction of previously acquired fear memories. Using in vitro brain slice preparations of transgenic GAD67-GFP (Δneo mice, we investigated the effects of NPS on neural activity in the lateral amygdala as a key region for the formation and extinction of fear memories. We are able to demonstrate that NPS augments excitatory glutamatergic synaptic input onto both projection neurons and interneurons of the lateral amygdala, resulting in enhanced spike activity of both types of cells. These effects were at least in part mediated by presynaptic mechanisms. In turn, inhibition of projection neurons by local interneurons was augmented by NPS, and subthreshold oscillations were strengthened, leading to their shift into the theta frequency range. These data suggest that the multifaceted effects of NPS on amygdaloid circuitry may shape behavior-related network activity patterns in the amygdala and reflect the peptide's potent activity in various forms of affective behavior and emotional memory.

  11. Src, a molecular switch governing gain control of synaptic transmission mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xian-Min; Salter, Michael W

    1999-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a principal subtype of glutamate receptor mediating fast excitatory transmission at synapses in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other regions of the central nervous system. NMDA receptors are crucial for the lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission that occurs both physiologically and in pathological conditions such as chronic pain. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the activ...

  12. Real Time Multiplicative Memory Amplification Mediated by Whole-Cell Scaling of Synaptic Response in Key Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Iris; Ghosh, Sourav; Barkai, Edi

    2017-01-01

    Intense spiking response of a memory-pattern is believed to play a crucial role both in normal learning and pathology, where it can create biased behavior. We recently proposed a novel model for memory amplification where the simultaneous two-fold increase of all excitatory (AMPAR-mediated) and inhibitory (GABAAR-mediated) synapses in a sub-group of cells that constitutes a memory-pattern selectively amplifies this memory. Here we confirm the cellular basis of this model by validating its major predictions in four sets of experiments, and demonstrate its induction via a whole-cell transduction mechanism. Subsequently, using theory and simulations, we show that this whole-cell two-fold increase of all inhibitory and excitatory synapses functions as an instantaneous and multiplicative amplifier of the neurons’ spiking. The amplification mechanism acts through multiplication of the net synaptic current, where it scales both the average and the standard deviation of the current. In the excitation-inhibition balance regime, this scaling creates a linear multiplicative amplifier of the cell’s spiking response. Moreover, the direct scaling of the synaptic input enables the amplification of the spiking response to be synchronized with rapid changes in synaptic input, and to be independent of previous spiking activity. These traits enable instantaneous real-time amplification during brief elevations of excitatory synaptic input. Furthermore, the multiplicative nature of the amplifier ensures that the net effect of the amplification is large mainly when the synaptic input is mostly excitatory. When induced on all cells that comprise a memory-pattern, these whole-cell modifications enable a substantial instantaneous amplification of the memory-pattern when the memory is activated. The amplification mechanism is induced by CaMKII dependent phosphorylation that doubles the conductance of all GABAA and AMPA receptors in a subset of neurons. This whole-cell transduction

  13. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis inhibits synaptic transmission by increasing ph buffering in the synaptic cleft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozan Vroman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms, highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca²⁺ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form

  14. NMDA receptors in the midbrain play a critical role in dopamine-mediated hippocampal synaptic potentiation caused by morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ling; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Cui, Cai-Lian; Xing, Guo-Gang; Zhu, Bing

    2014-05-01

    A single exposure to drugs of abuse produces an NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor)-dependent synaptic potentiation at excitatory synapses of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain. All addictive drugs can increase DA concentrations in projection areas of the midbrain, including the hippocampus. Hippocampal DA release subsequently modulates hippocampal plasticity and drug-associated memories. Using in vivo electrophysiological recording techniques in anesthetized rats, we show that systemic injection of morphine induced hippocampal synaptic potentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Intra-VTA but not intra-hippocampus injection of morphine evoked this potentiation. Local hippocampal dopamine D1 receptors (D1R) are required in the morphine-induced synaptic potentiation and conditioned place preference (CPP). Moreover, both NMDAR activation in the VTA and VTA/hippocampus dopaminergic connections are essential for the morphine-evoked potentiation and CPP. These findings suggest that NMDAR signalings in the midbrain play a key role in regulating dopamine-mediated hippocampal synaptic plasticity underlying drug-induced associative memory.

  15. Hippocampal long-term potentiation is not accompanied by presynaptic spike broadening, unlike synaptic potentiation by K+ channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerum, H; Storm, J F

    1994-02-21

    The expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is thought to be at least partly due to increased transmitter release. To test whether this increase is due to a broadening of the presynaptic action potential, we have compared the presynaptic fibre volley before and after LTP induction, or application of K+ channel blockers, in CA1 of rat hippocampal slices. Tetraethylammonium (TEA; 1 mM) induced a parallel increase in the fibre volley duration of the slope of the field EPSP, indicating that a presynaptic spike broadening underlying synaptic potentiation can be detected. In contrast, induction of LTP did not produce any measurable change in the fibre volley, although the average increase in the EPSP slope was larger than with TEA. These results indicate that LTP expression is not primarily due to a presynaptic spike broadening.

  16. Using Expression Profiles of Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons To Identify Genes That Mediate Synaptic Connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Leehod Baruch; Shalev Itzkovitz; Michal Golan-Mashiach; Ehud Shapiro; Eran Segal

    2008-01-01

    Authors Summary Synaptic wiring in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is largely invariant between individuals, suggesting that this wiring is genetically encoded. This is in essence the chemoaffinity hypothesis suggested by Roger Sperry. However, proving this hypothesis in model organisms and detecting the identities of the genes that determine the presence or absence of synaptic connections is a major challenge. C. elegans provides a unique opportunity to examine this hypothesis due to the...

  17. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  18. Channel-Mediated Lactate Release by K+-Stimulated Astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Sotelo-Hitschfeld, T.

    2015-03-11

    Excitatory synaptic transmission is accompanied by a local surge in interstitial lactate that occurs despite adequate oxygen availability, a puzzling phenomenon termed aerobic glycolysis. In addition to its role as an energy substrate, recent studies have shown that lactate modulates neuronal excitability acting through various targets, including NMDA receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors specific for lactate, but little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the increase in interstitial lactate. Using a panel of genetically encoded fluorescence nanosensors for energy metabolites, we show here that mouse astrocytes in culture, in cortical slices, and in vivo maintain a steady-state reservoir of lactate. The reservoir was released to the extracellular space immediately after exposure of astrocytes to a physiological rise in extracellular K+ or cell depolarization. Cell-attached patch-clamp analysis of cultured astrocytes revealed a 37 pS lactate-permeable ion channel activated by cell depolarization. The channel was modulated by lactate itself, resulting in a positive feedback loop for lactate release. A rapid fall in intracellular lactate levels was also observed in cortical astrocytes of anesthetized mice in response to local field stimulation. The existence of an astrocytic lactate reservoir and its quick mobilization via an ion channel in response to a neuronal cue provides fresh support to lactate roles in neuronal fueling and in gliotransmission.

  19. Effects of familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutations on neuronal P/Q-type Ca2+ channel activity and inhibitory synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu-Qing; Tsien, Richard W

    2005-02-15

    Inhibitory synapses play key roles in the modulatory circuitry that regulates pain signaling and generation of migraine headache. A rare, dominant form of this common disease, familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), arises from missense mutations in the pore-forming alpha1A subunit of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. These channels are normally vital for presynaptic Ca2+ entry and neurotransmitter release at many central synapses, raising questions about effects of FHM1 mutations on neuronal Ca2+ influx and inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission. We have expressed the four original FHM1 mutant channels in hippocampal neurons from alpha1A knockout mice. Whole-cell recordings indicated that FHM1 mutant channels were less effective than wild-type channels in their ability to conduct P/Q-type current, but not generally different from wild type in voltage-dependent channel gating. Ca2+ influx triggered by action potential waveforms was also diminished. In keeping with decreased channel activity, FHM1 mutant channels were correspondingly impaired in supporting the P/Q-type component of inhibitory neurotransmission. When expressed in wild-type inhibitory neurons, FHM1 mutant channels reduced the contribution of P/Q-type channels to GABAergic synaptic currents, consistent with a competition of mutant and endogenous channels for P/Q-specific slots. In all cases, N-type channels took up the burden of supporting transmission and homeostatic mechanisms maintained overall synaptic strength. The shift to reliance on N-type channels greatly increased the susceptibility to G protein-coupled modulation of neurotransmission, studied with the GABAB agonist baclofen. Thus, mutant-expressing synapses might be weakened in a heightened state of neuromodulation like that provoked by triggers of migraine such as stress.

  20. A Single Aplysia Neurotrophin Mediates Synaptic Facilitation via Differentially Processed Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan R. Kassabov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins control the development and adult plasticity of the vertebrate nervous system. Failure to identify invertebrate neurotrophin orthologs, however, has precluded studies in invertebrate models, limiting our understanding of fundamental aspects of neurotrophin biology and function. We identified a neurotrophin (ApNT and Trk receptor (ApTrk in the mollusk Aplysia and found that they play a central role in learning-related synaptic plasticity. Blocking ApTrk signaling impairs long-term facilitation, whereas augmenting ApNT expression enhances it and induces the growth of new synaptic varicosities at the monosynaptic connection between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. Unlike vertebrate neurotrophins, ApNT has multiple coding exons and exerts distinct synaptic effects through differentially processed and secreted splice isoforms. Our findings demonstrate the existence of bona fide neurotrophin signaling in invertebrates and reveal a posttranscriptional mechanism that regulates neurotrophin processing and the release of proneurotrophins and mature neurotrophins that differentially modulate synaptic plasticity.

  1. Mediators of synaptic activity in anxiety- and depression-related behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselycznyk, Carly

    2012-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are leading causes of years lost to disability, despite antidepressants being among the most commonly prescribed medications. Most currently prescribed antidepressants were found serendipitously rather than from an understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying depression. Recent evidence supports instead the antidepressant efficacy of glutamate-targeting drugs, such as ketamine, which promote plastic changes in synaptic structure and function. ...

  2. Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic KIR and KAS channels in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons: A computational study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jessy John; Rohit Manchanda

    2011-06-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical structure of the brain reward circuit, is implicated in normal goal-directed behaviour and learning as well as pathological conditions like schizophrenia and addiction. Its major cellular substrates, the medium spiny (MS) neurons, possess a wide variety of dendritic active conductances that may modulate the excitatory post synaptic potentials (EPSPs) and cell excitability. We examine this issue using a biophysically detailed 189-compartment stylized model of the NAc MS neuron, incorporating all the known active conductances. We find that, of all the active channels, inward rectifying K+ (KIR) channels play the primary role in modulating the resting membrane potential (RMP) and EPSPs in the down-state of the neuron. Reduction in the conductance of KIR channels evokes facilitatory effects on EPSPs accompanied by rises in local input resistance and membrane time constant. At depolarized membrane potentials closer to up-state levels, the slowly inactivating A-type potassium channel (KAs) conductance also plays a strong role in determining synaptic potential parameters and cell excitability. We discuss the implications of our results for the regulation of accumbal MS neuron biophysics and synaptic integration by intrinsic factors and extrinsic agents such as dopamine.

  3. Synaptic NMDA receptor-mediated currents in anterior piriform cortex are reduced in the adult fragile X mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocel, James; Larson, John

    2012-09-27

    Fragile X syndrome is a neurodevelopmental condition caused by the transcriptional silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse exhibits age-dependent deficits in long term potentiation (LTP) at association (ASSN) synapses in anterior piriform cortex (APC). To investigate the mechanisms for this, whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings of ASSN stimulation-evoked synaptic currents were made in APC of slices from adult Fmr1-KO and wild-type (WT) mice, using the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, CPP, to distinguish currents mediated by NMDA and AMPA receptors. NMDA/AMPA current ratios were lower in Fmr1-KO mice than in WT mice, at ages ranging from 3-18months. Since amplitude and frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) mediated by AMPA receptors were no different in Fmr1-KO and WT mice at these ages, the results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated currents are selectively reduced in Fmr1-KO mice. Analyses of voltage-dependence and decay kinetics of NMDA receptor-mediated currents did not reveal differences between Fmr1-KO and WT mice, suggesting that reduced NMDA currents in Fmr1-KO mice are due to fewer synaptic receptors rather than differences in receptor subunit composition. Reduced NMDA receptor signaling may help to explain the LTP deficit seen at APC ASSN synapses in Fmr1-KO mice at 6-18months of age, but does not explain normal LTP at these synapses in mice 3-6months old. Evoked currents and mEPSCs were also examined in senescent Fmr1-KO and WT mice at 24-28months of age. NMDA/AMPA ratios were similar in senescent WT and Fmr1-KO mice, due to a decrease in the ratio in the WT mice, without significant change in AMPA receptor-mediated mEPSCs.

  4. The kinase activity of EphA4 mediates homeostatic scaling-down of synaptic strength via activation of Cdk5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi-Rong; Hou, Zai-Hua; Yu, Xiang

    2013-02-01

    Neurons within a network have the ability to homeostatically scale-down their excitatory synaptic strength under conditions of persistent neuronal activity elevation, a process pivotal to neural circuit stability. How this homeostatic regulation is achieved at the molecular level in developing neural circuits, which face gradually elevated neuronal activity as part of circuit wiring, is not well-understood. Using dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures, we identified a critical and cell autonomous role for the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA4 in mediating activity-induced homeostatic down-regulation of excitatory synaptic strength. Reducing the endogenous level of EphA4 in individual neurons by RNAi effectively blocked activity-induced scaling-down of excitatory synaptic strength, while co-transfection of RNAi resistant EphA4 rescued this effect. Furthermore, interfering with EphA4 forward signaling using EphA4-Fc blocked activity-induced homeostatic synaptic scaling-down, while direct activation of EphA4 with its ligand EphrinA1 weakened excitatory synaptic strength. Up- or down-regulating EphA4 function in individual neurons also did not affect the density of excitatory synapses. The kinase activities of EphA4 and its downstream effector Cdk5 were both required for homeostatic synaptic scaling, as overexpression of EphA4 with constitutively active kinase activity reduced excitatory synaptic strength, while interfering with either the kinase activity of EphA4 or Cdk5 blocked activity-induced synaptic scaling. Consistently, the activities of EphA4 and Cdk5 increased significantly during global and persistent activity elevation. Together, our work demonstrated that the kinase activity of EphA4, via activation of downstream Cdk5 activity, mediates the scaling-down of excitatory synaptic strength under conditions of global activity elevation.

  5. Rapid State-Dependent Alteration in Kv3 Channel Availability Drives Flexible Synaptic Signaling Dependent on Somatic Subthreshold Depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J.M. Rowan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In many neurons, subthreshold depolarization in the soma can transiently increase action-potential (AP-evoked neurotransmission via analog-to-digital facilitation. The mechanisms underlying this form of short-term synaptic plasticity are unclear, in part, due to the relative inaccessibility of the axon to direct physiological interrogation. Using voltage imaging and patch-clamp recording from presynaptic boutons of cerebellar stellate interneurons, we observed that depolarizing somatic potentials readily spread into the axon, resulting in AP broadening, increased spike-evoked Ca2+ entry, and enhanced neurotransmission strength. Kv3 channels, which drive AP repolarization, rapidly inactivated upon incorporation of Kv3.4 subunits. This leads to fast susceptibility to depolarization-induced spike broadening and analog facilitation independent of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C signaling. The spread of depolarization into the axon was attenuated by hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih currents in the maturing cerebellum, precluding analog facilitation. These results suggest that analog-to-digital facilitation is tempered by development or experience in stellate cells.

  6. Rapid State-Dependent Alteration in Kv3 Channel Availability Drives Flexible Synaptic Signaling Dependent on Somatic Subthreshold Depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Matthew J M; Christie, Jason M

    2017-02-21

    In many neurons, subthreshold depolarization in the soma can transiently increase action-potential (AP)-evoked neurotransmission via analog-to-digital facilitation. The mechanisms underlying this form of short-term synaptic plasticity are unclear, in part, due to the relative inaccessibility of the axon to direct physiological interrogation. Using voltage imaging and patch-clamp recording from presynaptic boutons of cerebellar stellate interneurons, we observed that depolarizing somatic potentials readily spread into the axon, resulting in AP broadening, increased spike-evoked Ca(2+) entry, and enhanced neurotransmission strength. Kv3 channels, which drive AP repolarization, rapidly inactivated upon incorporation of Kv3.4 subunits. This leads to fast susceptibility to depolarization-induced spike broadening and analog facilitation independent of Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C signaling. The spread of depolarization into the axon was attenuated by hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih currents) in the maturing cerebellum, precluding analog facilitation. These results suggest that analog-to-digital facilitation is tempered by development or experience in stellate cells.

  7. Synaptic activity protects neurons against calcium-mediated oxidation and contraction of mitochondria during excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depp, Constanze; Bas-Orth, Carlos; Schroeder, Lisa; Hellwig, Andrea; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-10-07

    Excitotoxicity triggered by extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) has been implicated in many neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke. Mitochondrial calcium overload leading to mitochondrial dysfunction represents an early event in excitotoxicity. Neurons are rendered resistant to excitotoxicity by previous periods of synaptic activity that activates a nuclear calcium-driven neuroprotective gene program. This process, termed acquired neuroprotection, involves transcriptional repression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter leading to a reduction in excitotoxcity-associated mitochondrial calcium load. As mitochondrial calcium and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be linked, we monitored excitotoxicity-associated changes in the mitochondrial redox status using the ratiometric glutathione redox potential indicator, Grx1-roGFP2, targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. Aim of this study was to investigate if suppression of oxidative stress underlies mitoprotection afforded by synaptic activity. We found that synaptic activity protects primary rat hippocampal neurons against acute excitotoxicity-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and mitochondrial contraction associated with it. Downregulation of the mitochondrial uniporter by genetic means mimics the protective effect of synaptic activity on mitochondrial redox status. These findings indicate that oxidative stress acts downstream of mitochondrial calcium overload in excitotoxicity. Innovation and conclusion: We established mito-Grx1-roGFP2 as a reliable and sensitive tool to monitor rapid redox changes in mitochondria during excitotoxicity. Our results highlight the importance of developing means of blocking mitochondrial calcium overload for therapeutic targeting of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Dendritic GIRK Channels Gate the Integration Window, Plateau Potentials, and Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Dorsal But Not Ventral CA1 Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ruchi; Johnston, Daniel

    2017-04-05

    Studies comparing neuronal activity at the dorsal and ventral poles of the hippocampus have shown that the scale of spatial information increases and the precision with which space is represented declines from the dorsal to ventral end. These dorsoventral differences in neuronal output and spatial representation could arise due to differences in computations performed by dorsal and ventral CA1 neurons. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by quantifying the differences in dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity between dorsal and ventral CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus. Using a combination of somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we show that the threshold for LTP induction is higher in dorsal CA1 neurons and that a G-protein-coupled inward-rectifying potassium channel mediated regulation of dendritic plateau potentials and dendritic excitability underlies this gating. By contrast, similar regulation of LTP is absent in ventral CA1 neurons. Additionally, we show that generation of plateau potentials and LTP induction in dorsal CA1 neurons depends on the coincident activation of Schaffer collateral and temporoammonic inputs at the distal apical dendrites. The ventral CA1 dendrites, however, can generate plateau potentials in response to temporally dispersed excitatory inputs. Overall, our results highlight the dorsoventral differences in dendritic computation that could account for the dorsoventral differences in spatial representation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The dorsal and ventral parts of the hippocampus encode spatial information at very different scales. Whereas the place-specific firing fields are small and precise at the dorsal end of the hippocampus, neurons at the ventral end have comparatively larger place fields. Here, we show that the dorsal CA1 neurons have a higher threshold for LTP induction and require coincident timing of excitatory synaptic inputs for the generation of dendritic plateau potentials. By contrast, ventral CA1

  9. Modulation of NMDA and AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission by CB1 receptors in frontal cortical pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Yan, Haidun; Wilson, Wilkie A; Swartzwelder, H Scott

    2010-06-25

    Although the endogenous cannabinoid system modulates a variety of physiological and pharmacological processes, the specific role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and neural plasticity is not well understood. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques, evoked or spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs or sEPSCs) were recorded from visualized, layer II/III pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from rat brain. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist, WIN 55212-2 (WIN), reduced the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. When co-applied with the specific CB1 antagonists, AM251 or AM281, WIN did not suppress NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs. WIN also reduced the amplitude of evoked AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs, an effect that was also reversed by AM251. Both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs were significantly reduced by WIN. In contrast, WIN reduced the frequency, but not the amplitude of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that the suppression of glutamatergic activity by CB1 receptors in the frontal neocortex is mediated by a presynaptic mechanism. Taken together, these data indicate a critical role for endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission in frontal neocortex, and suggest a possible neuronal mechanism whereby THC regulates cortical function.

  10. 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors differently modulate AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L; Trovato, C; Musumeci, S A; Catania, M V; Ciranna, L

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the effects of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) serotonin receptor activation in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission using patch clamp on mouse brain slices. Application of either 5-HT or 8-OH DPAT, a mixed 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(7) receptor agonist, inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory post synaptic currents (EPSCs); this effect was mimicked by the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH PIPAT and blocked by the 5-HT(1A) antagonist NAN-190. 8-OH DPAT increased paired-pulse facilitation and reduced the frequency of mEPSCs, indicating a presynaptic reduction of glutamate release probability. In another group of neurons, 8-OH DPAT enhanced EPSC amplitude but did not alter paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting a postsynaptic action; this effect persisted in the presence of NAN-190 and was blocked by the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB-269970. To confirm that EPSC enhancement was mediated by 5-HT(7) receptors, we used the compound LP-44, which is considered a selective 5-HT(7) agonist. However, LP-44 reduced EPSC amplitude in most cells and instead increased EPSC amplitude in a subset of neurons, similarly to 8-OH DPAT. These effects were respectively antagonized by NAN-190 and by SB-269970, indicating that under our experimental condition LP-44 behaved as a mixed agonist. 8-OH DPAT also modulated the current evoked by exogenously applied AMPA, inducing either a reduction or an increase of amplitude in distinct neurons; these effects were respectively blocked by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, indicating that both receptors exert a postsynaptic action. Our results show that 5-HT(1A) receptors inhibit CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting both pre- and postsynaptically, whereas 5-HT(7) receptors enhance CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting exclusively at a postsynaptic site. We suggest that a selective pharmacological targeting of either subtype may be envisaged in pathological loss of hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. In this respect, we underline the

  11. Synaptic vesicle endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-09-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization.

  12. Changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents at early-stage epileptogenesis in adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juegang Ju; Sheng-tian Li

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are extensively involved in epilepsy genesis and recurrence.Recent studies have shown that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play different, or even opposing, roles in various signaling pathways, including synaptic plasticity and neuronal death.The present study analyzed changes in synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated currents during epilepsy onset.Mouse models of lithium chloride pilocarpine-induced epilepsy were established, and hippocampal slices were prepared at 24 hours after the onset of status epilepticus.Synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents (NMDA-EPSCs) were recorded in CA1 pyramidal neurons by whole-cell patch clamp technique.Results demonstrated no significant difference in rise and delay time of synaptic NMDA-EPSCs compared with normal neurons.Peak amplitude, area-to-peak ratio,and rising time of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs remained unchanged, but decay of extrasynaptic NMDA-EPSCs was faster than that of normal neurons.These results suggest that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play a role in epileptogenesis.

  13. Changes in action potential duration alter reliance of excitatory synaptic transmission on multiple types of Ca2+ channels in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, D B; Randall, A; Tsien, R W

    1996-04-01

    It has been established that multiple types of Ca2+ channels participate in triggering neurotransmitter release at central synapses, but there is uncertainty about the nature of their combined actions. We investigated synaptic transmission at CA3-CA1 synapses of rat hippocampal slices and asked whether the dependence on omega-CTx-GVIA-sensitive N-type channels and omega-Aga-IVA-sensitive P/Q-type Ca2+ channels can be altered by physiological mechanisms. The reliance on multiple types of Ca2+ channels was not absolute but depended strongly on the amount of Ca2+ influx through individual channels, which was manipulated by prolonging the presynaptic action potential with the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and by varying the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o). We quantified the influence of spike broadening on Ca2+ influx through various Ca2+ channels by imposing mock action potentials on voltage-clamped cerebellar granule neurons. In field recordings of the EPSP in hippocampal slices, action potential prolongation increased the EPSP slope by 2-fold and decreased its reliance on either N-type or P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. The inhibition of synaptic transmission by N-type channel blockade was virtually eliminated in the presence of 4-AP, but it could be restored by lowering [Ca2+]o. These results rule out a scenario in which a significant fraction of presynaptic terminals rely solely on N-type channels to trigger transmission. The change in sensitivity to the neurotoxins with 4-AP could be explained in terms of a nonlinear relationship between Ca2+ entry and synaptic strength, which rises steeply at low [Ca2+]o, but approaches saturation at high [Ca2+]o. This relationship was evaluated experimentally by varying [CA2+]o in the absence and presence of 4-AP. One consequence of this relationship is that down-modulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels by various modulators would increase the relative impact of spike broadening greatly.

  14. α-Actinin-2 mediates spine morphology and assembly of the post-synaptic density in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hodges

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that constitute the primary post-synaptic sites of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Spines mature from a filopodia-like protrusion into a mushroom-shaped morphology with a post-synaptic density (PSD at its tip. Modulation of the actin cytoskeleton drives these morphological changes as well as the spine dynamics that underlie learning and memory. Several PSD molecules respond to glutamate receptor activation and relay signals to the underlying actin cytoskeleton to regulate the structural changes in spine and PSD morphology. α-Actinin-2 is an actin filament cross-linker, which localizes to dendritic spines, enriched within the post-synaptic density, and implicated in actin organization. We show that loss of α-actinin-2 in rat hippocampal neurons creates an increased density of immature, filopodia-like protrusions that fail to mature into a mushroom-shaped spine during development. α-Actinin-2 knockdown also prevents the recruitment and stabilization of the PSD in the spine, resulting in failure of synapse formation, and an inability to structurally respond to chemical stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-type glutamate receptor. The Ca2+-insensitive EF-hand motif in α-actinin-2 is necessary for the molecule's function in regulating spine morphology and PSD assembly, since exchanging it for the similar but Ca2+-sensitive domain from α-actinin-4, another α-actinin isoform, inhibits its function. Furthermore, when the Ca2+-insensitive domain from α-actinin-2 is inserted into α-actinin-4 and expressed in neurons, it creates mature spines. These observations support a model whereby α-actinin-2, partially through its Ca2+-insensitive EF-hand motif, nucleates PSD formation via F-actin organization and modulates spine maturation to mediate synaptogenesis.

  15. Modulation of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission by Zn2+ at a dentate gyrus circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Grauert, A.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (ionic form Zn2+) is a common trace element in the forebrain, and is especially enriched in the hippocampus, a brain structure important for learning and memory. A large amount of vesicular Zn2+ which is thought to be released upon presynaptic depolarisation is found at synapses formed by the axons of dentate granule cells (GCs), known as mossy fibres (MFs). Zn2+ inhibits NMDA and GABAA receptors (NMDAR and GABAAR) at mono-synaptic inputs between MFs and CA3 pyramidal neurons but its rol...

  16. Biphasic somatic A-type K channel downregulation mediates intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Sung-Cherl Jung

    Full Text Available Since its original description, the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP has been known to be accompanied by a lasting increase in the intrinsic excitability (intrinsic plasticity of hippocampal neurons. Recent evidence shows that dendritic excitability can be enhanced by an activity-dependent decrease in the activity of A-type K(+ channels. In the present manuscript, we examined the role of A-type K(+ channels in regulating intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus after synapse-specific LTP induction. In electrophysiological recordings we found that LTP induced a potentiation of excitability which was accompanied by a two-phased change in A-type K(+ channel activity recorded in nucleated patches from organotypic slices of rat hippocampus. Induction of LTP resulted in an immediate but short lasting hyperpolarization of the voltage-dependence of steady-state A-type K(+ channel inactivation along with a progressive, long-lasting decrease in peak A-current density. Blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis prevented the A-current decrease and most measures of intrinsic plasticity. These results suggest that two temporally distinct but overlapping mechanisms of A-channel downregulation together contribute to the plasticity of intrinsic excitability. Finally we show that intrinsic plasticity resulted in a global enhancement of EPSP-spike coupling.

  17. Using expression profiles of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons to identify genes that mediate synaptic connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Leehod; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Golan-Mashiach, Michal; Shapiro, Ehud; Segal, Eran

    2008-07-11

    Synaptic wiring of neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans is largely invariable between animals. It has been suggested that this feature stems from genetically encoded molecular markers that guide the neurons in the final stage of synaptic formation. Identifying these markers and unraveling the logic by which they direct synapse formation is a key challenge. Here, we address this task by constructing a probabilistic model that attempts to explain the neuronal connectivity diagram of C. elegans as a function of the expression patterns of its neurons. By only considering neuron pairs that are known to be connected by chemical or electrical synapses, we focus on the final stage of synapse formation, in which neurons identify their designated partners. Our results show that for many neurons the neuronal expression map of C. elegans can be used to accurately predict the subset of adjacent neurons that will be chosen as its postsynaptic partners. Notably, these predictions can be achieved using the expression patterns of only a small number of specific genes that interact in a combinatorial fashion.

  18. Using expression profiles of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons to identify genes that mediate synaptic connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leehod Baruch

    Full Text Available Synaptic wiring of neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans is largely invariable between animals. It has been suggested that this feature stems from genetically encoded molecular markers that guide the neurons in the final stage of synaptic formation. Identifying these markers and unraveling the logic by which they direct synapse formation is a key challenge. Here, we address this task by constructing a probabilistic model that attempts to explain the neuronal connectivity diagram of C. elegans as a function of the expression patterns of its neurons. By only considering neuron pairs that are known to be connected by chemical or electrical synapses, we focus on the final stage of synapse formation, in which neurons identify their designated partners. Our results show that for many neurons the neuronal expression map of C. elegans can be used to accurately predict the subset of adjacent neurons that will be chosen as its postsynaptic partners. Notably, these predictions can be achieved using the expression patterns of only a small number of specific genes that interact in a combinatorial fashion.

  19. p140Cap regulates memory and synaptic plasticity through Src-mediated and citron-N-mediated actin reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Daniele; Camera, Paola; Melani, Riccardo; Morello, Noemi; Russo, Isabella; Calcagno, Eleonora; Tomasoni, Romana; Bianchi, Federico; Berto, Gaia; Giustetto, Maurizio; Berardi, Nicoletta; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Matteoli, Michela; Di Stefano, Paola; Missler, Markus; Turco, Emilia; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Defilippi, Paola

    2014-01-22

    A major challenge in the neuroscience field is the identification of molecules and pathways that control synaptic plasticity and memory. Dendritic spines play a pivotal role in these processes, as the major sites of excitatory synapses in neuronal communication. Previous studies have shown that the scaffold protein p140Cap localizes into dendritic spines and that its knockdown negatively modulates spine shape in culture. However, so far, there is no information on its in vivo relevance. By using a knock-out mouse model, we here demonstrate that p140Cap is a key element for both learning and synaptic plasticity. Indeed, p140Cap(-/-) mice are impaired in object recognition test, as well as in LTP and in LTD measurements. The in vivo effects of p140Cap loss are presumably attenuated by noncell-autonomous events, since primary neurons obtained from p140Cap(-/-) mice show a strong reduction in number of mushroom spines and abnormal organization of synapse-associated F-actin. These phenotypes are most likely caused by a local reduction of the inhibitory control of RhoA and of cortactin toward the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin. These events can be controlled by p140Cap through its capability to directly inhibit the activation of Src kinase and by its binding to the scaffold protein Citron-N. Altogether, our results provide new insight into how protein associated with dynamic microtubules may regulate spine actin organization through interaction with postsynaptic density components.

  20. Long-term social recognition memory is mediated by oxytocin-dependent synaptic plasticity in the medial amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Rotem; Tendler, Alex; Wagner, Shlomo

    2014-09-01

    Recognition of specific individuals is fundamental to mammalian social behavior and is mediated in most mammals by the main and accessory olfactory systems. Both these systems innervate the medial amygdala (MeA), where activity of the neuropeptide oxytocin is thought to mediate social recognition memory (SRM). The specific contribution of the MeA to SRM formation and the specific actions of oxytocin in the MeA are unknown. We used the social discrimination test to evaluate short-term and long-term SRM in adult Sprague-Dawley male rats (n = 38). The role of protein synthesis in the MeA was investigated by local application of the protein synthesis blocker anisomycin (n = 11). Synaptic plasticity was assessed in vivo by recording the MeA evoked field potential responses to stimulation of the main (n = 21) and accessory (n = 56) olfactory bulbs before and after theta burst stimulation. Intracerebroventricular administration of saline, oxytocin, or oxytocin receptor antagonist was used to measure the effect of oxytocin on synaptic plasticity. Anisomycin application to the MeA prevented the formation of long-term SRM. In addition, the responses of MeA neurons underwent long-term depression (LTD) after theta burst stimulation of the accessory olfactory bulb, but not the main accessory bulb, in an oxytocin-dependent manner. No LTD was found in socially isolated rats, which are known to lack long-term SRM. Finally, accessory olfactory bulb stimulation before SRM acquisition blocked long-term SRM, supporting the involvement of LTD in the MeA in formation of long-term SRM. Our results indicate that long-term SRM in rats involves protein synthesis and oxytocin-dependent LTD in the MeA. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species regulate the strength of inhibitory GABA-mediated synaptic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Michael V.; Daniels, Bryan A.; Brown, Patricia M. G. E.; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Bowie, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal communication imposes a heavy metabolic burden in maintaining ionic gradients essential for action potential firing and synaptic signalling. Although cellular metabolism is known to regulate excitatory neurotransmission, it is still unclear whether the brain’s energy supply affects inhibitory signalling. Here we show that mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (mROS) regulate the strength of postsynaptic GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses of cerebellar stellate cells. Inhibition is strengthened through a mechanism that selectively recruits α3-containing GABAA receptors into synapses with no discernible effect on resident α1-containing receptors. Since mROS promotes the emergence of postsynaptic events with unique kinetic properties, we conclude that newly recruited α3-containing GABAA receptors are activated by neurotransmitter released onto discrete postsynaptic sites. Although traditionally associated with oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disease, our data identify mROS as a putative homeostatic signalling molecule coupling cellular metabolism to the strength of inhibitory transmission.

  2. Proteasomal degradation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α is mediated by Homer-3 via the proteasomal S8 ATPase: Signal transduction and synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Khosrow; Baalman, Kelli; Teng, Yanfen; Mee, Maureen P; Dawson, Simon P; Wang, Hongmin; De Biasi, Mariella; Mayer, R John

    2012-07-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. This unique feature makes mGluRs potential targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. There is ample evidence to show that the ubiquitin proteasome system mediates changes in synaptic strength leading to multiple forms of synaptic plasticity. The present study describes a novel interaction between post-synaptic adaptors, long Homer-3 proteins, and one of the 26S proteasome regulatory subunits, the S8 ATPase, that influences the degradation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α). We have shown that the two human long Homer-3 proteins specifically interact with human proteasomal S8 ATPase. We identified that mGluR1α and long Homer-3s immunoprecipitate with the 26S proteasome both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that the mGluR1α receptor can be ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26S proteasome and that Homer-3A facilitates this process. Furthermore, the siRNA mediated silencing of Homer-3 led to increased levels of total and plasma membrane-associated mGluR1α receptors. These results suggest that long Homer-3 proteins control the degradation of mGluR1α receptors by shuttling ubiquitinated mGluR-1α receptors to the 26S proteasome via the S8 ATPase which may modulate synaptic transmission.

  3. VEGF Mediates ApoE4-Induced Neovascularization and Synaptic Pathology in the Choroid and Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Ran; Salomon-Zimri, Shiran; Beck, Susanne C; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Livnat, Tami; Maharshak, Idit; Kadar, Tamar; Seeliger, Mathias; Weinberger, Dov; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with neuronal and vascular impairments. Recent findings suggest that retina of apoE4 mice have synaptic and functional impairments. We presently investigated the effects of apoE4 on retinal and choroidal vasculature and the possible role of VEGF in these effects. There were no histological differences between the retinal and choroidal vasculatures of naïve apoE3 and apoE4 mice. In contrast, laserdriven choroidal injury induced higher levels of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in apoE4 than in apoE3 mice. These effects were associated with an inflammatory response and with activation of the Muller cells and asrocytic markers gluthatione synthetase and GFAP, all of which were more pronounced in the apoE4 mice. CNV also induced a transient increase in the levels of the synaptic markers synaptophysin and PSD95 which were however similar in the apoE4 and apoE3 naive mice. Retinal and choroidal VEGF and apoE levels were lower in naïve apoE4 than in corresponding apoE3 mice. In contrast, VEGF and apoE levels rose more pronouncedly following laser injury in the apoE4 than in apoE3 mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that the apoE4-induced retinal impairments, under basal conditions, may be related to reduced VEGF levels in the eyes of these mice. The hyper-neovascularization in the apoE4 mice might be driven by increased inflammation and the associated surge in VEGF following injury. Retinal and choroidal VEGF and apoE levels were lower in naïve apoE4 than in corresponding apoE3 mice. In contrast, VEGF and apoE levels rose more pronouncedly following laser injury in the apoE4 than in apoE3 mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that the apoE4-induced retinal impairments, under basal conditions, may be related to reduced VEGF levels in the eyes of these mice. The hyper-neovascularization in the apoE4 mice might be driven by increased inflammation

  4. Presynaptic CaV2.1 calcium channels carrying familial hemiplegic migraine mutation R192Q allow faster recovery from synaptic depression in mouse calyx of Held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Forsythe, Ian D; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2012-12-01

    Ca(V)2.1 Ca(2+) channels have a dominant and specific role in initiating fast synaptic transmission at central excitatory synapses, through a close association between release sites and calcium sensors. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α(1A) pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 channel. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harboring the FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study the consequences of this mutation in neurotransmission at the giant synapse of the auditory system formed by the presynaptic calyx of Held terminal and the postsynaptic neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). Although synaptic transmission seems unaffected by low-frequency stimulation in physiological Ca(2+) concentration, we observed that with low Ca(2+) concentrations (<1 mM) excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed increased amplitudes in R192Q KI mice compared with wild type (WT), meaning significant differences in the nonlinear calcium dependence of nerve-evoked transmitter release. In addition, when EPSCs were evoked by broadened presynaptic action potentials (achieved by inhibition of K(+) channels) via Ca(v)2.1-triggered exocytosis, R192Q KI mice exhibited further enhancement of EPSC amplitude and charge compared with WT mice. Repetitive stimulation of afferent axons to the MNTB at different frequencies caused short-term depression of EPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice than in WT mice. Faster recovery in R192Q KI mice was prevented by the calcium chelator EGTA-AM, pointing to enlarged residual calcium as a key factor in accelerating the replenishment of synaptic vesicles.

  5. Coordinated regulation of endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde synaptic suppression in the cerebellum by neuronal and astrocytic monoacylglycerol lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Chen, Yao; Vickstrom, Casey R.; Li, Yan; Viader, Andreu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Liu, Qing-song

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) mediates retrograde synaptic depression including depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and inhibition (DSI). 2-AG is degraded primarily by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), which is expressed in neurons and astrocytes. Using knockout mice in which MAGL is deleted globally or selectively in neurons or astrocytes, we investigated the relative contribution of neuronal and astrocytic MAGL to the termination of DSE and DSI in Purkinje cells (PCs) in cerebellar slices. We report that neuronal MAGL plays a predominant role in terminating DSE at climbing fiber (CF) to PC synapses, while both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL significantly contributes to the termination of DSE at parallel fiber (PF) to PC synapses and DSI at putative Stellate cell to PC synapses. Thus, DSE and DSI at different synapses is not uniformly affected by global and cell type-specific knockout of MAGL. Additionally, MAGL global knockout, but not cell type-specific knockout, caused tonic activation and partial desensitization of the CB1 receptor at PF-PC synapses. This tonic CB1 activation is mediated by 2-AG since it was blocked by the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor DO34. Together, these results suggest that both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL contribute to 2-AG clearance and prevent CB1 receptor over-stimulation in the cerebellum. PMID:27775008

  6. Src, a Molecular Switch Governing Gain Control of Synaptic Transmission Mediated by N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xian-Min; Salter, Michael W.

    1999-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a principal subtype of glutamate receptor mediating fast excitatory transmission at synapses in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other regions of the central nervous system. NMDA receptors are crucial for the lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission that occurs both physiologically and in pathological conditions such as chronic pain. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the activity of NMDA receptors is regulated by the protein tyrosine kinase, Src. Recently it has been discovered that, by means of up-regulating NMDA receptor function, activation of Src mediates the induction of the lasting enhancement of excitatory transmission known as long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Also, Src has been found to amplify the up-regulation of NMDA receptor function that is produced by raising the intracellular concentration of sodium. Sodium concentration increases in neuronal dendrites during high levels of firing activity, which is precisely when Src becomes activated. Therefore, we propose that the boost in NMDA receptor function produced by the coincidence of activating Src and raising intracellular sodium may be important in physiological and pathophysiological enhancement of excitatory transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and elsewhere in the central nervous system.

  7. TRPM2 channels mediate acetaminophen-induced liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradpezhouh, Ehsan; Ma, Linlin; Morphett, Arthur; Barritt, Greg J; Rychkov, Grigori Y

    2014-02-25

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most frequently used analgesic and antipyretic drug available over the counter. At the same time, acetaminophen overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure and the leading cause of chronic liver damage requiring liver transplantation in developed countries. Acetaminophen overdose causes a multitude of interrelated biochemical reactions in hepatocytes including the formation of reactive oxygen species, deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, covalent modification and oxidation of proteins, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Although an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in hepatocytes is a known consequence of acetaminophen overdose, its importance in acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity is not well understood, primarily due to lack of knowledge about the source of the Ca(2+) rise. Here we report that the channel responsible for Ca(2+) entry in hepatocytes in acetaminophen overdose is the Transient Receptor Potential Melanostatine 2 (TRPM2) cation channel. We show by whole-cell patch clamping that treatment of hepatocytes with acetaminophen results in activation of a cation current similar to that activated by H2O2 or the intracellular application of ADP ribose. siRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPM2 in hepatocytes inhibits activation of the current by either acetaminophen or H2O2. In TRPM2 knockout mice, acetaminophen-induced liver damage, assessed by the blood concentration of liver enzymes and liver histology, is significantly diminished compared with wild-type mice. The presented data strongly suggest that TRPM2 channels are essential in the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatocellular death.

  8. Using neurolipidomics to identify phospholipid mediators of synaptic (dysfunction in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffany A L Bennett

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Not all of the mysteries of life lie in our genetic code. Some can be found buried in our membranes. These shells of fat, sculpted in the central nervous system into the cellular (and subcellular boundaries of neurons and glia, are themselves complex systems of information. The diversity of neural phospholipids, coupled with their chameleon-like capacity to transmute into bioactive molecules, provides a vast repertoire of immediate response second messengers. The effects of compositional changes on synaptic function have only begun to be appreciated. Here, we mined 29 different neurolipidomic datasets for changes in neuronal membrane phospholipid metabolism in Alzheimer’s Disease. Three overarching metabolic disturbances were detected. We found that an increase in the hydrolysis of platelet activating factor precursors and ethanolamine-containing plasmalogens, coupled with a failure to regenerate relatively rare alkyl-acyl and alkenyl-acyl structural phospholipids, correlated with disease severity. Accumulation of specific bioactive metabolites (i.e., PC(O-16:0/2:0 and PE(P-16:0/0:0 was associated with aggravating tau pathology, enhancing vesicular release, and signaling neuronal loss. Finally, depletion of PI(16:0/20:4, PI(16:0/22:6, and PI(18:0/22:6 was implicated in accelerating Aβ42 biogenesis. Our analysis further suggested that converging disruptions in platelet activating factor, plasmalogen, phosphoinositol and phosphoethanolamine, and docosahexaenoic acid metabolism may contribute mechanistically to catastrophic vesicular depletion, impaired receptor trafficking, and morphological dendritic deformation. Together, this analysis supports an emerging hypothesis that aberrant phospholipid metabolism may be one of multiple critical determinants required for Alzheimer disease conversion.

  9. Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates trafficking of acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) via PSD-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excoffon, Katherine J D A; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Kusama, Nobuyoshi; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Sharma, Priyanka; Hruska-Hageman, Alesia M; Petroff, Elena; Benson, Christopher J

    2012-08-17

    We have previously shown that the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) can interact with post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95) and localize PSD-95 to cell-cell junctions. We have also shown that activity of the acid sensing ion channel (ASIC3), a H(+)-gated cation channel that plays a role in mechanosensation and pain signaling, is negatively modulated by PSD-95 through a PDZ-based interaction. We asked whether CAR and ASIC3 simultaneously interact with PSD-95, and if so, whether co-expression of these proteins alters their cellular distribution and localization. Results indicate that CAR and ASIC3 co-immunoprecipitate only when co-expressed with PSD-95. CAR also brings both PSD-95 and ASIC3 to the junctions of heterologous cells. Moreover, CAR rescues PSD-95-mediated inhibition of ASIC3 currents. These data suggest that, in addition to activity as a viral receptor and adhesion molecule, CAR can play a role in trafficking proteins, including ion channels, in a PDZ-based scaffolding complex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased Expression of the PI3K Enhancer PIKE Mediates Deficits in Synaptic Plasticity and Behavior in Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gross

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K enhancer PIKE links PI3K catalytic subunits to group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1/5 and activates PI3K signaling. The roles of PIKE in synaptic plasticity and the etiology of mental disorders are unknown. Here, we show that increased PIKE expression is a key mediator of impaired mGlu1/5-dependent neuronal plasticity in mouse and fly models of the inherited intellectual disability fragile X syndrome (FXS. Normalizing elevated PIKE protein levels in FXS mice reversed deficits in molecular and cellular plasticity and improved behavior. Notably, PIKE reduction rescued PI3K-dependent and -independent neuronal defects in FXS. We further show that PI3K signaling is increased in a fly model of FXS and that genetic reduction of the Drosophila ortholog of PIKE, CenG1A rescued excessive PI3K signaling, mushroom body defects, and impaired short-term memory in these flies. Our results demonstrate a crucial role of increased PIKE expression in exaggerated mGlu1/5 signaling causing neuronal defects in FXS.

  11. Increased expression of the PI3K enhancer PIKE mediates deficits in synaptic plasticity and behavior in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christina; Chang, Chia-Wei; Kelly, Seth M; Bhattacharya, Aditi; McBride, Sean M J; Danielson, Scott W; Jiang, Michael Q; Chan, Chi Bun; Ye, Keqiang; Gibson, Jay R; Klann, Eric; Jongens, Thomas A; Moberg, Kenneth H; Huber, Kimberly M; Bassell, Gary J

    2015-05-05

    The PI3K enhancer PIKE links PI3K catalytic subunits to group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1/5) and activates PI3K signaling. The roles of PIKE in synaptic plasticity and the etiology of mental disorders are unknown. Here, we show that increased PIKE expression is a key mediator of impaired mGlu1/5-dependent neuronal plasticity in mouse and fly models of the inherited intellectual disability fragile X syndrome (FXS). Normalizing elevated PIKE protein levels in FXS mice reversed deficits in molecular and cellular plasticity and improved behavior. Notably, PIKE reduction rescued PI3K-dependent and -independent neuronal defects in FXS. We further show that PI3K signaling is increased in a fly model of FXS and that genetic reduction of the Drosophila ortholog of PIKE, CenG1A rescued excessive PI3K signaling, mushroom body defects, and impaired short-term memory in these flies. Our results demonstrate a crucial role of increased PIKE expression in exaggerated mGlu1/5 signaling causing neuronal defects in FXS.

  12. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils.

  13. Dopaminergic enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission in layer II entorhinal neurons is dependent on D₁-like receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovaci, I; Caruana, D A; Chapman, C A

    2014-01-31

    The modulatory neurotransmitter dopamine induces concentration-dependent changes in synaptic transmission in the entorhinal cortex, in which high concentrations of dopamine suppress evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and lower concentrations induce an acute synaptic facilitation. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings were used to investigate the dopaminergic facilitation of synaptic responses in layer II neurons of the rat lateral entorhinal cortex. A constant bath application of 1 μM dopamine resulted in a consistent facilitation of EPSPs evoked in layer II fan cells by layer I stimulation; the size of the facilitation was more variable in pyramidal neurons, and synaptic responses in a small group of multiform neurons were not modulated by dopamine. Isolated inhibitory synaptic responses were not affected by dopamine, and the facilitation of EPSPs was not associated with a change in paired-pulse facilitation ratio. Voltage-clamp recordings of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were facilitated by dopamine, but N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents were not. Bath application of the dopamine D₁-like receptor blocker SCH23390 (50 μM), but not the D₂-like receptor blocker sulpiride (50 μM), prevented the facilitation, indicating that it is dependent upon D₁-like receptor activation. Dopamine D₁ receptors lead to activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and including the PKA inhibitor H-89 or KT 5720 in the recording pipette solution prevented the facilitation of EPSCs. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of inhibitor 1 or the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated protein phosphatase (DARPP-32) can lead to a facilitation of AMPA receptor responses by inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) that reduces dephosphorylation of AMPA receptors, and we found here that inhibition of PP1 occluded the facilitatory effect of dopamine. The dopamine

  14. Potentiation of Synaptic GluN2B NMDAR Currents by Fyn Kinase Is Gated through BDNF-Mediated Disinhibition in Spinal Pain Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael E; Xu, Jian; Dedek, Annemarie; Li, Yi; Sengar, Ameet S; Beggs, Simon; Lombroso, Paul J; Salter, Michael W

    2016-12-06

    In chronic pain states, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transforms the output of lamina I spinal neurons by decreasing synaptic inhibition. Pain hypersensitivity also depends on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and Src-family kinases, but the locus of NMDAR dysregulation remains unknown. Here, we show that NMDAR-mediated currents at lamina I synapses are potentiated in a peripheral nerve injury model of neuropathic pain. We find that BDNF mediates NMDAR potentiation through activation of TrkB and phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit by the Src-family kinase Fyn. Surprisingly, we find that Cl(-)-dependent disinhibition is necessary and sufficient to prime potentiation of synaptic NMDARs by BDNF. Thus, we propose that spinal pain amplification is mediated by a feedforward mechanism whereby loss of inhibition gates the increase in synaptic excitation within individual lamina I neurons. Given that neither disinhibition alone nor BDNF-TrkB signaling is sufficient to potentiate NMDARs, we have discovered a form of molecular coincidence detection in lamina I neurons.

  15. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  16. A CNS-permeable Hsp90 inhibitor rescues synaptic dysfunction and memory loss in APP-overexpressing Alzheimer’s mouse model via an HSF1-mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Liu, Yu; Huang, Lianyan; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Jing jing; Wang, Ruishan; Kim, Eunhee; Justicia, Carles; Sakata, Kazuko; Chen, Hao; Planas, Anna; Ostrom, Rennolds S; Li, Wei; Yang, Guang; McDonald, Michael P.; Chen, Ruihong; Heck, Detlef; Liao, Francesca-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Induction of neuroprotective heat-shock proteins via pharmacological Hsp90 inhibitors is currently being investigated as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. Two major hurdles for therapeutic use of Hsp90 inhibitors are systemic toxicity and limited CNS permeability. We demonstrate here that chronic treatment with a proprietary Hsp90 inhibitor compound (OS47720) not only elicits a heat shock-like response, but also offers synaptic protection in symptomatic Tg2576 mice, a model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), without noticeable systemic toxicity. Despite a short half-life of OS47720 in mouse brain, a single intraperitoneal injection induces rapid and long-lasting (> 3 d) nuclear activation of the heat shock factor, HSF1. Mechanistic study indicates that the remedial effects of OS47720 depend upon HSF1 activation and the subsequent HSF-1-mediated transcriptional events on synaptic genes. Taken together, this work reveals a novel role of HSF1 in synaptic function and memory, which likely occurs through modulation of the synaptic transcriptome. PMID:27457810

  17. Neurexin regulates nighttime sleep by modulating synaptic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huawei; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zi Chao; Li, Yi; Han, Junhai

    2016-01-01

    Neurexins are cell adhesion molecules involved in synaptic formation and synaptic transmission. Mutations in neurexin genes are linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), which are frequently associated with sleep problems. However, the role of neurexin-mediated synaptic transmission in sleep regulation is unclear. Here, we show that lack of the Drosophila α-neurexin homolog significantly reduces the quantity and quality of nighttime sleep and impairs sleep homeostasis. We report that neurexin expression in Drosophila mushroom body (MB) αβ neurons is essential for nighttime sleep. We demonstrate that reduced nighttime sleep in neurexin mutants is due to impaired αβ neuronal output, and show that neurexin functionally couples calcium channels (Cac) to regulate synaptic transmission. Finally, we determine that αβ surface (αβs) neurons release both acetylcholine and short neuropeptide F (sNPF), whereas αβ core (αβc) neurons release sNPF to promote nighttime sleep. Our findings reveal that neurexin regulates nighttime sleep by mediating the synaptic transmission of αβ neurons. This study elucidates the role of synaptic transmission in sleep regulation, and might offer insights into the mechanism of sleep disturbances in patients with autism disorders. PMID:27905548

  18. Trisomy of the G protein-coupled K+ channel gene, Kcnj6, affects reward mechanisms, cognitive functions, and synaptic plasticity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ayelet; Grigoryan, Gayane; Guy-David, Liora; Tsoory, Michael M; Chen, Alon; Reuveny, Eitan

    2012-02-14

    G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK) generate slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in the brain via G(i/o) protein-coupled receptors. GIRK2, a GIRK subunit, is widely abundant in the brain and has been implicated in various functions and pathologies, such as learning and memory, reward, motor coordination, and Down syndrome. Down syndrome, the most prevalent cause of mental retardation, results from the presence of an extra maternal chromosome 21 (trisomy 21), which comprises the Kcnj6 gene (GIRK2). The present study examined the behaviors and cellular physiology properties in mice harboring a single trisomy of the Kcnj6 gene. Kcnj6 triploid mice exhibit deficits in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, altered responses to rewards, hampered depotentiation, a form of excitatory synaptic plasticity, and have accentuated long-term synaptic depression. Collectively the findings suggest that triplication of Kcnj6 gene may play an active role in some of the abnormal neurological phenotypes found in Down syndrome.

  19. Amyloid-β induces synaptic dysfunction through G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels in the fimbria-CA3 hippocampal synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio O. Nava-Mesa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Last evidences suggest that, in Alzheimer's disease (AD early stage, Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide induces an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission systems resulting in the functional impairment of neural networks. Such alterations are particularly important in the septohippocampal system where learning and memory processes take place depending on accurate oscillatory activity tuned at fimbria-CA3 synapse. Here, the acute effects of Aβ on CA3 pyramidal neurons and their synaptic activation from septal part of the fimbria were studied in rats. A triphasic postsynaptic response defined by an excitatory potential (EPSP followed by both early and late inhibitory potentials (IPSP was evoked. The EPSP was glutamatergic acting on ionotropic receptors. The early IPSP was blocked by GABAA antagonists whereas the late IPSP was removed by GABAB antagonists. Aβ perfusion induced recorded cells to depolarize, increase their input resistance and decrease the late IPSP. Aβ action mechanism was localized at postsynaptic level and most likely linked to GABAB-related ion channels conductance decrease. In addition, it was found that the specific pharmacological modulation of the GABAB receptor effector, G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GirK channels, mimicked all Aβ effects previously described. Thus, our findings suggest that Aβ altering GirK channels conductance in CA3 pyramidal neurons might have a key role in the septohippocampal activity dysfunction observed in AD.

  20. Association of potassium channel Kv3.4 subunits with pre- and post-synaptic structures in brainstem and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, R E; Atkinson, L; Batten, T F C; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2004-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are divided into eight subfamilies (Kv1-8) and play a major role in determining the excitability of neurones. Members of the Kv3 subfamily are highly abundant in the CNS, with each Kv3 gene (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) exhibiting a unique pattern of expression, although single neurones can express more than one subtype. Of the Kv3 subunits relatively little is known of the Kv3.4 subunit distribution in the nervous system, particularly in the brainstem and spinal cord of the rat. We performed immunohistochemistry to determine both the cellular and sub-cellular distribution of the Kv3.4 subunit in these areas. Kv3.4 subunit immunoreactivity (Kv3.4-IR) was widespread, with dense, punctate staining in many regions including the intermediolateral cell column (IML) and the dorsal vagal nucleus (DVN), nucleus ambiguus (NA) and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). In the ventral horn a presynaptic location was confirmed by co-localization of Kv3.4-IR with the synaptic vesicle protein, SV2 and also with the glutamate vesicle markers vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT) 1, VGluT2 or the glycine transporter GlyT2, suggesting a role for the channel in both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Electron microscopy confirmed a presynaptic terminal location of Kv3.4-IR in the VH, IML, DVN, NA and NTS. Interestingly however, patches of Kv3.4-IR were also revealed postsynaptically in dendritic and somatic structures throughout these areas. This staining was striking due to its localization at synaptic junctions at terminals with morphological features consistent with excitatory functions, suggesting an association with the postsynaptic density. Therefore the pre and postsynaptic localization of Kv3.4-IR suggests a role both in the control of transmitter release and in regulating neuronal excitability.

  1. EphA4 Activation of c-Abl Mediates Synaptic Loss and LTP Blockade Caused by Amyloid-β Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Vargas, Lina; Leal, Nancy; Estrada, Lisbell D.; González, Adrian; Serrano, Felipe; Araya, Katherine; Gysling, Katia; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.

    2014-01-01

    The early stages of Alzheimer's disease are characterised by impaired synaptic plasticity and synapse loss. Here, we show that amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs) activate the c-Abl kinase in dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons and that c-Abl kinase activity is required for AβOs-induced synaptic loss. We also show that the EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase is upstream of c-Abl activation by AβOs. EphA4 tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) is increased in cultured neurons and synaptoneurosomes exposed to AβOs, and in Alzheimer-transgenic mice brain. We do not detect c-Abl activation in EphA4-knockout neurons exposed to AβOs. More interestingly, we demonstrate EphA4/c-Abl activation is a key-signalling event that mediates the synaptic damage induced by AβOs. According to this results, the EphA4 antagonistic peptide KYL and c-Abl inhibitor STI prevented i) dendritic spine reduction, ii) the blocking of LTP induction and iii) neuronal apoptosis caused by AβOs. Moreover, EphA4-/- neurons or sh-EphA4-transfected neurons showed reduced synaptotoxicity by AβOs. Our results are consistent with EphA4 being a novel receptor that mediates synaptic damage induced by AβOs. EphA4/c-Abl signalling could be a relevant pathway involved in the early cognitive decline observed in Alzheimer's disease patients. PMID:24658113

  2. Ethanol exposure during the third trimester equivalent does not affect GABAA or AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous synaptic transmission in rat CA3 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Baculis, Brian Charles; Valenzuela, Carlos Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol exposure during the rodent equivalent to the 3rd trimester of human pregnancy (i.e., first 1–2 weeks of neonatal life) has been shown to produce structural and functional alterations in the CA3 hippocampal sub-region, which is involved in associative memory. Synaptic plasticity mechanisms dependent on retrograde release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) driven by activation of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs) are thought to play a role in stabilization...

  3. Nanobody mediated crystallization of an archeal mechanosensitive channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Löw

    Full Text Available Mechanosensitive channels (MS are integral membrane proteins and allow bacteria to survive sudden changes in external osmolarity due to transient opening of their pores. The efflux of cytoplasmic osmolytes reduces the membrane tension and prevents membrane rupture. Therefore these channels serve as emergency valves when experiencing significant environmental stress. The preparation of high quality crystals of integral membrane proteins is a major bottleneck for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Crystallization chaperones based on various protein scaffolds have emerged as promising tool to increase the crystallization probability of a selected target protein. So far archeal mechanosensitive channels of small conductance have resisted crystallization in our hands. To structurally analyse these channels, we selected nanobodies against an archeal MS channel after immunization of a llama with recombinant expressed, detergent solubilized and purified protein. Here we present the characterization of 23 different binders regarding their interaction with the channel protein using analytical gel filtration, western blotting and surface plasmon resonance. Selected nanobodies bound the target with affinities in the pico- to nanomolar range and some binders had a profound effect on the crystallization of the MS channel. Together with previous data we show that nanobodies are a versatile and valuable tool in structural biology by widening the crystallization space for highly challenging proteins, protein complexes and integral membrane proteins.

  4. Ca2+ channels as integrators of G protein-mediated signaling in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Jesse; Diversé-Pierluissi, María A

    2004-11-01

    The observations from Dunlap and Fischbach that transmitter-mediated shortening of the duration of action potentials could be caused by a decrease in calcium conductance led to numerous studies of the mechanisms of modulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Calcium channels are well known targets for inhibition by receptor-G protein pathways, and multiple forms of inhibition have been described. Inhibition of Ca(2+) channels can be mediated by G protein betagamma-subunits or by kinases, such as protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. In the last few years, it has been shown that integration of G protein signaling can take place at the level of the calcium channel by regulation of the interaction of the channel pore-forming subunit with different cellular proteins.

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily M Member 8 channels mediate the anti-inflammatory effects of eucalyptol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Ana I; Liu, Boyi; Jabba, Sairam V; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Morris, John B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2017-05-01

    Eucalyptol (1,8-cineol), the major ingredient in the essential oil of eucalyptus leaves and other medicinal plants, has long been known for its anti-inflammatory properties. Eucalyptol interacts with the TRP cation channels among other targets, but it is unclear which of these mediates its anti-inflammatory effects. Effects of eucalyptol were compared in wild-type and TRPM8 channel-deficient mice in two different models: footpad inflammation elicited by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and pulmonary inflammation following administration of LPS. Oedema formation, behavioural inflammatory pain responses, leukocyte infiltration, enzyme activities and cytokine and chemokine levels were measured. In the CFA model, eucalyptol strongly attenuated oedema and mechanical allodynia and reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6), effects comparable with those of ibuprofen. In the LPS model of pulmonary inflammation, eucalyptol treatment diminished leukocyte infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity and production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-6. Genetic deletion of TRPM8 channels abolished the anti-inflammatory effects of eucalyptol in both models. Eucalyptol was at least sixfold more potent on human, than on mouse TRPM8 channels. A metabolite of eucalyptol, 2-hydroxy-1,8-cineol, also activated human TRPM8 channels. Among the pharmacological targets of eucalyptol, TRPM8 channels were essential for its anti-inflammatory effects in mice. Human TRPM8 channels are more sensitive to eucalyptol than rodent TRPM8 channels explaining the higher potency of eucalyptol in humans. Metabolites of eucalyptol could contribute to its anti-inflammatory effects. The development of more potent and selective TRPM8 agonists may yield novel anti-inflammatory agents. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Is ion channel selectivity mediated by confined water?

    CERN Document Server

    Prada-Gracia, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels form pores across the lipid bilayer, selectively allowing inorganic ions to cross the membrane down their electrochemical gradient. While the study of ion desolvation free-energies have attracted much attention, the role of water inside the pore is less clear. Here, molecular dynamics simulations of a reduced model of the KcsA selectivity filter indicate that the equilibrium position of Na+, but not of K+, is strongly influenced by confined water. The latter forms a stable complex with Na+, moving the equilibrium position of the ion to the plane of the backbone carbonyls. Almost at the centre of the binding site, the water molecule is trapped by favorable electrostatic interactions and backbone hydrogen-bonds. In the absence of confined water the equilibrium position of both Na+ and K+ is identical. Our observations strongly suggest a previously unnoticed active role of confined water in the selectivity mechanism of ion channels.

  7. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  8. BAX channel activity mediates lysosomal disruption linked to Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bové, Jordi; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Dehay, Benjamin; Perier, Celine; Recasens, Ariadna; Bombrun, Agnes; Antonsson, Bruno; Vila, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Lysosomal disruption is increasingly regarded as a major pathogenic event in Parkinson disease (PD). A reduced number of intraneuronal lysosomes, decreased levels of lysosomal-associated proteins and accumulation of undegraded autophagosomes (AP) are observed in PD-derived samples, including fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and post-mortem brain tissue. Mechanistic studies in toxic and genetic rodent PD models attribute PD-related lysosomal breakdown to abnormal lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PD-linked LMP and subsequent lysosomal defects remain virtually unknown, thereby precluding their potential therapeutic targeting. Here we show that the pro-apoptotic protein BAX (BCL2-associated X protein), which permeabilizes mitochondrial membranes in PD models and is activated in PD patients, translocates and internalizes into lysosomal membranes early following treatment with the parkinsonian neurotoxin MPTP, both in vitro and in vivo, within a time-frame correlating with LMP, lysosomal disruption, and autophagosome accumulation and preceding mitochondrial permeabilization and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Supporting a direct permeabilizing effect of BAX on lysosomal membranes, recombinant BAX is able to induce LMP in purified mouse brain lysosomes and the latter can be prevented by pharmacological blockade of BAX channel activity. Furthermore, pharmacological BAX channel inhibition is able to prevent LMP, restore lysosomal levels, reverse AP accumulation, and attenuate mitochondrial permeabilization and overall nigrostriatal degeneration caused by MPTP, both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, our results reveal that PD-linked lysosomal impairment relies on BAX-induced LMP, and point to small molecules able to block BAX channel activity as potentially beneficial to attenuate both lysosomal defects and neurodegeneration occurring in PD.

  9. Oxygen/glucose deprivation induces a reduction in synaptic AMPA receptors on hippocampal CA3 neurons mediated by mGluR1 and adenosine A3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G; Henley, Jeremy M; Mellor, Jack R

    2011-08-17

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighboring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca(2+), resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear whether the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 min OGD protocol, a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC, or chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalization of AMPARs after OGD. We also show that a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalization. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection.

  10. Oxygen/glucose Deprivation Induces a Reduction in Synaptic AMPA Receptors on Hippocampal CA3 Neurons Mediated by mGluR1 and A3 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighbouring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+ resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear if the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 minute OGD protocol a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC or chelation of intracellular Ca2+ also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalisation of AMPARs after OGD. We also show a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalisation. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection. PMID:21849555

  11. LSPS/Optogenetics to Improve Synaptic Connectivity Mapping: Unmasking the Role of Basket Cell-Mediated Feedforward Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Julia; Mattis, Joanna; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neocortical pyramidal cells (PYRs) receive synaptic inputs from many types of GABAergic interneurons. Connections between parvalbumin (PV)-positive, fast-spiking interneurons (“PV cells”) and PYRs are characterized by perisomatic synapses and high-amplitude, short-latency IPSCs. Here, we present novel methods to study the functional influence of PV cells on layer 5 PYRs using optogenetics combined with laser-scanning photostimulation (LSPS). First, we examined the strength and spatial distribution of PV-to-PYR inputs. To that end, the fast channelrhodopsin variant AAV5-EF1α-DIO-hChR2(E123T)-eYFP (ChETA) was expressed in PV cells in somatosensory cortex of mice using an adeno-associated virus-based viral construct. Focal blue illumination (100–150 µm half-width) was directed through the microscope objective to excite PV cells along a spatial grid covering layers 2–6, while IPSCs were recorded in layer 5 PYRs. The resulting optogenetic input maps showed evoked PV cell inputs originating from an ∼500-μm-diameter area surrounding the recorded PYR. Evoked IPSCs had the short-latency/high-amplitude characteristic of PV cell inputs. Second, we investigated how PV cell activity modulates PYR output in response to synaptic excitation. We expressed halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0) in PV cells using the same strategy as for ChETA. Yellow illumination hyperpolarized eNpHR3.0-expressing PV cells, effectively preventing action potential generation and thus decreasing the inhibition of downstream targets. Synaptic input maps onto layer 5 PYRs were acquired using standard glutamate-photolysis LSPS either with or without full-field yellow illumination to silence PV cells. The resulting IPSC input maps selectively lacked short-latency perisomatic inputs, while EPSC input maps showed increased connectivity, particularly from upper layers. This indicates that glutamate uncaging LSPS-based excitatory synaptic maps will consistently underestimate connectivity. PMID

  12. Transmission to interneurons is via slow excitatory synaptic potentials mediated by P2Y(1 receptors during descending inhibition in guinea-pig ileum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D J Thornton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nature of synaptic transmission at functionally distinct synapses in intestinal reflex pathways has not been fully identified. In this study, we investigated whether transmission between interneurons in the descending inhibitory pathway is mediated by a purine acting at P2Y receptors to produce slow excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Myenteric neurons from guinea-pig ileum in vitro were impaled with intracellular microelectrodes. Responses to distension 15 mm oral to the recording site, in a separately perfused stimulation chamber and to electrical stimulation of local nerve trunks were recorded. A subset of neurons, previously identified as nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive descending interneurons, responded to both stimuli with slow EPSPs that were reversibly abolished by a high concentration of PPADS (30 μM, P2 receptor antagonist. When added to the central chamber of a three chambered organ bath, PPADS concentration-dependently depressed transmission through that chamber of descending inhibitory reflexes, measured as inhibitory junction potentials in the circular muscle of the anal chamber. Reflexes evoked by distension in the central chamber were unaffected. A similar depression of transmission was seen when the specific P2Y(1 receptor antagonist MRS 2179 (10 μM was in the central chamber. Blocking either nicotinic receptors (hexamethonium 200 μM or 5-HT(3 receptors (granisetron 1 μM together with P2 receptors had no greater effect than blocking P2 receptors alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Slow EPSPs mediated by P2Y(1 receptors, play a primary role in transmission between descending interneurons of the inhibitory reflexes in the guinea-pig ileum. This is the first demonstration for a primary role of excitatory metabotropic receptors in physiological transmission at a functionally identified synapse.

  13. Potentiation of Acetylcholine-Mediated Facilitation of Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission by an Azaindolizione Derivative, ZSET1446 (ST101), in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Yoshimasa; Hino, Masataka; Kato, Fusao

    2016-02-01

    The integrity of the hippocampal network depends on the coordination of excitatory and inhibitory signaling, which are under dynamic control by various regulatory influences such as the cholinergic systems. ZSET1446 (ST101; spiro[imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3,2-indan]-2(3H)-one) is a newly synthesized azaindolizinone derivative that significantly improves learning deficits in various types of Alzheimer disease (AD) models in rats. We examined the effect of ZSET1446 on the nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR)-mediated regulation of synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices of rats. ZSET1446 significantly potentiated the facilitatory effect of nicotine and ACh on the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) recorded in CA1 pyramidal neurons with a maximum effect at 100 pM (tested range, 10 pM-1000 pM). The basal sPSC frequency without ACh was not affected. Such potentiation by ZSET1446 was observed in both the pharmacologic isolations of inhibitory and excitatory sPSCs and markedly reduced by blockade of either α7 or α4β2 nAChRs. ZSET1446 did not affect ACh-activated inward currents or depolarization of interneurons in the stratum radiatum and the lacunosum moleculare. These results indicate that ZSET1446 potentiates the nicotine-mediated enhancement of synaptic transmission in the hippocampal neurons without affecting nAChRs themselves, providing a novel possible mechanism of procognitive action that might improve learning deficits in clinical therapy.

  14. Postnatal Loss of P/Q-type Channels Confined to Rhombic Lip Derived Neurons Alters Synaptic Transmission at the Parallel Fiber to Purkinje Cell Synapse and Replicates Genomic Cacna1a Mutation Phenotype of Ataxia and Seizures in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Takashi; Wollenweber, Patric; Teusner, Lena U. C.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Herlitze, Stefan; Mark, Melanie D.

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia, episodic dyskinesia and thalamocortical seizures are associated with an inherited loss of P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function. P/Q-type channels are widely expressed throughout the neuraxis, obscuring identification of the critical networks underlying these complex neurological disorders. We recently showed that the conditional postnatal loss of P/Q-type channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in mice (purky) leads to these aberrant phenotypes, suggesting that intrinsic alteration in PC output is a sufficient pathogenic factor for disease initiation. The question arises whether P/Q-type channel deletion confined to a single upstream cerebellar synapse might induce the pathophysiological abnormality of genomically inherited P/Q-type channel disorders. PCs integrate two excitatory inputs, climbing fibers from inferior olive and parallel fibers (PFs) from granule cells (GCs) that receive mossy fiber (MF) input derived from precerebellar nuclei. In this paper, we introduce a new mouse model with a selective knock-out of P/Q-type channels in rhombic lip derived neurons including PF- and MF-pathways (quirky). We found that in quirky mice, PF-PC synaptic transmission is reduced during low-frequency stimulation. Using focal light stimulation of GCs that express optogenetic light-sensitive channels, channelrhodopsin-2, we found that modulation of PC firing via GC input is reduced in quirky mice. Phenotypic analysis revealed that quirky mice display ataxia, dyskinesia and absence epilepsy. These results suggest that developmental alteration of patterned input confined to only one of the main afferent cerebellar excitatory synaptic pathways has a significant role in generating the neurological phenotype associated with the global genomic loss of P/Q-type channel function. PMID:23516282

  15. Enhanced group II mGluR-mediated inhibition of pain-related synaptic plasticity in the amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird Gary C

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latero-capsular part of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC is the target of the spino-parabrachio-amygdaloid pain pathway. Our previous studies showed that CeLC neurons develop synaptic plasticity and increased neuronal excitability in the kaolin/carrageenan model of arthritic pain. These pain-related changes involve presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and postsynaptic NMDA and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP1 receptors. Here we address the role of group II mGluRs. Results Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings were made from CeLC neurons in brain slices from control rats and arthritic rats (>6 h postinjection of kaolin/carrageenan into the knee. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs were evoked by electrical stimulation of afferents from the pontine parabrachial (PB area. A selective group II mGluR agonist (LY354740 decreased the amplitude of EPSCs more potently in CeLC neurons from arthritic rats (IC50 = 0.59 nM than in control animals (IC50 = 15.0 nM. The inhibitory effect of LY354740 was reversed by a group II mGluR antagonist (EGLU but not a GABAA receptor antagonist (bicuculline. LY354740 decreased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature EPSCs in the presence of TTX. No significant changes of neuronal excitability measures (membrane slope conductance and action potential firing rate were detected. Conclusion Our data suggest that group II mGluRs act presynaptically to modulate synaptic plasticity in the amygdala in a model of arthritic pain.

  16. Effects of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels on nitroglycerin-mediated vasorelaxation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruhn, Nicolai; Boesgaard, Søren; Eiberg, Jonas

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-induced vasorelaxation and the regulation of endothelial superoxide anion levels is partly mediated by vascular large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels. Nitroglycerin acts through the release of NO and its effect is modulated by changes in endothelial superoxide...... levels. This study examines the effect of BK(Ca) channel blockade on nitroglycerin-induced vasorelaxation in human arterial and venous vascular segments and whether responses to BK(Ca) channel blockade are influenced by the development of venous nitroglycerin tolerance. Dose-relaxation curves...... suggest that primarily arterial effects of nitroglycerin are significantly inhibited by changes in the activity of the endothelial BK(Ca) channels. Although endothelial BK(Ca) are likely regulators of mechanisms underlying arterial tolerance development to nitroglycerin, they do not appear to play a role...

  17. Intracellular calcium elevation during plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptor activation in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is primarily due to calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yoshiaki; Kodama, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Sadahiro; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi

    2014-05-01

    We reported previously that plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) can be induced either by synaptic stimulation in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoresis of NMDA in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. To examine whether the plateau potentials are accompanied by an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and to determine the source of Ca2+ elevation, we performed Ca2+ imaging during the plateau potential. Neurons were loaded with Ca2+ indicator fluo-4, and the plateau potentials were generated either synaptically in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoretically applying NMDA. We have found that a transient elevation in intracellular Ca2+ accompanies the plateau potential. The synaptically induced plateau potential and the Ca2+ elevation were blocked by 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (5,7-dCK), an antagonist for the glycine-binding sites of NMDAR. A mixture of Cd2+ and tetrodotoxin did not block NMDA-induced plateau potentials, but completely abolished the accompanying Ca2+ elevation in both the presence and absence of Mg2+ ions in the bathing solution. The NMDA-induced plateau potential was blocked by further adding 5,7-dCK. Our results show that the NMDAR-mediated plateau potential is accompanied by elevation of intracellular Ca2+ that is primarily caused by the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K+ channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis

    OpenAIRE

    William eHamlet; Yu-Wei eLiu; Zhengquang eTang; Yong eLu

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along...

  19. Network excitability in a model of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy critically depends on SK channel-mediated AHP currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Robert; Kirschstein, Timo; Brehme, Hannes; Porath, Katrin; Mikkat, Ulrike; Köhling, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons generate an after-hyperpolarization (AHP) whose medium component is thought to be generated by small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK channels). Neuronal excitability is increased in epilepsy, and the AHP in turn is fundamentally involved in regulation of cellular excitability. We therefore investigated the involvement of the SK channel-mediated AHP in controlling cell and network excitability in the pilocarpine model epilepsy. Both acutely isolated CA1 pyramidal cells and isolated hippocampal slices were investigated in terms of the impact of SK channel-mediated AHP on hyperexcitability. Our findings show that pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats exhibit significantly reduced SK channel-mediated hyperpolarizing outward current which was accompanied by a significant decrease in the somatic AHP. Paradoxically, inhibiting SK channels strongly exacerbated 0-Mg(2+)-induced epileptiform activity in slices from pilocarpine-treated animals, while having a significantly smaller effect in control tissue. This suggests that in chronically epileptic tissue, network excitability very critically depends on the remaining SK-channel mediated AHP. Additional real-time RT-PCR and semiquantitative Western blot experiments revealed that both the SK2 channel transcript and protein were significantly downregulated in the epileptic CA1 region. We conclude that SK2 channels are down-regulated in chronic epilepsy underlying the impaired SK channel function in CA1 pyramidal cells, and a further reduction of the remaining critical mass of SK channels results in an acute network decompensation.

  20. Purkinje cell intrinsic excitability increases after synaptic long term depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Santamaria, Fidel

    2016-09-01

    Coding in cerebellar Purkinje cells not only depends on synaptic plasticity but also on their intrinsic membrane excitability. We performed whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Purkinje cells in sagittal cerebellar slices in mice. We found that inducing long-term depression (LTD) in the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses results in an increase in the gain of the firing rate response. This increase in excitability is accompanied by an increase in the input resistance and a decrease in the amplitude of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel-mediated voltage sag. Application of a HCN channel blocker prevents the increase in input resistance and excitability without blocking the expression of synaptic LTD. We conclude that the induction of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell LTD is accompanied by an increase in excitability of Purkinje cells through downregulation of the HCN-mediated h current. We suggest that HCN downregulation is linked to the biochemical pathway that sustains synaptic LTD. Given the diversity of information carried by the parallel fiber system, we suggest that changes in intrinsic excitability enhance the coding capacity of the Purkinje cell to specific input sources.

  1. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  2. Involvement of anion channels in mediating elicitor-induced ATP efflux in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Jing; Siu, Ka-Chai; Wu, Jian-Yong

    2011-01-15

    This study examines the roles of anion channels and ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein transporters in mediating elicitor-induced ATP release in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures. The elicitor-induced ATP release was effectively blocked by two putative membrane anion channel blockers, niflumic acid and Zn(2+), but not by a specific Cl(-) channel blocker, phenylanthranilic acid. The elicitor-induced ATP release was also significantly suppressed by two ABC inhibitors, glibenclamide and ethacrynic acid. Notable ATP release from the hairy roots was also induced by verapamil (2mM), an ABC activator in animal cells. The verapamil-induced ATP release was effectively blocked by niflumic acid, but only slightly inhibited by the ABC inhibitors. Another notable effect of verapamil was the induction of exocytosis, the secretion of vesicle-like particles to the root surface. The verapamil-induced exocytosis was not inhibited by nifulumic acid and YE did not induce the exocytosis. Overall, the results suggest a significant role of anion channels, a possible involvement of ABC proteins and no significant involvement of exocytosis in mediating the ATP efflux in hairy root cells.

  3. Chloride channels mediate sodium sulphide-induced relaxation in rat uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijušković, Ana; Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Dušić, Zorana Oreščanin; Slavić, Marija; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen sulphide reduces uterine contractility and is of potential interest as a treatment for uterine disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of sodium sulphide (Na2 S)-induced relaxation of rat uterus, investigate the importance of redox effects and ion channel-mediated mechanisms, and any interactions between these two mechanisms. Organ bath studies were employed to assess the pharmacological effects of Na2 S in uterine strips by exposing them to Na2 S with or without Cl(-) channel blockers (DIDS, NFA, IAA-94, T16Ainh-A01, TA), raised KCl (15 and 75 mM), K(+) channel inhibitors (glibenclamide, TEA, 4-AP), L-type Ca(2+) channel activator (S-Bay K 8644), propranolol and methylene blue. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in homogenates of treated uteri. The expression of bestrophin channel 1 (BEST-1) was determined by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Na2 S caused concentration-dependent reversible relaxation of spontaneously active and calcium-treated uteri, affecting both amplitude and frequency of contractions. Uteri exposed to 75 mM KCl were less sensitive to Na2 S compared with uteri in 15 mM KCl. Na2 S-induced relaxations were abolished by DIDS, but unaffected by other modulators or by the absence of extracellular HCO3 (-) , suggesting the involvement of chloride ion channels. Na2 S in combination with different modulators provoked specific changes in the anti-oxidant profiles of uteri. The expression of BEST-1, both mRNA and protein, was demonstrated in rat uteri. The relaxant effects of Na2 S in rat uteri are mediated mainly via a DIDS-sensitive Cl(-) -pathway. Components of the relaxation are redox- and Ca(2+) -dependent. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Optogenetics and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu-feng; Jackson, Michael F; Macdonald, John F

    2013-11-01

    The intricate and complex interaction between different populations of neurons in the brain has imposed limits on our ability to gain detailed understanding of synaptic transmission and its integration when employing classical electrophysiological approaches. Indeed, electrical field stimulation delivered via traditional microelectrodes does not permit the targeted, precise and selective control of neuronal activity amongst a varied population of neurons and their inputs (eg, cholinergic, dopaminergic or glutamatergic neurons). Recently established optogenetic techniques overcome these limitations allowing precise control of the target neuron populations, which is essential for the elucidation of the neural substrates underlying complex animal behaviors. Indeed, by introducing light-activated channels (ie, microbial opsin genes) into specific neuronal populations, optogenetics enables non-invasive optical control of specific neurons with milliseconds precision. These approaches can readily be applied to freely behaving live animals. Recently there is increased interests in utilizing optogenetics tools to understand synaptic plasticity and learning/memory. Here, we summarize recent progress in applying optogenetics in in the study of synaptic plasticity.

  5. GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors-mediate synaptic currents in hippocampal interneurons and pyramidal cells in juvenile mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob evon Engelhardt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The differential regulation of the two major N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR subunits GluN2A and GluN2B during development in forebrain pyramidal cells has been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, much less is known about the role of GluN2D, which is expressed at low levels and is downregulated following the second postnatal week. However, it appears that few cells, presumably interneurons, continue to express GluN2D also in juvenile mice. To investigate which hippocampal cell types express this subunit, we generated transgenic mice with EGFP-tagged GluN2D receptors. The expression of the transgene was confined to hippocampal interneurons, most of which were parvalbumin- and/or somatostatin-positive. Electrophysiological and morphological analyses showed that GluN2D was present mainly in fast spiking basket and axo-axonic cells. Based on pharmacological evidence and electrophysiological analysis of GluN2D knockout mice, we conclude that GluN2D-containing NMDARs mediate synaptic currents in hippocampal interneurons of young and juvenile mice and in CA1 pyramidal neurons of newborn mice.

  6. EEA1 restores homeostatic synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons from Rett syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2017-08-15

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mecp2 deletion in mice results in an imbalance of excitation and inhibition in hippocampal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' synaptic plasticity. We show that Mecp2-deficient neurons also lack homeostatic synaptic plasticity, likely due to reduced levels of EEA1, a protein involved in AMPA receptor endocytosis. Expression of EEA1 restored homeostatic synaptic plasticity in Mecp2-deficient neurons, providing novel targets of intervention in Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Deletion of Mecp2 in mice results in an imbalance of synaptic excitation and inhibition in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' long-term synaptic plasticity. Since the excitatory-inhibitory balance is maintained by homeostatic mechanisms, we examined the role of MeCP2 in homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) at excitatory synapses. Negative feedback HSP, also known as synaptic scaling, maintains the global synaptic strength of individual neurons in response to sustained alterations in neuronal activity. Hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout (KO) mice do not show the characteristic homeostatic scaling up of the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and of synaptic levels of the GluA1 subunit of AMPA-type glutamate receptors after 48 h silencing with the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin. This deficit in HSP is bidirectional because Mecp2 KO neurons also failed to scale down mEPSC amplitudes and GluA1 synaptic levels after 48 h blockade of type A GABA receptor (GABAA R)-mediated inhibition with bicuculline. Consistent with the role of synaptic trafficking of AMPA-type of glutamate receptors in HSP, Mecp2 KO neurons

  7. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the

  8. Elevated potassium elicits recurrent surges of large GABAA-receptor-mediated post-synaptic currents in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Yu, Wilson; Sutton, Alex; Calos, Megan; Carlen, Peter Louis

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we found that rat hippocampal CA3 interneurons become hyperactive with increasing concentrations of extracellular K(+) up to 10 mM. However, it is unclear how this enhanced interneuronal activity affects pyramidal neurons. Here we voltage-clamped rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in vitro at 0 mV to isolate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) and measured these in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) and with 10 mM K(+) bath perfusion. In aCSF, small IPSCs were present with amplitudes of 0.053 ± 0.007 nA and a frequency of 0.27 ± 0.14 Hz. With 10 mM K(+) perfusion, IPSCs increased greatly in frequency and amplitude, culminating in surge events with peak amplitudes of 0.56 ± 0.08 nA, that appeared and disappeared cyclically with durations lasting 2.02 ± 0.37 min repeatedly, up to 10 times over a 30-min bath perfusion of elevated K(+). These large IPSCs were GABA(A)-receptor mediated and did not involve significant desensitization of this receptor. Perfusion of a GABA transporter inhibitor (NO-711), glutamate receptor inhibitors CNQX and APV, or a gap junctional blocker (carbenoxolone) prevented the resurgence of large IPSCs. Pressure ejected sucrose resulted in the abolishment of subsequent surges. No elevated K(+)-mediated surges were observed in CA3 interneurons from the stratum oriens layer. In conclusion, these cyclic large IPSC events observable in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 10 mM KCl may be due to transient GABA depletion from continuously active interneuronal afferents.

  9. TRPV3 Channels Mediate Strontium-Induced Mouse-Egg Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Carvacho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, calcium influx is required for oocyte maturation and egg activation. The molecular identities of the calcium-permeant channels that underlie the initiation of embryonic development are not established. Here, we describe a transient receptor potential (TRP ion channel current activated by TRP agonists that is absent in TrpV3−/− eggs. TRPV3 current is differentially expressed during oocyte maturation, reaching a peak of maximum density and activity at metaphase of meiosis II (MII, the stage of fertilization. Selective activation of TRPV3 channels provokes egg activation by mediating massive calcium entry. Widely used to activate eggs, strontium application is known to yield normal offspring in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer. We show that TRPV3 is required for strontium influx, because TrpV3−/− eggs failed to conduct Sr2+ or undergo strontium-induced activation. We propose that TRPV3 is a major mediator of calcium influx in mouse eggs and is a putative target for artificial egg activation.

  10. Similar cation channels mediate protection from cerebellar exitotoxicity by exercise and inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Shani; Ofek, Keren; Barbash, Shahar; Meiri, Hanoch; Kovalev, Eugenia; Greenberg, David Samuel; Soreq, Hermona; Shoham, Shai

    2012-03-01

    Exercise and inherited factors both affect recovery from stroke and head injury, but the underlying mechanisms and interconnections between them are yet unknown. Here, we report that similar cation channels mediate the protective effect of exercise and specific genetic background in a kainate injection model of cerebellar stroke. Microinjection to the cerebellum of the glutamatergic agonist, kainate, creates glutamatergic excito\\xE2\\x80\\x90toxicity characteristic of focal stroke, head injury or alcoholism. Inherited protection and prior exercise were both accompanied by higher cerebellar expression levels of the Kir6.1 ATP-dependent potassium channel in adjacent Bergmann glia, and voltage-gated KVbeta2 and cyclic nucleotide-gated cation HCN1 channels in basket cells. Sedentary FVB/N and exercised C57BL/6 mice both expressed higher levels of these cation channels compared to sedentary C57BL/6 mice, and were both found to be less sensitive to glutamate toxicity. Moreover, blocking ATP-dependent potassium channels with Glibenclamide enhanced kainate-induced cell death in cerebellar slices from the resilient sedentary FVB/N mice. Furthermore, exercise increased the number of acetylcholinesterase-positive fibres in the molecular layer, reduced cerebellar cytokine levels and suppressed serum acetylcholinesterase activity, suggesting anti-inflammatory protection by enhanced cholinergic signalling. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that routine exercise and specific genetic backgrounds confer protection from cerebellar glutamatergic damages by similar molecular mechanisms, including elevated expression of cation channels. In addition, our findings highlight the involvement of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in insult-inducible cerebellar processes. These mechanisms are likely to play similar roles in other brain regions and injuries as well, opening new venues for targeted research efforts.

  11. Self-consistent Dark Matter simplified models with an s-channel scalar mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicole F.; Busoni, Giorgio; Sanderson, Isaac W.

    2017-03-01

    We examine Simplified Models in which fermionic DM interacts with Standard Model (SM) fermions via the exchange of an s-channel scalar mediator. The single-mediator version of this model is not gauge invariant, and instead we must consider models with two scalar mediators which mix and interfere. The minimal gauge invariant scenario involves the mixing of a new singlet scalar with the Standard Model Higgs boson, and is tightly constrained. We construct two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) extensions of this scenario, where the singlet mixes with the 2nd Higgs doublet. Compared with the one doublet model, this provides greater freedom for the masses and mixing angle of the scalar mediators, and their coupling to SM fermions. We outline constraints on these models, and discuss Yukawa structures that allow enhanced couplings, yet keep potentially dangerous flavour violating processes under control. We examine the direct detection phenomenology of these models, accounting for interference of the scalar mediators, and interference of different quarks in the nucleus. Regions of parameter space consistent with direct detection measurements are determined.

  12. Blockade of microglial KATP -channel abrogates suppression of inflammatory-mediated inhibition of neural precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Francisco J; Vukovic, Jana; Rodríguez, Manuel J; Bartlett, Perry F

    2014-02-01

    Microglia positively affect neural progenitor cell physiology through the release of inflammatory mediators or trophic factors. We demonstrated previously that reactive microglia foster K(ATP) -channel expression and that blocking this channel using glibenclamide administration enhances striatal neurogenesis after stroke. In this study, we investigated whether the microglial K(ATP) -channel directly influences the activation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) from the subventricular zone using transgenic Csf1r-GFP mice. In vitro exposure of NPCs to lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma resulted in a significant decrease in precursor cell number. The complete removal of microglia from the culture or exposure to enriched microglia culture also decreased the precursor cell number. The addition of glibenclamide rescued the negative effects of enriched microglia on neurosphere formation and promoted a ∼20% improvement in precursor cell number. Similar results were found using microglial-conditioned media from isolated microglia. Using primary mixed glial and pure microglial cultures, glibenclamide specifically targeted reactive microglia to restore neurogenesis and increased the microglial production of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). These findings provide the first direct evidence that the microglial K(ATP) -channel is a regulator of the proliferation of NPCs under inflammatory conditions.

  13. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  14. Acrolein-mediated conduction loss is partially restored by K⁺ channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui; Page, Jessica C; Shi, Riyi

    2016-02-01

    Acrolein-mediated myelin damage is thought to be a critical mechanism leading to conduction failure following neurotrauma and neurodegenerative diseases. The exposure and activation of juxtaparanodal voltage-gated K(+) channels due to myelin damage leads to conduction block, and K(+) channel blockers have long been studied as a means for restoring axonal conduction in spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we have found that 100 μM K(+) channel blockers 4-aminopyridine-3-methanol (4-AP-3-MeOH), and to a lesser degree 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), can significantly restore compound action potential (CAP) conduction in spinal cord tissue following acrolein-mediated myelin damage using a well-established ex vivo SCI model. In addition, 4-AP-3-MeOH can effectively restore CAP conduction in acrolein-damaged axons with a range of concentrations from 0.1 to 100 μM. We have also shown that while both compounds at 100 μM showed no preference of small- and large-caliber axons when restoring CAP conduction, 4-AP-3-MeOH, unlike 4-AP, is able to augment CAP amplitude while causing little change in axonal responsiveness measured in refractory periods and response to repetitive stimuli. In a prior study, we show that 4-AP-3-MeOH was able to functionally rescue mechanically injured axons. In this investigation, we conclude that 4-AP-3-MeOH is an effective K(+) channel blocker in restoring axonal conduction following both primary (physical) and secondary (chemical) insults. These findings also suggest that 4-AP-3-MeOH is a viable alternative of 4-AP for treating myelin damage and improving function following central nervous system trauma and neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. TRPC Channels Mediate a Muscarinic Receptor-Induced Afterdepolarization in Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-Dun; Villalobos, Claudio; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors on pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex induces the appearance of a slow afterdepolarization that can sustain autonomous spiking after a brief excitatory stimulus. Accordingly, this phenomenon has been hypothesized to allow for the transient storage of memory traces in neuronal networks. Here we investigated the molecular basis underlying the muscarinic receptor-induced afterdepolarization using molecular biological and electrophysiological strategies. We find that the ability of muscarinic receptors to induce the inward aftercurrent underlying the slow afterdepolarization is inhibited by expression of a Gαq-11 dominant negative and is also markedly reduced in a phospholipase C β1 (PLCβ1) knock-out mouse. Furthermore, we show, using a genetically encoded biosensor, that activation of muscarinic receptor induces the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in pyramidal cells. These results indicate that the Gαq-11/PLCβ1 cascade plays a key role in the ability of muscarinic receptors to signal the inward aftercurrent. We have shown previously that the muscarinic afterdepolarization is mediated by a calcium-activated nonselective cation current, suggesting the possible involvement of TRPC channels. We find that expression of a TRPC dominant negative inhibits, and overexpression of wild-type TRPC5 or TRPC6 enhances, the amplitude of the muscarinic receptor-induced inward aftercurrent. Furthermore, we find that coexpression of TRPC5 and T-type calcium channels is sufficient to reconstitute a muscarinic receptor-activated inward aftercurrent in human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells. These results indicate that TRPC channels mediate the muscarinic receptor-induced slow afterdepolarization seen in pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex and suggest a possible role for TRPC channels in mnemonic processes. PMID:19675237

  16. Trans-synaptic interaction of GluRdelta2 and Neurexin through Cbln1 mediates synapse formation in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Takeshi; Lee, Sung-Jin; Yasumura, Misato; Takeuchi, Tomonori; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ra, Moonjin; Taguchi, Ryo; Sakimura, Kenji; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2010-06-11

    Elucidation of molecular mechanisms that regulate synapse formation is required for the understanding of neural wiring, higher brain functions, and mental disorders. Despite the wealth of in vitro information, fundamental questions about how glutamatergic synapses are formed in the mammalian brain remain unanswered. Glutamate receptor (GluR) delta2 is essential for cerebellar synapse formation in vivo. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of GluRdelta2 interacts with presynaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin 1 precursor protein (Cbln1). The synaptogenic activity of GluRdelta2 is abolished in cerebellar primary cultures from Cbln1 knockout mice and is restored by recombinant Cbln1. Knockdown of NRXNs in cerebellar granule cells also hinders the synaptogenic activity of GluRdelta2. Both the NTD of GluRdelta2 and the extracellular domain of NRXN1beta suppressed the synaptogenic activity of Cbln1 in cerebellar primary cultures and in vivo. These results suggest that GluRdelta2 mediates cerebellar synapse formation by interacting with presynaptic NRXNs through Cbln1.

  17. Molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle pool heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Devon C; Kavalali, Ege T

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal communication relies on chemical synaptic transmission for information transfer and processing. Chemical neurotransmission is initiated by synaptic vesicle fusion with the presynaptic active zone resulting in release of neurotransmitters. Classical models have assumed that all synaptic vesicles within a synapse have the same potential to fuse under different functional contexts. In this model, functional differences among synaptic vesicle populations are ascribed to their spatial distribution in the synapse with respect to the active zone. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that synaptic vesicles are not a homogenous population of organelles, and they possess intrinsic molecular differences and differential interaction partners. Recent studies have reported a diverse array of synaptic molecules that selectively regulate synaptic vesicles' ability to fuse synchronously and asynchronously in response to action potentials or spontaneously irrespective of action potentials. Here we discuss these molecular mediators of vesicle pool heterogeneity that are found on the synaptic vesicle membrane, on the presynaptic plasma membrane, or within the cytosol and consider some of the functional consequences of this diversity. This emerging molecular framework presents novel avenues to probe synaptic function and uncover how synaptic vesicle pools impact neuronal signaling.

  18. Calcium as a trigger for cerebellar long-term synaptic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Elizabeth A; Tanaka, Keiko; Augustine, George J

    2012-09-01

    Cerebellar long-term depression (LTD) is a form of long-term synaptic plasticity that is triggered by calcium(Ca2+) signals in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell. This Ca2+comes both from IP3-mediated release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, as well as from Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ signal that triggers LTD occurs locally within dendritic spines and is due to supralinear summation of signals coming from these two Ca2+ sources. The properties of this postsynaptic Ca2+signal can explain several features of LTD, such as its associativity, synapse specificity, and dependence on thetiming of synaptic activity, and can account for the slow kinetics of LTD expression. Thus, from a Ca2+ signaling perspective, LTD is one of the best understood forms of synaptic plasticity.

  19. Coordinated Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity at Striatopallidal and Striatonigral Neurons Orchestrates Motor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Trusel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a critical role in shaping motor behavior. For this function, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the striatonigral and striatopallidal pathways must be integrated. It remains unclear whether the activity of the two pathways is primarily coordinated by synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Using a model of Parkinson’s disease, we determined the circuit and behavioral effects of concurrently regulating cell-type-specific forms of corticostriatal long-term synaptic depression (LTD by inhibiting small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SKs of the dorsolateral striatum. At striatopallidal synapses, SK channel inhibition rescued the disease-linked deficits in endocannabinoid (eCB-dependent LTD. At striatonigral cells, inhibition of these channels counteracted a form of adenosine-mediated LTD by activating the ERK cascade. Interfering with eCB-, adenosine-, and ERK signaling in vivo alleviated motor abnormalities, which supports that synaptic modulation of striatal pathways affects behavior. Thus, our results establish a central role of coordinated synaptic plasticity at MSN subpopulations in motor control.

  20. Satb2 Ablation Impairs Hippocampus-Based Long-Term Spatial Memory and Short-Term Working Memory and Immediate Early Genes (IEGs)-Mediated Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; You, Qiang-Long; Zhang, Sheng-Rong; Huang, Wei-Yuan; Zou, Wen-Jun; Jie, Wei; Li, Shu-Ji; Liu, Ji-Hong; Lv, Chuang-Ye; Cong, Jin; Hu, Yu-Ying; Gao, Tian-Ming; Li, Jian-Ming

    2017-04-18

    Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (Satb2) is a protein binding to the matrix attachment regions of DNA and important for gene regulation. Patients with SATB2 mutation usually suffer moderate to severe mental retardation. However, the mechanisms for the defects of intellectual activities in patients with SATB2 mutation are largely unclear. Here we established the heterozygous Satb2 mutant mice and Satb2 conditional knockout mice to mimic the patients with SATB2 mutation and figured out the role of Satb2 in mental activities. We found that the spatial memory and working memory were significantly damaged in the heterozygous Satb2 mutant mice, early postnatal Satb2-deficient mice (CaMKIIα-Cre(+)Satb2(fl/fl) mice), and adult Satb2 ablation mice (Satb2(fl/fl) mice injected with CaMKIIα-Cre virus). Functionally, late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) in these Satb2 mutant mice was greatly impaired. Morphologically, in CA1 neurons of CaMKIIα-Cre(+)Satb2(fl/fl) mice, we found decreased spine density of the basal dendrites and less branches of apical dendrites that extended into lacunar molecular layer. Mechanistically, expression levels of immediate early genes (IEGs) including Fos, FosB, and Egr1 were significantly decreased after Satb2 deletion. And, Satb2 could regulate expression of FosB by binding to the promoter of FosB directly. In general, our study uncovers that Satb2 plays an important role in spatial memory and working memory by regulating IEGs-mediated hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

  1. Deriving Flood-Mediated Connectivity between River Channels and Floodplains: Data-Driven Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Shao, Quanxi; Zhang, Yongyong

    2017-03-01

    The flood-mediated connectivity between river channels and floodplains plays a fundamental role in flood hazard mapping and exerts profound ecological effects. The classic nearest neighbor search (NNS) fails to derive this connectivity because of spatial heterogeneity and continuity. We develop two novel data-driven connectivity-deriving approaches, namely, progressive nearest neighbor search (PNNS) and progressive iterative nearest neighbor search (PiNNS). These approaches are illustrated through a case study in Northern Australia. First, PNNS and PiNNS are employed to identify flood pathways on floodplains through forward tracking. That is, progressive search is performed to associate newly inundated cells in each time step to previously inundated cells. In particular, iterations in PiNNS ensure that the connectivity is continuous - the connection between any two cells along the pathway is built through intermediate inundated cells. Second, inundated floodplain cells are collectively connected to river channel cells through backward tracing. Certain river channel sections are identified to connect to a large number of inundated floodplain cells. That is, the floodwater from these sections causes widespread floodplain inundation. Our proposed approaches take advantage of spatial-temporal data. They can be applied to achieve connectivity from hydro-dynamic and remote sensing data and assist in river basin planning and management.

  2. Potassium current inhibition by nonselective cation channel-mediated sodium entry in rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Strübing, C; J Hescheler

    1996-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, nonselective cation (NSC) channels mediate the entry of cations into cells, the most important being Na+ and Ca2+. In contrast to the Ca(2+)-dependent signaling mechanisms, little is known about the consequences and the spatial distribution of intracellular [Na+] elevation. In this study we demonstrate that Na+ entry, during the opening of ATP-activated NSC channels, leads to an inhibition of voltage-dependent K+ currents (IK) in cromaffin-like undifferentiated...

  3. Voluntary running-enhanced synaptic plasticity, learning and memory are mediated by Notch1 signal pathway in C57BL mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochen; Yang, Chunxiao; Gao, Jing; Yin, Hongqiang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2017-09-20

    It is well known that voluntary running can enhance synaptic plasticity and improve learning and memory abilities. The Notch1 receptor is also reported to be associated with these processes, but its role in running-induced alterations is unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the Notch1 signalling pathway was involved in voluntary running-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Notch1 heterozygous deficient (Notch1(+/-)) mice and wildtype (WT) C57BL littermates were randomly divided into runner group and non-runner group. Mice were given free access to running wheels for 14 days in both the Notch1(+/-) runner group and the WT runner group. Our results demonstrate that Notch1 knockdown impairs the performance in the novel object recognition (NOR) test and Morris water maze test and decreases the synaptic plasticity. Voluntary running improves spatial learning and memory abilities, promotes synaptic plasticity and increases expressions of postsynaptic proteins in WT mice but not in Notch1(+/-) mice. Our results suggest that Notch1 plays a vital role in spatial learning and memory, synaptic plasticity under normal physiological conditions and voluntary running conditions. These findings will set the groundwork and fill in some gaps for understanding the role of Notch1 signalling in voluntary running-induced phenomena.

  4. Synaptic vesicle proteins and active zone plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Kittel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone. The complex molecular architecture of active zones mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of active zones vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct active zone states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the active zone.The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and active zone states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  5. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Robert J; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  6. Ca2+ paradox injury mediated through TRPC channels in mouse ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Akiko; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Nosaka, Shuichi

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The Ca(2+) paradox is an important phenomenon associated with Ca(2+) overload-mediated cellular injury in myocardium. The present study was undertaken to elucidate molecular and cellular mechanisms for the development of the Ca(2+) paradox. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Fluorescence imaging was performed on fluo-3 loaded quiescent mouse ventricular myocytes using confocal laser scanning microscope. KEY RESULTS The Ca(2+) paradox was readily evoked by restoration of the extracellular Ca(2+) following 10-20 min of nominally Ca(2+)-free superfusion. The Ca(2+) paradox was significantly reduced by blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, Gd(3+), La(3+)) and anti-TRPC1 antibody. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content, assessed by caffeine application, gradually declined during Ca(2+)-free superfusion, which was further accelerated by metabolic inhibition. Block of SR Ca(2+) leak by tetracaine prevented Ca(2+) paradox. The Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchange (NCX) blocker KB-R7943 significantly inhibited Ca(2+) paradox when applied throughout superfusion period, but had little effect when added for a period of 3 min before and during Ca(2+) restoration. The SR Ca(2+) content was better preserved during Ca(2+) depletion by KB-R7943. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the expression of TRPC1, in addition to TRPC3 and TRPC4, in mouse ventricular myocytes. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results provide evidence that (i) the Ca(2+) paradox is primarily mediated by Ca(2+) entry through TRPC (probably TRPC1) channels that are presumably activated by SR Ca(2+) depletion; and (ii) reverse mode NCX contributes little to the Ca(2+) paradox, whereas inhibition of NCX during Ca(2+) depletion improves SR Ca(2+) loading, and is associated with reduced incidence of Ca(2+) paradox in mouse ventricular myocytes. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. T-type Ca(2+) channels facilitate NO-formation, vasodilatation and NO-mediated modulation of blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Andersen, Kenneth; Thuesen, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are involved in the vascular excitation-contraction mechanism and regulation of arterial blood pressure. It was hypothesized that T-type channels promote formation of nitric oxide from the endothelium. The present experiments determine the involvement of T-type chan......Voltage-gated calcium channels are involved in the vascular excitation-contraction mechanism and regulation of arterial blood pressure. It was hypothesized that T-type channels promote formation of nitric oxide from the endothelium. The present experiments determine the involvement of T......-type channels in depolarization-dependent dilatation of mesenteric arteries and blood pressure regulation in Cav3.1 knock-out mice. Nitric oxide-dependent vasodilatation following depolarization-mediated vasoconstriction was reduced significantly in mesenteric arteries from Cav3.1(-/-) compared to wild type...

  8. The mechanism of hetero-synaptic interaction based on spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Futagi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent physiological experiments focusing on synaptic plasticity, it is shown that synaptic modifications induced at one synapse are accompanied by hetero-synaptic changes at neighbor sites (Bi, 2002. These evidences imply that the hetero-synaptic interaction plays an important role in reconfiguration of synaptic connections to form and maintain functional neural circuits (Takahashi et al., 2012. Although the mechanism of the interaction is still unclear, some physiological studies suggest that the hetero-synaptic interaction could be caused by propagation of intracellular calcium signals (Nishiyama et al., 2000. Concretely, a spike-triggered calcium increase initiates calcium ion propagation along a dendrite through activation of molecular processes at neighboring sites. Here we hypothesized that the mechanism of the hetero-synaptic interaction was based on the intracellular calcium signaling, which is regulated by interactions between NMDA receptors (NMDARs, voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs and Ryanodine receptors (RyRs on endoplasmic reticulum (ER. To assess realizability of the hypothesized interaction mechanism, we simulated intracellular calcium dynamics at a cellular level, using the computational model that integrated the model of intracellular calcium dynamics (Keizer and Levine, 1996 and the multi-compartment neuron model (Poirazi et al., 2003. Using the proposed computational model, we induced calcium influxes at a local site in postsynaptic dendrite by controlling the spike timings of pre- and postsynaptic neurons. As a result, synchronized calcium influxes through NMDARs and VDCCs caused calcium release from ER. According to the phase plane analysis, RyR-mediated calcium release occurred when the calcium concentration in cytoplasm sufficiently increased under the condition of a high calcium concentration in ER. An NMDAR-mediated calcium influx was slow and persistent, consequently responsible for maintaining a high

  9. SK channels mediate NADPH oxidase-independent reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis in granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Alex J; Qian, Xiang; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2006-11-14

    Neutrophils are immune cells that bind to, engulf, and destroy bacterial and fungal pathogens in infected tissue, and their clearance by apoptosis is essential for the resolution of inflammation. Killing involves both oxidative and nonoxidative processes, the oxidative pathway requiring electrogenic production of superoxide by the membrane-bound NADPH oxidase complex. A variety of stimuli, from bacterial chemotactic peptides to complement- or IgG-opsonized microbes, can induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by neutrophils, presumably by means of NADPH oxidase. We report here that 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO), an activator of Ca2+-activated potassium channels of small conductance (SK) and intermediate conductance (IK), causes production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by neutrophils and granulocyte-differentiated PLB-985 cells. This response can be partially inhibited by the SK blocker apamin, which inhibits a Ca2+-activated K+ current in these cells. Analysis of RNA transcripts indicates that channels encoded by the SK3 gene carry this current. The effects of 1-EBIO and apamin are independent of the NADPH oxidase pathway, as demonstrated by using a PLB-985 cell line lacking the gp91phox subunit. Rather, 1-EBIO and apamin modulate mitochondrial ROS production. Consistent with the enhanced ROS production and K+ efflux mediated by 1-EBIO, we found that this SK opener increased apoptosis of PLB-985 cells. Together, these findings suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism for the regulation of neutrophil ROS production and programmed cell death.

  10. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2005-07-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium oscillations in vivo (10-20/h). The expression of calcium transients is up regulated during pupal development. Although the ability to generate transients is a property intrinsic to Kenyon cells, transients can be modulated by bath application of nicotine and GABA. Calcium transients are blocked, and baseline calcium levels reduced, by removal of external calcium, addition of cobalt, or addition of Plectreurys toxin (PLTX), an insect-specific calcium channel antagonist. Transients do not require calcium release from intracellular stores. Whole cell recordings reveal that the majority of voltage-gated calcium channels in Kenyon cells are PLTX-sensitive. Together these data show that influx of calcium through PLTX-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels mediates spontaneous calcium transients and regulates basal calcium levels in cultured Kenyon cells. The data also suggest that these calcium transients represent cellular events underlying calcium oscillations in the intact mushroom bodies. However, spontaneous calcium transients are not unique to Kenyon cells as they are present in approximately 60% of all cultured central brain neurons. This suggests the calcium transients play a more general role in maturation or function of adult brain neurons.

  11. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalappa, Bopanna I; Anderson, Charles T; Goldberg, Jacob M; Lippard, Stephen J; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-12-22

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses.

  12. TRPV6 calcium channel translocates to the plasma membrane via Orai1-mediated mechanism and controls cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphaël, Maylis; Lehen'kyi, V'yacheslav; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Beck, Benjamin; Khalimonchyk, Sergiy; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Farsetti, Leonardo; Germain, Emmanuelle; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Mihalache, Adriana; Gosset, Pierre; Romanin, Christoph; Clézardin, Philippe; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2014-09-16

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 6 (TRPV6) is a highly selective calcium channel that has been considered as a part of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Despite its first discovery in the early 2000s, the role of this channel in prostate cancer (PCa) remained, until now, obscure. Here we show that TRPV6 mediates calcium entry, which is highly increased in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism involving the translocation of the TRPV6 channel to the plasma membrane via the Orai1/TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway, partially contributing to SOCE. The TRPV6 calcium channel is expressed de novo by the PCa cell to increase its survival by enhancing proliferation and conferring apoptosis resistance. Xenografts in nude mice and bone metastasis models confirmed the remarkable aggressiveness of TRPV6-overexpressing tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of these demonstrated the increased expression of clinical markers such as Ki-67, prostate specific antigen, synaptophysin, CD31, and CD56, which are strongly associated with a poor prognosis. Thus, the TRPV6 channel acquires its oncogenic potential in PCa due to the remodeling mechanism via the Orai1-mediated Ca(2+)/Annexin I/S100A11 pathway.

  13. Differences in chloride gradients allow for three distinct types of synaptic modulation by endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Burrell, Brian D

    2016-08-01

    Endocannabinoids can elicit persistent depression of excitatory and inhibitory synapses, reducing or enhancing (disinhibiting) neural circuit output, respectively. In this study, we examined whether differences in Cl(-) gradients can regulate which synapses undergo endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic depression vs. disinhibition using the well-characterized central nervous system (CNS) of the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana Exogenous application of endocannabinoids or capsaicin elicits potentiation of pressure (P) cell synapses and depression of both polymodal (Npoly) and mechanical (Nmech) nociceptive synapses. In P synapses, blocking Cl(-) export prevented endocannabinoid-mediated potentiation, consistent with a disinhibition process that has been indicated by previous experiments. In Nmech neurons, which are depolarized by GABA due to an elevated Cl(-) equilibrium potentials (ECl), endocannabinoid-mediated depression was prevented by blocking Cl(-) import, indicating that this decrease in synaptic signaling was due to depression of excitatory GABAergic input (disexcitation). Npoly neurons are also depolarized by GABA, but endocannabinoids elicit depression in these synapses directly and were only weakly affected by disruption of Cl(-) import. Consequently, the primary role of elevated ECl may be to protect Npoly synapses from disinhibition. All forms of endocannabinoid-mediated plasticity required activation of transient potential receptor vanilloid (TRPV) channels. Endocannabinoid/TRPV-dependent synaptic plasticity could also be elicited by distinct patterns of afferent stimulation with low-frequency stimulation (LFS) eliciting endocannabinoid-mediated depression of Npoly synapses and high-frequency stimulus (HFS) eliciting endocannabinoid-mediated potentiation of P synapses and depression of Nmech synapses. These findings demonstrate a critical role of differences in Cl(-) gradients between neurons in determining the sign, potentiation vs. depression, of

  14. Synaptic conductances during interictal discharges in pyramidal neurons of rat entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Amakhin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In epilepsy, the balance of excitation and inhibition underlying the basis of neural network activity shifts, resulting in neuronal network hyperexcitability and recurrent seizure-associated discharges. Mechanisms involved in ictal and interictal events are not fully understood, in particular, because of controversial data regarding the dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances. In the present study, we estimated AMPAR-, NMDAR-, and GABAAR-mediated conductances during two distinct types of interictal discharge (IID in pyramidal neurons of rat entorhinal cortex in cortico-hippocampal slices. Repetitively emerging seizure-like events and IIDs were recorded in high extracellular potassium, 4-aminopyridine, and reduced magnesium-containing solution. An original procedure for estimating synaptic conductance during IIDs was based on the differences among the current-voltage characteristics of the synaptic components. The synaptic conductance dynamics obtained revealed that the first type of IID is determined by activity of GABAAR channels with depolarized reversal potential. The second type of IID is determined by the interplay between excitation and inhibition, with prominent early AMPAR and prolonged depolarized GABAAR and NMDAR-mediated components. The study then validated the contribution of these components to IIDs by intracellular pharmacological isolation. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of seizures generation, development, and cessation.

  15. Roles of Synaptic MAGUK Proteins in Analgesia and Anesthesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yuan-xiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the central nervous system, synapses, highly specialized sites of contact between neurons, are organized to facilitate the transmission of signals from the pre-synaptic terminal to the postsynaptic membrane and to activate subsequent signal transduction cascades that result in appropriate cellular events. Efficient and precise organization of synaptic proteins such as receptors, ion channels, and signaling molecules at both pre-synaptic and postsynaptic membranes is critical for proper signal transmission.

  16. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:25360084

  17. Pannexin 1 Regulates Bidirectional Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity in Adult Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro O. Ardiles

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1, a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP, it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory.

  18. Trisomy of the G protein-coupled K+ channel gene, Kcnj6, affects reward mechanisms, cognitive functions, and synaptic plasticity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Ayelet; Grigoryan, Gayane; Guy-David, Liora; Tsoory, Michael M; Chen, Alon; Reuveny, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK) generate slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in the brain via Gi/o protein-coupled receptors. GIRK2, a GIRK subunit, is widely abundant in the brain and has been implicated in various functions and pathologies, such as learning and memory, reward, motor coordination, and Down syndrome. Down syndrome, the most prevalent cause of mental retardation, results from the presence of an extra maternal chromosome 21 (trisomy 21), which com...

  19. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in the ventral tegmental area mediates cocaine-induced synaptic plasticity and rewarding effects

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Peng; Sun, Dalong; Liu, Qing-song

    2011-01-01

    Drugs of abuse such as cocaine induce long-term synaptic plasticity in the reward circuitry, which underlies the formation of drug-associated memories and addictive behavior. We reported previously that repeated cocaine exposure in vivo facilitates long-term potentiation in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) by reducing the strength of GABAergic inhibition and that endocannabinoid (eCB)-dependent long-term depression at inhibitory synapses (I-LTD) constitutes a mechanism for...

  20. Modulation of BK channels contributes to activity-dependent increase of excitability through MTORC1 activity in CA1 pyramidal cells of mouse hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven eSpringer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory acquisition and synaptic plasticity are accompanied by changes in the intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These activity-dependent changes in excitability are mediated by modulation of intrinsic currents which alters the responsiveness of the cell to synaptic inputs. The afterhyperpolarization, a major contributor to the regulation of neuronal excitability, is reduced in animals that have acquired several types of hippocampus-dependent memory tasks and also following synaptic potentiation by high frequency stimulation. BK channels underlie the fast afterhyperpolarization and contribute to spike repolarization, and this afterhyperpolarization is reduced in animals that successfully acquired trace-eyeblink conditioning. This suggests that BK channel function is activity-dependent, but the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we found that blockade of BK channels with paxilline (10µM increased spike half-width and instantaneous frequency in response to a +100pA depolarization. In addition, induction of LTP by theta burst stimulation (TBS in CA1 pyramidal neurons reduced BK channel’s contribution to spike repolarization and instantaneous frequency. This result indicates that BK channel activity is decreased following synaptic potentiation. Interestingly, blockade of mammalian target of rapamycin (MTORC1 with rapamycin (400 nM following synaptic potentiation restored BK channel function, suggesting a role for protein translation in signaling events which decreased postsynaptic BK channel activity following synaptic potentiation.

  1. Antispasmodic activity of Symplocos paniculata is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent K+ channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Symplocos paniculata is a medicinal plant used by native healers to manage gastrointestinal ailments. The crude methanolic extract of S. paniculata was screened pharmacologically both in vitro and in vivo for the validation of its therapeutic potential. It suppressed the spontaneous activity of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations and also caused inhibition of the low K+ (20 mM- induced spastic contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations in a manner comparable to cromakalim. The relaxant effect was found to be blocked following glibenclamide exposure of the isolated tissue preparations similar to cromakalim, suggesting that observed response was likely to be mediated through opening of ATP dependent K+ channels. Following oral administration to mice provided protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in a manner similar to loperamide. The plant material was found safe in toxicity study up to oral dose of 8 g/kg in mice. Hence, present study provides a scientific basis for the vernacular use of S. paniculata in gastro-intestinal system.

  2. K-channels inhibited by hydrogen peroxide mediate abscisic acid signaling in Vicia guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A number of studies show that environmental stress conditions increase abscisic acid (ABA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels in plant cells. Despite this central role of ABA in altering stomatal aperture by regulating guard cell ion transport, little is known concerning the relationship between ABA and H2O2 in signal transduction leading to stomatal movement. Epidermal strip bioassay illustrated that ABA-inhibited stomatal opening and ABA-induced stomatal closure were abolished partly by externally added catalase (CAT) or diphenylene iodonium (DPI), which are a H2O2 scavenger and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor respectively. In contrast, internally added CAT or DPI nearly completely or partly reversed ABA-induced closure in half-stoma. Consistent with these results, whole-cell patch-clamp analysis showed that intracellular application of CAT or DPI partly abolished ABA-inhibited inward K+ current across the plasma membrane of guard cells. H2O2 mimicked ABA to inhibit inward K+ current, an effect which was reversed by the addition of ascorbic acid (Vc) in patch clamping micropipettes. These results suggested that H2O2 mediated ABA-induced stomatal movement by targeting inward K+ channels at plasma membrane.

  3. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  4. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channel activity alters synaptic AMPA receptor phenotype in mouse cerebellar stellate cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu LIU; Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Acharjee, Shoana; Liu, Siqiong June

    2011-01-01

    Many fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons, including cerebellar stellate cells, fire brief action potentials and express α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) that are permeable to Ca2+ and do not contain the GluR2 subunit. In a recent study, we found that increasing action potential duration promotes GluR2 gene transcription in stellate cells. We have now tested the prediction that activation of potassium channels that control the durati...

  5. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2003-01-01

    of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx......43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium....

  6. Anthrax lethal factor (LF) mediated block of the anthrax protective antigen (PA) ion channel: effect of ionic strength and voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Tobias; Tonello, Fiorella; Dal Molin, Federica; Schiffler, Bettina; Orlik, Frank; Benz, Roland

    2006-03-07

    The anthrax toxin complex consists of three different molecules, protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). The activated form of PA, PA(63), forms heptamers that insert at low pH in biological membranes forming ion channels and that are necessary to translocate EF and LF in the cell cytosol. LF and EF are intracellular active enzymes that inhibit the host immune system promoting bacterial outgrowth. Here, PA(63) was reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayer membranes and formed ion-permeable channels. The heptameric PA(63) channel contains a binding site for LF on the cis side of the channel. Full-size LF was found to block the PA(63) channel in a dose- and ionic-strength-dependent way with half-saturation constants in the nanomolar concentration range. The binding curves suggest a 1:1 relationship between (PA(63))(7) and bound LF that blocks the channel. The presence of a His(6) tag at the N-terminal end of LF strongly increases the affinity of LF toward the PA(63) channel, indicating that the interaction between LF and the PA(63) channel occurs at the N terminus of the enzyme. The LF-mediated block of the PA(63)-induced membrane conductance is highly asymmetric with respect to the sign of the applied transmembrane potential. The result suggested that the PA(63) heptamers contain a high-affinity binding site for LF inside domain 1 or the channel vestibule and that the binding is ionic-strength-dependent.

  7. Early pre- and postsynaptic calcium signaling abnormalities mask underlying synaptic depression in presymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroborty, Shreaya; Kim, Joyce; Schneider, Corinne; Jacobson, Christopher; Molgó, Jordi; Stutzmann, Grace E.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-linked presenilin mutations result in pronounced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium disruptions that occur prior to detectable histopathology and cognitive deficits. More subtly, these early AD-linked calcium alterations also reset neurophysiological homeostasis, such that calcium-dependent pre- and postsynaptic signaling appear functionally normal yet are actually operating under aberrant calcium signaling systems. In these 3xTg-AD mouse brains, upregulated RyR activity is associated with a shift towards synaptic depression, likely through a reduction in presynaptic vesicle stores and increased postsynaptic outward currents through SK2 channels. The deviant RyR-calcium involvement in the 3xTg-AD mice also compensates for an intrinsic predisposition for hippocampal LTD and reduced LTP. In this study we detail the impact of disrupted ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium stores on synaptic transmission properties, long term depression (LTD) and calcium-activated membrane channels of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in presymptomatic 3xTg-AD mice. Using electrophysiological recordings in young 3xTg-AD and NonTg hippocampal slices, we show that increased RyR-evoked calcium release in 3xTg-AD mice ‘normalizes’ an altered synaptic transmission system operating under a shifted homeostatic state that is not present in NonTg mice. In the process, we uncover compensatory signaling mechanisms recruited early in the disease process which counterbalance the disrupted RyR-calcium dynamics, namely increases in presynaptic spontaneous vesicle release, altered probability of vesicle release, and upregulated postsynaptic SK channel activity. As AD is increasingly recognized as a ‘synaptic disease’, calcium-mediated signaling alterations may serve as a proximal trigger for the synaptic degradation driving the cognitive loss in AD. PMID:22699914

  8. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression.

  9. How to save the WIMP. Global analysis of a dark matter model with two s-channel mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerr, Michael; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2016-06-15

    A reliable comparison of different dark matter (DM) searches requires models that satisfy certain consistency requirements like gauge invariance and perturbative unitarity. As a well-motivated example, we study two-mediator DM (2MDM). The model is based on a spontaneously broken U(1){sup '} gauge symmetry and contains a Majorana DM particle as well as two s-channel mediators, one vector (the Z{sup '}) and one scalar (the dark Higgs). We perform a global scan over the parameters of the model assuming that the DM relic density is obtained by thermal freeze-out in the early Universe and imposing a large set of constraints: direct and indirect DM searches, monojet, dijet and dilepton searches at colliders, Higgs observables, electroweak precision tests and perturbative unitarity. We conclude that thermal DM is only allowed either close to an s-channel resonance or if at least one mediator is lighter than the DM particle. In these cases a thermal DM abundance can be obtained although DM couplings to the Standard Model are tiny. Interestingly, we find that vector-mediated DM-nucleon scattering leads to relevant constraints despite the velocity-suppressed cross section, and that indirect detection can be important if DM annihilations into both mediators are kinematically allowed.

  10. Interaction of inhibition and triplets of excitatory spikes modulates the NMDA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity in a computational model of spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) experiments have shown that a synapse is strengthened when a presynaptic spike precedes a postsynaptic one and depressed vice versa. The canonical form of STDP has been shown to have an asymmetric shape with the peak long-term potentiation at +6 ms and the peak long-term depression at -5 ms. Experiments in hippocampal cultures with more complex stimuli such as triplets (one presynaptic spike combined with two postsynaptic spikes or one postsynaptic spike with two presynaptic spikes) have shown that pre-post-pre spike triplets result in no change in synaptic strength, whereas post-pre-post spike triplets lead to significant potentiation. The sign and magnitude of STDP have also been experimentally hypothesized to be modulated by inhibition. Recently, a computational study showed that the asymmetrical form of STDP in the CA1 pyramidal cell dendrite when two spikes interact switches to a symmetrical one in the presence of inhibition under certain conditions. In the present study, I investigate computationally how inhibition modulates STDP in the CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrite when it is driven by triplets. The model uses calcium as the postsynaptic signaling agent for STDP and is shown to be consistent with the experimental triplet observations in the absence of inhibition: simulated pre-post-pre spike triplets result in no change in synaptic strength, whereas simulated post-pre-post spike triplets lead to significant potentiation. When inhibition is bounded by the onset and offset of the triplet stimulation, then the strength of the synapse is decreased as the strength of inhibition increases. When inhibition arrives either few milliseconds before or at the onset of the last spike in the pre-post-pre triplet stimulation, then the synapse is potentiated. Variability in the frequency of inhibition (50 vs. 100 Hz) produces no change in synaptic strength. Finally, a 5% variation in model's calcium parameters (calcium thresholds

  11. Sensitivity of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials and synaptic plasticity to TCN 201 and TCN 213 in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F

    2015-02-01

    Whereas ifenprodil has been used as a selective GluN1/GluN2B (NR1/NR2B, B-type) receptor antagonist to distinguish between GluN2B (NR2B) and GluN2A (NR2A)-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), TCN 201 (3-chloro-4-fluoro-N-[4-[[2-(phenylcarbonyl)hydrazino]carbonyl]benzyl]benzenesulphonamide) and TCN 213 [N-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2-[{5-[(phenylmethyl)amino]-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl}thio]acetamide] have been found to be selective GluN1/GluN2A (NR1/NR2A, A-type) antagonists. Based on the premise that A- and B-types are major synaptic NMDARs, we examined whether inhibition of NMDAR excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) by the TCN compounds and ifenprodil are complementary. Contrary to this prediction, inhibition of NMDAR EPSPs by the TCN compounds and ifenprodil were largely overlapping in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from 30-day-old rats. After partial inhibition by ifenprodil, TCN compounds produced little further suppression of NMDAR EPSPs. Similarly, after partial inhibition by TCN compounds ifenprodil failed to further suppress NMDAR EPSPs. However, low micromolar d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, a competitive NMDAR antagonist, which alone only partially inhibits NMDAR EPSPs, markedly suppresses residual NMDAR responses in the presence of ifenprodil or the TCNs, suggesting that low 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate antagonizes both ifenprodil- and TCN-insensitive synaptic NMDARs. These observations can be most readily interpreted if ifenprodil and TCNs act on a similar population of synaptic NMDARs. Recent lines of evidence suggest that the majority of hippocampal synaptic NMDARs are triheteromers. If so, modulation of GluN2A, and not just GluN2B NMDARs, could dampen long-term depression (LTD). Indeed, both TCNs, like ifenprodil, blocked LTD, suggesting the involvement of ifenprodil- and TCN-sensitive NMDARs in LTD induction. However, the TCNs plus ifenprodil failed to inhibit long-term potentiation (LTP), suggesting that neither ifenprodil- nor TCN

  12. GIRK Channel Plasticity and Implications for Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marron Fernandez de Velasco, Ezequiel; McCall, Nora; Wickman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse can "hijack" synaptic plasticity, a physiological basis of learning and memory, establishing maladaptations that can promote drug addiction. A wealth of data supports the existence and importance of neuroadaptations in excitatory neurotransmission upon drug exposure. Recent discoveries, however, have shown that inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (K(+)) (GIRK/Kir3) channels is also subject to adaptation triggered by exposure to drugs of abuse. GIRK channels are expressed in neuronal populations relevant to reward and reward-related behaviors, where their activation by neurotransmitters such as GABA, dopamine, and adenosine reduces neuronal excitability. Studies in animal models have implicated GIRK channels in a number of behaviors including reward. Drugs of abuse also affect the inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GIRK channels. These changes might be important for the development, maintenance, or relapse of addiction, making GIRK channels promising targets for novel addiction therapies. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Short-term plasticity in turtle dorsal horn neurons mediated by L-type Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1994-01-01

    Windup--the gradual increase of the response--of dorsal horn neurons to repeated activation of primary afferents is an elementary form of short-term plasticity that may mediate central sensitization to pain. In deep dorsal horn neurons of the turtle spinal cord in vitro we report windup...... for intrinsic postsynaptic properties in nociceptive plasticity and for L-type Ca2+ channels as a promising target for therapeutic intervention....

  14. Differential calcium signaling mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels in rat retinal ganglion cells and their unmyelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Sargoy

    Full Text Available Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury.

  15. Decrease of a Current Mediated by Kv1.3 Channels Causes Striatal Cholinergic Interneuron Hyperexcitability in Experimental Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Tubert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying a hypercholinergic state in Parkinson’s disease (PD remains uncertain. Here, we show that disruption of the Kv1 channel-mediated function causes hyperexcitability of striatal cholinergic interneurons in a mouse model of PD. Specifically, our data reveal that Kv1 channels containing Kv1.3 subunits contribute significantly to the orphan potassium current known as IsAHP in striatal cholinergic interneurons. Typically, this Kv1 current provides negative feedback to depolarization that limits burst firing and slows the tonic activity of cholinergic interneurons. However, such inhibitory control of cholinergic interneuron excitability by Kv1.3-mediated current is markedly diminished in the parkinsonian striatum, suggesting that targeting Kv1.3 subunits and their regulatory pathways may have therapeutic potential in PD therapy. These studies reveal unexpected roles of Kv1.3 subunit-containing channels in the regulation of firing patterns of striatal cholinergic interneurons, which were thought to be largely dependent on KCa channels.

  16. Membrane coordination of receptors and channels mediating the inhibition of neuronal ion currents by ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafar, Hend; Dominguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Chandaka, Giri K; Salzer, Isabella; Boehm, Stefan; Schicker, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    ADP and other nucleotides control ion currents in the nervous system via various P2Y receptors. In this respect, Cav2 and Kv7 channels have been investigated most frequently. The fine tuning of neuronal ion channel gating via G protein coupled receptors frequently relies on the formation of higher order protein complexes that are organized by scaffolding proteins and harbor receptors and channels together with interposed signaling components. However, ion channel complexes containing P2Y receptors have not been described. Therefore, the regulation of Cav2.2 and Kv7.2/7.3 channels via P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors and the coordination of these ion channels and receptors in the plasma membranes of tsA 201 cells have been investigated here. ADP inhibited currents through Cav2.2 channels via both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors with phospholipase C and pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins being involved, respectively. The nucleotide controlled the gating of Kv7 channels only via P2Y1 and phospholipase C. In fluorescence energy transfer assays using conventional as well as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors were found juxtaposed to Cav2.2 channels, but only P2Y1, and not P2Y12, was in close proximity to Kv7 channels. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in TIRF microscopy, evidence for a physical interaction was obtained for the pair P2Y12/Cav2.2, but not for any other receptor/channel combination. These results reveal a membrane juxtaposition of P2Y receptors and ion channels in parallel with the control of neuronal ion currents by ADP. This juxtaposition may even result in apparent physical interactions between receptors and channels.

  17. Neuronal p38α mediates synaptic and cognitive dysfunction in an Alzheimer’s mouse model by controlling β-amyloid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colié, Sandra; Sarroca, Sara; Palenzuela, Rocío; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander; Corpas, Rubén; Dotti, Carlos G.; Esteban, José A.; Sanfeliu, Coral; Nebreda, Angel R.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a severe and progressive neuronal loss leading to cognitive dysfunctions. Previous reports, based on the use of chemical inhibitors, have connected the stress kinase p38α to neuroinflammation, neuronal death and synaptic dysfunction. To explore the specific role of neuronal p38α signalling in the appearance of pathological symptoms, we have generated mice that combine expression of the 5XFAD transgenes to induce AD symptoms with the downregulation of p38α only in neurons (5XFAD/p38α∆-N). We found that the neuronal-specific deletion of p38α improves the memory loss and long-term potentiation impairment induced by 5XFAD transgenes. Furthermore, 5XFAD/p38α∆-N mice display reduced amyloid-β accumulation, improved neurogenesis, and important changes in brain cytokine expression compared with 5XFAD mice. Our results implicate neuronal p38α signalling in the synaptic plasticity dysfunction and memory impairment observed in 5XFAD mice, by regulating both amyloid-β deposition in the brain and the relay of this accumulation to mount an inflammatory response, which leads to the cognitive deficits. PMID:28361984

  18. Bi-directional modulation of AMPA receptor unitary conductance by synaptic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Paul

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of how synapses alter their efficiency of communication is central to the understanding of learning and memory. The most extensively studied forms of synaptic plasticity are long-term potentiation (LTP and its counterpart long-term depression (LTD of AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. In the CA1 region of the hippocampus, it has been shown that LTP often involves a rapid increase in the unitary conductance of AMPA receptor channels. However, LTP can also occur in the absence of any alteration in AMPA receptor unitary conductance. In the present study we have used whole-cell dendritic recording, failures analysis and non-stationary fluctuation analysis to investigate the mechanism of depotentiation of LTP. Results We find that when LTP involves an increase in unitary conductance, subsequent depotentiation invariably involves the return of unitary conductance to pre-LTP values. In contrast, when LTP does not involve a change in unitary conductance then depotentiation also occurs in the absence of any change in unitary conductance, indicating a reduction in the number of activated receptors as the most likely mechanism. Conclusions These data show that unitary conductance can be bi-directionally modified by synaptic activity. Furthermore, there are at least two distinct mechanisms to restore synaptic strength from a potentiated state, which depend upon the mechanism of the previous potentiation.

  19. Very long-chain fatty acids support synaptic structure and function in the mammalian retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopiavuori Blake R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elongation of Very Long chain fatty acids-like 4 (ELOVL4 is a fatty acid elongase responsible for the biosynthesis of very long chain (VLC; ≥ C26 fatty acids in the retina, brain, skin, Meibomian gland, and testes. Heterozygous inheritance of mutant ELOVL4 causes juvenile macular degeneration in autosomal dominant Stargardt-like macular dystrophy (STGD3. Retinal photoreceptors are enriched with VLC polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs, which have been shown by our group and others to be necessary for the survival of rod photoreceptors. Our group performed a series of studies using mice conditionally depleted of retinal Elovl4 (KO aimed at understanding the role of VLC-PUFAs in long-term retinal health and function, focusing on the role of these fatty acids in mediating synaptic function between the photoreceptors and the rest of the neural retina. The absence of VLC-PUFA from the retina of KO mice resulted in a marked decrease in retinal b-wave responses of the electroretinogram as well as a decrease in the amplitude of the oscillatory potentials mediated by the neural retina. Although there were no measureable differences between KO and wild type (WT mice in either pre-synaptic rod calcium channel function or post-synaptic bipolar cell glutamate receptor responses, ultrastructural analysis revealed a marked decrease in the diameter of synaptic vesicles in rod terminals. Recent quantification suggests that this decrease in synaptic vesicle size due to the absence of VLC-PUFAs in KO mice, and the consequent decrease in glutamate content, could account for the decrease in b-wave response amplitudes that were previously measured in these animals.

  20. Characterization of Two-pore Channel 2 (TPCN2)-mediated Ca2+ Currents in Isolated Lysosomes*

    OpenAIRE

    Schieder, Michael; Rötzer, Katrin; Brüggemann, Andrea; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A.

    2010-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCNs) have been proposed to form lysosomal Ca2+ release channels that are activated by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Here, we employ a glass chip-based method to record for the first time nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate -dependent currents through a two-pore channel (TPCN2) from intact lysosomes. We show that TPCN2 is a highly selective Ca2+ channel that is regulated by intralysosomal pH. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identify an amino ...

  1. Sodium Channel Voltage-Gated Beta 2 Plays a Vital Role in Brain Aging Associated with Synaptic Plasticity and Expression of COX5A and FGF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    XiYang, Yan-Bin; Wang, You-Cui; Zhao, Ya; Ru, Jin; Lu, Bing-Tuan; Zhang, Yue-Ning; Wang, Nai-Chao; Hu, Wei-Yan; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jin-Wei; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Hao, Chun-Guang; Feng, Zhong-Tang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dong, Wei; Quan, Xiong-Zhi; Zhang, Lian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The role of sodium channel voltage-gated beta 2 (SCN2B) in brain aging is largely unknown. The present study was therefore designed to determine the role of SCN2B in brain aging by using the senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8), a brain senescence-accelerated animal model, together with the SCN2B transgenic mice. The results showed that SAMP8 exhibited impaired learning and memory functions, assessed by the Morris water maze test, as early as 8 months of age. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of SCN2B were also upregulated in the prefrontal cortex at this age. Treatment with traditional Chinese anti-aging medicine Xueshuangtong (Panax notoginseng saponins, PNS) significantly reversed the SCN2B expressions in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in improved learning and memory. Moreover, SCN2B knockdown transgenic mice were generated and bred to determine the roles of SCN2B in brain senescence. A reduction in the SCN2B level by 60.68% resulted in improvement in the hippocampus-dependent spatial recognition memory and long-term potential (LTP) slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP), followed by an upregulation of COX5A mRNA levels and downregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA expression. Together, the present findings indicated that SCN2B could play an important role in the aging-related cognitive deterioration, which is associated with the regulations of COX5A and FGF-2. These findings could provide the potential strategy of candidate target to develop antisenescence drugs for the treatment of brain aging.

  2. Mapping homeostatic synaptic plasticity using cable properties of dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queenan, B N; Lee, K J; Tan, H; Huganir, R L; Vicini, S; Pak, D T S

    2016-02-19

    When chronically silenced, cortical and hippocampal neurons homeostatically upregulate excitatory synaptic function. However, the subcellular position of such changes on the dendritic tree is not clear. We exploited the cable-filtering properties of dendrites to derive a parameter, the dendritic filtering index (DFI), to map the spatial distribution of synaptic currents. Our analysis indicates that young rat cortical neurons globally scale AMPA receptor-mediated currents, while mature hippocampal neurons do not, revealing distinct homeostatic strategies between brain regions and developmental stages. The DFI presents a useful tool for mapping the dendritic origin of synaptic currents and the location of synaptic plasticity changes.

  3. A quantitative method to assess extrasynaptic NMDA receptor function in the protective effect of synaptic activity against neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors couple to a CREB shut-off pathway and cause cell death, whereas synaptic NMDA receptors and nuclear calcium signaling promote CREB-mediated transcription and neuronal survival. The distribution of NMDA receptors (synaptic versus extrasynaptic may be an important parameter that determines the susceptibility of neurons to toxic insults. Changes in receptor surface expression towards more extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may lead to neurodegeneration, whereas a reduction of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may render neurons more resistant to death. A quantitative assessment of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in individual neurons is needed in order to investigate the role of NMDA receptor distribution in neuronal survival and death. Results Here we refined and verified a protocol previously used to isolate the effects of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors using the NMDA receptor open channel blocker, MK-801. Using this method we investigated the possibility that the known neuroprotective shield built up in hippocampal neurons after a period of action potential bursting and stimulation of synaptic NMDA receptors is due to signal-induced trafficking of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors or a reduction in extrasynaptic NMDA receptor function. We found that extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated calcium responses and whole cell currents recorded under voltage clamp were surprisingly invariable and did not change even after prolonged (16 to 24 hours periods of bursting and synaptic NMDA receptor activation. Averaging a large number of calcium imaging traces yielded a small (6% reduction of extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in hippocampal neurons that were pretreated with prolonged bursting. Conclusion The slight reduction in extrasynaptic NMDA receptor function following action potential bursting and synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation could contribute to but is unlikely to fully account for activity

  4. The Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Mediates Amyloid β Toxicity and Represents a Potential Target for Alzheimer Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilansky, Angela; Dangoor, Liron; Nakdimon, Itay; Ben-Hail, Danya; Mizrachi, Dario; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), found in the mitochondrial outer membrane, forms the main interface between mitochondrial and cellular metabolisms, mediates the passage of a variety of molecules across the mitochondrial outer membrane, and is central to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. VDAC1 is overexpressed in post-mortem brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The development and progress of AD are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the cytotoxic effects of accumulated amyloid β (Aβ). In this study we demonstrate the involvement of VDAC1 and a VDAC1 N-terminal peptide (VDAC1-N-Ter) in Aβ cell penetration and cell death induction. Aβ directly interacted with VDAC1 and VDAC1-N-Ter, as monitored by VDAC1 channel conductance, surface plasmon resonance, and microscale thermophoresis. Preincubated Aβ interacted with bilayer-reconstituted VDAC1 and increased its conductance ∼ 2-fold. Incubation of cells with Aβ resulted in mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. However, the presence of non-cell-penetrating VDAC1-N-Ter peptide prevented Aβ cellular entry and Aβ-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Likewise, silencing VDAC1 expression by specific siRNA prevented Aβ entry into the cytosol as well as Aβ-induced toxicity. Finally, the mode of Aβ-mediated action involves detachment of mitochondria-bound hexokinase, induction of VDAC1 oligomerization, and cytochrome c release, a sequence of events leading to apoptosis. As such, we suggest that Aβ-mediated toxicity involves mitochondrial and plasma membrane VDAC1, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induction. The VDAC1-N-Ter peptide targeting Aβ cytotoxicity is thus a potential new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment.

  5. The vacuolar channel VvALMT9 mediates malate and tartrate accumulation in berries of Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angeli, Alexis; Baetz, Ulrike; Francisco, Rita; Zhang, Jingbo; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Regalado, Ana

    2013-08-01

    Vitis vinifera L. represents an economically important fruit species. Grape and wine flavour is made from a complex set of compounds. The acidity of berries is a major parameter in determining grape berry quality for wine making and fruit consumption. Despite the importance of malic and tartaric acid (TA) storage and transport for grape berry acidity, no vacuolar transporter for malate or tartrate has been identified so far. Some members of the aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) anion channel family from Arabidopsis thaliana have been shown to be involved in mediating malate fluxes across the tonoplast. Therefore, we hypothesised that a homologue of these channels could have a similar role in V. vinifera grape berries. We identified homologues of the Arabidopsis vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9 through a TBLASTX search on the V. vinifera genome database. We cloned the closest homologue of AtALMT9 from grape berry cDNA and designated it VvALMT9. The expression profile revealed that VvALMT9 is constitutively expressed in berry mesocarp tissue and that its transcription level increases during fruit maturation. Moreover, we found that VvALMT9 is targeted to the vacuolar membrane. Using patch-clamp analysis, we could show that, besides malate, VvALMT9 mediates tartrate currents which are higher than in its Arabidopsis homologue. In summary, in the present study we provide evidence that VvALMT9 is a vacuolar malate channel expressed in grape berries. Interestingly, in V. vinifera, a tartrate-producing plant, the permeability of the channel is apparently adjusted to TA.

  6. Fps1p channel is the mediator of the major part of glycerol passive diffusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : artefacts and re-definitions

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Rui Pedro Soares de; Lages, Fernanda; Graça, Magda Maria Couto da Silva; Lucas, Cândida

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol has been shown to cross Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasma membrane (1) through a H+/symport detected in cells grown on non-fermentable carbon sources, (2) by passive diffusion and (3) through the constitutive Fps1p channel. This has been named a facilitator, for mediating glycerol low affinity transport of the facilitated diffusion type. We present experimental evidence that this kinetics is an artefact created by glycerol kinase activity. Instead, the channel is shown to mediate the m...

  7. Endocannabinoids potentiate synaptic transmission through stimulation of astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Marta; Araque, Alfonso

    2010-10-06

    Endocannabinoids and their receptor CB1 play key roles in brain function. Astrocytes express CB1Rs that are activated by endocannabinoids released by neurons. However, the consequences of the endocannabinoid-mediated neuron-astrocyte signaling on synaptic transmission are unknown. We show that endocannabinoids released by hippocampal pyramidal neurons increase the probability of transmitter release at CA3-CA1 synapses. This synaptic potentiation is due to CB1R-induced Ca(2+) elevations in astrocytes, which stimulate the release of glutamate that activates presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors. While endocannabinoids induce synaptic depression in the stimulated neuron by direct activation of presynaptic CB1Rs, they indirectly lead to synaptic potentiation in relatively more distant neurons by activation of CB1Rs in astrocytes. Hence, astrocyte calcium signal evoked by endogenous stimuli (neuron-released endocannabinoids) modulates synaptic transmission. Therefore, astrocytes respond to endocannabinoids that then potentiate synaptic transmission, indicating that astrocytes are actively involved in brain physiology.

  8. Regulation of NMDA-receptor synaptic transmission by Wnt signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpa, Waldo; Gambrill, Abigail; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Barria, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Wnt ligands are secreted glycoproteins controlling gene expression and cytoskeleton reorganization involved in embryonic development of the nervous system. However, their role in later stages of brain development, particularly in the regulation of established synaptic connections is not known. We found that Wnt-5a acutely and specifically up-regulates synaptic NMDAR currents in rat hippocampal slices facilitating induction of LTP, a cellular model of learning and memory. This effect requires an increase in postsynaptic Ca2+ and activation of non-canonical downstream effectors of the Wnt signaling pathway. In contrast, Wnt-7a, an activator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, has no effect on NMDAR mediated synaptic transmission. Moreover, endogenous Wnt ligands are necessary to maintain basal NMDAR synaptic transmission adjusting the threshold for synaptic potentiation. This novel role for Wnt ligands provides a mechanism for Wnt signaling to acutely modulate synaptic plasticity and brain function in later stages of development and in the mature organism. PMID:21715611

  9. Hepatic ATGL mediates PPAR-α signaling and fatty acid channeling through an L-FABP independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kuok Teong; Mashek, Mara T; Davidson, Nicholas O; Mashek, Douglas G

    2014-05-01

    Adipose TG lipase (ATGL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in TG hydrolysis in most tissues. We have shown that hepatic ATGL preferentially channels hydrolyzed FAs to β-oxidation and induces PPAR-α signaling. Previous studies have suggested that liver FA binding protein (L-FABP) transports FAs from lipid droplets to the nucleus for ligand delivery and to the mitochondria for β-oxidation. To determine if L-FABP is involved in ATGL-mediated FA channeling, we used adenovirus-mediated suppression or overexpression of hepatic ATGL in either WT or L-FABP KO mice. Hepatic ATGL knockdown increased liver weight and TG content of overnight fasted mice regardless of genotype. L-FABP deletion did not impair the effects of ATGL overexpression on the oxidation of hydrolyzed FAs in primary hepatocyte cultures or on serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in vivo. Moreover, L-FABP deletion did not influence the effects of ATGL knockdown or overexpression on PPAR-α target gene expression. Taken together, we conclude that L-FABP is not required to channel ATGL-hydrolyzed FAs to mitochondria for β-oxidation or the nucleus for PPAR-α regulation.

  10. The Pyrexia transient receptor potential channel mediates circadian clock synchronization to low temperature cycles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Werner; Simoni, Alekos; Gentile, Carla; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2013-10-07

    Circadian clocks are endogenous approximately 24 h oscillators that temporally regulate many physiological and behavioural processes. In order to be beneficial for the organism, these clocks must be synchronized with the environmental cycles on a daily basis. Both light : dark and the concomitant daily temperature cycles (TCs) function as Zeitgeber ('time giver') and efficiently entrain circadian clocks. The temperature receptors mediating this synchronization have not been identified. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels function as thermo-receptors in animals, and here we show that the Pyrexia (Pyx) TRP channel mediates temperature synchronization in Drosophila melanogaster. Pyx is expressed in peripheral sensory organs (chordotonal organs), which previously have been implicated in temperature synchronization. Flies deficient for Pyx function fail to synchronize their behaviour to TCs in the lower range (16-20°C), and this deficit can be partially rescued by introducing a wild-type copy of the pyx gene. Synchronization to higher TCs is not affected, demonstrating a specific role for Pyx at lower temperatures. In addition, pyx mutants speed up their clock after being exposed to TCs. Our results identify the first TRP channel involved in temperature synchronization of circadian clocks.

  11. Inhibition of rat hippocampal excitability by the plant alkaloid 3-acetylaconitine mediated by interaction with voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A

    1997-02-01

    The effects of the Aconitum alkaloid 3-acetylaconitine on neuronal activity were investigated in the slice preparation and on cultivated neurons of rat hippocampus by extracellular and patch-clamp recordings, respectively. 3-Acetylaconitine (0.01-1 microM) diminished the orthodromic and antidromic population spike in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the drug was preceded by a transiently enhanced excitability. The latency of onset of the inhibition was accelerated by increased stimulation frequency, whereas recovery during washout of the alkaloid was accelerated by decreased stimulation frequency. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of 3-acetylaconitine was evaluated in two different models of epileptiform activity induced either by blockade of GABA receptors by bicuculline (10 microM) or by a nominal Mg(2+)-free bathing medium. In accordance with the activity-dependent mode of action, this compound abolished the synaptically evoked population spikes in the presence of bicuculline or nominal Mg(2+)-free bathing medium, respectively. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed an interaction of 3-acetylaconitine with the voltage-dependent sodium channel. At a concentration of 1 microM, 3-acetylaconitine did not affect the peak amplitude of the sodium current, but shifted the current-voltage relationship in the hyperpolarized direction such that sodium currents were already activated at the resting potential.

  12. High-threshold mechanosensitive ion channels blocked by a novel conopeptide mediate pressure-evoked pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam J Drew

    Full Text Available Little is known about the molecular basis of somatosensory mechanotransduction in mammals. We screened a library of peptide toxins for effects on mechanically activated currents in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. One conopeptide analogue, termed NMB-1 for noxious mechanosensation blocker 1, selectively inhibits (IC(50 1 microM sustained mechanically activated currents in a subset of sensory neurons. Biotinylated NMB-1 retains activity and binds selectively to peripherin-positive nociceptive sensory neurons. The selectivity of NMB-1 was confirmed by the fact that it has no inhibitory effects on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels, or ligand-gated channels such as acid-sensing ion channels or TRPA1 channels. Conversely, the tarantula toxin, GsMTx-4, which inhibits stretch-activated ion channels, had no effects on mechanically activated currents in sensory neurons. In behavioral assays, NMB-1 inhibits responses only to high intensity, painful mechanical stimulation and has no effects on low intensity mechanical stimulation or thermosensation. Unexpectedly, NMB-1 was found to also be an inhibitor of rapid FM1-43 loading (a measure of mechanotransduction in cochlear hair cells. These data demonstrate that pharmacologically distinct channels respond to distinct types of mechanical stimuli and suggest that mechanically activated sustained currents underlie noxious mechanosensation. NMB-1 thus provides a novel diagnostic tool for the molecular definition of channels involved in hearing and pressure-evoked pain.

  13. High-threshold mechanosensitive ion channels blocked by a novel conopeptide mediate pressure-evoked pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Liam J; Rugiero, Francois; Cesare, Paolo; Gale, Jonathan E; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Bowden, Sarah; Heinzmann, Sebastian; Robinson, Michelle; Brust, Andreas; Colless, Barbara; Lewis, Richard J; Wood, John N

    2007-06-13

    Little is known about the molecular basis of somatosensory mechanotransduction in mammals. We screened a library of peptide toxins for effects on mechanically activated currents in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. One conopeptide analogue, termed NMB-1 for noxious mechanosensation blocker 1, selectively inhibits (IC(50) 1 microM) sustained mechanically activated currents in a subset of sensory neurons. Biotinylated NMB-1 retains activity and binds selectively to peripherin-positive nociceptive sensory neurons. The selectivity of NMB-1 was confirmed by the fact that it has no inhibitory effects on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels, or ligand-gated channels such as acid-sensing ion channels or TRPA1 channels. Conversely, the tarantula toxin, GsMTx-4, which inhibits stretch-activated ion channels, had no effects on mechanically activated currents in sensory neurons. In behavioral assays, NMB-1 inhibits responses only to high intensity, painful mechanical stimulation and has no effects on low intensity mechanical stimulation or thermosensation. Unexpectedly, NMB-1 was found to also be an inhibitor of rapid FM1-43 loading (a measure of mechanotransduction) in cochlear hair cells. These data demonstrate that pharmacologically distinct channels respond to distinct types of mechanical stimuli and suggest that mechanically activated sustained currents underlie noxious mechanosensation. NMB-1 thus provides a novel diagnostic tool for the molecular definition of channels involved in hearing and pressure-evoked pain.

  14. Calmodulin mediates calcium-dependent activation of the intermediate conductance KCa channel, IKCa1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, C M; Ghanshani, S; Logsdon, N J; Rauer, H; Kalman, K; Zhou, J; Beckingham, K; Chandy, K G; Cahalan, M D; Aiyar, J

    1999-02-26

    Small and intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels play a crucial role in hyperpolarizing the membrane potential of excitable and nonexcitable cells. These channels are exquisitely sensitive to cytoplasmic Ca2+, yet their protein-coding regions do not contain consensus Ca2+-binding motifs. We investigated the involvement of an accessory protein in the Ca2+-dependent gating of hIKCa1, a human intermediate conductance channel expressed in peripheral tissues. Cal- modulin was found to interact strongly with the cytoplasmic carboxyl (C)-tail of hIKCa1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. Deletion analyses defined a requirement for the first 62 amino acids of the C-tail, and the binding of calmodulin to this region did not require Ca2+. The C-tail of hSKCa3, a human neuronal small conductance channel, also bound calmodulin, whereas that of a voltage-gated K+ channel, mKv1.3, did not. Calmodulin co-precipitated with the channel in cell lines transfected with hIKCa1, but not with mKv1. 3-transfected lines. A mutant calmodulin, defective in Ca2+ sensing but retaining binding to the channel, dramatically reduced current amplitudes when co-expressed with hIKCa1 in mammalian cells. Co-expression with varying amounts of wild-type and mutant calmodulin resulted in a dominant-negative suppression of current, consistent with four calmodulin molecules being associated with the channel. Taken together, our results suggest that Ca2+-calmodulin-induced conformational changes in all four subunits are necessary for the channel to open.

  15. How to save the WIMP: global analysis of a dark matter model with two s-channel mediators

    CERN Document Server

    Duerr, Michael; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    A reliable comparison of different dark matter (DM) searches requires models that satisfy certain consistency requirements like gauge invariance and perturbative unitarity. As a well-motivated example, we study two-mediator DM (2MDM). The model is based on a spontaneously broken $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry and contains a Majorana DM particle as well as two $s$-channel mediators, one vector (the $Z'$) and one scalar (the dark Higgs). We perform a global scan over the parameters of the model assuming that the DM relic density is obtained by thermal freeze-out in the early Universe and imposing a large set of constraints: direct and indirect DM searches, monojet, dijet and dilepton searches at colliders, Higgs observables, electroweak precision tests and perturbative unitarity. We conclude that thermal DM is only allowed either close to an $s$-channel resonance or if at least one mediator is lighter than the DM particle. In these cases a thermal DM abundance can be obtained although DM couplings to the Standard Model...

  16. A toxin from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer that blocks calcium channels coupled to exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatimosim, C; Romano-Silva, M A; Cruz, J S; Beirão, P S L; Kalapothakis, E; Moraes-Santos, T; Cordeiro, M N; Diniz, C R; Gomez, M V; Prado, M A M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the pharmacological action of a toxin from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, Tx3-3, on the function of calcium channels that control exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Tx3-3, in confirmation of previous work, diminished the intracellular calcium increase induced by membrane depolarization with KCl (25 mM) in rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The toxin was very potent (IC50 0.9 nM) at inhibiting calcium channels that regulate calcium entry in synaptosomes. In addition, Tx3-3 blocked the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, as measured with the fluorescent dye FM1-43. Using ω-toxins that interact selectively with distinct neuronal calcium channels, we investigated whether the target of Tx3-3 overlaps with known channels that mediate exocytosis. The results indicate that the main population of voltage-sensitive calcium channels altered by Tx3-3 can also be inhibited by ω-agatoxin IVA, an antagonist of P/Q calcium channels. ω-conotoxin GVIA, which inhibits N type calcium channels did not decrease significantly the entry of calcium or exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in depolarized synaptosomes. It is concluded that Tx3-3 potently inhibits ω-agatoxin IVA-sensitive calcium channels, which are involved in controlling exocytosis in rat brain cortical synaptosomes. PMID:9351520

  17. Opposing effects of the anesthetic propofol at pentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediated by a common site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Laube, Bodo

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is an intravenous general anesthetic that alters neuronal excitability by modulating agonist responses of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). Evidence suggests that propofol enhancement of anion-selective pLGICs is mediated by a binding site between adjacent subunits, whereas...... propofol inhibition of cation-selective pLGICs occurs via a binding site contained within helices M1-M4 of individual subunits. We considered this idea by testing propofol modulation of homomeric human glycine receptors (GlyRs) and nematode glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) recombinantly expressed...... in Xenopus laevis oocytes with electrophysiology. The Haemonchus contortus AVR-14B GluCl was inhibited by propofol with an IC50 value of 252 ± 48 μM, providing the first example of propofol inhibition of an anion-selective pLGIC. Remarkably, inhibition was converted to enhancement by a single I18'S...

  18. Synaptic Plasticity and Nociception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenJianguo

    2004-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is one of the fields that progresses rapidly and has a lot of success in neuroscience. The two major types of synaptie plasticity: long-term potentiation ( LTP and long-term depression (LTD are thought to be the cellular mochanisms of learning and memory. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that, besides serving as a cellular model for learning and memory, the synaptic plasticity involves in other physiological or pathophysiological processes, such as the perception of pain and the regulation of cardiovascular system. This minireview will focus on the relationship between synaptic plasticity and nociception.

  19. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didi Matza

    Full Text Available The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1 α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling.

  20. Tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in sensory neurons generate slow resurgent currents that are enhanced by inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Yong; Piekarz, Andrew D; Priest, Birgit T; Knopp, Kelly L; Krajewski, Jeffrey L; McDermott, Jeff S; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Cummins, Theodore R

    2014-05-21

    Resurgent sodium currents contribute to the regeneration of action potentials and enhanced neuronal excitability. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) resurgent currents have been described in many different neuron populations, including cerebellar and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. In most cases, sodium channel Nav1.6 is the major contributor to these TTX-S resurgent currents. Here we report a novel TTX-resistant (TTX-R) resurgent current recorded from rat DRG neurons. The TTX-R resurgent currents are similar to classic TTX-S resurgent currents in many respects, but not all. As with TTX-S resurgent currents, they are activated by membrane repolarization, inhibited by lidocaine, and enhanced by a peptide-mimetic of the β4 sodium channel subunit intracellular domain. However, the TTX-R resurgent currents exhibit much slower kinetics, occur at more depolarized voltages, and are sensitive to the Nav1.8 blocker A803467. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments from rat DRG lysates indicate the endogenous sodium channel β4 subunits associate with Nav1.8 in DRG neurons. These results suggest that slow TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are mediated by Nav1.8 and are generated by the same mechanism underlying TTX-S resurgent currents. We also show that both TTX-S and TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are enhanced by inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, the β4 peptide increased excitability of small DRG neurons in the presence of TTX. We propose that these slow TTX-R resurgent currents contribute to the membrane excitability of nociceptive DRG neurons under normal conditions and that enhancement of both types of resurgent currents by inflammatory mediators could contribute to sensory neuronal hyperexcitability associated with inflammatory pain.

  1. Homer proteins mediate the interaction between STIM1 and Cav1.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Natalia; Smani, Tarik; Woodard, Geoffrey E; Castellano, Antonio; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2015-05-01

    STIM1 is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor of the intracellular, agonist-sensitive, Ca2+ stores that communicates the filling state of the Ca2+ compartments to plasma membrane store-operated Ca2+ (SOC) channels. STIM1 has been presented as a point of convergence between store-operated and voltage-operated Ca2+ influx, both inducing activation of SOC channels while suppressing Cav1.2 channels. Here we report that Homer proteins play a relevant role in the communication between STIM1 and Cav1.2 channels. HEK-293 cells transiently expressing Cav1.2 channel subunits α1, β2 and α2δ-1 exhibited a significant Ca2+ entry upon treatment with a high concentration of KCl. In Cav1.2-expressing cells, treatment with thapsigargin (TG), to induce passive discharge of the intracellular Ca2+ stores, resulted in Ca2+ influx that was significantly greater than in cells not expressing Cav1.2 channels, a difference that was abolished by nifedipine and diltiazem. Treatment with TG induces co-immunoprecipitation of Homer1 with STIM1 and the Cav1.2 α1 subunit. Impairment of Homer function by introduction of the synthetic PPKKFR peptide into cells, which emulates the proline-rich sequences of the PPXXF motif, or using siRNA Homer1, reduced the association of STIM1 and the Cav1.2 α1 subunit. These findings indicate that Homer is important for the association between both proteins. Finally, treatment with siRNA Homer1 or the PPKKFR peptide enhanced the nifedipine-sensitive component of TG response in Cav1.2-expressing cells. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for a new role of Homer1 supporting the regulation of Cav1.2 channels by STIM1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dark-matter production through loop-induced processes at the LHC: the s-channel mediator case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattelaer, Olivier [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP), Durham (United Kingdom); Vryonidou, Eleni [Universite catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    We show how studies relevant for mono-X searches at the LHC in simplified models featuring a dark-matter candidate and an s-channel mediator can be performed within the MadGraph5{sub a}MC rate at NLO framework. We focus on gluon-initiated loop-induced processes, mostly relevant to the case where the mediator couples preferentially to third generation quarks and in particular to the top quark. Our implementation allows us to study signatures at hadron colliders involving missing transverse energy plus jets or plus neutral bosons (γ,Z,H), possibly including the effects of extra radiation by multi-parton merging and matching to the parton shower. (orig.)

  3. Dark-matter production through loop-induced processes at the LHC: the s-channel mediator case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattelaer, Olivier; Vryonidou, Eleni

    We show how studies relevant for mono-X searches at the LHC in simplified models featuring a dark-matter candidate and an s-channel mediator can be performed within the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. We focus on gluon-initiated loop-induced processes, mostly relevant to the case where the mediator couples preferentially to third generation quarks and in particular to the top quark. Our implementation allows us to study signatures at hadron colliders involving missing transverse energy plus jets or plus neutral bosons ([Formula: see text]), possibly including the effects of extra radiation by multi-parton merging and matching to the parton shower.

  4. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    Full Text Available Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs. In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH. In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM, ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs, and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3, an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3 channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  5. CX3CL1 is up-regulated in the rat hippocampus during memory-associated synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham K Sheridan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several cytokines and chemokines are now known to play normal physiological roles in the brain where they act as key regulators of communication between neurons, glia and microglia. In particular, cytokines and chemokines can affect cardinal cellular and molecular processes of hippocampal-dependent long-term memory consolidation including synaptic plasticity, synaptic scaling and neurogenesis. The chemokine, CX3CL1 (fractalkine, has been shown to modulate synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus. Here, we confirm widespread expression of CX3CL1 on mature neurons in the adult rat hippocampus. We report an up-regulation in CX3CL1 protein expression in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus 2 h after spatial learning in the water maze task. Moreover, the same temporal increase in CX3CL1 was evident following long-term potentiation-inducing theta-burst stimulation in the dentate gyrus. At physiologically relevant concentrations, CX3CL1 inhibited LTP maintenance in the dentate gyrus. This attenuation in dentate LTP was lost in the presence of GABAA receptor/chloride channel antagonism. CX3CL1 also had opposing actions on glutamate-mediated rise in intracellular calcium in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures in the presence and absence of GABAA receptor/chloride channel blockade. Using primary dissociated hippocampal cultures, we established that CX3CL1 reduces glutamate-mediated intracellular calcium rises in both neurons and glia in a dose dependent manner. In conclusion, CX3CL1 is up-regulated in the hippocampus during a brief temporal window following spatial learning the purpose of which may be to regulate glutamate-mediated neurotransmission tone. Our data supports a possible role for this chemokine in the protective plasticity process of synaptic scaling.

  6. Reduced KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channel activity underlies impaired ß-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of renal arteries in hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chadha, Preet S; Zunke, Friederike; Zhu, Hai-Lei;

    2012-01-01

    KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium (Kv7.4) channels are important regulators of vascular tone that are severely compromised in models of hypertension. However, there is no information as to the role of these channels in responses to endogenous vasodilators. We used a molecular knockdown...... strategy, as well as pharmacological tools, to examine the hypothesis that Kv7.4 channels contribute to ß-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and underlie the vascular deficit in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed gene and protein...... spontaneously hypertensive rats, which was associated with ˜60% decrease in Kv7.4 abundance. This study provides the first evidence that Kv7 channels contribute to ß-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and that abrogation of Kv7.4 channels is strongly implicated in the impaired ß...

  7. Intracellular ion channel CLIC1: involvement in microglia-mediated β-amyloid peptide(1-42) neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Giusti, Pietro

    2013-09-01

    Microglia can exacerbate central nervous system disorders, including stroke and chronic progressive neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. Mounting evidence points to ion channels expressed by microglia as contributing to these neuropathologies. The Chloride Intracellular Channel (CLIC) family represents a class of chloride intracellular channel proteins, most of which are localized to intracellular membranes. CLICs are unusual in that they possess both soluble and integral membrane forms. Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) accumulation in plaques is a hallmark of familial Alzheimer disease. The truncated Aβ25-35 species was shown previously to increase the expression of CLIC1 chloride conductance in cortical microglia and to provoke microglial neurotoxicity. However, the highly pathogenic and fibrillogenic full-length Aβ1-42 species was not examined, nor was the potential role of CLIC1 in mediating microglial activation and neurotoxicity by other stimuli (e.g. ligands for the Toll-like receptors). In the present study, we utilized a two chamber Transwell™ cell culture system to allow separate treatment of microglia and neurons while examining the effect of pharmacological blockade of CLIC1 in protecting cortical neurons from toxicity caused by Aβ1-42- and lipopolysaccaride-stimulated microglia. Presentation of Aβ1-42 to the upper, microglia-containing chamber resulted in a progressive loss of neurons over 3 days. Neuronal cell injury was prevented by the CLIC1 ion channel blockers IAA-94 [(R(+)-[(6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-2,3-dihydro-2-methyl-1-oxo-1H-inden-5yl)-oxy] acetic acid)] and niflumic acid (2-{[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino}nicotinic acid) when presented to the upper chamber only. Incubation of microglia with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ led to neuronal cell injury which, however, was insensitive to inhibition by the CLIC1 channel blockers, suggesting a degree of selectivity in agents leading to CLIC1 activation.

  8. Adrenaline-induced colonic K+ secretion is mediated by KCa1.1 (BK) channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Vaarby; Sausbier, Matthias; Ruth, Peter

    2010-01-01

    secretory K(+) channel in the apical membrane of the murine distal colon. The BK channel is responsible for both resting and Ca(2+)-activated colonic K(+) secretion and is up-regulated by aldosterone. Agonists (e.g. adrenaline) that elevate cAMP are potent activators of distal colonic K(+) secretion....... However, the secretory K(+) channel responsible for cAMP-induced K(+) secretion remains to be defined. In this study we used the Ussing chamber to identify adrenaline-induced electrogenic K(+) secretion. We found that the adrenaline-induced electrogenic ion secretion is a compound effect dominated...... by anion secretion and a smaller electrically opposing K(+) secretion. Using tissue from (i) BK wildtype (BK(+/+)) and knockout (BK(/)) and (ii) cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) wildtype (CFTR(+/+)) and knockout (CFTR(/)) mice we were able to isolate the adrenaline-induced K(+) secretion. We...

  9. Ethanol affects network activity in cultured rat hippocampus: mediation by potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Korkotian

    Full Text Available The effects of ethanol on neuronal network activity were studied in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. Exposure to low (0.25-0.5% ethanol concentrations caused an increase in synchronized network spikes, and a decrease in the duration of individual spikes. Ethanol also caused an increase in rate of miniature spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Higher concentrations of ethanol eliminated network spikes. These effects were reversible upon wash. The effects of the high, but not the low ethanol were blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. The enhancing action of low ethanol was blocked by apamin, an SK potassium channel antagonist, and mimicked by 1-EBIO, an SK channel opener. It is proposed that in cultured hippocampal networks low concentration of ethanol is associated with SK channel activity, rather than the GABAergic receptor.

  10. PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis regulates activation and inactivation of TRPC6/7 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsuki, Kyohei; Imai, Yuko; Hase, Hideharu; Okamura, Yasushi; Inoue, Ryuji; Mori, Masayuki X

    2014-02-01

    Transient receptor potential classical (or canonical) (TRPC)3, TRPC6, and TRPC7 are a subfamily of TRPC channels activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) produced through the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) by phospholipase C (PLC). PI(4,5)P2 depletion by a heterologously expressed phosphatase inhibits TRPC3, TRPC6, and TRPC7 activity independently of DAG; however, the physiological role of PI(4,5)P2 reduction on channel activity remains unclear. We used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure PI(4,5)P2 or DAG dynamics concurrently with TRPC6 or TRPC7 currents after agonist stimulation of receptors that couple to Gq and thereby activate PLC. Measurements made at different levels of receptor activation revealed a correlation between the kinetics of PI(4,5)P2 reduction and those of receptor-operated TRPC6 and TRPC7 current activation and inactivation. In contrast, DAG production correlated with channel activation but not inactivation; moreover, the time course of channel inactivation was unchanged in protein kinase C-insensitive mutants. These results suggest that inactivation of receptor-operated TRPC currents is primarily mediated by the dissociation of PI(4,5)P2. We determined the functional dissociation constant of PI(4,5)P2 to TRPC channels using FRET of the PLCδ Pleckstrin homology domain (PHd), which binds PI(4,5)P2, and used this constant to fit our experimental data to a model in which channel gating is controlled by PI(4,5)P2 and DAG. This model predicted similar FRET dynamics of the PHd to measured FRET in either human embryonic kidney cells or smooth muscle cells, whereas a model lacking PI(4,5)P2 regulation failed to reproduce the experimental data, confirming the inhibitory role of PI(4,5)P2 depletion on TRPC currents. Our model also explains various PLC-dependent characteristics of channel activity, including limitation of maximum open probability, shortening of the peak time, and the bell-shaped response of total

  11. Higher-order QCD predictions for dark matter production at the LHC in simplified models with s-channel mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backović, Mihailo [Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université catholique de Louvain, 1348, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Krämer, Michael [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University, 52056, Aachen (Germany); Maltoni, Fabio; Martini, Antony [Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université catholique de Louvain, 1348, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mawatari, Kentarou, E-mail: kentarou.mawatari@vub.ac.be [Theoretische Natuurkunde and IIHE/ELEM, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, 1050, Brussels (Belgium); Pellen, Mathieu [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University, 52056, Aachen (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    Weakly interacting dark matter particles can be pair-produced at colliders and detected through signatures featuring missing energy in association with either QCD/EW radiation or heavy quarks. In order to constrain the mass and the couplings to standard model particles, accurate and precise predictions for production cross sections and distributions are of prime importance. In this work, we consider various simplified models with s-channel mediators. We implement such models in the FeynRules/MadGraph5{sub a}MC@NLO framework, which allows to include higher-order QCD corrections in realistic simulations and to study their effect systematically. As a first phenomenological application, we present predictions for dark matter production in association with jets and with a top-quark pair at the LHC, at next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD, including matching/merging to parton showers. Our study shows that higher-order QCD corrections to dark matter production via s-channel mediators have a significant impact not only on total production rates, but also on shapes of distributions. We also show that the inclusion of next-to-leading order effects results in a sizeable reduction of the theoretical uncertainties.

  12. Higher-order QCD predictions for dark matter production at the LHC in simplified models with s-channel mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backovic, Mihailo; Maltoni, Fabio; Martini, Antony [Universite catholique de Louvain, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Kraemer, Michael; Pellen, Mathieu [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany); Mawatari, Kentarou [Theoretische Natuurkunde and IIHE/ELEM, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Weakly interacting dark matter particles can be pair-produced at colliders and detected through signatures featuring missing energy in association with either QCD/EW radiation or heavy quarks. In order to constrain the mass and the couplings to standard model particles, accurate and precise predictions for production cross sections and distributions are of prime importance. In this work, we consider various simplified models with s-channel mediators. We implement such models in the FeynRules/MadGraph5{sub a}MC rate at NLO framework, which allows to include higher-order QCD corrections in realistic simulations and to study their effect systematically. As a first phenomenological application, we present predictions for dark matter production in association with jets and with a top-quark pair at the LHC, at next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD, including matching/merging to parton showers. Our study shows that higher-order QCD corrections to dark matter production via s-channel mediators have a significant impact not only on total production rates, but also on shapes of distributions. We also show that the inclusion of next-to-leading order effects results in a sizeable reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. (orig.)

  13. Higher-order QCD predictions for dark matter production at the LHC in simplified models with s-channel mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backović, Mihailo; Krämer, Michael; Maltoni, Fabio; Martini, Antony; Mawatari, Kentarou; Pellen, Mathieu

    Weakly interacting dark matter particles can be pair-produced at colliders and detected through signatures featuring missing energy in association with either QCD/EW radiation or heavy quarks. In order to constrain the mass and the couplings to standard model particles, accurate and precise predictions for production cross sections and distributions are of prime importance. In this work, we consider various simplified models with s-channel mediators. We implement such models in the FeynRules/MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework, which allows to include higher-order QCD corrections in realistic simulations and to study their effect systematically. As a first phenomenological application, we present predictions for dark matter production in association with jets and with a top-quark pair at the LHC, at next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD, including matching/merging to parton showers. Our study shows that higher-order QCD corrections to dark matter production via s-channel mediators have a significant impact not only on total production rates, but also on shapes of distributions. We also show that the inclusion of next-to-leading order effects results in a sizeable reduction of the theoretical uncertainties.

  14. Simplified DM models with the full SM gauge symmetry : the case of $t$-channel colored scalar mediators

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P; Park, Myeonghun; Yokoya, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The general strategy for dark matter (DM) searches at colliders currently relies on simplified models. In this paper, we propose a new $t$-channel UV-complete simplified model that improves the existing simplified DM models in two important respects: (i) we impose the full SM gauge symmetry including the fact that the left-handed and the right-handed fermions have two independent mediators with two independent couplings, and (ii) we include the renormalization group evolution when we derive the effective Lagrangian for DM-nucleon scattering from the underlying UV complete models by integrating out the $t$-channel mediators. The first improvement will introduce a few more new parameters compared with the existing simplified DM models. In this study we look at the effect this broader set of free parameters has on direct detection and the mono-$X$ + MET ($X$=jet,$W,Z$) signatures at 13 TeV LHC while maintaining gauge invariance of the simplified model under the full SM gauge group. We find that the direct detect...

  15. Mechanisms of glycine release, which build up synaptic and extrasynaptic glycine levels: the role of synaptic and non-synaptic glycine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Matyus, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Glycine is an amino acid neurotransmitter that is involved in both inhibitory and excitatory neurochemical transmission in the central nervous system. The role of glycine in excitatory neurotransmission is related to its coagonist action at glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The glycine levels in the synaptic cleft rise many times higher during synaptic activation assuring that glycine spills over into the extrasynaptic space. Another possible origin of extrasynaptic glycine is the efflux of glycine occurring from astrocytes associated with glutamatergic synapses. The release of glycine from neuronal or glial origins exhibits several differences compared to that of biogenic amines or other amino acid neurotransmitters. These differences appear in an external Ca(2+)- and temperature-dependent manner, conferring unique characteristics on glycine as a neurotransmitter. Glycine transporter type-1 at synapses may exhibit neural and glial forms and plays a role in controlling synaptic glycine levels and the spill over rate of glycine from the synaptic cleft into the extrasynaptic biophase. Non-synaptic glycine transporter type-1 regulates extrasynaptic glycine concentrations, either increasing or decreasing them depending on the reverse or normal mode operation of the carrier molecule. While we can, at best, only estimate synaptic glycine levels at rest and during synaptic activation, glycine concentrations are readily measurable via brain microdialysis technique applied in the extrasynaptic space. The non-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor may obtain glycine for activation following its spill over from highly active synapses or from its release mediated by the reverse operation of non-synaptic glycine transporter-1. The sensitivity of non-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors to glutamate and glycine is many times higher than that of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors making the former type of receptor the primary target for drug action. Synaptic

  16. Contribution of Kv7 channels to natriuretic peptide mediated vasodilation in normal and hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, Jennifer B; Barrese, Vincenzo; Jepps, Thomas Andrew;

    2015-01-01

    -cAMP-linked vasodilator pathways has not been investigated. Natriuretic peptides are potent vasodilators, which operate primarily through the activation of a cGMP-dependent signaling pathway. This study investigated the putative role of Kv7 channels in natriuretic peptide-dependent relaxations in the vasculature...

  17. Small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium type 2 channels regulate the formation of contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana R K Murthy

    Full Text Available Small-conductance, Ca2+ activated K+ channels (SK channels are expressed at high levels in brain regions responsible for learning and memory. In the current study we characterized the contribution of SK2 channels to synaptic plasticity and to different phases of hippocampal memory formation. Selective SK2 antisense-treatment facilitated basal synaptic transmission and theta-burst induced LTP in hippocampal brain slices. Using the selective SK2 antagonist Lei-Dab7 or SK2 antisense probes, we found that hippocampal SK2 channels are critical during two different time windows: 1 blockade of SK2 channels before the training impaired fear memory, whereas, 2 blockade of SK2 channels immediately after the training enhanced contextual fear memory. We provided the evidence that the post-training cleavage of the SK2 channels was responsible for the observed bidirectional effect of SK2 channel blockade on memory consolidation. Thus, Lei-Dab7-injection before training impaired the C-terminal cleavage of SK2 channels, while Lei-Dab7 given immediately after training facilitated the C-terminal cleavage. Application of the synthetic peptide comprising a leucine-zipper domain of the C-terminal fragment to Jurkat cells impaired SK2 channel-mediated currents, indicating that the endogenously cleaved fragment might exert its effects on memory formation by blocking SK2 channel-mediated currents. Our present findings suggest that SK2 channel proteins contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory not only as ion channels but also by additionally generating a SK2 C-terminal fragment, involved in both processes. The modulation of fear memory by down-regulating SK2 C-terminal cleavage might have applicability in the treatment of anxiety disorders in which fear conditioning is enhanced.

  18. Phosphorylation mediated structural and functional changes in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels: implications for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Sahil; Lynch, Joseph W

    2014-08-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) mediate numerous physiological processes, including fast neurotransmission in the brain. They are targeted by a large number of clinically-important drugs and disruptions to their function are associated with many neurological disorders. The phosphorylation of pLGICs can result in a wide range of functional consequences. Indeed, many neurological disorders result from pLGIC phosphorylation. For example, chronic pain is caused by the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of α3 glycine receptors and nicotine addiction is mediated by the phosphorylation of α4- or α7-containing nicotinic receptors. A recent study demonstrated that phosphorylation can induce a global conformational change in a pLGIC that propagates to the neurotransmitter-binding site. Here we present evidence that phosphorylation-induced global conformational changes may be a universal phenomenon in pLGICs. This raises the possibility of designing drugs to specifically treat disease-modified pLGICs. This review summarizes some of the opportunities available in this area.

  19. Light-activated control of protein channel assembly mediated by membrane mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Findlay, Heather E.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical processes provide versatile triggers of chemical reactions. Here, we use a photoactivated lipid switch to modulate the folding and assembly of a protein channel within a model biological membrane. In contrast to the information rich field of water-soluble protein folding, there is only a limited understanding of the assembly of proteins that are integral to biological membranes. It is however possible to exploit the foreboding hydrophobic lipid environment and control membrane protein folding via lipid bilayer mechanics. Mechanical properties such as lipid chain lateral pressure influence the insertion and folding of proteins in membranes, with different stages of folding having contrasting sensitivities to the bilayer properties. Studies to date have relied on altering bilayer properties through lipid compositional changes made at equilibrium, and thus can only be made before or after folding. We show that light-activation of photoisomerisable di-(5-[[4-(4-butylphenyl)azo]phenoxy]pentyl)phosphate (4-Azo-5P) lipids influences the folding and assembly of the pentameric bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL. The use of a photochemical reaction enables the bilayer properties to be altered during folding, which is unprecedented. This mechanical manipulation during folding, allows for optimisation of different stages of the component insertion, folding and assembly steps within the same lipid system. The photochemical approach offers the potential to control channel assembly when generating synthetic devices that exploit the mechanosensitive protein as a nanovalve.

  20. Search for Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry in the gamma gamma missing ET Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesisoglou, Stilianos Isaak [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2005-05-01

    We present results on a search for Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry in the di-photon final state using Run II data collected by the D0 Experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We discuss event selection, Standard Model backgrounds, and the lower limits on the lightest neutralino and chargino masses resulted from this analysis.

  1. Computer-mediated communication as a channel for social resistance : The strategic side of SIDE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, R; Lea, M; Corneliussen, RA; Postmes, T; Ter Haar, W

    2002-01-01

    In two studies, the authors tested predictions derived from the social identity model of deindividuation effects (SIDE) concerning the potential of computer-mediated communication (CMC) to serve as a means to resist powerful out-groups. Earlier research using the SIDE model indicates that the anonym

  2. Ionic channel mechanisms mediating the intrinsic excitability of Kenyon cells in the mushroom body of the cricket brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Murata, Kaoru; Tanaka, Aiko; Kakuta, Eri; Tanemura, Saori; Hatakeyama, Shiori; Nakamura, Atsunao; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Hasebe, Masaharu; Kosakai, Kumiko; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsic neurons within the mushroom body of the insect brain, called Kenyon cells, play an important role in olfactory associative learning. In this study, we examined the ionic mechanisms mediating the intrinsic excitability of Kenyon cells in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. A perforated whole-cell clamp study using β-escin indicated the existence of several inward and outward currents. Three types of inward currents (INaf, INaP, and ICa) were identified. The transient sodium current (INaf) activated at -40 mV, peaked at -26 mV, and half-inactivated at -46.7 mV. The persistent sodium current (INaP) activated at -51 mV, peaked at -23 mV, and half-inactivated at -30.7 mV. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 1 μM) completely blocked both INaf and INaP, but 10nM TTX blocked INaf more potently than INaP. Cd(2+) (50 μM) potently blocked INaP with little effect on INaf. Riluzole (>20 μM) nonselectively blocked both INaP and INaf. The voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa) activated at -30 mV, peaked at -11.3 mV, and half-inactivated at -34 mV. The Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil (100 μM) blocked ICa in a use-dependent manner. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings showed the presence of a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel, and the activity of this channel was decreased by removing the extracellular Ca(2+) or adding verapamil or nifedipine, and increased by adding the Ca(2+) agonist Bay K8644, indicating that Ca(2+) entry via the L-type Ca(2+) channel regulates BK channel activity. Under the current-clamp condition, membrane depolarization generated membrane oscillations in the presence of 10nM TTX or 100 μM riluzole in the bath solution. These membrane oscillations disappeared with 1 μM TTX, 50 μM Cd(2+), replacement of external Na(+) with choline, and blockage of Na(+)-activated K(+) current (IKNa) with 50 μM quinidine, indicating that membrane oscillations are primarily mediated by INaP in cooperation with IKNa. The plateau potentials observed either in

  3. Decrease of a Current Mediated by K(v)1.3 Channels Causes Striatal Cholinergic Interneuron Hyperexcitability in Experimental Parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Tubert; Irene R.E. Taravini; Eden Flores-Barrera; Gonzalo M. Sánchez; María Alejandra Prost; María Elena Avale; Kuei Y. Tseng; Lorena Rela; Mario Gustavo Murer

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying a hypercholinergic state in Parkinsons disease (PD) remains uncertain. Here, we show that disruption of the K(v)1 channel-mediated function causes hyperexcitability of striatal cholinergic interneurons in a mouse model of PD. Specifically, our data reveal that Kv1 channels containing K(v)1.3 subunits contribute significantly to the orphan potassium current known as I-sAHP in striatal cholinergic interneurons. Typically, this Kv1 current provides negative feedback to d...

  4. Spontaneous neurotransmission signals through store-driven Ca2+ transients to maintain synaptic homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Austin L; Kavalali, Ege T

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous glutamate release-driven NMDA receptor activity exerts a strong influence on synaptic homeostasis. However, the properties of Ca2+ signals that mediate this effect remain unclear. Here, using hippocampal neurons labeled with the fluorescent Ca2+ probes Fluo-4 or GCAMP5, we visualized action potential-independent Ca2+ transients in dendritic regions adjacent to fluorescently labeled presynaptic boutons in physiological levels of extracellular Mg2+. These Ca2+ transients required NMDA receptor activity, and their propensity correlated with acute or genetically induced changes in spontaneous neurotransmitter release. In contrast, they were insensitive to blockers of AMPA receptors, L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, or group I mGluRs. However, inhibition of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release suppressed these transients and elicited synaptic scaling, a process which required protein translation and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase activity. These results support a critical role for Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in amplifying NMDA receptor-driven Ca2+ signals at rest for the maintenance of synaptic homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09262.001 PMID:26208337

  5. Carbon mediated reduction of silicon dioxide and growth of copper silicide particles in uniform width channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzocchero, Filippo; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    channels, which are aligned with the intersections of the (100) surface of the wafer and the {110} planes on an oxidized silicon wafer, as well as endotaxial copper silicide nanoparticles within the wafer bulk. We apply energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, in combination with scanning and transmission......We show that surface arc-discharge deposited carbon plays a critical intermediary role in the breakdown of thermally grown oxide diffusion barriers of 90 nm on a silicon wafer at 1035°C in an Ar/H2 atmosphere, resulting in the formation of epitaxial copper silicide particles in ≈ 10 μm wide...

  6. Glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the mesocorticolimbic system in addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huijstee, Aile N.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2015-01-01

    Addictive drugs remodel the brain’s reward circuitry, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system, by inducing widespread adaptations of glutamatergic synapses. This drug-induced synaptic plasticity is thought to contribute to both the development and the persistence of addiction. This review highlights the synaptic modifications that are induced by in vivo exposure to addictive drugs and describes how these drug-induced synaptic changes may contribute to the different components of addictive behavior, such as compulsive drug use despite negative consequences and relapse. Initially, exposure to an addictive drug induces synaptic changes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This drug-induced synaptic potentiation in the VTA subsequently triggers synaptic changes in downstream areas of the mesocorticolimbic system, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with further drug exposure. These glutamatergic synaptic alterations are then thought to mediate many of the behavioral symptoms that characterize addiction. The later stages of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the NAc and in particular in the PFC play a role in maintaining addiction and drive relapse to drug-taking induced by drug-associated cues. Remodeling of PFC glutamatergic circuits can persist into adulthood, causing a lasting vulnerability to relapse. We will discuss how these neurobiological changes produced by drugs of abuse may provide novel targets for potential treatment strategies for addiction. PMID:25653591

  7. AtHKT1;1 mediates nernstian sodium channel transport properties in Arabidopsis root stelar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowu Xue

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis AtHKT1;1 protein was identified as a sodium (Na⁺ transporter by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, direct comparative in vivo electrophysiological analyses of a plant HKT transporter in wild-type and hkt loss-of-function mutants has not yet been reported and it has been recently argued that heterologous expression systems may alter properties of plant transporters, including HKT transporters. In this report, we analyze several key functions of AtHKT1;1-mediated ion currents in their native root stelar cells, including Na⁺ and K⁺ conductances, AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents, and shifts in reversal potentials in the presence of defined intracellular and extracellular salt concentrations. Enhancer trap Arabidopsis plants with GFP-labeled root stelar cells were used to investigate AtHKT1;1-dependent ion transport properties using patch clamp electrophysiology in wild-type and athkt1;1 mutant plants. AtHKT1;1-dependent currents were carried by sodium ions and these currents were not observed in athkt1;1 mutant stelar cells. However, K⁺ currents in wild-type and athkt1;1 root stelar cell protoplasts were indistinguishable correlating with the Na⁺ over K⁺ selectivity of AtHKT1;1-mediated transport. Moreover, AtHKT1;1-mediated currents did not show a strong voltage dependence in vivo. Unexpectedly, removal of extracellular Na⁺ caused a reduction in AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents in Columbia root stelar cells and Xenopus oocytes, indicating a role for external Na⁺ in regulation of AtHKT1;1 activity. Shifting the NaCl gradient in root stelar cells showed a Nernstian shift in the reversal potential providing biophysical evidence for the model that AtHKT1;1 mediates passive Na⁺ channel transport properties.

  8. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor signaling dichotomously modulates inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in rat inner retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Han; Wu, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Miao, Yanying; Zhang, Chuan-Qiang; Dong, Ling-Dan; Yang, Xiong-Li; Wang, Zhongfeng

    2016-01-01

    In the inner retina, ganglion cells (RGCs) integrate and process excitatory signal from bipolar cells (BCs) and inhibitory signal from amacrine cells (ACs). Using multiple labeling immunohistochemistry, we first revealed the expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) at the terminals of ACs and BCs in rat retina. By patch-clamp techniques, we then showed how the activation of this receptor dichotomously regulated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), mediated by GABAA receptors and glycine receptors, and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), mediated by AMPA receptors, of RGCs in rat retinal slices. WIN55212-2 (WIN), a CB1R agonist, reduced the mIPSC frequency due to an inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels no matter whether AMPA receptors were blocked. In contrast, WIN reduced the mEPSC frequency by suppressing T-type Ca(2+) channels only when inhibitory inputs to RGCs were present, which could be in part due to less T-type Ca(2+) channels of cone BCs, presynaptic to RGCs, being in an inactivation state under such condition. This unique feature of CB1R-mediated retrograde regulation provides a novel mechanism for modulating excitatory synaptic transmission in the inner retina. Moreover, depolarization of RGCs suppressed mIPSCs of these cells, an effect that was eliminated by the CB1R antagonist SR141716, suggesting that endocannabinoid is indeed released from RGCs.

  9. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  10. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  11. Mechanoprotection by Polycystins against Apoptosis Is Mediated through the Opening of Stretch-Activated K2P Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Peyronnet

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available How renal epithelial cells respond to increased pressure and the link with kidney disease states remain poorly understood. Pkd1 knockout or expression of a PC2 pathogenic mutant, mimicking the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, dramatically enhances mechanical stress-induced tubular apoptotic cell death. We show the presence of a stretch-activated K+ channel dependent on the TREK-2 K2P subunit in proximal convoluted tubule epithelial cells. Our findings further demonstrate that polycystins protect renal epithelial cells against apoptosis in response to mechanical stress, and this function is mediated through the opening of stretch-activated K2P channels. Thus, to our knowledge, we establish for the first time, both in vitro and in vivo, a functional relationship between mechanotransduction and mechanoprotection. We propose that this mechanism is at play in other important pathologies associated with apoptosis and in which pressure or flow stimulation is altered, including heart failure or atherosclerosis.

  12. Interaction of hydrogen sulfide with ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanghua; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2010-07-01

    1. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a signalling gasotransmitter. It targets different ion channels and receptors, and fulfils its various roles in modulating the functions of different systems. However, the interaction of H(2)S with different types of ion channels and underlying molecular mechanisms has not been reviewed systematically. 2. H(2)S is the first identified endogenous gaseous opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Through the activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, H(2)S lowers blood pressure, protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury, inhibits insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells, and exerts anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and anti-apoptotic effects. 3. H(2)S inhibited L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes but stimulated the same channels in neurons, thus regulating intracellular Ca(2+) levels. H(2)S activated small and medium conductance K(Ca) channels but its effect on BK(Ca) channels has not been consistent. 4. H(2)S-induced hyperalgesia and pro-nociception seems to be related to the sensitization of both T-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPV(1) channels. The activation of TRPV(1) and TRPA(1) by H(2)S is believed to result in contraction of nonvascular smooth muscles and increased colonic mucosal Cl(-) secretion. 5. The activation of Cl(-) channel by H(2)S has been shown as a protective mechanism for neurons from oxytosis. H(2)S also potentiates N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor-mediated currents that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity for learning and memory. 6. Given the important modulatory effects of H(2)S on different ion channels, many cellular functions and disease conditions related to homeostatic control of ion fluxes across cell membrane should be re-evaluated.

  13. [Properties of cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on type I vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Kong, Wei-Jia; Xia, Jiao; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Hua-Mao; Guo, Chang-Kai

    2008-06-25

    To confirm the existence of cholinergic receptors on type I vestibular hair cells (VHCs I) of guinea pigs and to study the properties of the cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on VHCs I, electrophysiological responses of isolated VHCs I to external ACh were examined by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. The results showed that 7.5% (21/279) VHCs I were found to be sensitive to ACh (10-1000 μmol/L). ACh generated an outward current in a steady, slow, dose-dependent [EC(50) was (63.78±2.31) μmol/L] and voltage-independent manner. In standard extracellular solution, ACh at the concentration of 100 μmol/L triggered a calcium-dependent current of (170±15) pA at holding potential of -50 mV, and the current amplitude could be depressed by extracellularly added calcium-dependent potassium channel antagonist TEA. The time interval for the next complete activation of ACh-sensitive current was no less than 1 min. The ion channels did not shut off even when they were exposed to ACh for an extended period of time (8 min). The results suggest that dose-dependent, calcium-dependent and voltage-independent cholinergic receptors were located on a few of the VHCs I investibular epithelium of guinea pigs. The cholinergic receptors did not show desensitization to ACh. This work reveals the existence of efferent neurotransmitter receptors on VHCs I and helps in understanding the function of vestibular efferent nervous system, and may provide some useful information on guiding the clinical rehabilitative treatment of vertigo.

  14. Disruption of an EAAT-Mediated Chloride Channel in a Drosophila Model of Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinejad, Neda; Peco, Emilie; Ferreira, Tiago; Stacey, Stephanie M; van Meyel, Donald J

    2016-07-20

    Patients with Type 6 episodic ataxia (EA6) have mutations of the excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT1 (also known as GLAST), but the underlying pathophysiological mechanism for EA6 is not known. EAAT1 is a glutamate transporter expressed by astrocytes and other glia, and it serves dual function as an anion channel. One EA6-associated mutation is a P>R substitution (EAAT1(P>R)) that in transfected cells has a reduced rate of glutamate transport and an abnormal anion conductance. We expressed this EAAT1(P>R) mutation in glial cells of Drosophila larvae and found that these larvae exhibit episodic paralysis, and their astrocytes poorly infiltrate the CNS neuropil. These defects are not seen in Eaat1-null mutants, and so they cannot be explained by loss of glutamate transport. We instead explored the role of the abnormal anion conductance of the EAAT1(P>R) mutation, and to do this we expressed chloride cotransporters in astrocytes. Like the EAAT1(P>R) mutation, the chloride-extruding K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter KccB also caused astroglial malformation and paralysis, supporting the idea that the EAAT1(P>R) mutation causes abnormal chloride flow from CNS glia. In contrast, the Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter Ncc69, which normally allows chloride into cells, rescued the effects of the EAAT1(P>R) mutation. Together, our results indicate that the cytopathology and episodic paralysis in our Drosophila EA6 model stem from a gain-of-function chloride channelopathy of glial cells. We studied a mutation found in episodic ataxia of the dual-function glutamate transporter/anion channel EAAT1, and discovered it caused malformation of astrocytes and episodes of paralysis in a Drosophila model. These effects were mimicked by a chloride-extruding cotransporter and were rescued by restoring chloride homeostasis to glial cells with a Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter. Our findings reveal a new pathophysiological mechanism in which astrocyte cytopathology and neural circuit dysfunction

  15. Acid extrusion from human spermatozoa is mediated by flagellar voltage-gated proton channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishko, Polina V; Botchkina, Inna L; Fedorenko, Andriy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2010-02-05

    Human spermatozoa are quiescent in the male reproductive system and must undergo activation once introduced into the female reproductive tract. This process is known to require alkalinization of sperm cytoplasm, but the mechanism responsible for transmembrane proton extrusion has remained unknown because of the inability to measure membrane conductance in human sperm. Here, by successfully patch clamping human spermatozoa, we show that proton channel Hv1 is their dominant proton conductance. Hv1 is confined to the principal piece of the sperm flagellum, where it is expressed at unusually high density. Robust flagellar Hv1-dependent proton conductance is activated by membrane depolarization, an alkaline extracellular environment, endocannabinoid anandamide, and removal of extracellular zinc, a potent Hv1 blocker. Hv1 allows only outward transport of protons and is therefore dedicated to inducing intracellular alkalinization and activating spermatozoa. The importance of Hv1 for sperm activation makes it an attractive target for controlling male fertility.

  16. MicroRNA-Mediated Downregulation of the Potassium Channel Kv4.2 Contributes to Seizure Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gross

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are bursts of excessive synchronized neuronal activity, suggesting that mechanisms controlling brain excitability are compromised. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.2, a major mediator of hyperpolarizing A-type currents in the brain, is a crucial regulator of neuronal excitability. Kv4.2 expression levels are reduced following seizures and in epilepsy, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report that Kv4.2 mRNA is recruited to the RNA-induced silencing complex shortly after status epilepticus in mice and after kainic acid treatment of hippocampal neurons, coincident with reduction of Kv4.2 protein. We show that the microRNA miR-324-5p inhibits Kv4.2 protein expression and that antagonizing miR-324-5p is neuroprotective and seizure suppressive. MiR-324-5p inhibition also blocks kainic-acid-induced reduction of Kv4.2 protein in vitro and in vivo and delays kainic-acid-induced seizure onset in wild-type but not in Kcnd2 knockout mice. These results reveal an important role for miR-324-5p-mediated silencing of Kv4.2 in seizure onset.

  17. The cytoplasmic coiled-coil mediates cooperative gating temperature sensitivity in the voltage-gated H(+) channel Hv1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Takeshita, Kohei; Kobayashi, Megumi; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2012-05-08

    Hv1/VSOP is a dimeric voltage-gated H(+) channel in which the gating of one subunit is reportedly coupled to that of the other subunit within the dimer. The molecular basis for dimer formation and intersubunit coupling, however, remains unknown. Here we show that the carboxy terminus ends downstream of the S4 voltage-sensor helix twist in a dimer coiled-coil architecture, which mediates cooperative gating. We also show that the temperature-dependent activation of H(+) current through Hv1/VSOP is regulated by thermostability of the coiled-coil domain, and that this regulation is altered by mutation of the linker between S4 and the coiled-coil. Cooperative gating within the dimer is also dependent on the linker structure, which circular dichroism spectrum analysis suggests is α-helical. Our results indicate that the cytoplasmic coiled-coil strands form continuous α-helices with S4 and mediate cooperative gating to adjust the range of temperatures over which Hv1/VSOP operates.

  18. Modeling CaMKII-mediated regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Greenstein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC in the cardiac myocyte is mediated by a number of highly integrated mechanisms of intracellular Ca2+ transport. Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs allow for Ca2+ entry into the myocyte, which then binds to nearby ryanodine receptors (RyRs and triggers Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a process known as Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. The highly coordinated Ca2+-mediated interaction between LCCs and RyRs is further regulated by the cardiac isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII. Because CaMKII targets and modulates the function of many ECC proteins, elucidation of its role in ECC and integrative cellular function is challenging and much insight has been gained through the use of detailed computational models. Multiscale models that can both reconstruct the detailed nature of local signaling events within the cardiac dyad and predict their functional consequences at the level of the whole cell have played an important role in advancing our understanding of CaMKII function in ECC. Here, we review experimentally based models of CaMKII function with a focus on LCC and RyR regulation, and the mechanistic insights that have been gained through their application.

  19. Odor-Specific Habituation Arises from Interaction of Afferent Synaptic Adaptation and Intrinsic Synaptic Potentiation in Olfactory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linster, Christiane; Menon, Alka V.; Singh, Christopher Y.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of target odorants from background odorants is a fundamental computational requirement for the olfactory system and is thought to be behaviorally mediated by olfactory habituation memory. Data from our laboratory have shown that odor-specific adaptation in piriform neurons, mediated at least partially by synaptic adaptation between…

  20. Light-evoked synaptic activity of retinal ganglion and amacrine cells is regulated in developing mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quanhua; Wang, Ping; Tian, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a continued maturation of visual responsiveness and synaptic activity of retina after eye opening, including the size of receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), light-evoked synaptic output of RGCs, bipolar cell spontaneous synaptic inputs to RGCs, and the synaptic connections between RGCs and ON and OFF bipolar cells. Light deprivation retarded some of these age-dependent changes. However, many other functional and morphological features of RGCs are not sensitive to visual experience. To determine whether light-evoked synaptic responses of RGCs undergo developmental change, we directly examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to RGCs in developing retinas and found that both light-evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents decreased, but not increased, with age. We also examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to amacrine cells in developing retinas and found that the light-evoked synaptic input of amacrine cells is also down-regulated in developing mouse retina. Different from the developmental changes of RGC spontaneous synaptic activity, dark rearing has little effect on the developmental changes of light-evoked synaptic activity of both RGCs and amacrine cells. Therefore, we concluded that the synaptic mechanisms mediating spontaneous and light-evoked synaptic activity of RGCs and amacrine cells are likely to be different. PMID:21091802

  1. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus important bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with Edwardsiella ictaluri results in $40 - 50 million annual losses in profits to catfish producers. Early detection of this pathogen is necessary for disease control and reduction of economic loss. In this communication, the loop-mediated isothermal a...

  2. Biodegradable microsphere-mediated cell perforation in microfluidic channel using femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Atsuhiro; Ariyasu, Kazumasa; Mitsuhashi, Tatsuki; Heinemann, Dag; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-05-01

    The use of small particles has expanded the capability of ultrashort pulsed laser optoinjection technology toward simultaneous treatment of multiple cells. The microfluidic platform is one of the attractive systems that has obtained synergy with laser-based technology for cell manipulation, including optoinjection. We have demonstrated the delivery of molecules into suspended-flowing cells in a microfluidic channel by using biodegradable polymer microspheres and a near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse. The use of polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres realized not only a higher optoinjection ratio compared to that with polylactic acid microspheres but also avoids optical damage to the microfluidic chip, which is attributable to its higher optical intensity enhancement at the localized spot under a microsphere. Interestingly, optoinjection ratios to nucleus showed a difference for adhered cells and suspended cells. The use of biodegradable polymer microspheres provides high throughput optoinjection; i.e., multiple cells can be treated in a short time, which is promising for various applications in cell analysis, drug delivery, and ex vivo gene transfection to bone marrow cells and stem cells without concerns about residual microspheres.

  3. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Marco C; Israel, Mathilde R; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R; Harrington, Andrea M; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J; Brierley, Stuart M; Vetter, Irina

    2017-02-22

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1-1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation.

  4. TRPM7 channel inhibition mediates midazolam-induced proliferation loss in human malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingkao; Dou, Yunling; Zheng, Xiaoke; Leng, Tiandong; Lu, Xiaofang; Ouyang, Ying; Sun, Huawei; Xing, Fan; Mai, Jialuo; Gu, Jiayu; Lu, Bingzheng; Yan, Guangmei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Wenbo

    2016-11-01

    The melastatin-like transient receptor potential 7 (TRPM7) has been implicated in proliferation or apoptosis of some cancers, indicating the potential of TRPM7 as an anti-anaplastic target. Here, we identified the characteristic TRPM7 channel currents in human malignant glioma MGR2 cells, which could be blocked by a pharmacologic inhibitor Gd(3+). We mined the clinical sample data from Oncomine Database and found that human malignant glioma tissues expressed higher TRPM7 mRNA than normal brain ones. Importantly, we identified a widely used clinical anesthetic midazolam as a TRPM7 inhibitor. Midazolam treatment for seconds suppressed the TRPM7 currents and calcium influx, and treatment for 48 h inhibited the TRPM7 expression. The inhibitory effect on TRPM7 accounts for the proliferation loss and G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest induced by midazolam. Our data demonstrates that midazolam represses proliferation of human malignant glioma cells through inhibiting TRPM7 currents, which may be further potentiated by suppressing the expression of TRPM7. Our result indicates midazolam as a pharmacologic lead compound with brain-blood barrier permeability for targeting TRPM7 in the glioma.

  5. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Marco C.; Israel, Mathilde R.; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R.; Harrington, Andrea M.; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y.; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J.; Brierley, Stuart M.; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1–1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation. PMID:28225079

  6. Role of TRPM7 channels in hyperglycemia-mediated injury of vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Sun

    Full Text Available This study investigated the change of transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7 expression by high glucose and its role in hyperglycemia induced injury of vascular endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were incubated in the presence or absence of high concentrations of D-glucose (HG for 72 h. RT-PCR, Real-time PCR, Western blotting, Immunofluorescence staining and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed that TRPM7 mRNA, TRPM7 protein expression and TRPM7-like currents were increased in HUVECs following exposure to HG. In contrast to D-glucose, exposure of HUVECs to high concentrations of L-glucose had no effect. HG increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, cytotoxicity and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression, which could be attenuated by knockdown of TRPM7 with TRPM7 siRNA. The protective effect of silencing TRPM7 against HG induced endothelial injury was abolished by U0126, an inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. These observations suggest that TRPM7 channels play an important role in hyperglycemia-induced injury of vascular endothelial cells.

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-05

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis.

  8. TMEM16A is associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in mouse retina and its function is disrupted upon mutation of the auxiliary α2δ4 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Antonella; Piano, Ilaria; Demontis, Gian Carlo; Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Santina, Luca Della; Gargini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors rely upon highly specialized synapses to efficiently transmit signals to multiple postsynaptic targets. Calcium influx in the presynaptic terminal is mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). This event triggers neurotransmitter release, but also gates calcium-activated chloride channels (TMEM), which in turn regulate VGCC activity. In order to investigate the relationship between VGCC and TMEM channels, we analyzed the retina of wild type (WT) and Cacna2d4 mutant mice, in which the VGCC auxiliary α2δ4 subunit carries a nonsense mutation, disrupting the normal channel function. Synaptic terminals of mutant photoreceptors are disarranged and synaptic proteins as well as TMEM16A channels lose their characteristic localization. In parallel, calcium-activated chloride currents are impaired in rods, despite unaltered TMEM16A protein levels. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed the interaction between VGCC and TMEM16A channels in the retina. Heterologous expression of these channels in tsA-201 cells showed that TMEM16A associates with the CaV1.4 subunit, and the association persists upon expression of the mutant α2δ4 subunit. Collectively, our experiments show association between TMEM16A and the α1 subunit of VGCC. Close proximity of these channels allows optimal function of the photoreceptor synaptic terminal under physiological conditions, but also makes TMEM16A channels susceptible to changes occurring to calcium channels. PMID:26557056

  9. Channel-mediated lactic acid transport: a novel function for aquaglyceroporins in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Desguin, Benoît; Chaumont, François; Hols, Pascal

    2013-09-15

    MIPs (major intrinsic proteins), also known as aquaporins, are membrane proteins that channel water and/or uncharged solutes across membranes in all kingdoms of life. Considering the enormous number of different bacteria on earth, functional information on bacterial MIPs is scarce. In the present study, six MIPs [glpF1 (glycerol facilitator 1)-glpF6] were identified in the genome of the Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that GlpF2, GlpF3 and GlpF4 each facilitated the transmembrane diffusion of water, dihydroxyacetone and glycerol. As several lactic acid bacteria have GlpFs in their lactate racemization operon (GlpF1/F4 phylogenetic group), their ability to transport this organic acid was tested. Both GlpF1 and GlpF4 facilitated the diffusion of D/L-lactic acid. Deletion of glpF1 and/or glpF4 in Lb. plantarum showed that both genes were involved in the racemization of lactic acid and, in addition, the double glpF1 glpF4 mutant showed a growth delay under conditions of mild lactic acid stress. This provides further evidence that GlpFs contribute to lactic acid metabolism in this species. This lactic acid transport capacity was shown to be conserved in the GlpF1/F4 group of Lactobacillales. In conclusion, we have functionally analysed the largest set of bacterial MIPs and demonstrated that the lactic acid membrane permeability of bacteria can be regulated by aquaglyceroporins.

  10. Phorbol Ester Modulation of Ca2+ Channels Mediates Nociceptive Transmission in Dorsal Horn Neurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J. Stephens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phorbol esters are analogues of diacylglycerol which activate C1 domain proteins, such as protein kinase C (PKC. Phorbol ester/PKC pathways have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for chronic pain states, potentially by phosphorylating proteins involved in nociception, such as voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs. In this brief report, we investigate the potential involvement of CaV2 VDCC subtypes in functional effects of the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA on nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Effects of PMA and of selective pharmacological blockers of CaV2 VDCC subtypes on nociceptive transmission at laminae II dorsal horn neurones were examined in mouse spinal cord slices. Experiments were extended to CaV2.3(−/− mice to complement pharmacological studies. PMA increased the mean frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in dorsal horn neurones, without an effect on event amplitude or half-width. sPSC frequency was reduced by selective VDCC blockers, w-agatoxin-IVA (AgTX; CaV2.1, w-conotoxin-GVIA (CTX; CaV2.2 or SNX-482 (CaV2.3. PMA effects were attenuated in the presence of each VDCC blocker and, also, in CaV2.3(−/− mice. These initial data demonstrate that PMA increases nociceptive transmission at dorsal horn neurones via actions on different CaV2 subtypes suggesting potential anti-nociceptive targets in this system.

  11. Optical fiber synaptic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.; Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; García-Lopez, J. H.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding neuron connections is a great challenge, which is needed to solve many important problems in neurobiology and neuroengineering for recreation of brain functions and efficient biorobotics. In particular, a design of an optical synapse capable to communicate with neuron spike sequences would be crucial to improve the functionality of neuromimmetic networks. In this work we propose an optical synaptic sensor based on an erbium-doped fiber laser driven by a FitzHung-Nagumo electronic neuron, to connect with another electronic neuron. Two possible optical synaptic configurations are analyzed for optoelectronic coupling between neurons: laser cavity loss modulation and pump laser modulation. The control parameters of the proposed optical synapse provide additional degrees of flexibility to the neuron connection traditionally controlled only by coupling strengths in artificial networks.

  12. The role of DPO-1 and XE991-sensitive potassium channels in perivascular adipose tissue-mediated regulation of vascular tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Tsvetkov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The anti-contractile effect of perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT is an important mechanism in the modulation of vascular tone in peripheral arteries. Recent evidence has implicated the XE991-sensitive voltage-gated Kv (KCNQ channels in the regulation of arterial tone by PVAT. However, until now the in vivo pharmacology of the involved vascular Kv channels with regard to XE991 remains undetermined, since XE991 effects may involve Ca2+ activated BKCa channels and/or voltage-dependent Kv1.5 channels sensitive to diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (DPO-1. In this study, we tested whether Kv1.5 channels are involved in the control of mesenteric arterial tone and its regulation by PVAT. Our study was also aimed at extending our current knowledge on the in situ vascular pharmacology of DPO-1 and XE991 regarding Kv1.5 and BKCa channels, in helping to identify the nature of K+ channels that could contribute to PVAT-mediated relaxation. XE991 at 30 µM reduced the anti-contractile response of PVAT, but had no effects on vasocontraction induced by phenylephrine (PE in the absence of PVAT. Similar effects were observed for XE991 at 0.3 µM, which is known to almost completely inhibit mesenteric artery VSMC Kv currents. 30 µM XE991 did not affect BKCa currents in VSMCs. Kcna5-/- arteries and wild-type arteries incubated with 1 µM DPO-1 showed normal vasocontractions in response to PE in the presence and absence of PVAT. Kv current density and inhibition by 30 µM XE991 were normal in mesenteric artery VSMCs isolated from Kcna5-/- mice. We conclude that Kv channels are involved in the control of arterial vascular tone by PVAT. These channels are present in VSMCs and very potently inhibited by the KCNQ channel blocker XE991. BKCa channels and/or DPO-1 sensitive Kv1.5 channels in VSMCs are not the downstream mediators of the XE991 effects on PVAT-dependent arterial vasorelaxation. Further studies will need to be undertaken to examine the role of other Kv channels in

  13. Synapse geometry and receptor dynamics modulate synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Freche

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission relies on several processes, such as the location of a released vesicle, the number and type of receptors, trafficking between the postsynaptic density (PSD and extrasynaptic compartment, as well as the synapse organization. To study the impact of these parameters on excitatory synaptic transmission, we present a computational model for the fast AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic current. We show that in addition to the vesicular release probability, due to variations in their release locations and the AMPAR distribution, the postsynaptic current amplitude has a large variance, making a synapse an intrinsic unreliable device. We use our model to examine our experimental data recorded from CA1 mice hippocampal slices to study the differences between mEPSC and evoked EPSC variance. The synaptic current but not the coefficient of variation is maximal when the active zone where vesicles are released is apposed to the PSD. Moreover, we find that for certain type of synapses, receptor trafficking can affect the magnitude of synaptic depression. Finally, we demonstrate that perisynaptic microdomains located outside the PSD impacts synaptic transmission by regulating the number of desensitized receptors and their trafficking to the PSD. We conclude that geometrical modifications, reorganization of the PSD or perisynaptic microdomains modulate synaptic strength, as the mechanisms underlying long-term plasticity.

  14. Salt-Induced Hypertension in a Mouse Model of Liddle's Syndrome is Mediated by Epithelial Sodium Channels in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Huysse, James W.; Amin, Md. Shahrier; Yang, Baoli; Leenen, Frans H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed and developmentally downregulated 4-2 protein (Nedd4-2) facilitates the endocytosis of epithelial Na channels (ENaC). Both mice and humans with a loss of regulation of ENaC by Nedd4-2 have salt-induced hypertension. ENaC is also expressed in the brain, where it is critical for hypertension on high salt diet in salt-sensitive rats. In the present studies we assessed whether Nedd4-2 knockout (−/−) mice have: 1) increased brain ENaC; 2) elevated CSF sodium on high salt diet; and 3) enhanced pressor responses to CSF sodium and hypertension on high salt diet, both mediated by brain ENaC. Prominent choroid plexus and neuronal ENaC staining was present in −/− but not in wild-type (W/T) mice. In chronically instrumented mice, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of Na-rich aCSF increased MAP 3-fold higher in −/− than W/T. Icv infusion of the ENaC blocker benzamil abolished this enhancement. In telemetered −/− mice on high salt diet (8% NaCl), CSF [Na+], MAP and HR increased significantly, MAP by 30-35 mmHg. These MAP and HR responses were largely prevented by icv benzamil, but only to a minor extent by sc benzamil at the icv rate. We conclude that increased ENaC expression in the brain of Nedd 4-2 −/− mice mediates their hypertensive response to high salt diet, by causing increased sodium levels in the CSF as well as hyper-responsiveness to CSF sodium. These findings highlight the possible causative contribution of CNS ENaC in the etiology of salt-induced hypertension. PMID:22802227

  15. Synaptic Plasticity, Dementia and Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Zusso, Morena; Giusti, Pietro

    2017-01-13

    Neuroplasticity is not only shaped by learning and memory but is also a mediator of responses to neuron attrition and injury (compensatory plasticity). As an ongoing process it reacts to neuronal cell activity and injury, death, and genesis, which encompasses the modulation of structural and functional processes of axons, dendrites, and synapses. The range of structural elements that comprise plasticity includes long-term potentiation (a cellular correlate of learning and memory), synaptic efficacy and remodelling, synaptogenesis, axonal sprouting and dendritic remodelling, and neurogenesis and recruitment. Degenerative diseases of the human brain continue to pose one of biomedicine's most intractable problems. Research on human neurodegeneration is now moving from descriptive to mechanistic analyses. At the same time, it is increasing apparent that morphological lesions traditionally used by neuropathologists to confirm post-mortem clinical diagnosis might furnish us with an experimentally tractable handle to understand causative pathways. Consider the aging-dependent neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) which is characterised at the neuropathological level by deposits of insoluble amyloid b-peptide (Ab) in extracellular plaques and aggregated tau protein, which is found largely in the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. We now appreciate that mild cognitive impairment in early AD may be due to synaptic dysfunction caused by accumulation of non-fibrillar, oligomeric Ab, occurring well in advance of evident widespread synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Soluble Ab oligomers can adversely affect synaptic structure and plasticity at extremely low concentrations, although the molecular substrates by which synaptic memory mechanisms are disrupted remain to be fully elucidated. The dendritic spine constitutes a primary locus of excitatory synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. These structures protruding from dendritic shafts

  16. [Lipids in the process of synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zefirov, A L; Petrov, A M

    2010-08-01

    The phenomenon of synaptic transmission is based on the processes of synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis carried out with complex protein-dependent mechanisms. The SNARE-complex forming proteins (synaptobrevin, syntaxin, SNAP-25), synaptotagmin, Munc13, Munc18, NSF, alpha-SNAP are involved in exocytosis, while the synaptic vesicle endocytosis is mediated by another protein (clathrin, AP-2, epsin, endophilin, amphiphysin, dynamin, synaptojanin, Hsc70). In recent years, data on critical role of various lipids in exo- and encocytosis are collected. Most interesting results are received about significance of the cholesterol, phosphoinositides, phosphatidic and polynonsaturated fat acids in the exo-endocytosis cycle. Participation of lipid rafts in synaptic vesicle recycling is discussed. In this article, the data of the last years, including the authors' own data about role of some lipids and lipid-modifying enzimes in processes of exo- and endocytosis are presented.

  17. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels enhances DMT1-mediated iron uptake in SK-N-SH cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xixun; Xu, Huamin; Shi, Limin; Jiang, Zhifeng; Song, Ning; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Iron importer divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) plays a crucial role in the nigal iron accumulation in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Membrane hyperpolarization is one of the factors that could affect its iron transport function. Besides iron, selective activation of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels also contributes to the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD. Interestingly, activation of KATP channels could induce membrane hyperpolarization. Therefore, it is of vital importance to study the effects of activation of KATP channels on DMT1-mediated iron uptake function. In the present study, activation of KATP channels by diazoxide resulted in the hyperpolarization of the membrane potential and increased DMT1-mediated iron uptake in SK-N-SH cells. This led to an increase in intracellular iron levels and a subsequent decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in ROS production. Delayed inactivation of the Fe2+-evoked currents by diazoxide was recorded by patch clamp in HEK293 cells, which demonstrated that diazoxide could prolonged DMT1-facilitated iron transport. While inhibition of KATP channels by glibenclamide could block ferrous iron influx and the subsequent cell damage. Overexpression of Kir6.2/SUR1 resulted in an increase in iron influx and intracellular iron levels, which was markedly increased after diazoxide treatment. PMID:27646472

  18. Age-dependent impact of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channel deletion on myogenic tone and flow-mediated vasodilatation in small arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Miriam F.; Björling, Karl; Jensen, Lars Jørn

    2016-01-01

    .2-dependent and -independent effects. No changes in mRNA expression of several important K(+) and Ca(2+) channel genes were induced by CaV3.2 knock-out. However, the expression of the other T-type channel isoform (CaV3.1) was reduced at the mRNA and protein level in mature adult compared to young WT arteries......The myogenic response and flow-mediated vasodilatation are important regulators of local blood perfusion and total peripheral resistance, and are known to entail a calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs), respectively. CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels...... are expressed in both VSMCs and ECs of small arteries. The T-type channels are important drug targets but due to the lack of specific antagonists our understanding of the role of CaV3.2 channels in vasomotor tone at various ages is scarce. We evaluated the myogenic response, flow-mediated vasodilatation...

  19. Activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels is a trigger but not a mediator of ischaemic preconditioning in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Rainer; Gres, Petra; Heusch, Gerd

    2003-05-01

    1. Activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels (K(ATP)) is involved in ischaemic preconditioning (IP). In isolated buffer-perfused rabbit hearts, activation of mitochondrial K(ATP)--through a generation of free radicals--acted as a trigger rather than a mediator of IP; the isolated buffer-perfused heart preparation, however, favours free radical generation. In contrast, in vivo studies in rats and dogs suggested that activation of K(ATP) acts as a mediator of IP's protection. A detailed analysis on the role of K(ATP) in IP's protection in vivo by varying the time and dose of K(ATP) blocker administration is, however, lacking. 2. In 54 enflurane-anaesthetized pigs, the left anterior descending coronary artery was perfused by an extracorporeal circuit. Infarct size (IS, %, TTC) following 90 min sustained low-flow ischaemia and 120 min reperfusion was 26.6+/-3.5 (s.e.m.) (n=8). IP with one cycle of 10 min ischaemia and 15 min reperfusion reduced IS to 6.5+/-2.1 (n=7, P<0.05). Blockade of K(ATP) with glibenclamide (0.5 mg kg(-1) i.v., 50 microg min(-1) continuous infusion) starting 10 min before or immediately following the preconditioning ischaemia abolished IS reduction by IP (20.7+/-2.7, n=7 and 21.9+/-6.6, n=6, respectively) while having no effect on IS per se (22.2+/-5.2, n=7), supporting a trigger role of K(ATP) in IP. In contrast, starting glibenclamide following the preconditioning ischaemia 10 min prior to the sustained ischaemia did not prevent IS reduction by IP (3.7+/-2.3, n=6), even when its bolus dose was increased to 1.5 mg kg(-1) (26.6+/-3.8 with IP vs 37.5+/-2.9 without IP; n=7 and 6 respectively, P<0.05), thereby refuting a mediator role of K(ATP) in IP. 3. In conclusion, activation of K(ATP) in the immediate reperfusion following the preconditioning ischaemia is pivotal for triggering IP.

  20. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 mediates peripheral anti-hyperalgesia effects of acupuncture in mice inflammatory pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wei-Hsin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral tissue inflammation initiates hyperalgesia accompanied by tissue acidosis, nociceptor activation, and inflammation mediators. Recent studies have suggested a significantly increased expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 in both carrageenan- and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-induced inflammation. This study tested the hypothesis that acupuncture is curative for mechanical hyperalgesia induced by peripheral inflammation. Methods Here we used mechanical stimuli to assess behavioral responses in paw and muscle inflammation induced by carrageenan or CFA. We also used immunohistochemistry staining and western blot methodology to evaluate the expression of ASIC3 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. Results In comparison with the control, the inflammation group showed significant mechanical hyperalgesia with both intraplantar carrageenan and CFA-induced inflammation. Interestingly, both carrageenan- and CFA-induced hyperalgesia were accompanied by ASIC3 up-regulation in DRG neurons. Furthermore, electroacupuncture (EA at the ST36 rescued mechanical hyperalgesia through down-regulation of ASIC3 overexpression in both carrageenan- and CFA-induced inflammation. Conclusions In addition, electrical stimulation at the ST36 acupoint can relieve mechanical hyperalgesia by attenuating ASIC3 overexpression.

  1. The analgesic activities of Stauntonia brachyanthera and YM11 through regulating inflammatory mediators and directly controlling the sodium channel prompt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dali; Wang, Lei; Du, Jingnan; Chen, Jianchao; Chen, Chao; Xu, Wei; Li, Chunli

    2017-08-08

    The analgesic studies on Stauntonia brachyanthera, a traditional Chinese folk medicine used to treat headache, pains and inflammatory diseases in local areas, showed that the EtOH extracts (EESB) and the characteristic ingredient YM11 could significantly inhibit the acetic acid-induced writhing responses by 43.1% and 78.95%, and decrease the xylene-induced ear edemas by 48.9% and 21.4%, respectively. EESB could significantly increase pain threshold of mice in hot-plate test, but the effect of YM11 was not obviously. Further study in formalin test showed the inhibitory effect of YM11 in 2(nd) phase was more significant than that in 1(st) phase, revealed the peripheral analgesic activity of YM11. The ELISA and Western Blot analysis suggested that the analgesic mechanisms of YM11 were related to the inhibitions of the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and down-regulations of Nav1.8 protein in the left side of L4-6 DRG regulated by MAPKs, in which the levels of p-ERK, p-JNK and p-p38 were all decreased. In addition, the electrophysiological experiments indicated YM11 could reduce the Nav1.8 currents by 46.01% in small-diameter DRG neurons. Therefore, the analgesic activity of S. brachyanthera might be based on the regulation of inflammatory mediators and the directly control of the sodium channel prompt.

  2. Role of gp91phox -containing NADPH oxidase in mediating the effect of K restriction on ROMK channels and renal K excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilonia, Elisa; Lin, Daohong; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Yuan; Yue, Peng; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2007-07-01

    Previous study has demonstrated that superoxide and the related products are involved in mediating the effect of low K intake on renal K secretion and ROMK channel activity in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). This study investigated the role of gp91(phox)-containing NADPH oxidase (NOXII) in mediating the effect of low K intake on renal K excretion and ROMK channel activity in gp91(-/-) mice. K depletion increased superoxide levels, phosphorylation of c-Jun, expression of c-Src, and tyrosine phosphorylation of ROMK in renal cortex and outer medulla in wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, tempol treatment in WT mice abolished whereas deletion of gp91 significantly attenuated the effect of low K intake on superoxide production, c-Jun phosphorylation, c-Src expression, and tyrosine phosphorylation of ROMK. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated that low K intake decreased mean product of channel number (N) and open probability (P) (NP(o)) of ROMK channels from 1.1 to 0.4 in the CCD. However, the effect of low K intake on ROMK channel activity was significantly attenuated in the CCD from gp91(-/-) mice and completely abolished by tempol treatment. Immunocytochemical staining also was used to examine the ROMK distribution in WT, gp91(-/-), and WT mice with tempol treatment in response to K restriction. K restriction decreased apical staining of ROMK in WT mice. In contrast, a sharp apical ROMK staining was observed in the tempol-treated WT or gp91(-/-) mice. Metabolic cage study further showed that urinary K loss is significantly higher in gp91(-/-) mice than in WT mice. It is concluded that superoxide anions play a key role in suppressing K secretion during K restriction and that NOXII is involved in mediating the effect of low K intake on renal K secretion and ROMK channel activity.

  3. Developmental changes in Ca2+ channel subtypes regulating endocytosis at the calyx of Held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Okamoto, Yuji; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2014-08-15

    At the mammalian central synapse, Ca(2+) influx through Ca(2+) channels triggers neurotransmitter release by exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, which fuse with the presynaptic membrane and are subsequently retrieved by endocytosis. At the calyx of Held terminal, P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels mainly mediate exocytosis, while N- and R-type channels have a minor role in young terminals (postnatal days 8-11). The role of each Ca(2+) channel subtype in endocytosis remains to be elucidated; therefore, we examined the role of each type of Ca(2+) channel in endocytosis, by using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in conjunction with capacitance measurement techniques. We found that at the young calyx terminal, when R-type Ca(2+) channels were blocked, the slow mode of endocytosis was further slowed, while blocking of either P/Q- or N-type Ca(2+) channels had no major effect. In more mature terminals (postnatal days 14-17), the slow mode of endocytosis was mainly triggered by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, suggesting developmental changes in the regulation of the slow mode of endocytosis by different Ca(2+) channel subtypes. In contrast, a fast mode of endocytosis was observed after strong stimulation in young terminals that was mediated mainly by P/Q-type, but not R- or N-type Ca(2+) channels. These results suggest that different types of Ca(2+) channels regulate the two different modes of endocytosis. The results may also suggest that exo- and endocytosis are regulated independently at different sites in young animals but are more tightly coupled in older animals, allowing more efficient synaptic vesicle cycling adapted for fast signalling.

  4. Effects of K+ channel agonists cromakalim and pinacidil on rat basilar artery smooth muscle cells are mediated by Ca(++)-activated K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, N; Zhang, H; Weir, B

    1991-11-27

    Whole-cell and cell-free inside-out patch-clamp recording techniques were used to examine the actions of potassium channel openers pinacidil and cromakalim in enzymatically isolated smooth muscle cells of rat basilar artery. Delayed rectifier and calcium-dependent potassium currents were identified from the whole-cell recordings. Only the calcium-dependent potassium current was increased by cromakalim and pinacidil. Recordings from inside-out membrane patches revealed a large conductance voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium channel, which was blocked by charybdotoxin but unaffected by ATP less than 10 mM. Cromakalim and pinacidil increased the open probability of this channel. On the basis of these results, we suggest that such drugs, acting on cerebral arterial smooth muscle cell potassium channels, may be of some benefit in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  5. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  6. Identification of sodium channel isoforms that mediate action potential firing in lamina I/II spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Paula L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated sodium channels play key roles in acute and chronic pain processing. The molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of sodium channel currents have been extensively studied for peripheral nociceptors while the properties of sodium channel currents in dorsal horn spinal cord neurons remain incompletely understood. Thus far, investigations into the roles of sodium channel function in nociceptive signaling have primarily focused on recombinant channels or peripheral nociceptors. Here, we utilize recordings from lamina I/II neurons withdrawn from the surface of spinal cord slices to systematically determine the functional properties of sodium channels expressed within the superficial dorsal horn. Results Sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons exhibited relatively hyperpolarized voltage-dependent properties and fast kinetics of both inactivation and recovery from inactivation, enabling small changes in neuronal membrane potentials to have large effects on intrinsic excitability. By combining biophysical and pharmacological channel properties with quantitative real-time PCR results, we demonstrate that functional sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons are predominantly composed of the NaV1.2 and NaV1.3 isoforms. Conclusions Overall, lamina I/II neurons express a unique combination of functional sodium channels that are highly divergent from the sodium channel isoforms found within peripheral nociceptors, creating potentially complementary or distinct ion channel targets for future pain therapeutics.

  7. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones.

  8. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdjan eOstojic

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity. Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain.

  9. p53 prevents neurodegeneration by regulating synaptic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Paola; Frost, Bess; Peng, Shouyong; Yang, Yawei J; Park, Peter J; Feany, Mel

    2014-12-16

    DNA damage has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies, but the consequences of genotoxic stress to postmitotic neurons are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that p53, a key mediator of the DNA damage response, plays a neuroprotective role in a Drosophila model of tauopathy. Further, through a whole-genome ChIP-chip analysis, we identify genes controlled by p53 in postmitotic neurons. We genetically validate a specific pathway, synaptic function, in p53-mediated neuroprotection. We then demonstrate that the control of synaptic genes by p53 is conserved in mammals. Collectively, our results implicate synaptic function as a central target in p53-dependent protection from neurodegeneration.

  10. Axonal noise as a source of synaptic variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Neishabouri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Post-synaptic potential (PSP variability is typically attributed to mechanisms inside synapses, yet recent advances in experimental methods and biophysical understanding have led us to reconsider the role of axons as highly reliable transmission channels. We show that in many thin axons of our brain, the action potential (AP waveform and thus the Ca++ signal controlling vesicle release at synapses will be significantly affected by the inherent variability of ion channel gating. We investigate how and to what extent fluctuations in the AP waveform explain observed PSP variability. Using both biophysical theory and stochastic simulations of central and peripheral nervous system axons from vertebrates and invertebrates, we show that channel noise in thin axons (<1 µm diameter causes random fluctuations in AP waveforms. AP height and width, both experimentally characterised parameters of post-synaptic response amplitude, vary e.g. by up to 20 mV and 0.5 ms while a single AP propagates in C-fibre axons. We show how AP height and width variabilities increase with a ¾ power-law as diameter decreases and translate these fluctuations into post-synaptic response variability using biophysical data and models of synaptic transmission. We find for example that for mammalian unmyelinated axons with 0.2 µm diameter (matching cerebellar parallel fibres axonal noise alone can explain half of the PSP variability in cerebellar synapses. We conclude that axonal variability may have considerable impact on synaptic response variability. Thus, in many experimental frameworks investigating synaptic transmission through paired-cell recordings or extracellular stimulation of presynaptic neurons, causes of variability may have been confounded. We thereby show how bottom-up aggregation of molecular noise sources contributes to our understanding of variability observed at higher levels of biological organisation.

  11. Endocannabinoids and synaptic function in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Kano, Masanobu

    2007-04-01

    Marijuana affects neural functions through the binding of its active component (Delta(9)-THC) to cannabinoid receptors in the CNS. Recent studies have elucidated that endogenous ligands for cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids, serve as retrograde messengers at central synapses. Endocannabinoids are produced on demand in activity-dependent manners and released from postsynaptic neurons. The released endocannabinoids travel backward across the synapse, activate presynaptic CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and modulate presynaptic functions. Retrograde endocannabinoid signaling is crucial for certain forms of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory or inhibitory synapses in many brain regions, and thereby contributes to various aspects of brain function including learning and memory. Molecular identities of the CB1 receptor and enzymes involved in production and degradation of endocannabinoids have been elucidated. Anatomical studies have demonstrated unique distributions of these molecules around synapses, which provide morphological bases for the roles of endocannabinoids as retrograde messengers. CB1-knockout mice exhibit various behavioral abnormalities and multiple defects in synaptic plasticity, supporting the notion that endocannabinoid signaling is involved in various aspects of neural function. In this review article, the authors describe molecular mechanisms of the endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic modulation and its possible physiological significance.

  12. Treatment of Na(v)1.7-mediated pain in inherited erythromelalgia using a novel sodium channel blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Yigal Paul; Price, Nicola; Namdari, Rostam; Cohen, Charles Jay; Lamers, Mieke H; Winters, Conrad; Price, James; Young, Clint E; Verschoof, Henry; Sherrington, Robin; Pimstone, Simon Neil; Hayden, Michael Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN9A gene leading to deficiency of its protein product, Na(v)1.7, cause congenital indifference to pain (CIP). CIP is characterized by the absence of the ability to sense pain associated with noxious stimuli. In contrast, the opposite phenotype to CIP, inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), is a disorder of spontaneous pain caused by missense mutations resulting in gain-of-function in Na(v)1.7 that promote neuronal hyperexcitability. The primary aim of this study was to demonstrate that Na(v)1.7 antagonism could alleviate the pain of IEM, thereby demonstrating the utility of this opposite phenotype model as a tool for rapid proof-of-concept for novel analgesics. An exploratory, randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was conducted in 4 SCN9A mutation-proven IEM patients. In each treatment period (2days), separated by a 2-day washout period, patients were orally administered XEN402 (400mg twice daily) or matching placebo. In 3 patients, pain was induced by heat or exercise during each treatment arm. A fourth patient, in constant severe pain, required no induction. Patient-reported outcomes of pain intensity and/or relief were recorded, and the time taken to induce pain was measured. The ability to induce pain in IEM patients was significantly attenuated by XEN402 compared with placebo. XEN402 increased the time to maximal pain induction and significantly reduced the amount of pain (42% less) after induction (P=.014). This pilot study showed that XEN402 blocks Na(v)1.7-mediated pain associated with IEM, thereby demonstrating target engagement in humans and underscoring the use of rare genetic disorders with mutant target channels as a novel approach to rapid proof-of-concept.

  13. Orai1 mediates the interaction between STIM1 and hTRPC1 and regulates the mode of activation of hTRPC1-forming Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Isaac; Lopez, José J; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2008-09-12

    Orai1 and hTRPC1 have been presented as essential components of store-operated channels mediating highly Ca(2+) selective I(CRAC) and relatively Ca(2+) selective I(SOC), respectively. STIM1 has been proposed to communicate the Ca(2+) content of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores to the plasma membrane store-operated Ca(2+) channels. Here we present evidence for the dynamic interaction between endogenously expressed Orai1 and both STIM1 and hTRPC1 regulated by depletion of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, using the pharmacological tools thapsigargin plus ionomycin, or by the physiological agonist thrombin, independently of extracellular Ca(2+). In addition we report that Orai1 mediates the communication between STIM1 and hTRPC1, which is essential for the mode of activation of hTRPC1-forming Ca(2+) permeable channels. Electrotransjection of cells with anti-Orai1 antibody, directed toward the C-terminal region that mediates the interaction with STIM1, and stabilization of an actin cortical barrier with jasplakinolide prevented the interaction between STIM1 and hTRPC1. Under these conditions hTRPC1 was no longer involved in store-operated calcium entry but in diacylglycerol-activated non-capacitative Ca(2+) entry. These findings support the functional role of the STIM1-Orai1-hTRPC1 complex in the activation of store-operated Ca(2+) entry.

  14. Functional modifications of acid-sensing ion channels by ligand-gated chloride channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanmao Chen

    Full Text Available Together, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs and epithelial sodium channels (ENaC constitute the majority of voltage-independent sodium channels in mammals. ENaC is regulated by a chloride channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Here we show that ASICs were reversibly inhibited by activation of GABA(A receptors in murine hippocampal neurons. This inhibition of ASICs required opening of the chloride channels but occurred with both outward and inward GABA(A receptor-mediated currents. Moreover, activation of the GABA(A receptors modified the pharmacological features and kinetic properties of the ASIC currents, including the time course of activation, desensitization and deactivation. Modification of ASICs by open GABA(A receptors was also observed in both nucleated patches and outside-out patches excised from hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, ASICs and GABA(A receptors interacted to regulate synaptic plasticity in CA1 hippocampal slices. The activation of glycine receptors, which are similar to GABA(A receptors, also modified ASICs in spinal neurons. We conclude that GABA(A receptors and glycine receptors modify ASICs in neurons through mechanisms that require the opening of chloride channels.

  15. Reduced KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channel activity underlies impaired β-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of renal arteries in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Preet S; Zunke, Friederike; Zhu, Hai-Lei; Davis, Alison J; Jepps, Thomas A; Olesen, Søren P; Cole, William C; Moffatt, James D; Greenwood, Iain A

    2012-04-01

    KCNQ4-encoded voltage-dependent potassium (Kv7.4) channels are important regulators of vascular tone that are severely compromised in models of hypertension. However, there is no information as to the role of these channels in responses to endogenous vasodilators. We used a molecular knockdown strategy, as well as pharmacological tools, to examine the hypothesis that Kv7.4 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and underlie the vascular deficit in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed gene and protein expression of KCNQ1, KCNQ3, KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and Kv7.1, Kv7.4, and Kv7.5 in rat renal artery. Isoproterenol produced concentration-dependent relaxation of precontracted renal arteries and increased Kv7 channel currents in isolated smooth muscle cells. Application of the Kv7 blocker linopirdine attenuated isoproterenol-induced relaxation and current. Isoproterenol-induced relaxations were also reduced in arteries incubated with small interference RNAs targeted to KCNQ4 that produced a ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 protein level. Relaxation to isoproterenol and the Kv7 activator S-1 were abolished in arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats, which was associated with ≈60% decrease in Kv7.4 abundance. This study provides the first evidence that Kv7 channels contribute to β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation in the renal vasculature and that abrogation of Kv7.4 channels is strongly implicated in the impaired β-adrenoceptor pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These findings may provide a novel pathogenic link between arterial dysfunction and hypertension.

  16. Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzum, Duygu; Yu, Shimeng; Wong, H-S Philip

    2013-09-27

    In this paper, the recent progress of synaptic electronics is reviewed. The basics of biological synaptic plasticity and learning are described. The material properties and electrical switching characteristics of a variety of synaptic devices are discussed, with a focus on the use of synaptic devices for neuromorphic or brain-inspired computing. Performance metrics desirable for large-scale implementations of synaptic devices are illustrated. A review of recent work on targeted computing applications with synaptic devices is presented.

  17. Contextual learning requires synaptic AMPA receptor delivery in the hippocampus.

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    Mitsushima, Dai; Ishihara, Kouji; Sano, Akane; Kessels, Helmut W; Takahashi, Takuya

    2011-07-26

    The hippocampus plays a central role in learning and memory. Although synaptic delivery of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) contributes to experience-dependent synaptic strengthening, its role in hippocampus-dependent learning remains elusive. By combining viral-mediated in vivo gene delivery with in vitro patch-clamp recordings, we found that the inhibitory avoidance task, a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear-learning paradigm, delivered GluR1-containing AMPARs into CA3-CA1 synapses of the dorsal hippocampus. To block the synaptic delivery of endogenous AMPARs, we expressed a fragment of the GluR1-cytoplasmic tail (the 14-aa GluR1 membrane-proximal region with two serines mutated to phospho-mimicking aspartates: MPR-DD). MPR-DD prevented learning-driven synaptic AMPAR delivery in CA1 neurons. Bilateral expression of MPR-DD in the CA1 region of the rat impaired inhibitory avoidance learning, indicating that synaptic GluR1 trafficking in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is required for encoding contextual fear memories. The fraction of CA1 neurons that underwent synaptic strengthening positively correlated with the performance in the inhibitory avoidance fear memory task. These data suggest that the robustness of a contextual memory depends on the number of hippocampal neurons that participate in the encoding of a memory trace.

  18. A trans-synaptic nanocolumn aligns neurotransmitter release to receptors.

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    Tang, Ai-Hui; Chen, Haiwen; Li, Tuo P; Metzbower, Sarah R; MacGillavry, Harold D; Blanpied, Thomas A

    2016-08-11

    Synaptic transmission is maintained by a delicate, sub-synaptic molecular architecture, and even mild alterations in synapse structure drive functional changes during experience-dependent plasticity and pathological disorders. Key to this architecture is how the distribution of presynaptic vesicle fusion sites corresponds to the position of receptors in the postsynaptic density. However, while it has long been recognized that this spatial relationship modulates synaptic strength, it has not been precisely described, owing in part to the limited resolution of light microscopy. Using localization microscopy, here we show that key proteins mediating vesicle priming and fusion are mutually co-enriched within nanometre-scale subregions of the presynaptic active zone. Through development of a new method to map vesicle fusion positions within single synapses in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we find that action-potential-evoked fusion is guided by this protein gradient and occurs preferentially in confined areas with higher local density of Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM) within the active zones. These presynaptic RIM nanoclusters closely align with concentrated postsynaptic receptors and scaffolding proteins, suggesting the existence of a trans-synaptic molecular 'nanocolumn'. Thus, we propose that the nanoarchitecture of the active zone directs action-potential-evoked vesicle fusion to occur preferentially at sites directly opposing postsynaptic receptor-scaffold ensembles. Remarkably, NMDA receptor activation triggered distinct phases of plasticity in which postsynaptic reorganization was followed by trans-synaptic nanoscale realignment. This architecture suggests a simple organizational principle of central nervous system synapses to maintain and modulate synaptic efficiency.

  19. Molecular mechanism underlying RAG1/RAG2 synaptic complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2009-07-31

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled.

  20. Molecular Mechanism Underlying RAG1/RAG2 Synaptic Complex Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N.; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2009-01-01

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled. PMID:19502597

  1. A model of synaptic reconsolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kastner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reconsolidation of memories has mostly been studied at the behavioral and molecular level. Here, we put forward a simple extension of existing computational models of synaptic consolidation to capture hippocampal slice experiments that have been interpreted as reconsolidation at the synaptic level. The model implements reconsolidation through stabilization of consolidated synapses by stabilizing entities combined with an activity-dependent reservoir of stabilizing entities that are immune to protein synthesis inhibition (PSI. We derive a reduced version of our model to explore the conditions under which synaptic reconsolidation does or does not occur, often referred to as the boundary conditions of reconsolidation. We find that our computational model of synaptic reconsolidation displays complex boundary conditions. Our results suggest that a limited resource of hypothetical stabilizing molecules or complexes, which may be implemented by protein phosphorylation or different receptor subtypes, can underlie the phenomenon of synaptic reconsolidation.

  2. PSD-95 regulates synaptic kainate receptors at mouse hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Etsuko; Kamiya, Haruyuki

    2016-06-01

    Kainate-type glutamate receptors (KARs) are the third class of ionotropic glutamate receptors whose activation leads to the unique roles in regulating synaptic transmission and circuit functions. In contrast to AMPA receptors (AMPARs), little is known about the mechanism of synaptic localization of KARs. PSD-95, a major scaffold protein of the postsynaptic density, is a candidate molecule that regulates the synaptic KARs. Although PSD-95 was shown to bind directly to KARs subunits, it has not been tested whether PSD-95 regulates synaptic KARs in intact synapses. Using PSD-95 knockout mice, we directly investigated the role of PSD-95 in the KARs-mediated components of synaptic transmission at hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapse, one of the synapses with the highest density of KARs. Mossy fiber EPSCs consist of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated fast component and KAR-mediated slower component, and the ratio was significantly reduced in PSD-95 knockout mice. The size of KARs-mediated field EPSP reduced in comparison with the size of the fiber volley. Analysis of KARs-mediated miniature EPSCs also suggested reduced synaptic KARs. All the evidence supports critical roles of PSD-95 in regulating synaptic KARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Interneuron- and GABAA receptor-specific inhibitory synaptic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qionger; Duguid, Ian; Clark, Beverley; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Patel, Bijal; Thomas, Philip; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitory synaptic plasticity is important for shaping both neuronal excitability and network activity. Here we investigate the input and GABAA receptor subunit specificity of inhibitory synaptic plasticity by studying cerebellar interneuron-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses. Depolarizing PCs initiated a long-lasting increase in GABA-mediated synaptic currents. By stimulating individual interneurons, this plasticity was observed at somatodendritic basket cell synapses, but not at distal dendritic stellate cell synapses. Basket cell synapses predominantly express β2-subunit-containing GABAA receptors; deletion of the β2-subunit ablates this plasticity, demonstrating its reliance on GABAA receptor subunit composition. The increase in synaptic currents is dependent upon an increase in newly synthesized cell surface synaptic GABAA receptors and is abolished by preventing CaMKII phosphorylation of GABAA receptors. Our results reveal a novel GABAA receptor subunit- and input-specific form of inhibitory synaptic plasticity that regulates the temporal firing pattern of the principal output cells of the cerebellum.

  4. Cationic influences upon synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse of the frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of inorganic cations (K+, Na+, and Ca2+) bathing the isolated frog labyrinth were varied in order to assess their role in influencing and mediating synaptic transmission at the hair cell-afferent fiber synapse. Experiments employed intracellular recordings of synaptic activity from VIIIth nerve afferents. Recordings were digitized continuously at 50 kHz, and excitatory postsynaptic potentials were detected and parameters quantified by computer algorithms. Particular attention was focused on cationic effects upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence and excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude, in order to discriminate between pre- and postsynaptic actions. Because the small size of afferents preclude long term stable recordings, alterations in cationic concentrations were applied transiently and their peak effects on synaptic activity were assessed. Increases in extracellular K+ concentration of a few millimolar produced a large increase in the frequency of occurrence of excitatory postsynaptic potentials with little change in amplitude, indicating that release of transmitter from the hair cell is tightly coupled to its membrane potential. Increasing extracellular Na+ concentration resulted in an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude with no significant change in excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency of occurrence, suggesting that the transmitter-gated subsynaptic channel conducts Na+ ions. Decreases in extracellular Ca2+ concentration had little effect upon excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency, but increased excitatory postsynaptic potential frequency and amplitude. These findings suggest that at higher concentrations Ca2+ act presynaptically to prevent transmitter release and postsynaptically to prevent Na+ influx during the generation of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. The influences of these ions on synaptic activity at this synapse are remarkably similar to those reported at the

  5. Effect of mitochondrial potassium channel on the renal protection mediated by sodium thiosulfate against ethylene glycol induced nephrolithiasis in rat model

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    N. Baldev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Sodium thiosulfate (STS is clinically reported to be a promising drug in preventing nephrolithiasis. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial KATP channel in the renal protection mediated by STS. Materials and Methods: Nephrolithiasis was induced in Wistar rats by administrating 0.4% ethylene glycol (EG along with 1% ammonium chloride for one week in drinking water followed by only 0.75% EG for two weeks. Treatment groups received STS, mitochondrial KATP channel opener and closer exclusively or in combination with STS for two weeks. Results: Animals treated with STS showed normal renal tissue architecture, supported by near normal serum creatinine, urea and ALP activity. Diazoxide (mitochondria KATP channel opening treatment to the animal also showed normal renal tissue histology and improved serum chemistry. However, an opposite result was shown by glibenclamide (mitochondria KATP channel closer treated rats. STS administered along with diazoxide negated the renal protection rendered by diazoxide alone, while it imparted protection to the glibenclamide treated rats, formulating a mitochondria modulated STS action. Conclusion: The present study confirmed that STS render renal protection not only through chelation and antioxidant effect but also by modulating the mitochondrial KATP channel for preventing urolithiasis.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced mitochondrial motility arrest and presynaptic docking contribute to BDNF-enhanced synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo; Ji, Yun-Song; Sun, Xu-lu; Liu, Xiang-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2014-01-17

    Appropriate mitochondrial transport and distribution are essential for neurons because of the high energy and Ca(2+) buffering requirements at synapses. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an essential role in regulating synaptic transmission and plasticity. However, whether and how BDNF can regulate mitochondrial transport and distribution are still unclear. Here, we find that in cultured hippocampal neurons, application of BDNF for 15 min decreased the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons, a process dependent on the activation of the TrkB receptor and its downstream PI3K and phospholipase-Cγ signaling pathways. Moreover, the BDNF-induced mitochondrial stopping requires the activation of transient receptor potential canonical 3 and 6 (TRPC3 and TRPC6) channels and elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The Ca(2+) sensor Miro1 plays an important role in this process. Finally, the BDNF-induced mitochondrial stopping leads to the accumulation of more mitochondria at presynaptic sites. Mutant Miro1 lacking the ability to bind Ca(2+) prevents BDNF-induced mitochondrial presynaptic accumulation and synaptic transmission, suggesting that Miro1-mediated mitochondrial motility is involved in BDNF-induced mitochondrial presynaptic docking and neurotransmission. Together, these data suggest that mitochondrial transport and distribution play essential roles in BDNF-mediated synaptic transmission.

  7. Accumulation of free ADP-ribose from mitochondria mediates oxidative stress-induced gating of TRPM2 cation channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perraud, AL; Takanishi, CL; Shen, B; Kang, S; Smith, MK; Schmitz, C; Knowles, HM; Ferraris, D; Li, WX; Zhang, J; Stoddard, BL; Scharenberg, AM

    2005-01-01

    TRPM2 is a member of the transient receptor potential melastatin-related (TRPM) family of cation channels, which possesses both ion channel and ADP-ribose hydrolase functions. TRPM2 has been shown to gate in response to oxidative and nitrosative stresses, but the mechanism through which TRPM2 gating

  8. Functional BK channels facilitate the β3-adrenoceptor agonist-mediated relaxation of nerve-evoked contractions in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle isolated strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afeli, Serge A Y; Petkov, Georgi V

    2013-07-05

    The large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel is a major regulator of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractility thus facilitating urinary bladder function. Recent findings suggest that activation of β3-adrenoceptors causes DSM relaxation. However, it is unknown whether the β3-adrenoceptor-mediated DSM relaxation is BK channel-dependent during nerve-evoked contractions. To test this hypothesis, we induced nerve-evoked contractions in rat DSM isolated strips by using a tissue bath system equipped with platinum electrodes for electrical field stimulation (EFS). (±)-(R(*),R(*))-[4-[2-[[2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amino]propyl]phenoxy] acetic acid sodium hydrate (BRL37344), a β3-adrenoceptor agonist, significantly decreased the amplitude and muscle force of the 20 Hz EFS-induced DSM contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. The BRL37344 inhibitory effect was significantly antagonized by 1-(2-ethylphenoxy)-3-[[(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthalenyl]amino]-(2S)-2-propanol hydrochloride (SR59230A), a β3-adrenoceptor antagonist. We further isolated the cholinergic from the purinergic component of the 0.5-50 Hz EFS-induced DSM contractions by using selective inhibitors, atropine as well as suramin and α,β-methylene-ATP. We found that BRL37344 inhibited both the purinergic and cholinergic components of the nerve-evoked contractions in rat DSM isolated strips. The pharmacological blockade of the BK channels with iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, increased the amplitude and muscle force of the 20 Hz EFS-induced contractions in rat DSM isolated strips. In the presence of iberiotoxin, there was a significant reduction in the BRL37344-induced inhibition of the 20 Hz EFS-induced contractions in rat DSM isolated strips. These latter findings suggest that BK channels play a critical role in the β3-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of rat DSM nerve-evoked contractions.

  9. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

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    Marcos G. Frank

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity.

  10. Archaerhodopsin Selectively and Reversibly Silences Synaptic Transmission through Altered pH

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    Mohamady El-Gaby

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tools that allow acute and selective silencing of synaptic transmission in vivo would be invaluable for understanding the synaptic basis of specific behaviors. Here, we show that presynaptic expression of the proton pump archaerhodopsin enables robust, selective, and reversible optogenetic synaptic silencing with rapid onset and offset. Two-photon fluorescence imaging revealed that this effect is accompanied by a transient increase in pH restricted to archaerhodopsin-expressing boutons. Crucially, clamping intracellular pH abolished synaptic silencing without affecting the archaerhodopsin-mediated hyperpolarizing current, indicating that changes in pH mediate the synaptic silencing effect. To verify the utility of this technique, we used trial-limited, archaerhodopsin-mediated silencing to uncover a requirement for CA3-CA1 synapses whose afferents originate from the left CA3, but not those from the right CA3, for performance on a long-term memory task. These results highlight optogenetic, pH-mediated silencing of synaptic transmission as a spatiotemporally selective approach to dissecting synaptic function in behaving animals.

  11. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eLi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2, and a presynaptically-localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3 with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Re-acidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real-time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released.

  12. Synaptic gain-of-function effects of mutant Cav2.1 channels in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine are due to increased basal [Ca2+]i

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Di Guilmi (Mariano); T. Wang (Teng); C.G. Inchauspe (Carlota Gonzalez); I.D. Forsythe (Ian); M.D. Ferrari (Michel); A.M.J.M. van der Maagdenberg (Arn M. J.); J.G.G. Borst (Gerard); O.D. Uchitel (Osvaldo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSpecific missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes a subunit of voltage-gated CaV2.1 channels, are associated with familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), a rare monogenic subtype of common migraine with aura. We used transgenic knock-in (KI) mice harboring the human path

  13. Induction of thermal hyperalgesia and synaptic long-term potentiation in the spinal cord lamina I by TNF-α and IL-1β is mediated by glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber-Schoffnegger, Doris; Drdla-Schutting, Ruth; Hönigsperger, Christoph; Wunderbaldinger, Gabriele; Gassner, Matthias; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2013-04-10

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength in nociceptive pathways is a cellular model of hyperalgesia. The emerging literature suggests a role for cytokines released by spinal glial cells for both LTP and hyperalgesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. In rat lumbar spinal cord slices, we now demonstrate that conditioning high-frequency stimulation of primary afferents activated spinal microglia within hyperalgesia induced by spinal application of either IL-1β or TNF-α in naive animals also required activation of spinal glial cells. These results reveal a novel, decisive role of spinal glial cells for the synaptic effects of IL-1β and TNF-α and for some forms of hyperalgesia.

  14. Cellular and molecular connections between sleep and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benington, Joel H; Frank, Marcos G

    2003-02-01

    The hypothesis that sleep promotes learning and memory has long been a subject of active investigation. This hypothesis implies that sleep must facilitate synaptic plasticity in some way, and recent studies have provided evidence for such a function. Our knowledge of both the cellular neurophysiology of sleep states and of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity has expanded considerably in recent years. In this article, we review findings in these areas and discuss possible mechanisms whereby the neurophysiological processes characteristic of sleep states may serve to facilitate synaptic plasticity. We address this issue first on the cellular level, considering how activation of T-type Ca(2+) channels in nonREM sleep may promote either long-term depression or long-term potentiation, as well as how cellular events of REM sleep may influence these processes. We then consider how synchronization of neuronal activity in thalamocortical and hippocampal-neocortical networks in nonREM sleep and REM sleep could promote differential strengthening of synapses according to the degree to which activity in one neuron is synchronized with activity in other neurons in the network. Rather than advocating one specific cellular hypothesis, we have intentionally taken a broad approach, describing a range of possible mechanisms whereby sleep may facilitate synaptic plasticity on the cellular and/or network levels. We have also provided a general review of evidence for and against the hypothesis that sleep does indeed facilitate learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity.

  15. Synaptic potentials in locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J T; Bobker, D H; Harris, G C

    1991-01-01

    Neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) fire action potentials spontaneously in vitro in the absence of any stimulation. This spontaneous activity is thought to arise from intrinsic membrane properties that include a balance between at least two ion conductances. One is a persistent inward sodium current that is active near the threshold for action potential generation. The second is a calcium-dependent potassium current that is activated following the entry of calcium during the action potential, is responsible for the after-hyperpolarization following the action potential, and decays over a period of 1-2 sec following the action potential. The spontaneous activity of LC neurons can be altered by both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. One excitatory input has been described that is mediated by glutamate receptors of both the non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. Inhibitory synaptic potentials include those mediated by GABA (acting on GABAA-receptors), glycine (acting on a strychnine-sensitive receptor) and noradrenaline (acting on alpha 2-adrenoceptors). The presence of synaptic potentials mediated by these transmitters, studied in vitro, correlate with studies made in vivo and with histochemical identification of synaptic inputs to the locus coeruleus.

  16. Kv3.4 potassium channel-mediated electrosignaling controls cell cycle and survival of irradiated leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Daniela; Misovic, Milan; Schmid, Evi; Klumpp, Dominik; Salih, Helmut R; Rudner, Justine; Huber, Stephan M

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant ion channel expression in the plasma membrane is characteristic for many tumor entities and has been attributed to neoplastic transformation, tumor progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance. The present study aimed to define the function of these "oncogenic" channels for radioresistance of leukemia cells. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells were irradiated (0-6 Gy X ray), ion channel expression and activity, Ca(2+)- and protein signaling, cell cycle progression, and cell survival were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, patch-clamp recording, fura-2 Ca(2+)-imaging, immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and clonogenic survival assays, respectively. Ionizing radiation-induced G2/M arrest was preceded by activation of Kv3.4-like voltage-gated potassium channels. Channel activation in turn resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) entry and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase-II, and inactivation of the phosphatase cdc25B and the cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2. Accordingly, channel inhibition by tetraethylammonium and blood-depressing substance-1 and substance-2 or downregulation by RNA interference led to release from radiation-induced G2/M arrest, increased apoptosis, and decreased clonogenic survival. Together, these findings indicate the functional significance of voltage-gated K(+) channels for the radioresistance of myeloid leukemia cells.

  17. Transduction for pheromones in the main olfactory epithelium is mediated by the Ca2+ -activated channel TRPM5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fabián; Delgado, Ricardo; López, Roberto; Bacigalupo, Juan; Restrepo, Diego

    2014-02-26

    Growing evidence suggests that the main olfactory epithelium contains a subset of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) responding to pheromones. One candidate subpopulation expresses the calcium activated cation channel TRPM5 (transient receptor potential channel M5). Using GFP driven by the TRPM5 promoter in mice, we show that this subpopulation responds to putative pheromones, urine, and major histocompatibility complex peptides, but not to regular odors or a pheromone detected by other species. In addition, this subpopulation of TRPM5-GFP+ OSNs uses novel transduction. In regular OSNs, odorants elicit activation of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, leading to Ca2+ gating of Cl- channels; in TRPM5-GFP+ OSNs, the Ca2+ -activated Cl- ANO2 (anoctamin 2) channel is not expressed, and pheromones elicit activation of the CNG channel leading to Ca2+ gating of TRPM5. In conclusion, we show that OSNs expressing TRPM5 respond to pheromones, but not to regular odors through the opening of CNG channels leading to Ca2+ gating of TRPM5.

  18. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

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    Ong John M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB permeability in brain tumors, but not in normal brain. Iberiotoxin, a KCa channel antagonist, significantly attenuated NS1619-induced BTB permeability increase. We found KCa channels and bradykinin type 2 receptors (B2R expressed in cultured human metastatic brain tumor cells (CRL-5904, non-small cell lung cancer, metastasized to brain, human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung cancer brain metastasis tissues. Potentiometric assays demonstrated the activity of KCa channels in metastatic brain tumor cells and HBMEC. Furthermore, we detected higher expression of KCa channels in the metastatic brain tumor tissue and tumor capillary endothelia as compared to normal brain tissue. Co-culture of metastatic brain tumor cells and brain microvessel endothelial cells showed an upregulation of KCa channels, which may contribute to the overexpression of KCa channels in tumor microvessels and selectivity of BTB opening. Conclusion These findings suggest that KCa channels in metastatic brain tumors may serve as an effective target for biochemical modulation of BTB permeability to enhance selective delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to metastatic brain tumors.

  19. Calmodulin and calcium interplay in the modulation of TRPC5 channel activity. Identification of a novel C-terminal domain for calcium/calmodulin-mediated facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Benito; Tang, Jisen; Xiao, Rui; Salgado, Alfonso; Sampieri, Alicia; Zhu, Michael X; Vaca, Luis

    2005-09-02

    TRPC5 forms Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channels important for neurite outgrowth and growth cone morphology of hippocampal neurons. Here we studied the activation of mouse TRPC5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells by agonist stimulation of several receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide signaling cascade and the role of calmodulin (CaM) on the activation. We showed that exogenous application of 10 microM CaM through patch pipette accelerated the agonist-induced channel activation by 2.8-fold, with the time constant for half-activation reduced from 4.25 +/- 0.4 to 1.56 +/- 0.85 min. We identified a novel CaM-binding site located at the C terminus of TRPC5, 95 amino acids downstream from the previously determined common CaM/IP3R-binding (CIRB) domain for all TRPC proteins. Deletion of the novel CaM-binding site attenuated the acceleration in channel activation induced by CaM. However, disruption of the CIRB domain from TRPC5 rendered the channel irresponsive to agonist stimulation without affecting the cell surface expression of the channel protein. Furthermore, we showed that high (>5 microM) intracellular free Ca2+ inhibited the current density without affecting the time course of TRPC5 activation by receptor agonists. These results demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ has dual and opposite effects on the activation of TRPC5. The novel CaM-binding site is important for the Ca2+/CaM-mediated facilitation, whereas the CIRB domain is critical for the overall response of receptor-induced TRPC5 channel activation.

  20. Activation of PPARβ/δ prevents hyperglycaemia-induced impairment of Kv7 channels and cAMP-mediated relaxation in rat coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cano, Daniel; Moreno, Laura; Barreira, Bianca; Briones, Ana M; Pandolfi, Rachele; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Callejo, Maria; Mondejar-Parreño, Gema; Cortijo, Julio; Salaices, Mercedes; Duarte, Juan; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Cogolludo, Angel

    2016-10-01

    PPARβ/δ activation protects against endothelial dysfunction in diabetic models. Elevated glucose is known to impair cAMP-induced relaxation and Kv channel function in coronary arteries (CA). Herein, we aimed to analyse the possible protective effects of the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 on the hyperglycaemic-induced impairment of cAMP-induced relaxation and Kv channel function in rat CA. As compared with low glucose (LG), incubation under high glucose (HG) conditions attenuated the relaxation induced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin in CA and this was prevented by GW0742. The protective effect of GW0742 was supressed by a PPARβ/δ antagonist. In myocytes isolated from CA under LG, forskolin enhanced Kv currents and induced hyperpolarization. In contrast, when CA were incubated with HG, Kv currents were diminished and the electrophysiological effects of forskolin were abolished. These deleterious effects were prevented by GW0742. The protective effects of GW0742 on forskolin-induced relaxation and Kv channel function were confirmed in CA from type-1 diabetic rats. In addition, the differences in the relaxation induced by forskolin in CA incubated under LG, HG or HG + GW0742 were abolished by the Kv7 channel inhibitor XE991. Accordingly, GW0742 prevented the down-regulation of Kv7 channels induced by HG. Finally, the preventive effect of GW0742 on oxidative stress and cAMP-induced relaxation were overcome by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA). Our results reveal that the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 prevents the impairment of the cAMP-mediated relaxation in CA under HG. This protective effect was associated with induction of PDK4, attenuation of oxidative stress and preservation of Kv7 channel function.

  1. Angiotensin-2-mediated Ca2+ signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium: role of angiotensin-receptor-associated-protein and TRPV2 channel.

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    Rene Barro-Soria

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (AngII receptor (ATR is involved in pathologic local events such as neovascularisation and inflammation including in the brain and retina. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE expresses ATR in its AT1R form, angiotensin-receptor-associated protein (Atrap, and transient-receptor-potential channel-V2 (TRPV2. AT1R and Atrap co-localize to the basolateral membrane of the RPE, as shown by immunostaining. Stimulation of porcine RPE (pRPE cells by AngII results in biphasic increases in intracellular free Ca(2+inhibited by losartan. Xestospongin C (xest C and U-73122, blockers of IP3R and PLC respectively, reduced AngII-evoked Ca(2+response. RPE cells from Atrap(-/- mice showed smaller AngII-evoked Ca(2+peak (by 22% and loss of sustained Ca(2+elevation compared to wild-type. The TRPV channel activator cannabidiol (CBD at 15 µM stimulates intracellular Ca(2+-rise suggesting that porcine RPE cells express TRPV2 channels. Further evidence supporting the functional expression of TRPV2 channels comes from experiments in which 100 µM SKF96365 (a TRPV channel inhibitor reduced the cannabidiol-induced Ca(2+-rise. Application of SKF96365 or reduction of TRPV2 expression by siRNA reduced the sustained phase of AngII-mediated Ca(2+transients by 53%. Thus systemic AngII, an effector of the local renin-angiotensin system stimulates biphasic Ca(2+transients in the RPE by releasing Ca(2+from cytosolic IP3-dependent stores and activating ATR/Atrap and TRPV2 channels to generate a sustained Ca(2+elevation.

  2. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties.

  3. Growth Factors in Synaptic Function

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    Vivian Yi Nuo Poon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Synapses are increasingly recognized as key structures that malfunction in disorders like schizophrenia, mental retardation, and neurodegenerative diseases. The importance and complexity of the synapse has fuelled research into the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. In this regard, neurotrophic factors such as netrin, Wnt, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and others have gained prominence for their ability to regulate synaptic function. Several of these factors were first implicated in neuroprotection, neuronal growth, and axon guidance. However, their roles in synaptic development and function have become increasingly clear, and the downstream signaling pathways employed by these factors have begun to be elucidated. In this review, we will address the role of these factors and their downstream effectors in synaptic function in vivo and in cultured neurons.

  4. Nitric oxide and Kir6.1 potassium channel mediate isoquercitrin-induced endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilation in the mesenteric arterial bed of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes; Dos Reis Piornedo, Renê; Assreuy, Jamil; Da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo

    2016-10-05

    The vascular effect of flavonoid isoquercitrin was investigated in the perfused mesenteric vascular bed of rats. In preparations with functional endothelium isoquercitrin (100, 300 and 1000nmol) dose-dependently reduced the perfusion pressure by 13±2.2, 33±3.9, and 58±3.7mm Hg, respectively. Endothelium removal or inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase enzymes by l-NAME did not change the effects of 100 and 300 nmol isoquercitrin, but reduced by 30-40% the vasodilation induced by 1000 nmol isoquercitrin. Perfusion with nutritive solution containing 40mM KCl abolished the vasodilatory effect of all isoquercitrin doses. Treatment with glibenclamide, a Kir6.1 (ATP-sensitive) potassium channel blocker, inhibited vasodilation induced by 100 and 300 nmol isoquercitrin, but only partially reduced the effect of 1000 nmol isoquercitrin. The non-selective KCa (calcium-activated) potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium, but not the selective KCa1.1 channel blocker iberiotoxin, reduced by around 60% vasodilation induced by all isoquercitrin doses. In addition, association of tetraethylammonium and glibenclamide, or l-NAME and glibenclamide, fully inhibited isoquercitrin-induced vasodilation. Our study shows that isoquercitrin induces vasodilation in resistance arteries, an effect mediated by K(+) channel opening and endothelial nitric oxide production.

  5. 2-(1-Hexyn-1-yl)adenosine-induced intraocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-08-22

    The present study was performed to clarify the mechanism of change in intraocular pressure by 2-(1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-H-Ado), a selective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, in rabbits. 2-H-Ado (0.1%, 50 microl)-induced ocular hypertension (E(max): 7.7 mm Hg) was inhibited by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine, ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine or a cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The outflow facility induced by 2-H-Ado seems to be independent of increase in intraocular pressure or ATP-sensitive K+ channel. In contrast, the recovery rate in intraocular pressure decreased by hypertonic saline was accelerated by 2-H-Ado, and this response was dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channel. These results suggest that 2-H-Ado-induced ocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor, and this is probably due to aqueous formation, but independent of change in outflow facility or prostaglandin production.

  6. Presynaptically localized cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase 1 is a key determinant of spinal synaptic potentiation and pain hypersensitivity.

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    Ceng Luo

    Full Text Available Synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP at spinal neurons directly communicating pain-specific inputs from the periphery to the brain has been proposed to serve as a trigger for pain hypersensitivity in pathological states. Previous studies have functionally implicated the NMDA receptor-NO pathway and the downstream second messenger, cGMP, in these processes. Because cGMP can broadly influence diverse ion-channels, kinases, and phosphodiesterases, pre- as well as post-synaptically, the precise identity of cGMP targets mediating spinal LTP, their mechanisms of action, and their locus in the spinal circuitry are still unclear. Here, we found that Protein Kinase G1 (PKG-I localized presynaptically in nociceptor terminals plays an essential role in the expression of spinal LTP. Using the Cre-lox P system, we generated nociceptor-specific knockout mice lacking PKG-I specifically in presynaptic terminals of nociceptors in the spinal cord, but not in post-synaptic neurons or elsewhere (SNS-PKG-I(-/- mice. Patch clamp recordings showed that activity-induced LTP at identified synapses between nociceptors and spinal neurons projecting to the periaqueductal grey (PAG was completely abolished in SNS-PKG-I(-/- mice, although basal synaptic transmission was not affected. Analyses of synaptic failure rates and paired-pulse ratios indicated a role for presynaptic PKG-I in regulating the probability of neurotransmitter release. Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 and myosin light chain kinase were recruited as key phosphorylation targets of presynaptic PKG-I in nociceptive neurons. Finally, behavioural analyses in vivo showed marked defects in SNS-PKG-I(-/- mice in several models of activity-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity, and pharmacological studies identified a clear contribution of PKG-I expressed in spinal terminals of nociceptors. Our results thus indicate that presynaptic mechanisms involving an increase in release probability from nociceptors are

  7. Porocytosis: a new approach to synaptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebel, M E; Keller, B; Silver, R B; Fox, G Q; Pappas, G D

    2001-12-01

    We propose a new approach to address the question of how a single quantum of neurotransmitter is secreted from a presynaptic terminal whose clustered secretory vesicles are locally bathed in high levels of calcium ions [Proceedings of the Symposium on Bioelectrogenesis (1961) 297-309; The Physiology of Synapses (1964) Chapters 1, 4, 5, 6; How the Self Controls its Brain (1994) Chapters 1, 4, 5, 6; Science 256 (1992) 677-679]. This hypothesis, which we term 'porocytosis', posits that the post-synaptic quantal response results from transmitter secreted through an array of docked vesicle/secretory pore complexes. The transient increase in calcium ions, which results from the voltage activated calcium channels, stimulates the array of secretory pores to simultaneously flicker open to pulse transmitter. Porocytosis is consistent with the quantal nature of presynaptic secretion and transmission, and with available biochemical, morphological and physiological evidence. It explains the frequency dependency of quantal size as a function of the secretion process. It permits a signature amount of transmitter release for different frequencies allowing a given synapse to be employed in different behavioral responses. The porocytosis hypothesis permits fidelity of secretion and the seemingly apposed characteristic of synaptic plasticity. The dynamics inherent in an array insure a constant quantal size as a function of the number of units within the array. In this hypothesis, plasticity is a consequence of concurrent pre- and post-synaptic changes due to a change in array size. Changes in the number of docked vesicle-secretory pore complexes composing the array can explain facilitation, depletion, graded excitation-secretion and long term plasticity.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of a mitochondrial K+-ATP channel opener (diazoxide) are mediated by Bcl-2 expression upregulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Majid Katebi; Mansooreh Soleimani; Mehdi Mehdizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial K+-ATP (mito-KATP) channels play an important role in cellular function and survival following ischemic stress. The present results revealed that intervention with diazoxide, a mito-KATP channel opener, led to an increase in Bcl-2 expression in the cerebral cortex of rats subjected to cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. In addition, the intervention also led to clear improvements in neuronal mitochondrial morphology and consciousness post-injury. Glibenclamide, a mito-KATP channel blocker, exhibited the converse effects. Both diazoxide and glibenclamide exerted dose-dependent effects (in particular, at 18 mg/kg diazoxide and 25 mg/kg glibenclamide). These findings suggest that diazoxide exerts a neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury by opening mito-KATP channels and upregulating Bcl-2 expression.

  9. Analysis of polypeptide movement in the SecY channel during SecA-mediated protein translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Erlandson, K. J.; Or, E.; Osborne, A. R.; Rapoport, T A

    2008-01-01

    In bacteria most secretory proteins are transported across the plasma membrane by the interplay of the ATPase SecA with the translocation channel formed by the SecY complex; SecA uses cycles of ATP hydrolysis to "push" consecutive segments of a polypeptide substrate through the channel. Here we have addressed the mechanism of this process by following the fate of stalled translocation intermediates. These were generated by using a polypeptide substrate containing a bulky disulfide-bonded loop...

  10. The HCN4 channel mutation D553N associated with bradycardia has a C-linker mediated gating defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Michael F; Zuzarte, Marylou; Schlichthörl, Günter; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The D553N mutation located in the C-linker of the cardiac pacemaker channel HCN4 is thought to cause sino-atrial dysfunction via a pronounced dominant-negative trafficking defect. Since HCN4 mutations usually have a minor defect in channel gating, it was our aim to further characterize the disease causing mechanism of D553N. Fluorescence microscopy, FACS, TEVC and patch-clamp recordings were performed to characterize D553N. Surprisingly, we found that D553N channels reach the plasma membrane and have no apparent trafficking defect. Co-expression of D553N with HCN4 also revealed no dominant-negative effect on wild-type channels. Consistent with the normal cell surface expression of D553N, it was possible to extensively characterize D553N mutants in Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells. D553N channels generate currents with reduced amplitude, while the kinetics of activation and deactivation are not altered. While the regulation of D553N by tyrosine kinases is normal, we observed a change in the cAMP regulation which however cannot account for the strong loss-of-function of the mutant. The pronounced current reduction and the regular surface expression indicate a major gating defect of the C-linker gate. We hypothesize that the D553N mutation stabilizes a previously reported salt bridge important for the gating of the channel. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II differentially mediate behaviors associated with nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, K J; Damaj, M I

    2009-07-01

    Smoking is a widespread health problem. Because the nicotine withdrawal syndrome is a major contributor to continued smoking and relapse, it is important to understand the molecular and behavioral mechanisms of nicotine withdrawal to generate more effective smoking cessation therapies. Studies suggest a role for calcium-dependent mechanisms, such as L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), in the effects of nicotine dependence; however, the role of these mechanisms in nicotine-mediated behaviors is unclear. Thus, the goal of this study was to elucidate the role of L-type calcium channels and CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Using both pharmacological and genetic methods, our results show that L-type calcium channels are involved in physical, but not affective, nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Although our data do provide evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors, our pharmacological and genetic assessments yielded different results concerning the specific role of the kinase. Pharmacological data suggest that CaMKII is involved in somatic signs and affective nicotine withdrawal, and activity level is decreased after nicotine withdrawal, whereas the genetic assessments yielded results suggesting that CaMKII is involved only in the anxiety-related response, yet the kinase activity may be increased after nicotine withdrawal; thus, future studies are necessary to clarify the precise behavioral specifics of the relevance of CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Overall, our data show that L-type calcium channels and CaMKII are relevant in nicotine withdrawal and differentially mediate nicotine withdrawal behaviors.

  12. Methamphetamine reduces LTP and increases baseline synaptic transmission in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus.

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    Jarod Swant

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is an addictive psychostimulant whose societal impact is on the rise. Emerging evidence suggests that psychostimulants alter synaptic plasticity in the brain--which may partly account for their adverse effects. While it is known that METH increases the extracellular concentration of monoamines dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, it is not clear how METH alters glutamatergic transmission. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and systemic METH on basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP; an activity-induced increase in synaptic efficacy in CA1 sub-field in the hippocampus. Both the acute ex vivo application of METH to hippocampal slices and systemic administration of METH decreased LTP. Interestingly, the acute ex vivo application of METH at a concentration of 30 or 60 microM increased baseline synaptic transmission as well as decreased LTP. Pretreatment with eticlopride (D2-like receptor antagonist did not alter the effects of METH on synaptic transmission or LTP. In contrast, pretreatment with D1/D5 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 or 5-HT1A receptor antagonist NAN-190 abrogated the effect of METH on synaptic transmission. Furthermore, METH did not increase baseline synaptic transmission in D1 dopamine receptor haploinsufficient mice. Our findings suggest that METH affects excitatory synaptic transmission via activation of dopamine and serotonin receptor systems in the hippocampus. This modulation may contribute to synaptic maladaption induced by METH addiction and/or METH-mediated cognitive dysfunction.

  13. Sevoflurane protects ventricular myocytes from Ca2+ paradox-mediated Ca2+ overload by blocking the activation of transient receptor potential canonical channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Akiko; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Nosaka, Shuichi

    2011-09-01

    Volatile anesthetics produce cardioprotective action by attenuating cellular Ca2+ overload. The Ca2+ paradox is an important model for studying the mechanisms associated with Ca2+ overload-mediated myocardial injury, and was recently found to be mediated by Ca2+ entry through the transient receptor potential canonical channels upon Ca2+ repletion. This study investigated the effect of sevoflurane on cellular mechanisms underlying the Ca2+ paradox. The Ca2+ paradox was examined in fluo-3 or mag-fluo-4-loaded mouse ventricular myocytes using confocal laser scanning microscope, upon Ca2+ repletion after 15 min of Ca2+ depletion in the absence and presence of sevoflurane. The Ca2+ paradox was evoked in approximately 65% of myocytes upon Ca2+ repletion, as determined by an abrupt elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ accompanied by hypercontracture. The Ca2+ paradox was significantly suppressed by sevoflurane administered for 3 min before and during Ca2+ repletion (Post) or during Ca2+ depletion and repletion (Postlong), and Postlong was more beneficial than Post application. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels gradually decreased during Ca2+ depletion, and the Ca2+ paradox was readily evoked in myocytes with reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels. Postlong but not Post application of sevoflurane prevented decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels by blocking Ca2+ leak through ryanodine receptors. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that sevoflurane rapidly blocked thapsigargin-induced transient receptor potential canonical currents. Sevoflurane protects ventricular myocytes from Ca2+ paradox-mediated Ca2+ overload by blocking transient receptor potential canonical channels and by preventing the decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels, which is associated with less activation of transient receptor potential canonical channels.

  14. 酸敏感离子通道参与伤害性感受的研究%Advance in nociception mediated by acid sensing ion channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹤; 曹君利

    2013-01-01

    背景 组织酸化是炎症、缺血/缺氧、骨质破坏等多种疼痛条件下的共同病理特征.酸敏感离子通道(acid-sensingion channels,ASICs)是一类兴奋性阳离子通道,表达在神经系统,可直接被细胞外质子激活,介导组织酸化所致的伤害性感受. 目的 以ASICs为疼痛治疗靶标,将为疼痛治疗提供一条新途径. 内容 综述ASICs参与组织酸化所致伤害性感受的相关研究. 趋向 近年来,研究发现ASICs在介导组织酸化所致伤害性感受过程中发挥重要作用,以ASICs为靶点,将为开发新型镇痛药物和疼痛治疗提供新思路.%Background Tissue acidosis is a common pathological feature of many painful conditions including inflammation,ischemia and bone destruction.Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are excitatory cation channels directly activated by extracellular protons that are expressed in the nervous system,and mediate nociception indcued by tissue acidosis.Objective It will provide a new approach to take ASICs for pain treatment targets.Content The studies of ASICs in mediating nociception associated with tissue acidosis is reviewed.Trend Recent studies show that ASICs play a key role in mediating nociception associated with tissue acidosis,and it will provide a novel approach for development new analgesic drugs and pain treatment targeted ASICs.

  15. N- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels mediate fast calcium transients in axonal shafts of mouse peripheral nerve.

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    Ruxandra eBarzan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the peripheral nervous system a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz. We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e. occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system.

  16. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na(+) and K(+) channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca(2+) ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca(2+) elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca(2+) indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca(2+) imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca(2+) concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca(2+) transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca(2+) imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca(2+) transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca(2+) entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca(2+) may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS).

  17. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmann, Nadine; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialized proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modeling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometer scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organization of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy (SRM) techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how SRM can be used to obtain information on the organization of AZ proteins.

  18. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eEhmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ a variety of specialised proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission.Calcium (Ca2+ channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modelling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometre scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organisation of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy can be used to obtain information on the organisation of AZ proteins.

  19. Synaptic consolidation across multiple timescales

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    Lorric Ziegler

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The brain is bombarded with a continuous stream of sensory events, but retains only a small subset in memory. The selectivity of memory formation prevents our memory from being overloaded with irrelevant items that would rapidly bring the brain to its storage limit; moreover, selectivity also prevents overwriting previously formed memories with new ones. Memory formation in the hippocampus, as well as in other brain regions, is thought to be linked to changes in the synaptic connections between neurons. In this view, sensory events imprint traces at the level of synapses that reflect potential memory items. The question of memory selectivity can therefore be reformulated as follows: what are the reasons and conditions that some synaptic traces fade away whereas others are consolidated and persist? Experimentally, changes in synaptic strength induced by 'Hebbian' protocols fade away over a few hours (early long-term potentiation or e-LTP, unless these changes are consolidated. The experiments and conceptual theory of synaptic tagging and capture (STC provide a mechanistic explanation for the processes involved in consolidation. This theory suggests that the initial trace of synaptic plasticity sets a tag at the synapse, which then serves as a marker for potential consolidation of the changes in synaptic efficacy. The actual consolidation processes, transforming e-LTP into late LTP (l-LTP, require the capture of plasticity-related proteins (PRP. We translate the above conceptual model into a compact computational model that accounts for a wealth of in vitro data including experiments on cross-tagging, tag-resetting and depotentiation. A central ingredient is that synaptic traces are described with several variables that evolve on different time scales. Consolidation requires the transmission of information from a 'fast' synaptic trace to a 'slow' one through a 'write' process, including the formation of tags and the production of PRP for the

  20. Remodeling of inhibitory synaptic connections in developing ferret visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Matthew B

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the visual cortex, as in many other regions of the developing brain, excitatory synaptic connections undergo substantial remodeling during development. While evidence suggests that local inhibitory synapses may behave similarly, the extent and mechanisms that mediate remodeling of inhibitory connections are not well understood. Results Using scanning laser photostimulation in slices of developing ferret visual cortex, we assessed the overall patterns of developing inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections converging onto individual neurons. Inhibitory synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons in cortical layers 2 and 3 were already present as early as postnatal day 20, well before eye opening, and originated from regions close to the recorded neurons. During the ensuing 2 weeks, the numbers of synaptic inputs increased, with the numbers of inhibitory (and excitatory synaptic inputs peaking near the time of eye opening. The pattern of inhibitory inputs refined rapidly prior to the refinement of excitatory inputs. By uncaging the neurotransmtter GABA in brain slices from animals of different ages, we find that this rapid refinement correlated with a loss of excitatory activity by GABA. Conclusion Inhibitory synapses, like excitatory synapses, undergo significant postnatal remodeling. The time course of the remodeling of inhibitory connections correlates with the emergence of orientation tuning in the visual cortex, implicating these rearrangements in the genesis of adult cortical response properties.

  1. PSD-95 and PSD-93 play critical but distinct roles in synaptic scaling up and down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2011-05-04

    Synaptic scaling stabilizes neuronal firing through the homeostatic regulation of postsynaptic strength, but the mechanisms by which chronic changes in activity lead to bidirectional adjustments in synaptic AMPA receptor (AMPAR) abundance are incompletely understood. Furthermore, it remains unclear to what extent scaling up and scaling down use distinct molecular machinery. PSD-95 is a scaffold protein proposed to serve as a binding "slot" that determines synaptic AMPAR content, and synaptic PSD-95 abundance is regulated by activity, raising the possibility that activity-dependent changes in the synaptic abundance of PSD-95 or other membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) drives the bidirectional changes in AMPAR accumulation during synaptic scaling. We found that synaptic PSD-95 and SAP102 (but not PSD-93) abundance were bidirectionally regulated by activity, but these changes were not sufficient to drive homeostatic changes in synaptic strength. Although not sufficient, the PSD-95 MAGUKs were necessary for synaptic scaling, but scaling up and down were differentially dependent on PSD-95 and PSD-93. Scaling down was completely blocked by reduced or enhanced PSD-95, through a mechanism that depended on the PDZ1/2 domains. In contrast, scaling up could be supported by either PSD-95 or PSD-93 in a manner that depended on neuronal age and was unaffected by a superabundance of PSD-95. Together, our data suggest that scaling up and down of quantal amplitude is not driven by changes in synaptic abundance of PSD-95 MAGUKs, but rather that the PSD-95 MAGUKs serve as critical synaptic organizers that use distinct protein-protein interactions to mediate homeostatic accumulation and loss of synaptic AMPAR.

  2. L-type Ca2+ channels in the enteric nervous system mediate oscillatory Cl- secretion in guinea pig colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikitani, Mariko; Yasuoka, Yukiko; Kawada, Hideaki; Kawahara, Katsumasa

    2007-02-01

    The enteric nervous system regulates epithelial ion and fluid secretion. Our previous study has shown that the low (0.2-1 mM) concentrations of Ba2+, a K+ channel inhibitor, evoke Ca2+-dependent oscillatory Cl- secretion via activation of submucosal cholinergic neurons in guinea pig distal colon. However, it is still unclear which types of Ca2+ channels are involved in the oscillation at the neuroepithelial junction. We investigated the inhibitory effects of organic and inorganic Ca2+ channel antagonists on the short circuit current (I(sc)) of colonic epithelia (mucosa-submucosa sheets) mounted in Ussing chambers. The amplitude (412 +/- 37 microA cm(-2)) and frequency (2.6 +/- 0.1 cycles min(-1)) of the Ba2+-induced I(sc) in normal (1.8 mM) Ca2+ solution (n = 26) significantly decreased by 37.6% and 38.5%, respectively, in the low (0.1 mM) Ca2+ solution (n = 14). The I(sc) amplitude was reversibly inhibited by either verapamil (an L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist) or divalent cations (Cd2+, Mn2+, Ni2+) in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentration of verapamil for half-maximum inhibition (IC50) was 4 and 2 microM in normal and low Ca2+ solution, respectively. The relative blocking potencies of metal ions were Cd2+ > Mn2+, Ni2+ in normal Ca2+ solution. In contrast, the frequency of I(sc) was unchanged over the range of concentrations of the Ca2+ channel antagonists used. Our results show that the oscillatory I(sc) evoked by Ba2+ involves L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. We conclude that L-type Ca2+ channels play a key role in the oscillation at the neuroepithelial junctions of guinea pig colon.

  3. Synapsin-dependent reserve pool of synaptic vesicles supports replenishment of the readily releasable pool under intense synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, Mariya; Horstmann, Heinz; Geumann, Constanze; Gitler, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Synapsins are abundant synaptic vesicle (SV)-associated proteins thought to mediate synaptic vesicle mobility and clustering at most synapses. We used synapsin triple knock-out (TKO) mice to examine the morphological and functional consequences of deleting all synapsin isoforms at the calyx of Held, a giant glutamatergic synapse located in the auditory brain stem. Quantitative three-dimensional (3D) immunohistochemistry of entire calyces showed lower amounts of the synaptic vesicle protein vGluT1 while the level of the active zone marker bassoon was unchanged in TKO terminals. Examination of brain lysates by ELISA revealed a strong reduction in abundance of several synaptic vesicle proteins, while proteins of the active zone cytomatrix or postsynaptic density were unaffected. Serial section scanning electron microscopy of large 3D-reconstructed segments confirmed a decrease in the number of SVs to approximately 50% in TKO calyces. Short-term depression tested at stimulus frequencies ranging from 10 to 300 Hz was accelerated only at frequencies above 100 Hz and the time course of recovery from depression was slowed in calyces lacking synapsins. These results reveal that in wild-type synapses, the synapsin-dependent reserve pool contributes to the replenishment of the readily releasable pool (RRP), although accounting only for a small fraction of the SVs that enter the RRP. In conclusion, our results suggest that synapsins may be required for normal synaptic vesicle biogenesis, trafficking and immobilization of synaptic vesicles, yet they are not essential for sustained high-frequency synaptic transmission at the calyx terminal.

  4. Sodium-calcium exchanger and R-type Ca(2+) channels mediate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortus, Stepan; Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Forostyak, Oksana; Zapotocky, Martin; Ueta, Yoichi; Sykova, Eva; Chvatal, Alexandr; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2016-06-01

    Isolated supraoptic neurones generate spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in isolated conditions. Here we report in depth analysis of the contribution of plasmalemmal ion channels (Ca(2+), Na(+)), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), intracellular Ca(2+) release channels (InsP3Rs and RyRs), Ca(2+) storage organelles, plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump and intracellular signal transduction cascades into spontaneous Ca(2+) activity. While removal of extracellular Ca(2+) or incubation with non-specific voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) blocker Cd(2+) suppressed the oscillations, neither Ni(2+) nor TTA-P2, the T-type VGCC blockers, had an effect. Inhibitors of VGCC nicardipine, ω-conotoxin GVIA, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, ω-agatoxin IVA (for L-, N-, P and P/Q-type channels, respectively) did not affect [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. In contrast, a specific R-type VGCC blocker SNX-482 attenuated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. Incubation with TTX had no effect, whereas removal of the extracellular Na(+) or application of an inhibitor of the reverse operation mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger KB-R7943 blocked the oscillations. The mitochondrial uncoupler CCCP irreversibly blocked spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i activity. Exposure of neurones to Ca(2+) mobilisers (thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, caffeine and ryanodine); 4-aminopyridine (A-type K(+) current blocker); phospholipase C and adenylyl cyclase pathways blockers U-73122, Rp-cAMP, SQ-22536 and H-89 had no effect. Oscillations were blocked by GABA, but not by glutamate, apamin or dynorphin. In conclusion, spontaneous oscillations in magnocellular neurones are mediated by a concerted action of R-type Ca(2+) channels and the NCX fluctuating between forward and reverse modes.

  5. Retina derived relaxation is mediated by K(ir) channels and the inhibition of Ca(2+) sensitization in isolated bovine retinal arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takır, Selçuk; Uydeş-Doğan, B Sönmez; Özdemir, Osman

    2015-03-01

    Retinal relaxing factor (RRF) has recently been identified as a novel paracrine regulator of retinal circulation acting differently from well known mediators of the endothelium and the retina. Herein, we aimed to characterize the relaxing mechanism of the retina, i.e. RRF, by evaluating the role of Ca(+2)-dependent and -independent signaling mechanisms as well as inward rectifier K(+) (Kir) channels. Retinal relaxation was determined by placing a piece of retinal tissue just on top of the precontracted bovine retinal arteries mounted in a wire myograph. The retina produced a complete relaxation response, which display a biphasic character, in depolarized arteries contracted by L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist, Bay k 8644. Blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channel by nifedipine, inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase by cyclopiazonic acid or removal of extracellular Ca(2+) did not influence the prominent relaxation to the retina. Originally, retinal relaxation was found to be unaffected from the inhibition of myosin light chain kinase by ML7, whereas, completely abolished in the presence of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor, Calyculin A. Moreover, the inhibition of Rho kinase by its putative inhibitor, Y-27632 displayed comparable relaxant effects to RRF in retinal arteries precontracted either by prostaglandin F2α or K(+), and augmented the moderate response to the retina in K(+) precontracted arteries. In addition, retinal relaxation was significantly inhibited and lost its biphasic character in the presence of Kir channel blocker, Ba(2+). Our results suggested that inhibition of Ca(2+) sensitization through the activation of MLCP, possibly via interfering with Rho kinase, and the opening of Kir channels are likely to be involved in the inhibitory influence of RRF on the retinal arteries.

  6. The familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutation K1336E affects direct G protein-mediated regulation of neuronal P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-López, Edgar; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Sandoval, Alejandro; Felix, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura characterized by recurrent migraine, hemiparesis and ataxia. FHM-1 has been linked to missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.1α1). Here, we explored the effects of the FHM-1 K1336E mutation on G protein-dependent modulation of the recombinant P/Q-type channel. The mutation was introduced into the human CaV2.1α1 subunit and its functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in HEK-293 cells using patch-clamp recordings. Functional analysis of the K1336E mutation revealed a reduction of Ca(2+) current densities, a ∼10 mV left-shift in the current-voltage relationship, and the slowing of current inactivation kinetics. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist DAMGO inhibited whole-cell currents through both the wild-type and the mutant channels. Prepulse facilitation was also reduced by the K1336E mutation. Likewise, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the mutation affects the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex. These results suggest that the extent of G-protein-mediated inhibition is significantly reduced in the K1336E mutant CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels. This alteration would contribute to render the neuronal network hyperexcitable, possibly as a consequence of reduced presynaptic inhibition, and may help to explain some aspects of the FHM-1 pathophysiology.

  7. Thermal impact on spiking properties in Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with synaptic stimulus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shenbing Kuang; Jiafu Wang; Ting Zeng; Aiyin Cao

    2008-01-01

    The effect of environmental temperature on neuronal spiking behaviors is investigated by numerically simulating the temperature dependence of spiking threshold of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron subject to synaptic stimulus. We find that the spiking threshold exhibits a global minimum in a specific temperature range where spike initiation needs weakest synaptic strength, which form the engineering perspective indicates the occurrence of optimal use of synaptic transmission in the nervous system. We further explore the biophysical origin of this phenomenon associated with ion channel gating kinetics and also discuss its possible biological relevance in information processing in neuronal systems.

  8. Correlated network activity enhances synaptic efficacy via BDNF and the ERK pathway at immature CA3 CA1 connections in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerani, Majid H; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Zacchi, Paola; Aguilera, Pedro; Cherubini, Enrico

    2007-08-07

    At early developmental stages, correlated neuronal activity is thought to exert a critical control on functional and structural refinement of synaptic connections. In the hippocampus, between postnatal day 2 (P2) and P6, network-driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) are generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA, which is depolarizing and excitatory. Here the rising phase of GDPs was used to trigger Schaffer collateral stimulation in such a way that synchronized network activity was coincident with presynaptic activation of afferent input. This procedure produced a persistent increase in spontaneous and evoked alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxadepropionic acid-mediated glutamatergic currents, an effect that required calcium influx through postsynaptic L-type calcium channels. No potentiation was observed when a delay of 3 sec was introduced between GDPs and afferent stimulation. Pairing-induced potentiation was prevented by scavengers of endogenous BDNF or tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB) receptor antagonists. Blocking TrkB receptors in the postsynaptic cell did not prevent the effects of pairing, suggesting that BDNF, possibly secreted from the postsynaptic cell during GDPs, acts on TrkB receptors localized on presynaptic neurons. Application of exogenous BDNF mimicked the effects of pairing on synaptic transmission. In addition, pairing-induced synaptic potentiation was blocked by ERK inhibitors, suggesting that BDNF activates the MAPK/ERK cascade, which may lead to transcriptional regulation and new protein synthesis in the postsynaptic neuron. These results support the hypothesis that, during a critical period of postnatal development, GABAA-mediated GDPs are instrumental in tuning excitatory synaptic connections and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  9. Analysis of Polypeptide movement in the SecY channel during SecA-mediated protein translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Erlandson, K. J.; Or, E.; Osborne, Andrew R.; Rapoport, T A

    2008-01-01

    In bacteria most secretory proteins are transported across the plasma membrane by the interplay of the ATPase SecA with the translocation channel formed by the SecY complex; SecA uses cycles of ATP hydrolysis to “push” consecutive segments of a polypeptide substrate through the channel. Here we have addressed the mechanism of this process by following the fate of stalled translocation intermediates. These were generated by using a polypeptide substrate containing a bulky disulfide-bonded loop...

  10. Neuroinflammation and synaptic loss

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Jagadeesh S.; Kellom, Matthew; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the progression of many neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric illnesses. It is evident that microglia in particular are central to mediating the effects of neuroinflammation. Activated microglia release a number of cytokines and chemokines, which in turn activate many signal transduction pathways. For instance, interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha regulate transcription of a number of genes within the brain including proinflam...

  11. Two aspects of ASIC function: Synaptic plasticity and neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Jiang, Nan; Li, Jun; Ji, Yong-Hua; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Zha, Xiang-ming

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular brain pH fluctuates in both physiological and disease conditions. The main postsynaptic proton receptor is the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). During the past decade, much progress has been made on protons, ASICs, and neurological disease. This review summarizes the recent progress on synaptic role of protons and our current understanding of how ASICs contribute to various types of neuronal injury in the brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Synaptic determinants of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena M B Boggio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence showing that the structural and molecular organization of synaptic connections are affected both in human patients and in animal models of neurological and psychiatric diseases. As a consequence of these experimental observations, it has been introduced the concept of synapsopathies, a notion describing brain disorders of synaptic function and plasticity. A close correlation between neurological diseases and synaptic abnormalities is especially relevant for those syndromes including also mental retardation in their symptomatology, such as Rett Syndrome (RS. RS (MIM312750 is an X-linked dominant neurological disorder that is caused, in the majority of cases by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the synaptic alterations produced by mutations of the gene MeCP2 in mouse models of RS and will highlight prospects experimental therapies currently in use. Different experimental approaches have revealed that RS could be the consequence of an impairment in the homeostasis of synaptic transmission in specific brain regions. Indeed, several forms of experience-induced neuronal plasticity are impaired in the absence of MeCP2. Based on the results presented in this review, it is reasonable to propose that understanding how the brain is affected by diseases such as RS is at reach. This effort will bring us closer to identify the neurobiological bases of human cognition.

  13. In vivo BDNF modulation of adult functional and morphological synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Palacio-Schjetnan, Andrea; Escobar, Martha L

    2008-11-07

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a key regulator and mediator of long-term synaptic modifications related to learning and memory maintenance. Our previous studies show that application of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) sufficient to elicit LTP at the dentate gyrus (DG)-CA3 pathway produces mossy fiber structural modifications 7 days after tetanic stimulation. In the present study, we show that acute intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy in the DG-CA3 projection of anesthetized adult rats. Furthermore, we show that BDNF functional modifications in synaptic efficacy are accompanied by a presynaptic structural long-lasting reorganization at the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway. These findings support the idea that BDNF plays an important role as synaptic messenger of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the adult mammalian brain, in vivo.

  14. SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Leigh D; Marks, Jeremy D; Goldstein, Steve AN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism for the earliest response of central neurons to hypoxia—an increase in voltage-gated sodium current (INa)—has been unknown. Here, we show that hypoxia activates the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) pathway in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) and that SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels increases INa. The time-course for SUMOylation of single NaV1.2 channels at the cell surface and changes in INa coincide, and both are prevented by mutation of NaV1.2-Lys38 or application of a deSUMOylating enzyme. Within 40 s, hypoxia-induced linkage of SUMO1 to the channels is complete, shifting the voltage-dependence of channel activation so that depolarizing steps evoke larger sodium currents. Given the recognized role of INa in hypoxic brain damage, the SUMO pathway and NaV1.2 are identified as potential targets for neuroprotective interventions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20054.001 PMID:28029095

  15. Synaptic vesicle pools and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, AbdulRasheed A; Tsien, Richard W

    2012-08-01

    Synaptic vesicles release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses, thus initiating the flow of information in neural networks. To achieve this, vesicles undergo a dynamic cycle of fusion and retrieval to maintain the structural and functional integrity of the presynaptic terminals in which they reside. Moreover, compelling evidence indicates these vesicles differ in their availability for release and mobilization in response to stimuli, prompting classification into at least three different functional pools. Ongoing studies of the molecular and cellular bases for this heterogeneity attempt to link structure to physiology and clarify how regulation of vesicle pools influences synaptic strength and presynaptic plasticity. We discuss prevailing perspectives on vesicle pools, the role they play in shaping synaptic transmission, and the open questions that challenge current understanding.

  16. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activation by dietary capsaicin promotes urinary sodium excretion by inhibiting epithelial sodium channel α subunit-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Fei; Wei, Xing; Liang, Yi; Cui, Yuanting; Gao, Feng; Zhong, Jian; Pu, Yunfei; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Zhencheng; Arendshorst, William J; Nilius, Bernd; Chen, Jing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-08-01

    High salt (HS) intake contributes to the development of hypertension. Epithelial sodium channels play crucial roles in regulating renal sodium reabsorption and blood pressure. The renal transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel can be activated by its agonist capsaicin. However, it is unknown whether dietary factors can act on urinary sodium excretion and renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function. Here, we report that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin increased urinary sodium excretion through reducing sodium reabsorption in wild-type (WT) mice on a HS diet but not in TRPV1(-/-) mice. The effect of capsaicin on urinary sodium excretion was involved in inhibiting αENaC and its related with-no-lysine kinase 1/serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase 1 pathway in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Dietary capsaicin further reduced the increased αENaC activity in WT mice attributed to the HS diet. In contrast, this capsaicin effect was absent in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Immunoprecipitation study indicated αENaC specifically coexpressed and functionally interact with TRPV1 in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Additionally, ENaC activity and expression were suppressed by capsaicin-mediated TRPV1 activation in cultured M1-cortical collecting duct cells. Long-term dietary capsaicin prevented the development of high blood pressure in WT mice on a HS diet. It concludes that TRPV1 activation in the cortical collecting ducts by capsaicin increases urinary sodium excretion and avoids HS diet-induced hypertension through antagonizing αENaC-mediated urinary sodium reabsorption. Dietary capsaicin may represent a promising lifestyle intervention in populations exposed to a high dietary salt intake.

  17. Synaptic Effects of Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Asif

    Learning and sensory processing in the brain relies on the effective transmission of information across synapses. The strength and efficacy of synaptic transmission is modifiable through training and can be modulated with noninvasive electrical brain stimulation. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), specifically, induces weak intensity and spatially diffuse electric fields in the brain. Despite being weak, electric fields modulate spiking probability and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. These effects critically depend on the direction of the electric field relative to the orientation of the neuron and on the level of endogenous synaptic activity. TES has been used to modulate a wide range of neuropsychiatric indications, for various rehabilitation applications, and cognitive performance in diverse tasks. How can a weak and diffuse electric field, which simultaneously polarizes neurons across the brain, have precise changes in brain function? Designing therapies to maximize desired outcomes and minimize undesired effects presents a challenging problem. A series of experiments and computational models are used to define the anatomical and functional factors leading to specificity of TES. Anatomical specificity derives from guiding current to targeted brain structures and taking advantage of the direction-sensitivity of neurons with respect to the electric field. Functional specificity originates from preferential modulation of neuronal networks that are already active. Diffuse electric fields may recruit connected brain networks involved in a training task and promote plasticity along active synaptic pathways. In vitro, electric fields boost endogenous synaptic plasticity and raise the ceiling for synaptic learning with repeated stimulation sessions. Synapses undergoing strong plasticity are preferentially modulated over weak synapses. Therefore, active circuits that are involved in a task could be more susceptible to stimulation than inactive circuits

  18. Alzheimer's disease: synaptic dysfunction and Abeta

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shankar, Ganesh M

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Synapse loss is an early and invariant feature of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) and there is a strong correlation between the extent of synapse loss and the severity of dementia. Accordingly, it has been proposed that synapse loss underlies the memory impairment evident in the early phase of AD and that since plasticity is important for neuronal viability, persistent disruption of plasticity may account for the frank cell loss typical of later phases of the disease. Extensive multi-disciplinary research has implicated the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the aetiology of AD and here we review the evidence that non-fibrillar soluble forms of Aβ are mediators of synaptic compromise. We also discuss the possible mechanisms of Aβ synaptotoxicity and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Defective glycinergic synaptic transmission in zebrafish motility mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Hirata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs.

  20. ATP hydrolysis is critically required for function of CaV1.3 channels in cochlear inner hair cells via fueling Ca2+ clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Simon; Krinner, Stefanie; Wong, Aaron B; Moser, Tobias; Pangršič, Tina

    2014-05-14

    Sound encoding is mediated by Ca(2+) influx-evoked release of glutamate at the ribbon synapse of inner hair cells. Here we studied the role of ATP in this process focusing on Ca(2+) current through CaV1.3 channels and Ca(2+) homeostasis in mouse inner hair cells. Patch-clamp recordings and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrate that hydrolyzable ATP is essential to maintain synaptic Ca(2+) influx in inner hair cells via fueling Ca(2+)-ATPases to avoid an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and subsequent Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation of CaV1.3 channels.

  1. Multiquantal release underlies the distribution of synaptic efficacies in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Loebel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Inter-pyramidal synaptic connections are characterized by a wide range of EPSP amplitudes. Although repeatedly observed at different brain regions and across layers, little is known about the synaptic characteristics that contribute to this wide range. In particular, the range could potentially be accounted for by differences in all three parameters of the quantal model of synaptic transmission, i.e. the number of release sites, release probability and quantal size. Here, we present a rigorous statistical analysis of the transmission properties of excitatory synaptic connections between layer-5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex. Our central finding is that the EPSP amplitude is strongly correlated with the number of estimated release sites, but not with the release probability or quantal size. In addition, we found that the number of release sites can be more than an order of magnitude higher than the typical number of synaptic contacts for this type of connection. Our findings indicate that transmission at stronger synaptic connections is mediated by multiquantal release from their synaptic contacts. We propose that modulating the number of release sites could be an important mechanism in regulating neocortical synaptic transmission.

  2. Long-term potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission in neonatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillard, O; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaiarsa, J L

    1999-07-01

    1. The plasticity of GABAergic synapses was investigated in neonatal rat hippocampal slices obtained between postnatal days 3 and 6 using intracellular recording techniques. Ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists were present throughout the experiments to isolate GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic potentials (GABAA PSPs) or currents (GABAA PSCs). 2. Repetitive depolarizing pulses (20 pulses, 0.5 s duration, at 0.1 Hz, each pulse generating 4-6 action potentials) induced a long-term potentiation in the slope and amplitude of the evoked GABAA PSPs and GABAA PSCs. 3. Long-term potentiation was prevented by intracellular injection of the calcium chelator BAPTA (50 mM), or when the voltage-dependent calcium channels blockers Ni2+ (50 microM) and nimodipine (10 microM) were bath applied. 4. Repetitive depolarizing pulses induced a persistent (over 1 h) increase in the frequency of spontaneous GABAA PSCs. 5. Repetitive depolarizing pulses induced a long-lasting increase in the frequency of miniature GABAA PSCs, without altering their amplitude or decay-time constant. 6. It is concluded that the postsynaptic activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels leads to a long-term potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission in neonatal rat hippocampus. This form of plasticity is expressed as an increase in the probability of GABA release or in the number of functional synapses, rather than as an upregulation of postsynaptic GABAA receptor numbers or conductance at functional synapses.

  3. Neurovascular microcirculatory vasodilation mediated by C-fibers and Transient receptor potential vanilloid-type-1 channels (TRPV 1) is impaired in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marche, P.; Dubois, S.; Abraham, P.; Parot-Schinkel, E.; Gascoin, L.; Humeau-Heurtier, A.; Ducluzeau, PH.; Mahe, G.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction may have an early onset in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and can precede major complications. Our objectives were to assess the endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh; and post-occlusive hyperemia, PORH), non-endothelial-dependent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) and neurovascular-dependent (local heating, LH and current induced vasodilation, CIV) microcirculatory vasodilation in T1D patients compared with matched control subjects using a laser speckle contrast imager. Seventeen T1D patients - matched with 17 subjects according to age, gender, Body-Mass-Index, and smoking status - underwent macro- and microvascular investigations. The LH early peak assessed the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels (TRPV1) mediated vasodilation, whereas the plateau assessed the Nitirc-Oxyde (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathways. PORH explored sensory nerves and (EDHF), while CIV assessed sensory nerves (C-fibers) and prostaglandin-mediated vasodilation. Using neurological investigations, we observed that C-fiber and A-delta fiber functions in T1D patients were similar to control subjects. PORH, CIV, LH peak and plateau vasodilations were significantly decreased in T1D patients compared to controls, whereas there was no difference between the two groups for ACh and SNP vasodilations. Neurovascular microcirculatory vasodilations (C-fibers and TRPV 1-mediated vasodilations) are impaired in TD1 patients whereas no abnormalities were found using clinical neurological investigations. Clinicaltrials: No. NCT02538120. PMID:28287157

  4. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the voltage gated sodium ion channel TcNav causes mortality in Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Halim, Hesham M.; Alshukri, Baida M. H.; Ahmad, Munawar S.; Nakasu, Erich Y. T.; Awwad, Mohammed H.; Salama, Elham M.; Gatehouse, Angharad M. R.; Edwards, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium ion channel (VGSC) belongs to the largest superfamily of ion channels. Since VGSCs play key roles in physiological processes they are major targets for effective insecticides. RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to analyse gene function, but recently, it has shown potential to contribute to novel strategies for selectively controlling agricultural insect pests. The current study evaluates the delivery of dsRNA targeted to the sodium ion channel paralytic A (TcNav) gene in Tribolium castaneum as a viable means of controlling this insect pest. Delivery of TcNav dsRNA caused severe developmental arrest with larval mortalities up to 73% post injection of dsRNA. Injected larvae showed significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression between 30–60%. Expression was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in pupae following injection causing 30% and 42% knockdown for early and late pupal stages, respectively. Oral delivery of dsRNA caused dose-dependant mortalities of between 19 and 51.34%; this was accompanied by significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression following 3 days of continuous feeding. The majority of larvae injected with, or fed, dsRNA died during the final larval stage prior to pupation. This work provides evidence of a viable RNAi-based strategy for insect control. PMID:27411529

  5. Synaptic plasticity: Building memories to last.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S M

    2000-03-23

    A series of recent studies has provided long-awaited direct evidence that enduring changes in synaptic strength, presumably underlying the formation of persistent memories, may be encoded in a lasting form as a change in synaptic structure.

  6. Ultrafast action potentials mediate kilohertz signaling at a central synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzau-Jost, Andreas; Delvendahl, Igor; Rings, Annika; Byczkowicz, Niklas; Harada, Harumi; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Eilers, Jens; Hallermann, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Fast synaptic transmission is important for rapid information processing. To explore the maximal rate of neuronal signaling and to analyze the presynaptic mechanisms, we focused on the input layer of the cerebellar cortex, where exceptionally high action potential (AP) frequencies have been reported in vivo. With paired recordings between presynaptic cerebellar mossy fiber boutons and postsynaptic granule cells, we demonstrate reliable neurotransmission up to ∼1 kHz. Presynaptic APs are ultrafast, with ∼100 μs half-duration. Both Kv1 and Kv3 potassium channels mediate the fast repolarization, rapidly inactivating sodium channels ensure metabolic efficiency, and little AP broadening occurs during bursts of up to 1.5 kHz. Presynaptic Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels open efficiently during ultrafast APs. Furthermore, a subset of synaptic vesicles is tightly coupled to Ca(2+) channels, and vesicles are rapidly recruited to the release site. These data reveal mechanisms of presynaptic AP generation and transmitter release underlying neuronal kHz signaling.

  7. Blockade of IP[subscript 3]-Mediated SK Channel Signaling in the Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex Improves Spatial Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Avis R.; Dolinsky, Beth; Vu, Mai-Anh T.; Stanley, Marion; Yeckel, Mark F.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.

    2008-01-01

    Planning and directing thought and behavior require the working memory (WM) functions of prefrontal cortex. WM is compromised by stress, which activates phosphatidylinositol (PI)-mediated IP[subscript 3]-PKC intracellular signaling. PKC overactivation impairs WM operations and in vitro studies indicate that IP[subscript 3] receptor (IP[subscript…

  8. Mitochondria, synaptic plasticity, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Laifenfeld, Daphna

    2004-01-01

    The conceptualization of schizophrenia as a disorder of connectivity, i.e., of neuronal?synaptic plasticity, suggests abnormal synaptic modeling and neuronal signaling, possibly as a consequence of flawed interactions with the environment, as at least a secondary mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. Indeed, deficits in episodic memory and malfunction of hippocampal circuitry, as well as anomalies of axonal sprouting and synapse formation, are all suggestive of diminished neuronal plasticity in schizophrenia. Evidence supports a dysfunction of mitochondria in schizophrenia, including mitochondrial hypoplasia, and a dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system, as well as altered mitochondrial-related gene expression. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to alterations in ATP production and cytoplasmatic calcium concentrations, as well as reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production. All of the latter processes have been well established as leading to altered synaptic strength or plasticity. Moreover, mitochondria have been shown to play a role in plasticity of neuronal polarity, and studies in the visual cortex show an association between mitochondria and synaptogenesis. Finally, mitochondrial gene upregulation has been observed following synaptic and neuronal activity. This review proposes that mitochondrial dysfunction in schizophrenia could cause, or arise from, anomalies in processes of plasticity in this disorder.

  9. Making synapses strong: metaplasticity prolongs associativity of long-term memory by switching synaptic tag mechanisms.

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    Li, Qin; Rothkegel, Martin; Xiao, Zhi Cheng; Abraham, Wickliffe C; Korte, Martin; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2014-02-01

    One conceptual mechanism for the induction of associative long-term memory is that a synaptic tag, set by a weak event, can capture plasticity-related proteins from a nearby strong input, thus enabling associativity between the 2 (synaptic tagging and capture, STC). So far, STC has been observed for only a limited time of 60 min. Nevertheless, association of weak memory forms can occur beyond this period and its mechanism is not well understood. Here we report that metaplasticity induced by ryanodine receptor activation or synaptic activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors prolongs the durability of the synaptic tag, thus extending the time window for associative interactions mediating storage of long-term memory. We provide evidence that such metaplasticity alters the mechanisms of STC from a CaMKII-mediated (in non-primed STC) to a protein kinase Mzeta (PKMζ)-mediated process (in primed STC). Thus the association of weak synapses with strong synapses in the "late" stage of associative memory formation occurs only through metaplasticity. The results also reveal that the short-lived, CaMKII-mediated tag may contribute to a mechanism for a fragile form of memory while metaplasticity enables a PKMζ-mediated synaptic tag capable of prolonged interactions that induce a more stable form of memory that is resistant to reversal.

  10. Neto1 is a novel CUB-domain NMDA receptor-interacting protein required for synaptic plasticity and learning.

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    David Ng

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, a major excitatory ligand-gated ion channel in the central nervous system (CNS, is a principal mediator of synaptic plasticity. Here we report that neuropilin tolloid-like 1 (Neto1, a complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1 (CUB domain-containing transmembrane protein, is a novel component of the NMDAR complex critical for maintaining the abundance of NR2A-containing NMDARs in the postsynaptic density. Neto1-null mice have depressed long-term potentiation (LTP at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, with the subunit dependency of LTP induction switching from the normal predominance of NR2A- to NR2B-NMDARs. NMDAR-dependent spatial learning and memory is depressed in Neto1-null mice, indicating that Neto1 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and cognition. Remarkably, we also found that the deficits in LTP, learning, and memory in Neto1-null mice were rescued by the ampakine CX546 at doses without effect in wild-type. Together, our results establish the principle that auxiliary proteins are required for the normal abundance of NMDAR subunits at synapses, and demonstrate that an inherited learning defect can be rescued pharmacologically, a finding with therapeutic implications for humans.

  11. A clinico-radiological phenotype of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody-mediated disorder presenting with seizures and basal ganglia changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Wright, Sukhvir; Siddiqui, Ata; Pandya, Nikki; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2012-12-01

    In childhood, central nervous system (CNS) presentations associated with antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex include limbic encephalitis, status epilepticus, epileptic encephalopathy, and autistic regression. We report the cases of two individuals (a 6-year-old male and an 11-year-old female) who presented with an acute-onset explosive seizure disorder with positive VGKC complex antibodies and bilateral basal ganglia changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both patients made a complete clinical recovery, without immunotherapy, with resolution of the MRI changes and normalization of the antibody levels. Extended antibody testing, including testing for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein 2, and contactin-2 was negative. This could suggest that the clinico-radiological phenotype in our patients may in fact be associated with a novel autoreactive target(s) within the VGKC complex, as may be the case in other children with VGKC complex-mediated CNS disorders.

  12. Molecular Basis of Regulating High Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels by S-Nitrosylation.

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    Zhou, Meng-Hua; Bavencoffe, Alexis; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-12-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in a variety of physiological processes, such as vasoregulation and neurotransmission, and has a complex role in the regulation of pain transduction and synaptic transmission. We have shown previously that NO inhibits high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels in primary sensory neurons and excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the molecular mechanism involved in this inhibitory action remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of S-nitrosylation in the NO regulation of high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP) rapidly reduced N-type currents when Cav2.2 was coexpressed with the Cavβ1 or Cavβ3 subunits in HEK293 cells. In contrast, SNAP only slightly inhibited P/Q-type and L-type currents reconstituted with various Cavβ subunits. SNAP caused a depolarizing shift in voltage-dependent N-type channel activation, but it had no effect on Cav2.2 protein levels on the membrane surface. The inhibitory effect of SNAP on N-type currents was blocked by the sulfhydryl-specific modifying reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium. Furthermore, the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation were much more abundant in Cav2.2 than in Cav1.2 and Cav2.1. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that Cys-805, Cys-930, and Cys-1045 in the II-III intracellular loop, Cys-1835 and Cys-2145 in the C terminus of Cav2.2, and Cys-346 in the Cavβ3 subunit were nitrosylation sites mediating NO sensitivity of N-type channels. Our findings demonstrate that the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation in cytoplasmically accessible sites are critically involved in post-translational regulation of N-type Ca(2+) channels by NO. S-Nitrosylation mediates the feedback regulation of N-type channels by NO.

  13. Regulation of basal and reserve cardiac pacemaker function by interactions of cAMP mediated PKA-dependent Ca2+ cycling with surface membrane channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Decades of intensive research of primary cardiac pacemaker, the sinoatrial node, have established potential roles of specific membrane channels in the generation of the diastolic depolarization, the major mechanism allowing sinoatrial node cells generate spontaneous beating. During the last three decades, multiple studies made either in the isolated sinoatrial node or sinoatrial node cells have demonstrated a pivotal role of Ca2+ and, specifically Ca2+-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, for spontaneous beating of cardiac pacemaker. Recently, spontaneous, rhythmic local subsarcolemmal Ca2+ releases from ryanodine receptors during late half of the diastolic depolarization have been implicated as a vital factor in the generation of sinoatrial node cells spontaneous firing. Local Ca2+ releases are driven by a unique combination of high basal cAMP production by adenylyl cyclases, high basal cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterases and a high level of cAMP-mediated PKA-dependent phosphorylation. These local Ca2+ releases activate an inward Na+-Ca2+ exchange current which accelerates the terminal diastolic depolarization rate and, thus, controls the spontaneous pacemaker firing. Both the basal primary pacemaker beating rate and its modulation via β-adrenergic receptor stimulation appear to be critically dependent upon intact RyR function and local subsarcolemmal sarcoplasmic reticulum generated Ca2+ releases. This review aspires to integrate the traditional viewpoint that has emphasized the supremacy of the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels in spontaneous firing of the primary cardiac pacemaker, and these novel perspectives of cAMP-mediated PKA-dependent Ca2+ cycling in regulation of the heart pacemaker clock, both in the basal state and during β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. PMID:19573534

  14. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  15. Presynaptic Localization and Possible Function of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Anoctamin 1 in the Mammalian Retina.

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    Ji Hyun Jeon

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca(2+-activated chloride (Cl(- channels (CaCCs play a role in the modulation of action potentials and synaptic responses in the somatodendritic regions of central neurons. In the vertebrate retina, large Ca(2+-activated Cl(- currents (ICl(Ca regulate synaptic transmission at photoreceptor terminals; however, the molecular identity of CaCCs that mediate ICl(Ca remains unclear. The transmembrane protein, TMEM16A, also called anoctamin 1 (ANO1, has been recently validated as a CaCC and is widely expressed in various secretory epithelia and nervous tissues. Despite the fact that tmem16a was first cloned in the retina, there is little information on its cellular localization and function in the mammalian retina. In this study, we found that ANO1 was abundantly expressed as puncta in 2 synaptic layers. More specifically, ANO1 immunoreactivity was observed in the presynaptic terminals of various retinal neurons, including photoreceptors. ICl(Ca was first detected in dissociated rod bipolar cells expressing ANO1. ICl(Ca was abolished by treatment with the Ca(2+ channel blocker Co(2+, the L-type Ca(2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and the Cl(- channel blockers 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino benzoic acid (NPPB and niflumic acid (NFA. More specifically, a recently discovered ANO1-selective inhibitor, T16Ainh-A01, and a neutralizing antibody against ANO1 inhibited ICl(Ca in rod bipolar cells. Under a current-clamping mode, the suppression of ICl(Ca by using NPPB and T16Ainh-A01 caused a prolonged Ca(2+ spike-like depolarization evoked by current injection in dissociated rod bipolar cells. These results suggest that ANO1 confers ICl(Ca in retinal neurons and acts as an intrinsic regulator of the presynaptic membrane potential during synaptic transmission.

  16. Calcium, synaptic plasticity and intrinsic homeostasis in Purkinje neuron models

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    Pablo Achard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We recently reproduced the complex electrical activity of a Purkinje cell (PC with very different combinations of ionic channel maximum conductances, suggesting that a large parameter space is available to homeostatic mechanisms. It has been hypothesized that cytoplasmic calcium concentrations control the homeostatic activity sensors. This raises many questions for PCs since in these neurons calcium plays an important role in the induction of synaptic plasticity. To address this question, we generated 148 new PC models. In these models the somatic membrane voltages are stable, but the somatic calcium dynamics are very variable, in agreement with experimental results. Conversely, the calcium signal in spiny dendrites shows only small variability. We demonstrate that this localized control of calcium conductances preserves the induction of long-term depression for all models. We conclude that calcium is unlikely to be the sole activity-sensor in this cell but that there is a strong relationship between activity homeostasis and synaptic plasticity.

  17. The prostaglandin E2/EP4 receptor/cyclic AMP/T-type Ca(2+) channel pathway mediates neuritogenesis in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Maeda, Takashi; Tanaka, Yukari; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-03-01

    We investigated mechanisms for the neuritogenesis caused by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells. PGE2 caused neuritogenesis, an effect abolished by an EP4 receptor antagonist or inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase (AC) or protein kinase A (PKA) and mimicked by the AC activator forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), and selective activators of PKA or Epac. ND7/23 cells expressed both Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T-channels). The neuritogenesis induced by db-cAMP or PGE2 was abolished by T-channel blockers. T-channels were functionally upregulated by db-cAMP. The PGE2/EP4/cAMP/T-channel pathway thus appears to mediate neuritogenesis in sensory neurons.

  18. Role of capsaicin-sensitive C-fiber afferents in neuropathic pain-induced synaptic potentiation in the nociceptive amygdala

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    Nakao Ayano

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons in the capsular part of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeC, a region also called "nociceptive amygdala," receive nociceptive information from the dorsal horn via afferent pathways relayed from the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB. As the central amygdala is known to be involved in the acquisition and expression of emotion, this pathway is thought to play central roles in the generation of affective responses to nociceptive inputs. Excitatory synaptic transmission between afferents arising from the LPB and these CeC neurons is potentiated in arthritic, visceral, neuropathic, inflammatory and muscle pain models. In neuropathic pain models following spinal nerve ligation (SNL, in which we previously showed a robust LPB-CeC potentiation, the principal behavioral symptom is tactile allodynia triggered by non-C-fiber low-threshold mechanoreceptor afferents. Conversely, recent anatomical studies have revealed that most of the spinal neurons projecting to the LPB receive C-fiber afferent inputs. Here, we examined the hypothesis that these C-fiber-mediated inputs are necessary for the full establishment of robust synaptic potentiation of LPB-CeC transmission in the rats with neuropathic pain. Results Postnatal capsaicin treatment, which has been shown to denervate the C-fibers expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1 channels, completely abolished eye-wiping responses to capsaicin eye instillation in rats, but this treatment did not affect mechanical allodynia in the nerve-ligated animals. However, the postnatal capsaicin treatment prevented LPB-CeC synaptic potentiation after SNL, unlike in the vehicle-treated rats, primarily due to the decreased incidence of potentiated transmission by elimination of TRPV1-expressing C-fiber afferents. Conclusions C-fiber-mediated afferents in the nerve-ligated animals may be a required facilitator of the establishment of nerve injury-evoked synaptic

  19. [Study on the effect of Klotho gene interferred by plasmid-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) on sinoatrial node pacing channel gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yingying; Wang, Han; Hou, Yanbin; Fang, Chenli; Tian, Peng; Wang, Guihua; Li, Lu; Deng, Juelin

    2013-06-01

    The study was aimed to assess the effect of Klotho gene and sinoatrial node pacing channel gene (HCN4 and HCN2) for studying sick sinus syndrome, with Klotho gene under the interference of Plasmid-mediated short hairpin RNA. Twenty-five C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups, i. e, plasmid shRNA 24h group, plasmid shRNA 12h group, sodium chloride 24h group and sodium chloride 12h group. Plasmid shRNA 50microL (1microg/microL) and sodium chloride 50microl were respectively injected according to mice vena caudalis into those in plasmid shRNA group and sodium chloride group. After 12h or 24h respectively, all mice were executed and their sinoatrial node tissues were cut. The mRNA of Klotho, HCN4 and HCN2 gene were detected by RT-PCR. The results of RT-PCR showed that Klotho, HCN4 and HCN2 mRNA levels were lower compared with those in sodium chloride 12h group after 12h interference interval. The results indicated that there might be the a certain relationship between Klotho gene and sinoatrial node pacing channel gene.

  20. Dual-channel detection of metallothioneins and mercury based on a mercury-mediated aptamer beacon using thymidine-mercury-thymidine complex as a quencher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-Han; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Tang, Xian; Cao, Jin-Xiu; Li, Ming-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Huang, Yan-Qin

    2015-01-01

    A novel dual-channel strategy for the detection of metallothioneins (MTs) and Hg(2+) has been developed based on a mercury-mediated aptamer beacon (MAB) using thymidine-mercury-thymidine complex as a quencher for the first time. In the presence of Hg(2+), the T-rich oligonucleotide with a 6-carboxyfluorescein (TRO-FAM) can form an aptamer beacon via the formation of T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs, which results in a fluorescence quenching of the sensing system owing to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the fluorophore of FAM to the terminated T-Hg(2+)-T base pair. The addition of MTs into this solution leads to the disruption of the T-Hg(2+)-T complex, resulting in an increase of the fluorescent signal of the system. In the optimizing condition, ΔF was directly proportional to the concentrations ranging from 5.63 nM to 0.275 μM for MTs, and 14.2 nM to 0.30 μM for Hg(2+) with the detection limits of 1.69 nM and 4.28 nM, respectively. The proposed dual-channel method avoids the label steps of a quencher in common molecular beacon strategies, without tedious procedure or the requirement of sophisticated equipment, and is rapid, inexpensive and sensitive.

  1. Augmented activity of the pelvic nerve afferent mediated by TRP channels in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimura, Yukitoshi; Ito, Koichi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2012-08-01

    Enteritis has been recognized as a major symptom in domestic animals and human patients suffering from feed and food poisonings. The aim of the present study was to clarify the excitatory mechanism of the pelvic nerve afferent which may influence the occurrence of enteritis in response to nociceptive chemical stimuli of the colon in normal and abnormal rats with colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). The pelvic nerve afferent activity was markedly increased by colonic instillation of solution (0.5 ml) of acetic acid (5-25%) and capsaicin (100 μg/ml). The nerve activity was augmented by colonic instillation of capsaicin to a greater extent in rats with DSS-induced colitis than in normal control rats. This augmented activity by capsaicin was more prominent at one day (DSS-1) than at 8 day (DSS-8) after the administration of DSS. The increased nerve activity caused by capsaicin in DSS-1 and DSS-8 was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with ruthenium red, which is a nonselective inhibitor of TRP channels of unmyelinated C-fibers (nociceptors). In conclusion, it was elucidated that the nociceptive function of the pelvic nerve was largely elevated at one day after DSS-induced colitis and such increased function was mostly mediated by TRP channels.

  2. Acute p38-mediated modulation of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in mouse sensory neurons by tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaochun; Gereau, Robert W

    2006-01-04

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. TNFalpha can have long-lasting effects by regulating the expression of a variety of inflammatory mediators, including other cytokines and TNFalpha itself. However, the speed with which TNFalpha induces tactile and thermal hypersensitivity suggests that transcriptional regulation cannot fully account for its sensitizing effects, and some recent findings suggest that TNFalpha may act directly on primary afferent neurons to induce pain hypersensitivity. In the present study, we show that peripheral administration of TNFalpha induces thermal hypersensitivity in wild-type mice but not in transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor TRPV1(-/-) mice. In contrast, TNFalpha produced equivalent mechanical hypersensitivity in TRPV1(-/-) mice and wild-type littermates, suggesting a role for TRPV1 in TNFalpha-induced thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity. Because tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na+ channels are a critical site of modulation underlying mechanical hypersensitivity in inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions, we tested the effects of TNFalpha on these channels in isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We report that acute application of TNFalpha rapidly enhances TTX-resistant Na+ currents in isolated DRG neurons. This potentiation of TTX-resistant currents by TNFalpha is dramatically reduced in DRG neurons from TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) knock-out mice and is blocked by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole]. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced by peripherally applied TNFalpha is also significantly reduced by SB202190. These results suggest that TNFalpha may induce acute peripheral mechanical sensitization by acting directly on TNFR1 in primary afferent neurons, resulting in p38-dependent modulation

  3. Aβ-Induced Synaptic Alterations Require the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth M; Scudder, Samantha L; Goo, Marisa S; Patrick, Gentry N

    2016-02-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which patients experience progressive cognitive decline. A wealth of evidence suggests that this cognitive impairment results from synaptic dysfunction in affected brain regions caused by cleavage of amyloid precursor protein into the pathogenic peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). Specifically, it has been shown that Aβ decreases surface AMPARs, dendritic spine density, and synaptic strength, and also alters synaptic plasticity. The precise molecular mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination in Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction in cultured rat neurons. We find that Aβ promotes the ubiquitination of AMPARs, as well as the redistribution and recruitment of Nedd4-1, a HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase we previously demonstrated to target AMPARs for ubiquitination and degradation. Strikingly, we show that Nedd4-1 is required for Aβ-induced reductions in surface AMPARs, synaptic strength, and dendritic spine density. Our findings, therefore, indicate an important role for Nedd4-1 and ubiquitin in the synaptic alterations induced by Aβ. Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include surface AMPAR loss, which can weaken synapses. In a cell culture model of AD, we found that AMPAR loss correlates with increased AMPAR ubiquitination. In addition, the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1, known to ubiquitinate AMPARs, is recruited to synapses in response to Aβ. Strikingly, reducing Nedd4-1 levels in this model prevented surface AMPAR loss and synaptic weakening. These findings suggest that, in AD, Nedd4-1 may ubiquitinate AMPARs to promote their internalization and weaken synaptic strength, similar to what occurs in Nedd4-1's established role in homeostatic synaptic scaling. This is the first demonstration of Aβ-mediated control of a ubiquitin ligase to regulate surface AMPAR expression. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/361590-06$15.00/0.

  4. Vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects of methanolic extract from roots of Laelia anceps are mediated by calcium-channel antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Galicia, Jorge; Ortiz-Andrade, Rolffy; Rivera-Leyva, Julio; Castillo-España, Patricia; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Ibarra-Barajas, Maximiliano; Gallardo-Ortiz, Itzell; Estrada-Soto, Samuel

    2010-07-01

    RMELanc-induced relaxation in aortic rings precontracted with NE, 5-HT and KCl. It also reduced NE-induced transient contraction in Ca(2+)-free solution and inhibited contraction induced by increasing external calcium. Nevertheless, the vasorelaxant effect of RMELanc was not reduced by ODQ, 1-alprenolol, TEA, glibenclamide, and 2-AP. Oral administration of 100 mg/kg of RMELanc exhibited a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressures in SHR rats. HPLC analysis allowed us to detect the presence of 2,7-dihydroxy-3,4,9-trimethoxyphenantrene (1), which induced a significant relaxation effect. Therefore, our results suggest that RMELanc induces vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects by blockade of Ca(2+) channels.

  5. Steviol reduces MDCK Cyst formation and growth by inhibiting CFTR channel activity and promoting proteasome-mediated CFTR degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowalit Yuajit

    Full Text Available Cyst enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD involves cAMP-activated proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR chloride channel. This study aimed to investigate an inhibitory effect and detailed mechanisms of steviol and its derivatives on cyst growth using a cyst model in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. Among 4 steviol-related compounds tested, steviol was found to be the most potent at inhibiting MDCK cyst growth. Steviol inhibition of cyst growth was dose-dependent; steviol (100 microM reversibly inhibited cyst formation and cyst growth by 72.53.6% and 38.2±8.5%, respectively. Steviol at doses up to 200 microM had no effect on MDCK cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis. However, steviol acutely inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current in MDCK epithelia, measured with the Ussing chamber technique, in a dose-dependent manner. Prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM also strongly inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current, in part by reducing CFTR protein expression in MDCK cells. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, abolished the effect of steviol on CFTR protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that prolonged treatment (24 h with steviol (100 microM markedly reduced CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Taken together, the data suggest that steviol retards MDCK cyst progression in two ways: first by directly inhibiting CFTR chloride channel activity and second by reducing CFTR expression, in part, by promoting proteasomal degradation of CFTR. Steviol and related compounds therefore represent drug candidates for treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  6. A Critical Role of TRPM7 As an Ion Channel Protein in Mediating the Mineralization of the Craniofacial Hard Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yukiko; Le, Michael H.; Abduweli, Dawud; Ho, Sunita P.; Ryazanova, Lillia V.; Hu, Zhixian; Ryazanov, Alexey G.; Den Besten, Pamela K.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium ion (Mg2+) is the fourth most common cation in the human body, and has a crucial role in many physiological functions. Mg2+ homeostasis is an important contributor to bone development, however, its roles in the development of dental mineralized tissues have not yet been well known. We identified that transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), was significantly upregulated in the mature ameloblasts as compared to other ameloblasts through our whole transcript microarray analyses of the ameloblasts. TRPM7, an ion channel for divalent metal cations with an intrinsic serine/threonine protein kinase activity, has been characterized as a key regulator of whole body Mg2+ homeostasis. Semi-quantitative PCR and immunostaining for TRMP7 confirmed its upregulation during the maturation stage of enamel formation, at which ameloblasts direct rapid mineralization of the enamel matrix. The significantly hypomineralized craniofacial structures, including incisors, molars, and cranial bones were demonstrated by microCT analysis, von Kossa and trichrome staining in Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice. A previously generated heterozygous mouse model with the deletion of the TRPM7 kinase domain. Interestingly, the skeletal phenotype of Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice resembled those found in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) KO mice, thus we further examined whether ALPL protein content and alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity in ameloblasts, odontoblasts and osteoblasts were affected in those mice. While ALPL protein in Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice remained at the similar level as that in wt mice, ALPase activities in the Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice were almost nonexistent. Supplemented magnesium successfully rescued the activities of ALPase in ameloblasts, odontoblasts and osteoblasts of Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice. These results suggested that TRPM7 is essential for mineralization of enamel as well as dentin and bone by providing sufficient Mg2+ for the ALPL

  7. The TRPA1 ion channel is expressed in CD4+ T cells and restrains T-cell-mediated colitis through inhibition of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Samuel; Aoki-Nonaka, Yukari; Lee, Jihyung; de Jong, Petrus R; Kim, Peter; Han, Tiffany; Yu, Timothy; To, Keith; Takahashi, Naoki; Boland, Brigid S; Chang, John T; Ho, Samuel B; Herdman, Scott; Corr, Maripat; Franco, Alessandra; Sharma, Sonia; Dong, Hui; Akopian, Armen N; Raz, Eyal

    2017-09-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) are calcium (Ca(2+))-permeable ion channels mostly known as pain receptors in sensory neurons. However, growing evidence suggests their crucial involvement in the pathogenesis of IBD. We explored the possible contribution of TRPA1 and TRPV1 to T-cell-mediated colitis. We evaluated the role of Trpa1 gene deletion in two models of experimental colitis (ie, interleukin-10 knockout and T-cell-adoptive transfer models). We performed electrophysiological and Ca(2+) imaging studies to analyse TRPA1 and TRPV1 functions in CD4+ T cells. We used genetic and pharmacological approaches to evaluate TRPV1 contribution to the phenotype of Trpa1(-/-) CD4+ T cells. We also analysed TRPA1 and TRPV1 gene expression and TRPA1(+)TRPV1(+) T cell infiltration in colonic biopsies from patients with IBD. We identified a protective role for TRPA1 in T-cell-mediated colitis. We demonstrated the functional expression of TRPA1 on the plasma membrane of CD4+ T cells and identified that Trpa1(-/-) CD4+ T cells have increased T-cell receptor-induced Ca(2+) influx, activation profile and differentiation into Th1-effector cells. This phenotype was abrogated upon genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of the TRPV1 channel in mouse and human CD4+ T cells. Finally, we found differential regulation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 gene expression as well as increased infiltration of TRPA1(+)TRPV1(+) T cells in the colon of patients with IBD. Our study indicates that TRPA1 inhibits TRPV1 channel activity in CD4+ T cells, and consequently restrains CD4+ T-cell activation and colitogenic responses. These findings may therefore have therapeutic implications for human IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) mediates cAMP-dependent but protein kinase A-insensitive modulation of vascular ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Gregor I; Kamishima, Tomoko; Davies, Lowri M; Quayle, John M; Dart, Caroline

    2009-07-15

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP (Epacs or cAMP-GEF) represent a family of novel cAMP-binding effector proteins. The identification of Epacs and the recent development of pharmacological tools that discriminate between cAMP-mediated pathways have revealed previously unrecognized roles for cAMP that are independent of its traditional target cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Here we show that Epac exists in a complex with vascular ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel subunits and that cAMP-mediated activation of Epac modulates KATP channel activity via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism involving the activation of Ca2+-sensitive protein phosphatase 2B (PP-2B, calcineurin). Application of the Epac-specific cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, at concentrations that activate Epac but not PKA, caused a 41.6 +/- 4.7% inhibition (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 7) of pinacidil-evoked whole-cell KATP currents recorded in isolated rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Importantly, similar results were obtained when cAMP was elevated by addition of the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in the presence of the structurally distinct PKA inhibitors, Rp-cAMPS or KT5720. Activation of Epac by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP caused a transient 171.0 +/- 18.0 nM (n = 5) increase in intracellular Ca2+ in Fura-2-loaded aortic myocytes, which persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Inclusion of the Ca2+-specific chelator BAPTA in the pipette-filling solution or preincubation with the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A or ascomycin, significantly reduced the ability of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP to inhibit whole-cell KATP currents. These results highlight a previously undescribed cAMP-dependent regulatory mechanism that may be essential for understanding the physiological and pathophysiological roles ascribed to arterial KATP channels in the control of vascular tone and blood flow.

  9. Epithelial Sodium Channel-Mediated Sodium Transport Is Not Dependent on the Membrane-Bound Serine Protease CAP2/Tmprss4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Keppner

    Full Text Available The membrane-bound serine protease CAP2/Tmprss4 has been previously identified in vitro as a positive regulator of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC. To study its in vivo implication in ENaC-mediated sodium absorption, we generated a knockout mouse model for CAP2/Tmprss4. Mice deficient in CAP2/Tmprss4 were viable, fertile, and did not show any obvious histological abnormalities. Unexpectedly, when challenged with sodium-deficient diet, these mice did not develop any impairment in renal sodium handling as evidenced by normal plasma and urinary sodium and potassium electrolytes, as well as normal aldosterone levels. Despite minor alterations in ENaC mRNA expression, we found no evidence for altered proteolytic cleavage of ENaC subunits. In consequence, ENaC activity, as monitored by the amiloride-sensitive rectal potential difference (ΔPD, was not altered even under dietary sodium restriction. In summary, ENaC-mediated sodium balance is not affected by lack of CAP2/Tmprss4 expression and thus, does not seem to directly control ENaC expression and activity in vivo.

  10. Synaptic dynamics and decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deco, Gustavo; Rolls, Edmund T.; Romo, Ranulfo

    2010-01-01

    During decision making between sequential stimuli, the first stimulus must be held in memory and then compared with the second. Here, we show that in systems that encode the stimuli by their firing rate, neurons can use synaptic facilitation not only to remember the first stimulus during the delay but during the presentation of the second stimulus so that they respond to a combination of the first and second stimuli, as has been found for “partial differential” neurons recorded in the ventral premotor cortex during vibrotactile flutter frequency decision making. Moreover, we show that such partial differential neurons provide important input to a subsequent attractor decision-making network that can then compare this combination of the first and second stimuli with inputs from other neurons that respond only to the second stimulus. Thus, both synaptic facilitation and neuronal attractor dynamics can account for sequential decision making in such systems in the brain. PMID:20360555

  11. G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type calcium channels by regulators of G protein signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Wittemann, S; Herlitze, S

    2000-10-01

    1. Fast synaptic transmission is triggered by the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels which can be inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which are responsible for >100-fold increases in the GTPase activity of G proteins and might be involved in the regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels. In this study we investigated the effects of RGS2 on G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type channels expressed in a human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell line using whole-cell recordings. 2. RGS2 markedly accelerates transmitter-mediated inhibition and recovery from inhibition of Ba2+ currents (IBa) through P/Q-type channels heterologously expressed with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (mAChR M2). 3. Both RGS2 and RGS4 modulate the prepulse facilitation properties of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. G protein reinhibition is accelerated, while release from inhibition is slowed. These kinetics depend on the availability of G protein alpha and betagamma subunits which is altered by RGS proteins. 4. RGS proteins unmask the Ca2+ channel beta subunit modulation of Ca2+ channel G protein inhibition. In the presence of RGS2, P/Q-type channels containing the beta2a and beta3 subunits reveal significantly altered kinetics of G protein modulation and increased facilitation compared to Ca2+ channels coexpressed with the beta1b or beta4 subunit.

  12. CaV3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channels in H₂S-mediated hypoxic response of the carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Peng, Ying-Jie; Yuan, Guoxiang; Fox, Aaron P; Kumar, Ganesh K; Nanduri, Jayasri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2015-01-15

    Arterial blood O2 levels are detected by specialized sensory organs called carotid bodies. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) are important for carotid body O2 sensing. Given that T-type VGCCs contribute to nociceptive sensation, we hypothesized that they participate in carotid body O2 sensing. The rat carotid body expresses high levels of mRNA encoding the α1H-subunit, and α1H protein is localized to glomus cells, the primary O2-sensing cells in the chemoreceptor tissue, suggesting that CaV3.2 is the major T-type VGCC isoform expressed in the carotid body. Mibefradil and TTA-A2, selective blockers of the T-type VGCC, markedly attenuated elevation of hypoxia-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, secretion of catecholamines from glomus cells, and sensory excitation of the rat carotid body. Similar results were obtained in the carotid body and glomus cells from CaV3.2 knockout (Cacna1h(-/-)) mice. Since cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE)-derived H2S is a critical mediator of the carotid body response to hypoxia, the role of T-type VGCCs in H2S-mediated O2 sensing was examined. Like hypoxia, NaHS, a H2S donor, increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and augmented carotid body sensory nerve activity in wild-type mice, and these effects were markedly attenuated in Cacna1h(-/-) mice. In wild-type mice, TTA-A2 markedly attenuated glomus cell and carotid body sensory nerve responses to hypoxia, and these effects were absent in CSE knockout mice. These results demonstrate that CaV3.2 T-type VGCCs contribute to the H2S-mediated carotid body response to hypoxia.

  13. CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels in H2S-mediated hypoxic response of the carotid body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Vladislav V.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Yuan, Guoxiang; Fox, Aaron P.; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood O2 levels are detected by specialized sensory organs called carotid bodies. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are important for carotid body O2 sensing. Given that T-type VGCCs contribute to nociceptive sensation, we hypothesized that they participate in carotid body O2 sensing. The rat carotid body expresses high levels of mRNA encoding the α1H-subunit, and α1H protein is localized to glomus cells, the primary O2-sensing cells in the chemoreceptor tissue, suggesting that CaV3.2 is the major T-type VGCC isoform expressed in the carotid body. Mibefradil and TTA-A2, selective blockers of the T-type VGCC, markedly attenuated elevation of hypoxia-evoked intracellular Ca2+ concentration, secretion of catecholamines from glomus cells, and sensory excitation of the rat carotid body. Similar results were obtained in the carotid body and glomus cells from CaV3.2 knockout (Cacna1h−/−) mice. Since cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE)-derived H2S is a critical mediator of the carotid body response to hypoxia, the role of T-type VGCCs in H2S-mediated O2 sensing was examined. Like hypoxia, NaHS, a H2S donor, increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration and augmented carotid body sensory nerve activity in wild-type mice, and these effects were markedly attenuated in Cacna1h−/− mice. In wild-type mice, TTA-A2 markedly attenuated glomus cell and carotid body sensory nerve responses to hypoxia, and these effects were absent in CSE knockout mice. These results demonstrate that CaV3.2 T-type VGCCs contribute to the H2S-mediated carotid body response to hypoxia. PMID:25377087

  14. The Role of GluK4 in Synaptic Plasticity and Affective Behavior in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catches, Justin Samuel

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels that signal through both ionotropic and metabotropic pathways (Contractor et al., 2011). Combinations of five KAR subunits (GluK1-5) form tetrameric receptors with GluK1, GluK2, and GluK3 able to form functional homomeric channels. The high-affinity subunits, GluK4 and GluK5, do not form homomeric channels but modify the properties of heteromeric receptors. Expression of the GluK4 receptor subunit in the forebrain is restricted to the CA3 region of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus regions where KARs modulate synaptic plasticity. In this study, ablation of Grik4, which encodes GluK4, in mice reduced KAR synaptic currents and altered activation properties of postsynaptic receptors but left two forms of presynaptic short-term plasticity intact. Disruption of both Grik4 and Grik5 caused complete loss of the postsynaptic ionotropic KAR current and impaired presynaptic frequency facilitation. Additionally, KAR surface expression was altered at pre- and postsynaptic sites at the MF synapse. Despite the loss of ionotropic signaling, KAR-mediated inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization current, which is dependent on metabotropic signaling, was intact in CA3 neurons. Long-term potentiation at the MF-CA3 synapse was reduced, likely through a loss of KAR modulation of excitability of the presynaptic MF axons. Genetic variants in the human GRIK4 gene alter the susceptibility for affective disorders (Bloss and Hunter, 2010). We found that ablation of Grik4 in mice resulted in reduced anxiety and an antidepressant-like phenotype. In the elevated zero-maze, a test for anxiety and risk taking behavior, and in two anxiogenic tests, marble-burying and novelty-induced suppression of feeding, anxiety-like behavior was consistently reduced in knockout animals. In the forced swim, a test of learned helplessness used to determine depression-like behavior, knockout mice demonstrated significantly less immobility suggesting

  15. Multiscale modeling and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Upinder S

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is a major convergence point for theory and computation, and the process of plasticity engages physiology, cell, and molecular biology. In its many manifestations, plasticity is at the hub of basic neuroscience questions about memory and development, as well as more medically themed questions of neural damage and recovery. As an important cellular locus of memory, synaptic plasticity has received a huge amount of experimental and theoretical attention. If computational models have tended to pick specific aspects of plasticity, such as STDP, and reduce them to an equation, some experimental studies are equally guilty of oversimplification each time they identify a new molecule and declare it to be the last word in plasticity and learning. Multiscale modeling begins with the acknowledgment that synaptic function spans many levels of signaling, and these are so tightly coupled that we risk losing essential features of plasticity if we focus exclusively on any one level. Despite the technical challenges and gaps in data for model specification, an increasing number of multiscale modeling studies have taken on key questions in plasticity. These have provided new insights, but importantly, they have opened new avenues for questioning. This review discusses a wide range of multiscale models in plasticity, including their technical landscape and their implications.

  16. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances L Meredith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  17. Mechanisms of NMDA Receptor- and Voltage-Gated L-Type Calcium Channel-Dependent Hippocampal LTP Critically Rely on Proteolysis That Is Mediated by Distinct Metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Nowak, Daria; van Hove, Inge; Dziegiel, Piotr; Moons, Lieve; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2017-02-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is widely perceived as a memory substrate and in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway, distinct forms of LTP depend on NMDA receptors (nmdaLTP) or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (vdccLTP). LTP is also known to be effectively regulated by extracellular proteolysis that is mediated by various enzymes. Herein, we investigated whether in mice hippocampal slices these distinct forms of LTP are specifically regulated by different metalloproteinases (MMPs). We found that MMP-3 inhibition or knock-out impaired late-phase LTP in the CA3-CA1 pathway. Interestingly, late-phase LTP was also decreased by MMP-9 blockade. When both MMP-3 and MMP-9 were inhibited, both early- and late-phase LTP was impaired. Using immunoblotting, in situ zymography, and immunofluorescence, we found that LTP induction was associated with an increase in MMP-3 expression and activity in CA1 stratum radiatum. MMP-3 inhibition and knock-out prevented the induction of vdccLTP, with no effect on nmdaLTP. L-type channel-dependent LTP is known to be impaired by hyaluronic acid digestion. We found that slice treatment with hyaluronidase occluded the effect of MMP-3 blockade on LTP, further confirming a critical role for MMP-3 in this form of LTP. In contrast to the CA3-CA1 pathway, LTP in the mossy fiber-CA3 projection did not depend on MMP-3, indicating the pathway specificity of the actions of MMPs. Overall, our study indicates that the activation of perisynaptic MMP-3 supports L-type channel-dependent LTP in the CA1 region, whereas nmdaLTP depends solely on MMP-9. Various types of long-term potentiation (LTP) are correlated with distinct phases of memory formation and retrieval, but the underlying molecular signaling pathways remain poorly understood. Extracellular proteases have emerged as key players in neuroplasticity phenomena. The present study found that L-type calcium channel-dependent LTP in the CA3-CA1 hippocampal projection is critically regulated by the activity

  18. S-nitrosylation-dependent proteasomal degradation restrains Cdk5 activity to regulate hippocampal synaptic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Fu, Wing-Yu; Fu, Amy K Y; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-27

    Precise regulation of synaptic strength requires coordinated activity and functions of synaptic proteins, which is controlled by a variety of post-translational modification. Here we report that S-nitrosylation of p35, the activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), by nitric oxide (NO) is important for the regulation of excitatory synaptic strength. While blockade of NO signalling results in structural and functional synaptic deficits as indicated by reduced mature dendritic spine density and surface expression of glutamate receptor subunits, phosphorylation of numerous synaptic substrates of Cdk5 and its activity are aberrantly upregulated following reduced NO production. The results show that the NO-induced reduction in Cdk5 activity is mediated by S-nitrosylation of p35, resulting in its ubiquitination and degradation by the E3 ligase PJA2. Silencing p35 protein in hippocampal neurons partially rescues the NO blockade-induced synaptic deficits. These findings collectively demonstrate that p35 S-nitrosylation by NO signalling is critical for regulating hippocampal synaptic strength.

  19. Divide and conquer: functional segregation of synaptic inputs by astrocytic microdomains could alleviate paroxysmal activity following brain trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Volman

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury often leads to epileptic seizures. Among other factors, homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP mediates posttraumatic epileptogenesis through unbalanced synaptic scaling, partially compensating for the trauma-incurred loss of neural excitability. HSP is mediated in part by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, which is released locally from reactive astrocytes early after trauma in response to chronic neuronal inactivity. During this early period, TNFα is likely to be constrained to its glial sources; however, the contribution of glia-mediated spatially localized HSP to post-traumatic epileptogenesis remains poorly understood. We used computational model to investigate the reorganization of collective neural activity early after trauma. Trauma and synaptic scaling transformed asynchronous spiking into paroxysmal discharges. The rate of paroxysms could be reduced by functional segregation of synaptic input into astrocytic microdomains. Thus, we propose that trauma-triggered reactive gliosis could exert both beneficial and deleterious effects on neural activity.

  20. Activation of a TRP-like channel and intracellular Ca2+ dynamics during phospholipase-C-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A Pedro; Cordeiro, J Miguel; Monteiro, João; Muñoz, Alberto; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Read, Nick D; Videira, Arnaldo

    2014-09-01

    The model organism Neurospora crassa undergoes programmed cell death when exposed to staurosporine. Here, we show that staurosporine causes defined changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c) dynamics and a distinct Ca(2+) signature that involves Ca(2+) influx from the external medium and internal Ca(2+) stores. We investigated the molecular basis of this Ca(2+) response by using [Ca(2+)]c measurements combined with pharmacological and genetic approaches. Phospholipase C was identified as a pivotal player during cell death, because modulation of the phospholipase C signaling pathway and deletion of PLC-2, which we show to be involved in hyphal development, results in an inability to trigger the characteristic staurosporine-induced Ca(2+) signature. Using Δcch-1, Δfig-1 and Δyvc-1 mutants and a range of inhibitors, we show that extracellular Ca(2+) entry does not occur through the hitherto described high- and low-affinity Ca(2+) uptake systems, but through the opening of plasma membrane channels with properties resembling the transient receptor potential (TRP) family. Partial blockage of the response to staurosporine after inhibition of a putative inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor suggests that Ca(2+) release from internal stores following IP3 formation combines with the extracellular Ca(2+) influx.

  1. Inhibiting BACE1 to reverse synaptic dysfunctions in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Riqiang; Fan, Qingyuan; Zhou, John; Vassar, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Over the past two decades, many studies have identified significant contributions of toxic β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative disease. AD is also recognized as a disease of synaptic failure. Aβ, generated by sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by BACE1 and γ-secretase, is one of major culprits that cause this failure. In this review, we summarize current findings on how BACE1-cleaved APP products impact learning and memory through proteins localized on glutamatergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic synapses. Considering the broad effects of Aβ on all three types of synapses, BACE1 inhibition emerges as a practical approach for ameliorating Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunctions. Since BACE1 inhibitory drugs are currently in clinical trials, this review also discusses potential complications arising from BACE1 inhibition. We emphasize that the benefits of BACE1 inhibitory drugs will outweigh the concerns.

  2. Carbenoxolone inhibits Pannexin1 channels through interactions in the first extracellular loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Kevin; Kawate, Toshimitsu

    2016-02-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) is an ATP release channel important for controlling immune responses and synaptic strength. Various stimuli including C-terminal cleavage, a high concentration of extracellular potassium, and voltage have been demonstrated to activate Panx1. However, it remains unclear how Panx1 senses and integrates such diverse stimuli to form an open channel. To provide a clue on the mechanism underlying Panx1 channel gating, we investigated the action mechanism of carbenoxolone (CBX), the most commonly used small molecule for attenuating Panx1 function triggered by a wide range of stimuli. Using a chimeric approach, we discovered that CBX reverses its action polarity and potentiates the voltage-gated channel activity of Panx1 when W74 in the first extracellular loop is mutated to a nonaromatic residue. A systematic mutagenesis study revealed that conserved residues in this loop also play important roles in CBX function, potentially by mediating CBX binding. We extended our experiments to other Panx1 inhibitors such as probenecid and ATP, which also potentiate the voltage-gated channel activity of a Panx1 mutant at position 74. Notably, probenecid alone can activate this mutant at a resting membrane potential. These data suggest that CBX and other inhibitors, including probenecid, attenuate Panx1 channel activity through modulation of the first extracellular loop. Our experiments are the first step toward identifying a previously unknown mode of CBX action, which provide insight into the role of the first extracellular loop in Panx1 channel gating.

  3. cAMP Signals in Drosophila Motor Neurons Are Confined to Single Synaptic Boutons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Maiellaro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. Although there is evidence for local control of synaptic transmission and plasticity, it is less clear whether a similar spatial confinement of cAMP signaling exists. Here, we suggest a possible biophysical basis for the site-specific regulation of synaptic plasticity by cAMP, a highly diffusible small molecule that transforms the physiology of synapses in a local and specific manner. By exploiting the octopaminergic system of Drosophila, which mediates structural synaptic plasticity via a cAMP-dependent pathway, we demonstrate the existence of local cAMP signaling compartments of micrometer dimensions within single motor neurons. In addition, we provide evidence that heterogeneous octopamine receptor localization, coupled with local differences in phosphodiesterase activity, underlies the observed differences in cAMP signaling in the axon, cell body, and boutons.

  4. Mathematical analysis of depolarization block mediated by slow inactivation of fast sodium channels in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Yu, Na; Tucker, Kristal R; Levitan, Edwin S; Canavier, Carmen C

    2014-12-01

    Dopamine neurons in freely moving rats often fire behaviorally relevant high-frequency bursts, but depolarization block limits the maximum steady firing rate of dopamine neurons in vitro to ∼10 Hz. Using a reduced model that faithfully reproduces the sodium current measured in these neurons, we show that adding an additional slow component of sodium channel inactivation, recently observed in these neurons, qualitatively changes in two different ways how the model enters into depolarization block. First, the slow time course of inactivation allows multiple spikes to be elicited during a strong depolarization prior to entry into depolarization block. Second, depolarization block occurs near or below the spike threshold, which ranges from -45 to -30 mV in vitro, because the additional slow component of inactivation negates the sodium window current. In the absence of the additional slow component of inactivation, this window current produces an N-shaped steady-state current-voltage (I-V) curve that prevents depolarization block in the experimentally observed voltage range near -40 mV. The time constant of recovery from slow inactivation during the interspike interval limits the maximum steady firing rate observed prior to entry into depolarization block. These qualitative features of the entry into depolarization block can be reversed experimentally by replacing the native sodium conductance with a virtual conductance lacking the slow component of inactivation. We show that the activation of NMDA and AMPA receptors can affect bursting and depolarization block in different ways, depending upon their relative contributions to depolarization versus to the total linear/nonlinear conductance.

  5. Neuronal trafficking of voltage-gated potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla S; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    The computational ability of CNS neurons depends critically on the specific localization of ion channels in the somatodendritic and axonal membranes. Neuronal dendrites receive synaptic inputs at numerous spines and integrate them in time and space. The integration of synaptic potentials....... The physiological significance of proper Kv channel localization is emphasized by the fact that defects in the trafficking of Kv channels are observed in several neurological disorders including epilepsy. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms of Kv channel trafficking...... is regulated by voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, such as Kv4.2, which are specifically localized in the dendritic membrane. The synaptic potentials eventually depolarize the membrane of the axon initial segment, thereby activating voltage-gated sodium channels to generate action potentials. Specific Kv...

  6. New tools for targeted disruption of cholinergic synaptic transmission in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Mejia

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. The α7 subtype of nAChRs is involved in neurological pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, addiction, epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders. The Drosophila melanogaster α7 (Dα7 has the closest sequence homology to the vertebrate α7 subunit and it can form homopentameric receptors just as the vertebrate counterpart. The Dα7 subunits are essential for the function of the Giant Fiber circuit, which mediates the escape response of the fly. To further characterize the receptor function, we generated different missense mutations in the Dα7 nAChR's ligand binding domain. We characterized the effects of targeted expression of two UAS-constructs carrying a single mutation, D197A and Y195T, as well as a UAS-construct carrying a triple D77T, L117Q, I196P mutation in a Dα7 null mutant and in a wild type background. Expression of the triple mutation was able to restore the function of the circuit in Dα7 null mutants and had no disruptive effects when expressed in wild type. In contrast, both single mutations severely disrupted the synaptic transmission of Dα7-dependent but not glutamatergic or gap junction dependent synapses in wild type background, and did not or only partially rescued the synaptic defects of the null mutant. These observations are consistent with the formation of hybrid receptors, consisting of D197A or Y195T subunits and wild type Dα7 subunits, in which the binding of acetylcholine or acetylcholine-induced conformational changes of the Dα7 receptor are altered and causes inhibition of cholinergic responses. Thus targeted expression of D197A or Y195T can be used to selectively disrupt synaptic transmission of Dα7-dependent synapses in neuronal circuits. Hence, these constructs can be used as tools to study learning and memory or addiction associated behaviors by allowing the manipulation of neuronal processing in the

  7. Detection of shrimp Taura syndrome virus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification using a designed portable multi-channel turbidimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappat, Assawapong; Jaroenram, Wansadaj; Puthawibool, Teeranart; Lomas, Tanom; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a portable turbidimetric end-point detection method was devised and tested for the detection of Taura syndrome virus (TSV) using spectroscopic measurement of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) by-product: magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg(2)P(2)O(7)). The device incorporated a heating block that maintained an optimal temperature of 63°C for the duration of the RT-LAMP reaction. Turbidity of the RT-LAMP by-product was measured when light from a light-emitting diode (LED) passed through the tube to reach a light dependent resistance (LDR) detector. Results revealed that turbidity measurement of the RT-LAMP reactions using this device provided the same detection sensitivity as the agarose gel electrophoresis detection of RT-LAMP and nested RT-PCR (IQ2000™) products. Cross reactions with other shrimp viruses were not found, indicating that the RT-LAMP-turbidity measurement was highly specific to TSV. The combination of 10 min for rapid RNA preparation with 30 min for RT-LAMP amplification followed by turbidity measurement resulted in a total assay time of less than 1h compared to 4-8h for the nested RT-PCR method. RT-LAMP plus turbidity measurement constitutes a platform for the development of more rapid and user-friendly detection of TSV in the field.

  8. Comparative impact of voltage-gated calcium channels and NMDA receptors on mitochondria-mediated neuronal injury.

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    Stanika, Ruslan I; Villanueva, Idalis; Kazanina, Galina; Andrews, S Brian; Pivovarova, Natalia B

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, a major component of many neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by excessive calcium influx selectively through NMDARs. However, there is a substantial uncertainty concerning why other known routes of significant calcium entry, in particular, VGCCs, are not similarly toxic. Here, we report that in the majority of neurons in rat hippocampal and cortical cultures, maximal L-type VGCC activation induces much lower calcium loading than toxic NMDAR activation. Consequently, few depolarization-activated neurons exhibit calcium deregulation and cell death. Activation of alternative routes of calcium entry induced neuronal death in proportion to the degree of calcium loading. In a small subset of neurons, depolarization evoked stronger calcium elevations, approaching those induced by toxic NMDA. These neurons were characterized by elevated expression of VGCCs and enhanced voltage-gated calcium currents, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Preventing VGCC-dependent mitochondrial calcium loading resulted in stronger cytoplasmic calcium elevations, whereas inhibiting mitochondrial calcium clearance accelerated mitochondrial depolarization. Both observations further implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in VGCC-mediated cell death. Results indicate that neuronal vulnerability tracks the extent of calcium loading but does not appear to depend explicitly on the route of calcium entry.

  9. A synaptic nidogen: Developmental regulation and role of nidogen-2 at the neuromuscular junction

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    Smyth Neil

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The skeletal neuromuscular junction is a useful model for elucidating mechanisms that regulate synaptogenesis. Developmentally important intercellular interactions at the neuromuscular junction are mediated by the synaptic portion of a basal lamina that completely ensheaths each muscle fiber. Basal laminas in general are composed of four main types of glycosylated proteins: laminins, collagens IV, heparan sulfate proteoglycans and nidogens (entactins. The portion of the muscle fiber basal lamina that passes between the motor nerve terminal and postsynaptic membrane has been shown to bear distinct isoforms of the first three of these. For laminins and collagens IV, the proteins are deposited by the muscle; a synaptic proteoglycan, z-agrin, is deposited by the nerve. In each case, the synaptic isoform plays key roles in organizing the neuromuscular junction. Here, we analyze the fourth family, composed of nidogen-1 and -2. Results In adult muscle, nidogen-1 is present throughout muscle fiber basal lamina, while nidogen-2 is concentrated at synapses. Nidogen-2 is initially present throughout muscle basal lamina, but is lost from extrasynaptic regions during the first three postnatal weeks. Neuromuscular junctions in mutant mice lacking nidogen-2 appear normal at birth, but become topologically abnormal as they mature. Synaptic laminins, collagens IV and heparan sulfate proteoglycans persist in the absence of nidogen-2, suggesting the phenotype is not secondary to a general defect in the integrity of synaptic basal lamina. Further genetic studies suggest that synaptic localization of each of the four families of synaptic basal lamina components is independent of the other three. Conclusion All four core components of the basal lamina have synaptically enriched isoforms. Together, they form a highly specialized synaptic cleft material. Individually, they play distinct roles in the formation, maturation and maintenance of the

  10. Cooperative gating between ion channels.

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    Choi, Kee-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative gating between ion channels, i.e. the gating of one channel directly coupled to the gating of neighboring channels, has been observed in diverse channel types at the single-channel level. Positively coupled gating could enhance channel-mediated signaling while negative coupling may effectively reduce channel gating noise. Indeed, the physiological significance of cooperative channel gating in signal transduction has been recognized in several in vivo studies. Moreover, coupled gating of ion channels was reported to be associated with some human disease states. In this review, physiological roles for channel cooperativity and channel clustering observed in vitro and in vivo are introduced, and stimulation-induced channel clustering and direct channel cross linking are suggested as the physical mechanisms of channel assembly. Along with physical clustering, several molecular mechanisms proposed as the molecular basis for functional coupling of neighboring channels are covered: permeant ions as a channel coupling mediator, concerted channel activation through the membrane, and allosteric mechanisms. Also, single-channel analysis methods for cooperative gating such as the binomial analysis, the variance analysis, the conditional dwell time density analysis, and the maximum likelihood fitting analysis are reviewed and discussed.

  11. Pannexin1 stabilizes synaptic plasticity and is needed for learning.

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    Nora Prochnow

    Full Text Available Pannexin 1 (Panx1 represents a class of vertebrate membrane channels, bearing significant sequence homology with the invertebrate gap junction proteins, the innexins and more distant similarities in the membrane topologies and pharmacological sensitivities with gap junction proteins of the connexin family. In the nervous system, cooperation among pannexin channels, adenosine receptors, and K(ATP channels modulating neuronal excitability via ATP and adenosine has been recognized, but little is known about the significance in vivo. However, the localization of Panx1 at postsynaptic sites in hippocampal neurons and astrocytes in close proximity together with the fundamental role of ATP and adenosine for CNS metabolism and cell signaling underscore the potential relevance of this channel to synaptic plasticity and higher brain functions. Here, we report increased excitability and potently enhanced early and persistent LTP responses in the CA1 region of acute slice preparations from adult Panx1(-/- mice. Adenosine application and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR-blocking normalized this phenotype, suggesting that absence of Panx1 causes chronic extracellular ATP/adenosine depletion, thus facilitating postsynaptic NMDAR activation. Compensatory transcriptional up-regulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (grm4 accompanies these adaptive changes. The physiological modification, promoted by loss of Panx1, led to distinct behavioral alterations, enhancing anxiety and impairing object recognition and spatial learning in Panx1(-/- mice. We conclude that ATP release through Panx1 channels plays a critical role in maintaining synaptic strength and plasticity in CA1 neurons of the adult hippocampus. This result provides the rationale for in-depth analysis of Panx1 function and adenosine based therapies in CNS disorders.

  12. Reflections on the specificity of synaptic connections.

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    White, Edward L

    2007-10-01

    The principal focus of this treatise is the specificity of synaptic connectivity in the mammalian central nervous system. The occurrence of stereotypical patterns of connection at the macro level (e.g., the general consistency with which axonal pathways impinge on and originate within specific cortical areas and layers) implies that the cerebral cortex is a highly ordered structure. Order is seen also at the more micro level of synaptic connectivity, for instance, in the contrasting synaptic patterns of spiny vs. non-spiny neurons. Quantitative electron microscopic studies of synapses between identified neurons and correlative anatomical/electrophysiological investigations indicate that the high degree of order characterizing many aspects of cortical organization is mirrored by an equally ordered arrangement of synaptic connections between specific types of neurons. The recognition of recurring synaptic patterns has generated increased support for the notion of synaptic specificity as opposed to randomness, and we have begun now to understand the role of specificity in cortical function. At the core of cortical processing lie myriad possibilities for computation provided by the wealth of synaptic connections involving each neuron. Specificity, by limiting possibilities for connection, imposes an order on synaptic interactions even as processes of dynamic selection or synaptic remodeling ensure the constant formation and dissolution of cortical circuits. Collectively, these operations make maximal use of the richness of cortical synaptic connections to produce a highly flexible system, irrespective of the degree of hard-wiring, mutability, randomness or specificity that obtains for cortical wiring at any particular time. A brief, historical account of developments leading to our current understanding of cortical synaptic organization will precede the presentation of evidence for synaptic specificity.

  13. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification.

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    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons.

  14. Microparticle-mediated transfer of the viral receptors CAR and CD46, and the CFTR channel in a CHO cell model confers new functions to target cells.

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    Gaëlle Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Cell microparticles (MPs released in the extracellular milieu can embark plasma membrane and intracellular components which are specific of their cellular origin, and transfer them to target cells. The MP-mediated, cell-to-cell transfer of three human membrane glycoproteins of different degrees of complexity was investigated in the present study, using a CHO cell model system. We first tested the delivery of CAR and CD46, two monospanins which act as adenovirus receptors, to target CHO cells. CHO cells lack CAR and CD46, high affinity receptors for human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5, and serotype 35 (HAdV35, respectively. We found that MPs derived from CHO cells (MP-donor cells constitutively expressing CAR (MP-CAR or CD46 (MP-CD46 were able to transfer CAR and CD46 to target CHO cells, and conferred selective permissiveness to HAdV5 and HAdV35. In addition, target CHO cells incubated with MP-CD46 acquired the CD46-associated function in complement regulation. We also explored the MP-mediated delivery of a dodecaspanin membrane glycoprotein, the CFTR to target CHO cells. CFTR functions as a chloride channel in human cells and is implicated in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Target CHO cells incubated with MPs produced by CHO cells constitutively expressing GFP-tagged CFTR (MP-GFP-CFTR were found to gain a new cellular function, the chloride channel activity associated to CFTR. Time-course analysis of the appearance of GFP-CFTR in target cells suggested that MPs could achieve the delivery of CFTR to target cells via two mechanisms: the transfer of mature, membrane-inserted CFTR glycoprotein, and the transfer of CFTR-encoding mRNA. These results confirmed that cell-derived MPs represent a new class of promising therapeutic vehicles for the delivery of bioactive macromolecules, proteins or mRNAs, the latter exerting the desired therapeutic effect in target cells via de novo synthesis of their encoded proteins.

  15. Influence of testosterone on synaptic transmission in the rat medial vestibular nuclei: estrogenic and androgenic effects.

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    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Di Mauro, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2010-12-15

    In brainstem slices of young male rat, we investigated the influence of the neuroactive steroid testosterone (T) on the synaptic responses by analyzing the field potential evoked in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. T induced three distinct and independent long-term synaptic changes: fast long-lasting potentiation (fLP), slow long-lasting potentiation (sLP) and long-lasting depression (LD). The fLP was mediated by 17β-estradiol (E(2)) since it was abolished by blocking the estrogen receptors (ERs) or the enzyme converting T to E(2). Conversely, sLP and LD were mediated by 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) since they were prevented by blocking the androgen receptors (ARs) or the enzyme converting T to DHT. Therefore, the synaptic effects of T were mediated by its androgenic or estrogenic metabolites. The pathways leading to estrogenic and androgenic conversion of T might be co-localized since, the occurrence of fLP under block of androgenic pathway, and that of sLP and LD under estrogenic block, were higher than those observed without blocks. In case of co-localization, the effect on synaptic transmission should depend on the prevailing enzymatic activity. We conclude that circulating and neuronal T can remarkably influence synaptic responses of the vestibular neurons in different and opposite ways, depending on its conversion to estrogenic or androgenic metabolites.

  16. Dynamic control of presynaptic Ca(2+) inflow by fast-inactivating K(+) channels in hippocampal mossy fiber boutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, J R; Jonas, P

    2000-12-01

    Analysis of presynaptic determinants of synaptic strength has been difficult at cortical synapses, mainly due to the lack of direct access to presynaptic elements. Here we report patch-clamp recordings from mossy fiber boutons (MFBs) in rat hippocampal slices. The presynaptic action potential is very short during low-frequency stimulation but is prolonged up to 3-fold during high-frequency stimulation. Voltage-gated K(+) channels in MFBs inactivate rapidly but recover from inactivation very slowly, suggesting that cumulative K(+) channel inactivation mediates activity-dependent spike broadening. Prolongation of the presynaptic voltage waveform leads to an increase in the number of Ca(2+) ions entering the terminal per action potential and to a consecutive potentiation of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents at MFB-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Thus, inactivation of presynaptic K(+) channels contributes to the control of efficacy of a glutamatergic synapse in the cortex.

  17. Near-Perfect Synaptic Integration by Nav1.7 in Hypothalamic Neurons Regulates Body Weight.

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    Branco, Tiago; Tozer, Adam; Magnus, Christopher J; Sugino, Ken; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Lee, Albert K; Wood, John N; Sternson, Scott M

    2016-06-16

    Neurons are well suited for computations on millisecond timescales, but some neuronal circuits set behavioral states over long time periods, such as those involved in energy homeostasis. We found that multiple types of hypothalamic neurons, including those that oppositely regulate body weight, are specialized as near-perfect synaptic integrators that summate inputs over extended timescales. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are greatly prolonged, outlasting the neuronal membrane time-constant up to 10-fold. This is due to the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 (Scn9a), previously associated with pain-sensation but not synaptic integration. Scn9a deletion in AGRP, POMC, or paraventricular hypothalamic neurons reduced EPSP duration, synaptic integration, and altered body weight in mice. In vivo whole-cell recordings in the hypothalamus confirmed near-perfect synaptic integration. These experiments show that integration of synaptic inputs over time by Nav1.7 is critical for body weight regulation and reveal a mechanism for synaptic control of circuits regulating long term homeostatic functions.

  18. SK channel modulation rescues striatal plasticity and control over habit in cannabinoid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzaro, Cristiano; Greco, Barbara; Cerovic, Milica; Baxter, Paul; Rubino, Tiziana; Trusel, Massimo; Parolaro, Daniela; Tkatch, Tatiana; Benfenati, Fabio; Pedarzani, Paola; Tonini, Raffaella

    2012-01-08

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) regulate neuronal activity in the dorso-lateral striatum (DLS), a brain region that is involved in habitual behaviors. How synaptic eCB signaling contributes to habitual behaviors under physiological and pathological conditions remains unclear. Using a mouse model of cannabinoid tolerance, we found that persistent activation of the eCB pathway impaired eCB-mediated long-term depression (LTD) and synaptic depotentiation in the DLS. The loss of eCB LTD, occurring preferentially at cortical connections to striatopallidal neurons, was associated with a shift in behavioral control from goal-directed action to habitual responding. eCB LTD and behavioral alterations were rescued by in vivo modulation of small-conductance calcium activated potassium channel (SK channel) activity in the DLS, which potentiates eCB signaling. Our results reveal a direct relationship between drug tolerance and changes in control of instrumental performance by establishing a central role for eCB LTD in habit expression. In addition, SK channels emerge as molecular targets to fine tune the eCB pathway under pathological conditions.

  19. Presynaptic active zone density during development and synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle L Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS, active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  20. Spiking neural P systems with multiple channels.

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    Peng, Hong; Yang, Jinyu; Wang, Jun; Wang, Tao; Sun, Zhang; Song, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Xiaohui; Huang, Xiangnian

    2017-11-01

    Spiking neural P systems (SNP systems, in short) are a class of distributed parallel computing systems inspired from the neurophysiological behavior of biological spiking neurons. In this paper, we investigate a new variant of SNP systems in which each neuron has one or more synaptic channels, called spiking neural P systems with multiple channels (SNP-MC systems, in short). The spiking rules with channel label are introduced to handle the firing mechanism of neurons, where the channel labels indicate synaptic channels of transmitting the generated spikes. The computation power of SNP-MC systems is investigated. Specifically, we prove that SNP-MC systems are Turing universal as both number generating and number accepting devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a is required for mGlu receptor dependent long-term depression in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, D; Braksator, E; Battaglia, G; Marcelli, S; Mercuri, N B; Feligioni, M; Nicoletti, F; Bashir, Z I; Nisticò, R

    2017-01-27

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), members of the degenerin/epithelial Na(+) channel superfamily, are widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system. ASIC1a is highly permeable to Ca(2+) and are thought to be important in a variety of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. To further understand the role of ASIC1a in synaptic transmission and plasticity, we investigated metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus. We found that ASIC1a channels mediate a component of LTD in P30-40 animals, since the ASIC1a selective blocker psalmotoxin-1 (PcTx1) reduced the magnitude of LTD induced by application of the group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or induced by paired-pulse low frequency stimulation (PP-LFS). Conversely, PcTx1 did not affect LTD in P13-18 animals. We also provide evidence that ASIC1a is involved in group I mGlu receptor-induced increase in action potential firing. However, blockade of ASIC1a did not affect DHPG-induced polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis, suggesting the involvement of some other molecular partners in the functional crosstalk between ASIC1a and group I mGlu receptors. Notably, PcTx1 was able to prevent the increase in GluA1 S845 phosphorylation at the post-synaptic membrane induced by group I mGlu receptor activation. These findings suggest a novel function of ASIC1a channels in the regulation of group I mGlu receptor synaptic plasticity and intrinsic excitability.

  2. Calcium Channels and Oxidative Stress Mediate a Synergistic Disruption of Tight Junctions by Ethanol and Acetaldehyde in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samak, Geetha; Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Rao, Roshan G; Shukla, Pradeep K; Manda, Bhargavi; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2016-12-13

    Ethanol is metabolized into acetaldehyde in most tissues. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on the tight junction integrity in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Expression of alcohol dehydrogenase sensitized Caco-2 cells to ethanol-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction, whereas aldehyde dehydrogenase attenuated acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption. Ethanol up to 150 mM did not affect tight junction integrity or barrier function, but it dose-dependently increased acetaldehyde-mediated tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Src kinase and MLCK inhibitors blocked this synergistic effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on tight junction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde caused a rapid and synergistic elevation of intracellular calcium. Calcium depletion by BAPTA or Ca(2+)-free medium blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. Diltiazem and selective knockdown of TRPV6 or CaV1.3 channels, by shRNA blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced tight junction disruption and barrier dysfunction. Ethanol and acetaldehyde induced a rapid and synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species by a calcium-dependent mechanism. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cyclosporine A, blocked ethanol and acetaldehyde-induced barrier dysfunction and tight junction disruption. These results demonstrate that ethanol and acetaldehyde synergistically disrupt tight junctions by a mechanism involving calcium, oxidative stress, Src kinase and MLCK.

  3. Short-term plasticity and modulation of synaptic transmission at mammalian inhibitory cholinergic olivocochlear synapses

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    Eleonora eKatz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The organ of Corti, the mammalian sensory epithelium of the inner ear, has two types of mechanoreceptor cells, inner hair cells (IHCs and outer hair cells (OHCs. In this sensory epithelium, vibrations produced by sound waves are transformed into electrical signals. When depolarized by incoming sounds, IHCs release glutamate and activate auditory nerve fibers innervating them and OHCs, by virtue of their electromotile property, increase the amplification and fine tuning of sound signals. The medial olivocochlear (MOC system, an efferent feedback system, inhibits OHC activity and thereby reduces the sensitivity and sharp tuning of cochlear afferent fibers. During neonatal development, IHCs fire Ca2+ action potentials which evoke glutamate release promoting activity in the immature auditory system in the absence of sensory stimuli. During this period, MOC fibers also innervate IHCs and are thought to modulate their firing rate. Both the MOC-OHC and the MOC-IHC synapses are cholinergic, fast and inhibitory and mediated by the alpha9alpha10 nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR coupled to the activation of calcium-activated potassium channels that hyperpolarize the hair cells.In this review we discuss the biophysical, functional and molecular data which demonstrate that at the synapses between MOC efferent fibers and cochlear hair cells, modulation of transmitter release as well as short-term synaptic plasticity mechanisms, operating both at the presynaptic terminal and at the postsynaptic hair-cell, determine the efficacy of these synapses and shape the hair cell response pattern.

  4. Raised Intracellular Calcium Contributes to Ischemia-Induced Depression of Evoked Synaptic Transmission.

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    Shirin Jalini

    Full Text Available Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD leads to depression of evoked synaptic transmission, for which the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i during transient OGD contributes to the depression of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs. Additionally, we hypothesized that increased buffering of intracellular calcium would shorten electrophysiological recovery after transient ischemia. Mouse hippocampal slices were exposed to 2 to 8 min of OGD. fEPSPs evoked by Schaffer collateral stimulation were recorded in the stratum radiatum, and whole cell current or voltage clamp recordings were performed in CA1 neurons. Transient ischemia led to increased presynaptic [Ca2+]i, (shown by calcium imaging, increased spontaneous miniature EPSP/Cs, and depressed evoked fEPSPs, partially mediated by adenosine. Buffering of intracellular Ca2+ during OGD by membrane-permeant chelators (BAPTA-AM or EGTA-AM partially prevented fEPSP depression and promoted faster electrophysiological recovery when the OGD challenge was stopped. The blocker of BK channels, charybdotoxin (ChTX, also prevented fEPSP depression, but did not accelerate post-ischemic recovery. These results suggest that OGD leads to elevated presynaptic [Ca2+]i, which reduces evoked transmitter release; this effect can be reversed by increased intracellular Ca2+ buffering which also speeds recovery.

  5. Molecular machines regulating the release probability of synaptic vesicles at the active zone.

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    Christoph eKoerber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ upon arrival of an action potential (AP at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabil-istic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr, is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffer-ing of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying mole-cules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ.

  6. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx arising from compartmentalized electrical signals in dendritic spines.

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    Brenda L Bloodgood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory synapses on mammalian principal neurons are typically formed onto dendritic spines, which consist of a bulbous head separated from the parent dendrite by a thin neck. Although activation of voltage-gated channels in the spine and stimulus-evoked constriction of the spine neck can influence synaptic signals, the contribution of electrical filtering by the spine neck to basal synaptic transmission is largely unknown. Here we use spine and dendrite calcium (Ca imaging combined with 2-photon laser photolysis of caged glutamate to assess the impact of electrical filtering imposed by the spine morphology on synaptic Ca transients. We find that in apical spines of CA1 hippocampal neurons, the spine neck creates a barrier to the propagation of current, which causes a voltage drop and results in spatially inhomogeneous activation of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs on a micron length scale. Furthermore, AMPA and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively that are colocalized on individual spine heads interact to produce two kinetically and mechanistically distinct phases of synaptically evoked Ca influx. Rapid depolarization of the spine triggers a brief and large Ca current whose amplitude is regulated in a graded manner by the number of open AMPARs and whose duration is terminated by the opening of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK channels. A slower phase of Ca influx is independent of AMPAR opening and is determined by the number of open NMDARs and the post-stimulus potential in the spine. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx only occurs when AMPARs and NMDARs are coactive within an individual spine. These results demonstrate that the morphology of dendritic spines endows associated synapses with specialized modes of signaling and permits the graded and independent control of multiple phases of synaptic Ca influx.

  7. Epigenetic Basis of Neuronal and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, Nina N; Sales, Amanda J; Joca, Samia R

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal network and plasticity change as a function of experience. Altered neural connectivity leads to distinct transcriptional programs of neuronal plasticity-related genes. The environmental challenges throughout life may promote long-lasting reprogramming of gene expression and the development of brain disorders. The modifications in neuronal epigenome mediate gene-environmental interactions and are required for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal differentiation, maturation and plasticity. Here, we highlight the latest advances in understanding the role of the main players of epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation and demethylation, histone modifications, chromatin-remodeling enzymes, transposons, and non-coding RNAs) in activity-dependent and long- term neural and synaptic plasticity. The review focuses on both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression levels, including the processes of promoter activation, alternative splicing, regulation of stability of gene transcripts by natural antisense RNAs, and alternative polyadenylation. Further, we discuss the epigenetic aspects of impaired neuronal plasticity and the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental (Rett syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, genomic imprinting disorders, schizophrenia, and others), stressrelated (mood disorders) and neurodegenerative Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disorders. The review also highlights the pharmacological compounds that modulate epigenetic programming of gene expression, the potential treatment strategies of discussed brain disorders, and the questions that should be addressed during the development of effective and safe approaches for the treatment of brain disorders.

  8. GAP-43 in synaptic plasticity: molecular perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holahan MR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Matthew R HolahanDepartment of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, CanadaAbstract: The growth-associated protein, GAP-43 (also known as F1, neuromodulin, B-50, participates in the developmental regulation of axonal growth and neural network formation via protein kinase C-mediated regulation of cytoskeletal elements. Transgenic overexpression of GAP-43 can result in the formation of new synapses, neurite outgrowth, and synaptogenesis after injury. In a number of adult mammalian species, GAP-43 has been implicated in the regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity, such as long-term potentiation, drug sensitization, and changes in memory processes. This review examines the molecular and biochemical attributes of GAP-43, its distribution in the central nervous system, subcellular localization, role in neurite outgrowth and development, and functions related to plasticity, such as those occurring during long-term potentiation, memory formation, and drug sensitization.Keywords: GAP-43, protein kinase C, axons, development, regeneration, long-term potentiation, memory

  9. Location-dependent excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites.

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    Bardia F Behabadi

    Full Text Available Neocortical pyramidal neurons (PNs receive thousands of excitatory synaptic contacts on their basal dendrites. Some act as classical driver inputs while others are thought to modulate PN responses based on sensory or behavioral context, but the biophysical mechanisms that mediate classical-contextual interactions in these dendrites remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. Distal excitation lowers the local spike threshold for more proximal inputs, while having little effect on peak responses at the soma. In contrast, proximal excitation lowers the threshold, but also substantially increases the gain of distally-driven responses. Our findings support the view that PN basal dendrites possess significant analog computing capabilities, and suggest that the diverse forms of nonlinear response modulation seen in the neocortex, including uni-modal, cross-modal, and attentional effects, could depend in part on pathway-specific biases in the spatial distribution of excitatory synaptic contacts onto PN basal dendritic arbors.

  10. Spontaneous Vesicle Recycling in the Synaptic Bouton

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    Sven eTruckenbrodt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The trigger for synaptic vesicle exocytosis is Ca2+, which enters the synaptic bouton following action potential stimulation. However, spontaneous release of neurotransmitter also occurs in the absence of stimulation in virtually all synaptic boutons. It has long been thought that this represents exocytosis driven by fluctuations in local Ca2+ levels. The vesicles responding to these fluctuations are thought to be the same ones that release upon stimulation, albeit potentially triggered by different Ca2+ sensors. This view has been challenged by several recent works, which have suggested that spontaneous release is driven by a separate pool of synaptic vesicles. Numerous articles appeared during the last few years in support of each of these hypotheses, and it has been challenging to bring them into accord. We speculate here on the origins of this controversy, and propose a solution that is related to developmental effects. Constitutive membrane traffic, needed for the biogenesis of vesicles and synapses, is responsible for high levels of spontaneous membrane fusion in young neurons, probably independent of Ca2+. The vesicles releasing spontaneously in such neurons are not related to other synaptic vesicle pools and may represent constitutively releasing vesicles (CRVs rather than bona fide synaptic vesicles. In mature neurons, constitutive traffic is much dampened, and the few remaining spontaneous release events probably represent bona fide spontaneously releasing synaptic vesicles (SRSVs responding to Ca2+ fluctuations, along with a handful of CRVs that participate in synaptic vesicle turnover.

  11. Spontaneous vesicle recycling in the synaptic bouton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckenbrodt, Sven; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2014-01-01

    The trigger for synaptic vesicle exocytosis is Ca(2+), which enters the synaptic bouton following action potential stimulation. However, spontaneous release of neurotransmitter also occurs in the absence of stimulation in virtually all synaptic boutons. It has long been thought that this represents exocytosis driven by fluctuations in local Ca(2+) levels. The vesicles responding to these fluctuations are thought to be the same ones that release upon stimulation, albeit potentially triggered by different Ca(2+) sensors. This view has been challenged by several recent works, which have suggested that spontaneous release is driven by a separate pool of synaptic vesicles. Numerous articles appeared during the last few years in support of each of these hypotheses, and it has been challenging to bring them into accord. We speculate here on the origins of this controversy, and propose a solution that is related to developmental effects. Constitutive membrane traffic, needed for the biogenesis of vesicles and synapses, is responsible for high levels of spontaneous membrane fusion in young neurons, probably independent of Ca(2+). The vesicles releasing spontaneously in such neurons are not related to other synaptic vesicle pools and may represent constitutively releasing vesicles (CRVs) rather than bona fide synaptic vesicles. In mature neurons, constitutive traffic is much dampened, and the few remaining spontaneous release events probably represent bona fide spontaneously releasing synaptic vesicles (SRSVs) responding to Ca(2+) fluctuations, along with a handful of CRVs that participate in synaptic vesicle turnover.

  12. Cdk5 is essential for synaptic vesicle endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Timothy C; Valova, Valentina A; Malladi, Chandra S

    2003-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) is triggered by calcineurin-mediated dephosphorylation of the dephosphin proteins. SVE is maintained by the subsequent rephosphorylation of the dephosphins by unidentified protein kinases. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylates dynamin...... I on Ser 774 and Ser 778 in vitro, which are identical to its endogenous phosphorylation sites in vivo. Cdk5 antagonists and expression of dominant-negative Cdk5 block phosphorylation of dynamin I, but not of amphiphysin or AP180, in nerve terminals and inhibit SVE. Thus Cdk5 has an essential role...

  13. Liprin-α2 promotes the presynaptic recruitment and turnover of RIM1/CASK to facilitate synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Samantha A; Schmitz, Sabine K; Kevenaar, Josta T; de Graaff, Esther; de Wit, Heidi; Demmers, Jeroen; Toonen, Ruud F; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2013-06-10

    The presynaptic active zone mediates synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and modulation of its molecular composition is important for many types of synaptic plasticity. Here, we identify synaptic scaffold protein liprin-α2 as a key organizer in this process. We show that liprin-α2 levels were regulated by synaptic activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, liprin-α2 organized presynaptic ultrastructure and controlled synaptic output by regulating synaptic vesicle pool size. The presence of liprin-α2 at presynaptic sites did not depend on other active zone scaffolding proteins but was critical for recruitment of several components of the release machinery, including RIM1 and CASK. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that depletion of liprin-α2 resulted in reduced turnover of RIM1 and CASK at presynaptic terminals, suggesting that liprin-α2 promotes dynamic scaffolding for molecular complexes that facilitate synaptic vesicle release. Therefore, liprin-α2 plays an important role in maintaining active zone dynamics to modulate synaptic efficacy in response to changes in network activity.

  14. Statistical theory of synaptic connectivity in the neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Gina

    Learning and long-term memory rely on plasticity of neural circuits. In adult cerebral cortex plasticity can be mediated by modulation of existing synapses and structural reorganization of circuits through growth and retraction of dendritic spines. In the first part of this thesis, we describe a theoretical framework for the analysis of spine remodeling plasticity. New synaptic contacts appear in the neuropil where gaps between axonal and dendritic branches can be bridged by dendritic spines. Such sites are termed potential synapses. We derive expressions for the densities of potential synapses in the neuropil. We calculate the ratio of actual to potential synapses, called the connectivity fraction, and use it to find the number of structurally different circuits attainable with spine remodeling. These parameters are calculated in four systems: mouse occipital cortex, rat hippocampal area CA1, monkey primary visual (V1), and human temporal cortex. The neurogeometric results indicate that a dendritic spine can choose among an average of 4-7 potential targets in rodents, while in primates it can choose from 10-20 potential targets. The potential of the neuropil to undergo circuit remodeling is found to be highest in rat CA1 (4.9-6.0 nats/mum 3) and lowest in monkey V1 (0.9-1.0 nats/mum3). We evaluate the lower bound of neuron selectivity in the choice of synaptic partners and find that post-synaptic excitatory neurons in rodents make synaptic contacts with more than 21-30% of pre-synaptic axons encountered with new spine growth. Primate neurons appear to be more selective, making synaptic connections with more than 7-15% of encountered axons. Another plasticity mechanism is included in the second part of this work: long-term potentiation and depression of excitatory synaptic connections. Because synaptic strength is correlated with the size of the synapse, the former can be inferred from the distribution of spine head volumes. To this end we analyze and compare 166

  15. MOLECULAR MACHINES DETERMINING THE FATE OF ENDOCYTOSED SYNAPTIC VESICLES IN NERVE TERMINALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eFassio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The cycle of a synaptic vesicle (SV within the nerve terminal is a step-by-step journey with the final goal of ensuring the proper synaptic strength under changing environmental conditions.The SV cycle is a precisely regulated membrane traffic event in cells and, because of this, a plethora of membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins are devoted to assist SVs in each step of the journey. The cycling fate of endocytosed SVs determines both the availability for subsequent rounds of release and the lifetime of SVs in the terminal and is therefore crucial for synaptic function and plasticity. Molecular players that determine the destiny of SVs in nerve terminals after a round of exo-endocytosis are largely unknown. Here we review the functional role in SV fate of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of SV proteins and of small GTPases acting on membrane trafficking at the synapse, as they are emerging as key molecules in determining the recycling route of SVs within the nerve terminal. In particular, we focus on (i the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 and calcineurin control of the recycling pool of SVs; (ii the role of small GTPases of the Rab and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf families in defining the route followed by SV in their nerve terminal cycle. These regulatory proteins together with their synaptic regulators and effectors, are molecular nanomachines mediating homeostatic responses in synaptic plasticity and potential targets of drugs modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission.

  16. Synaptic Variability Introduces State-Dependent Modulation of Excitatory Spinal Cord Synapses

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    David Parker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of neuronal and synaptic variability remains unclear. Cellular and synaptic plasticity and neuromodulation are also variable. This could reflect state-dependent effects caused by the variable initial cellular or synaptic properties or direct variability in plasticity-inducing mechanisms. This study has examined state-dependent influences on synaptic plasticity at connections between excitatory interneurons (EIN and motor neurons in the lamprey spinal cord. State-dependent effects were examined by correlating initial synaptic properties with the substance P-mediated plasticity of low frequency-evoked EPSPs and the reduction of the EPSP depression over spike trains (metaplasticity. The low frequency EPSP potentiation reflected an interaction between the potentiation of NMDA responses and the release probability. The release probability introduced a variable state-dependent subtractive influence on the postsynaptic NMDA-dependent potentiation. The metaplasticity was also state-dependent: it was greater at connections with smaller available vesicle pools and high initial release probabilities. This was supported by the significant reduction in the number of connections showing metaplasticity when the release probability was reduced by high Mg2+ Ringer. Initial synaptic properties thus introduce state-dependent influences that affect the potential for plasticity. Understanding these conditions will be as important as understanding the subsequent changes.

  17. Synaptic Variability Introduces State-Dependent Modulation of Excitatory Spinal Cord Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of neuronal and synaptic variability remains unclear. Cellular and synaptic plasticity and neuromodulation are also variable. This could reflect state-dependent effects caused by the variable initial cellular or synaptic properties or direct variability in plasticity-inducing mechanisms. This study has examined state-dependent influences on synaptic plasticity at connections between excitatory interneurons (EIN) and motor neurons in the lamprey spinal cord. State-dependent effects were examined by correlating initial synaptic properties with the substance P-mediated plasticity of low frequency-evoked EPSPs and the reduction of the EPSP depression over spike trains (metaplasticity). The low frequency EPSP potentiation reflected an interaction between the potentiation of NMDA responses and the release probability. The release probability introduced a variable state-dependent subtractive influence on the postsynaptic NMDA-dependent potentiation. The metaplasticity was also state-dependent: it was greater at connections with smaller available vesicle pools and high initial release probabilities. This was supported by the significant reduction in the number of connections showing metaplasticity when the release probability was reduced by high Mg(2+) Ringer. Initial synaptic properties thus introduce state-dependent influences that affect the potential for plasticity. Understanding these conditions will be as important as understanding the subsequent changes.

  18. Late onset deficits in synaptic plasticity in the valproic acid rat model of autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Giles Stratten Martin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid (VPA is a frequently used drug in the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorders and migraines; however it is also a potent teratogen. Prenatal exposure increases the risk of childhood malformations and can result in cognitive deficits. In rodents in utero exposure to VPA also causes neurodevelopmental abnormalities and is an important model of autism. In early postnatal life VPA exposed rat pups show changes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC physiology and synaptic connectivity. Specifically, principal neurons show decreased excitability but increased local connectivity, coupled with an increase in long-term potentiation (LTP due to an up-regulation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR expression. However recent evidence suggests compensatory homeostatic mechanisms lead to normalization of synaptic NMDA receptors during later postnatal development. Here we have extended study of mPFC synaptic physiology into adulthood to better understand the longitudinal consequences of early developmental abnormalities in VPA exposed rats. Surprisingly in contrast to early postnatal life and adolescence, we find that adult VPA exposed rats show reduced synaptic function. Both NMDAR mediated currents and LTP are lower in adult VPA rats, although spontaneous activity and endocannabinoid dependent long-term depression are normal. We conclude that rather than correcting, synaptic abnormalities persist into adulthood in VPA exposed rats, although a quite different synaptic phenotype is present. This switch from hyper to hypo function in mPFC may be linked to some of the neurodevelopmental defects found in prenatal VPA exposure and autism spectrum disorders in general.

  19. Pre- and postsynaptic twists in BDNF secretion and action in synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar; Brigadski, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence collected since the early 1990's strongly supports the notion that BDNF is among the key regulators of synaptic plasticity in many areas of the mammalian central nervous system. Still, due to the extremely low expression levels of endogenous BDNF in most brain areas, surprisingly little data i) pinpointing pre- and postsynaptic release sites, ii) unraveling the time course of release, and iii) elucidating the physiological levels of synaptic activity driving this secretion are available. Likewise, our knowledge regarding pre- and postsynaptic effects of endogenous BDNF at the single cell level in mediating long-term potentiation still is sparse. Thus, our review will discuss the data currently available regarding synaptic BDNF secretion in response to physiologically relevant levels of activity, and will discuss how endogenously secreted BDNF affects synaptic plasticity, giving a special focus on spike timing-dependent types of LTP and on mossy fiber LTP. We will attempt to open up perspectives how the remaining challenging questions regarding synaptic BDNF release and action might be addressed by future experiments. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'.

  20. Timing is essential for rapid effects of corticosterone on synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegert, O.; Joëls, M.; Krugers, H.

    2006-01-01

    Stress facilitates memory formation, but only when the stressor is closely linked to the learning context. These effects are, at least in part, mediated by corticosteroid hormones. Here we demonstrate that corticosterone rapidly facilitates synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampal CA1 area

  1. Timing is Essential for Rapid Effects of Corticosterone on Synaptic Potentiation in the Mouse Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joels, Marian; Krugers, Harm; Wiegert, Olof

    2006-01-01

    Stress facilitates memory formation, but only when the stressor is closely linked to the learning context. These effects are, at least in part, mediated by corticosteroid hormones. Here we demonstrate that corticosterone rapidly facilitates synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampal CA1 area when high levels of the hormone and high-frequency…

  2. Synaptic dynamics: linear model and adaptation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Ali; Dibazar, Alireza A; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-08-01

    In this research, temporal processing in brain neural circuitries is addressed by a dynamic model of synaptic connections in which the synapse model accounts for both pre- and post-synaptic processes determining its temporal dynamics and strength. Neurons, which are excited by the post-synaptic potentials of hundred of the synapses, build the computational engine capable of processing dynamic neural stimuli. Temporal dynamics in neural models with dynamic synapses will be analyzed, and learning algorithms for synaptic adaptation of neural networks with hundreds of synaptic connections are proposed. The paper starts by introducing a linear approximate model for the temporal dynamics of synaptic transmission. The proposed linear model substantially simplifies the analysis and training of spiking neural networks. Furthermore, it is capable of replicating the synaptic response of the non-linear facilitation-depression model with an accuracy better than 92.5%. In the second part of the paper, a supervised spike-in-spike-out learning rule for synaptic adaptation in dynamic synapse neural networks (DSNN) is proposed. The proposed learning rule is a biologically plausible process, and it is capable of simultaneously adjusting both pre- and post-synaptic components of individual synapses. The last section of the paper starts with presenting the rigorous analysis of the learning algorithm in a system identification task with hundreds of synaptic connections which confirms the learning algorithm's accuracy, repeatability and scalability. The DSNN is utilized to predict the spiking activity of cortical neurons and pattern recognition tasks. The DSNN model is demonstrated to be a generative model capable of producing different cortical neuron spiking patterns and CA1 Pyramidal neurons recordings. A single-layer DSNN classifier on a benchmark pattern recognition task outperforms a 2-Layer Neural Network and GMM classifiers while having fewer numbers of free parameters and

  3. Calcium current homeostasis and synaptic deficits in hippocampal neurons from Kelch-like 1 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Patricia Perissinotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1 is a neuronal actin-binding protein that modulates voltage-gated CaV2.1 (P/Q-type and CaV3.2 (α1H T-type calcium channels; KLHL1 knockdown experiments (KD cause down-regulation of both channel types and altered synaptic properties in cultured rat hippocampal neurons (Perissinotti et al., 2014. Here, we studied the effect of ablation of KLHL1 on calcium channel function and synaptic properties in cultured hippocampal neurons from KLHL1 knockout (KO mice. Western blot data showed the P/Q-type channel α1A subunit was less abundant in KO hippocampus compared to wildtype (WT; and PQ-type calcium currents were smaller in KO neurons than WT during early days in vitro, although this decrease was compensated for at late stages by increases in L-type calcium current. In contrast, T-type currents did not change in culture. However, biophysical properties and western blot analysis revealed a differential contribution of T-type channel isoforms in the KO, with CaV3.2 α1H subunit being down-regulated and CaV3.1 α1G up-regulated. Synapsin I levels were reduced in the KO hippocampus; cultured neurons displayed a concomitant reduction in synapsin I puncta and decreased miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC frequency. In summary, genetic ablation of the calcium channel modulator resulted in compensatory mechanisms to maintain calcium current homeostasis in hippocampal KO neurons; however, synaptic alterations resulted in a reduction of excitatory synapse number, causing an imbalance of the excitatory-inhibitory synaptic input ratio favoring inhibition.

  4. External bioenergy-induced increases in intracellular free calcium concentrations are mediated by Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Juliann G; Ives, John A; Jonas, Wayne B

    2005-03-01

    External bioenergy (EBE, energy emitted from a human body) has been shown to increase intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i, an important factor in signal transduction) and regulate the cellular response to heat stress in cultured human lymphoid Jurkat T cells. In this study, we wanted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. A bioenergy specialist emitted bioenergy sequentially toward tubes of cultured Jurkat T cells for one 15-minute period in buffers containing different ion compositions or different concentrations of inhibitors. [Ca2+], was measured spectrofluorometrically using the fluorescent probe fura-2. The resting [Ca2+]i in Jurkat T cells was 70 +/- 3 nM (n = 130) in the normal buffer. Removal of external calcium decreased the resting [Ca2+]i to 52 +/- 2 nM (n = 23), indicating that Ca2+ entry from the external source is important for maintaining the basal level of [Ca2+]i. Treatment of Jurkat T cells with EBE for 15 min increased [Ca2+]i by 30 +/- 5% (P EBE did not attenuate [Ca2+]i responsiveness to EBE. Removal of external Ca2+ or Na+, but not Mg2+, inhibited the EBE-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. Dichlorobenzamil, an inhibitor of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, also inhibited the EBE-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 0.11 +/- 0.02 nM. When external [K+] was increased from 4.5 mM to 25 mM, EBE decreased [Ca2+]i. The EBE-induced increase was also blocked by verapamil, an L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blocker. These results suggest that the EBE-induced [Ca2+]i increase may serve as an objective means for assessing and validating bioenergy effects and those specialists claiming bioenergy capability. The increase in [Ca2+]i is mediated by activation of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers and opening of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.

  5. CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels mediate the augmented calcium influx in carotid body glomus cells by chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Ahmmed, Gias U; Peng, Ying-Jie; Khan, Shakil A; Nanduri, Jayasri; Kumar, Ganesh K; Fox, Aaron P; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark manifestation of sleep apnea. A heightened carotid body activity and the resulting chemosensory reflex mediate increased sympathetic nerve activity by CIH. However, the mechanisms underlying heightened carotid body activity by CIH are not known. An elevation of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in glomus cells, the primary oxygen-sensing cells, is an essential step for carotid body activation by hypoxia. In the present study, we examined the effects of CIH on the glomus cell [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia and assessed the underlying mechanisms. Glomus cells were harvested from adult rats or wild-type mice treated with 10 days of either room air (control) or CIH (alternating cycles of 15 s of hypoxia and 5 min of room air; 9 episodes/h; 8 h/day). CIH-treated glomus cells exhibited an enhanced [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia, and this effect was absent in the presence of 2-(4-cyclopropylphenyl)-N-((1R)-1-[5-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)oxo]-pyridin-2-yl]ethyl)acetamide (TTA-A2), a specific inhibitor of T-type Ca(2+) channels, and in voltage-gated calcium channel, type 3.2 (CaV3.2), null glomus cells. CaV3.2 knockout mice exhibited an absence of CIH-induced hypersensitivity of the carotid body. CIH increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in glomus cells. A ROS scavenger prevented the exaggerated TTA-A2-sensitive [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia. CIH had no effect on CaV3.2 mRNA levels. CIH augmented Ca(2+) currents and increased CaV3.2 protein in plasma membrane fractions of human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably expressing CaV3.2, and either a ROS scavenger or brefeldin-A, an inhibitor of protein trafficking, prevented these effects. These findings suggest that CIH leads to an augmented Ca(2+) influx via ROS-dependent facilitation of CaV3.2 protein trafficking to the plasma membrane.

  6. Synaptic control of motoneuronal excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Funk, G D; Bayliss, D A

    2000-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore......, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions...... and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K(+) current, cationic inward...

  7. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Babu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  8. Age dependence of the rapid antidepressant and synaptic effects of acute NMDA receptor blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eNosyreva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that produces rapid antidepressant responses in individuals with major depressive disorder. The antidepressant action of ketamine has been linked to blocking NMDA receptor activation at rest, which inhibits eukaryotic elongation factor2 kinase leading to desuppression of protein synthesis and synaptic potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Here, we investigated ketamine mediated antidepressant response and the resulting synaptic potentiation in juvenile animals. We found that ketamine did not produce an antidepressant response in juvenile animals in the novelty suppressed feeding or the forced swim test. In addition ketamine application failed to trigger synaptic potentiation in hippocampal slices obtained from juvenile animals, unlike its action in slices from older animals (6-9 weeks old. The inability of ketamine to trigger an antidepressant response or subsequent synaptic plasticity processes suggests a developmental component to ketamine mediated antidepressant efficacy. We also show that the NMDAR antagonist AP5 triggers synaptic potentiation in mature hippocampus similar to the action of ketamine, demonstrating that global competitive blockade of NMDA receptors is sufficient to trigger this effect. These findings suggest that global blockade of NMDA receptors in developmentally mature hippocampal synapses are required for the antidepressant efficacy of ketamine.

  9. Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jake F; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2017-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23024.001 PMID:28290985

  10. KV7 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, Jennifer B; Jepps, Thomas Andrew; Greenwood, Iain A

    2014-01-01

    identified as being crucial mediators of this process in a variety of smooth muscle. Recently, KV7 channels have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension, as well as being implicated in other smooth muscle disorders, providing a new and inviting target for smooth muscle disorders.......Potassium channels are key regulators of smooth muscle tone, with increases in activity resulting in hyperpolarisation of the cell membrane, which acts to oppose vasoconstriction. Several potassium channels exist within smooth muscle, but the KV7 family of voltage-gated potassium channels have been...

  11. NMDA receptor subunit composition determines beta-amyloid-induced neurodegeneration and synaptic loss

    OpenAIRE

    Tackenberg, C; Grinschgl, S; Trutzel, A; Santuccione, A C; Frey, M C; Konietzko