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Sample records for channel interacting protein

  1. Intra-membrane molecular interactions of K+ channel proteins :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moczydlowski, Edward G.

    2013-07-01

    Ion channel proteins regulate complex patterns of cellular electrical activity and ionic signaling. Certain K+ channels play an important role in immunological biodefense mechanisms of adaptive and innate immunity. Most ion channel proteins are oligomeric complexes with the conductive pore located at the central subunit interface. The long-term activity of many K+ channel proteins is dependent on the concentration of extracellular K+; however, the mechanism is unclear. Thus, this project focused on mechanisms underlying structural stability of tetrameric K+ channels. Using KcsA of Streptomyces lividans as a model K+ channel of known structure, the molecular basis of tetramer stability was investigated by: 1. Bioinformatic analysis of the tetramer interface. 2. Effect of two local anesthetics (lidocaine, tetracaine) on tetramer stability. 3. Molecular simulation of drug docking to the ion conduction pore. The results provide new insights regarding the structural stability of K+ channels and its possible role in cell physiology.

  2. Screening for cardiac HERG potassium channel interacting proteins using the yeast two-hybrid technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyan; Yu, Hong; Lin, Jijin; Sun, Yifan; Shen, Xinyuan; Ren, Li

    2014-02-01

    The human ERG protein (HERG or Kv 11.1) encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (herg) is the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) responsible for action potential (AP) repolarization. Mutations in HERG lead to long-QT syndrome, a major cause of arrhythmias. Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for ion channel trafficking, membrane localization, and functional modulation. To identify proteins involved in the regulation of the HERG channel, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library using the C-terminus or N-terminus of HERG as bait. Fifteen proteins were identified as HERG amino terminal (HERG-NT)-interacting proteins, including Caveolin-1 (a membrane scaffold protein with multiple interacting partners, including G-proteins, kinases and NOS), the zinc finger protein, FHL2 and PTPN12 (a non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase). Eight HERG carboxylic terminal (HERG-CT)-interacting proteins were also identified, including the NF-κB-interacting protein myotrophin, We have identified multiple potential interacting proteins that may regulate cardiac IKr through cytoskeletal interactions, G-protein modulation, phosphorylation and downstream second messenger and transcription cascades. These findings provide further insight into dynamic modulation of HERG under physiological conditions and arrhythmogenesis.

  3. Direct protein-protein interactions and substrate channeling between cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and CYP26B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cara H; Peng, Chi-Chi; Lutz, Justin D; Yeung, Catherine K; Zelter, Alex; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABPs) bind all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) tightly. This study aimed to determine whether atRA is channeled directly to cytochrome P450 (CYP) CYP26B1 by CRABPs, and whether CRABPs interact directly with CYP26B1. atRA bound to CRABPs (holo-CRABP) was efficiently metabolized by CYP26B1. Isotope dilution experiments showed that delivery of atRA to CYP26B1 in solution was similar with or without CRABP. Holo-CRABPs had higher affinity for CYP26B1 than free atRA, but both apo-CRABPs inhibited the formation of 4-OH-RA by CYP26B1. Similar protein-protein interactions between soluble binding proteins and CYPs may be important for other lipophilic CYP substrates.

  4. Development of heart failure is independent of K+ channel-interacting protein 2 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speerschneider, Tobias; Grubb, Søren; Metoska, Artina;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract  Abnormal ventricular repolarization in ion channelopathies and heart disease is a major cause of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. K(+) channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) expression is significantly reduced in human heart failure (HF), contributing to a loss...

  5. Exploration of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel-interacting proteins using affinity purification and mass spectrometry.

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    Ding, Xi-Qin; Matveev, Alexander; Singh, Anil; Komori, Naoka; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Photopic (cone) vision essential for color sensation, central vision, and visual acuity is mediated by the activation of photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. Naturally occurring mutations in the cone channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophies. This work investigated the functional modulation of cone CNG channel by exploring the channel-interacting proteins. Retinal protein extracts prepared from cone-dominant Nrl (- / -) mice were used in CNGA3 antibody affinity purification, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. The peptide mass fingerprinting of the tryptic digests and database search identified a number of proteins including spectrin alpha-2, ATPase (Na(+)/K(+) transporting) alpha-3, alpha and beta subunits of ATP synthase (H(+) transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex), and alpha-2 subunit of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. In addition, the affinity-binding assays demonstrated an interaction between cone CNG channel and calmodulin but not cone Na(+)/Ca(2+)-K(+) exchanger in the mouse retina. Results of this study provide insight into our understanding of cone CNG channel-interacting proteins and the functional modulations.

  6. Conserved BK channel-protein interactions reveal signals relevant to cell death and survival.

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    Bernd Sokolowski

    Full Text Available The large-conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BK channel and its β-subunit underlie tuning in non-mammalian sensory or hair cells, whereas in mammals its function is less clear. To gain insights into species differences and to reveal putative BK functions, we undertook a systems analysis of BK and BK-Associated Proteins (BKAPS in the chicken cochlea and compared these results to other species. We identified 110 putative partners from cytoplasmic and membrane/cytoskeletal fractions, using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation, 2-D gel, and LC-MS/MS. Partners included 14-3-3γ, valosin-containing protein (VCP, stathmin (STMN, cortactin (CTTN, and prohibitin (PHB, of which 16 partners were verified by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation. Bioinformatics revealed binary partners, the resultant interactome, subcellular localization, and cellular processes. The interactome contained 193 proteins involved in 190 binary interactions in subcellular compartments such as the ER, mitochondria, and nucleus. Comparisons with mice showed shared hub proteins that included N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR and ATP-synthase. Ortholog analyses across six species revealed conserved interactions involving apoptosis, Ca(2+ binding, and trafficking, in chicks, mice, and humans. Functional studies using recombinant BK and RNAi in a heterologous expression system revealed that proteins important to cell death/survival, such as annexinA5, γ-actin, lamin, superoxide dismutase, and VCP, caused a decrease in BK expression. This revelation led to an examination of specific kinases and their effectors relevant to cell viability. Sequence analyses of the BK C-terminus across 10 species showed putative binding sites for 14-3-3, RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β and phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1. Knockdown of 14-3-3 and Akt caused an increase in BK expression, whereas silencing of GSK3β and PDK1 had the opposite

  7. Cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 interacts with and is regulated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Gavillet, Bruno; van Bemmelen, Miguel X;

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify proteins interacting with the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5, we used the last 66 amino acids of the C-terminus of the channel as bait to screen a human cardiac cDNA library. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1 as an interacting protein. Pull...

  8. Defective interactions of protein partner with ion channels and transporters as alternative mechanisms of membrane channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    The past twenty years have revealed the existence of numerous ion channel mutations resulting in human pathology. Ion channels provide the basis of diverse cellular functions, ranging from hormone secretion, excitation-contraction coupling, cell signaling, immune response, and trans-epithelial transport. Therefore, the regulation of biophysical properties of channels is vital in human physiology. Only within the last decade has the role of non-ion channel components come to light in regard to ion channel spatial, temporal, and biophysical regulation in physiology. A growing number of auxiliary components have been determined to play elemental roles in excitable cell physiology, with dysfunction resulting in disorders and related manifestations. This review focuses on the broad implications of such dysfunction, focusing on disease-causing mutations that alter interactions between ion channels and auxiliary ion channel components in a diverse set of human excitable cell disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé

  9. Circadian rhythm in QT interval is preserved in mice deficient of potassium channel interacting protein 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Lisa A; Lubberding, Anniek; Larsen, Anders Peter;

    2016-01-01

    Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is suggested to be responsible for the circadian rhythm in repolarization duration, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the hypothesis that there is no circadian rhythm in QT interval in the absence of KChIP2. Implanted...... telemetric devices recorded electrocardiogram continuously for 5 days in conscious wild-type mice (WT, n = 9) and KChIP2(-/-) mice (n = 9) in light:dark periods and in complete darkness. QT intervals were determined from all RR intervals and corrected for heart rate (QT100 = QT/(RR/100)(1/2)). Moreover, QT...... intervals were determined from complexes within the RR range of mean-RR ± 1% in the individual mouse (QTmean-RR). We find that RR intervals are 125 ± 5 ms in WT and 123 ± 4 ms in KChIP2(-/-) (p = 0.81), and QT intervals are 52 ± 1 and 52 ± 1 ms, respectively(p = 0.89). No ventricular arrhythmias or sudden...

  10. ABA Signaling in Guard Cells Entails a Dynamic Protein-Protein Interaction Relay from the PYL-RCAR Family Receptors to Ion Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Chul Lee; Chae Woo Lim; Wenzhi Lan; Kai He; Sheng Luan

    2013-01-01

    Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) serves as an integrator of environmental stresses such as drought to trigger stomatal closure by regulating specific ion channels in guard cells.We previously reported that SLACl,an outward anion channel required for stomatal closure,was regulated via reversible protein phosphorylation events involving ABA signaling components,including protein phosphatase 2C members and a SnRK2-type kinase (OST1).In this study,we reconstituted the ABA signaling pathway as a protein-protein interaction relay from the PYL/RCAR-type receptors,to the PP2C-SnRK2 phosphatase-kinase pairs,to the ion channel SLACl.The ABA receptors interacted with and inhibited PP2C phosphatase activity against the SnRK2-type kinase,releasing active SnRK2 kinase to phosphorylate,and activate the SLACl channel,leading to reduced guard cell turgor and stomatal closure.Both yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays were used to verify the interactions among the components in the pathway.These biochemical assays demonstrated activity modifications of phosphatases and kinases by their interaction partners.The SLACl channel activity was used as an endpoint readout for the strength of the signaling pathway,depending on the presence of different combinations of signaling components.Further study using transgenic plants overexpressing one of the ABA receptors demonstrated that changing the relative level of interacting partners would change ABA sensitivity.

  11. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

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    Piotr Koprowski

    Full Text Available Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  12. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Piotr; Grajkowski, Wojciech; Balcerzak, Marcin; Filipiuk, Iwona; Fabczak, Hanna; Kubalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS) channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS) family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  13. Antibodies against potassium channel interacting protein 2 induce necrosis in isolated rat cardiomyocytes.

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    Choudhury, Sangita; Schnell, Michael; Bühler, Thomas; Reinke, Yvonne; Lüdemann, Jan; Nießner, Felix; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Herda, Lars R; Staudt, Alexander; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Felix, Stephan B; Landsberger, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Auto-antibodies against cardiac proteins have been described in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Antibodies against the C-terminal part of KChIP2 (anti-KChIP2 [C-12]) enhance cell death of rat cardiomyocytes. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Therefore, we wanted to explore the mechanisms responsible for anti-KChIP2-mediated cell death. Rat cardiomyocytes were treated with anti-KChIP2 (C-12). KChIP2 RNA and protein expressions, nuclear NF-κB, mitochondrial membrane potential Δψm, caspase-3 and -9 activities, necrotic and apoptotic cells, total Ca(2+) and K(+) concentrations, and the effects on L-type Ca(2+) channels were quantified. Anti-KChIP2 (C-12) induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Anti-KChIP2 (C-12)-treatment for 2 h significantly reduced KChIP2 mRNA and protein expression. Anti-KChIP2 (C-12) induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB after 1 h. After 6 h, Δψm and caspase-3 and -9 activities were not significantly changed. After 24 h, anti-KChIP2 (C-12)-treated cells were 75 ± 3% necrotic, 2 ± 1% apoptotic, and 13 ± 2% viable. Eighty-six ± 1% of experimental buffer-treated cells were viable. Anti-KChIP2 (C-12) induced significant increases in total Ca(2+) (plus 11 ± 2%) and K(+) (plus 18 ± 2%) concentrations after 5 min. Anti-KChIP2 (C-12) resulted in an increased Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels. In conclusion, our results suggest that anti-KChIP2 (C-12) enhances cell death of rat cardiomyocytes probably due to necrosis.

  14. E. coli F1-ATPase interacts with a membrane protein component of a proton channel.

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    Walker, J E; Saraste, M; Gay, N J

    1982-08-26

    The ATP synthases of bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts, which use the energy of a transmembrane proton gradient to power the synthesis of ATP, consist of an integral membrane component F0--thought to contain a proton channel--and a catalytic component, F1. To help investigate the way F0 and F1 are coupled, we have sequenced the b-subunit of the Escherichia coli F0, which seems to be the counterpart of a thermophilic bacteria F0 subunit thought to be essential for F1 binding. We report here that its sequence is remarkable, being hydrophobic around the N-terminus and highly charged in the remainder. We propose that the N-terminal segment lies in the membrane and the rest outside. The extramembranous section contains two adjacent stretches of 31 amino acids where the sequence is very similar: in the second of these stretches there is further internal homology. These duplicated stretches of the polypeptide probably fold into two alpha-helices which have many common features able to make contact with F1 subunits. Thus protein b occupies a central position in the enzyme, where it may be involved in proton translocation. It is possibly also important in biosynthetic assembly.

  15. Expression and distribution of Kv4 potassium channel subunits and potassium channel interacting proteins in subpopulations of interneurons in the basolateral amygdala.

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    Dabrowska, J; Rainnie, D G

    2010-12-15

    The Kv4 potassium channel α subunits, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3, determine some of the fundamental physiological properties of neurons in the CNS. Kv4 subunits are associated with auxiliary β-subunits, such as the potassium channel interacting proteins (KChIP1 - 4), which are thought to regulate the trafficking and gating of native Kv4 potassium channels. Intriguingly, KChIP1 is thought to show cell type-selective expression in GABA-ergic inhibitory interneurons, while other β-subunits (KChIP2-4) are associated with principal glutamatergic neurons. However, nothing is known about the expression of Kv4 family α- and β-subunits in specific interneurons populations in the BLA. Here, we have used immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation, and Western Blotting to determine the relative expression of KChIP1 in the different interneuron subtypes within the BLA, and its co-localization with one or more of the Kv4 α subunits. We show that all three α-subunits of Kv4 potassium channel are found in rat BLA neurons, and that the immunoreactivity of KChIP1 closely resembles that of Kv4.3. Indeed, Kv4.3 showed almost complete co-localization with KChIP1 in the soma and dendrites of a distinct subpopulation of BLA neurons. Dual-immunofluorescence studies revealed this to be in BLA interneurons immunoreactive for parvalbumin, cholecystokin-8, and somatostatin. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that KChIP1 was associated with all three Kv4 α subunits. Together our results suggest that KChIP1 is selectively expressed in BLA interneurons where it may function to regulate the activity of A-type potassium channels. Hence, KChIP1 might be considered as a cell type-specific regulator of GABAergic inhibitory circuits in the BLA.

  16. The dipeptidyl-aminopeptidase-like protein 6 is an integral voltage sensor-interacting beta-subunit of neuronal K(V)4.2 channels.

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    Dougherty, Kevin; Tu, Liwei; Deutsch, Carol; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Auxiliary beta-subunits dictate the physiological properties of voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in excitable tissues. In many instances, however, the underlying mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The dipeptidyl-aminopeptidase-like protein 6 (DPP6) is a specific beta-subunit of neuronal K(V)4 channels, which may promote gating through interactions between the single transmembrane segment of DPP6 and the channel's voltage sensing domain (VSD). A combination of gating current measurements and protein biochemistry (in-vitro translation and co-immunoprecipitations) revealed preferential physical interaction between the isolated K(V)4.2-VSD and DPP6. Significantly weaker interactions were detected between DPP6 and K(V)1.3 channels or the K(V)4.2 pore domain. More efficient gating charge movement resulting from a direct interaction between DPP6 and the K(V)4.2-VSD is unique among the known actions of K(V) channel beta-subunits. This study shows that the modular VSD of a K(V) channel can be directly regulated by transmembrane protein-protein interactions involving an extrinsic beta-subunit. Understanding these interactions may shed light on the pathophysiology of recently identified human disorders associated with mutations affecting the dpp6 gene.

  17. Identifying interacting proteins of a Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1 using GFP-Trap and mass spectrometry.

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    Zhou, Zi-Liang; Jiang, Jing; Yin, Jiang-An; Cai, Shi-Qing

    2014-06-25

    Chloride channels belong to a superfamily of ion channels that permit passive passage of anions, mainly chloride, across cell membrane. They play a variety of important physiological roles in regulation of cytosolic pH, cell volume homeostasis, organic solute transport, cell migration, cell proliferation, and differentiation. However, little is known about the functional regulation of these channels. In this study, we generated an integrated transgenic worm strain expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) fused CLC-type chloride channel 1 (CLH-1::GFP), a voltage-gated chloride channel in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). CLH-1::GFP was expressed in some unidentified head neurons and posterior intestinal cells of C. elegans. Interacting proteins of CLH-1::GFP were purified by GFP-Trap, a novel system for efficient isolation of GFP fusion proteins and their interacting factors. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that a total of 27 high probability interacting proteins were co-trapped with CLHp-1::GFP. Biochemical evidence showed that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (EEF-1), one of these co-trapped proteins identified by MS, physically interacted with CLH-1, in consistent with GFP-Trap experiments. Further immunostaining data revealed that the protein level of CLH-1 was significantly increased upon co-expression with EEF-1. These results suggest that the combination of GFP-Trap purification with MS is an excellent tool to identify novel interacting proteins of voltage-gated chloride channels in C. elegans. Our data also show that EEF-1 is a regulator of voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1.

  18. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the alpha1 pore-forming subunit of high voltage-activated calcium channel

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    Alan eNeely

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Openings of high-voltage-activated calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, high-voltage-activated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1 associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels.

  19. Regulation of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel by Nedd4 family interacting proteins (Ndfips).

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    Kang, Yudi; Guo, Jun; Yang, Tonghua; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Shetuan

    2015-11-15

    The cardiac electrical disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS) pre-disposes affected individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. Dysfunction of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) channel (IKr) is a major cause of LQTS. The expression of hERG channels is controlled by anterograde trafficking of newly synthesized channels to and retrograde degradation of existing channels from the plasma membrane. We have previously shown that the E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Nedd4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4-2) targets the PY motif of hERG channels to initiate channel degradation. Although both immature and mature hERG channels contain the PY motif, Nedd4-2 selectively mediates the degradation of mature hERG channels. In the present study, we demonstrate that Nedd4-2 is directed to specific cellular compartments by the Nedd4 family interacting proteins, Nedd4 family-interacting protein 1 (Ndfip1) and Ndfip2. Ndfip1 is primarily localized in the Golgi apparatus where it recruits Nedd4-2 to mediate the degradation of mature hERG proteins during channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Although Ndfip2 directs Nedd4-2 to the Golgi apparatus, it also recruits Nedd4-2 to the multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which may impair MVB function and impede the degradation of mature hERG proteins mediated by Nedd4-2. These findings extend our understanding of hERG channel regulation and provide information which may be useful for the rescue of impaired hERG function in LQTS.

  20. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers......, are reported. The aim is to depict how the elucidation of the interplay of structures requires the interplay of methods....

  1. MaxiK channel interactome reveals its interaction with GABA transporter 3 and heat shock protein 60 in the mammalian brain.

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    Singh, H; Li, M; Hall, L; Chen, S; Sukur, S; Lu, R; Caputo, A; Meredith, A L; Stefani, E; Toro, L

    2016-03-11

    Large conductance voltage and calcium-activated potassium (MaxiK) channels are activated by membrane depolarization and elevated cytosolic Ca(2+). In the brain, they localize to neurons and astrocytes, where they play roles such as resetting the membrane potential during an action potential, neurotransmitter release, and neurovascular coupling. MaxiK channels are known to associate with several modulatory proteins and accessory subunits, and each of these interactions can have distinct physiological consequences. To uncover new players in MaxiK channel brain physiology, we applied a directed proteomic approach and obtained MaxiK channel pore-forming α subunit brain interactome using specific antibodies. Controls included immunoprecipitations with rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and with anti-MaxiK antibodies in wild type and MaxiK channel knockout mice (Kcnma1(-/-)), respectively. We have found known and unreported interactive partners that localize to the plasma membrane, extracellular space, cytosol and intracellular organelles including mitochondria, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Localization of MaxiK channel to mitochondria was further confirmed using purified brain mitochondria colabeled with MitoTracker. Independent proof of MaxiK channel interaction with previously unidentified partners is given for GABA transporter 3 (GAT3) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60). In human embryonic kidney 293 cells containing SV40 T-antigen (HEK293T) cells, both GAT3 and HSP60 coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with MaxiK channel; colabeling was observed mainly at the cell periphery with GAT3 and intracellularly with HSP60 with protein proximity indices of ∼ 0.6 and ∼ 0.4, respectively. In rat primary hippocampal neurons, colocalization index was identical for GAT3 (∼ 0.6) and slightly higher for HSP60 (∼ 0.5) association with MaxiK channel. The results of this study provide a complete interactome of MaxiK channel the mouse brain, further establish

  2. The stoichiometry and biophysical properties of the Kv4 potassium channel complex with K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) subunits are variable, depending on the relative expression level.

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    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-06-20

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K(+) channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K(+) (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K(+) channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits.

  3. Functional multimerization of mucolipin channel proteins.

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    Curcio-Morelli, Cyntia; Zhang, Peng; Venugopal, Bhuvarahamurthy; Charles, Florie A; Browning, Marsha F; Cantiello, Horacio F; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2010-02-01

    MCOLN1 encodes mucolipin-1 (TRPML1), a member of the transient receptor potential TRPML subfamily of channel proteins. Mutations in MCOLN1 cause mucolipidosis-type IV (MLIV), a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurologic, ophthalmologic, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. Along with TRPML1, there are two other TRPML family members, mucolipin-2 (TRPML2) and mucolipin-3 (TRPML3). In this study, we used immunocytochemical analysis to determine that TRPML1, TRPML2, and TRPML3 co-localize in cells. The multimerization of TRPML proteins was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis, which demonstrated that TRPML1 homo-multimerizes as well as hetero-multimerizes with TRPML2 and TRPML3. MLIV-causing mutants of TRPML1 also interacted with wild-type TRPML1. Lipid bilayer re-constitution of in vitro translated TRPML2 and TRPML3 confirmed their cation channel properties with lower single channel conductance and higher partial permeability to anions as compared to TRPML1. We further analyzed the electrophysiological properties of single channel TRPML hetero-multimers, which displayed functional differences when compared to individual TRPMLs. Our data shows for the first time that TRPMLs form distinct functional channel complexes. Homo- and hetero-multimerization of TRPMLs may modulate channel function and biophysical properties, thereby increasing TRPML functional diversity.

  4. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside.

  5. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware......Years of meticulous curation of scientific literature and increasingly reliable computational predictions have resulted in creation of vast databases of protein interaction data. Over the years, these repositories have become a basic framework in which experiments are analyzed and new directions...

  6. Interaction of the epithelial Ca2+ channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 with the intestine- and kidney-enriched PDZ protein NHERF4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, S.F.J. van de; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Gisler, S.M.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 constitute the apical Ca(2+) influx pathway in epithelial Ca(2+) transport. PDZ proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the targeting or anchoring of ion channels and transporters in the apical domain of the cell. In this study, we des

  7. Study of the interaction of unaggregated and aggregated amyloid β protein (10-21) with outward potassium channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Metal ion-induced aggregation of Aβinto insoluble plaques is a central factor in Alzheimer's disease. Zn2+ is the only physiologically available transition metal ion responsible for aggregating Aβ at pH 7.4. To make it clear that the neurotoxicity of Zn2+-induced aggregation of Aβ on neurons is the key to understand Aβ mechanism of action further. In this paper, we choose Aβ (10-21) as the model fragment to research hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. For the first time, we adopt the combination of spectral analysis with patch-clamp technique for the preliminary study of the mutual relations of Zn2+, Aβ and ion channel from the cell level. The following expounds upon the effects and mode of action of two forms (unaggregated and aggregated) of Aβ (10-21) on hippocampus outward potassium channel three processes (activation, inactivation and reactivation). It also shows the molecular mechanics of AD from the channel level. These results are significant for the further study of Aβ nosogenesis and the development of new types of target drugs for the treatment of AD.

  8. Immunohistochemical investigation of voltage-gated potassium channel-interacting protein 1 in normal rat brain and Pentylenettrazole-induced seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao SU; Ai-Hua LUO; Wen-Dong CONG; Wei-Wen SUN; Wei-Yi DENG; Qi-Hua ZHAO; Zhuo-Hua ZHANG; Wei-Ping LIAO

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the possible role of voltage-gated potassium channel-interacting protein 1 (KChIP1) in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Methods Sprague Dawley female adult rats were treated with pentylenettrazole (PTZ) to develop acute and chronic epilepsy models. The approximate coronal sections of normal and epilepsy rat brain were processed for immunohistochemistry. Double-labeling confocal microscopy was used to determine the coexistence of KChIP1 and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Results KChIP1 was expressed abundantly throughout adult rat brain.KChIP1 is highly co-localize with GABA transmitter in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. In the acute PTZ-induced convulsive rats, the number of KChIP1-postive cells was significantly increased especially in the regions of CA 1 and CA3 (P < 0.05); whereas the chronic PTZ-induced convulsive rats were found no changes. The number of GABA-labeled and co-labeled neurons in the hippocampus appeared to have no significant alteration responding to the epilepsy-genesis treatments. Conclusion KChIP1 might be involved in the PTZ-induced epileptogenesis process as a regulator to neuronal excitability through influencing the properties of potassium channels. KChIP1 is preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons, but its changes did not couple with GABA in the epileptic models.

  9. Adsorption of charged protein residues on an inorganic nanosheet: Computer simulation of LDH interaction with ion channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Alexey A.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional and hybrid nanomaterials based on layered double hydroxides (LDH), cationic clays, layered oxyhydroxides and hydroxides of metals possess large specific surface area and strong electrostatic properties with permanent or pH-dependent electric charge. Such nanomaterials may impact cellular electrostatics, changing the ion balance, pH and membrane potential. Selective ion adsorption/exchange may alter the transmembrane electrochemical gradient, disrupting potential-dependent cellular processes. Cellular proteins as a rule have charged residues which can be effectively adsorbed on the surface of layered hydroxide based nanomaterials. The aim of this study is to attempt to shed some light on the possibility and mechanisms of protein "adhesion" an LDH nanosheet and to propose a new direction in anticancer medicine, based on physical impact and strong electrostatics. An unbiased molecular dynamics simulation was performed and the combined process free energy estimation (COPFEE) approach was used.

  10. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  11. Interaction of hydrogen sulfide with ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanghua; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2010-07-01

    1. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a signalling gasotransmitter. It targets different ion channels and receptors, and fulfils its various roles in modulating the functions of different systems. However, the interaction of H(2)S with different types of ion channels and underlying molecular mechanisms has not been reviewed systematically. 2. H(2)S is the first identified endogenous gaseous opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Through the activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, H(2)S lowers blood pressure, protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury, inhibits insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells, and exerts anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and anti-apoptotic effects. 3. H(2)S inhibited L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes but stimulated the same channels in neurons, thus regulating intracellular Ca(2+) levels. H(2)S activated small and medium conductance K(Ca) channels but its effect on BK(Ca) channels has not been consistent. 4. H(2)S-induced hyperalgesia and pro-nociception seems to be related to the sensitization of both T-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPV(1) channels. The activation of TRPV(1) and TRPA(1) by H(2)S is believed to result in contraction of nonvascular smooth muscles and increased colonic mucosal Cl(-) secretion. 5. The activation of Cl(-) channel by H(2)S has been shown as a protective mechanism for neurons from oxytosis. H(2)S also potentiates N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor-mediated currents that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity for learning and memory. 6. Given the important modulatory effects of H(2)S on different ion channels, many cellular functions and disease conditions related to homeostatic control of ion fluxes across cell membrane should be re-evaluated.

  12. The open-close mechanism of M2 channel protein in influenza A virus: A computational study on the hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions among His37 and Trp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG JiaGao; ZHU WeiLiang; WANG YanLi; YAN XiuHua; LI Zhong; TANG Yun; JIANG HuaLiang

    2008-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A virus is a tetrameric ion channel. It was reported that the permeation of the ion channel is correlated with the hydrogen bond network among His37 residues and the cation-π interactions between His37 and Trp41. In the present study, the hydrogen bonding network of 4-methyl-imidazoles was built to mimic the hydrogen bonds between His37 residues, and the cation-π interactions between 4-methyl-imidazolium and indole systems were selected to represent the interac-tions between His37 and Trp41. Then, quantum chemistry calculations at the MP2/6-311G** level were carried out to explore the properties of the hydrogen bonds and the cation-π interactions. The calculation results indicate that the binding strength of the N--H…N hydrogen bond between imidazole rings is up to -6.22 kcal·mol-1, and the binding strength of the strongest cation-π interaction is up to -18.8 kcal·mol-1 (T-shaped interaction) or -12.3 kcal·mol-1 (parallel stacking interaction). Thus, the calculated binding energies indicate that it is possible to control the permeation of the M2 ion channel through the hydrogen bond network and the cation-π interactions by altering the pH values.

  13. The open-close mechanism of M2 channel protein in influenza A virus:A computational study on the hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions among His37 and Trp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A virus is a tetrameric ion channel. It was reported that the permeation of the ion channel is correlated with the hydrogen bond network among His37 residues and the cation-π interactions between His37 and Trp41. In the present study,the hydrogen bonding network of 4-methyl-imidazoles was built to mimic the hydrogen bonds between His37 residues,and the cation-π interactions between 4-methyl-imidazolium and indole systems were selected to represent the interac-tions between His37 and Trp41. Then,quantum chemistry calculations at the MP2/6-311G level were carried out to explore the properties of the hydrogen bonds and the cation-π interactions. The calcula-tion results indicate that the binding strength of the N-H···N hydrogen bond between imidazole rings is up to -6.22 kcal·mol-1,and the binding strength of the strongest cation-π interaction is up to -18.8 kcal·mol-1(T-shaped interaction) or -12.3 kcal·mol-1(parallel stacking interaction). Thus,the calcu-lated binding energies indicate that it is possible to control the permeation of the M2 ion channel through the hydrogen bond network and the cation-π interactions by altering the pH values.

  14. Functional Interaction of the SNARE Protein NtSyp121 in Ca2+ Channel Gating,Ca2+ Transients and ABA Signalling of Stomatal Guard Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergei Sokolovski; Adrian Hills; Robert A.Gay; Michael R.Blatt

    2008-01-01

    There is now growing evidence that membrane vesicle trafficking proteins,especially of the superfamily of SNAREs,are critical for cellular signalling in plants.Work from this laboratory first demonstrated that a soluble,inhibitory (dominant-negative) fragment of the SNARE NtSyp121 blocked K+ and Cl- channel responses to the stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA),but left open a question about functional impacts on signal intermediates,especially on Ca2+-mediated signalling events.Here,we report one mode of action for the SNARE mediated directly through alterations in Caz+ channel gating and its consequent effects on cytosolic-free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) elevation.We find that expressing the same inhibitory fragment of NtSyp121 blocks ABA-evoked stomatal closure,but only partially suppresses stomatal closure in the presence of the NO donor,SNAP,which promotes [Ca2+]i elevation independently of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channels.Consistent with these observations,Ca2+ channel gating at the plasma membrane is altered by the SNARE fragment in a manner effective in reducing the potential for triggering a rise in [Ca2+]i,and we show directly that its expression in vivo leads to a pronounced suppression of evoked [Ca2+]i transients.These observations offer primary evidence for the functional coupling of the SNARE with Ca2+ channels at the plant cell plasma membrane and,because [Ca2+]i plays a key role in the control of K+ and Cl- channel currents in guard cells,they underscore an important mechanism for SNARE integration with ion channel regulation during stomatal closure.

  15. [Interaction of melittin with ion channels of excitable membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherelova, O M; Kabanova, N V; Kazachenko, V N; Chaĭlakhian, L M

    2007-01-01

    The effect of the neurotoxin melittin on the activation of ion channels of excitable membrane, the plasmalemma of Characeae algae cells, isolated membrane patches of neurons of mollusc L. stagnalis and Vero cells was studied by the method of intracellular perfusion and the patch-clamp technique in inside-out configuration. It was shown that melittin disturbs the conductivity of plasmalemma and modifieds Ca(2+)-channels of plant membrane. The leakage current that appears by the action of melittin can be restored by substituting calmodulin for melittin. Melittin modifies K(+)-channels of animal cell membrane by disrupting the phospholipid matrix and forms conductive structures in the membrane by interacting with channel proteins, which is evidenced by the appearance of additional ion channels.

  16. Cardiolipin Interactions with Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Dwarakanath, Himal; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Yanamala, Naveena; Kagan, Valerian E; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2015-09-15

    Cardiolipins (CL) represent unique phospholipids of bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria with four acyl chains and two phosphate groups that have been implicated in numerous functions from energy metabolism to apoptosis. Many proteins are known to interact with CL, and several cocrystal structures of protein-CL complexes exist. In this work, we describe the collection of the first systematic and, to the best of our knowledge, the comprehensive gold standard data set of all known CL-binding proteins. There are 62 proteins in this data set, 21 of which have nonredundant crystal structures with bound CL molecules available. Using binding patch analysis of amino acid frequencies, secondary structures and loop supersecondary structures considering phosphate and acyl chain binding regions together and separately, we gained a detailed understanding of the general structural and dynamic features involved in CL binding to proteins. Exhaustive docking of CL to all known structures of proteins experimentally shown to interact with CL demonstrated the validity of the docking approach, and provides a rich source of information for experimentalists who may wish to validate predictions.

  17. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  18. Scaffolds for blocking protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Stefan J; Lee, Song-Gil; Chmielewski, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Due to the pivotal roles that protein-protein interactions play in a plethora of biological processes, the design of therapeutic agents targeting these interactions has become an attractive and important area of research. The development of such agents is faced with a variety of challenges. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made in the design of proteomimetics capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions. Those inhibitors based on molecular scaffold designs hold considerable interest because of the ease of variation in regard to their displayed functionality. In particular, protein surface mimetics, alpha-helical mimetics, beta-sheet/beta-strand mimetics, as well as beta-turn mimetics have successfully modulated protein-protein interactions involved in such diseases as cancer and HIV. In this review, current progress in the development of molecular scaffolds designed for the disruption of protein-protein interactions will be discussed with an emphasis on those active against biological targets.

  19. Controllability in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchty, Stefan

    2014-05-13

    Recently, the focus of network research shifted to network controllability, prompting us to determine proteins that are important for the control of the underlying interaction webs. In particular, we determined minimum dominating sets of proteins (MDSets) in human and yeast protein interaction networks. Such groups of proteins were defined as optimized subsets where each non-MDSet protein can be reached by an interaction from an MDSet protein. Notably, we found that MDSet proteins were enriched with essential, cancer-related, and virus-targeted genes. Their central position allowed MDSet proteins to connect protein complexes and to have a higher impact on network resilience than hub proteins. As for their involvement in regulatory functions, MDSet proteins were enriched with transcription factors and protein kinases and were significantly involved in bottleneck interactions, regulatory links, phosphorylation events, and genetic interactions.

  20. Regulation of heartbeat by G protein-coupled ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M

    1990-12-01

    The coupling of ion channels to receptors by G proteins is the subject of this American Physiological Society Walter B. Cannon Memorial "Physiology in Perspective" Lecture. This subject is particularly appropriate because it includes a molecular explanation of a homeostatic mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system and the latter subject preoccupied Dr. Cannon during most of his career. With the use of reconstitution methods, we and others have shown that heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins couple receptors to ion channels by both membrane-delimited, direct pathways and cytoplasmic second messenger pathways. Furthermore, one set of receptors may be coupled to as many as three different sets of ion channels to form networks. Dual G protein pathways lead to the prediction of biphasic ion current responses in cell signaling, and this prediction was confirmed. In sinoatrial pacemaker cells, the pacemaking hyperpolarization-activated inward current (If) is directly regulated by the G proteins Gs and Go, and the two can act simultaneously. This could explain the classical observation that vagal inhibition of heart rate is greater during sympathetic stimulation. Because deactivation of the muscarinic response occurs much faster than the G protein alpha-subunit hydrolyzes guanosine 5'-triphosphate, we looked for accessory cellular factors. A surprising result was that the small monomeric ras G protein blocked the muscarinic pathway. The significance of this observation is unknown, but it appears that small and large G proteins may interact in ion channel signaling pathways.

  1. Conductometric monitoring of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Rosanna; Festa, Fernanda; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Pechkova, Eugenia; LaBaer, Joshua; Nicolini, Claudio

    2013-12-06

    Conductometric monitoring of protein-protein and protein-sterol interactions is here proved feasible by coupling quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM_D) to nucleic acid programmable protein arrays (NAPPA). The conductance curves measured in NAPPA microarrays printed on quartz surface allowed the identification of binding events between the immobilized proteins and the query. NAPPA allows the immobilization on the quartz surface of a wide range of proteins and can be easily adapted to generate innumerous types of biosensors. Indeed multiple proteins on the same quartz crystal have been tested and envisaged proving the possibility of analyzing the same array for several distinct interactions. Two examples of NAPPA-based conductometer applications with clinical relevance are presented herein, the interaction between the transcription factors Jun and ATF2 and the interaction between Cytochrome P540scc and cholesterol.

  2. Moonlighting proteins in sperm-egg interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, François M; Serres, Catherine; Auer, Jana

    2014-12-01

    Sperm-egg interaction is a highly species-specific step during the fertilization process. The first steps consist of recognition between proteins on the sperm head and zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins, the acellular coat that protects the oocyte. We aimed to determine which sperm head proteins interact with ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4 in humans. Two approaches were combined to identify these proteins: immunoblotting human spermatozoa targeted by antisperm antibodies (ASAs) from infertile men and far-Western blotting of human sperm proteins overlaid by each of the human recombinant ZP (hrZP) proteins. We used a proteomic approach with 2D electrophoretic separation of sperm protein revealed using either ASAs eluted from infertile patients or recombinant human ZP glycoproteins expressed in Chinese-hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Only spots highlighted by both methods were analysed by MALDI-MS/MS for identification. We identified proteins already described in human spermatozoa, but implicated in different metabolic pathways such as glycolytic enzymes [phosphokinase type 3 (PK3), enolase 1 (ENO1), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), aldolase A (ALDOA) and triose phosphate isomerase (TPI)], detoxification enzymes [GST Mu (GSTM) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) 4], ion channels [voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2)] or structural proteins (outer dense fibre 2). Several proteins were localized on the sperm head by indirect immunofluorescence, and their interaction with ZP proteins was confirmed by co-precipitation experiments. These results confirm the complexity of the sperm-ZP recognition process in humans with the implication of different proteins interacting with the main three ZP glycoproteins. The multiple roles of these proteins suggest that they are multifaceted or moonlighting proteins.

  3. Role of connexin43-interacting proteins at gap junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2006-01-01

    Gap junctions are arrays of cell-to-cell channels that allow diffusion of small molecules between neighboring cells. The individual channels are formed by the four-transmembrane connexin (Cx) proteins. Recently, multiple proteins have been found to interact at the cytoplasmic site with the most abun

  4. Optical methods in the study of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Alessio; Cicchi, Riccardo; Carloni, Adolfo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2010-01-01

    Förster (or Fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a physical process in which energy is transferred nonradiatively from an excited fluorophore, serving as a donor, to another chromophore (acceptor). Among the techniques related to fluorescence microscopy, FRET is unique in providing signals sensitive to intra- and intermolecular distances in the 1-10 nm range. Because of its potency, FRET is increasingly used to visualize and quantify the dynamics of protein-protein interaction in living cells, with high spatio-temporal resolution. Here we describe the physical bases of FRET, detailing the principal methods applied: (1) measurement of signal intensity and (2) analysis of fluorescence lifetime (FLIM). Although several technical complications must be carefully considered, both methods can be applied fruitfully to specific fields. For example, FRET based on intensity detection is more suitable to follow biological phenomena at a finely tuned spatial and temporal scale. Furthermore, a specific fluorescence signal occurring close to the plasma membrane (advantage of the discovery and use of spontaneously fluorescent proteins, like the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Until now, FRET has been widely used to analyze the structural characteristics of several proteins, including integrins and ion channels. More recently, this method has been applied to clarify the interaction dynamics of these classes of membrane proteins with cytosolic signaling proteins. We report two examples in which the interaction dynamics between integrins and ion channels have been studied with FRET methods. Using fluorescent antibodies and applying FRET-FLIM, the direct interaction of beta1 integrin with the receptor for Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF-R) has been proved in living endothelial cells. A different approach, based on TIRFM measurement of the FRET intensity of fluorescently labeled recombinant proteins, suggests that a direct interaction also occurs between integrins and the

  5. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (KV channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD, the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins.

  6. Discovering functional interaction patterns in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tolga

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, a considerable amount of research effort has been directed to the analysis of biological networks with the availability of genome-scale networks of genes and/or proteins of an increasing number of organisms. A protein-protein interaction (PPI network is a particular biological network which represents physical interactions between pairs of proteins of an organism. Major research on PPI networks has focused on understanding the topological organization of PPI networks, evolution of PPI networks and identification of conserved subnetworks across different species, discovery of modules of interaction, use of PPI networks for functional annotation of uncharacterized proteins, and improvement of the accuracy of currently available networks. Results In this article, we map known functional annotations of proteins onto a PPI network in order to identify frequently occurring interaction patterns in the functional space. We propose a new frequent pattern identification technique, PPISpan, adapted specifically for PPI networks from a well-known frequent subgraph identification method, gSpan. Existing module discovery techniques either look for specific clique-like highly interacting protein clusters or linear paths of interaction. However, our goal is different; instead of single clusters or pathways, we look for recurring functional interaction patterns in arbitrary topologies. We have applied PPISpan on PPI networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified a number of frequently occurring functional interaction patterns. Conclusion With the help of PPISpan, recurring functional interaction patterns in an organism's PPI network can be identified. Such an analysis offers a new perspective on the modular organization of PPI networks. The complete list of identified functional interaction patterns is available at http://bioserver.ceng.metu.edu.tr/PPISpan/.

  7. Protopia: a protein-protein interaction tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Ruiz-Mostazo, Iván; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions can be considered the basic skeleton for living organism self-organization and homeostasis. Impressive quantities of experimental data are being obtained and computational tools are essential to integrate and to organize this information. This paper presents Protopia, a biological tool that offers a way of searching for proteins and their interactions in different Protein Interaction Web Databases, as a part of a multidisciplinary initiative of our institution for the integration of biological data . Results The tool accesses the different Databases (at present, the free version of Transfac, DIP, Hprd, Int-Act and iHop), and results are expressed with biological protein names or databases codes and can be depicted as a vector or a matrix. They can be represented and handled interactively as an organic graph. Comparison among databases is carried out using the Uniprot codes annotated for each protein. Conclusion The tool locates and integrates the current information stored in the aforementioned databases, and redundancies among them are detected. Results are compatible with the most important network analysers, so that they can be compared and analysed by other world-wide known tools and platforms. The visualization possibilities help to attain this goal and they are especially interesting for handling multiple-step or complex networks. PMID:19828077

  8. Description of interacting channel gating using a stochastic Markovian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, K; Mathias, R T; Gudowska-Nowak, E

    1996-01-01

    Single-channel recordings from membrane patches frequently exhibit multiple conductance levels. In some preparations, the steady-state probabilities of observing these levels do not follow a binomial distribution. This behavior has been reported in sodium channels, potassium channels, acetylcholine receptor channels and gap junction channels. A non-binomial distribution suggests interaction of the channels or the presence of channels or the presence of channels with different open probabilities. However, the current trace sometimes exhibits single transitions spanning several levels. Since the probability of simultaneous transitions of independent channels is infinitesimally small, such observations strongly suggest a cooperative gating behavior. We present a Markov model to describe the cooperative gating of channels using only the all-points current amplitude histograms for the probability of observing the various conductance levels. We investigate the steady-state (or equilibrium) properties of a system of N channels and provide a scheme to express all the probabilities in terms of just two parameters. The main feature of our model is that lateral interaction of channels gives rise to cooperative gating. Another useful feature is the introduction of the language of graph theory which can potentially provide a different avenue to study ion channel kinetics. We write down explicit expressions for systems of two, three and four channels and provide a procedure to describe the system of N channels.

  9. Detecting mutually exclusive interactions in protein-protein interaction maps.

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez Claros, Carmen

    2012-06-08

    Comprehensive protein interaction maps can complement genetic and biochemical experiments and allow the formulation of new hypotheses to be tested in the system of interest. The computational analysis of the maps may help to focus on interesting cases and thereby to appropriately prioritize the validation experiments. We show here that, by automatically comparing and analyzing structurally similar regions of proteins of known structure interacting with a common partner, it is possible to identify mutually exclusive interactions present in the maps with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity higher than 85% and that, in about three fourth of the correctly identified complexes, we also correctly recognize at least one residue (five on average) belonging to the interaction interface. Given the present and continuously increasing number of proteins of known structure, the requirement of the knowledge of the structure of the interacting proteins does not substantially impact on the coverage of our strategy that can be estimated to be around 25%. We also introduce here the Estrella server that embodies this strategy, is designed for users interested in validating specific hypotheses about the functional role of a protein-protein interaction and it also allows access to pre-computed data for seven organisms.

  10. Detecting mutually exclusive interactions in protein-protein interaction maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sánchez Claros

    Full Text Available Comprehensive protein interaction maps can complement genetic and biochemical experiments and allow the formulation of new hypotheses to be tested in the system of interest. The computational analysis of the maps may help to focus on interesting cases and thereby to appropriately prioritize the validation experiments. We show here that, by automatically comparing and analyzing structurally similar regions of proteins of known structure interacting with a common partner, it is possible to identify mutually exclusive interactions present in the maps with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity higher than 85% and that, in about three fourth of the correctly identified complexes, we also correctly recognize at least one residue (five on average belonging to the interaction interface. Given the present and continuously increasing number of proteins of known structure, the requirement of the knowledge of the structure of the interacting proteins does not substantially impact on the coverage of our strategy that can be estimated to be around 25%. We also introduce here the Estrella server that embodies this strategy, is designed for users interested in validating specific hypotheses about the functional role of a protein-protein interaction and it also allows access to pre-computed data for seven organisms.

  11. Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent...

  12. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the best-studied

  13. Ca2+ channels as integrators of G protein-mediated signaling in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Jesse; Diversé-Pierluissi, María A

    2004-11-01

    The observations from Dunlap and Fischbach that transmitter-mediated shortening of the duration of action potentials could be caused by a decrease in calcium conductance led to numerous studies of the mechanisms of modulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Calcium channels are well known targets for inhibition by receptor-G protein pathways, and multiple forms of inhibition have been described. Inhibition of Ca(2+) channels can be mediated by G protein betagamma-subunits or by kinases, such as protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. In the last few years, it has been shown that integration of G protein signaling can take place at the level of the calcium channel by regulation of the interaction of the channel pore-forming subunit with different cellular proteins.

  14. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    OpenAIRE

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixtures. Gelatin gels with added globular protein and globular protein gels with added gelatin were analyzed for their gel microstructure and rheological properties. Mixed gels with altered microstruc...

  15. Interaction of Two Filament Channels of Different Chiralities

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Schmieder, Brigitte; Magara, Tetsuya; Moon, Young-Jae; Uddin, Wahab

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of interactions between the two filament channels of different chiralities and associated dynamics that occurred during 2014 April 18 -- 20. While two flux ropes of different helicity with parallel axial magnetic fields can only undergo a bounce interaction when they are brought together, the observations at the first glance show that the heated plasma is moving from one filament channel to the other. The SDO/AIA 171 A observations and the PFSS magnetic field extrapolation reveal the presence of fan-spine magnetic configuration over the filament channels with a null point located above them. Three different events of filament activations, partial eruptions, and associated filament channel interactions have been observed. The activation initiated in one filament channel seems to propagate along the neighbour filament channel. We believe that the activation and partial eruption of the filaments bring the field lines of flux ropes containing them closer to the null point and trigger the m...

  16. Altered expression of stromal interaction molecule (STIM)-calcium release-activated calcium channel protein (ORAI) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP Rs) in cancer:will they become a new battlefield for oncotherapy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wen; Ying Cheng Huang; HuanHuan Xiu; ZhiMing Shan; KangQing Xu

    2016-01-01

    The stromal interaction molecule (STIM)‑calcium release‑activated calcium channel protein (ORAI) and inositol 1,4,5‑trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) play pivotal roles in the modulation of Ca2+‑regulated pathways from gene transcription to cell apoptosis by driving calcium‑dependent signaling processes. Increasing evidence has implicated the dysregulation of STIM–ORAI and IP3Rs in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. By controlling the activities, struc‑ture, and/or expression levels of these Ca2+‑transporting proteins, malignant cancer cells can hijack them to drive essential biological functions for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the participa‑tion of STIM–ORAI and IP3Rs in the biological behavior of cancer remain elusive. In this review, we summarize recent advances regarding STIM–ORAI and IP3Rs and discuss how they promote cell proliferation, apoptosis evasion, and cell migration through temporal and spatial rearrangements in certain types of malignant cells. An understanding of the essential roles of STIM–ORAI and IP3Rs may provide new pharmacologic targets that achieve a better therapeutic effect by inhibiting their actions in key intracellular signaling pathways.

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJL199C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...cies; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey (4) Ro...n; not conserved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies... species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey Ro

  18. Automatic Extraction of Protein Interaction in Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Peilei; Wang, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction extraction is the key precondition of the construction of protein knowledge network, and it is very important for the research in the biomedicine. This paper extracted directional protein-protein interaction from the biological text, using the SVM-based method. Experiments were evaluated on the LLL05 corpus with good results. The results show that dependency features are import for the protein-protein interaction extraction and features related to the interaction w...

  19. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Using Protein Signature Profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood A. Mahdavi; Yen-Han Lin

    2007-01-01

    Protein domains are conserved and functionally independent structures that play an important role in interactions among related proteins. Domain-domain inter- actions have been recently used to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI). In general, the interaction probability of a pair of domains is scored using a trained scoring function. Satisfying a threshold, the protein pairs carrying those domains are regarded as "interacting". In this study, the signature contents of proteins were utilized to predict PPI pairs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis ele- gans, and Homo sapiens. Similarity between protein signature patterns was scored and PPI predictions were drawn based on the binary similarity scoring function. Results show that the true positive rate of prediction by the proposed approach is approximately 32% higher than that using the maximum likelihood estimation method when compared with a test set, resulting in 22% increase in the area un- der the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. When proteins containing one or two signatures were removed, the sensitivity of the predicted PPI pairs in- creased significantly. The predicted PPI pairs are on average 11 times more likely to interact than the random selection at a confidence level of 0.95, and on aver- age 4 times better than those predicted by either phylogenetic profiling or gene expression profiling.

  20. Protein mixtures: interactions and gelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersch, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gelation is a ubiquitous process in the preparation of foods. As most foods are multi constituent mixtures, understanding gelation in mixtures is an important goal in food science. Here we presented a systematic investigation on the influence of molecular interactions on the gelation in protein mixt

  1. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  2. Efficient mapping of ligand migration channel networks in dynamic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tu-Liang; Song, Guang

    2011-08-01

    For many proteins such as myoglobin, the binding site lies in the interior, and there is no obvious route from the exterior to the binding site in the average structure. Although computer simulations for a limited number of proteins have found some transiently open channels, it is not clear if there exist more channels elsewhere or how the channels are regulated. A systematic approach that can map out the whole ligand migration channel network is lacking. Ligand migration in a dynamic protein resembles closely a well-studied problem in robotics, namely, the navigation of a mobile robot in a dynamic environment. In this work, we present a novel robotic motion planning inspired approach that can map the ligand migration channel network in a dynamic protein. The method combines an efficient spatial mapping of protein inner space with a temporal exploration of protein structural heterogeneity, which is represented by a structure ensemble. The spatial mapping of each conformation in the ensemble produces a partial map of protein inner cavities and their inter-connectivity. These maps are then merged to form a super map that contains all the channels that open dynamically. Results on the pathways in myoglobin for gaseous ligands demonstrate the efficiency of our approach in mapping the ligand migration channel networks. The results, obtained in a significantly less amount of time than trajectory-based approaches, are in agreement with previous simulation results. Additionally, the method clearly illustrates how and what conformational changes open or close a channel.

  3. Quantum transport with two interacting conduction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander J; Migliore, Agostino; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2013-05-07

    The transport properties of a conduction junction model characterized by two mutually coupled channels that strongly differ in their couplings to the leads are investigated. Models of this type describe molecular redox junctions (where a level that is weakly coupled to the leads controls the molecular charge, while a strongly coupled one dominates the molecular conduction), and electron counting devices in which the current in a point contact is sensitive to the charging state of a nearby quantum dot. Here we consider the case where transport in the strongly coupled channel has to be described quantum mechanically (covering the full range between sequential tunneling and co-tunneling), while conduction through the weakly coupled channel is a sequential process that could by itself be described by a simple master equation. We compare the result of a full quantum calculation based on the pseudoparticle non-equilibrium Green function method to that obtained from an approximate mixed quantum-classical calculation, where correlations between the channels are taken into account through either the averaged rates or the averaged energy. We find, for the steady state current, that the approximation based on the averaged rates works well in most of the voltage regime, with marked deviations from the full quantum results only at the threshold for charging the weekly coupled level. These deviations are important for accurate description of the negative differential conduction behavior that often characterizes redox molecular junctions in the neighborhood of this threshold.

  4. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction.

  5. Small Terminal MIMO Channels with User Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund; Andersen, Jørgen Bach; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of results obtained from measurements of different types of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channels. For the indoor case measurements were made at 5.8 GHz from access points (APs) to mobile stations (MSs) at different places in a large open office type room. Th...... an investigation of the potentials for communication between cars approaching as well as in convoy and from inside and outside the car....

  6. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  7. Signatures of protein structure in the cooperative gating of mechanosensitive ion channels

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins deform the surrounding lipid bilayer, which can lead to membrane-mediated interactions between neighboring proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we demonstrate how the observed differences in protein structure can affect membrane-mediated interactions and cooperativity among membrane proteins. We find that distinct oligomeric states of MscL lead to distinct gateway states for the clustering of MscL, and predict signatures of MscL structure and spatial organization in the cooperative gating of MscL. Our modeling approach establishes a quantitative relation between the observed shapes and cooperative function of membrane~proteins.

  8. CFTR chloride channel in the apical compartments: spatiotemporal coupling to its interacting partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunying; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2010-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel located primarily at the apical or luminal surfaces of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, kidney, sweat gland, as well as male reproductive tract, where it plays a crucial role in transepithelial fluid homeostasis. CFTR dysfunction can be detrimental and may result in life-threatening disorders. CFTR hypofunctioning because of genetic defects leads to cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, whereas CFTR hyperfunctioning resulting from various infections evokes secretory diarrhea, the leading cause of mortality in early childhood. Therefore, maintaining a dynamic balance between CFTR up-regulating processes and CFTR down-regulating processes is essential for maintaining fluid and body homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that protein-protein interactions play a critical role in the fine-tuned regulation of CFTR function. A growing number of proteins have been reported to interact directly or indirectly with CFTR chloride channel, suggesting that CFTR might be coupled spatially and temporally to a wide variety of interacting partners including ion channels, receptors, transporters, scaffolding proteins, enzyme molecules, signaling molecules, and effectors. Most interactions occur primarily between the opposing terminal tails (amino or carboxyl) of CFTR protein and its binding partners, either directly or mediated through various PDZ scaffolding proteins. These dynamic interactions impact the channel function, as well as localization and processing of CFTR protein within cells. This article reviews the most recent progress and findings about the interactions between CFTR and its binding partners through PDZ scaffolding proteins, as well as the spatiotemporal regulation of CFTR-containing macromolecular signaling complexes in the apical compartments of polarized cells lining the secretory epithelia.

  9. Forest Management Effects on Channel Wood and Wood-Channel Interactions in Caspar Creek, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, S.

    2006-12-01

    First-cycle logging in much of California's redwood region converted streams with some of the highest known wood volumes and piece sizes to efficient log transport channels. A century later, second-growth trees are still much smaller than old growth, and later logging and stream cleaning have further affected potential wood inputs and large woody debris (LWD) volumes in channels. At Caspar Creek, a 50-year paired watershed study creates an opportunity to compare the effects of two second-growth forest management strategies on wood dynamics in these channels, and to examine how the resulting differences in LWD affect channel form and process. Both the North and South Forks of Caspar Creek started the 20th century with almost no in-channel wood and little potential LWD as a result of clearcut logging, burning, and channel clearing. Stands had partially regrown by 1968, when near-channel roadbuilding and selective logging in the 424-ha South Fork watershed again reduced potential channel LWD. Trees that fell into the channel during logging were removed, along with some instream wood. Logging began in the 384-ha North Fork in 1989 using ridgetop roads; buffer strips were left between the mainstem channel and upslope clearcuts. Potential LWD in the buffer strips was reduced by selective cutting, but channel LWD was not immediately affected. LWD mapping, inventories, and tagging, channel cross-sections and photos, and pool mapping and volume measurements show differences in channel wood and LWD-channel interactions between the two watersheds. Windthrow from buffer strips increased the total channel LWD volume in the North Fork in the mid 1990's while reducing potential future LWD. These higher LWD loads increased pool volumes and enabled increased sediment storage, particularly upstream of logjams. In the South Fork, total LWD volumes are lower and a higher proportion of the wood is residual old growth pieces, some of which entered the channel during the 1970's logging

  10. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically inter...

  11. In-depth study of the interaction, sensitivity and gating modulation by PUFAs on K+ channels; interaction and new targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Moreno

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage gated potassium channels (Kv are membrane proteins that allow selective flow of K+ ions in a voltage-dependent manner. These channels play an important role in several excitable cells as neurons, cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle. Over the last 20 years, it has been shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs enhance or decrease the activity of several cardiac Kv channels. PUFAs-dependent modulation of potassium ion channels has been reported to be cardioprotective. However, the precise cellular mechanism underlying the cardiovascular benefits remained unclear in part because new PUFAs targets and signaling pathways continue being discovered. In this review, we will focus on recent data available concerning the following aspects of the Kv channel modulation by PUFAs: i the exact residues involved in PUFAs-Kv channels interaction; ii the structural PUFAs determinants important for their effects on Kv channels; iii the mechanism of the gating modulation of KV channels and, finally, iv the PUFAs modulation of a few new targets present in smooth muscle cells, KCa1.1, K2P and KATP channels, involved in vascular relaxation.

  12. In-Depth Study of the Interaction, Sensitivity, and Gating Modulation by PUFAs on K+ Channels; Interaction and New Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Cristina; de la Cruz, Alicia; Valenzuela, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Voltage gated potassium channels (KV) are membrane proteins that allow selective flow of K+ ions in a voltage-dependent manner. These channels play an important role in several excitable cells as neurons, cardiomyocytes, and vascular smooth muscle. Over the last 20 years, it has been shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) enhance or decrease the activity of several cardiac KV channels. PUFAs-dependent modulation of potassium ion channels has been reported to be cardioprotective. However, the precise cellular mechanism underlying the cardiovascular benefits remained unclear in part because new PUFAs targets and signaling pathways continue being discovered. In this review, we will focus on recent data available concerning the following aspects of the KV channel modulation by PUFAs: (i) the exact residues involved in PUFAs-KV channels interaction; (ii) the structural PUFAs determinants important for their effects on KV channels; (iii) the mechanism of the gating modulation of KV channels and, finally, (iv) the PUFAs modulation of a few new targets present in smooth muscle cells (SMC), KCa1.1, K2P, and KATP channels, involved in vascular relaxation. PMID:27933000

  13. New insights into TRP channels: Interaction with pattern recognition receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Huirong; Yi, Fan

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have implicated that the activation of innate immune system and inflammatory mechanisms are of importance in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. The innate immune system is present in almost all multicellular organisms in response to pathogens or tissue injury, which is performed via germ-line encoded pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or dangers-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Intracellular pathways linking immune and inflammatory response to ion channel expression and function have been recently identified. Among ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a major family of non-selective cation-permeable channels that function as polymodal cellular sensors involved in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about classifications, functions, and interactions of TRP channels and PRRs, which may provide new insights into their roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases.

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL226C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omputational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a ... computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesicle-

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR425W, YGL161C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data sug...olgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible ro

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YOR155C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YLR245C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...Vps9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YPR193C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...in; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in trans

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL161C, YDR084C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available les; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesi...GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction

  20. Probing protein-sugar interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, C; Eisenberg, H; Ghirlando, R

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the partial specific volumes (2) (ml/g), hydration, and cosolvent interactions of rabbit muscle aldolase by equilibrium sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge and by direct density increment (partial differential/partial differentialc(2))(mu) measurements over a range of sugar concentrations and temperature. In a series of sugars increasing in size, glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and alpha-cyclodextrin, (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu) decreases linearly with the solvent density rho(0). These sugar cosolvents do not interact with the protein; however, the interaction parameter B(1) (g water/g protein) mildly increases with increasing sugar size. The experimental B(1) values are smaller than values calculated by excluded volume (rolling ball) considerations. B(1) relates to hydration in this and in other instances studied. It decreases with increasing temperature, leading to an increase in (2) due to reduced water of hydration electrostriction. The density increments (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu), however, decrease in concave up form in the case of glycerol and in concave down form for trehalose, leading to more complex behavior in the case of carbohydrates playing a biological role as osmolytes and antifreeze agents. A critical discussion, based on the thermodynamics of multicomponent solutions, is presented.

  1. On the convergence of multi-channel effective interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, M; Kuo, T T S; Schaefer, B J; Wambach, J

    2006-01-01

    A detailed analysis of convergence properties of the Andreozzi-Lee-Suzuki iteration method, which is used for the calculation of low-momentum effective potentials Vlowk is presented. After summarizing different modifications of the iteration method for one-flavor channel we introduce a simple model in order to study the generalization of the iteration method to multi-flavor channels. The failure of a straightforward generalization is discussed. The introduction of a channel-dependent cutoff cures the conceptual and technical problems. This novel method has already been applied successfully for realistic hyperon-nucleon interactions.

  2. Noise analysis of ionization kinetics in a protein ion channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    1993-08-01

    We observed excess current noise generated by the reversible ionization of sites in a transmembrane protein ion channel, which is analogous to current fluctuations found recently in solid state microstructure electronic devices. Specifically the current through fully open single channels formed by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin shows pH dependent fluctuations. We show that noise analysis of the open channel current can be used to evaluate the ionization rate constants, the number of sites participating in the ionization process, and the effect of recharging a single site on the channel conductance.

  3. H+ channels in embryonic Biomphalaria glabrata cell membranes: Putative roles in snail host-schistosome interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Brandon J.; Bickham-Wright, Utibe; Yoshino, Timothy P.; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2017-01-01

    The human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni causes intestinal schistosomiasis, a widespread neglected tropical disease. Infection of freshwater snails Biomphalaria spp. is an essential step in the transmission of S. mansoni to humans, although the physiological interactions between the parasite and its obligate snail host that determine success or failure are still poorly understood. In the present study, the B. glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line, a widely used in vitro model for hemocyte-like activity, was used to investigate membrane properties, and assess the impact of larval transformation proteins (LTP) on identified ion channels. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from Bge cells demonstrated that a Zn2+-sensitive H+ channel serves as the dominant plasma membrane conductance. Moreover, treatment of Bge cells with Zn2+ significantly inhibited an otherwise robust production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus implicating H+ channels in the regulation of this immune function. A heat-sensitive component of LTP appears to target H+ channels, enhancing Bge cell H+ current over 2-fold. Both Bge cells and B. glabrata hemocytes express mRNA encoding a hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1 (HVCN1)-like protein, although its function in hemocytes remains to be determined. This study is the first to identify and characterize an H+ channel in non-neuronal cells of freshwater molluscs. Importantly, the involvement of these channels in ROS production and their modulation by LTP suggest that these channels may function in immune defense responses against larval S. mansoni. PMID:28319196

  4. Channelpedia: an integrative and interactive database for ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish eRanjan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are membrane proteins that selectively conduct ions across the cell membrane. The flux of ions through ion channels drives electrical and biochemical processes in cells and plays a critical role in shaping the electrical properties of neurons. During the past three decades,extensive research has been carried out to characterize the molecular, structural and biophysical properties of ion channels. This research has begun to elucidate the role of ion channels in neuronal function and has subsequently led to the development of computational models of ion channel function. Although there have been substantial efforts to consolidate these findings into easily accessible and coherent online resources, a single comprehensive resource is still lacking. The success of these initiatives has been hindered by the sheer diversity of approaches and the variety in data formats. Here, we present Channelpedia (http://www.Channelpedia.net which is designed to store information related to ion channels and models and is characterized by an efficient information management framework. Composed of a combination of a database and a wiki like discussion platform Channelpedia allows researchers to collaborate and synthesize ion channel information from literature. Equipped to automatically update references, Channelpedia integrates and highlights recent publications with relevant information in the database. It is web based, freely accessible and currently contains 187 annotated ion channels with 45 Hodgkin-Huxley models.

  5. Inferring protein-protein interaction complexes from immunoprecipitation data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutzera, J.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Malovannaya, A.; Smit, A.B.; Van Mechelen, I.; Smilde, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein inverted question markprotein interactions in cells are widely explored using small inverted question markscale experiments. However, the search for protein complexes and their interactions in data from high throughput experiments such as immunoprecipitation is still a challenge.

  6. New approach for predicting protein-protein interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of vital importance for virtually all processes of a living cell. The study of these associations of protein molecules could improve people's understanding of diseases and provide basis for therapeutic approaches.

  7. G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type calcium channels by regulators of G protein signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Wittemann, S; Herlitze, S

    2000-10-01

    1. Fast synaptic transmission is triggered by the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels which can be inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which are responsible for >100-fold increases in the GTPase activity of G proteins and might be involved in the regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels. In this study we investigated the effects of RGS2 on G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type channels expressed in a human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell line using whole-cell recordings. 2. RGS2 markedly accelerates transmitter-mediated inhibition and recovery from inhibition of Ba2+ currents (IBa) through P/Q-type channels heterologously expressed with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (mAChR M2). 3. Both RGS2 and RGS4 modulate the prepulse facilitation properties of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. G protein reinhibition is accelerated, while release from inhibition is slowed. These kinetics depend on the availability of G protein alpha and betagamma subunits which is altered by RGS proteins. 4. RGS proteins unmask the Ca2+ channel beta subunit modulation of Ca2+ channel G protein inhibition. In the presence of RGS2, P/Q-type channels containing the beta2a and beta3 subunits reveal significantly altered kinetics of G protein modulation and increased facilitation compared to Ca2+ channels coexpressed with the beta1b or beta4 subunit.

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YEL043W, YOR164C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on quantitative analysis of protein-protein interaction maps; may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification studies...ing based on quantitative analysis of protein-protein interaction maps; may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification studies

  9. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are separate

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL095C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a ...gene name YIP4 Prey description Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computation

  11. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  12. Bioinformatic Prediction of WSSV-Host Protein-Protein Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WSSV is one of the most dangerous pathogens in shrimp aquaculture. However, the molecular mechanism of how WSSV interacts with shrimp is still not very clear. In the present study, bioinformatic approaches were used to predict interactions between proteins from WSSV and shrimp. The genome data of WSSV (NC_003225.1 and the constructed transcriptome data of F. chinensis were used to screen potentially interacting proteins by searching in protein interaction databases, including STRING, Reactome, and DIP. Forty-four pairs of proteins were suggested to have interactions between WSSV and the shrimp. Gene ontology analysis revealed that 6 pairs of these interacting proteins were classified into “extracellular region” or “receptor complex” GO-terms. KEGG pathway analysis showed that they were involved in the “ECM-receptor interaction pathway.” In the 6 pairs of interacting proteins, an envelope protein called “collagen-like protein” (WSSV-CLP encoded by an early virus gene “wsv001” in WSSV interacted with 6 deduced proteins from the shrimp, including three integrin alpha (ITGA, two integrin beta (ITGB, and one syndecan (SDC. Sequence analysis on WSSV-CLP, ITGA, ITGB, and SDC revealed that they possessed the sequence features for protein-protein interactions. This study might provide new insights into the interaction mechanisms between WSSV and shrimp.

  13. PSAIA – Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahoviček Kristian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSAIA (Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer was developed to compute geometric parameters for large sets of protein structures in order to predict and investigate protein-protein interaction sites. Results In addition to most relevant established algorithms, PSAIA offers a new method PIADA (Protein Interaction Atom Distance Algorithm for the determination of residue interaction pairs. We found that PIADA produced more satisfactory results than comparable algorithms implemented in PSAIA. Particular advantages of PSAIA include its capacity to combine different methods to detect the locations and types of interactions between residues and its ability, without any further automation steps, to handle large numbers of protein structures and complexes. Generally, the integration of a variety of methods enables PSAIA to offer easier automation of analysis and greater reliability of results. PSAIA can be used either via a graphical user interface or from the command-line. Results are generated in either tabular or XML format. Conclusion In a straightforward fashion and for large sets of protein structures, PSAIA enables the calculation of protein geometric parameters and the determination of location and type for protein-protein interaction sites. XML formatted output enables easy conversion of results to various formats suitable for statistic analysis. Results from smaller data sets demonstrated the influence of geometry on protein interaction sites. Comprehensive analysis of properties of large data sets lead to new information useful in the prediction of protein-protein interaction sites.

  14. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL189W, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tein; not conserved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...myces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as pr

  16. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Colwell, Lucy J; Wingreen, Ned S

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multi-protein complexes, and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners. Hence, the sequences of interacting partners are correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify which proteins are specific interaction partners from sequence data alone. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer direct couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the three-dimensional structures of proteins from sequences. Building on this approach, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from among the members of two protein families. We assess the algorithm's performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. The algorithm proves successful without any a pri...

  17. In vivo bacterial morphogenetic protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, R.; den Blaauwen, T.; Meghea, A.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will discuss none-invasive techniques that are widely used to study protein-protein interactions. As an example, their application in exploring interactions between proteins involved in bacterial cell division will be evaluated. First, bacterial morphology and cell division of the rod-s

  18. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhihao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity method, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. Following the approach of that of the previously proposed clustering algorithm IPCA which expands clusters starting from seeded vertices, we present a clustering algorithm OIIP based on the new weighted Protein-Protein interaction networks for identifying protein complexes. Results The algorithm OIIP is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Experimental results show that the algorithm OIIP has higher F-measure and accuracy compared to other competing approaches.

  19. Analysis of Protein-Membrane Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine

    Cellular membranes are complex structures, consisting of hundreds of different lipids and proteins. These membranes act as barriers between distinct environments, constituting hot spots for many essential functions of the cell, including signaling, energy conversion, and transport. These functions...... are implemented by soluble proteins reversibly binding to, as well as by integral membrane proteins embedded in, cellular membranes. The activity and interaction of these proteins is furthermore modulated by the lipids of the membrane. Here, liposomes were used as model membrane systems to investigate...... interactions between proteins and lipids. First, interactions of soluble proteins with membranes and specific lipids were studied, using two proteins: Annexin V and Tma1. The protein was first subjected to a lipid/protein overlay assay to identify candidate interaction partners in a fast and efficient way...

  20. Assessing protein-protein interactions based on the semantic similarity of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guangyu; Kim, Byungmin; Alguwaizani, Saud; Han, Kyungsook

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) has been used in estimating the semantic similarity of proteins since it has the largest and reliable vocabulary of gene products and characteristics. We developed a new method which can assess Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) using the branching factor and information content of the common ancestor of interacting proteins in the GO hierarchy. We performed a comparative evaluation of the measure with other GO-based similarity measures and evaluation results showed that our method outperformed others in most GO domains.

  1. Cooperative endocytosis of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renigunta, Vijay; Fischer, Thomas; Zuzarte, Marylou; Kling, Stefan; Zou, Xinle; Siebert, Kai; Limberg, Maren M; Rinné, Susanne; Decher, Niels; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-06-15

    The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 interacts with the acid-sensitive potassium channel TASK-1. The functional relevance of this interaction was studied by heterologous expression of these proteins (and mutants thereof) in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. Coexpression of syntaxin-8 caused a fourfold reduction in TASK-1 current, a corresponding reduction in the expression of TASK-1 at the cell surface, and a marked increase in the rate of endocytosis of the channel. TASK-1 and syntaxin-8 colocalized in the early endosomal compartment, as indicated by the endosomal markers 2xFYVE and rab5. The stimulatory effect of the SNARE protein on the endocytosis of the channel was abolished when both an endocytosis signal in TASK-1 and an endocytosis signal in syntaxin-8 were mutated. A syntaxin-8 mutant that cannot assemble with other SNARE proteins had virtually the same effect as wild-type syntaxin-8. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed formation and endocytosis of vesicles containing fluorescence-tagged clathrin, TASK-1, and/or syntaxin-8. Our results suggest that the unassembled form of syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1 are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a cooperative manner. This implies that syntaxin-8 regulates the endocytosis of TASK-1. Our study supports the idea that endosomal SNARE proteins can have functions unrelated to membrane fusion.

  2. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL198W, YDR084C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available les; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesi... GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interactio

  3. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL189W, YOR284W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ait as prey (0) YOR284W HUA2 Cytoplasmic protein of unknown function; computational analysis of large-scal...protein of unknown function; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests

  4. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  5. A conserved mammalian protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Pérez-Bercoff

    Full Text Available Physical interactions between proteins mediate a variety of biological functions, including signal transduction, physical structuring of the cell and regulation. While extensive catalogs of such interactions are known from model organisms, their evolutionary histories are difficult to study given the lack of interaction data from phylogenetic outgroups. Using phylogenomic approaches, we infer a upper bound on the time of origin for a large set of human protein-protein interactions, showing that most such interactions appear relatively ancient, dating no later than the radiation of placental mammals. By analyzing paired alignments of orthologous and putatively interacting protein-coding genes from eight mammals, we find evidence for weak but significant co-evolution, as measured by relative selective constraint, between pairs of genes with interacting proteins. However, we find no strong evidence for shared instances of directional selection within an interacting pair. Finally, we use a network approach to show that the distribution of selective constraint across the protein interaction network is non-random, with a clear tendency for interacting proteins to share similar selective constraints. Collectively, the results suggest that, on the whole, protein interactions in mammals are under selective constraint, presumably due to their functional roles.

  6. Hemoglobin interacting proteins and implications of spectrin hemoglobin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Avik; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-10-14

    In this report we have analyzed interacting partners of hemoglobin inside erythrocyte and sought possible implications of hemoglobin-spectrin interaction. Our list of identified cytosolic hemoglobin interacting proteins includes redox regulators like peroxiredoxin-2, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1, flavin reductase and chaperones like HSP70, α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein. Others include metabolic enzymes like carbonic anhydrase-1, selenium binding protein-1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase and nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Additionally, various membrane proteins like α and β spectrin, ankyrin, band3, protein4.1, actin and glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase have been shown to interact with hemoglobin. Our result indicates that major membrane skeleton protein spectrin, that also has a chaperone like activity, helps to fold the unstable alpha-globin chains in vitro. Taken together our results could provide insight into a protein network evolved around hemoglobin molecule inside erythrocyte that may add a new perspective in understanding the hemoglobin function and homeostasis.

  7. Protein Synthesis--An Interactive Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Lee Ann J.; Jackson, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interactive game designed to help students see and understand the dynamic relationship between DNA, RNA, and proteins. Appropriate for either a class or laboratory setting, following a lecture session about protein synthesis. (DDR)

  8. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact wi...

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR291C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey Rows with this prey as prey (

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows wi...in-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey (4) Rows with this prey as bait (1) 28 6 3 4 0 0 ...d in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale prote

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR124C, YGR268C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available that of Type I J-proteins; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a...tational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in actin patch as

  12. Quantification of protein interaction kinetics in a micro droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L. L. [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wang, S. P., E-mail: shaopeng.wang@asu.edu, E-mail: njtao@asu.edu; Shan, X. N.; Tao, N. J., E-mail: shaopeng.wang@asu.edu, E-mail: njtao@asu.edu [Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Zhang, S. T. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Characterization of protein interactions is essential to the discovery of disease biomarkers, the development of diagnostic assays, and the screening for therapeutic drugs. Conventional flow-through kinetic measurements need relative large amount of sample that is not feasible for precious protein samples. We report a novel method to measure protein interaction kinetics in a single droplet with sub microliter or less volume. A droplet in a humidity-controlled environmental chamber is replacing the microfluidic channels as the reactor for the protein interaction. The binding process is monitored by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system. Association curves are obtained from the average SPR image intensity in the center area of the droplet. The washing step required by conventional flow-through SPR method is eliminated in the droplet method. The association and dissociation rate constants and binding affinity of an antigen-antibody interaction are obtained by global fitting of association curves at different concentrations. The result obtained by this method is accurate as validated by conventional flow-through SPR system. This droplet-based method not only allows kinetic studies for proteins with limited supply but also opens the door for high-throughput protein interaction study in a droplet-based microarray format that enables measurement of many to many interactions on a single chip.

  13. Quantification of protein interaction kinetics in a micro droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. L.; Wang, S. P.; Shan, X. N.; Zhang, S. T.; Tao, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of protein interactions is essential to the discovery of disease biomarkers, the development of diagnostic assays, and the screening for therapeutic drugs. Conventional flow-through kinetic measurements need relative large amount of sample that is not feasible for precious protein samples. We report a novel method to measure protein interaction kinetics in a single droplet with sub microliter or less volume. A droplet in a humidity-controlled environmental chamber is replacing the microfluidic channels as the reactor for the protein interaction. The binding process is monitored by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system. Association curves are obtained from the average SPR image intensity in the center area of the droplet. The washing step required by conventional flow-through SPR method is eliminated in the droplet method. The association and dissociation rate constants and binding affinity of an antigen-antibody interaction are obtained by global fitting of association curves at different concentrations. The result obtained by this method is accurate as validated by conventional flow-through SPR system. This droplet-based method not only allows kinetic studies for proteins with limited supply but also opens the door for high-throughput protein interaction study in a droplet-based microarray format that enables measurement of many to many interactions on a single chip.

  14. Adding protein context to the human protein-protein interaction network to reveal meaningful interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    Full Text Available Interactions of proteins regulate signaling, catalysis, gene expression and many other cellular functions. Therefore, characterizing the entire human interactome is a key effort in current proteomics research. This challenge is complicated by the dynamic nature of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, which are conditional on the cellular context: both interacting proteins must be expressed in the same cell and localized in the same organelle to meet. Additionally, interactions underlie a delicate control of signaling pathways, e.g. by post-translational modifications of the protein partners - hence, many diseases are caused by the perturbation of these mechanisms. Despite the high degree of cell-state specificity of PPIs, many interactions are measured under artificial conditions (e.g. yeast cells are transfected with human genes in yeast two-hybrid assays or even if detected in a physiological context, this information is missing from the common PPI databases. To overcome these problems, we developed a method that assigns context information to PPIs inferred from various attributes of the interacting proteins: gene expression, functional and disease annotations, and inferred pathways. We demonstrate that context consistency correlates with the experimental reliability of PPIs, which allows us to generate high-confidence tissue- and function-specific subnetworks. We illustrate how these context-filtered networks are enriched in bona fide pathways and disease proteins to prove the ability of context-filters to highlight meaningful interactions with respect to various biological questions. We use this approach to study the lung-specific pathways used by the influenza virus, pointing to IRAK1, BHLHE40 and TOLLIP as potential regulators of influenza virus pathogenicity, and to study the signalling pathways that play a role in Alzheimer's disease, identifying a pathway involving the altered phosphorylation of the Tau protein. Finally, we provide the

  15. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identification of interaction partners and structural characterization of protein interactions because of its high sensitivity, mass accuracy and tolerance towards sample heterogeneity. Several tools that allow studies of protein interaction are now...... available and recent developments that increase the confidence of studies of protein interaction by mass spectrometry include quantification of affinity-purified proteins by stable isotope labeling and reagents for surface topology studies that can be identified by mass-contributing reporters (e.g. isotope...... labels, cleavable cross-linkers or fragment ions. The use of mass spectrometers to study protein interactions using deuterium exchange and for analysis of intact protein complexes recently has progressed considerably....

  16. Phospholipase C not protein kinase C is required for the activation of TRPC5 channels by cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisanti, Laurel A; Kurada, Lalitha; Cilz, Nicholas I; Porter, James E; Lei, Saobo

    2012-08-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in the brain where it interacts with two G protein-coupled receptors (CCK1 and CCK2). Both types of CCK receptors are coupled to G(q/11) proteins resulting in increased function of phospholipase C (PLC) pathway. Whereas CCK has been suggested to increase neuronal excitability in the brain via activation of cationic channels, the types of cationic channels have not yet been identified. Here, we co-expressed CCK2 receptors and TRPC5 channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and studied the effects of CCK on TRPC5 channels using patch-clamp techniques. Our results demonstrate that activation of CCK2 receptors robustly potentiates the function of TRPC5 channels. CCK-induced activation of TRPC5 channels requires the functions of G-proteins and PLC and depends on extracellular Ca(2+). The activation of TRPC5 channels mediated by CCK2 receptors is independent of IP(3) receptors and protein kinase C. CCK-induced opening of TRPC5 channels is not store-operated because application of thapsigargin to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores failed to alter CCK-induced TRPC5 channel currents significantly. Bath application of CCK also significantly increased the open probability of TRPC5 single channel currents in cell-attached patches. Because CCK exerts extensive effects in the brain, our results may provide a novel mechanism to explain its roles in modulating neuronal excitability.

  17. Protein interaction networks from literature mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Sigeo

    2005-03-01

    The ability to accurately predict and understand physiological changes in the biological network system in response to disease or drug therapeutics is of crucial importance in life science. The extensive amount of gene expression data generated from even a single microarray experiment often proves difficult to fully interpret and comprehend the biological significance. An increasing knowledge of protein interactions stored in the PubMed database, as well as the advancement of natural language processing, however, makes it possible to construct protein interaction networks from the gene expression information that are essential for understanding the biological meaning. From the in house literature mining system we have developed, the protein interaction network for humans was constructed. By analysis based on the graph-theoretical characterization of the total interaction network in literature, we found that the network is scale-free and semantic long-ranged interactions (i.e. inhibit, induce) between proteins dominate in the total interaction network, reducing the degree exponent. Interaction networks generated based on scientific text in which the interaction event is ambiguously described result in disconnected networks. In contrast interaction networks based on text in which the interaction events are clearly stated result in strongly connected networks. The results of protein-protein interaction networks obtained in real applications from microarray experiments are discussed: For example, comparisons of the gene expression data indicative of either a good or a poor prognosis for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL rearrangements, using our system, showed newly discovered signaling cross-talk.

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR103W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tein involved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors...gulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR040W, YDL188C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YPR040W TIP41 Protein that interacts physically and genetically with Tap42p, which ...ait ORF YPR040W Bait gene name TIP41 Bait description Protein that interacts physically and genetically

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR040W, YDL134C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YPR040W TIP41 Protein that interacts physically and genetically with Tap42p, which ...Bait ORF YPR040W Bait gene name TIP41 Bait description Protein that interacts physically and genetically

  1. Side-effects of protein kinase inhibitors on ion channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youn Kyoung Son; Hongzoo Park; Amy L Firth; Won Sun Park

    2013-12-01

    Protein kinases are one of the largest gene families and have regulatory roles in all aspects of eukaryotic cell function. Modulation of protein kinase activity is a desirable therapeutic approach for a number of human diseases associated with aberrant kinase activity, including cancers, arthritis and cardiovascular disorders. Several strategies have been used to develop specific and selective protein kinase modulators, primarily via inhibition of phosphorylation and down-regulation of kinase gene expression. These strategies are effective at regulating intracellular signalling pathways, but are unfortunately associated with several undesirable effects, particularly those that modulate ion channel function. In fact, the side-effects have precluded these inhibitors from being both useful experimental tools and therapeutically viable. This review focuses on the ion channel side-effects of several protein kinase inhibitors and specifically on those modulating K+, Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. It is hoped that the information provided with a detailed summary in this review will assist the future development of novel specific and selective compounds targeting protein kinases both for experimental tools and for therapeutic approaches.

  2. Human cancer protein-protein interaction network: a structural perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Kar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network. The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%. We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub

  3. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGR268C, YER125W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available larity to that of Type I J-proteins; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data ...equence similarity to that of Type I J-proteins; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein inter

  4. Interaction of zwitterionic penicillins with the OmpF channel facilitates their translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelon, Christophe; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M; Winterhalter, Mathias; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2006-03-01

    To study translocation of beta-lactam antibiotics of different size and charge across the outer bacterial membrane, we combine an analysis of ion currents through single trimeric outer membrane protein F (OmpF) porins in planar lipid bilayers with molecular dynamics simulations. Because the size of penicillin molecules is close to the size of the narrowest part of the OmpF pore, penicillins occlude the pore during their translocation. Favorably interacting penicillins cause time-resolvable transient blockages of the small-ion current through the channel and thereby provide information about their dynamics within the pore. Analyzing these random fluctuations, we find that ampicillin and amoxicillin have a relatively high affinity for OmpF. In contrast, no or only a weak interaction is detected for carbenicillin, azlocillin, and piperacillin. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest a possible pathway of these drugs through the OmpF channel and rationalize our experimental findings. For zwitterionic ampicillin and amoxicillin, we identify a region of binding sites near the narrowest part of the channel pore. Interactions with these sites partially compensate for the entropic cost of drug confinement by the channel. Whereas azlocillin and piperacillin are clearly too big to pass through the channel constriction, dianionic carbenicillin does not find an efficient binding region in the constriction zone. Carbenicillin's favorable interactions are limited to the extracellular vestibule. These observations confirm our earlier suggestion that a set of high-affinity sites at the narrowest part of the OmpF channel improves a drug's ability to cross the membrane via the pore.

  5. Mapping interactions of Chikungunya virus nonstructural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, R; Rana, Jyoti; Dudha, Namrata; Kumar, Kapila; Gabrani, Reema; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Gupta, Amita; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-10-01

    The four nonstructural proteins (nsPs1-4) of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) play important roles involving enzymatic activities and specific interactions with both viral and host components, during different stages of viral pathogenesis. Elucidation of the presence and/or absence of interactions among nsPs in a systematic manner is thus of scientific interest. In the current study, each pair-wise combination among the four nonstructural proteins of CHIKV was systematically analyzed for possible interactions. Six novel protein interactions were identified for CHIKV, using systems such as yeast two-hybrid, GST pull down and ELISA, three of which have not been previously reported for the genus Alphavirus. These interactions form a network of organized associations that suggest the spatial arrangement of nonstructural proteins in the late replicase complex. The study identified novel interactions as well as concurred with previously described associations in related alphaviruses.

  6. Intermolecular Interactions in the TMEM16A Dimer Controlling Channel Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudieri, Paolo; Musante, Ilaria; Gianotti, Ambra; Moran, Oscar; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2016-12-01

    TMEM16A and TMEM16B are plasma membrane proteins with Ca2+-dependent Cl‑ channel function. By replacing the carboxy-terminus of TMEM16A with the equivalent region of TMEM16B, we obtained channels with potentiation of channel activity. Progressive shortening of the chimeric region restricted the “activating domain” to a short sequence close to the last transmembrane domain and led to TMEM16A channels with high activity at very low intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this effect, we carried out experiments based on double chimeras, Forster resonance energy transfer, and intermolecular cross-linking. We also modeled TMEM16A structure using the Nectria haematococca TMEM16 protein as template. Our results indicate that the enhanced activity in chimeric channels is due to altered interaction between the carboxy-terminus and the first intracellular loop in the TMEM16A homo-dimer. Mimicking this perturbation with a small molecule could be the basis for a pharmacological stimulation of TMEM16A-dependent Cl‑ transport.

  7. In vivo bacterial morphogenetic protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    van der Ploeg, R.; den Blaauwen, T.; Meghea, A.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will discuss none-invasive techniques that are widely used to study protein-protein interactions. As an example, their application in exploring interactions between proteins involved in bacterial cell division will be evaluated. First, bacterial morphology and cell division of the rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli will be introduced. Next, three bacterial two-hybrid methods and three Förster resonance energy transfer detection methods that are frequently applied to detect int...

  8. An interactive visualization tool for multi-channel confocal microscopy data in neurobiology research

    KAUST Repository

    Yong Wan,

    2009-11-01

    Confocal microscopy is widely used in neurobiology for studying the three-dimensional structure of the nervous system. Confocal image data are often multi-channel, with each channel resulting from a different fluorescent dye or fluorescent protein; one channel may have dense data, while another has sparse; and there are often structures at several spatial scales: subneuronal domains, neurons, and large groups of neurons (brain regions). Even qualitative analysis can therefore require visualization using techniques and parameters fine-tuned to a particular dataset. Despite the plethora of volume rendering techniques that have been available for many years, the techniques standardly used in neurobiological research are somewhat rudimentary, such as looking at image slices or maximal intensity projections. Thus there is a real demand from neurobiologists, and biologists in general, for a flexible visualization tool that allows interactive visualization of multi-channel confocal data, with rapid fine-tuning of parameters to reveal the three-dimensional relationships of structures of interest. Together with neurobiologists, we have designed such a tool, choosing visualization methods to suit the characteristics of confocal data and a typical biologist\\'s workflow. We use interactive volume rendering with intuitive settings for multidimensional transfer functions, multiple render modes and multi-views for multi-channel volume data, and embedding of polygon data into volume data for rendering and editing. As an example, we apply this tool to visualize confocal microscopy datasets of the developing zebrafish visual system.

  9. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YKL076C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...NA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YNR048W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...y of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YML015C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...y of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YOR284W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available th this bait as prey (0) YOR284W HUA2 Cytoplasmic protein of unknown function; computational analysis of large-scale... unknown function; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interact

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR447C, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xpression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Sp...; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; act

  15. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dwyer, Robert S.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein−protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multiprotein complexes and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners, causing their sequences to be correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify, from sequence data alone, which proteins are specific interaction partners. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the 3D structures of proteins from sequences. Thus inspired, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from two protein families whose members are known to interact. We first assess the algorithm’s performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. We obtain a striking 0.93 true positive fraction on our complete dataset without any a priori knowledge of interaction partners, and we uncover the origin of this success. We then apply the algorithm to proteins from ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter complexes, and obtain accurate predictions in these systems as well. Finally, we present two metrics that accurately distinguish interacting protein families from noninteracting ones, using only sequence data. PMID:27663738

  16. Noninvasive imaging of protein-protein interactions in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D.; Sharma, Vijay; Pica, Christina M.; Dahlheimer, Julie L.; Li, Wei; Ochesky, Joseph; Ryan, Christine E.; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2002-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions control transcription, cell division, and cell proliferation as well as mediate signal transduction, oncogenic transformation, and regulation of cell death. Although a variety of methods have been used to investigate protein interactions in vitro and in cultured cells, none can analyze these interactions in intact, living animals. To enable noninvasive molecular imaging of protein-protein interactions in vivo by positron-emission tomography and fluorescence imaging, we engineered a fusion reporter gene comprising a mutant herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase and green fluorescent protein for readout of a tetracycline-inducible, two-hybrid system in vivo. By using micro-positron-emission tomography, interactions between p53 tumor suppressor and the large T antigen of simian virus 40 were visualized in tumor xenografts of HeLa cells stably transfected with the imaging constructs. Imaging protein-binding partners in vivo will enable functional proteomics in whole animals and provide a tool for screening compounds targeted to specific protein-protein interactions in living animals.

  17. Protein-protein interaction based on pairwise similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Nazar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI is essential to most biological processes. Abnormal interactions may have implications in a number of neurological syndromes. Given that the association and dissociation of protein molecules is crucial, computational tools capable of effectively identifying PPI are desirable. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method to detect PPI based on pairwise similarity and using only the primary structure of the protein. The PPI based on Pairwise Similarity (PPI-PS method consists of a representation of each protein sequence by a vector of pairwise similarities against large subsequences of amino acids created by a shifting window which passes over concatenated protein training sequences. Each coordinate of this vector is typically the E-value of the Smith-Waterman score. These vectors are then used to compute the kernel matrix which will be exploited in conjunction with support vector machines. Results To assess the ability of the proposed method to recognize the difference between "interacted" and "non-interacted" proteins pairs, we applied it on different datasets from the available yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction. The proposed method achieved reasonable improvement over the existing state-of-the-art methods for PPI prediction. Conclusion Pairwise similarity score provides a relevant measure of similarity between protein sequences. This similarity incorporates biological knowledge about proteins and it is extremely powerful when combined with support vector machine to predict PPI.

  18. Information assessment on predicting protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerstein Mark

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying protein-protein interactions is fundamental for understanding the molecular machinery of the cell. Proteome-wide studies of protein-protein interactions are of significant value, but the high-throughput experimental technologies suffer from high rates of both false positive and false negative predictions. In addition to high-throughput experimental data, many diverse types of genomic data can help predict protein-protein interactions, such as mRNA expression, localization, essentiality, and functional annotation. Evaluations of the information contributions from different evidences help to establish more parsimonious models with comparable or better prediction accuracy, and to obtain biological insights of the relationships between protein-protein interactions and other genomic information. Results Our assessment is based on the genomic features used in a Bayesian network approach to predict protein-protein interactions genome-wide in yeast. In the special case, when one does not have any missing information about any of the features, our analysis shows that there is a larger information contribution from the functional-classification than from expression correlations or essentiality. We also show that in this case alternative models, such as logistic regression and random forest, may be more effective than Bayesian networks for predicting interactions. Conclusions In the restricted problem posed by the complete-information subset, we identified that the MIPS and Gene Ontology (GO functional similarity datasets as the dominating information contributors for predicting the protein-protein interactions under the framework proposed by Jansen et al. Random forests based on the MIPS and GO information alone can give highly accurate classifications. In this particular subset of complete information, adding other genomic data does little for improving predictions. We also found that the data discretizations used in the

  19. Effects of cochlear-implant pulse rate and inter-channel timing on channel interactions and thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John C.

    2004-07-01

    Interactions among the multiple channels of a cochlear prosthesis limit the number of channels of information that can be transmitted to the brain. This study explored the influence on channel interactions of electrical pulse rates and temporal offsets between channels. Anesthetized guinea pigs were implanted with 2-channel scala-tympani electrode arrays, and spike activity was recorded from the auditory cortex. Channel interactions were quantified as the reduction of the threshold for pulse-train stimulation of the apical channel by sub-threshold stimulation of the basal channel. Pulse rates were 254 or 4069 pulses per second (pps) per channel. Maximum threshold reductions averaged 9.6 dB when channels were stimulated simultaneously. Among nonsimultaneous conditions, threshold reductions at the 254-pps rate were entirely eliminated by a 1966-μs inter-channel offset. When offsets were only 41 to 123 μs, however, maximum threshold shifts averaged 3.1 dB, which was comparable to the dynamic ranges of cortical neurons in this experimental preparation. Threshold reductions at 4069 pps averaged up to 1.3 dB greater than at 254 pps, which raises some concern in regard to high-pulse-rate speech processors. Thresholds for various paired-pulse stimuli, pulse rates, and pulse-train durations were measured to test possible mechanisms of temporal integration.

  20. Structural similarity of genetically interacting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of gene mutants and their interactions is fundamental to understanding gene function and backup mechanisms within the cell. The recent availability of large scale genetic interaction networks in yeast and worm allows the investigation of the biological mechanisms underlying these interactions at a global scale. To date, less than 2% of the known genetic interactions in yeast or worm can be accounted for by sequence similarity. Results Here, we perform a genome-scale structural comparison among protein pairs in the two species. We show that significant fractions of genetic interactions involve structurally similar proteins, spanning 7–10% and 14% of all known interactions in yeast and worm, respectively. We identify several structural features that are predictive of genetic interactions and show their superiority over sequence-based features. Conclusion Structural similarity is an important property that can explain and predict genetic interactions. According to the available data, the most abundant mechanism for genetic interactions among structurally similar proteins is a common interacting partner shared by two genetically interacting proteins.

  1. Protein-protein interaction predictions using text mining methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Nikolas; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Theodosiou, Theodosios; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-03-01

    It is beyond any doubt that proteins and their interactions play an essential role in most complex biological processes. The understanding of their function individually, but also in the form of protein complexes is of a great importance. Nowadays, despite the plethora of various high-throughput experimental approaches for detecting protein-protein interactions, many computational methods aiming to predict new interactions have appeared and gained interest. In this review, we focus on text-mining based computational methodologies, aiming to extract information for proteins and their interactions from public repositories such as literature and various biological databases. We discuss their strengths, their weaknesses and how they complement existing experimental techniques by simultaneously commenting on the biological databases which hold such information and the benchmark datasets that can be used for evaluating new tools.

  2. Probing Protein Channel Dynamics At The Single Molecule Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. Ann; Dunn, Robert C.

    1997-03-01

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance played by protein ion channels in cellular function. These macromolecular pores allow the passage of ions across the cellular membrane and play indispensable roles in all aspects of neurophysiology. While the patch-clamp technique continues to provide elegant descriptions of the kinetic processes involved in ion channel gating, the associated conformational changes remain a mystery. We are using the spectroscopic capabilities and single molecule fluorescence sensitivity of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe these dynamics at the single channel level. Using a newly developed cantilevered NSOM probe capable of probing soft biological samples with single molecule fluorescence sensitivity, we have begun mapping the location of single NMDA receptors in intact rat cortical neurons with <100 nm spatial resolution. We will also present recent results exploring the conformational changes accompanying activation of nuclear pore channels located in the nuclear membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Our recent NSOM and AFM measurements on single nuclear pore complexes reveal large conformational changes taking place upon activation, providing rich, new molecular level details of channel function.

  3. Dynamic fluctuations of protein-carbohydrate interactions promote protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Voynov

    Full Text Available Protein-carbohydrate interactions are important for glycoprotein structure and function. Antibodies of the IgG class, with increasing significance as therapeutics, are glycosylated at a conserved site in the constant Fc region. We hypothesized that disruption of protein-carbohydrate interactions in the glycosylated domain of antibodies leads to the exposure of aggregation-prone motifs. Aggregation is one of the main problems in protein-based therapeutics because of immunogenicity concerns and decreased efficacy. To explore the significance of intramolecular interactions between aromatic amino acids and carbohydrates in the IgG glycosylated domain, we utilized computer simulations, fluorescence analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the surface exposure of one aromatic amino acid increases due to dynamic fluctuations. Moreover, protein-carbohydrate interactions decrease upon stress, while protein-protein and carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions increase. Substitution of the carbohydrate-interacting aromatic amino acids with non-aromatic residues leads to a significantly lower stability than wild type, and to compromised binding to Fc receptors. Our results support a mechanism for antibody aggregation via decreased protein-carbohydrate interactions, leading to the exposure of aggregation-prone regions, and to aggregation.

  4. Ionic channels and nerve membrane lipids. Cholesterol-tetrodotoxin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V; Camejo, G

    1970-04-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate possible interactions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) with lipid molecules isolated from nerve fiber plasma membranes of the squid Dosidicus gigas. TTX has a highly selective ability to block the channel normally used by Na(+) to cross the axolemma during nervous impulse conduction. In order to investigate the interaction each lipid sample was spread on 5 x 10(-7)M TTX and TTX-free 0.15 M NaCl solutions adjusted to pH 7.4 with 7 x 10(-3)M phosphate buffer. The surface pressure-area diagrams of the lipid monolayers revealed that TTX interacts only with cholesterol. The expansion of the cholesterol monolayers at 5 x 10(-7)M TTX was 2 A(2)/molecule at zero pressure for the experiments at 20 degrees C and 2.5 A(2)/molecule for those at 25 degrees C. Similar results were obtained in KCl subphases. The apparent dissociation constant of the cholesterol-TTX complex calculated from dose-response experiments is 2.6 x 10(-7)M. Experiments at pH 10.1 revealed that the zwitter ionic form of TTX is less active. Experiments with cholesterol derivatives (cholesteryl acetate, cholesterol methyl ether, cholestanol, and cholestanyl acetate) indicate that for the interaction with TTX a partial negatively charged group at C-3 and a double bond between C-5 and C-6 on the steroid nucleus are required. Tetrodonic acid, a biologically inactive derivative of TTX, does not interact with cholesterol. The results lead us to propose that cholesterol is part of the Na(+) channel.

  5. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  6. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL198W, YGL161C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YGL198W YIP4 Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; comput...that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational ...eracts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-pro...ized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests

  7. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL161C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YGL161C YIP5 Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; comput...that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational ...eracts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-pro...ized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests

  8. Data management of protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cannataro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Interactomics: a complete survey from data generation to knowledge extraction With the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, more and more protein interaction databases are becoming available. As a result, computational analysis of protein-to-protein interaction (PPI) data and networks, now known as interactomics, has become an essential tool to determine functionally associated proteins. From wet lab technologies to data management to knowledge extraction, this timely book guides readers through the new science of interactomics, giving them the tools needed to: Generate

  9. Intraviral protein interactions of Chandipura virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kapila; Rana, Jyoti; Sreejith, R; Gabrani, Reema; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-10-01

    Chandipura virus (CHPV) is an emerging rhabdovirus responsible for several outbreaks of fatal encephalitis among children in India. The characteristic structure of the virus is a result of extensive and specific interplay among its five encoded proteins. The revelation of interactions among CHPV proteins can help in gaining insight into viral architecture and pathogenesis. In the current study, we carried out comprehensive yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analysis to elucidate intraviral protein-protein interactions. All of the interactions identified by Y2H were assessed for reliability by GST pull-down and ELISA. A total of eight interactions were identified among four viral proteins. Five of these interactions are being reported for the first time for CHPV. Among these, the glycoprotein (G)-nucleocapsid (N) interaction could be considered novel, as this has not been reported for any members of the family Rhabdoviridae. This study provides a framework within which the roles of the identified protein interactions can be explored further for understanding the biology of this virus at the molecular level.

  10. Analysis of correlations between protein complex and protein-protein interaction and mRNA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lun; XUE Hong; LU Hongchao; ZHAO Yi; ZHU Xiaopeng; BU Dongbo; LING Lunjiang; CHEN Runsheng

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction is a physical interaction of two proteins in living cells. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, large-scale protein-protein interaction data have been obtained through high-throughput yeast two-hybrid systems (Y2H) and protein complex purification techniques based on mass-spectrometry. Here, we collect 11855 interactions between total 2617 proteins. Through seriate genome-wide mRNA expression data, similarity between two genes could be measured. Protein complex data can also be obtained publicly and can be translated to pair relationship that any two proteins can only exist in the same complex or not. Analysis of protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data can elucidate correlations between them. The results show that proteins that have interactions or similar expression patterns have a higher possibility to be in the same protein complex than randomized selected proteins, and proteins which have interactions and similar expression patterns are even more possible to exist in the same protein complex. The work indicates that comprehensive integration and analysis of public large-scale bioinformatical data, such as protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data, may help to uncover their relationships and common biological information underlying these data. The strategies described here may help to integrate and analyze other functional genomic and proteomic data, such as gene expression profiling, protein-localization mapping and large-scale phenotypic data, both in yeast and in other organisms.

  11. Characterization of protein-protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of protein-protein interactions has attracted the attention of many researchers from both a fundamental point of view and a practical point of view. From a fundamental point of view, the development of an understanding of the signaling events triggered by the interaction of two or more proteins provides key information to elucidate the functioning of many cell processes. From a practical point of view, understanding protein-protein interactions at a quantitative level provides the foundation for the development of antagonists or agonists of those interactions. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique with the capability of measuring not only binding affinity but the enthalpic and entropic components that define affinity. Over the years, isothermal titration calorimeters have evolved in sensitivity and accuracy. Today, TA Instruments and MicroCal market instruments with the performance required to evaluate protein-protein interactions. In this methods paper, we describe general procedures to analyze heterodimeric (porcine pancreatic trypsin binding to soybean trypsin inhibitor) and homodimeric (bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin) protein associations by ITC.

  12. Interacting tilt and kink instabilities in repelling current channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppens, R.; Porth, O.; Xia, C., E-mail: rony.keppens@wis.kuleuven.be [Centre for mathematical Plasma-Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical study in resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) where the initial equilibrium configuration contains adjacent, oppositely directed, parallel current channels. Since oppositely directed current channels repel, the equilibrium is liable to an ideal magnetohydrodynamic tilt instability. This tilt evolution, previously studied in planar settings, involves two magnetic islands or flux ropes, which on Alfvénic timescales undergo a combined rotation and separation. This in turn leads to the creation of (near) singular current layers, posing severe challenges to numerical approaches. Using our open-source grid-adaptive MPI-AMRVAC software, we revisit the planar evolution case in compressible MHD, as well as its extension to two-and-a-half-dimensional (2.5D) and full three-dimensional (3D) scenarios. As long as the third dimension can be ignored, pure tilt evolutions result that are hardly affected by out of plane magnetic field components. In all 2.5D runs, our simulations do show secondary tearing type disruptions throughout the near singular current sheets in the far nonlinear saturation regime. In full 3D runs, both current channels can be liable to additional ideal kink deformations. We discuss the effects of having both tilt and kink instabilities acting simultaneously in the violent, reconnection-dominated evolution. In 3D, both the tilt and the kink instabilities can be stabilized by tension forces. As a concrete space plasma application, we argue that interacting tilt-kink instabilities in repelling current channels provide a novel route to initiate solar coronal mass ejections, distinctly different from the currently favored pure kink or torus instability routes.

  13. Evolvability of yeast protein-protein interaction interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, David; Williams, Simon G; Norris, Matthew G S; Robertson, David L; Lovell, Simon C

    2012-06-22

    The functional importance of protein-protein interactions indicates that there should be strong evolutionary constraint on their interaction interfaces. However, binding interfaces are frequently affected by amino acid replacements. Change due to coevolution within interfaces can contribute to variability but is not ubiquitous. An alternative explanation for the ability of surfaces to accept replacements may be that many residues can be changed without affecting the interaction. Candidates for these types of residues are those that make interchain interaction only through the protein main chain, β-carbon, or associated hydrogen atoms. Since almost all residues have these atoms, we hypothesize that this subset of interface residues may be more easily substituted than those that make interactions through other atoms. We term such interactions "residue type independent." Investigating this hypothesis, we find that nearly a quarter of residues in protein interaction interfaces make exclusively interchain residue-type-independent contacts. These residues are less structurally constrained and less conserved than residues making residue-type-specific interactions. We propose that residue-type-independent interactions allow substitutions in binding interfaces while the specificity of binding is maintained.

  14. Treponema denticola interactions with host proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christopher Fenno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral Treponema species, most notably T. denticola, are implicated in the destructive effects of human periodontal disease. Progress in the molecular analysis of interactions between T. denticola and host proteins is reviewed here, with particular emphasis on the characterization of surface-expressed and secreted proteins of T. denticola involved in interactions with host cells, extracellular matrix components, and components of the innate immune system.

  15. Interface-resolved network of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Johnson

    Full Text Available We define an interface-interaction network (IIN to capture the specificity and competition between protein-protein interactions (PPI. This new type of network represents interactions between individual interfaces used in functional protein binding and thereby contains the detail necessary to describe the competition and cooperation between any pair of binding partners. Here we establish a general framework for the construction of IINs that merges computational structure-based interface assignment with careful curation of available literature. To complement limited structural data, the inclusion of biochemical data is critical for achieving the accuracy and completeness necessary to analyze the specificity and competition between the protein interactions. Firstly, this procedure provides a means to clarify the information content of existing data on purported protein interactions and to remove indirect and spurious interactions. Secondly, the IIN we have constructed here for proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME exhibits distinctive topological properties. In contrast to PPI networks with their global and relatively dense connectivity, the fragmentation of the IIN into distinctive network modules suggests that different functional pressures act on the evolution of its topology. Large modules in the IIN are formed by interfaces sharing specificity for certain domain types, such as SH3 domains distributed across different proteins. The shared and distinct specificity of an interface is necessary for effective negative and positive design of highly selective binding targets. Lastly, the organization of detailed structural data in a network format allows one to identify pathways of specific binding interactions and thereby predict effects of mutations at specific surfaces on a protein and of specific binding inhibitors, as we explore in several examples. Overall, the endocytosis IIN is remarkably complex and rich in features masked

  16. A simple dependence between protein evolution rate and the number of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsh Aaron E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown for an evolutionarily distant genomic comparison that the number of protein-protein interactions a protein has correlates negatively with their rates of evolution. However, the generality of this observation has recently been challenged. Here we examine the problem using protein-protein interaction data from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and genome sequences from two other yeast species. Results In contrast to a previous study that used an incomplete set of protein-protein interactions, we observed a highly significant correlation between number of interactions and evolutionary distance to either Candida albicans or Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study differs from the previous one in that it includes all known protein interactions from S. cerevisiae, and a larger set of protein evolutionary rates. In both evolutionary comparisons, a simple monotonic relationship was found across the entire range of the number of protein-protein interactions. In agreement with our earlier findings, this relationship cannot be explained by the fact that proteins with many interactions tend to be important to yeast. The generality of these correlations in other kingdoms of life unfortunately cannot be addressed at this time, due to the incompleteness of protein-protein interaction data from organisms other than S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Protein-protein interactions tend to slow the rate at which proteins evolve. This may be due to structural constraints that must be met to maintain interactions, but more work is needed to definitively establish the mechanism(s behind the correlations we have observed.

  17. Mining minimal motif pair sets maximally covering interactions in a protein-protein interaction network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyen, P.; Neven, F.; Valentim, F.L.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Correlated motif covering (CMC) is the problem of finding a set of motif pairs, i.e., pairs of patterns, in the sequences of proteins from a protein-protein interaction network (PPI-network) that describe the interactions in the network as concisely as possible. In other words, a perfect solution fo

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YKL002W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding prote...xpression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Sp

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL237C, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding prote... expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein

  20. Understanding Protein-Protein Interactions Using Local Structural Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Bonet, Jaume; García-García, Javier;

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a relevant role among the different functions of a cell. Identifying the PPI network of a given organism (interactome) is useful to shed light on the key molecular mechanisms within a biological system. In this work, we show the role of structural features...... (loops and domains) to comprehend the molecular mechanisms of PPIs. A paradox in protein-protein binding is to explain how the unbound proteins of a binary complex recognize each other among a large population within a cell and how they find their best docking interface in a short timescale. We use...

  1. HCVpro: Hepatitis C virus protein interaction database

    KAUST Repository

    Kwofie, Samuel K.

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Length, protein–protein interactions, and complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, T.; Frenkel, D.; Gupta, V.; Deem, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein–protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they ar

  3. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2009-01-01

    to the endogenous C-terminal peptide of the NMDA receptor, as evaluated by a cell-free protein-protein interaction assay. However, it is important to address both membrane permeability and effect in living cells. Therefore a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay was established, where the C...

  4. Protein-protein interaction networks in the spinocerebellar ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    David C Rubinsztein

    2006-01-01

    A large yeast two-hybrid study investigating whether the proteins mutated in different forms of spinocerebellar ataxia have interacting protein partners in common suggests that some forms do share common pathways, and will provide a valuable resource for future work on these diseases.

  5. Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) reagents: | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below.

  6. Protein-Protein Interaction Reagents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below. Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Contact: Haian Fu

  7. Mapping Protein-Protein Interactions by Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics in combination with affinity purification protocols has become the method of choice to map and track the dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions, including the ones occurring during cellular signaling events. Different quantitative MS strategies have been used...

  8. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  9. STIM1 and STIM2 proteins differently regulate endogenous store-operated channels in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygin, Alexey; Skopin, Anton; Kalinina, Vera; Zimina, Olga; Glushankova, Lyuba; Mozhayeva, Galina N; Kaznacheyeva, Elena

    2015-02-20

    The endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensors stromal interaction molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2) are key modulators of store-operated calcium entry. Both these sensors play a major role in physiological functions in normal tissue and in pathology, but available data on native STIM2-regulated plasma membrane channels are scarce. Only a few studies have recorded STIM2-induced CRAC (calcium release-activated calcium) currents. On the other hand, many cell types display store-operated currents different from CRAC. The STIM1 protein regulates not only CRAC but also transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, but it has remained unclear whether STIM2 is capable of regulating store-operated non-CRAC channels. Here we present for the first time experimental evidence for the existence of endogenous non-CRAC STIM2-regulated channels. As shown in single-channel patch clamp experiments on HEK293 cells, selective activation of native STIM2 proteins or STIM2 overexpression results in store-operated activation of Imin channels, whereas STIM1 activation blocks this process. Changes in the ratio between active STIM2 and STIM1 proteins can switch the regulation of Imin channels between store-operated and store-independent modes. We have previously characterized electrophysiological properties of different Ca(2+) influx channels coexisting in HEK293 cells. The results of this study show that STIM1 and STIM2 differ in the ability to activate these store-operated channels; Imin channels are regulated by STIM2, TRPC3-containing INS channels are induced by STIM1, and TRPC1-composed Imax channels are activated by both STIM1 and STIM2. These new data about cross-talk between STIM1 and STIM2 and their different roles in store-operated channel activation are indicative of an additional level in the regulation of store-operated calcium entry pathways.

  10. Inferring domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions with formal concept analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Khor

    Full Text Available Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains.

  11. A New Poisson-Nernst-Planck Model with Ion-Water Interactions for Charge Transport in Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose a new Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model with ion-water interactions for biological charge transport in ion channels. Due to narrow geometries of these membrane proteins, ion-water interaction is critical for both dielectric property of water molecules in channel pore and transport dynamics of mobile ions. We model the ion-water interaction energy based on realistic experimental observations in an efficient mean-field approach. Variation of a total energy functional of the biological system yields a new PNP-type continuum model. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model with ion-water interaction energy has the new features that quantitatively describe dielectric properties of water molecules in narrow pores and are possible to model the selectivity of some ion channels.

  12. Rap-Interacting Proteins are Key Players in the Rap Symphony Orchestra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Xi; An, Su; Yang, Yang; Liu, Ying; Hao, Qian; Xu, Tian-Rui

    2016-01-01

    Rap, a member of the Ras-like small G-protein family, is a key node among G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), ion channels and many other downstream pathways. Rap plays a unique role in cell morphogenesis, adhesion, migration, exocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. The complexity and diversity of Rap functions are tightly regulated by Rap-interacting proteins such as GEFs, GAPs, Rap effectors and scaffold proteins. These interacting proteins decide the subcellular localization of Rap, the interaction modes with downstream Rap effectors and tune Rap as an atypical molecular conductor, coupling extra- and intracellular signals to various pathways. In this review, we summarize four groups of Rap-interacting proteins, highlight their distinctions in Rap-binding properties and interactive modes and discuss their contribution to the spatiotemporal regulation of Rap as well as the implications of targeting Rap-interacting proteins in human cancer therapy.

  13. Rap-Interacting Proteins are Key Players in the Rap Symphony Orchestra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xi Guo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rap, a member of the Ras-like small G-protein family, is a key node among G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, ion channels and many other downstream pathways. Rap plays a unique role in cell morphogenesis, adhesion, migration, exocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. The complexity and diversity of Rap functions are tightly regulated by Rap-interacting proteins such as GEFs, GAPs, Rap effectors and scaffold proteins. These interacting proteins decide the subcellular localization of Rap, the interaction modes with downstream Rap effectors and tune Rap as an atypical molecular conductor, coupling extra- and intracellular signals to various pathways. In this review, we summarize four groups of Rap-interacting proteins, highlight their distinctions in Rap-binding properties and interactive modes and discuss their contribution to the spatiotemporal regulation of Rap as well as the implications of targeting Rap-interacting proteins in human cancer therapy.

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPR148C, YDL237W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YPR148C - Protein of unknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification experiments... with ribosomes, based on co-purification experiments; green fluorescent protein

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR347C, YLR377C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear pore complex; regulat...0p; interacts with nucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear p

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR347C, YBR176W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear pore complex; regulat...p; interacts with nucleoporins to mediate nuclear import of NLS-containing cargo proteins via the nuclear po

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL070W, YBR176W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available utational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in transcription...otein of unknown function containing a Vps9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR084C, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computational analysis of large-scale...omputational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a possible role in vesicle-me

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL226C, YJL151C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s bait as prey (0) YJL151C SNA3 Integral membrane protein localized to vacuolar intralumenal vesicles, computation...intralumenal vesicles, computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data suggests a pos... gene name SNA3 Prey description Integral membrane protein localized to vacuolar

  20. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment.

  1. An evaluation of in vitro protein-protein interaction techniques: assessing contaminating background proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jenika M; Winstone, Tara L; Coorssen, Jens R; Turner, Raymond J

    2006-04-01

    Determination of protein-protein interactions is an important component in assigning function and discerning the biological relevance of proteins within a broader cellular context. In vitro protein-protein interaction methodologies, including affinity chromatography, coimmunoprecipitation, and newer approaches such as protein chip arrays, hold much promise in the detection of protein interactions, particularly in well-characterized organisms with sequenced genomes. However, each of these approaches attracts certain background proteins that can thwart detection and identification of true interactors. In addition, recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are also extensively used to assess protein-protein interactions, and background proteins in these isolates can thus contaminate interaction studies. Rigorous validation of a true interaction thus requires not only that an interaction be found by alternate techniques, but more importantly that researchers be aware of and control for matrix/support dependence. Here, we evaluate these methods for proteins interacting with DmsD (an E. coli redox enzyme maturation protein chaperone), in vitro, using E. coli subcellular fractions as prey sources. We compare and contrast the various in vitro interaction methods to identify some of the background proteins and protein profiles that are inherent to each of the methods in an E. coli system.

  2. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR026C, YDL030W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDR026C - Protein of unknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification...ein of unknown function that may interact with ribosomes, based on co-purification

  3. Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii Kuchaiev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding complex networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs is one of the foremost challenges of the post-genomic era. Due to the recent advances in experimental bio-technology, including yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H, tandem affinity purification (TAP and other high-throughput methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI detection, huge amounts of PPI network data are becoming available. Of major concern, however, are the levels of noise and incompleteness. For example, for Y2H screens, it is thought that the false positive rate could be as high as 64%, and the false negative rate may range from 43% to 71%. TAP experiments are believed to have comparable levels of noise.We present a novel technique to assess the confidence levels of interactions in PPI networks obtained from experimental studies. We use it for predicting new interactions and thus for guiding future biological experiments. This technique is the first to utilize currently the best fitting network model for PPI networks, geometric graphs. Our approach achieves specificity of 85% and sensitivity of 90%. We use it to assign confidence scores to physical protein-protein interactions in the human PPI network downloaded from BioGRID. Using our approach, we predict 251 interactions in the human PPI network, a statistically significant fraction of which correspond to protein pairs sharing common GO terms. Moreover, we validate a statistically significant portion of our predicted interactions in the HPRD database and the newer release of BioGRID. The data and Matlab code implementing the methods are freely available from the web site: http://www.kuchaev.com/Denoising.

  4. Proteomic analysis of SETD6 interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Ofir; Chen, Ayelet; Feldman, Michal; Levy, Dan

    2016-03-01

    SETD6 (SET-domain-containing protein 6) is a mono-methyltransferase that has been shown to methylate RelA and H2AZ. Using a proteomic approach we recently identified several new SETD6 substrates. To identify novel SETD6 interacting proteins, SETD6 was immunoprecipitated (IP) from Human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia K562 cells. SETD6 binding proteins were subjected to mass-spectrometry analysis resulting in 115 new SETD6 binding candidates. STRING database was used to map the SETD6 interactome network. Network enrichment analysis of biological processes with Gene Ontology (GO) database, identified three major groups; metabolic processes, muscle contraction and protein folding.

  5. Coevolution study of mitochondria respiratory chain proteins:Toward the understanding of protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yang; Yan Ge; Jiayan Wu; Jingfa Xiao; Jun Yu

    2011-01-01

    Coevolution can be seen as the interdependency between evolutionary histories. In the context of protein evolution, functional correlation proteins are ever-present coordinated evolutionary characters without disruption of organismal integrity. As to complex system, there are two forms of protein-protein interactions in vivo, which refer to inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction. In this paper, we studied the difference of coevolution characters between inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction using "Mirror tree" method on the respiratory chain (RC) proteins. We divided the correlation coefficients of every pairwise RC proteins into two groups corresponding to the binary protein-protein interaction in intra-complex and the binary protein-protein interaction in inter-complex, respectively. A dramatical discrepancy is detected between the coevolution characters of the two sets of protein interactions (Wilcoxon test, p-value = 4.4 x 10-6). Our finding reveals some critical information on coevolutionary study and assists the mechanical investigation of protein-protein interaction.Furthermore, the results also provide some unique clue for supramolecular organization of protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. More detailed binding sites map and genome information of nuclear encoded RC proteins will be extraordinary valuable for the further mitochondria dynamics study.

  6. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Protein and Network Topology Information for Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birlutiu, Adriana; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Heskes, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein-protein interactions are important tools that can complement high-throughput technologies and guide biologists in designing new laboratory experiments. The proteins and the interactions between them can be described by a network which is characterized by several topological properties. Information about proteins and interactions between them, in combination with knowledge about topological properties of the network, can be used for developing computational methods that can accurately predict unknown protein-protein interactions. This paper presents a supervised learning framework based on Bayesian inference for combining two types of information: i) network topology information, and ii) information related to proteins and the interactions between them. The motivation of our model is that by combining these two types of information one can achieve a better accuracy in predicting protein-protein interactions, than by using models constructed from these two types of information independently.

  7. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xueping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83% of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134% than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109% or occurrence ranking (~46%. Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high

  8. Predicting protein-protein interactions in the post synaptic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-shira, Ossnat; Chechik, Gal

    2013-09-01

    The post synaptic density (PSD) is a specialization of the cytoskeleton at the synaptic junction, composed of hundreds of different proteins. Characterizing the protein components of the PSD and their interactions can help elucidate the mechanism of long-term changes in synaptic plasticity, which underlie learning and memory. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the proteome and interactome of the PSD is still partial and noisy. In this study we describe a computational framework to improve the reconstruction of the PSD network. The approach is based on learning the characteristics of PSD protein interactions from a set of trusted interactions, expanding this set with data collected from large scale repositories, and then predicting novel interaction with proteins that are suspected to reside in the PSD. Using this method we obtained thirty predicted interactions, with more than half of which having supporting evidence in the literature. We discuss in details two of these new interactions, Lrrtm1 with PSD-95 and Src with Capg. The first may take part in a mechanism underlying glutamatergic dysfunction in schizophrenia. The second suggests an alternative mechanism to regulate dendritic spines maturation.

  9. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Background: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. Material and methods: In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. Results: According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Conclusion: Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease. PMID:27895852

  10. Interaction between 2 extracellular loops influences the activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Steven D; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is thought to be controlled by cytoplasmic factors. However, recent evidence has shown that overall channel activity is also influenced by extracellular anions that interact directly with the extracellular loops (ECLs) of the CFTR protein. Very little is known about the structure of the ECLs or how substances interacting with these ECLs might affect CFTR function. We used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced throughout ECL1 and 2 key sites in ECL4. Furthermore, interactions between ECL1 and ECL4 were investigated by the formation of disulfide crosslinks between cysteines introduced into these 2 regions. Crosslinks could be formed between R899C (in ECL4) and a number of sites in ECL1 in a manner that was dependent on channel activity, suggesting that the relative orientation of these 2 loops changes on activation. Formation of these crosslinks inhibited channel function, suggesting that relative movement of these ECLs is important to normal channel function. Implications of these findings for the effects of mutations in the ECLs that are associated with cystic fibrosis and interactions with extracellular substances that influence channel activity are discussed.

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR049W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a regulator... (0) YOR047C STD1 Protein involved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sens...ors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; ac

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR047C, YKL038W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available racts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a...Bait description Protein involved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose senso...rs Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a regulator of the tra

  13. Annotation and retrieval in protein interaction databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannataro, Mario; Hiram Guzzi, Pietro; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Biological databases have been developed with a special focus on the efficient retrieval of single records or the efficient computation of specialized bioinformatics algorithms against the overall database, such as in sequence alignment. The continuos production of biological knowledge spread on several biological databases and ontologies, such as Gene Ontology, and the availability of efficient techniques to handle such knowledge, such as annotation and semantic similarity measures, enable the development on novel bioinformatics applications that explicitly use and integrate such knowledge. After introducing the annotation process and the main semantic similarity measures, this paper shows how annotations and semantic similarity can be exploited to improve the extraction and analysis of biologically relevant data from protein interaction databases. As case studies, the paper presents two novel software tools, OntoPIN and CytoSeVis, both based on the use of Gene Ontology annotations, for the advanced querying of protein interaction databases and for the enhanced visualization of protein interaction networks.

  14. Protein-protein interactions within late pre-40S ribosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody G Campbell

    Full Text Available Ribosome assembly in eukaryotic organisms requires more than 200 assembly factors to facilitate and coordinate rRNA transcription, processing, and folding with the binding of the ribosomal proteins. Many of these assembly factors bind and dissociate at defined times giving rise to discrete assembly intermediates, some of which have been partially characterized with regards to their protein and RNA composition. Here, we have analyzed the protein-protein interactions between the seven assembly factors bound to late cytoplasmic pre-40S ribosomes using recombinant proteins in binding assays. Our data show that these factors form two modules: one comprising Enp1 and the export adaptor Ltv1 near the beak structure, and the second comprising the kinase Rio2, the nuclease Nob1, and a regulatory RNA binding protein Dim2/Pno1 on the front of the head. The GTPase-like Tsr1 and the universally conserved methylase Dim1 are also peripherally connected to this second module. Additionally, in an effort to further define the locations for these essential proteins, we have analyzed the interactions between these assembly factors and six ribosomal proteins: Rps0, Rps3, Rps5, Rps14, Rps15 and Rps29. Together, these results and previous RNA-protein crosslinking data allow us to propose a model for the binding sites of these seven assembly factors. Furthermore, our data show that the essential kinase Rio2 is located at the center of the pre-ribosomal particle and interacts, directly or indirectly, with every other assembly factor, as well as three ribosomal proteins required for cytoplasmic 40S maturation. These data suggest that Rio2 could play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic maturation steps.

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YHR114W, YDR422C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available substrate specificity; vacuolar protein containing KIS (Kinase-Interacting Sequence) and ASC (Association w...strate specificity; vacuolar protein containing KIS (Kinase-Interacting Sequence) and ASC (Association with ...e 4 CuraGen (0 or 1) 0 S. Fields (0 or 1) 0 Association (0 or 1,YPD) 0 Complex (0

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR425W, YGL198W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available with this bait as prey (0) YGL198W YIP4 Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computation...IP4 Prey description Protein that interacts with Rab GTPases, localized to late Golgi vesicles; computatio

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBR108W, YGR136W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YBR108W AIM3 Protein interacting with Rvs167p; null mutant is viable and displays e...w YBR108W Bait ORF YBR108W Bait gene name AIM3 Bait description Protein interacting with Rvs167p; null mutant is viable and display

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBR108W, YDR388W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YBR108W AIM3 Protein interacting with Rvs167p; null mutant is viable and displays e...l mutant is viable and displays elevated frequency of mitochondrial genome loss R...8 - Show YBR108W Bait ORF YBR108W Bait gene name AIM3 Bait description Protein interacting with Rvs167p; nul

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YMR280C, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available olved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensor... glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, an

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YMR047C, YDR229W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available R229W IVY1 Phospholipid-binding protein that interacts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially...holipid-binding protein that interacts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially counteract the action of Vp

  1. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  2. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  3. The large conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel interacts with the small GTPase Rab11b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Sophia; Harvey, Margaret; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Jordan, Amy; Sokolowski, Bernd

    2012-09-21

    The transduction of sound by the receptor or hair cells of the cochlea leads to the activation of ion channels found in the basal and lateral regions of these cells. Thus, the processing of these transduced signals to the central nervous system is tied to the regulation of baso-lateral ion channels. The large conductance calcium-activated potassium or BK channel was revealed to interact with the small GTPase, Rab11b, which is one of many Rabs found in various endosomal pathways. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the colocalization of these two proteins in receptor cells and auditory neurons. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells as a heterologous expression system, Rab11b increased or decreased BK expression, depending on the overexpression or RNAi knockdown of Rab, respectively. Additional mutation analyses, using a yeast two-hybrid assay, suggested that this GTPase moderately interacts within a region of BK exclusive of the N- or C-terminal tails. These data suggest that this small GTPase regulates BK in a slow recycling process through the endocytic compartment and to the plasmalemma.

  4. Evidence for the Interaction of Endophilin A3 with Endogenous Kca2.3 Channels in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika Janbein

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Small-conductance calcium-activated (SK channels play an important role by controlling the after-hyperpolarization of excitable cells. The level of expression and density of these channels is an essential factor for controlling different cellular functions. Several studies showed a co-localization of KCa2.3 channels and Endophilin A3 in different tissues. Endophilin A3 belongs to a family of BAR- and SH3 domain containing proteins that bind to dynamin and are involved in the process of vesicle scission in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Methods: Using the yeast two-hybrid system and the GST pull down assay we demonstrated that Endophilin A3 interacts with the N-terminal part of KCa2.3 channels. In addition, we studied the impact of this interaction on channel activity by patch clamp measurements in PC12 cells expressing endogenous KCa2.3 channels. KCa2.3 currents were activated by using pipette solutions containing 1 µM free Ca2+. Results: Whole-cell measurements of PC12 cells transfected with Endophilin A3 showed a reduction of KCa2.3 specifc Cs+ currents indicating that the interaction of Endophilin A3 with KCa2.3 channels also occurs in mammalian cells and that this interaction has functional consequences for current flowing through KCa2.3 channels. Since KCa2.3 specific currents could be increased in PC12 cells transfected with Endophilin A3 with DC-EBIO (30 µM, a known SK-channel activator, these data also implicate that Endophilin A3 did not significantly remove KCa2.3 channels from the membrane but changed the sensitivity of the channels to Ca2+ which could be overcome by DC-EBIO. Conclusion: This interaction seems to be important for the function of KCa2.3 channels and might therefore play a significant role in situations where channel activation is pivotal for cellular function.

  5. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  6. Targeting protein-protein interactions for parasite control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Taylor

    Full Text Available Finding new drug targets for pathogenic infections would be of great utility for humanity, as there is a large need to develop new drugs to fight infections due to the developing resistance and side effects of current treatments. Current drug targets for pathogen infections involve only a single protein. However, proteins rarely act in isolation, and the majority of biological processes occur via interactions with other proteins, so protein-protein interactions (PPIs offer a realm of unexplored potential drug targets and are thought to be the next-generation of drug targets. Parasitic worms were chosen for this study because they have deleterious effects on human health, livestock, and plants, costing society billions of dollars annually and many sequenced genomes are available. In this study, we present a computational approach that utilizes whole genomes of 6 parasitic and 1 free-living worm species and 2 hosts. The species were placed in orthologous groups, then binned in species-specific orthologous groups. Proteins that are essential and conserved among species that span a phyla are of greatest value, as they provide foundations for developing broad-control strategies. Two PPI databases were used to find PPIs within the species specific bins. PPIs with unique helminth proteins and helminth proteins with unique features relative to the host, such as indels, were prioritized as drug targets. The PPIs were scored based on RNAi phenotype and homology to the PDB (Protein DataBank. EST data for the various life stages, GO annotation, and druggability were also taken into consideration. Several PPIs emerged from this study as potential drug targets. A few interactions were supported by co-localization of expression in M. incognita (plant parasite and B. malayi (H. sapiens parasite, which have extremely different modes of parasitism. As more genomes of pathogens are sequenced and PPI databases expanded, this methodology will become increasingly

  7. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YOR265W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...n Member of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizin

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YKL113C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...r of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YDR389W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...d proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpression causes increased sensi...scription Member of the Puf family of RNA-binding proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associate

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YDL147W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 complex to mitochondria; overexpre...g proteins, interacts with mRNAs encoding membrane-associated proteins; involved in localizing the Arp2/3 co

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR358W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; act...rotein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a regulator o

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGL127C, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ith protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt15p; acts as a regula...rotein involved in control of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors

  13. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Hildebrand

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7, and B (between TM5 and 6, respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all

  14. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  15. Ion Channel Formation by Tau Protein: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Tauopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, N; S. Ramachandran; Azimov, R; Kagan, BL; Lal, R

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Tau is a microtubule associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Because of the channel forming properties of other amyloid peptides, we employed planar lipid bilayers and atomic force microscopy to test tau for its ability to form ion permeable channels. Our results demonstrate that tau can form such channels, but only under acidic conditions. The channels formed are remarkably similar to amyloid peptide channels ...

  16. SNF8, a member of the ESCRT-II complex, interacts with TRPC6 and enhances its channel activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasquillo Robert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC channels are non-selective cation channels involved in receptor-mediated calcium signaling in diverse cells and tissues. The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6 has been implicated in several pathological processes, including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, cardiac hypertrophy, and pulmonary hypertension. The two large cytoplasmic segments of the cation channel play a critical role in the proper regulation of channel activity, and are involved in several protein-protein interactions. Results Here we report that SNF8, a component of the endosomal sorting complex for transport-II (ESCRT-II complex, interacts with TRPC6. The interaction was initially observed in a yeast two-hybrid screen using the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of TRPC6 as bait, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from eukaryotic cell extracts. The amino-terminal 107 amino acids are necessary and sufficient for the interaction. Overexpression of SNF8 enhances both wild-type and gain-of-function mutant TRPC6-mediated whole-cell currents in HEK293T cells. Furthermore, activation of NFAT-mediated transcription by gain-of-function mutants is enhanced by overexpression of SNF8, and partially inhibited by RNAi mediated knockdown of SNF8. Although the ESCRT-II complex functions in the endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of transmembrane proteins, SNF8 overexpression does not alter the amount of TRPC6 present on the cell surface. Conclusion SNF8 is novel binding partner of TRPC6, binding to the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the channel. Modulating SNF8 expression levels alters the TRPC6 channel current and can modulate activation of NFAT-mediated transcription downstream of gain-of-function mutant TRPC6. Taken together, these results identify SNF8 as a novel regulator of TRPC6.

  17. PCorral--interactive mining of protein interactions from MEDLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Jimeno-Yepes, Antonio; Arregui, Miguel; Kirsch, Harald; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of information from the scientific literature is a complex task-for researchers doing manual curation and for automatic text processing solutions. The identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) requires the extraction of protein named entities and their relations. Semi-automatic interactive support is one approach to combine both solutions for efficient working processes to generate reliable database content. In principle, the extraction of PPIs can be achieved with different methods that can be combined to deliver high precision and/or high recall results in different combinations at the same time. Interactive use can be achieved, if the analytical methods are fast enough to process the retrieved documents. PCorral provides interactive mining of PPIs from the scientific literature allowing curators to skim MEDLINE for PPIs at low overheads. The keyword query to PCorral steers the selection of documents, and the subsequent text analysis generates high recall and high precision results for the curator. The underlying components of PCorral process the documents on-the-fly and are available, as well, as web service from the Whatizit infrastructure. The human interface summarizes the identified PPI results, and the involved entities are linked to relevant resources and databases. Altogether, PCorral serves curator at both the beginning and the end of the curation workflow for information retrieval and information extraction. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Rebholz-srv/pcorral.

  18. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Nieto-Torres

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV envelope (E gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS

  19. Exploring Strong Interactions in Proteins with Quantum Chemistry and Examples of Their Applications in Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neng-Zhong Xie

    Full Text Available Three strong interactions between amino acid side chains (salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge are studied that are stronger than (or comparable to the common hydrogen bond interactions, and play important roles in protein-protein interactions.Quantum chemical methods MP2 and CCSD(T are used in calculations of interaction energies and structural optimizations.The energies of three types of amino acid side chain interactions in gaseous phase and in aqueous solutions are calculated using high level quantum chemical methods and basis sets. Typical examples of amino acid salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge interactions are analyzed, including the inhibitor design targeting neuraminidase (NA enzyme of influenza A virus, and the ligand binding interactions in the HCV p7 ion channel. The inhibition mechanism of the M2 proton channel in the influenza A virus is analyzed based on strong amino acid interactions.(1 The salt bridge interactions between acidic amino acids (Glu- and Asp- and alkaline amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+ are the strongest residue-residue interactions. However, this type of interaction may be weakened by solvation effects and broken by lower pH conditions. (2 The cation- interactions between protonated amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+ and aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, Trp and His are 2.5 to 5-fold stronger than common hydrogen bond interactions and are less affected by the solvation environment. (3 The amide bridge interactions between the two amide-containing amino acids (Asn and Gln are three times stronger than hydrogen bond interactions, which are less influenced by the pH of the solution. (4 Ten of the twenty natural amino acids are involved in salt bridge, or cation-, or amide bridge interactions that often play important roles in protein-protein, protein-peptide, protein-ligand, and protein-DNA interactions.

  20. Identification of NAD interacting residues in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Gajendra PS

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small molecular cofactors or ligands play a crucial role in the proper functioning of cells. Accurate annotation of their target proteins and binding sites is required for the complete understanding of reaction mechanisms. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ or NAD is one of the most commonly used organic cofactors in living cells, which plays a critical role in cellular metabolism, storage and regulatory processes. In the past, several NAD binding proteins (NADBP have been reported in the literature, which are responsible for a wide-range of activities in the cell. Attempts have been made to derive a rule for the binding of NAD+ to its target proteins. However, so far an efficient model could not be derived due to the time consuming process of structure determination, and limitations of similarity based approaches. Thus a sequence and non-similarity based method is needed to characterize the NAD binding sites to help in the annotation. In this study attempts have been made to predict NAD binding proteins and their interacting residues (NIRs from amino acid sequence using bioinformatics tools. Results We extracted 1556 proteins chains from 555 NAD binding proteins whose structure is available in Protein Data Bank. Then we removed all redundant protein chains and finally obtained 195 non-redundant NAD binding protein chains, where no two chains have more than 40% sequence identity. In this study all models were developed and evaluated using five-fold cross validation technique on the above dataset of 195 NAD binding proteins. While certain type of residues are preferred (e.g. Gly, Tyr, Thr, His in NAD interaction, residues like Ala, Glu, Leu, Lys are not preferred. A support vector machine (SVM based method has been developed using various window lengths of amino acid sequence for predicting NAD interacting residues and obtained maximum Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC 0.47 with accuracy 74.13% at window length 17

  1. Studying protein-protein interactions using peptide arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katz, C.; Levy-Beladev, L.; Rotem-Bamberger, S.; Rito, T.; Rudiger, S.G.D.; Friedler, A.

    2010-01-01

    Screening of arrays and libraries of compounds is well-established as a high-throughput method for detecting and analyzing interactions in both biological and chemical systems. Arrays and libraries can be composed from various types of molecules, ranging from small organic compounds to DNA, proteins

  2. A framework for protein and membrane interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bacci, Giorgio; Miculan, Marino; 10.4204/EPTCS.11.2

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the BioBeta Framework, a meta-model for both protein-level and membrane-level interactions of living cells. This formalism aims to provide a formal setting where to encode, compare and merge models at different abstraction levels; in particular, higher-level (e.g. membrane) activities can be given a formal biological justification in terms of low-level (i.e., protein) interactions. A BioBeta specification provides a protein signature together a set of protein reactions, in the spirit of the kappa-calculus. Moreover, the specification describes when a protein configuration triggers one of the only two membrane interaction allowed, that is "pinch" and "fuse". In this paper we define the syntax and semantics of BioBeta, analyse its properties, give it an interpretation as biobigraphical reactive systems, and discuss its expressivity by comparing with kappa-calculus and modelling significant examples. Notably, BioBeta has been designed after a bigraphical metamodel for the same purposes. Hence, each ...

  3. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSuter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS, and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  5. Development of a multiplexed microfluidic proteomic reactor and its application for studying protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruijun; Hoa, Xuyen Dai; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Pezacki, John Paul; Veres, Teodor; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics techniques have been very successful for the identification and study of protein-protein interactions. Typically, immunopurification of protein complexes is conducted, followed by protein separation by gel electrophoresis and in-gel protein digestion, and finally, mass spectrometry is performed to identify the interacting partners. However, the manual processing of the samples is time-consuming and error-prone. Here, we developed a polymer-based microfluidic proteomic reactor aimed at the parallel analysis of minute amounts of protein samples obtained from immunoprecipitation. The design of the proteomic reactor allows for the simultaneous processing of multiple samples on the same devices. Each proteomic reactor on the device consists of SCX beads packed and restricted into a 1 cm microchannel by two integrated pillar frits. The device is fabricated using a combination of low-cost hard cyclic olefin copolymer thermoplastic and elastomeric thermoplastic materials (styrene/(ethylene/butylenes)/styrene) using rapid hot-embossing replication techniques with a polymer-based stamp. Three immunopurified protein samples are simultaneously captured, reduced, alkylated, and digested on the device within 2-3 h instead of the days required for the conventional protein-protein interaction studies. The limit of detection of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was shown to be lower than 2 ng of protein. Furthermore, the application of the microfluidic proteomic reactor was demonstrated for the simultaneous processing of the interactome of the histone variant Htz1 in wild-type yeast and in a swr1Δ yeast strain compared to an untagged control using a novel three-channel microfluidic proteomic reactor.

  6. PREFACE: Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation Physics approaches to protein interactions and gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa

    2011-06-01

    Physics approaches focus on uncovering, modeling and quantitating the general principles governing the micro and macro universe. This has always been an important component of biological research, however recent advances in experimental techniques and the accumulation of unprecedented genome-scale experimental data produced by these novel technologies now allow for addressing fundamental questions on a large scale. These relate to molecular interactions, principles of bimolecular recognition, and mechanisms of signal propagation. The functioning of a cell requires a variety of intermolecular interactions including protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-RNA, hormones, peptides, small molecules, lipids and more. Biomolecules work together to provide specific functions and perturbations in intermolecular communication channels often lead to cellular malfunction and disease. A full understanding of the interactome requires an in-depth grasp of the biophysical principles underlying individual interactions as well as their organization in cellular networks. Phenomena can be described at different levels of abstraction. Computational and systems biology strive to model cellular processes by integrating and analyzing complex data from multiple experimental sources using interdisciplinary tools. As a result, both the causal relationships between the variables and the general features of the system can be discovered, which even without knowing the details of the underlying mechanisms allow for putting forth hypotheses and predicting the behavior of the systems in response to perturbation. And here lies the strength of in silico models which provide control and predictive power. At the same time, the complexity of individual elements and molecules can be addressed by the fields of molecular biophysics, physical biology and structural biology, which focus on the underlying physico-chemical principles and may explain the molecular mechanisms of cellular function. In this issue

  7. Exposing the Alkanesulfonate Monooxygenase Protein-Protein Interaction Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Paritosh V; Singh, Harsimran; Busenlehner, Laura S; Ellis, Holly R

    2015-12-29

    The alkanesulfonate monooxygenase enzymes (SsuE and SsuD) catalyze the desulfonation of diverse alkanesulfonate substrates. The SsuE enzyme is an NADPH-dependent FMN reductase that provides reduced flavin to the SsuD monooxygenase enzyme. Previous studies have highlighted the presence of protein-protein interactions between SsuE and SsuD thought to be important in the flavin transfer event, but the putative interaction sites have not been identified. Protected sites on specific regions of SsuE and SsuD were identified by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. An α-helix on SsuD containing conserved charged amino acids showed a decrease in percent deuteration in the presence of SsuE. The α-helical region of SsuD is part of an insertion sequence and is adjacent to the active site opening. A SsuD variant containing substitutions of the charged residues showed a 4-fold decrease in coupled assays that included SsuE to provide reduced FMN, but there was no activity observed with an SsuD variant containing a deletion of the α-helix under similar conditions. Desulfonation by the SsuD deletion variant was only observed with an increase in enzyme and substrate concentrations. Although activity was observed under certain conditions, there were no protein-protein interactions observed with the SsuD variants and SsuE in pull-down assays and fluorimetric titrations. The results from these studies suggest that optimal transfer of reduced flavin from SsuE to SsuD requires defined protein-protein interactions, but diffusion can occur under specified conditions. A basis is established for further studies to evaluate the structural features of the alkanesulfonate monooxygenase enzymes that promote desulfonation.

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YEL017W, YEL017W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17W GTT3 Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by compu...Bait description Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by comput...ion Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by computationa...YEL017W GTT3 Protein of unknown function with a possible role in glutathione metabolism, as suggested by com...putational analysis of large-scale protein-protein interaction data; GFP-fusion pro

  9. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.D.J.; Morabito, G.; Fiers, M.A.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Angenent, G.C.; Immink, R.G.H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein famil

  10. A Novel Approach for Protein-Named Entity Recognition and Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Meijing Li; Tsendsuren Munkhdalai; Xiuming Yu; Keun Ho Ryu

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers focus on developing protein-named entity recognition (Protein-NER) or PPI extraction systems. However, the studies about these two topics cannot be merged well; then existing PPI extraction systems’ Protein-NER still needs to improve. In this paper, we developed the protein-protein interaction extraction system named PPIMiner based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) and parsing tree. PPIMiner consists of three main models: natural language processing (NLP) model, Protein-NER mod...

  11. The aquaporin family of water channel proteins in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M D; King, L S; Agre, P

    1997-05-01

    The aquaporins are a family of membrane channel proteins that serve as selective pores through which water crosses the plasma membranes of many human tissues and cell types. The sites where aquaporins are expressed implicate these proteins in renal water reabsorption, cerebrospinal fluid secretion and reabsorption, generation of pulmonary secretions, aqueous humor secretion and reabsorption, lacrimation, and multiple other physiologic processes. Determination of the aquaporin gene sequences and their chromosomal locations has provided insight into the structure and pathophysiologic roles of these proteins, and primary and secondary involvement of aquaporins is becoming apparent in diverse clinical disorders. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed in multiple tissues including red blood cells, and the Colton blood group antigens represent a polymorphism on the AQP1 protein. AQP2 is restricted to renal collecting ducts and has been linked to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans and to lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and fluid retention from congestive heart failure in rat models. Congenital cataracts result from mutations in the mouse gene encoding the lens homolog Aqp0 (Mip). The present understanding of aquaporin physiology is still incomplete; identification of additional members of the aquaporin family will affect future studies of multiple disorders of water distribution throughout the body. In some tissues, the aquaporins may participate in the transepithelial movement of fluid without being rate limiting, so aquaporins may be involved in clinical disorders without being causative. As outlined in this review, our challenge is to identify disease states in which aquaporins are involved, to define the aquaporins' roles mechanistically, and to search for ways to exploit this information therapeutically.

  12. The Development and Characterization of Protein-Based Stationary Phases for Studying Drug-Protein and Protein-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghvi, Mitesh; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2011-01-01

    Protein-based liquid chromatography stationary phases are used in bioaffinity chromatography for studying drug-protein interactions, the determination of binding affinities, competitive and allosteric interactions, as well as for studying protein-protein interactions. This review addresses the development and characterization of protein-based stationary phase, and the application of these phases using frontal and zonal chromatography techniques. The approach will be illustrated using immobili...

  13. Inhibition of G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels by different classes of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Various antidepressants are commonly used for the treatment of depression and several other neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition to their primary effects on serotonergic or noradrenergic neurotransmitter systems, antidepressants have been shown to interact with several receptors and ion channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of antidepressants have not yet been sufficiently clarified. G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+ (GIRK, Kir3 channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and heart rate, and GIRK channel modulation has been suggested to have therapeutic potential for several neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the effects of various classes of antidepressants on GIRK channels using the Xenopus oocyte expression assay. In oocytes injected with mRNA for GIRK1/GIRK2 or GIRK1/GIRK4 subunits, extracellular application of sertraline, duloxetine, and amoxapine effectively reduced GIRK currents, whereas nefazodone, venlafaxine, mianserin, and mirtazapine weakly inhibited GIRK currents even at toxic levels. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent, with various degrees of potency and effectiveness. Furthermore, the effects of sertraline were voltage-independent and time-independent during each voltage pulse, whereas the effects of duloxetine were voltage-dependent with weaker inhibition with negative membrane potentials and time-dependent with a gradual decrease in each voltage pulse. However, Kir2.1 channels were insensitive to all of the drugs. Moreover, the GIRK currents induced by ethanol were inhibited by sertraline but not by intracellularly applied sertraline. The present results suggest that GIRK channel inhibition may reveal a novel characteristic of the commonly used antidepressants, particularly sertraline, and contributes to some of the therapeutic effects and adverse effects.

  14. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  15. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D. T.; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Turner, Ray W.

    2013-01-01

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  16. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan D.T. Engbers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs. In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH are activated during trains of IPSPs. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT, and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect effects on

  17. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2013-11-27

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (I T) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I H) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with I T generating a rebound burst and I H controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing I H to increase the efficacy of I T and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  18. Protein-protein interactions as druggable targets: recent technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higueruelo, Alicia P; Jubb, Harry; Blundell, Tom L

    2013-10-01

    Classical target-based drug discovery, where large chemical libraries are screened using inhibitory assays for a single target, has struggled to find ligands that inhibit protein-protein interactions (PPI). Nevertheless, in the past decade there have been successes that have demonstrated that PPI can be useful drug targets, and the field is now evolving fast. This review focuses on the new approaches and concepts that are being developed to tackle these challenging targets: the use of fragment based methods to explore the chemical space, stapled peptides to regulate intracellular PPI, alternatives to competitive inhibition and the use of antibodies to enable small molecule discovery for these targets.

  19. Sentence Simplification Aids Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha

    2010-01-01

    Accurate systems for extracting Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) automatically from biomedical articles can help accelerate biomedical research. Biomedical Informatics researchers are collaborating to provide metaservices and advance the state-of-art in PPI extraction. One problem often neglected by current Natural Language Processing systems is the characteristic complexity of the sentences in biomedical literature. In this paper, we report on the impact that automatic simplification of sentences has on the performance of a state-of-art PPI extraction system, showing a substantial improvement in recall (8%) when the sentence simplification method is applied, without significant impact to precision.

  20. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  1. CFTR anion channel modulates expression of human transmembrane mucin MUC3 through the PDZ protein GOPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaseyed, Thaher; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2011-09-15

    The transmembrane mucins in the enterocyte are type 1 transmembrane proteins with long and rigid mucin domains, rich in proline, threonine and serine residues that carry numerous O-glycans. Three of these mucins, MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17 are unique in harboring C-terminal class I PDZ motifs, making them suitable ligands for PDZ proteins. A screening of 123 different human PDZ domains for binding to MUC3 identified a strong interaction with the PDZ protein GOPC (Golgi-associated PDZ and coiled-coil motif-containing protein). This interaction was mediated by the C-terminal PDZ motif of MUC3, binding to the single GOPC PDZ domain. GOPC is also a binding partner for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that directs CFTR for degradation. Overexpression of GOPC downregulated the total levels of MUC3, an effect that was reversed by introducing CFTR. The results suggest that CFTR and MUC3 compete for binding to GOPC, which in turn can regulate levels of these two proteins. For the first time a direct coupling between mucins and the CFTR channel is demonstrated, a finding that will shed further light on the still poorly understood relationship between cystic fibrosis and the mucus phenotype of this disease.

  2. Systematic screens for proteins that interact with the mucolipidosis type IV protein TRPML1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Ellen; McLaughlin, Brooke M; Lepow, Talya; Durns, Tyler A; Randall, Justin; Upchurch, Cameron; Miller, Katherine; Campbell, Erin M; Fares, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting from mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the endosomal/lysosomal Transient Receptor Potential channel protein mucolipin-1/TRPML1. Cells isolated from Mucolipidosis type IV patients and grown in vitro and in in vivo models of this disease both show several lysosome-associated defects. However, it is still unclear how TRPML1 regulates the transport steps implicated by these defects. Identifying proteins that associate with TRPML1 will facilitate the elucidation of its cellular and biochemical functions. We report here two saturation screens for proteins that interact with TRPML1: one that is based on immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and the other using a genetic yeast two-hybrid approach. From these screens, we identified largely non-overlapping proteins, which represent potential TRPML1-interactors., Using additional interaction assays on some of the potential interactors from each screen, we validated some proteins as candidate TRPML1 interactors In addition, our analysis indicates that each of the two screens not only identified some false-positive interactors, as expected from any screen, but also failed to uncover potential TRPML1 interactors. Future studies on the true interactors, first identified in these screens, will help elucidate the structure and function of protein complexes containing TRPML1.

  3. Systematic screens for proteins that interact with the mucolipidosis type IV protein TRPML1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Spooner

    Full Text Available Mucolipidosis type IV is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting from mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the endosomal/lysosomal Transient Receptor Potential channel protein mucolipin-1/TRPML1. Cells isolated from Mucolipidosis type IV patients and grown in vitro and in in vivo models of this disease both show several lysosome-associated defects. However, it is still unclear how TRPML1 regulates the transport steps implicated by these defects. Identifying proteins that associate with TRPML1 will facilitate the elucidation of its cellular and biochemical functions. We report here two saturation screens for proteins that interact with TRPML1: one that is based on immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and the other using a genetic yeast two-hybrid approach. From these screens, we identified largely non-overlapping proteins, which represent potential TRPML1-interactors., Using additional interaction assays on some of the potential interactors from each screen, we validated some proteins as candidate TRPML1 interactors In addition, our analysis indicates that each of the two screens not only identified some false-positive interactors, as expected from any screen, but also failed to uncover potential TRPML1 interactors. Future studies on the true interactors, first identified in these screens, will help elucidate the structure and function of protein complexes containing TRPML1.

  4. The β1-subunit of Na(v1.5 cardiac sodium channel is required for a dominant negative effect through α-α interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Mercier

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is an inherited autosomal dominant cardiac channelopathy. Several mutations on the cardiac sodium channel Na(v1.5 which are responsible for BrS lead to misfolded proteins that do not traffic properly to the plasma membrane. In order to mimic patient heterozygosity, a trafficking defective mutant, R1432G was co-expressed with Wild Type (WT Na(v1.5 channels in HEK293T cells. This mutant significantly decreased the membrane Na current density when it was co-transfected with the WT channel. This dominant negative effect did not result in altered biophysical properties of Na(v1.5 channels. Luminometric experiments revealed that the expression of mutant proteins induced a significant reduction in membrane expression of WT channels. Interestingly, we have found that the auxiliary Na channel β(1-subunit was essential for this dominant negative effect. Indeed, the absence of the β(1-subunit prevented the decrease in WT sodium current density and surface proteins associated with the dominant negative effect. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a physical interaction between Na channel α-subunits. This interaction occurred only when the β(1-subunit was present. Our findings reveal a new role for β(1-subunits in cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels by promoting α-α subunit interaction which can lead to a dominant negative effect when one of the α-subunits shows a trafficking defective mutation.

  5. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  6. High throughput protein-protein interaction data: clues for the architecture of protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Chi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput techniques are becoming widely used to study protein-protein interactions and protein complexes on a proteome-wide scale. Here we have explored the potential of these techniques to accurately determine the constituent proteins of complexes and their architecture within the complex. Results Two-dimensional representations of the 19S and 20S proteasome, mediator, and SAGA complexes were generated and overlaid with high quality pairwise interaction data, core-module-attachment classifications from affinity purifications of complexes and predicted domain-domain interactions. Pairwise interaction data could accurately determine the members of each complex, but was unexpectedly poor at deciphering the topology of proteins in complexes. Core and module data from affinity purification studies were less useful for accurately defining the member proteins of these complexes. However, these data gave strong information on the spatial proximity of many proteins. Predicted domain-domain interactions provided some insight into the topology of proteins within complexes, but was affected by a lack of available structural data for the co-activator complexes and the presence of shared domains in paralogous proteins. Conclusion The constituent proteins of complexes are likely to be determined with accuracy by combining data from high-throughput techniques. The topology of some proteins in the complexes will be able to be clearly inferred. We finally suggest strategies that can be employed to use high throughput interaction data to define the membership and understand the architecture of proteins in novel complexes.

  7. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL167C, YBR212W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available as bait (2) Rows with this bait as prey (0) YBR212W NGR1 RNA binding protein that negatively regulates grow...ption RNA binding protein that negatively regulates growth rate; interacts with the 3' UTR of the mitochondr

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR302W, YOR047C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rol of glucose-regulated gene expression; interacts with protein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt...tein kinase Snf1p, glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p, and TATA-binding protein Spt1

  9. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Cohen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host’s immune system (molecular mimicry. Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells, stick and roll (bacteria or surfacing (viruses.

  10. The antimalarial drug mefloquine inhibits cardiac inward rectifier K+ channels: evidence for interference in PIP2-channel interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Izquierdo, Angélica; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Aréchiga-Figueroa, Iván A; Rodríguez-Martínez, Martín; Ferrer, Tania; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Sánchez-Chapula, José A

    2011-04-01

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine was found to inhibit the KATP channel by an unknown mechanism. Because mefloquine is a Cationic amphiphilic drug and is known to insert into lipid bilayers, we postulate that mefloquine interferes with the interaction between PIP2 and Kir channels resulting in channel inhibition. We studied the inhibitory effects of mefloquine on Kir2.1, Kir2.3, Kir2.3(I213L), and Kir6.2/SUR2A channels expressed in HEK-293 cells, and on IK1 and IKATP from feline cardiac myocytes. The order of mefloquine inhibition was Kir6.2/SUR2A ≈ Kir2.3 (IC50 ≈ 2 μM) > Kir2.1 (IC50 > 30 μM). Similar results were obtained in cardiac myocytes. The Kir2.3(I213L) mutant, which enhances the strength of interaction with PIP2 (compared to WT), was significantly less sensitive (IC50 = 9 μM). In inside-out patches, continuous application of PIP2 strikingly prevented the mefloquine inhibition. Our results support the idea that mefloquine interferes with PIP2-Kir channels interactions.

  11. Electrochemical evaluation of chemical selectivity of glutamate receptor ion channel proteins with a multi-channel sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, M; Hirano, A; Rehák, M; Nakanishi, J; Kawai, K; Sato, H; Umezawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    A new method for evaluating chemical selectivity of agonists towards receptor ion channel proteins is proposed by using glutamate receptor (GluR) ion channel proteins and their agonists N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), L-glutamate, and (2S, 3R, 4S) isomer of 2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-IV). Integrated multi-channel currents, corresponding to the sum of total amount of ions passed through the multiple open channels, were used as a measure of agonists' selectivity to recognize ion channel proteins and induce channel currents. GluRs isolated from rat synaptic plasma membranes were incorporated into planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) formed by the folding method. The empirical factors that affect the selectivity were demonstrated: (i) the number of GluRs incorporated into BLMs varied from one membrane to another; (ii) each BLM contained different subtypes of GluRs (NMDA and/or non-NMDA subtypes); and (iii) the magnitude of multi-channel responses induced by L-glutamate at negative applied potentials was larger than at positive potentials, while those by NMDA and L-CCG-IV were linearly related to applied potentials. The chemical selectivity among NMDA, L-glutamate and L-CCG-IV for NMDA subtype of GluRs was determined with each single BLM in which only NMDA subtype of GluRs was designed to be active by inhibiting the non-NMDA subtypes using a specific antagonist DNQX. The order of selectivity among the relevant agonists for the NMDA receptor subtype was found to be L-CCG-IV > L-glutamate > NMDA, which is consistent with the order of binding affinity of these agonists towards the same NMDA subtypes. The potential use of this approach for evaluating chemical selectivity towards non-NMDA receptor subtypes of GluRs and other receptor ion channel proteins is discussed.

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR285W, YDR233C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available racts with exocyst subunit Sec6p and with Yip3p; also interacts with Sbh1p; null mutant has an altered (most...tion ER membrane protein that interacts with exocyst subunit Sec6p and with Yip3p; also interacts with Sbh1p; null mutant has an alte...red (mostly cisternal) ER morphology; member of the RTNL

  13. CPL:Detecting Protein Complexes by Propagating Labels on Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代启国; 郭茂祖; 刘晓燕; 滕志霞; 王春宇

    2014-01-01

    Proteins usually bind together to form complexes, which play an important role in cellular activities. Many graph clustering methods have been proposed to identify protein complexes by finding dense regions in protein-protein interaction networks. We present a novel framework (CPL) that detects protein complexes by propagating labels through interactions in a network, in which labels denote complex identifiers. With proper propagation in CPL, proteins in the same complex will be assigned with the same labels. CPL does not make any strong assumptions about the topological structures of the complexes, as in previous methods. The CPL algorithm is tested on several publicly available yeast protein-protein interaction networks and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results suggest that CPL performs better than the existing methods. An analysis of the functional homogeneity based on a gene ontology analysis shows that the detected complexes of CPL are highly biologically relevant.

  14. Comprehensive peptidomimetic libraries targeting protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Landon R; Boger, Dale L

    2012-10-16

    Transient protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential components in cellular signaling pathways as well as in important processes such as viral infection, replication, and immune suppression. The unknown or uncharacterized PPIs involved in such interaction networks often represent compelling therapeutic targets for drug discovery. To date, however, the main strategies for discovery of small molecule modulators of PPIs are typically limited to structurally characterized targets. Recent developments in molecular scaffolds that mimic the side chain display of peptide secondary structures have yielded effective designs, but few screening libraries of such mimetics are available to interrogate PPI targets. We initiated a program to prepare a comprehensive small molecule library designed to mimic the three major recognition motifs that mediate PPIs (α-helix, β-turn, and β-strand). Three libraries would be built around templates designed to mimic each such secondary structure and substituted with all triplet combinations of groups representing the 20 natural amino acid side chains. When combined, the three libraries would contain a member capable of mimicking the key interaction and recognition residues of most targetable PPIs. In this Account, we summarize the results of the design, synthesis, and validation of an 8000 member α-helix mimetic library and a 4200 member β-turn mimetic library. We expect that the screening of these libraries will not only provide lead structures against α-helix- or β-turn-mediated protein-protein or peptide-receptor interactions, even if the nature of the interaction is unknown, but also yield key insights into the recognition motif (α-helix or β-turn) and identify the key residues mediating the interaction. Consistent with this expectation, the screening of the libraries against p53/MDM2 and HIV-1 gp41 (α-helix mimetic library) or the opioid receptors (β-turn mimetic library) led to the discovery of library members expected

  15. Screening and identification of dynamin-1 interacting proteins in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ciliu; Omran, Ahmed Galal; He, Fang; Deng, Xiaolu; Wu, Lei; Peng, Jing; Yin, Fei

    2014-01-16

    Dynamin-1 is a multi-domain GTPase that is crucial for the fission stage of synaptic vesicle recycling and vesicle trafficking. In this study, we constructed prokaryotic expression plasmids for the four functional domains of dynamin-1, which are pGEX-4T-2-PH, pGEX-4T-2-PRD, pGEX-4T-2-GED and pGEX-4T-2-GTPase. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP), and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry were used to screen and identify dynamin-1 interacting proteins in rat brain synaptosomes. We identified a set of 63 candidate protein interactions, including 36 proteins interacting with dynamin-1 C-terminal proline-rich domain (PRD), 14 with pleckstrin-homology domain (PH), 7 with GTPase effector domain (GED) and 6 with GTPase domain, consisting of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and other proteins. We selected three previously unreported dynamin-1 interacting proteins to verify their interaction with dynamin-1 under native conditions. Using co-IP, we found that Rab GDP-dissociation inhibitor (Rab GDI) and chloride channel 3 (ClC-3) do interact with dynamin-1, but not with TUC-4b (the TOAD-64/Ulip/CRMP (TUC) family member). Those novel interactions detected in our study offer valuable insight into the protein-protein interacting network that could enhance our understanding of dynamin-1 mediated synaptic vesicle recycling.

  16. Interaction of heavy metals with membrane Ca2+ channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PengSQ; HajelRK

    2002-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine if specific types of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels,typically found in neurons were affected differentially by MeHg,Hg2+ and Pb2+.Expression cDNA clones of α1C,α1B or α1E subunits coding for neuronal L-,N- and R- subtypes respectively,were combined with α2b δ and β3 Ca2+ channel subunits of human neuronal origin to transfect HEK293 cells.Current was measured using whole cell voltage clamp recording techniques.It the present studies,we conclude: (1)neurotoxic heavy metals such as MeHg,Hg2+ and Pb impair the function of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at low μmolar to sub-μmolar concentrations-concentrations in the range of which are pathologically and environmentally relevant; (2)a particular metal,i.e.Pb2+,may inhibit function of phenotypically distince Ca2+ channels with variable potency; (3)different metals have differing “orders of potency” at inhibiting defined populations of Ca2+ channels; (4)for “susceptible populations” of patients with either underlying diseases or genetic alter ations of Ca2+ channel function,these metals may have heightened effectiveness.As such,for these populations,environmental toxic metals could produce a more dominant neurotoxicity.

  17. Predict potential drug targets from the ion channel proteins based on SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Zhang, Ruijie; Chen, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Yongshuai; Shang, Zhenwei; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xuehong; Li, Xia

    2010-02-21

    The identification of molecular targets is a critical step in the drug discovery and development process. Ion channel proteins represent highly attractive drug targets implicated in a diverse range of disorders, in particular in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Due to the limits of experimental technique and low-throughput nature of patch-clamp electrophysiology, they remain a target class waiting to be exploited. In our study, we combined three types of protein features, primary sequence, secondary structure and subcellular localization to predict potential drug targets from ion channel proteins applying classical support vector machine (SVM) method. In addition, our prediction comprised two stages. In stage 1, we predicted ion channel target proteins based on whole-genome target protein characteristics. Firstly, we performed feature selection by Mann-Whitney U test, then made predictions to identify potential ion channel targets by SVM and designed a new evaluating indicator Q to prioritize results. In stage 2, we made a prediction based on known ion channel target protein characteristics. Genetic algorithm was used to select features and SVM was used to predict ion channel targets. Then, we integrated results of two stages, and found that five ion channel proteins appeared in both prediction results including CGMP-gated cation channel beta subunit and Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit alpha-5, etc., and four of which were relative to some nerve diseases. It suggests that these five proteins are potential targets for drug discovery and our prediction strategies are effective.

  18. Mechanism of interaction of niflumic acid with heterologously expressed kidney CLC-K chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picollo, Alessandra; Liantonio, Antonella; Babini, Elena; Camerino, Diana Conte; Pusch, Michael

    2007-04-01

    CLC-K Cl(-) channels belong to the CLC protein family. In kidney and inner ear, they are involved in transepithelial salt transport. Mutations in ClC-Kb lead to Bartter's syndrome, and mutations in the associated subunit barttin produce Bartter's syndrome and deafness. We have previously found that 3-phenyl-CPP blocks hClC-Ka and rClC-K1 from the extracellular side in the pore entrance. Recently, we have shown that niflumic acid (NFA), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory fenamate, produces biphasic behavior on human CLC-K channels that suggests the presence of two functionally different binding sites: an activating site and a blocking site. Here, we investigate in more detail the interaction of NFA on CLC-K channels. Mutants that altered block by 3-phenyl-2-(p-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid (CPP) had no effect on NFA block, indicating that the inhibition binding site of NFA is different from that of 3-phenyl-CPP and flufenamic acid. Moreover, NFA does not compete with extracellular Cl(-) ions, suggesting that the binding sites of NFA are not located deep in the pore. Differently from ClC-Ka, on the rat homologue ClC-K1, NFA has only an inhibitory effect. We developed a quantitative model to describe the complex action of NFA on ClC-Ka. The model predicts that ClC-Ka possesses two NFA binding sites: when only one site is occupied, NFA increases ClC-Ka currents, whereas the occupation of both binding sites leads to channel block.

  19. Polarized axonal surface expression of neuronal KCNQ potassium channels is regulated by calmodulin interaction with KCNQ2 subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Cavaretta

    Full Text Available KCNQ potassium channels composed of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits give rise to the M-current, a slow-activating and non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium current that limits repetitive firing of action potentials. KCNQ channels are enriched at the surface of axons and axonal initial segments, the sites for action potential generation and modulation. Their enrichment at the axonal surface is impaired by mutations in KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail that cause benign familial neonatal convulsion and myokymia, suggesting that their correct surface distribution and density at the axon is crucial for control of neuronal excitability. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating enrichment of KCNQ channels at the neuronal axon remain elusive. Here, we show that enrichment of KCNQ channels at the axonal surface of dissociated rat hippocampal cultured neurons is regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. Using immunocytochemistry and the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 membrane protein as a trafficking reporter, we demonstrate that fusion of KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail is sufficient to target CD4 protein to the axonal surface whereas inhibition of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 abolishes axonal surface expression of CD4 fusion proteins by retaining them in the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 also impairs enrichment of heteromeric KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels at the axonal surface by blocking their trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the axon. Consistently, hippocampal neuronal excitability is dampened by transient expression of wild-type KCNQ2 but not mutant KCNQ2 deficient in calmodulin binding. Furthermore, coexpression of mutant calmodulin, which can interact with KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels but not calcium, reduces but does not abolish their enrichment at the axonal surface, suggesting that apo calmodulin but not calcium-bound calmodulin is necessary for their preferential targeting to the axonal

  20. Alternating-Current Conductivity for a Two-Channel Interacting Quantum Wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG De-Jun; CHENG Fang; ZHOU Guang-Hui

    2007-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the ac conductivity of a clean two-channel spinless quantum wire in the presence of both short-ranged intra- and inter-channel electron-electron interactions. In the Luttinger-liquid regime, we formulize the action functional of the system with an external time-varying electric field. The obtained expression of ac conductivity for the system within linear response theory is generally an oscillation function of the interaction strength, the driving frequency as well as the measured position in the wire. The numerical examples demonstrate that the amplitude of ac conductivity is renormalized by the both interactions, and the dc conductivity of the system with inter-channel interaction is smaller than that without inter-channel interaction.

  1. MOLEonline 2.0: interactive web-based analysis of biomacromolecular channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berka, Karel; Hanák, Ondrej; Sehnal, David; Banás, Pavel; Navrátilová, Veronika; Jaiswal, Deepti; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Svobodová Vareková, Radka; Koca, Jaroslav; Otyepka, Michal

    2012-07-01

    Biomolecular channels play important roles in many biological systems, e.g. enzymes, ribosomes and ion channels. This article introduces a web-based interactive MOLEonline 2.0 application for the analysis of access/egress paths to interior molecular voids. MOLEonline 2.0 enables platform-independent, easy-to-use and interactive analyses of (bio)macromolecular channels, tunnels and pores. Results are presented in a clear manner, making their interpretation easy. For each channel, MOLEonline displays a 3D graphical representation of the channel, its profile accompanied by a list of lining residues and also its basic physicochemical properties. The users can tune advanced parameters when performing a channel search to direct the search according to their needs. The MOLEonline 2.0 application is freely available via the Internet at http://ncbr.muni.cz/mole or http://mole.upol.cz.

  2. Investigating CFTR and KCa3.1 Protein/Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hélène; Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Luo, Yishan; Wiseman, Paul W; Hanrahan, John W; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Sauvé, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    In epithelia, Cl- channels play a prominent role in fluid and electrolyte transport. Of particular importance is the cAMP-dependent cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR) with mutations of the CFTR encoding gene causing cystic fibrosis. The bulk transepithelial transport of Cl- ions and electrolytes needs however to be coupled to an increase in K+ conductance in order to recycle K+ and maintain an electrical driving force for anion exit across the apical membrane. In several epithelia, this K+ efflux is ensured by K+ channels, including KCa3.1, which is expressed at both the apical and basolateral membranes. We show here for the first time that CFTR and KCa3.1 can physically interact. We first performed a two-hybrid screen to identify which KCa3.1 cytosolic domains might mediate an interaction with CFTR. Our results showed that both the N-terminal fragment M1-M40 of KCa3.1 and part of the KCa3.1 calmodulin binding domain (residues L345-A400) interact with the NBD2 segment (G1237-Y1420) and C- region of CFTR (residues T1387-L1480), respectively. An association of CFTR and F508del-CFTR with KCa3.1 was further confirmed in co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrating the formation of immunoprecipitable CFTR/KCa3.1 complexes in CFBE cells. Co-expression of KCa3.1 and CFTR in HEK cells did not impact CFTR expression at the cell surface, and KCa3.1 trafficking appeared independent of CFTR stimulation. Finally, evidence is presented through cross-correlation spectroscopy measurements that KCa3.1 and CFTR colocalize at the plasma membrane and that KCa3.1 channels tend to aggregate consequent to an enhanced interaction with CFTR channels at the plasma membrane following an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest 1) that the physical interaction KCa3.1/CFTR can occur early during the biogenesis of both proteins and 2) that KCa3.1 and CFTR form a dynamic complex, the formation of which depends on

  3. Evaluation of clustering algorithms for protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Jacques

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions are crucial components of all cellular processes. Recently, high-throughput methods have been developed to obtain a global description of the interactome (the whole network of protein interactions for a given organism. In 2002, the yeast interactome was estimated to contain up to 80,000 potential interactions. This estimate is based on the integration of data sets obtained by various methods (mass spectrometry, two-hybrid methods, genetic studies. High-throughput methods are known, however, to yield a non-negligible rate of false positives, and to miss a fraction of existing interactions. The interactome can be represented as a graph where nodes correspond with proteins and edges with pairwise interactions. In recent years clustering methods have been developed and applied in order to extract relevant modules from such graphs. These algorithms require the specification of parameters that may drastically affect the results. In this paper we present a comparative assessment of four algorithms: Markov Clustering (MCL, Restricted Neighborhood Search Clustering (RNSC, Super Paramagnetic Clustering (SPC, and Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE. Results A test graph was built on the basis of 220 complexes annotated in the MIPS database. To evaluate the robustness to false positives and false negatives, we derived 41 altered graphs by randomly removing edges from or adding edges to the test graph in various proportions. Each clustering algorithm was applied to these graphs with various parameter settings, and the clusters were compared with the annotated complexes. We analyzed the sensitivity of the algorithms to the parameters and determined their optimal parameter values. We also evaluated their robustness to alterations of the test graph. We then applied the four algorithms to six graphs obtained from high-throughput experiments and compared the resulting clusters with the annotated complexes. Conclusion This

  4. σ Channel Chiral Loops in NN Interaction and Two-Pion Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, H. A.; Kaskulov, M. M.; Doroshkevich, E. A.

    After examination of the correlated two-pion exchange in the NN interaction in terms of chiral pion loops in the t-channel, we consider loops in the s-channel, which get lifted on mass shell in the two-pion production process. We show that the thus obtained dynamical correlations in the σ channel lead to a quantitative description of recent exclusive measuerements near threshold.

  5. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Quistgaard, Esben M. [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordlund, Par [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Thanabalu, Thirumaran [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Torres, Jaume, E-mail: jtorres@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  6. Support vector machine for predicting protein interactions using domain scores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xin-jun; WANG Yi-fei

    2009-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a crucial role in the cellular process such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. This paper presents a new domain score-based support vector machine (SVM) to infer protein interactions, which can be used not only to explore all possible domain interactions by the kernel method, but also to reflect the evolutionary conservation of domains in proteins by using the domain scores of proteins. The experimental result on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dataset demonstrates that this approach can predict protein-protein interactions with higher performances compared to the existing approaches.

  7. INTERACTION OF LIQUID FLAT SCREENS WITH GAS FLOW RESTRICTED BY CHANNEL WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Aksentiev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives description of physical pattern of liquid screen interaction that are injected from the internal walls of a rectangular channel with gas flow. Criterion dependences for determination of intersection coordinates of external boundaries with longitudinal channel axis and factor of liquid screen head resistance.

  8. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed.

  9. RGS12 interacts with the SNARE-binding region of the Cav2.2 calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ryan W; Strock, Jesse; Hains, Melinda D; Cabanilla, Nory Jun; Lau, King-Kei; Siderovski, David P; Diversé-Pierluissi, María

    2005-01-14

    Activation of GABAB receptors in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons inhibits the Cav2.2 calcium channel in both a voltage-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The voltage-independent inhibition requires activation of a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates the alpha1 subunit of the channel and thereby recruits RGS12, a member of the "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. Here we report that RGS12 binds to the SNARE-binding or "synprint" region (amino acids 726-985) in loop II-III of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit. A recombinant protein encompassing the N-terminal PTB domain of RGS12 binds to the synprint region in protein overlay and surface plasmon resonance binding assays; this interaction is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation and yet is within a sequence that differs from the canonical NPXY motif targeted by other PTB domains. In electrophysiological experiments, microinjection of DRG neurons with synprint-derived peptides containing the tyrosine residue Tyr-804 altered the rate of desensitization of neurotransmitter-mediated inhibition of the Cav2.2 calcium channel, whereas peptides centered about a second tyrosine residue, Tyr-815, were without effect. RGS12 from a DRG neuron lysate was precipitated using synprint peptides containing phosphorylated Tyr-804. The high degree of conservation of Tyr-804 in the SNARE-binding region of Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 calcium channels suggests that this region, in addition to the binding of SNARE proteins, is also important for determining the time course of the modulation of calcium current via tyrosine phosphorylation.

  10. Prediction of Protein-protein Interactions on the Basis of Evolutionary Conservation of Protein Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kotelnikova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Although a great deal of progress is being made in the development of fast and reliable experimental techniques to extract genome-wide networks of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, the sequencing of new genomes proceeds at an even faster rate. That is why there is a considerable need for reliable methods of in-silico prediction of protein interaction based solely on sequence similarity information and known interactions from well-studied organisms. This problem can be solved if a dependency exists between sequence similarity and the conservation of the proteins’ functions.Results: In this paper, we introduce a novel probabilistic method for prediction of protein-protein interactions using a new empirical probabilistic formula describing the loss of interactions between homologous proteins during the course of evolution. This formula describes an evolutional process quite similar to the process of the Earth’s population growth. In addition, our method favors predictions confi rmed by several interacting pairs over predictions coming from a single interacting pair. Our approach is useful in working with “noisy” data such as those coming from high-throughput experiments. We have generated predictions for fi ve “model” organisms: H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, C. elegans, A. thaliana, and S. cerevisiae and evaluated the quality of these predictions.

  11. Stimulation of protein kinase C recruits covert calcium channels in Aplysia bag cell neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, J A; Fox, A P; Tsien, R W; Kaczmarek, L K

    The modulation of voltage-activated calcium currents by protein kinases provides excitable cells with a mechanism for regulating their electrical behaviour. At the single channel level, modulation of calcium current has, to date, been characterized only in cardiac muscle, where beta-adrenergic agonists, acting through cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, enhance the calcium current by increasing channel availability and opening. We now report that enhancement of calcium current in the peptidergic bag cell neurons of Aplysia by protein kinase C occurs through a different mechanism, the recruitment of a previously covert class of calcium channel. Under control conditions, bag cell neurons contain only one class of voltage-activated calcium channel with a conductance of approximately 12 pS. After exposure to agents that activate protein kinase C, these neurons also express a second class of calcium channel with a different unitary conductance (approximately 24 pS) that is never seen in untreated cells.

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YPL255W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...it as prey (1) YPL255W BBP1 Protein required for the spindle pole body (SPB) dupl...ows with this prey as bait (0) 4 8 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 7 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...ediate assembly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  13. Predicting protein-protein interactions from sequence using correlation coefficient and high-quality interaction dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Guang; Xia, Jun-Feng; Li, Xue-Ling; Huang, De-Shuang

    2010-03-01

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is critical for understanding the cellular function of the proteins and the machinery of a proteome. Data of PPIs derived from high-throughput technologies are often incomplete and noisy. Therefore, it is important to develop computational methods and high-quality interaction dataset for predicting PPIs. A sequence-based method is proposed by combining correlation coefficient (CC) transformation and support vector machine (SVM). CC transformation not only adequately considers the neighboring effect of protein sequence but describes the level of CC between two protein sequences. A gold standard positives (interacting) dataset MIPS Core and a gold standard negatives (non-interacting) dataset GO-NEG of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were mined to objectively evaluate the above method and attenuate the bias. The SVM model combined with CC transformation yielded the best performance with a high accuracy of 87.94% using gold standard positives and gold standard negatives datasets. The source code of MATLAB and the datasets are available on request under smgsmg@mail.ustc.edu.cn.

  14. Interaction graph mining for protein complexes using local clique merging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Tan, Soon-Heng; Foo, Chuan-Sheng; Ng, See-Kiong

    2005-01-01

    While recent technological advances have made available large datasets of experimentally-detected pairwise protein-protein interactions, there is still a lack of experimentally-determined protein complex data. To make up for this lack of protein complex data, we explore the mining of existing protein interaction graphs for protein complexes. This paper proposes a novel graph mining algorithm to detect the dense neighborhoods (highly connected regions) in an interaction graph which may correspond to protein complexes. Our algorithm first locates local cliques for each graph vertex (protein) and then merge the detected local cliques according to their affinity to form maximal dense regions. We present experimental results with yeast protein interaction data to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. Compared with other existing techniques, our predicted complexes can match or overlap significantly better with the known protein complexes in the MIPS benchmark database. Novel protein complexes were also predicted to help biologists in their search for new protein complexes.

  15. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YLR423C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...0 0 - - - - - 0 0 34 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL239C Bait gene name ADY3 Bait des...ure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle pole body components; potentia

  16. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Russo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development.

  17. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  18. Dengue virus M protein C-terminal peptide (DVM-C) forms ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, A; Horan, C R; Gage, P W

    2005-03-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide consisting of the C-terminus of the M protein of the Dengue virus type 1 strain Singapore S275/90 (DVM-C) produced ion channel activity in artificial lipid bilayers. The channels had a variable conductance and were more permeable to sodium and potassium ions than to chloride ions and more permeable to chloride ions than to calcium ions. Hexamethylene amiloride (100 microM) and amantadine (10 microM), blocked channels formed by DVM-C. Ion channels may play an important role in the life cycle of many viruses and drugs that block these channels may prove to be useful antiviral agents.

  19. Developing algorithms for predicting protein-protein interactions of homology modeled proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the protein-protein docking problem, especially as it relates to homology-based structures, identify the key bottlenecks in current software tools, and evaluate and prototype new algorithms that may be developed to improve these bottlenecks. This report describes the current challenges in the protein-protein docking problem: correctly predicting the binding site for the protein-protein interaction and correctly placing the sidechains. Two different and complementary approaches are taken that can help with the protein-protein docking problem. The first approach is to predict interaction sites prior to docking, and uses bioinformatics studies of protein-protein interactions to predict theses interaction site. The second approach is to improve validation of predicted complexes after docking, and uses an improved scoring function for evaluating proposed docked poses, incorporating a solvation term. This scoring function demonstrates significant improvement over current state-of-the art functions. Initial studies on both these approaches are promising, and argue for full development of these algorithms.

  20. Novel protein-protein interaction family proteins involved in chloroplast movement response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-04-01

    To optimize photosynthetic activity, chloroplasts change their intracellular location in response to ambient light conditions; chloroplasts move toward low intensity light to maximize light capture, and away from high intensity light to avoid photodamage. Although several proteins have been reported to be involved in the chloroplast photorelocation movement response, any physical interaction among them was not found so far. We recently found a physical interaction between two plant-specific coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 (Weak Chloroplast Movement under Blue Light 1) and PMI2 (Plastid Movement Impaired 2), that were identified to regulate chloroplast movement velocity. Since the both coiled-coil regions of WEB1 and PMI2 were classified into an uncharacterized protein family having DUF827 (DUF: Domain of Unknown Function) domain, it was the first report that DUF827 proteins could mediate protein-protein interaction. In this mini-review article, we discuss regarding molecular function of WEB1 and PMI2, and also define a novel protein family composed of WEB1, PMI2 and WEB1/PMI2-like proteins for protein-protein interaction in land plants.

  1. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network.

  2. Analysis and application of large-scale protein-protein interaction data sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jingchun; XU Jinlin; LI Yixue; SHI Tieliu

    2005-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play key roles in cells. Lots of experimental approaches and in silico methods have been developed to identify and predict large-scale protein-protein interactions. However, compared with the traditionally experimental results, the high-throughput protein-protein interaction data often contain the false positives in high probability. In order to fully utilize the large-scale data, it is necessary to develop bioinformatic methods for systematically evaluating those data in order to further improve the data reliability and mine biological information. This review summarizes the methodologies of analysis and application of high-throughput protein-protein interaction data, including the evaluation methods, the relationship between protein-protein interaction data and other protein biological information, and their applications in biological study. In addition, this paper also suggests some interesting topics on mining high-throughput protein-protein interaction data.

  3. Protein-lipid interactions at interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde, P.

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Foams and emulsions are both types of multiphase foods and are a dispersion of one immiscible phase (e.g. air or oil in another (e.g. water. Amphiphilic molecules (either proteins or chemical compounds are able to stabilise the interface between these phases and are termed emulsifiers. The ability of protein emulsifiers to bind lipid is reviewed, and the mechanisms underlying the behaviour of these and low molecular weight surfactants (LMWS at the interface are summarised. New research, exploiting atomic force microscopy, has given fresh insights into the mechanisms by which proteins and LMWS interact when both are present at the interface, compromising the stability of foams and emulsions stabilised by these mixtures. The understanding of component interactions at the interfacial level is essential if advances are to be made in the control and manipulation of multiphase foods during production and storage.Las espumas y las emulsiones son dispersiones de una fase inmiscible (ejemplo aire o aceite en otra (ejemplo agua. Las moléculas anfifílicas (bien proteínas o compuestos químicos pueden estabilizar la interfase y se denominan emulsionantes. En este artículo se revisa la habilidad de los emulsionantes proteínicos para enlazar lípidos y los mecanismos que subyacen en el comportamiento de estas moléculas así como de los tensioactivos de bajo peso molecular en la interfase. Recientes investigaciones que usan la microscopía han ofrecido visiones nuevas de los mecanismos mediante los cuales las proteínas y los tensioactivos de bajo peso molecular interaccionan cuando ambos están presentes en la interfase, comprometiendo la estabilidad de espumas y emulsiones estabilizadas por estas mezclas. El entendimiento de las interacciones entre componentes a nivel interfacial es esencial para lograr avances en el control y manipulación de alimentos multifases durante la producción y el almacenamiento.

  4. The Foundations of Protein-Ligand Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    For the specific design of a drug we must first answer the question: How does a drug achieve its activity? An active ingredient must, in order to develop its action, bind to a particular target molecule in the body. Usually this is a protein, but also nucleic acids in the form of RNA and DNA can be target structures for active agents. The most important condition for binding is at first that the active agent exhibits the correct size and shape in order to optimally fit into a cavity exposed to the surface of the protein, the "bindingpocket". It is further necessary for the surface properties of the ligand and protein to be mutually compatible to form specific interactions. In 1894 Emil Fischer compared the exact fit of a substrate for the catalytic centre of an enzyme with the picture of a "lock-and-key". Paul Ehrlich coined in 1913 "Corpora non agunt nisi fixata", literally "bodies do not work when they are not bound". He wanted to imply that active agents that are meant to kill bacteria or parasites must be "fixed" by them, i.e. linked to their structures. Both concepts form the starting point for any rational concept in the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In many respects they still apply today. A drug must, after being administered, reach its target and interact with a biological macromolecule. Specific agents have a large affinity and sufficient selectivity to bind to the macromolecule's active site. This is the only way they can develop the desired biological activity without side-effects.

  5. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  6. Interacting tilt and kink instabilities in repelling current channels

    CERN Document Server

    Keppens, Rony; Xia, Chun

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical study in resistive magnetohydrodynamics where the initial equilibrium configuration contains adjacent, oppositely directed, parallel current channels. Since oppositely directed current channels repel, the equilibrium is liable to an ideal magnetohydrodynamic tilt instability. This tilt evolution, previously studied in planar settings, involves two magnetic islands or fluxropes, which on Alfvenic timescales undergo a combined rotation and separation. This in turn leads to the creation of (near) singular current layers, posing severe challenges to numerical approaches. Using our open-source grid-adaptive MPI-AMRVAC software, we revisit the planar evolution case in compressible MHD, as well as its extension to 2.5D and full 3D scenarios. As long as the third dimension remains ignorable, pure tilt evolutions result which are hardly affected by out of plane magnetic field components. In all 2.5D runs, our simulations do show secondary tearing type disruptions throughout the near singular cur...

  7. The Pathogenic A116V Mutation Enhances Ion-Selective Channel Formation by Prion Protein in Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabareesan, Ambadi Thody; Singh, Jogender; Roy, Samrat; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Mathew, M K

    2016-04-26

    Prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that afflict mammals. Misfolded and aggregated forms of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) have been associated with many prion diseases. A transmembrane form of PrP favored by the pathogenic mutation A116V is associated with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, but no accumulation of PrP(Sc) is detected. However, the role of the transmembrane form of PrP in pathological processes leading to neuronal death remains unclear. This study reports that the full-length mouse PrP (moPrP) significantly increases the permeability of living cells to K(+), and forms K(+)- and Ca(2+)-selective channels in lipid membranes. Importantly, the pathogenic mutation A116V greatly increases the channel-forming capability of moPrP. The channels thus formed are impermeable to sodium and chloride ions, and are blocked by blockers of voltage-gated ion channels. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) show that upon interaction with lipid, the central hydrophobic region (109-132) of the protein is protected against exchange, making it a good candidate for inserting into the membrane and lining the channel. HDX-MS also shows a dramatic increase in the protein-lipid stoichiometry for A116V moPrP, providing a rationale for its increased channel-forming capability. The results suggest that ion channel formation may be a possible mechanism of PrP-mediated neurodegeneration by the transmembrane forms of PrP.

  8. The Phospholipid-binding Protein SESTD1 Is a Novel Regulator of the Transient Receptor Potential Channels TRPC4 and TRPC5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, Susanne; Bieberstein, Andrea; Arnould, Isabelle; Ihdene, Orhia; Rütten, Hartmut; Strübing, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    TRPC4 and TRPC5 are two closely related members of the mammalian transient receptor potential cation channel family that have been implicated in important physiological functions, such as growth cone guidance and smooth muscle contraction. To further unravel the role of TRPC4 and TRPC5 in these processes in vivo, detailed information about the molecular composition of native channel complexes and their association with cellular signaling networks is needed. We therefore searched a human aortic cDNA library for novel TRPC4-interacting proteins using a modified yeast two-hybrid assay. This screen identified SESTD1, a previously uncharacterized protein containing a lipid-binding SEC14-like domain as well as spectrin-type cytoskeleton interaction domains. SESTD1 was found to associate with TRPC4 and TRPC5 via the channel's calmodulin- and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding domain. In functional studies, we demonstrate that SESTD1 binds several phospholipid species in vitro and is essential for efficient receptor-mediated activation of TRPC5. Notably, phospholipid binding to SESTD1 was Ca2+-dependent. Because TRPC4 and -5 conduct Ca2+, SESTD1-channel signaling may be bidirectional and also couple TRPC activity to lipid signaling through SESTD1. The modulation of TRPC channel function by specific lipid-binding proteins, such as SESTD1, adds another facet to the complex regulation of these channels complementary to the previously described effects of direct channel-phospholipid interaction. PMID:20164195

  9. Correlation of apical fluid-regulating channel proteins with lung function in human COPD lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runzhen Zhao

    Full Text Available Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, and aquaporin 5 (AQP5 proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI and II (ATII-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD.

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR055W, YPL193W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of 60S ribosomal subunits; functionally interacts with Dbp6p; functions in a late nucleoplasmic step of the...L193W Prey gene name RSA1 Prey description Protein involved in the assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits; functionally

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL044C, YLR386W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41p) and couples RNA processing and translation to transcription Rows wi...protein that interacts with an N-terminal region of mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41p) and couples RNA pr

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YIL007C, YOR117W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YIL007C NAS2 Proteasome-interacting protein involved in the assembly of the base su... - - - - - 0 0 3 4 Show YIL007C Bait ORF YIL007C Bait gene name NAS2 Bait description Proteasome-interacti

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL041C, YDR229W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pholipid-binding protein that interacts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially...teracts with both Ypt7p and Vps33p, may partially counteract the action of Vps33p and vice versa, localizes

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR091C, YLR156W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion with Jsn1p in a large-scale analysis Rows with this prey as prey (1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 7 5...scription Putative protein of unknown function; exhibits a two-hybrid interaction with Jsn1p in a large-scale

  15. Categorizing Biases in High-Confidence High-Throughput Protein-Protein Interaction Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Interactions Functional Diversity in Protein Interaction Data Sets—Al- though genomic-scale protein-protein interaction detection campaigns are by design...mapped out in Fig. 2 show that the different data sets covered distinct parts of the interaction space, with some FIG. 1. Functional diversity among

  16. Contribution of N- and C-terminal Kv4.2 channel domains to KChIP interaction [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callsen, Britta; Isbrandt, Dirk; Sauter, Kathrin; Hartmann, L Sven; Pongs, Olaf; Bähring, Robert

    2005-10-15

    Association of Shal gene-related voltage-gated potassium (Kv4) channels with cytoplasmic Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) influences inactivation gating and surface expression. We investigated both functional and biochemical consequences of mutations in cytoplasmic N and C-terminal Kv4.2 domains to characterize structural determinants for KChIP interaction. We performed a lysine-scanning mutagenesis within the proximal 40 amino acid portion and a structure-based mutagenesis in the tetramerization 1 (T1) domain of Kv4.2. In addition, the cytoplasmic Kv4.2 C-terminus was truncated at various positions. Wild-type and mutant Kv4.2 channels were coexpressed with KChIP2 isoforms in mammalian cell lines. The KChIP2-induced modulation of Kv4.2 currents was studied with whole-cell patch clamp and the binding of KChIP2 isoforms to Kv4.2 channels with coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Our results define one major interaction site for KChIPs, including amino acids in the proximal N-terminus between residues 11 and 23, where binding and functional modulation are essentially equivalent. A further interaction site includes residues in the T1 domain. Notably, C-terminal deletions also had marked effects on KChIP2-dependent gating modulation and KChIP2 binding, revealing a previously unknown involvement of domains within the cytoplasmic Kv4.2 C-terminus in KChIP interaction. Less coincidence of binding and functional modulation indicates a more loose 'anchoring' at T1- and C-terminal interaction sites. Our results refine and extend previously proposed structural models for Kv4.2/KChIP complex formation.

  17. State-dependent blocker interactions with the CFTR chloride channel: implications for gating the pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is subject to voltage-dependent open-channel block by a diverse range of cytoplasmic anions. However, in most cases the ability of these blocking substances to influence the pore opening and closing process has not been reported. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the state-dependent block of CFTR by cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions. Two major effects of Pt(NO2)4(2-) were identified. First, this anion caused fast, voltage-dependent block of open channels, leading to an apparent decrease in single-channel current amplitude. Secondly, Pt(NO2)4(2-) also decreased channel open probability due to an increase in interburst closed times. Interestingly, mutations in the pore that weakened (K95Q) or strengthened (I344K, V345K) interactions with Pt(NO2)4(2-) altered blocker effects both on Cl(-) permeation and on channel gating, suggesting that both these effects are a consequence of Pt(NO2)4(2-) interaction with a single site within the pore. Experiments at reduced extracellular Cl(-) concentration hinted that Pt(NO2)4(2-) may have a third effect, possibly increasing channel activity by interfering with channel closure. These results suggest that Pt(NO2)4(2-) can enter from the cytoplasm into the pore inner vestibule of both open and closed CFTR channels, and that Pt(NO2)4(2-) bound in the inner vestibule blocks Cl(-) permeation as well as interfering with channel opening and, perhaps, channel closure. Implications for the location of the channel gate in the pore, and the operation of this gate, are discussed.

  18. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent.

  19. Phycodnavirus potassium ion channel proteins question the virus molecular piracy hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Hamacher

    Full Text Available Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K(+ channels. To determine if these viral K(+ channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K(+ channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K(+ channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K(+ channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K(+ channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K(+ channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K(+ channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms.

  20. Phycodnavirus potassium ion channel proteins question the virus molecular piracy hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Kay; Greiner, Timo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Van Etten, James L; Gebhardt, Manuela; Villarreal, Luis P; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K(+) channels. To determine if these viral K(+) channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K(+) channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K(+) channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K(+) channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K(+) channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K(+) channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K(+) channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation of Kv1.3 channel is disregulated by adaptor proteins Grb10 and nShc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are important regulators of growth and regeneration, and acutely, they can modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Previously we have shown that acute brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activation of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB suppresses the Shaker voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3 via phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues in the N and C terminal aspects of the channel protein. It is not known how adaptor proteins, which lack catalytic activity, but interact with members of the neurotrophic signaling pathway, might scaffold with ion channels or modulate channel activity. Results We report the co-localization of two adaptor proteins, neuronal Src homology and collagen (nShc and growth factor receptor-binding protein 10 (Grb10, with Kv1.3 channel as demonstrated through immunocytochemical approaches in the olfactory bulb (OB neural lamina. To further explore the specificity and functional ramification of adaptor/channel co-localization, we performed immunoprecipitation and Western analysis of channel, kinase, and adaptor transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK 293. nShc formed a direct protein-protein interaction with Kv1.3 that was independent of BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3, whereas Grb10 did not complex with Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells. Both adaptors, however, co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.3 in native OB. Grb10 was interestingly able to decrease the total expression of Kv1.3, particularly at the membrane surface, and subsequently eliminated the BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3. To examine the possibility that the Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of Grb10 were directly binding to basally phosphorylated tyrosines in Kv1.3, we utilized point mutations to substitute multiple tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Removal of the tyrosines 111–113 and 449 prevented Grb10 from decreasing Kv1.3 expression. In the absence of either adaptor protein

  2. In silico identification of essential proteins in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis based on protein-protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folador, Edson Luiz; de Carvalho, Paulo Vinícius Sanches Daltro; Silva, Wanderson Marques;

    2016-01-01

    and decreased production of meat, wool, and milk. Current diagnosis or treatment protocols are not fully effective and, thus, require further research of Cp pathogenesis. RESULTS: Here, we mapped known protein-protein interactions (PPI) from various species to nine Cp strains to reconstruct parts...

  3. Elucidating the Interacting Domains of Chandipura Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapila Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N protein of Chandipura virus (CHPV plays a crucial role in viral life cycle, besides being an important structural component of the virion through proper organization of its interactions with other viral proteins. In a recent study, the authors had mapped the associations among CHPV proteins and shown that N protein interacts with four of the viral proteins: N, phosphoprotein (P, matrix protein (M, and glycoprotein (G. The present study aimed to distinguish the regions of CHPV N protein responsible for its interactions with other viral proteins. In this direction, we have generated the structure of CHPV N protein by homology modeling using SWISS-MODEL workspace and Accelrys Discovery Studio client 2.55 and mapped the domains of N protein using PiSQRD. The interactions of N protein fragments with other proteins were determined by ZDOCK rigid-body docking method and validated by yeast two-hybrid and ELISA. The study revealed a unique binding site, comprising of amino acids 1–30 at the N terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (N1 that is instrumental in its interactions with N, P, M, and G proteins. It was also observed that N2 associates with N and G proteins while N3 interacts with N, P, and M proteins.

  4. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite interactions with heme proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jia; Groves, John T

    2010-07-19

    Oxygenated heme proteins are known to react rapidly with nitric oxide (NO) to produce peroxynitrite (PN) at the heme site. This process could lead either to attenuation of the effects of NO or to nitrosative protein damage. PN is a powerful nitrating and oxidizing agent that has been implicated in a variety of cell injuries. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the nature and variety of reaction mechanisms of PN interactions with heme proteins. In this Forum, we survey the range of reactions of PN with heme proteins, with particular attention to myoglobin and cytochrome c. While these two proteins are textbook paradigms for oxygen binding and electron transfer, respectively, both have recently been shown to have other important functions that involve NO and PN. We have recently described direct evidence that ferrylmyolgobin (ferrylMb) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) are both produced during the reaction of PN and metmyolgobin (metMb) (Su, J.; Groves, J. T. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 12979-12988). Kinetic evidence indicates that these products evolve from the initial formation of a caged radical intermediate [Fe(IV) horizontal lineO.NO(2)]. This caged pair reacts mainly via internal return with a rate constant k(r) to form metMb and nitrate in an oxygen-rebound scenario. Detectable amounts of ferrylMb are observed by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, appearing at a rate consistent with the rate, k(obs), of heme-mediated PN decomposition. Freely diffusing NO(2), which is liberated concomitantly from the radical pair (k(e)), preferentially nitrates myoglobin Tyr103 and added fluorescein. For cytochrome c, Raman spectroscopy has revealed that a substantial fraction of cytochrome c converts to a beta-sheet structure, at the expense of turns and helices at low pH (Balakrishnan, G.; Hu, Y.; Oyerinde, O. F.; Su, J.; Groves, J. T.; Spiro, T. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 504-505). It is proposed that a short beta-sheet segment, comprising residues 37-39 and 58

  5. Studying protein-protein interactions via blot overlay/far western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Blot overlay is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. This technique involves fractionating proteins on SDS-PAGE, blotting to nitrocellulose or PVDF membrane, and then incubating with a probe of interest. The probe is typically a protein that is radiolabeled, biotinylated, or simply visualized with a specific antibody. When the probe is visualized via antibody detection, this technique is often referred to as "Far Western blot." Many different kinds of protein-protein interactions can be studied via blot overlay, and the method is applicable to screens for unknown protein-protein interactions as well as to the detailed characterization of known interactions.

  6. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  7. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming, E-mail: dming@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-07

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  8. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming

    2015-10-01

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  9. Linguistic feature analysis for protein interaction extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis Chris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid growth of the amount of publicly available reports on biomedical experimental results has recently caused a boost of text mining approaches for protein interaction extraction. Most approaches rely implicitly or explicitly on linguistic, i.e., lexical and syntactic, data extracted from text. However, only few attempts have been made to evaluate the contribution of the different feature types. In this work, we contribute to this evaluation by studying the relative importance of deep syntactic features, i.e., grammatical relations, shallow syntactic features (part-of-speech information and lexical features. For this purpose, we use a recently proposed approach that uses support vector machines with structured kernels. Results Our results reveal that the contribution of the different feature types varies for the different data sets on which the experiments were conducted. The smaller the training corpus compared to the test data, the more important the role of grammatical relations becomes. Moreover, deep syntactic information based classifiers prove to be more robust on heterogeneous texts where no or only limited common vocabulary is shared. Conclusion Our findings suggest that grammatical relations play an important role in the interaction extraction task. Moreover, the net advantage of adding lexical and shallow syntactic features is small related to the number of added features. This implies that efficient classifiers can be built by using only a small fraction of the features that are typically being used in recent approaches.

  10. Ancient association between cation leak channels and Mid1 proteins is conserved in fungi and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo eGhezzi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal resting potential can tune the excitability of neural networks, affecting downstream behavior. Sodium leak channels (NALCN play a key role in rhythmic behaviors by helping set, or subtly changing neuronal resting potential. The full complexity of these newly described channels is just beginning to be appreciated, however. NALCN channels can associate with numerous subunits in different tissues and can be activated by several different peptides and second messengers. We recently showed that NALCN channels are closely related to fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. Here, we use this relationship to predict a family of NALCN-associated proteins in animals on the basis of homology with the yeast protein Mid1, the subunit of the yeast calcium channel. These proteins all share a cysteine-rich region that is necessary for Mid1 function in yeast. We validate this predicted association by showing that the Mid1 homolog in Drosophila, encoded by the CG33988 gene, is coordinately expressed with NALCN, and that knockdown of either protein creates identical phenotypes in several behaviors associated with NALCN function. The relationship between Mid1 and leak channels has therefore persisted over a billion years of evolution, despite drastic changes to both proteins and the organisms in which they exist.

  11. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-01-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR ch...

  12. Interactions Between Channel Topography and Hydrokinetic Turbines: Sediment Transport, Turbine Performance, and Wake Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Craig Steven

    Accelerating marine hydrokinetic (MHK) renewable energy development towards commercial viability requires investigating interactions between the engineered environment and its surrounding physical and biological environments. Complex and energetic hydrodynamic and morphodynamic environments desired for such energy conversion installations present difficulties for designing efficient yet robust sustainable devices, while permitting agency uncertainties regarding MHK device environmental interactions result in lengthy and costly processes prior to installing and demonstrating emerging technologies. A research program at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), University of Minnesota, utilized multi-scale physical experiments to study the interactions between axial-flow hydrokinetic turbines, turbulent open channel flow, sediment transport, turbulent turbine wakes, and complex hydro-morphodynamic processes in channels. Model axial-flow current-driven three-bladed turbines (rotor diameters, dT = 0.15m and 0.5m) were installed in open channel flumes with both erodible and non-erodible substrates. Device-induced local scour was monitored over several hydraulic conditions and material sizes. Synchronous velocity, bed elevation and turbine performance measurements provide an indication into the effect channel topography has on device performance. Complimentary experiments were performed in a realistic meandering outdoor research channel with active sediment transport to investigate device interactions with bedform migration and secondary turbulent flow patterns in asymmetric channel environments. The suite of experiments undertaken during this research program at SAFL in multiple channels with stationary and mobile substrates under a variety of turbine configurations provides an in-depth investigation into how axial-flow hydrokinetic devices respond to turbulent channel flow and topographic complexity, and how they impact local and far-field sediment transport characteristics

  13. Predicting and validating protein interactions using network structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Protein interactions play a vital part in the function of a cell. As experimental techniques for detection and validation of protein interactions are time consuming, there is a need for computational methods for this task. Protein interactions appear to form a network with a relatively high degree of local clustering. In this paper we exploit this clustering by suggesting a score based on triplets of observed protein interactions. The score utilises both protein characteristics and network properties. Our score based on triplets is shown to complement existing techniques for predicting protein interactions, outperforming them on data sets which display a high degree of clustering. The predicted interactions score highly against test measures for accuracy. Compared to a similar score derived from pairwise interactions only, the triplet score displays higher sensitivity and specificity. By looking at specific examples, we show how an experimental set of interactions can be enriched and validated. As part of this work we also examine the effect of different prior databases upon the accuracy of prediction and find that the interactions from the same kingdom give better results than from across kingdoms, suggesting that there may be fundamental differences between the networks. These results all emphasize that network structure is important and helps in the accurate prediction of protein interactions. The protein interaction data set and the program used in our analysis, and a list of predictions and validations, are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/bioinfo/resources/PredictingInteractions.

  14. Sediment–flow interactions at channel confluences: A flume study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonghuan Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sediment transport and bed morphology at channel confluences with different confluence angles and discharge ratios are analyzed through a series of flume experiments. Bed topography and sediment transport rate are measured and results are compared among different conditions. Sediment transport is intermittent and pulsating as the tributary flow mixes with the mainstream, and the sediment transport rate goes up with the increase in discharge ratio and confluence angle. With no sediment supplied from upstream of the flume, a central scour hole will form along the shear plane and develop toward the right bank, and the depth of the central scour hole increases as the confluence angle and discharge ratio increase. With heavy upstream sediment supplement, deposition will happen in the separation zone and upstream of the confluence area because of the tributary. And the deposition height is related to the discharge ratio and confluence angle. Results indicate the significant impact of confluence geometry, sediment, and flow factors on fluvial processes.

  15. Evidence for functional interaction of plasma membrane electron transport, voltage-dependent anion channel and volume-regulated anion channel in frog aorta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashmi P Rao; J Prakasa Rao

    2010-12-01

    Frog aortic tissue exhibits plasma membrane electron transport (PMET) owing to its ability to reduce ferricyanide even in the presence of mitochondrial poisons, such as cyanide and azide. Exposure to hypotonic solution (108 mOsmol/kg H2O) enhanced the reduction of ferricyanide in excised aortic tissue of frog. Increment in ferricyanide reductase activity was also brought about by the presence of homocysteine (100 M dissolved in isotonic frog Ringer solution), a redox active compound and a potent modulator of PMET. Two plasma-membrane-bound channels, the volume regulated anion channel (VRAC) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), are involved in the response to hypotonic stress. The presence of VRAC and VDAC antagonists–tamoxifen, glibenclamide, fluoxetine and verapamil, and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS), respectively–inhibited this enhanced activity brought about by either hypotonic stress or homocysteine. The blockers do not affect the ferricyanide reductase activity under isotonic conditions. Taken together, these findings indicate a functional interaction of the three plasma membrane proteins, namely, ferricyanide reductase (PMET), VDAC and VRAC.

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YDR273W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...it as prey (1) YDR273W DON1 Meiosis-specific component of the spindle pole body, ...0 - - - - - 0 0 5 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL239C Bait gene name ADY3 Bait descri... at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle pole body components; potentially

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YOR324C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p... as bait (0) 4 5 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 4 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL239C Ba... a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle pole

  18. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YDR148C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...s prey as bait (0) 4 15 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 3 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...mbly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YAL028W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p...(1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 4 5 4 7 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 3 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL... to mediate assembly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YBR072W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p... (3) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 4 52 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 3 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...ht to mediate assembly of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindl

  1. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL239C, YLR072W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDL239C ADY3 Protein required for spore wall formation, thought to mediate assembly... of a Don1p-containing structure at the leading edge of the prospore membrane via interaction with spindle p... with this prey as prey (1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 4 5 4 7 0 0 0 0 0 - - - - - 0 0 4 - Show YDL239C Bait ORF YDL...pore membrane via interaction with spindle pole body components; potentially phosphorylated by Cdc28p Rows w

  2. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure.

  3. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lei; LI Xia; GUO Zheng; ZHU MingZhu; LI YanHui; RAO ShaoQi

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interaction data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automatically selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning process, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to "biology process" by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  4. Widely predicting specific protein functions based on protein-protein interaction data and gene expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    GESTs (gene expression similarity and taxonomy similarity), a gene functional prediction approach previously proposed by us, is based on gene expression similarity and concept similarity of functional classes defined in Gene Ontology (GO). In this paper, we extend this method to protein-protein interac-tion data by introducing several methods to filter the neighbors in protein interaction networks for a protein of unknown function(s). Unlike other conventional methods, the proposed approach automati-cally selects the most appropriate functional classes as specific as possible during the learning proc-ess, and calls on genes annotated to nearby classes to support the predictions to some small-sized specific classes in GO. Based on the yeast protein-protein interaction information from MIPS and a dataset of gene expression profiles, we assess the performances of our approach for predicting protein functions to “biology process” by three measures particularly designed for functional classes organ-ized in GO. Results show that our method is powerful for widely predicting gene functions with very specific functional terms. Based on the GO database published in December 2004, we predict some proteins whose functions were unknown at that time, and some of the predictions have been confirmed by the new SGD annotation data published in April, 2006.

  5. Interaction of anesthetics with neurotransmitter release machinery proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; McMillan, Kyle; Pike, Carolyn M; Cahill, Anne L; Herring, Bruce E; Wang, Qiang; Fox, Aaron P

    2013-02-01

    General anesthetics produce anesthesia by depressing central nervous system activity. Activation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptors plays a central role in the action of many clinically relevant general anesthetics. Even so, there is growing evidence that anesthetics can act at a presynaptic locus to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our own data identified the neurotransmitter release machinery as a target for anesthetic action. In the present study, we sought to examine the site of anesthetic action more closely. Exocytosis was stimulated by directly elevating the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration at neurotransmitter release sites, thereby bypassing anesthetic effects on channels and receptors, allowing anesthetic effects on the neurotransmitter release machinery to be examined in isolation. Three different PC12 cell lines, which had the expression of different release machinery proteins stably suppressed by RNA interference, were used in these studies. Interestingly, there was still significant neurotransmitter release when these knockdown PC12 cells were stimulated. We have previously shown that etomidate, isoflurane, and propofol all inhibited the neurotransmitter release machinery in wild-type PC12 cells. In the present study, we show that knocking down synaptotagmin I completely prevented etomidate from inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Synaptotagmin I knockdown also diminished the inhibition produced by propofol and isoflurane, but the magnitude of the effect was not as large. Knockdown of SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 expression also changed the ability of these three anesthetics to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that general anesthetics inhibit the neurotransmitter release machinery by interacting with multiple SNARE and SNARE-associated proteins.

  6. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-03-01

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H+-ATPase-energized K+ uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K+-selective channel, which taps a ‘potassium battery’, providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals.

  7. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, David C; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-23

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  8. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  9. G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-fei GAO; Hai-lin ZHANG; Zhen-dong YOU; Chang-lin LU; Cheng HE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK) are important for neuronal signaling and membrane excitability. In the present study, we intend to find whether GIRK channels express functionally in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods: We used RT-PCR to detect mRNA for4 subunits of GIRK in the adult DRG. The whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to confirm GIRK channels functionally expressed. Results: The mRNA for the 4 subunits of GIRK were detected in the adult DRG. GTPγS enhanced inwardly rectifying potassium (K+) currents of the DRG neurons, while Ba2+inhibited such currents. Furthermore, the GIRK channels were shown to be coupled to the GABAB receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, as baclofen increased the inwardly rectifying K+ currents. Conclusion: GIRK channels are expressed and functionally coupled with GABAB receptors in adult rat DRG neurons.

  10. Correlation of disorder between S. cerevisiae interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rue-Albrecht, Kevin; Shields, Denis C; Khaldi, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Protein disorder has been frequently associated with protein-protein interaction. However, our knowledge of how protein disorder evolves within a network is limited. It is expected that physically interacting proteins evolve in a coordinated manner. This has so far been shown in their evolutionary rate, and in their gene expression levels. Here we examine the percentage of predicted disorder residues within binary and complex interacting proteins (physical and functional interactions respectively) to investigate how the disorder of a protein relates to that of its interacting partners. We show that the level of disorder of interacting proteins are correlated, with a greater correlation seen among proteins that are co-members of the same complex, and a lesser correlation between proteins that are documented as binary interactors of each other. There is a striking variation among complexes not only in their disorder, but in the extent to which the proteins within the complex differ in their levels of disorder, with RNA processes and protein binding complexes showing more variation in the disorder of their proteins, whilst other complexes show very little variation in the overall disorder of their constituent proteins. There is likely to be a stronger selection for complex subunits to have similar disorder, than is seen for proteins involved in binary interactions. Thus, binary interactions may be more resilient to changes in disorder than are complex interactions. These results add a new dimension to the role of disorder in protein networks, and highlight the potential importance of maintaining similar disorder in the members of a complex.

  11. Transcription factors do it together : the hows and whys of studying protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are intrinsic to virtually every cellular process. Recent breakthroughs in techniques to study protein-interaction and the availability of fully sequenced plant genomes have attracted many plant scientists to undertake the first steps in the field of protein interactions

  12. Securing Interactive Sessions Using Mobile Device through Visual Channel and Visual Inspection

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Chengfang; Chang, Ee-Chien

    2010-01-01

    Communication channel established from a display to a device's camera is known as visual channel, and it is helpful in securing key exchange protocol. In this paper, we study how visual channel can be exploited by a network terminal and mobile device to jointly verify information in an interactive session, and how such information can be jointly presented in a user-friendly manner, taking into account that the mobile device can only capture and display a small region, and the user may only wa...

  13. AtPIN: Arabidopsis thaliana Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Filho Marcio C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions (PPIs constitute one of the most crucial conditions to sustain life in living organisms. To study PPI in Arabidopsis thaliana we have developed AtPIN, a database and web interface for searching and building interaction networks based on publicly available protein-protein interaction datasets. Description All interactions were divided into experimentally demonstrated or predicted. The PPIs in the AtPIN database present a cellular compartment classification (C3 which divides the PPI into 4 classes according to its interaction evidence and subcellular localization. It has been shown in the literature that a pair of genuine interacting proteins are generally expected to have a common cellular role and proteins that have common interaction partners have a high chance of sharing a common function. In AtPIN, due to its integrative profile, the reliability index for a reported PPI can be postulated in terms of the proportion of interaction partners that two proteins have in common. For this, we implement the Functional Similarity Weight (FSW calculation for all first level interactions present in AtPIN database. In order to identify target proteins of cytosolic glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (Cyt-gluRS (AT5G26710 we combined two approaches, AtPIN search and yeast two-hybrid screening. Interestingly, the proteins glutamine synthetase (AT5G35630, a disease resistance protein (AT3G50950 and a zinc finger protein (AT5G24930, which has been predicted as target proteins for Cyt-gluRS by AtPIN, were also detected in the experimental screening. Conclusions AtPIN is a friendly and easy-to-use tool that aggregates information on Arabidopsis thaliana PPIs, ontology, and sub-cellular localization, and might be a useful and reliable strategy to map protein-protein interactions in Arabidopsis. AtPIN can be accessed at http://bioinfo.esalq.usp.br/atpin.

  14. Mechanism of functional interaction between potassium channel Kv1.3 and sodium channel NavBeta1 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Correa, Ana M.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily A member 3 (Kv1.3) dominantly expresses on T cells and neurons. Recently, the interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 subunits has been explored through ionic current measurements, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated yet. We explored the functional interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 through gating current measurements using the Cut-open Oocyte Voltage Clamp (COVC) technique. We showed that the N-terminal 1–52 sequence of hKv1.3 disrupts the channel expression on the Xenopus oocyte membrane, suggesting a potential role as regulator of hKv1.3 expression in neurons and lymphocytes. Our gating currents measurements showed that NavBeta1 interacts with the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of Kv1.3 through W172 in the transmembrane segment and modifies the gating operation. The comparison between G-V and Q-V with/without NavBeta1 indicates that NavBeta1 may strengthen the coupling between hKv1.3-VSD movement and pore opening, inducing the modification of kinetics in ionic activation and deactivation. PMID:28349975

  15. Dynamics of protein-protein interactions studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somireddy Venkata, Bharat Kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an important role in all cellular processes such as signal transduction, electron transfer, gene regulation, transcription, and translation. Understanding these protein-protein interactions at the molecular level, is an important aim in structural biology. The prote

  16. A scored human protein-protein interaction network to catalyze genomic interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Taibo; Wernersson, Rasmus; Hansen, Rasmus B;

    2017-01-01

    Genome-scale human protein-protein interaction networks are critical to understanding cell biology and interpreting genomic data, but challenging to produce experimentally. Through data integration and quality control, we provide a scored human protein-protein interaction network (In...

  17. Bacterial origin of a mitochondrial outer membrane protein translocase: new perspectives from comparative single channel electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsman, Anke; Niemann, Moritz; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Burmann, Björn M; Hiller, Sebastian; Meisinger, Chris; Schneider, André; Wagner, Richard

    2012-09-07

    Mitochondria are of bacterial ancestry and have to import most of their proteins from the cytosol. This process is mediated by Tom40, an essential protein that forms the protein-translocating pore in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Tom40 is conserved in virtually all eukaryotes, but its evolutionary origin is unclear because bacterial orthologues have not been identified so far. Recently, it was shown that the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei lacks a conventional Tom40 and instead employs the archaic translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (ATOM), a protein that shows similarities to both eukaryotic Tom40 and bacterial protein translocases of the Omp85 family. Here we present electrophysiological single channel data showing that ATOM forms a hydrophilic pore of large conductance and high open probability. Moreover, ATOM channels exhibit a preference for the passage of cationic molecules consistent with the idea that it may translocate unfolded proteins targeted by positively charged N-terminal presequences. This is further supported by the fact that the addition of a presequence peptide induces transient pore closure. An in-depth comparison of these single channel properties with those of other protein translocases reveals that ATOM closely resembles bacterial-type protein export channels rather than eukaryotic Tom40. Our results support the idea that ATOM represents an evolutionary intermediate between a bacterial Omp85-like protein export machinery and the conventional Tom40 that is found in mitochondria of other eukaryotes.

  18. A least square method based model for identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity.

  19. Computational approaches for detecting protein complexes from protein interaction networks: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwoh Chee-Keong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most proteins form macromolecular complexes to perform their biological functions. However, experimentally determined protein complex data, especially of those involving more than two protein partners, are relatively limited in the current state-of-the-art high-throughput experimental techniques. Nevertheless, many techniques (such as yeast-two-hybrid have enabled systematic screening of pairwise protein-protein interactions en masse. Thus computational approaches for detecting protein complexes from protein interaction data are useful complements to the limited experimental methods. They can be used together with the experimental methods for mapping the interactions of proteins to understand how different proteins are organized into higher-level substructures to perform various cellular functions. Results Given the abundance of pairwise protein interaction data from high-throughput genome-wide experimental screenings, a protein interaction network can be constructed from protein interaction data by considering individual proteins as the nodes, and the existence of a physical interaction between a pair of proteins as a link. This binary protein interaction graph can then be used for detecting protein complexes using graph clustering techniques. In this paper, we review and evaluate the state-of-the-art techniques for computational detection of protein complexes, and discuss some promising research directions in this field. Conclusions Experimental results with yeast protein interaction data show that the interaction subgraphs discovered by various computational methods matched well with actual protein complexes. In addition, the computational approaches have also improved in performance over the years. Further improvements could be achieved if the quality of the underlying protein interaction data can be considered adequately to minimize the undesirable effects from the irrelevant and noisy sources, and the various biological

  20. Phage display library screening for identification of interacting protein partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Rao, Suryadevara; Hunt, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a versatile high-throughput screening method employed to understand and improve the chemical biology, be it production of human monoclonal antibodies or identification of interacting protein partners. A majority of cell proteins operate in a concerted fashion either by stable or transient interactions. Such interactions can be mediated by recognition of small amino acid sequence motifs on the protein surface. Phage display can play a crucial role in identification of such motifs. This report describes the use of phage display for the identification of high affinity sequence motifs that could be responsible for interactions with a target (bait) protein.

  1. Functional reconstitution and channel activity measurements of purified wildtype and mutant CFTR protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2015-03-09

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates.

  2. Role of protein-protein interactions in cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Sylvie E; Lampe, Jed N

    2014-09-15

    Through their unique oxidative chemistry, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) catalyze the elimination of most drugs and toxins from the human body. Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in this process. Historically, the study of CYP-protein interactions has focused on their electron transfer partners and allosteric mediators, cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5. However, CYPs can bind other proteins that also affect CYP function. Some examples include the progesterone receptor membrane component 1, damage resistance protein 1, human and bovine serum albumin, and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, in addition to other CYP isoforms. Furthermore, disruption of these interactions can lead to altered paths of metabolism and the production of toxic metabolites. In this review, we summarize the available evidence for CYP protein-protein interactions from the literature and offer a discussion of the potential impact of future studies aimed at characterizing noncanonical protein-protein interactions with CYP enzymes.

  3. Effects of ethanol on the proteasome interacting proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia; Bardag-Gorce

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome dysfunction has been repeatedly reported in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol metabolism endproducts affect the structure of the proteasome, and, therefore, change the proteasome interaction with its regulatory complexes 19S and PA28, as well as its interacting proteins. Chronic ethanol feeding alters the ubiquitin-proteasome activity by altering the interaction between the 19S and the 20S proteasome interaction. The degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins is thus decreased and leads to accum...

  4. Channel-facilitated molecular transport: The role of strength and spatial distribution of interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppulury, Karthik; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular transport across channels and pores is critically important for multiple natural and industrial processes. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have allowed researchers to probe translocation through nanopores with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of channel-facilitated molecular transport is still not complete. We present a theoretical approach that investigates the role of molecular interactions in the transport through channels. It is based on the discrete-state stochastic analysis that provides a fully analytical description of this complex process. It is found that a spatial distribution of the interactions strongly influences the translocation dynamics. We predict that there is the optimal distribution that leads to the maximal flux through the channel. It is also argued that the channel transport depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions, on the shape of interaction potentials and on the relative contributions of entrance and diffusion processes in the system. These observations are discussed using simple physical-chemical arguments.

  5. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample.

  6. Proteins interacting with the 26S proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, R; Gordon, C

    2004-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the multi-protein protease that recognizes and degrades ubiquitinylated substrates targeted for destruction by the ubiquitin pathway. In addition to the well-documented subunit organization of the 26S holoenzyme, it is clear that a number of other proteins transiently...... associate with the 26S complex. These transiently associated proteins confer a number of different roles such as substrate presentation, cleavage of the multi-ubiquitin chain from the protein substrate and turnover of misfolded proteins. Such activities are essential for the 26S proteasome to efficiently...... fulfill its intracellular function in protein degradation....

  7. Protein interaction network related to Helicobacter pylori infection response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu Kwang Kim; Han Bok Kim

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To understand the complex reaction of gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) in a systematic manner using a protein interaction network. METHODS: The expression of genes significantly changed on microarray during H pylori infection was scanned from the web literary database and translated into proteins. A network of protein interactions was constructed by searching the primary interactions of selected proteins. The constructed network was mathematically analyzed and its biological function was examined. In addition, the nodes on the network were checked to determine if they had any further functional importance or relation to other proteins by extending them.RESULTS: The scale-free network showing the relationship between inflammation and carcinogenesis was constructed. Mathematical analysis showed hub and bottleneck proteins, and these proteins were mostly related to immune response. The network contained pathways and proteins related to H pylori infection, such as the JAK-STAT pathway triggered by interleukins. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB, TLR4, and other proteins known to function as core proteins of immune response were also found.These immune-related proteins interacted on the network with pathways and proteins related to the cell cycle, cell maintenance and proliferation, and transcription regulators such as BRCA1, FOS, REL, and zinc finger proteins. The extension of nodes showed interactions of the immune proteins with cancerrelated proteins. One extended network, the core network, a summarized form of the extended network, and cell pathway model were constructed. CONCLUSION: Immune-related proteins activated by H pylori infection interact with proto-oncogene proteins. The hub and bottleneck proteins are potential drug targets for gastric inflammation and cancer.

  8. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  10. Reconstituting Protein Interaction Networks Using Parameter-Dependent Domain-Domain Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    that approximately 80% of eukaryotic proteins and 67% of prokaryotic proteins have multiple domains [13,14]. Most annotation databases characterize...domain annotations, Domain-domain interactions, Protein-protein interaction networks Background The living cell is a dynamic, interconnected system...detailed in Methods. Here, we illustrate its application on a well- annotated single- cell organism. We created a merged set of protein-domain annotations

  11. Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Bertrand; Xiao, Bailong; Santos, Jose S; Syeda, Ruhma; Grandl, Jörg; Spencer, Kathryn S; Kim, Sung Eun; Schmidt, Manuela; Mathur, Jayanti; Dubin, Adrienne E; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2012-02-19

    Mechanotransduction has an important role in physiology. Biological processes including sensing touch and sound waves require as-yet-unidentified cation channels that detect pressure. Mouse Piezo1 (MmPiezo1) and MmPiezo2 (also called Fam38a and Fam38b, respectively) induce mechanically activated cationic currents in cells; however, it is unknown whether Piezo proteins are pore-forming ion channels or modulate ion channels. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster Piezo (DmPiezo, also called CG8486) also induces mechanically activated currents in cells, but through channels with remarkably distinct pore properties including sensitivity to the pore blocker ruthenium red and single channel conductances. MmPiezo1 assembles as a ∼1.2-million-dalton homo-oligomer, with no evidence of other proteins in this complex. Purified MmPiezo1 reconstituted into asymmetric lipid bilayers and liposomes forms ruthenium-red-sensitive ion channels. These data demonstrate that Piezo proteins are an evolutionarily conserved ion channel family involved in mechanotransduction.

  12. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation...... excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose...... excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins....

  13. Membrane-mediated interaction between strongly anisotropic protein scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Schweitzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Specialized proteins serve as scaffolds sculpting strongly curved membranes of intracellular organelles. Effective membrane shaping requires segregation of these proteins into domains and is, therefore, critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction. Interactions mediated by membrane elastic deformations have been extensively analyzed within approximations of large inter-protein distances, small extents of the protein-mediated membrane bending and small deviations of the protein shapes from isotropic spherical segments. At the same time, important classes of the realistic membrane-shaping proteins have strongly elongated shapes with large and highly anisotropic curvature. Here we investigated, computationally, the membrane mediated interaction between proteins or protein oligomers representing membrane scaffolds with strongly anisotropic curvature, and addressed, quantitatively, a specific case of the scaffold geometrical parameters characterizing BAR domains, which are crucial for membrane shaping in endocytosis. In addition to the previously analyzed contributions to the interaction, we considered a repulsive force stemming from the entropy of the scaffold orientation. We computed this interaction to be of the same order of magnitude as the well-known attractive force related to the entropy of membrane undulations. We demonstrated the scaffold shape anisotropy to cause a mutual aligning of the scaffolds and to generate a strong attractive interaction bringing the scaffolds close to each other to equilibrium distances much smaller than the scaffold size. We computed the energy of interaction between scaffolds of a realistic geometry to constitute tens of kBT, which guarantees a robust segregation of the scaffolds into domains.

  14. Protein interactions in genome maintenance as novel antibacterial targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee H Marceau

    Full Text Available Antibacterial compounds typically act by directly inhibiting essential bacterial enzyme activities. Although this general mechanism of action has fueled traditional antibiotic discovery efforts for decades, new antibiotic development has not kept pace with the emergence of drug resistant bacterial strains. These limitations have severely restricted the therapeutic tools available for treating bacterial infections. Here we test an alternative antibacterial lead-compound identification strategy in which essential protein-protein interactions are targeted rather than enzymatic activities. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs form conserved protein interaction "hubs" that are essential for recruiting many DNA replication, recombination, and repair proteins to SSB/DNA nucleoprotein substrates. Three small molecules that block SSB/protein interactions are shown to have antibacterial activity against diverse bacterial species. Consistent with a model in which the compounds target multiple SSB/protein interactions, treatment of Bacillus subtilis cultures with the compounds leads to rapid inhibition of DNA replication and recombination, and ultimately to cell death. The compounds also have unanticipated effects on protein synthesis that could be due to a previously unknown role for SSB/protein interactions in translation or to off-target effects. Our results highlight the potential of targeting protein-protein interactions, particularly those that mediate genome maintenance, as a powerful approach for identifying new antibacterial compounds.

  15. Globular and disordered-the non-identical twins in protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2015-01-01

    In biology proteins from different structural classes interact across and within classes in ways that are optimized to achieve balanced functional outputs. The interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and other proteins rely on changes in flexibility and this is seen as a str...... of other protein-protein interactions. We find that ordered proteins and the disordered ones act as non-identical twins operating by similar principles but where the disordered proteins complexes are on average less stable by 2.5 kcal mol(-1)....

  16. A second-generation protein-protein interaction network of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Roman; Ceol, Arnaud; Rajagopala, Seesandra V; Mosca, Roberto; Siszler, Gabriella; Wermke, Nadja; Sikorski, Patricia; Schwarz, Frank; Schick, Matthias; Wuchty, Stefan; Aloy, Patrick; Uetz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections cause gastric ulcers and play a major role in the development of gastric cancer. In 2001, the first protein interactome was published for this species, revealing over 1500 binary protein interactions resulting from 261 yeast two-hybrid screens. Here we roughly double the number of previously published interactions using an ORFeome-based, proteome-wide yeast two-hybrid screening strategy. We identified a total of 1515 protein-protein interactions, of which 1461 are new. The integration of all the interactions reported in H. pylori results in 3004 unique interactions that connect about 70% of its proteome. Excluding interactions of promiscuous proteins we derived from our new data a core network consisting of 908 interactions. We compared our data set to several other bacterial interactomes and experimentally benchmarked the conservation of interactions using 365 protein pairs (interologs) of E. coli of which one third turned out to be conserved in both species.

  17. 14-3-3 proteins in plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Robatzek, Silke

    2015-05-01

    14-3-3 proteins define a eukaryotic-specific protein family with a general role in signal transduction. Primarily, 14-3-3 proteins act as phosphosensors, binding phosphorylated client proteins and modulating their functions. Since phosphorylation regulates a plethora of different physiological responses in plants, 14-3-3 proteins play roles in multiple signaling pathways, including those controlling metabolism, hormone signaling, cell division, and responses to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Increasing evidence supports a prominent role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulating plant immunity against pathogens at various levels. In this review, potential links between 14-3-3 function and the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions are discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in response to pathogen perception, interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and defense-related proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins as targets of pathogen effectors.

  18. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  19. Origin of the voltage dependence of G-protein regulation of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Yu-Hang; Bangaru, Saroja D; He, Linling; Abele, Kathryn; Tanabe, Shihori; Kozasa, Tohru; Yang, Jian

    2008-12-24

    G-protein (Gbetagamma)-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition of N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels contributes to presynaptic inhibition and short-term synaptic plasticity. The voltage dependence derives from the dissociation of Gbetagamma from the inhibited channels, but the underlying molecular and biophysical mechanisms remain largely unclear. In this study we investigated the role in this process of Ca(2+) channel beta subunit (Ca(v)beta) and a rigid alpha-helical structure between the alpha-interacting domain (AID), the primary Ca(v)beta docking site on the channel alpha(1) subunit, and the pore-lining IS6 segment. Gbetagamma inhibition of P/Q-type channels was reconstituted in giant inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes. Large populations of channels devoid of Ca(v)beta were produced by washing out a mutant Ca(v)beta with a reduced affinity for the AID. These beta-less channels were still inhibited by Gbetagamma, but without any voltage dependence, indicating that Ca(v)beta is indispensable for voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition. A truncated Ca(v)beta containing only the AID-binding guanylate kinase (GK) domain could fully confer voltage dependence to Gbetagamma inhibition. Gbetagamma did not alter inactivation properties, and channels recovered from Gbetagamma inhibition exhibited the same activation property as un-inhibited channels, indicating that Gbetagamma does not dislodge Ca(v)beta from the inhibited channel. Furthermore, voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition was abolished when the rigid alpha-helix between the AID and IS6 was disrupted by insertion of multiple glycines, which also eliminated Ca(v)beta regulation of channel gating, revealing a pivotal role of this rigid alpha-helix in both processes. These results suggest that depolarization-triggered movement of IS6, coupled to the subsequent conformational change of the Gbetagamma-binding pocket through a rigid alpha-helix induced partly by the Ca(v)beta GK domain, causes the

  20. Endophilin isoforms have distinct characteristics in interactions with N-type Ca2+ channels and dynamin Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Tian; Ji-Feng Zhang; Jinjin Fan; Zhihong Song; Yuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Objective Formation of the endophilin Ⅱ-Ca2+ channel complex is Ca2+-dependent in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.However,little is known about whether the other two endophilin isoforms have the same features.The present study aimed to investigate the characteristics of the interactions of all three isoforms with Ca2+ channels and dynamin Ⅰ.Methods N-type Ca2+ channel C-terminal fragments (NCFs) synthesized with a 3H-leucine-labeled kit,were incubated with endophilin-GST fusion proteins,followed by pull-down assay.Results were counted on a scintillation counter.In addition,the different endophilin isoforms were each co-transfected with dynamin Ⅰ into 293T cells,followed by flow cytometry and co-immunoprecipitation assay.Immunostaining was performed and an image analysis program was used to evaluate the overlap coefficient of cells expressing endophilin and dynamin Ⅰ.Results All three isoforms interacted with NCF.Endophilins Ⅰ and Ⅱ demonstrated clear Ca2+-dependent interactions with NCF,whereas endophilin Ⅲ did not.Co-immunoprecipitation showed that,compared to endophilin Ⅰ/Ⅱ,the interaction between endophilin Ⅲ and dynamin Ⅰ was significantly increased.Similar results were obtained from flow cytometry.Furthermore,endophilin Ⅲ had a higher overlap coefficient with dynamin Ⅰ in co-transfected 293T cells.Conclusion Endophilin isoforms have distinct characteristics in interactions with NCF and dynamin Ⅰ.Endophilin Ⅲ binding to NCF is Ca2+-independent,implying that it plays a different role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  1. From networks of protein interactions to networks of functional dependencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciani Davide

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As protein-protein interactions connect proteins that participate in either the same or different functions, networks of interacting and functionally annotated proteins can be converted into process graphs of inter-dependent function nodes (each node corresponding to interacting proteins with the same functional annotation. However, as proteins have multiple annotations, the process graph is non-redundant, if only proteins participating directly in a given function are included in the related function node. Results Reasoning that topological features (e.g., clusters of highly inter-connected proteins might help approaching structured and non-redundant understanding of molecular function, an algorithm was developed that prioritizes inclusion of proteins into the function nodes that best overlap protein clusters. Specifically, the algorithm identifies function nodes (and their mutual relations, based on the topological analysis of a protein interaction network, which can be related to various biological domains, such as cellular components (e.g., peroxisome and cellular bud or biological processes (e.g., cell budding of the model organism S. cerevisiae. Conclusions The method we have described allows converting a protein interaction network into a non-redundant process graph of inter-dependent function nodes. The examples we have described show that the resulting graph allows researchers to formulate testable hypotheses about dependencies among functions and the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  3. Identification and functional characterization of cereblon as a binding protein for large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sooyeon; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Song, Sungmin; Jung, Yong-Keun; Park, Chul-Seung

    2005-09-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK(Ca)) channels are activated by membrane depolarization and modulated by intracellular Ca2+. Here, we report the direct interaction of cereblon (CRBN) with the cytosolic carboxy-terminus of the BK(Ca) channel alpha subunit (Slo). Rat CRBN contained the N-terminal domain of the Lon protease, a 'regulators of G protein-signaling' (RGS)-like domain, a leucine zipper (LZ) motif, and four putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. RNA messages of rat cereblon (rCRBN) were widely distributed in different tissues with especially high-levels of expression in the brain. Direct association of rCRBN with the BK(Ca) channel was confirmed by immunoprecipitation in brain lysate, and the two proteins were co-localized in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Ionic currents evoked by the rSlo channel were dramatically suppressed upon coexpression of rCRBN. rCRBN decreased the formation of the tetrameric rSlo complex thus reducing the surface expression of functional channels. Therefore, we suggest that CRBN may play an important role in assembly and surface expression of functional BK(Ca) channels by direct interaction with the cytosolic C-terminus of its alpha-subunit.

  4. Genome-wide protein-protein interactions and protein function exploration in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qi; Ma, Weimin; Liu, Hui; Li, Jiang; Wang, Huan; Lu, Fang; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Tieliu

    2015-10-22

    Genome-wide network analysis is well implemented to study proteins of unknown function. Here, we effectively explored protein functions and the biological mechanism based on inferred high confident protein-protein interaction (PPI) network in cyanobacteria. We integrated data from seven different sources and predicted 1,997 PPIs, which were evaluated by experiments in molecular mechanism, text mining of literatures in proved direct/indirect evidences, and "interologs" in conservation. Combined the predicted PPIs with known PPIs, we obtained 4,715 no-redundant PPIs (involving 3,231 proteins covering over 90% of genome) to generate the PPI network. Based on the PPI network, terms in Gene ontology (GO) were assigned to function-unknown proteins. Functional modules were identified by dissecting the PPI network into sub-networks and analyzing pathway enrichment, with which we investigated novel function of underlying proteins in protein complexes and pathways. Examples of photosynthesis and DNA repair indicate that the network approach is a powerful tool in protein function analysis. Overall, this systems biology approach provides a new insight into posterior functional analysis of PPIs in cyanobacteria.

  5. A functional interaction between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 within the bacterial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt an interaction that had been detected between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 in the crystal structure of the bacterial 30 S subunit. This interaction, which is located in the E site, connects the head of the 30 S subunit to the platform and is involved in the formation of the exit channel through which passes the 30 S-bound messenger RNA. Neither mutations in S7 nor mutations in S11 prevented the incorporation of the proteins into the 30 S subunits but they perturbed the function of the ribosome. In vivo assays showed that ribosomes with either mutated S7 or S11 were altered in the control of translational fidelity, having an increased capacity for frameshifting, readthrough of a nonsense codon and codon misreading. Toeprinting and filter-binding assays showed that 30 S subunits with either mutated S7 or S11 have an enhanced capacity to bind mRNA. The effects of the S7 and S11 mutations can be related to an increased flexibility of the head of the 30 S, to an opening of the mRNA exit channel and to a perturbation of the proposed allosteric coupling between the A and E sites. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S7 and S11 interact in a functional manner and support the notion that protein-protein interactions contribute to the dynamics of the ribosome.

  6. Detecting reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs) significantly enhancing the computational prediction of protein-protein interactions using machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Mazzocco, G; Kel, A; Wyrwicz, L S; Plewczynski, D

    2016-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a vital role in most biological processes. Hence their comprehension can promote a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying living systems. However, besides the cost and the time limitation involved in the detection of experimentally validated PPIs, the noise in the data is still an important issue to overcome. In the last decade several in silico PPI prediction methods using both structural and genomic information were developed for this purpose. Here we introduce a unique validation approach aimed to collect reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs). Thereafter the most relevant protein/protein-pair related features were selected. Finally, the prepared dataset was used for PPI classification, leveraging the prediction capabilities of well-established machine learning methods. Our best classification procedure displayed specificity and sensitivity values of 96.33% and 98.02%, respectively, surpassing the prediction capabilities of other methods, including those trained on gold standard datasets. We showed that the PPI/NIP predictive performances can be considerably improved by focusing on data preparation.

  7. Dynamic modularity in protein interaction networks predicts breast cancer outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Ian W; Linding, Rune; Warde-Farley, David

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the biochemical wiring of oncogenic cells drives phenotypic transformations that directly affect disease outcome. Here we examine the dynamic structure of the human protein interaction network (interactome) to determine whether changes in the organization of the interactome can be used...... to predict patient outcome. An analysis of hub proteins identified intermodular hub proteins that are co-expressed with their interacting partners in a tissue-restricted manner and intramodular hub proteins that are co-expressed with their interacting partners in all or most tissues. Substantial differences...

  8. Intramembrane aromatic interactions influence the lipid sensitivities of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, Casey L; Sun, Jiayin; Baenziger, John E

    2015-01-23

    Although the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) membranes lacking cholesterol and anionic lipids adopts a conformation where agonist binding is uncoupled from channel gating, the underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Here, we examine the mechanism behind lipid-dependent uncoupling by comparing the propensities of two prokaryotic homologs, Gloebacter and Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC and ELIC, respectively), to adopt a similar uncoupled conformation. Membrane-reconstituted GLIC and ELIC both exhibit folded structures in the minimal PC membranes that stabilize an uncoupled nAChR. GLIC, with a large number of aromatic interactions at the interface between the outermost transmembrane α-helix, M4, and the adjacent transmembrane α-helices, M1 and M3, retains the ability to flux cations in this uncoupling PC membrane environment. In contrast, ELIC, with a level of aromatic interactions intermediate between that of the nAChR and GLIC, does not undergo agonist-induced channel gating, although it does not exhibit the expected biophysical characteristics of the uncoupled state. Engineering new aromatic interactions at the M4-M1/M3 interface to promote effective M4 interactions with M1/M3, however, increases the stability of the transmembrane domain to restore channel function. Our data provide direct evidence that M4 interactions with M1/M3 are modulated during lipid sensing. Aromatic residues strengthen M4 interactions with M1/M3 to reduce the sensitivities of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels to their surrounding membrane environment.

  9. Interaction of two-dimensional turbulence with a sheared channel flow: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Leon; Marques Rosas Fernandes, Vitor; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of large-scale flows with turbulence is of fundamental and widespread importance in geophysical fluid dynamics and also, more recently for the dynamics of fusion plasma. More specifically the interplay between two-dimensional turbulence and so-called zonal flows has gained considerable interest because of its relevance for transport and associated barriers. We present numerical results on the interaction of driven two-dimensional turbulence with typical sheared channel flows (Couette and Poiseuille). It turns out that a linear shear rate that is being sustained by moving channel walls (Couette flow) is far more effective in suppressing turbulence and associated transport than a Poiseuille flow. We explore the mechanisms behind this in relation to the width of the channel and the strength of the shear of the background flow. Also the prominent role played by the no-slip boundaries and the Reynolds stress is discussed.

  10. Real-time single-molecule coimmunoprecipitation of weak protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Won; Ryu, Ji Young; Yoo, Janghyun; Choi, Byungsan; Kim, Kipom; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2013-10-01

    Coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) analysis is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. It currently involves electrophoresis and western blotting, which are not optimized for detecting weak and transient interactions. In this protocol we describe an advanced version of co-IP analysis that uses real-time, single-molecule fluorescence imaging as its detection scheme. Bait proteins are pulled down onto the imaging plane of a total internal reflection (TIR) microscope. With unpurified cells or tissue extracts kept in reaction chambers, we observe single protein-protein interactions between the surface-immobilized bait and the fluorescent protein-labeled prey proteins in real time. Such direct recording provides an improvement of five orders of magnitude in the time resolution of co-IP analysis. With the single-molecule sensitivity and millisecond time resolution, which distinguish our method from other methods for measuring weak protein-protein interactions, it is possible to quantify the interaction kinetics and active fraction of native, unlabeled bait proteins. Real-time single-molecule co-IP analysis, which takes ∼4 h to complete from lysate preparation to kinetic analysis, provides a general avenue for revealing the rich kinetic picture of target protein-protein interactions, and it can be used, for example, to investigate the molecular lesions that drive individual cancers at the level of protein-protein interactions.

  11. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  12. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Cooper, H M; Reyes, A; Di Re, M; Sembongi, H; Litwin, T R; Gao, J; Neuman, K C; Fearnley, I M; Spinazzola, A; Walker, J E; Holt, I J

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion.

  13. Interactions between permeant and blocking anions inside the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsdell, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Binding of cytoplasmic anionic open channel blockers within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is antagonized by extracellular Cl(-). In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the interaction between extracellular Cl(-) (and other anions) and cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions inside the CFTR channel pore. In constitutively open (E1371Q-CFTR) channels, these different anions bind to two separate sites, located in the outer and inner vestibules of the pore respectively, in a mutually antagonistic fashion. A mutation in the inner vestibule (I344K) that greatly increased Pt(NO2)4(2-) binding affinity also greatly strengthened antagonistic Cl(-):blocker interactions as well as the voltage-dependence of block. Quantitative analysis of ion binding affinity suggested that the I344K mutation strengthened interactions not only with intracellular Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions but also with extracellular Cl(-), and that altered blocker Cl(-)- and voltage-dependence were due to the introduction of a novel type of antagonistic ion:ion interaction inside the pore that was independent of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule. It is proposed that this mutation alters the arrangement of anion binding sites inside the pore, allowing both Cl(-) and Pt(NO2)4(2-) to bind concurrently within the inner vestibule in a strongly mutually antagonistic fashion. However, the I344K mutation does not increase single channel conductance following disruption of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule in R334Q channels. Implications for the arrangement of ion binding sites in the pore, and their functional consequences for blocker binding and for rapid Cl(-) permeation, are discussed.

  14. Compensation for channel interaction in a simultaneous cochlear implant coding strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Paul; Kals, Mathias; Schatzer, Reinhold; Griessner, Andreas; Zierhofer, Clemens

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated a concept to reduce detrimental effects of spatial channel interaction in case of simultaneous stimulation with cochlear implants. The hypothesis was that effects of simultaneous channel interaction can be compensated by an algorithm such that no difference in hearing performance between simultaneous pulsatile stimulation and a strictly sequential reference strategy can be found. The simultaneous strategies used in this study stimulated two or three electrodes simultaneously in a monopolar configuration and used a specific compensation algorithm to reduce detrimental effects of simultaneous channel interaction. Overall stimulation rate was kept constant throughout conditions. Three of the configurations applied extended pulse phase durations. The German Oldenburg sentence and a German vowel test were used to measure speech recognition in 12 cochlear implant users. The results support the initial hypothesis. No significant differences in performance were found. A small spatial distance between simultaneous electrodes yielded slightly better results than a large distance. Extending the pulse phase durations had no significant effect on hearing performance. However, it significantly reduced stimulation amplitudes. Thus strategies implementing channel interaction compensated simultaneous stimulation with extended pulse phase durations might be a viable option for reducing power consumption and increasing battery life in cochlear implants.

  15. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  16. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling le...

  17. Functional Maps of Protein Complexes from Quantitative Genetic Interaction Data

    OpenAIRE

    Sourav Bandyopadhyay; Ryan Kelley; Krogan, Nevan J.; Trey Ideker

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of advanced screening technologies have allowed for the comprehensive quantification of aggravating and alleviating genetic interactions among gene pairs. In parallel, TAP-MS studies (tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectroscopy) have been successful at identifying physical protein interactions that can indicate proteins participating in the same molecular complex. Here, we propose a method for the joint learning of protein complexes and their functional relat...

  18. Interaction between Protein, Phytate, and Microbial Phytase. In Vitro Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kies, A.K.; Jonge, de L.H.; Kemme, P.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between protein and phytate was investigated in vitro using proteins extracted from five common feedstuffs and from casein. The appearance of naturally present soluble protein-phytate complexes in the feedstuffs, the formation of complexes at different pHs, and the degradation of the

  19. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target.

  20. Mapping functional prion-prion protein interaction sites using prion protein based peptide-arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigter, A.; Priem, J.; Timmers-Parohi, D.; Langeveld, J.; Bossers, A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the basis of most if not all biological processes in living cells. Therefore, adapting existing techniques or developing new techniques to study interactions between proteins are of importance in elucidating which amino acid sequences contribute to these interacti

  1. Interrogating the architecture of protein assemblies and protein interaction networks by cross-linking mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fan; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are involved in almost all processes of the living cell. They are organized through extensive networks of interaction, by tightly bound macromolecular assemblies or more transiently via signaling nodes. Therefore, revealing the architecture of protein complexes and protein interaction netwo

  2. Protein-protein interactions: principles, techniques, and their potential role in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shagufta H; Ahmad, Faizan; Ahmad, Nihal; Flynn, Daniel C; Kumar, Raj

    2011-06-01

    A vast network of genes is inter-linked through protein-protein interactions and is critical component of almost every biological process under physiological conditions. Any disruption of the biologically essential network leads to pathological conditions resulting into related diseases. Therefore, proper understanding of biological functions warrants a comprehensive knowledge of protein-protein interactions and the molecular mechanisms that govern such processes. The importance of protein-protein interaction process is highlighted by the fact that a number of powerful techniques/methods have been developed to understand how such interactions take place under various physiological and pathological conditions. Many of the key protein-protein interactions are known to participate in disease-associated signaling pathways, and represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Thus, controlling protein-protein interactions offers a rich dividend for the discovery of new drug targets. Availability of various tools to study and the knowledge of human genome have put us in a unique position to understand highly complex biological network, and the mechanisms involved therein. In this review article, we have summarized protein-protein interaction networks, techniques/methods of their binding/kinetic parameters, and the role of these interactions in the development of potential tools for drug designing.

  3. 14-3-3 proteins interact with specific MEK kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, G R; Widmann, C; Porter, A C; Sather, S; Johnson, G L; Vaillancourt, R R

    1998-02-06

    MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase) kinases (MEKKs) regulate c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular response kinase pathways. The 14-3-3zeta and 14-3-3epsilon isoforms were isolated in a two-hybrid screen for proteins interacting with the N-terminal regulatory domain of MEKK3. 14-3-3 proteins bound both the N-terminal regulatory and C-terminal kinase domains of MEKK3. The binding affinity of 14-3-3 for the MEKK3 N terminus was 90 nM, demonstrating a high affinity interaction. 14-3-3 proteins also interacted with MEKK1 and MEKK2, but not MEKK4. Endogenous 14-3-3 protein and MEKK1 and MEKK2 were similarly distributed in the cell, consistent with their in vitro interactions. MEKK1 and 14-3-3 proteins colocalized using two-color digital confocal immunofluorescence. Binding of 14-3-3 proteins mapped to the N-terminal 393 residues of 196-kDa MEKK1. Unlike MEKK2 and MEKK3, the C-terminal kinase domain of MEKK1 demonstrated little or no ability to interact with 14-3-3 proteins. MEKK1, but not MEKK2, -3 or -4, is a caspase-3 substrate that when cleaved releases the kinase domain from the N-terminal regulatory domain. Functionally, caspase-3 cleavage of MEKK1 releases the kinase domain from the N-terminal 14-3-3-binding region, demonstrating that caspases can selectively alter protein kinase interactions with regulatory proteins. With regard to MEKK1, -2 and -3, 14-3-3 proteins do not appear to directly influence activity, but rather function as "scaffolds" for protein-protein interactions.

  4. PEDV ORF3 encodes an ion channel protein and regulates virus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Lu, Wei; Chen, Jianfei; Xie, Shiqi; Shi, Hongyan; Hsu, Haojen; Yu, Wenjing; Xu, Ke; Bian, Chao; Fischer, Wolfgang B; Schwarz, Wolfgang; Feng, Li; Sun, Bing

    2012-02-17

    Several studies suggest that the open reading frame 3 (ORF3) gene of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is related to viral infectivity and pathogenicity, but its function remains unknown. Here, we propose a structure model of the ORF3 protein consisting of four TM domains and forming a tetrameric assembly. ORF3 protein can be detected in PEDV-infected cells and it functions as an ion channel in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and yeast. Mutation analysis showed that Tyr170 in TM4 is important for potassium channel activity. Furthermore, viral production is reduced in infected Vero cells when ORF3 gene is silenced by siRNA. Interestingly, the ORF3 gene from an attenuated PEDV encodes a truncated protein with 49 nucleotide deletions, which lacks the ion channel activity.

  5. Predicting Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Signaling Propagation Interference on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghyun Park

    Full Text Available As pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (PD DDIs could lead to severe adverse effects in patients, it is important to identify potential PD DDIs in drug development. The signaling starting from drug targets is propagated through protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. PD DDIs could occur by close interference on the same targets or within the same pathways as well as distant interference through cross-talking pathways. However, most of the previous approaches have considered only close interference by measuring distances between drug targets or comparing target neighbors. We have applied a random walk with restart algorithm to simulate signaling propagation from drug targets in order to capture the possibility of their distant interference. Cross validation with DrugBank and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG shows that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods significantly. We also provide a web service with which PD DDIs for drug pairs can be analyzed at http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/targetrw.

  6. Protein-flavour interactions in relation to development of novel protein foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heng, L.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Gruppen, H.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Vincken, J.P.; Roozen, J.P.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are known to interact with relatively small molecules such as flavour compounds and saponins, and may thus influence the taste perception of food. In this study, the interactions of flavour volatiles with pea proteins, and the effects of heat on these interactions were investigated. The pre

  7. Casein - whey protein interactions in heated milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, Astrid Jolanda

    2003-01-01

    Heating of milk is an essential step in the processing of various dairy products, like for example yoghurt. A major consequence of the heat treatment is the denaturation of whey proteins, which either associate with the casein micelle or form soluble whey protein aggregates. By combination of enzyma

  8. RNA-protein interactions: an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Joshi, Tejal; Kulberkyte, Eleonora;

    2014-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are key players in the regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we discuss the main protein-RNA recognition modes used by RBPs in order to regulate multiple steps of RNA processing. We discuss traditional and state-of-the-art technologies that can be used to stud...

  9. Computational biology for target discovery and characterization: a feasibility study in protein-protein interaction detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Zemla, A

    2009-02-25

    In this work we developed new code for detecting putative multi-domain protein-protein interactions for a small network of bacterial pathogen proteins, and determined how structure-driven domain-fusion (DF) methods should be scaled up for whole-proteome analysis. Protein-protein interactions are of great interest in structural biology and are important for understanding the biology of pathogens. The ability to predict protein-protein interactions provides a means for development of anti-microbials that may interfer with key processes in pathogenicity. The function of a protein-protein complex can be elucidated through knowledge of its structure. The overall goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of extending current LLNL capabilities to produce a high-throughput systems bio-informatics capability for identification and characterization of putative interacting protein partners within known or suspected small protein networks. We extended an existing LLNL methodology for identification of putative protein-protein interacting partners (Chakicherla et al (in review)) by writing a new code to identify multi-domain-fusion linkages (3 or more per complex). We applied these codes to the proteins in the Yersinia pestis quorum sensing network, known as the lsr operon, which comprises a virulence mechanism in this pathogen. We determined that efficient application of our computational algorithms in high-throughput for detection of putative protein-protein complexes genome wide would require pre-computation of PDB domains and construction of a domain-domain association database.

  10. PPLook: an automated data mining tool for protein-protein interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracting and visualizing of protein-protein interaction (PPI from text literatures are a meaningful topic in protein science. It assists the identification of interactions among proteins. There is a lack of tools to extract PPI, visualize and classify the results. Results We developed a PPI search system, termed PPLook, which automatically extracts and visualizes protein-protein interaction (PPI from text. Given a query protein name, PPLook can search a dataset for other proteins interacting with it by using a keywords dictionary pattern-matching algorithm, and display the topological parameters, such as the number of nodes, edges, and connected components. The visualization component of PPLook enables us to view the interaction relationship among the proteins in a three-dimensional space based on the OpenGL graphics interface technology. PPLook can also provide the functions of selecting protein semantic class, counting the number of semantic class proteins which interact with query protein, counting the literature number of articles appearing the interaction relationship about the query protein. Moreover, PPLook provides heterogeneous search and a user-friendly graphical interface. Conclusions PPLook is an effective tool for biologists and biosystem developers who need to access PPI information from the literature. PPLook is freely available for non-commercial users at http://meta.usc.edu/softs/PPLook.

  11. Protein conducting channels-mechanisms, structures and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonardi, Francesco; Nouwen, Nico; Feringa, Ben L.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade among the main developments in the field of bionanotechnology is the application of proteins in devices. Research focuses on the modification of enzyme systems by means of chemical and physical tools in order to achieve full control of their function and to employ them for specifi

  12. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Taufiq, E-mail: mtur2@cam.ac.uk; Smith, Ewan St. John

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction.

  13. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes.

  14. Rosetta stone method for detecting protein function and protein-protein interactions from genome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Thompson, Michael J.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2002-10-15

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  15. Regulatory R region of the CFTR chloride channel is a dynamic integrator of phospho-dependent intra- and intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoky, Zoltan; Krzeminski, Mickael; Muhandiram, Ranjith; Birtley, James R; Al-Zahrani, Ateeq; Thomas, Philip J; Frizzell, Raymond A; Ford, Robert C; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2013-11-19

    Intrinsically disordered proteins play crucial roles in regulatory processes and often function as protein interaction hubs. Here, we present a detailed characterization of a full-length disordered hub protein region involved in multiple dynamic complexes. We performed NMR, CD, and fluorescence binding studies on the nonphosphorylated and highly PKA-phosphorylated human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) regulatory region, a ∼200-residue disordered segment involved in phosphorylation-dependent regulation of channel trafficking and gating. Our data provide evidence for dynamic, phosphorylation-dependent, multisite interactions of various segments of the regulatory region for its intra- and intermolecular partners, including the CFTR nucleotide binding domains 1 and 2, a 42-residue peptide from the C terminus of CFTR, the SLC26A3 sulphate transporter and antisigma factor antagonist (STAS) domain, and 14-3-3β. Because of its large number of binding partners, multivalent binding of individually weak sites facilitates rapid exchange between free and bound states to allow the regulatory region to engage with different partners and generate a graded or rheostat-like response to phosphorylation. Our results enrich the understanding of how disordered binding segments interact with multiple targets. We present structural models consistent with our data that illustrate this dynamic aspect of phospho-regulation of CFTR by the disordered regulatory region.

  16. Screening for protein-DNA interactions by automatable DNA-protein interaction ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise H Brand

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins (DBPs, such as transcription factors, constitute about 10% of the protein-coding genes in eukaryotic genomes and play pivotal roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by binding to short stretches of DNA. Despite their number and importance, only for a minor portion of DBPs the binding sequence had been disclosed. Methods that allow the de novo identification of DNA-binding motifs of known DBPs, such as protein binding microarray technology or SELEX, are not yet suited for high-throughput and automation. To close this gap, we report an automatable DNA-protein-interaction (DPI-ELISA screen of an optimized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA probe library that allows the high-throughput identification of hexanucleotide DNA-binding motifs. In contrast to other methods, this DPI-ELISA screen can be performed manually or with standard laboratory automation. Furthermore, output evaluation does not require extensive computational analysis to derive a binding consensus. We could show that the DPI-ELISA screen disclosed the full spectrum of binding preferences for a given DBP. As an example, AtWRKY11 was used to demonstrate that the automated DPI-ELISA screen revealed the entire range of in vitro binding preferences. In addition, protein extracts of AtbZIP63 and the DNA-binding domain of AtWRKY33 were analyzed, which led to a refinement of their known DNA-binding consensi. Finally, we performed a DPI-ELISA screen to disclose the DNA-binding consensus of a yet uncharacterized putative DBP, AtTIFY1. A palindromic TGATCA-consensus was uncovered and we could show that the GATC-core is compulsory for AtTIFY1 binding. This specific interaction between AtTIFY1 and its DNA-binding motif was confirmed by in vivo plant one-hybrid assays in protoplasts. Thus, the value and applicability of the DPI-ELISA screen for de novo binding site identification of DBPs, also under automatized conditions, is a promising approach for a

  17. Single-file diffusion of interacting particles in a finite-sized channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfau, J B; Coste, C; Even, C; Saint Jean, M

    2010-09-01

    We study the dynamics of charged macroscopic particles (millimetric steel balls) confined in a linear channel of finite length, sufficiently narrow to avoid particles crossing. We show that their individual response to thermal fluctuations strongly depends either on their position in the channel or the local potential they experience. Three different dynamical regimes are identified. At small times, a "free regime" takes place, with the outermost particles exhibiting the highest diffusion coefficient. This effect results from an "echo" of the thermal fluctuations reflected by the channel wall. Then, forbidden crossing induces a correlated regime similar to single file diffusion. Surprisingly, the corresponding mobility increases with the local potential. Lastly, the finite length of the channel induces the saturation of fluctuations. We show that those behaviors may be described heuristically with the help of models for N hard-core interacting particles diffusing in a finite channel of length L, provided that we replace the uniform interparticle distance L/N by a characteristic distance (k(B)T/K)(1/2) built upon the temperature T and the stiffness K of the local potential. It provides a very satisfactory estimate for the fluctuations sizes, whereas they are greatly overestimated assuming hard-core interactions.

  18. The role of electrostatics in protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2014-07-07

    Understanding how protein-protein interactions depend on the choice of buffer, salt, ionic strength, and pH is needed to have better control over protein solution behavior. Here, we have characterized the pH and ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions in terms of an interaction parameter kD obtained from dynamic light scattering and the osmotic second virial coefficient B22 measured by static light scattering. A simplified protein-protein interaction model based on a Baxter adhesive potential and an electric double layer force is used to separate out the contributions of longer-ranged electrostatic interactions from short-ranged attractive forces. The ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions for solutions at pH 6.5 and below can be accurately captured using a Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential to describe the double layer forces. In solutions at pH 9, attractive electrostatics occur over the ionic strength range of 5-275 mM. At intermediate pH values (7.25 to 8.5), there is a crossover effect characterized by a nonmonotonic ionic strength dependence of protein-protein interactions, which can be rationalized by the competing effects of long-ranged repulsive double layer forces at low ionic strength and a shorter ranged electrostatic attraction, which dominates above a critical ionic strength. The change of interactions from repulsive to attractive indicates a concomitant change in the angular dependence of protein-protein interaction from isotropic to anisotropic. In the second part of the paper, we show how the Baxter adhesive potential can be used to predict values of kD from fitting to B22 measurements, thus providing a molecular basis for the linear correlation between the two protein-protein interaction parameters.

  19. Interaction between -Synuclein and Other Proteins in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt A. Jellinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is a common characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders, and the interaction between pathological/toxic proteins to cause neurodegeneration is a hot topic of current neuroscience research. Despite clinical, genetic, and experimental differences, evidence increasingly indicates considerable overlap between synucleinopathies and tauopathies or other protein-misfolding diseases. Inclusions, characteristics of these disorders, also occurring in other neurodegenerative diseases, suggest interactions of pathological proteins engaging common downstream pathways. Novel findings that have shifted our understanding in the role of pathologic proteins in the pathogenesis of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases have confirmed correlations/overlaps between these and other neurodegenerative disorders. The synergistic effects of α-synuclein, hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid-β, and other pathologic proteins, and the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms, including induction and spread of protein aggregates, are critically reviewed, suggesting a dualism or triad of neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disorders, although the etiology of most of these processes is still mysterious.

  20. Competing superconducting channels in iron pnictides from the strong coupling theory with biquadratic spin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rong; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.

    2016-12-01

    We study the symmetry and strength of the superconducting pairing in a two-orbital t-{{J}1}-{{J}2}-K model for iron pnictides using the slave boson strong coupling approach. We show that the nearest-neighbor biquadratic interaction -K{{({{S}i}\\cdot {{S}j})}2} strongly affects the superconducting pairing phase diagram by promoting the {{d}{{x2}-{{y}2}}} B 1g and the {{s}{{x2}+{{y}2}}} A 1g channels. The resulting phase diagram consists of several competing pairing channels, including the isotropic {{s}+/-} A 1g channel, an anisotropic {{d}{{x2}-{{y}2}}} B 1g channel, and two s+\\text{i}d pairing channels. We have investigated the evolution of superconducting states with electron doping, and find that the biquadratic interaction plays a crucial role in stabilizing the s+\\text{i}d and even pure d-wave pairing in the heavily electron- and hole-doped regimes. In addition, we identify a novel orbital-B 1g pairing channel, which has a s-wave form factor but a B 1g symmetry. This channel has a comparable pairing amplitude to the d-wave pairing, and may strongly influence the superconducting gap anisotropy of the system in the overdoped regime. These findings are crucial in understanding the doping evolution of the superconducting gap anisotropy observed by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy in the iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides, including the heavily K-doped BaFe2As2 and K-doped FeSe films.

  1. Interaction between the sodium channel inactivation linker and domain III S4-S5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M R; Goldin, A L

    1997-10-01

    The III-IV linker (L(III-IV)) of the rat brain sodium channel is critical for fast inactivation, possibly forming a fast inactivation particle. Inactivation can be disrupted by mutation of a conserved alanine at position 1329 in the S4-S5 loop of domain III. Combination of a charged mutation at 1329 with a compensatory (opposite) charge mutation at position 1489 in L(III-IV) partially restores inactivation of the channel. The compensatory charge mutant channel has a single-channel mean open time that is similar to that of the wild-type channel and is approximately 50 times shorter than that of the L(III-IV) mutant channel. The results of thermodynamic cycle analysis indicate that the mutations in domain III S4-S5 and L(III-IV) have a coupling energy of 2.8 kcal/mol, indicating that the two mutations act interdependently. These data suggest that L(III-IV) interacts directly with A1329, which may form part of the docking site if L(III-IV) is a fast inactivation particle.

  2. Quantum ballistic transport by interacting two-electron states in quasi-one-dimensional channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Danhong [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Gumbs, Godfrey [Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Abranyos, Yonatan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    For quantum ballistic transport of electrons through a short conduction channel, the role of Coulomb interaction may significantly modify the energy levels of two-electron states at low temperatures as the channel becomes wide. In this regime, the Coulomb effect on the two-electron states is calculated and found to lead to four split energy levels, including two anticrossing-level and two crossing-level states. Moreover, due to the interplay of anticrossing and crossing effects, our calculations reveal that the ground two-electron state will switch from one anticrossing state (strong confinement) to a crossing state (intermediate confinement) as the channel width gradually increases and then back to the original anticrossing state (weak confinement) as the channel width becomes larger than a threshold value. This switching behavior leaves a footprint in the ballistic conductance as well as in the diffusion thermoelectric power of electrons. Such a switching is related to the triple spin degeneracy as well as to the Coulomb repulsion in the central region of the channel, which separates two electrons away and pushes them to different channel edges. The conductance reoccurrence region expands from the weak to the intermediate confinement regime with increasing electron density.

  3. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  4. Finding finer functions for partially characterized proteins by protein-protein interaction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on high-throughput data, numerous algorithms have been designed to find functions of novel proteins. However, the effectiveness of such algorithms is currently limited by some fundamental factors, including (1) the low a-priori probability of novel proteins participating in a detailed function; (2) the huge false data present in high-throughput datasets; (3) the incomplete data coverage of functional classes; (4) the abundant but heterogeneous negative samples for training the algorithms; and (5) the lack of detailed functional knowledge for training algorithms. Here, for partially characterized proteins, we suggest an approach to finding their finer functions based on protein interaction sub-networks or gene expression patterns, defined in function-specific subspaces. The proposed approach can lessen the above-mentioned problems by properly defining the prediction range and functionally filtering the noisy data, and thus can efficiently find proteins' novel functions. For thousands of yeast and human proteins partially characterized, it is able to reliably find their finer functions (e.g., the translational functions) with more than 90% precision. The predicted finer functions are highly valuable both for guiding the follow-up wet-lab validation and for providing the necessary data for training algorithms to learn other proteins.

  5. Cross-species Virus-host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    SUBJECTTERMS viral pathogen, zoonotic, arenavirus, host tropism, protein - protein interactions, RIG-I, Z protein , CARD domain, MAVS 16. SECURITY...individually subcloned into Checkmate M2H System (Promega) bait and prey reporter plasmids. The genes encoding the viral Z proteins were synthesized... viral proteins were calculated with PhyML. While several residue positions are highly conserved across Z proteins (Figure 8), significant sequence

  6. Protein-surface interaction maps for ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alexander S; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-04-05

    In this paper, protein-surface interaction maps were generated by performing coarse-grained protein-surface calculations. This approach allowed for the rapid determination of the protein-surface interaction energies at a range of orientations and distances. Interaction maps of lysozyme indicated that there was a contiguous series of orientations corresponding to several adjacent preferred binding regions on the protein surface. Examination of these orientations provided insight into the residues involved in surface interactions, which qualitatively agreed with the retention data for single-site mutants. Interaction maps of lysozyme single-site mutants were also generated and provided significant insight into why these variants exhibited significant differences in their chromatographic behavior. This approach was also employed to study the binding behavior of CspB and related mutants. The results indicated that, in addition to describing general trends in the data, these maps provided significant insight into retention data of the single-site mutants. In particular, subtle retention trends observed with the K12 and K13 mutants were well-described using this interaction map approach. Finally, the number of interaction points with energies stronger than -2 kcal/mol was shown to be able to semi-quantitatively predict the behavior of most of the mutants. This rapid approach for calculating protein-surface interaction maps is expected to facilitate future method development for separating closely related protein variants in ion-exchange systems.

  7. Computational Insights of the Interaction among Sea Anemones Neurotoxins and Kv1.3 Channel

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Sea anemone neurotoxins are peptides that interact with Na+ and K+ channels, resulting in specific alterations on their functions. Some of these neurotoxins (1ROO, 1BGK, 2K9E, 1BEI) are important for the treatment of about 80 autoimmune disorders because of their specificity for Kv1.3 channel. The aim of this study was to identify the common residues among these neurotoxins by computational methods, and establish whether there is a pattern useful for the future generation of a treatment for a...

  8. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  9. A protein domain interaction interface database: InterPare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jungsul

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most proteins function by interacting with other molecules. Their interaction interfaces are highly conserved throughout evolution to avoid undesirable interactions that lead to fatal disorders in cells. Rational drug discovery includes computational methods to identify the interaction sites of lead compounds to the target molecules. Identifying and classifying protein interaction interfaces on a large scale can help researchers discover drug targets more efficiently. Description We introduce a large-scale protein domain interaction interface database called InterPare http://interpare.net. It contains both inter-chain (between chains interfaces and intra-chain (within chain interfaces. InterPare uses three methods to detect interfaces: 1 the geometric distance method for checking the distance between atoms that belong to different domains, 2 Accessible Surface Area (ASA, a method for detecting the buried region of a protein that is detached from a solvent when forming multimers or complexes, and 3 the Voronoi diagram, a computational geometry method that uses a mathematical definition of interface regions. InterPare includes visualization tools to display protein interior, surface, and interaction interfaces. It also provides statistics such as the amino acid propensities of queried protein according to its interior, surface, and interface region. The atom coordinates that belong to interface, surface, and interior regions can be downloaded from the website. Conclusion InterPare is an open and public database server for protein interaction interface information. It contains the large-scale interface data for proteins whose 3D-structures are known. As of November 2004, there were 10,583 (Geometric distance, 10,431 (ASA, and 11,010 (Voronoi diagram entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB containing interfaces, according to the above three methods. In the case of the geometric distance method, there are 31,620 inter-chain domain

  10. Understanding protein–protein interactions by genetic suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitaraman Sujatha; Dipankar Chatterji

    2000-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions influence many cellular processes and it is increasingly being felt that even a weak and remote interplay between two subunits of a protein or between two proteins in a complex may govern the fate of a particular biochemical pathway. In a bacterial system where the complete genome sequence is available, it is an arduous task to assign function to a large number of proteins. It is possible that many of them are peripherally associated with a cellular event and it is very difficult to probe such interaction. However, mutations in the genes that encode such proteins (primary mutations) are useful in these studies. Isolation of a suppressor or a second-site mutation that restores the phenotype abolished by the primary mutation could be an elegant yet simple way to follow a set of interacting proteins. Such a reversion site need not necessarily be geometrically close to the primary mutation site.

  11. Regulation of PCNA-protein interactions for genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Niels; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has a central role in promoting faithful DNA replication, providing a molecular platform that facilitates the myriad protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that occur at the replication fork. Numerous PCNA-associated proteins compete for binding...... to a common surface on PCNA; hence these interactions need to be tightly regulated and coordinated to ensure proper chromosome replication and integrity. Control of PCNA-protein interactions is multilayered and involves post-translational modifications, in particular ubiquitylation, accessory factors...... and regulated degradation of PCNA-associated proteins. This regulatory framework allows cells to maintain a fine-tuned balance between replication fidelity and processivity in response to DNA damage....

  12. Versatile screening for binary protein-protein interactions by yeast two-hybrid mating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letteboer, S.J.F.; Roepman, R.

    2008-01-01

    Identification of binary protein-protein interactions is a crucial step in determining the molecular context and functional pathways of proteins. State-of-the-art proteomics techniques provide high-throughput information on the content of proteomes and protein complexes, but give little information

  13. Protein-protein interaction domains of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Baarle; I.N. Celik; K.G. Kaval; M. Bramkamp; L.W. Hamoen; S. Halbedel

    2012-01-01

    DivIVA proteins are curvature sensitive membrane binding proteins that recruit other proteins to the poles and the division septum. They consist of a conserved N-terminal lipid binding domain fused to a less conserved C-terminal domain. DivIVA homologues interact with different proteins involved in

  14. Protein-protein interaction domains of Bacillus subtilis DivIVA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarle, S.; Celik, I.N.; Kaval, K.G.; Bramkamp, M.; Hamoen, L.W.; Halbedel, S.

    2013-01-01

    DivIVA proteins are curvature sensitive membrane binding proteins that recruit other proteins to the poles and the division septum. They consist of a conserved N-terminal lipid binding domain fused to a less conserved C-terminal domain. DivIVA homologues interact with different proteins involved in

  15. Structure and inhibition of the SARS coronavirus envelope protein ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Pervushin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The envelope (E protein from coronaviruses is a small polypeptide that contains at least one alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Absence, or inactivation, of E protein results in attenuated viruses, due to alterations in either virion morphology or tropism. Apart from its morphogenetic properties, protein E has been reported to have membrane permeabilizing activity. Further, the drug hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not amiloride, inhibited in vitro ion channel activity of some synthetic coronavirus E proteins, and also viral replication. We have previously shown for the coronavirus species responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV that the transmembrane domain of E protein (ETM forms pentameric alpha-helical bundles that are likely responsible for the observed channel activity. Herein, using solution NMR in dodecylphosphatidylcholine micelles and energy minimization, we have obtained a model of this channel which features regular alpha-helices that form a pentameric left-handed parallel bundle. The drug HMA was found to bind inside the lumen of the channel, at both the C-terminal and the N-terminal openings, and, in contrast to amiloride, induced additional chemical shifts in ETM. Full length SARS-CoV E displayed channel activity when transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 cells in a whole-cell patch clamp set-up. This activity was significantly reduced by hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not by amiloride. The channel structure presented herein provides a possible rationale for inhibition, and a platform for future structure-based drug design of this potential pharmacological target.

  16. Protein Interactions Investigated by the Raman Spectroscopy for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kengne-Momo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction and surface binding characteristics of staphylococcal protein A (SpA and an anti-Escherichia coli immunoglobulin G (IgG were studied using the Raman spectroscopy. The tyrosine amino acid residues present in the α-helix structure of SpA were found to be involved in interaction with IgG. In bulk interaction condition the native structure of proteins was almost preserved where interaction-related changes were observed in the overall secondary structure (α-helix of SpA. In the adsorbed state, the protein structure was largely modified, which allowed the identification of tyrosine amino acids involved in SpA and IgG interaction. This study constitutes a direct Raman spectroscopic investigation of SpA and IgG (receptor-antibody interaction mechanism in the goal of a future biosensor application for detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  17. A protein interaction map of the kalimantacin biosynthesis assembly line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Uytterhoeven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial secondary metabolite kalimantacin is produced by a hybrid polyketide/ non-ribosomal peptide system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. In this study, the kalimantacin biosynthesis gene cluster is analyzed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, creating a protein-protein interaction map of the entire assembly line. In total, 28 potential interactions were identified, of which 13 could be confirmed further. These interactions include the dimerization of ketosynthase domains, a link between assembly line modules 9 and 10, and a specific interaction between the trans-acting enoyl reductase BatK and the carrier proteins of modules 8 and 10. These interactions reveal fundamental insight into the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.This study is the first to reveal interactions in a complete biosynthetic pathway. Similar future studies could build a strong basis for engineering strategies in such clusters.

  18. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and Interacting Proteins in Epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter and receptor systems are involved in different neurological and neuropsychological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, depression, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. Recent advances in studies of signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins of neurotransmitter receptor systems suggest that different receptor systems may share the common signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins which may be better therapeutic targets for development of drugs to effectively control brain diseases. In this paper, we reviewed metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and their related signal transduction pathways or interacting proteins in status epilepticus and temporal lobe epilepsy, and proposed some novel therapeutical drug targets for controlling epilepsy and epileptogenesis.

  19. Multivariate Analysis of Side Effects of Drug Molecules Based on Knowledge of Protein Bindings and ProteinProtein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Funatsu, Kimito

    2014-12-01

    Here, we examined the relationships between 969 side effects associated with 658 drugs and their 1368 human protein targets using our hybrid approaches. Firstly, L-shaped PLS (LPLS) was used to construct a multivariate model of side effects and protein bindings of drug molecules. LPLS is an extension of standard PLS regression, where, in addition to the response matrix Y and the regressor matrix X, an extra data matrix Z is constructed that summarizes the background information of X. X and Y are matrices comprising drugs-target proteins, and drugs-side effects, respectively. The Z matrix is the proteinprotein interaction data. From the loading plot of Y, we could identify two remarkable side effects (urinary incontinence and increased salivation) From the corresponding loading plot of X, the responsible protein targets causing each side effect could be estimated (sodium channels and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors). The loading plot of the Z matrix indicated that the GABA receptors interact with each other and they heavily influence the side effect of increased salivation. Secondly, Bayesian classifier methods were separately applied to the cases of the two side effects. That is, the Bayesian classifier method was used to classify drug molecules as binding or not binding to the responsible protein targets associated with each side effect. Using atom-coloring techniques, it was possible to estimate which fragments on the drug molecule might cause the specific side effects. This information is valuable for drug design to avoid specific side effects.

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR446W, YDR510W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YDR446W ECM11 Non-essential protein apparently involved in meiosis, GFP fusion protein is present in discret...description Non-essential protein apparently involved in meiosis, GFP fusion protein is present in discrete

  1. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YHR111W, YIL008W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YHR111W UBA4 Protein that activates Urm1p before its conjugation to proteins (urmyl...description Protein that activates Urm1p before its conjugation to proteins (urmylation); one target is the

  2. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...... with colocalization of the full-length proteins in cells and with previous studies, we suggest that the range of relevant interactions might extend to interactions with K i = 450 µM in the in vitro assays. Within this range, we identify novel PSD-95 interactions with the chemokine receptor CXCR2, the neuropeptide Y...

  3. Stabilized helical peptides: a strategy to target protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mark A

    2014-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Peptides hold great promise for clinical applications focused on targeting protein-protein interactions. Advantages of peptides include a large chemical space and potential diversity of sequences and structures. However, peptides do present well-known challenges for drug development. Progress has been made in the development of stabilizing alpha helices for potential therapeutic applications. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of helical peptide stabilization are discussed.

  4. Comparison of analytical protein separation characteristics for three amine-based capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liuwei; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fiber stationary phases are finding utility in the realms of protein analytics as well as downstream processing. We have recently described the modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) C-CP fibers to affect amine-rich phases for the weak anion-exchange (WAX) separation of proteins. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is covalently coupled to the PET surface, with subsequent cross-linking imparted by treatment with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BUDGE). These modifications yield vastly improved dynamic binding capacities over the unmodified fibers. We have also previously employed native (unmodified) nylon 6 C-CP fibers as weak anion/cation-exchange (mixed-mode) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) phases for protein separations. Polyamide, nylon 6, consists of amide groups along the polymer backbone, with primary amines and carboxylic acid end groups. The analytical separation characteristics of these three amine-based C-CP fiber phases are compared here. Each of the C-CP fiber columns in this study was shown to be able to separate a bovine serum albumin/hemoglobin/lysozyme mixture at high mobile phase linear velocity (∼70 mm s(-1)) but with different elution characteristics. These differences reflect the types of protein-surface interactions that are occurring, based on the active group composition of the fiber surfaces. This study provides important fundamental understanding for the development of surface-modified C-CP fiber columns for protein separation.

  5. A modified resonant recognition model to predict protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang; WANG Yifei

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are fundamental components of all living cells and the protein-protein interaction plays an important role in vital movement.This paper briefly introduced the original Resonant Recognition Model (RRM),and then modified it by using the wavelet transform to acquire the Modified Resonant Recognition Model (MRRM).The key characteristic of the new model is that it can predict directly the proteinprotein interaction from the primary sequence,and the MRRM is more suitable than the RRM for this prediction.The results of numerical experiments show that the MRRM is effective for predicting the protein-protein interaction.

  6. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  7. Integrating protein-protein interactions and text mining for protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leser Ulf

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional annotation of proteins remains a challenging task. Currently the scientific literature serves as the main source for yet uncurated functional annotations, but curation work is slow and expensive. Automatic techniques that support this work are still lacking reliability. We developed a method to identify conserved protein interaction graphs and to predict missing protein functions from orthologs in these graphs. To enhance the precision of the results, we furthermore implemented a procedure that validates all predictions based on findings reported in the literature. Results Using this procedure, more than 80% of the GO annotations for proteins with highly conserved orthologs that are available in UniProtKb/Swiss-Prot could be verified automatically. For a subset of proteins we predicted new GO annotations that were not available in UniProtKb/Swiss-Prot. All predictions were correct (100% precision according to the verifications from a trained curator. Conclusion Our method of integrating CCSs and literature mining is thus a highly reliable approach to predict GO annotations for weakly characterized proteins with orthologs.

  8. The origins of the evolutionary signal used to predict protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Lakshmipuram S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation of genetic distances between pairs of protein sequence alignments has been used to infer protein-protein interactions. It has been suggested that these correlations are based on the signal of co-evolution between interacting proteins. However, although mutations in different proteins associated with maintaining an interaction clearly occur (particularly in binding interfaces and neighbourhoods, many other factors contribute to correlated rates of sequence evolution. Proteins in the same genome are usually linked by shared evolutionary history and so it would be expected that there would be topological similarities in their phylogenetic trees, whether they are interacting or not. For this reason the underlying species tree is often corrected for. Moreover processes such as expression level, are known to effect evolutionary rates. However, it has been argued that the correlated rates of evolution used to predict protein interaction explicitly includes shared evolutionary history; here we test this hypothesis. Results In order to identify the evolutionary mechanisms giving rise to the correlations between interaction proteins, we use phylogenetic methods to distinguish similarities in tree topologies from similarities in genetic distances. We use a range of datasets of interacting and non-interacting proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the signal of correlated evolution between interacting proteins is predominantly a result of shared evolutionary rates, rather than similarities in tree topology, independent of evolutionary divergence. Conclusions Since interacting proteins do not have tree topologies that are more similar than the control group of non-interacting proteins, it is likely that coevolution does not contribute much to, if any, of the observed correlations.

  9. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zencir, Sevil [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Ege University, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Ovee, Mohiuddin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Dobson, Melanie J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2 (Canada); Banerjee, Monimoy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Topcu, Zeki, E-mail: zeki.topcu@ege.edu.tr [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ege University, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Mohanty, Smita, E-mail: mohansm@auburn.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  10. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Teresa K; Grieco-Calub, Tina M; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2009-02-18

    The beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming alpha subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, beta1, beta2, and beta3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the beta4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected beta4 into HEK (human embryonic kidney) cells stably expressing Na(V)1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the beta4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length beta4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, beta4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of noninactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of beta1 or chimeric subunits including the beta1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Coexpressing Na(V)1.1 and beta4 with beta1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that beta1 overcomes the effects of beta4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, beta1(C121W), which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by beta4 and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with beta4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in beta4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that beta1 and beta4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation, and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted beta1 subunits.

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptors and interacting proteins: evolving drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The correct targeting, localization, regulation and signaling of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) represent major mechanisms underlying the complex function of neuronal networks. These tasks are accomplished by the formation of synaptic signal complexes that integrate functionally related proteins such as neurotransmitter receptors, enzymes and scaffold proteins. By these means, proteins interacting with mGluRs are important regulators of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Most described mGluR interaction partners bind to the intracellular C-termini of the receptors. These domains are extensively spliced and phosphorylated, resulting in a high variability of binding surfaces offered to interacting proteins. Malfunction of mGluRs and associated proteins are linked to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction, depression, epilepsy, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's disease. MGluR associated signal complexes are dynamic structures that assemble and disassemble in response to the neuronal fate. This, in principle, allows therapeutic intervention, defining mGluRs and interacting proteins as promising drug targets. In the last years, several studies elucidated the geometry of mGluRs in contact with regulatory proteins, providing a solid fundament for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, I will give an overview of human disorders directly associated with mGluR malfunction, provide an up-to-date summary of mGluR interacting proteins and highlight recently described structures of mGluR domains in contact with binding partners.

  12. Calcium-dependent modulation and plasma membrane targeting of the AKT2 potassium channel by the CBL4/ CIPK6 calcium sensor/protein kinase complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrin Held; Jean-Baptiste Thibaud; J(o)rg Kudla; Francois Pascaud; Christian Eckert; Pawel Gajdanowicz; Kenji Hashimoto; Claire Corratgé-Faillie; Jan Niklas Offenborn; Beno(i)t Lacombe; Ingo Dreyer

    2011-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channel function is fundamental to many physiological processes. However, components and mechanisms regulating the activity of plant K+ channels remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the calcium (Ca2+)sensor CBL4 together with the interacting protein kinase CIPK6 modulates the activity and plasma membrane (PM)targeting of the K+ channel AKT2 from Arabidopsis thaliana by mediating translocation of AKT2 to the PM in plant cells and enhancing AKT2 activity in oocytes. Accordingly, akt2, cbl4 and cipk6 mutants share similar developmental and delayed flowering pheuotypes. Moreover, the isolated regulatory C-terminal domain of CIPK6 is sufficient for mediating CBL4- and Ca2+-dependent channel translocation from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to the PM by a novel targeting pathway that is dependent on dual lipid modifications of CBL4 by myristoylation and palmitoylation. Thus, we describe a critical mechanism of ion-channel regulation where a Ca2+ sensor modulates K+ channel activity by promoting a kinase interaction-dependent but phosphorylation-independent translocation of the channel to the PM.

  13. General anesthetic action at an internal protein site involving the S4-S5 cytoplasmic loop of a neuronal K(+) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T; Shahidullah, M; Ellingson, J S; Covarrubias, M

    2000-02-18

    The structural bases of general anesthetic action on a neuronal K(+) channel were investigated using the series of homologous 1-alkanols, electrophysiology, and mutational analysis. Domain swapping between dShaw2 (alkanol-sensitive) and hKv3.4 (alkanol-resistant) and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic loop (S4-S5) determines the selective inhibition of native dShaw2 channels by 1-alkanols. The S4-S5 loop may contribute to a receptor for both 1-alkanols and the inactivation particle, because the enhanced 1-alkanol sensitivity of hKv3.4 channels hosting S4-S5 mutations correlates directly with disrupted channel inactivation. Evidence of a discrete protein site was also obtained from the analysis of the relationship between potency and alkyl chain length, which begins to level off after 1-hexanol. Rapid application to the cytoplasmic side of inside-out membrane patches shows that the interaction between dShaw2 channels and 1-alkanols equilibrates in 1000-fold slower when the drug is applied externally to outside-out membrane patches. The data strongly favor a mechanism of inhibition involving a discrete internal site for 1-alkanols in dShaw2 K(+) channels. A new working hypothesis proposes that 1-alkanols lock dShaw2 channels in their closed conformation by a direct interaction at a crevice formed by the S4-S5 loop.

  14. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alfred Dick

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses-- MA, CA, and NC-- provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding.

  15. Prediction of protein-protein interactions between viruses and human by an SVM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guangyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions from amino acid sequences, but most of those methods are intended for the interactions within a species rather than for interactions across different species. Methods for predicting interactions between homogeneous proteins are not appropriate for finding those between heterogeneous proteins since they do not distinguish the interactions between proteins of the same species from those of different species. Results We developed a new method for representing a protein sequence of variable length in a frequency vector of fixed length, which encodes the relative frequency of three consecutive amino acids of a sequence. We built a support vector machine (SVM model to predict human proteins that interact with virus proteins. In two types of viruses, human papillomaviruses (HPV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, our SVM model achieved an average accuracy above 80%, which is higher than that of another SVM model with a different representation scheme. Using the SVM model and Gene Ontology (GO annotations of proteins, we predicted new interactions between virus proteins and human proteins. Conclusions Encoding the relative frequency of amino acid triplets of a protein sequence is a simple yet powerful representation method for predicting protein-protein interactions across different species. The representation method has several advantages: (1 it enables a prediction model to achieve a better performance than other representations, (2 it generates feature vectors of fixed length regardless of the sequence length, and (3 the same representation is applicable to different types of proteins.

  16. Protein solvent and weak protein protein interactions in halophilic malate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Christine; Faou, Pierre; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    With the aim to correlate the solvation, stability and solubility properties of halophilic malate dehydrogenase, we characterized its weak interparticle interactions by small-angle neutron scattering in various solvents. The protein concentration dependence of the apparent radius of gyration and forward scattered intensity extrapolated from Guinier plots, and thus the second virial coefficient, A2, were determined for each solvent condition. In NaCl 1M+2-methylpentane-2,4-diol 30%, a solvent that promotes protein crystallization, A2 is negative, -0.4×10 -4 ml mol g -2 and indicating attractive interactions; in ammonium sulfate 3M, in which the protein precipitates at high concentrations, A2˜0. In 2-5M NaCl, 1-3.5M NaOAc, 1-4.5M KF or 1-2M (NH 4) 2SO 4, in which the protein is very soluble, A2 is positive with a value of the order of 0.4×10 -4 ml mol g -2 which decreases with increasing salt concentration. In MgCl 2 however, A2 increases with increasing salt concentration from 0.2 to 1.3M.

  17. Engineering of an E. coli outer membrane protein FhuA with increased channel diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dworeck Tamara

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Channel proteins like FhuA can be an alternative to artificial chemically synthesized nanopores. To reach such goals, channel proteins must be flexible enough to be modified in their geometry, i.e. length and diameter. As continuation of a previous study in which we addressed the lengthening of the channel, here we report the increasing of the channel diameter by genetic engineering. Results The FhuA Δ1-159 diameter increase has been obtained by doubling the amino acid sequence of the first two N-terminal β-strands, resulting in variant FhuA Δ1-159 Exp. The total number of β-strands increased from 22 to 24 and the channel surface area is expected to increase by ~16%. The secondary structure analysis by circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows a high β-sheet content, suggesting the correct folding of FhuA Δ1-159 Exp. To further prove the FhuA Δ1-159 Exp channel functionality, kinetic measurement using the HRP-TMB assay (HRP = Horse Radish Peroxidase, TMB = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine were conducted. The results indicated a 17% faster diffusion kinetic for FhuA Δ1-159 Exp as compared to FhuA Δ1-159, well correlated to the expected channel surface area increase of ~16%. Conclusion In this study using a simple "semi rational" approach the FhuA Δ1-159 diameter was enlarged. By combining the actual results with the previous ones on the FhuA Δ1-159 lengthening a new set of synthetic nanochannels with desired lengths and diameters can be produced, broadening the FhuA Δ1-159 applications. As large scale protein production is possible our approach can give a contribution to nanochannel industrial applications.

  18. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  19. Protein-protein interactions between proteins of Citrus tristeza virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchongboh, Chofong Gilbert; Wu, Guan-Wei; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guo-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most devastating pathogens of citrus. Its genome is organized into 12 open reading frames (ORFs), of which ten ORFs located at the 3'-terminus of the genome have multiple biological functions. The ten genes at the 3'-terminus of the genome of a severe isolate (CTV-S4) and three ORFs (CP, CPm and p20) of three other isolates (N4, S45 and HB1) were cloned into pGBKT7 and pGADT7 yeast shuttle vectors. Yeast two-hybridization (Y2H) assays results revealed a strong self-interaction for CP and p20, and a unique interaction between the CPm of CTV-S4 (severe) and CP of CTV-N4 (mild) isolates. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation also confirmed these interactions. Analysis of the deletion mutants delineated the domains of CP and p20 self-interaction. Furthermore, the domains responsible for CP and p20 self-interactions were mapped at the CP amino acids sites 41-84 and p20 amino acids sites 1-21 by Y2H. This study provided new information on CTV protein interactions which will help for further understanding the biological functions.

  20. Scalable prediction of compound-protein interactions using minwise hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Yasuo; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    The identification of compound-protein interactions plays key roles in the drug development toward discovery of new drug leads and new therapeutic protein targets. There is therefore a strong incentive to develop new efficient methods for predicting compound-protein interactions on a genome-wide scale. In this paper we develop a novel chemogenomic method to make a scalable prediction of compound-protein interactions from heterogeneous biological data using minwise hashing. The proposed method mainly consists of two steps: 1) construction of new compact fingerprints for compound-protein pairs by an improved minwise hashing algorithm, and 2) application of a sparsity-induced classifier to the compact fingerprints. We test the proposed method on its ability to make a large-scale prediction of compound-protein interactions from compound substructure fingerprints and protein domain fingerprints, and show superior performance of the proposed method compared with the previous chemogenomic methods in terms of prediction accuracy, computational efficiency, and interpretability of the predictive model. All the previously developed methods are not computationally feasible for the full dataset consisting of about 200 millions of compound-protein pairs. The proposed method is expected to be useful for virtual screening of a huge number of compounds against many protein targets.

  1. Novel Technology for Protein-Protein Interaction-based Targeted Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Me Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simple but highly efficient in-cell protein-protein interaction (PPI discovery system based on the translocation properties of protein kinase C- and its C1a domain in live cells. This system allows the visual detection of trimeric and dimeric protein interactions including cytosolic, nuclear, and/or membrane proteins with their cognate ligands. In addition, this system can be used to identify pharmacological small compounds that inhibit specific PPIs. These properties make this PPI system an attractive tool for screening drug candidates and mapping the protein interactome.

  2. Light-activated control of protein channel assembly mediated by membrane mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Findlay, Heather E.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical processes provide versatile triggers of chemical reactions. Here, we use a photoactivated lipid switch to modulate the folding and assembly of a protein channel within a model biological membrane. In contrast to the information rich field of water-soluble protein folding, there is only a limited understanding of the assembly of proteins that are integral to biological membranes. It is however possible to exploit the foreboding hydrophobic lipid environment and control membrane protein folding via lipid bilayer mechanics. Mechanical properties such as lipid chain lateral pressure influence the insertion and folding of proteins in membranes, with different stages of folding having contrasting sensitivities to the bilayer properties. Studies to date have relied on altering bilayer properties through lipid compositional changes made at equilibrium, and thus can only be made before or after folding. We show that light-activation of photoisomerisable di-(5-[[4-(4-butylphenyl)azo]phenoxy]pentyl)phosphate (4-Azo-5P) lipids influences the folding and assembly of the pentameric bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL. The use of a photochemical reaction enables the bilayer properties to be altered during folding, which is unprecedented. This mechanical manipulation during folding, allows for optimisation of different stages of the component insertion, folding and assembly steps within the same lipid system. The photochemical approach offers the potential to control channel assembly when generating synthetic devices that exploit the mechanosensitive protein as a nanovalve.

  3. A protein-protein interaction map of the Trypanosoma brucei paraflagellar rod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Lacomble

    Full Text Available We have conducted a protein interaction study of components within a specific sub-compartment of a eukaryotic flagellum. The trypanosome flagellum contains a para-crystalline extra-axonemal structure termed the paraflagellar rod (PFR with around forty identified components. We have used a Gateway cloning approach coupled with yeast two-hybrid, RNAi and 2D DiGE to define a protein-protein interaction network taking place in this structure. We define two clusters of interactions; the first being characterised by two proteins with a shared domain which is not sufficient for maintaining the interaction. The other cohort is populated by eight proteins, a number of which possess a PFR domain and sub-populations of this network exhibit dependency relationships. Finally, we provide clues as to the structural organisation of the PFR at the molecular level. This multi-strand approach shows that protein interactome data can be generated for insoluble protein complexes.

  4. Water-mediated ionic interactions in protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sabarinathan; K Aishwarya; R Sarani; M Kirti Vaishnavi; K Sekar

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that water molecules play an indispensable role in the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The water-mediated ionic interactions between the charged residues provide stability and plasticity and in turn address the function of the protein structures. Thus, this study specifically addresses the number of possible water-mediated ionic interactions, their occurrence, distribution and nature found in 90% non-redundant protein chains. Further, it provides a statistical report of different charged residue pairs that are mediated by surface or buried water molecules to form the interactions. Also, it discusses its contributions in stabilizing various secondary structural elements of the protein. Thus, the present study shows the ubiquitous nature of the interactions that imparts plasticity and flexibility to a protein molecule.

  5. Designing specificity of protein-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coluzza, I.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the key properties of biological molecules is that they can bind strongly to certain substrates yet interact only weakly with the very large number of other molecules that they encounter. Using a simple lattice model, we test several methods to design molecule-substrate binding specificity. W

  6. Inferring High-Confidence Human Protein-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Similarly, the top-ranked interaction between L-threonine dehydrogenase ( TDH ) and aminoacetone synthetase (alias of GCAT) catalyzes the conversion of L...acetyltransferase TDH 2 L-threonine dehydrogenase 2 577.4 11.0 1328.0 CXCL16 4 Inducible T cell co-stimulator CXCR6 4 Inducible T cell co-stimulator

  7. Neurodegenerative diseases: quantitative predictions of protein-RNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Davide; Agostini, Federico; Klus, Petr; Marchese, Domenica; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that RNA plays an active role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We recently introduced a theoretical framework, catRAPID, to predict the binding ability of protein and RNA molecules. Here, we use catRAPID to investigate ribonucleoprotein interactions linked to inherited intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeuld-Jakob, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. We specifically focus on (1) RNA interactions with fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP; (2) protein sequestration caused by CGG repeats; (3) noncoding transcripts regulated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43 TDP-43; (4) autogenous regulation of TDP-43 and FMRP; (5) iron-mediated expression of amyloid precursor protein APP and α-synuclein; (6) interactions between prions and RNA aptamers. Our results are in striking agreement with experimental evidence and provide new insights in processes associated with neuronal function and misfunction.

  8. Deducing topology of protein-protein interaction networks from experimentally measured sub-networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLellan W Robb

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction networks are commonly sampled using yeast two hybrid approaches. However, whether topological information reaped from these experimentally-measured sub-networks can be extrapolated to complete protein-protein interaction networks is unclear. Results By analyzing various experimental protein-protein interaction datasets, we found that they are not random samples of the parent networks. Based on the experimental bait-prey behaviors, our computer simulations show that these non-random sampling features may affect the topological information. We tested the hypothesis that a core sub-network exists within the experimentally sampled network that better maintains the topological characteristics of the parent protein-protein interaction network. We developed a method to filter the experimentally sampled network to result in a core sub-network that more accurately reflects the topology of the parent network. These findings have fundamental implications for large-scale protein interaction studies and for our understanding of the behavior of cellular networks. Conclusion The topological information from experimental measured networks network as is may not be the correct source for topological information about the parent protein-protein interaction network. We define a core sub-network that more accurately reflects the topology of the parent network.

  9. PPISEARCHENGINE: gene ontology-based search for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Cui, Guangyu; Lee, Hyunjin; Huang, De-Shuang; Han, Kyungsook

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new search engine called PPISearchEngine which finds protein-protein interactions (PPIs) using the gene ontology (GO) and the biological relations of proteins. For efficient retrieval of PPIs, each GO term is assigned a prime number and the relation between the terms is represented by the product of prime numbers. This representation is hidden from users but facilitates the search for the interactions of a query protein by unique prime factorisation of the number that represents the query protein. For a query protein, PPISearchEngine considers not only the GO term associated with the query protein but also the GO terms at the lower level than the GO term in the GO hierarchy, and finds all the interactions of the query protein which satisfy the search condition. In contrast, the standard keyword-matching or ID-matching search method cannot find the interactions of a protein unless the interactions involve a protein with explicit annotations. To the best of our knowledge, this search engine is the first method that can process queries like 'for protein p with GO [Formula: see text], find p's interaction partners with GO [Formula: see text]'. PPISearchEngine is freely available to academics at http://search.hpid.org/.

  10. A method for investigating protein-protein interactions related to Salmonella typhimurium pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Saiful M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Yoon, Hyunjin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Ansong, Charles [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rommereim, Leah M. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Norbeck, Angela D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Auberry, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moore, R. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adkins, Joshua N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heffron, Fred [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-02-10

    We successfully modified an existing method to investigate protein-protein interactions in the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium (STM). This method includes i) addition of a histidine-biotin-histidine tag to the bait proteins via recombinant DNA techniques; ii) in vivo cross-linking with formaldehyde; iii) tandem affinity purification of bait proteins under fully denaturing conditions; and iv) identification of the proteins cross-linked to the bait proteins by liquid-chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass-spectrometry. In vivo cross-linking stabilized protein interactions permitted the subsequent two-step purification step conducted under denaturing conditions. The two-step purification greatly reduced nonspecific binding of non-cross-linked proteins to bait proteins. Two different negative controls were employed to reduce false-positive identification. In an initial demonstration of this approach, we tagged three selected STM proteins- HimD, PduB and PhoP- with known binding partners that ranged from stable (e.g., HimD) to transient (i.e., PhoP). Distinct sets of interacting proteins were identified with each bait protein, including the known binding partners such as HimA for HimD, as well as anticipated and unexpected binding partners. Our results suggest that novel protein-protein interactions may be critical to pathogenesis by Salmonella typhimurium. .

  11. Proteomic Analyses of NF1-Interacting Proteins in Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0070 TITLE: Proteomic Analyses of NF1 -Interacting Proteins in Keratinocytes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shyni Varghese...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a.CONTRACT NUMBER Proteomic Analyses of NF1 -Interacting Proteins in Keratinocytes 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0070 5c. PROGRAM...in the NF1 null epidermis, we analyzed NF1 expression in a mouse model of psoriasis (imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation) and

  12. Transient interactions studied by NMR : iron sulfur proteins and their interaction partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xingfu

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between proteins are of central importance for virtually every process in a living cell. It has long been a mystery how two proteins associate to form a complex in a complicated cellular context. Recently, it was found that an intermediate state called encounter state, of a protein

  13. Identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks by using clique seeds and graph entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bolin; Shi, Jinhong; Zhang, Shenggui; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The identification of protein complexes plays a key role in understanding major cellular processes and biological functions. Various computational algorithms have been proposed to identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. In this paper, we first introduce a new seed-selection strategy for seed-growth style algorithms. Cliques rather than individual vertices are employed as initial seeds. After that, a result-modification approach is proposed based on this seed-selection strategy. Predictions generated by higher order clique seeds are employed to modify results that are generated by lower order ones. The performance of this seed-selection strategy and the result-modification approach are tested by using the entropy-based algorithm, which is currently the best seed-growth style algorithm to detect protein complexes from PPI networks. In addition, we investigate four pairs of strategies for this algorithm in order to improve its accuracy. The numerical experiments are conducted on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPI network. The group of best predictions consists of 1711 clusters, with the average f-score at 0.68 after removing all similar and redundant clusters. We conclude that higher order clique seeds can generate predictions with higher accuracy and that our improved entropy-based algorithm outputs more reasonable predictions than the original one.

  14. Description and control of dissociation channels in gas-phase protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thachuk, Mark; Fegan, Sarah K.; Raheem, Nigare

    2016-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the charged apo-hemoglobin protein complex, this work expands upon our initial report [S. K. Fegan and M. Thachuk, J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 722-728 (2014)] about control of dissociation channels in the gas phase using specially designed charge tags. Employing a charge hopping algorithm and a range of temperatures, a variety of dissociation channels are found for activated gas-phase protein complexes. At low temperatures, a single monomer unfolds and becomes charge enriched. At higher temperatures, two additional channels open: (i) two monomers unfold and charge enrich and (ii) two monomers compete for unfolding with one eventually dominating and the other reattaching to the complex. At even higher temperatures, other more complex dissociation channels open with three or more monomers competing for unfolding. A model charge tag with five sites is specially designed to either attract or exclude charges. By attaching this tag to the N-terminus of specific monomers, the unfolding of those monomers can be decidedly enhanced or suppressed. In other words, using charge tags to direct the motion of charges in a protein complex provides a mechanism for controlling dissociation. This technique could be used in mass spectrometry experiments to direct forces at specific attachment points in a protein complex, and hence increase the diversity of product channels available for quantitative analysis. In turn, this could provide insight into the function of the protein complex in its native biological environment. From a dynamics perspective, this system provides an interesting example of cooperative behaviour involving motions with differing time scales.

  15. Measurements of Protein-Protein Interactions by Size Exclusion Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Bloustine, J.; Berejnov, V.; Fraden, S

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented for determining second virial coefficients (B2) of protein solutions from retention time measurements in size exclusion chromatography. We determine B2 by analyzing the concentration dependence of the chromatographic partition coefficient. We show the ability of this method to track the evolution of B2 from positive to negative values in lysozyme and bovine serum albumin solutions. Our size exclusion chromatography results agree quantitatively with data obtained by light...

  16. Identification of Redox and Glucose-Dependent Txnip Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Forred

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip acts as a negative regulator of thioredoxin function and is a critical modulator of several diseases including, but not limited to, diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion cardiac injury, and carcinogenesis. Therefore, Txnip has become an attractive therapeutic target to alleviate disease pathologies. Although Txnip has been implicated with numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, fatty acid and glucose metabolism, inflammation, and apoptosis, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are largely unknown. The objective of these studies was to identify Txnip interacting proteins using the proximity-based labeling method, BioID, to understand differential regulation of pleiotropic Txnip cellular functions. The BioID transgene fused to Txnip expressed in HEK293 identified 31 interacting proteins. Many protein interactions were redox-dependent and were disrupted through mutation of a previously described reactive cysteine (C247S. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this model can be used to identify dynamic Txnip interactions due to known physiological regulators such as hyperglycemia. These data identify novel Txnip protein interactions and demonstrate dynamic interactions dependent on redox and glucose perturbations, providing clarification to the pleiotropic cellular functions of Txnip.

  17. Imaging mRNA and protein interactions within neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliscovich, Carolina; Shenoy, Shailesh M.

    2017-01-01

    RNA–protein interactions are essential for proper gene expression regulation, particularly in neurons with unique spatial constraints. Currently, these interactions are defined biochemically, but a method is needed to evaluate them quantitatively within morphological context. Colocalization of two-color labels using wide-field microscopy is a method to infer these interactions. However, because of chromatic aberrations in the objective lens, this approach lacks the resolution to determine whether two molecules are physically in contact or simply nearby by chance. Here, we developed a robust super registration methodology that corrected the chromatic aberration across the entire image field to within 10 nm, which is capable of determining whether two molecules are physically interacting or simply in proximity by random chance. We applied this approach to image single-molecule FISH in combination with immunofluorescence (smFISH-IF) and determined whether the association between an mRNA and binding protein(s) within a neuron was significant or accidental. We evaluated several mRNA-binding proteins identified from RNA pulldown assays to determine which of these exhibit bona fide interactions. Surprisingly, many known mRNA-binding proteins did not bind the mRNA in situ, indicating that adventitious interactions are significant using existing technology. This method provides an ability to evaluate two-color registration compatible with the scale of molecular interactions. PMID:28223507

  18. Molecular imprinting of protein by coordinate interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Wang; Zhen Dong Hua; Zhi Yong Chen; Yuan Zong Li; Mei Ping Zhao

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a novel strong interaction by forming complex between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper ion was utilized for the preparation of molecular imprinted hydrogel in aqueous solution. Results show that the inclusion of copper ion in preparation can bridge the template BSA and functional monomers together and improve the imprinting effect compared to the polymer made without copper ion added. High selectivity factor and large adsorption capacity are also observed for the obtained BSA-imprinted hydrogel.

  19. Mapping the Interaction Anatomy of BmP02 on Kv1.3 Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B.; Wu, B. F.; Feng, Y. J.; Tao, J.; Ji, Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    The potassium channel Kv 1.3 plays a vital part in the activation of T lymphocytes and is an attractive pharmacological target for autoimmune diseases. BmP02, a 28-residue peptide isolated from Chinese scorpion (Buthus martensi Karsch) venom, is a potent and selective Kv1.3 channel blocker. However, the mechanism through which BmP02 recognizes and inhibits the Kv1.3 channel is still unclear. In the present study, a complex molecular model of Kv1.3-BmP02 was developed by docking analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. From these simulations, it appears the large β-turn (residues 10–16) of BmP02 might be the binding interface with Kv 1.3. These results were confirmed by scanning alanine mutagenesis of BmP02, which identified His9, Lys11 and Lys13, which lie within BmP02’s β-turn, as key residues for interacting with Kv1.3. Based on these results and molecular modeling, two negatively charged residues of Kv1.3, D421 and D422, located in turret region, were predicted to act as the binding site for BmP02. Mutation of these residues reduced sensitivity of Kv 1.3 to BmP02 inhibition, suggesting that electrostatic interactions play a crucial role in Kv1.3-BmP02 interaction. This study revealed the molecular basis of Kv 1.3 recognition by BmP02 venom, and provides a novel interaction model for Kv channel-specific blocker complex, which may help guide future drug-design for Kv1.3-related channelopathies.

  20. Mutant analysis, protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization of the Arabidopsis B sister (ABS) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Kerstin; Anfang, Nicole; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    2005-09-01

    Recently, close relatives of class B floral homeotic genes, termed B(sister) genes, have been identified in both angiosperms and gymnosperms. In contrast to the B genes themselves, B(sister) genes are exclusively expressed in female reproductive organs, especially in the envelopes or integuments surrounding the ovules. This suggests an important ancient function in ovule or seed development for B(sister) genes, which has been conserved for about 300 million years. However, investigation of the first loss-of-function mutant for a B(sister) gene (ABS/TT16 from Arabidopsis) revealed only a weak phenotype affecting endothelium formation. Here, we present an analysis of two additional mutant alleles, which corroborates this weak phenotype. Transgenic plants that ectopically express ABS show changes in the growth and identity of floral organs, suggesting that ABS can interact with floral homeotic proteins. Yeast-two-hybrid and three-hybrid analyses indicated that ABS can form dimers with SEPALLATA (SEP) floral homeotic proteins and multimeric complexes that also include the AGAMOUS-like proteins SEEDSTICK (STK) or SHATTERPROOF1/2 (SHP1, SHP2). These data suggest that the formation of multimeric transcription factor complexes might be a general phenomenon among MIKC-type MADS-domain proteins in angiosperms. Heterodimerization of ABS with SEP3 was confirmed by gel retardation assays. Fusion proteins tagged with CFP (Cyan Fluorescent Protein) and YFP (Yellow Fluorescent Protein) in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that ABS is localized in the nucleus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a structurally deviant, but closely related, paralogue of ABS in the Arabidopsis genome. Thus the evolutionary developmental genetics of B(sister) genes can probably only be understood as part of a complex and redundant gene network that may govern ovule formation in a conserved manner, which has yet to be fully explored.

  1. Detection of protein-protein interactions in plants using bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracha-Drori, Keren; Shichrur, Keren; Katz, Aviva; Oliva, Moran; Angelovici, Ruthie; Yalovsky, Shaul; Ohad, Nir

    2004-11-01

    Protein function is often mediated via formation of stable or transient complexes. Here we report the determination of protein-protein interactions in plants using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). The yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) was split into two non-overlapping N-terminal (YN) and C-terminal (YC) fragments. Each fragment was cloned in-frame to a gene of interest, enabling expression of fusion proteins. To demonstrate the feasibility of BiFC in plants, two pairs of interacting proteins were utilized: (i) the alpha and beta subunits of the Arabidopsis protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), and (ii) the polycomb proteins, FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) and MEDEA (MEA). Members of each protein pair were transiently co-expressed in leaf epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis. Reconstitution of a fluorescing YFP chromophore occurred only when the inquest proteins interacted. No fluorescence was detected following co-expression of free non-fused YN and YC or non-interacting protein pairs. Yellow fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm of cells that expressed PFT alpha and beta subunits, or in nuclei and cytoplasm of cells that expressed FIE and MEA. In vivo measurements of fluorescence spectra emitted from reconstituted YFPs were identical to that of a non-split YFP, confirming reconstitution of the chromophore. Expression of the inquest proteins was verified by immunoblot analysis using monoclonal antibodies directed against tags within the hybrid proteins. In addition, protein interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitations. These results demonstrate that plant BiFC is a simple, reliable and relatively fast method for determining protein-protein interactions in plants.

  2. Molecular Characterization of LRB7 Gene and a Water Channel Protein TIP2 in Chorispora bungeana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaoxu; Di, Cuixia; Fang, Weikuan; Wu, Kaichao; Chen, Maoshan; He, Shanshan; Zeng, Yuan; Jing, Yan; Liang, Jun; Tan, Fang; Li, Song; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Guangxiu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Water channel proteins, also called aquaporins, are integral membrane proteins from major intrinsic protein (MIP) family and involved in several pathways including not only water transport but also cell signaling, reproduction, and photosynthesis. The full cDNA and protein sequences of aquaporin in Chorispora bungeana Fisch. & C.A. Mey (C. bungeana) are still unknown. Results. In this study, PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends approaches were used to clone the full cDNA of LRB7 (GenBank accession number: EU636988) of C. bungeana. Sequence analysis indicated that it was 1235 bp, which had two introns and encoded a protein of 250 amino acids. Structure analysis revealed that the protein had two conserved NPA motifs, one of which is MIP signature sequence (SGxHxNPAVT), six membrane helix regions, and additional membrane-embedded domains. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the protein was from TIP2 subgroup. Surprisingly, semiquantitative RT-PCR experiment and western blot analysis showed that LRB7 and TIP2 were only detectable in roots, unlike Arabidopsis and Raphanus. Connecting with our previous studies, LRB7 was supported to associate with chilling-tolerance in C. bungeana. Conclusion. This is the first time to characterize the full sequences of LRB7 gene and water channel protein in C. bungeana. Our findings contribute to understanding the water transports in plants under low temperatures. PMID:27689074

  3. Molecular Characterization of LRB7 Gene and a Water Channel Protein TIP2 in Chorispora bungeana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Water channel proteins, also called aquaporins, are integral membrane proteins from major intrinsic protein (MIP family and involved in several pathways including not only water transport but also cell signaling, reproduction, and photosynthesis. The full cDNA and protein sequences of aquaporin in Chorispora bungeana Fisch. & C.A. Mey (C. bungeana are still unknown. Results. In this study, PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends approaches were used to clone the full cDNA of LRB7 (GenBank accession number: EU636988 of C. bungeana. Sequence analysis indicated that it was 1235 bp, which had two introns and encoded a protein of 250 amino acids. Structure analysis revealed that the protein had two conserved NPA motifs, one of which is MIP signature sequence (SGxHxNPAVT, six membrane helix regions, and additional membrane-embedded domains. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the protein was from TIP2 subgroup. Surprisingly, semiquantitative RT-PCR experiment and western blot analysis showed that LRB7 and TIP2 were only detectable in roots, unlike Arabidopsis and Raphanus. Connecting with our previous studies, LRB7 was supported to associate with chilling-tolerance in C. bungeana. Conclusion. This is the first time to characterize the full sequences of LRB7 gene and water channel protein in C. bungeana. Our findings contribute to understanding the water transports in plants under low temperatures.

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR291C, YPL070W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YPL070W MUK1 Cytoplasmic protein of unknown function containing a Vps9 domain; computation...rotein of unknown function containing a Vps9 domain; computational analysis of large-scale protein-protein i

  5. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YIL008W, YHR111W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ait as prey (1) YHR111W UBA4 Protein that activates Urm1p before its conjugation ...4 Prey description Protein that activates Urm1p before its conjugation to proteins (urmylation); one target

  6. Sequence motifs in MADS transcription factors responsible for specificity and diversification of protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and

  7. Rare disease relations through common genes and protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Novo, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Monica

    2016-06-01

    ODCs (Orphan Disease Connections), available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/odcs, is a novel resource to explore potential molecular relations between rare diseases. These molecular relations have been established through the integration of disease susceptibility genes and human protein-protein interactions. The database currently contains 54,941 relations between 3032 diseases.

  8. Interaction of maize chromatin-associated HMG proteins with mononucleosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichota, J.; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    maize HMGA and five different HMGB proteins with mononucleosomes (containing approx. 165 bp of DNA) purified from micrococcal nuclease-digested maize chromatin. The HMGB proteins interacted with the nucleosomes independent of the presence of the linker histone H1, while the binding of HMGA...

  9. Physical and chemical interactions in cold gelation of food proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.; Jongh, de H.H.J.; Visschers, R.W.; Simons, J.W.F.A.

    2002-01-01

    pH-Induced cold gelation of whey proteins is a two-step process. After protein aggregates have been prepared by heat treatment, gelation is established at ambient temperature by gradually lowering the pH. To demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions between aggregates during this latt

  10. Use and application of hydrophobic interaction chromatography for protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Justin T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this section is to provide the reader with guidelines and background on the use and experimental application of Hydrophobic Interaction chromatography (HIC) for the purification of proteins. The section will give step by step instructions on how to use HIC in the laboratory to purify proteins. General guidelines and relevant background information is also provided.

  11. Identification of proteins interacting with Arabidopsis ACD11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Joensen, Jan; McKinney, Lea V;

    2009-01-01

    in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an Arabidopsis cDNA library to identify ACD11 interacting proteins. One interactor identified is a protein of unknown function with an RNA recognition motif (RRM) designated BPA1 (binding partner of ACD11). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the ACD11-BPA1...

  12. Understanding Protein Synthesis: An Interactive Card Game Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Alison; Peat, Mary; Franklin, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a complex process and students find it difficult to understand. This article describes an interactive discussion "game" used by first year biology students at the University of Sydney. The students, in small groups, use the game in which the processes of protein synthesis are actioned by the students during a…

  13. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  14. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology al...

  15. Filtering high-throughput protein-protein interaction data using a combination of genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Ashwini

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction data used in the creation or prediction of molecular networks is usually obtained from large scale or high-throughput experiments. This experimental data is liable to contain a large number of spurious interactions. Hence, there is a need to validate the interactions and filter out the incorrect data before using them in prediction studies. Results In this study, we use a combination of 3 genomic features – structurally known interacting Pfam domains, Gene Ontology annotations and sequence homology – as a means to assign reliability to the protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae determined by high-throughput experiments. Using Bayesian network approaches, we show that protein-protein interactions from high-throughput data supported by one or more genomic features have a higher likelihood ratio and hence are more likely to be real interactions. Our method has a high sensitivity (90% and good specificity (63%. We show that 56% of the interactions from high-throughput experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have high reliability. We use the method to estimate the number of true interactions in the high-throughput protein-protein interaction data sets in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens to be 27%, 18% and 68% respectively. Our results are available for searching and downloading at http://helix.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp/htp/. Conclusion A combination of genomic features that include sequence, structure and annotation information is a good predictor of true interactions in large and noisy high-throughput data sets. The method has a very high sensitivity and good specificity and can be used to assign a likelihood ratio, corresponding to the reliability, to each interaction.

  16. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiawei; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins. Method In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC), based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID), of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification. Results Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC). Conclusions LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods. PMID:26125187

  17. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei Luo

    Full Text Available Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins.In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC, based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID, of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification.Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC.LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods.

  18. Formation of individual protein channels in lipid bilayers suspended in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, André; Han, Xiaojun; Winkler, Fritz K; Tiefenauer, Louis X

    2009-10-15

    Free-standing lipid bilayers are formed in regularly arranged nanopores of 200, 400 and 800 nm in a 300 nm thin hydrophobic silicon nitride membrane separating two fluid compartments. The extraordinary stability of the lipid bilayers allows us to monitor channel formation of the model peptide melittin and alpha-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. We observed that melittin channel formation is voltage-dependent and transient, whereas transmembrane heptameric alpha-hemolysin channels in nano-BLMs persist for hours. The onset of alpha-hemolysin-mediated conduction depends on the applied protein concentration and strongly on the diameter of the nanopores. Heptameric channel formation from adsorbed alpha-hemolysin monomers needs more time in bilayers suspended in 200 nm pores compared to bilayers in pores of 400 and 800 nm diameters. Diffusion of sodium ions across alpha-hemolysin channels present in a sufficiently high number in the bilayers was quantitatively and specifically determined using ion selective electrodes. The results demonstrate that relatively small variations of nano-dimensions have a tremendous effect on observable dynamic biomolecular processes. Such nanopore chips are potentially useful as supports for stable lipid bilayers to establish functional assays of membrane proteins needed in basic research and drug discovery.

  19. PathFinder: mining signal transduction pathway segments from protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Signal transduction pathway is the chain of processes by which a cell converts an extracellular signal into a response. In most unicellular organisms, the number of signal transduction pathways influences the number of ways the cell can react and respond to the environment. Discovering signal transduction pathways is an arduous problem, even with the use of systematic genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies. These techniques lead to an enormous amount of data and how to interpret and process this data becomes a challenging computational problem. Results In this study we present a new framework for identifying signaling pathways in protein-protein interaction networks. Our goal is to find biologically significant pathway segments in a given interaction network. Currently, protein-protein interaction data has excessive amount of noise, e.g., false positive and false negative interactions. First, we eliminate false positives in the protein-protein interaction network by integrating the network with microarray expression profiles, protein subcellular localization and sequence information. In addition, protein families are used to repair false negative interactions. Then the characteristics of known signal transduction pathways and their functional annotations are extracted in the form of association rules. Conclusion Given a pair of starting and ending proteins, our methodology returns candidate pathway segments between these two proteins with possible missing links (recovered false negatives. In our study, S. cerevisiae (yeast data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  20. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Regulation of WRKY Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Chi; Yan Yang; Yuan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Baofang Fan; Jing-Quan Yu; Zhixiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor,SPF1,from sweet potato.Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth,development,and responses to biotic and abiotic stress.Despite the functional diversity,almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TrGACC/T W-box sequences and,therefore,mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors.Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling,transcription,and chromatin remodeling.Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors.It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes.In this review,we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute,at different levels,to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  1. Genome-wide protein-protein interaction screening by protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Samuel; Diss, Guillaume; Filteau, Marie; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Dubé, Alexandre K; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are the building blocks, effectors and signal mediators of cellular processes. A protein's function, regulation and localization often depend on its interactions with other proteins. Here, we describe a protocol for the yeast protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA), a powerful method to detect direct and proximal associations between proteins in living cells. The interaction between two proteins, each fused to a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) protein fragment, translates into growth of yeast strains in presence of the drug methotrexate (MTX). Differential fitness, resulting from different amounts of reconstituted DHFR enzyme, can be quantified on high-density colony arrays, allowing to differentiate interacting from non-interacting bait-prey pairs. The high-throughput protocol presented here is performed using a robotic platform that parallelizes mating of bait and prey strains carrying complementary DHFR-fragment fusion proteins and the survival assay on MTX. This protocol allows to systematically test for thousands of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) involving bait proteins of interest and offers several advantages over other PPI detection assays, including the study of proteins expressed from their endogenous promoters without the need for modifying protein localization and for the assembly of complex reporter constructs.

  2. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands.

  3. Molecular interactions of Epstein-Barr virus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2011-02-01

    The capsids of herpesviruses, which comprise major and minor capsid proteins, have a common icosahedral structure with 162 capsomers. An electron microscopic study shows that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) capsids in the nucleus are immunolabeled by anti-BDLF1 and anti-BORF1 antibodies, indicating that BDLF1 and BORF1 are the minor capsid proteins of EBV. Cross-linking and electrophoresis studies of purified BDLF1 and BORF1 revealed that these two proteins form a triplex that is similar to that formed by the minor capsid proteins, VP19C and VP23, of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Although the interaction between VP23, a homolog of BDLF1, and the major capsid protein VP5 could not be verified biochemically in earlier studies, the interaction between BDLF1 and the EBV major capsid protein, viral capsid antigen (VCA), can be confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assay and coimmunoprecipitation. Additionally, in HSV-1, VP5 interacts with only the middle region of VP19C; in EBV, VCA interacts with both the N-terminal and middle regions of BORF1, a homolog of VP19C, revealing that the proteins in the EBV triplex interact with the major capsid protein differently from those in HSV-1. A GST pulldown study also identifies the oligomerization domains in VCA and the dimerization domain in BDLF1. The results presented herein reveal how the EBV capsid proteins interact and thereby improve our understanding of the capsid structure of the virus.

  4. Fluorescent protein-scorpion toxin chimera is a convenient molecular tool for studies of potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kudryashova, Kseniya S; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Stepanov, Alexey V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Grishin, Eugene V; Feofanov, Alexey V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2016-09-21

    Ion channels play a central role in a host of physiological and pathological processes and are the second largest target for existing drugs. There is an increasing need for reliable tools to detect and visualize particular ion channels, but existing solutions suffer from a number of limitations such as high price, poor specificity, and complicated protocols. As an alternative, we produced recombinant chimeric constructs (FP-Tx) consisting of fluorescent proteins (FP) fused with potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom (Tx). In particular, we used two FP, eGFP and TagRFP, and two Tx, OSK1 and AgTx2, to create eGFP-OSK1 and RFP-AgTx2. We show that these chimeras largely retain the high affinity of natural toxins and display selectivity to particular ion channel subtypes. FP-Tx are displaced by other potassium channel blockers and can be used as an imaging tool in ion channel ligand screening setups. We believe FP-Tx chimeras represent a new efficient molecular tool for neurobiology.

  5. Protein complex prediction based on k-connected subgraphs in protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Mahnaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein complexes play an important role in cellular mechanisms. Recently, several methods have been presented to predict protein complexes in a protein interaction network. In these methods, a protein complex is predicted as a dense subgraph of protein interactions. However, interactions data are incomplete and a protein complex does not have to be a complete or dense subgraph. Results We propose a more appropriate protein complex prediction method, CFA, that is based on connectivity number on subgraphs. We evaluate CFA using several protein interaction networks on reference protein complexes in two benchmark data sets (MIPS and Aloy, containing 1142 and 61 known complexes respectively. We compare CFA to some existing protein complex prediction methods (CMC, MCL, PCP and RNSC in terms of recall and precision. We show that CFA predicts more complexes correctly at a competitive level of precision. Conclusions Many real complexes with different connectivity level in protein interaction network can be predicted based on connectivity number. Our CFA program and results are freely available from http://www.bioinf.cs.ipm.ir/softwares/cfa/CFA.rar.

  6. Insight into structural organization and protein-protein interaction of non structural 3 (NS3) proteins from dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Pratap; Yadav, R N S; Sarma, Kishore

    2014-01-01

    Dengue infections produce a distinct character of virus-induced intracellular membrane alterations which are associated with the viral replication machinery. Currently, the NS3 protein is being targeted for antiviral therapy against dengue. NS3 protein of dengue virus interacts with nuclear receptor binding protein (NRBP) of human causing cell trafficking between the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and Golgi, which interacts with Rac3, a member of the Rho-GTPase family. No crystal structure of the NRBP is available for any species, thus limiting the complete understanding of structure- function relationships of this protein. The present study deals with the molecular modeling of the viral protein (NS3 of DENV1-4), the host protein (NRBP) and their interactions through protein-protein docking study. Theoretical threedimensional structures of the NRBP and NS3 were modeled using the Modeller 9v8, and the evaluated models were docked using GRAMM-X to study the mode of protein-protein interaction (NRBP as receptor and NS3 as ligand). The docked docking complexes were further evaluated for interaction analysis by the RosettaDock Server. Suface and interface residues were observed along with hydrogen and hydrophobic interaction. The conserved residues forming hydrogen interaction of NRBP with DENV1-4 serotypes were found to be GLN 305, SER 363 and GLN 379.

  7. Multiphasic interactions between nucleotides and target proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Nissen, Per

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) bind to target proteins to promote bacterial survival (Corrigan et al. 2016). Thus, the binding of the nucleotides to RsgA, a GTPase, inhibits the hydrolysis of GTP. The dose response, taken to be curvilinear with respect to the logarithm of the inhibitor concentration, is instead much better (P<0.001 when the 6 experiments are combined) represented as multiphasic, with high to exceedingly high absolute r values for the straight lines, and with transitions in the form of non-contiguities (jumps). Profiles for the binding of radiolabeled nucleotides to HprT and Gmk, GTP synthesis enzymes, were, similarly, taken to be curvilinear with respect to the logarithm of the protein concentration. However, the profiles are again much better represented as multiphasic than as curvilinear (the P values range from 0.047 to <0.001 for each of the 8 experiments for binding of ppGpp and pppGpp to HprT). The binding of GTP to HprT and ...

  8. Systematic Screens for Proteins That Interact with the Mucolipidosis Type IV Protein TRPML1

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting from mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the endosomal/lysosomal Transient Receptor Potential channel protein mucolipin-1/TRPML1. Cells isolated from Mucolipidosis type IV patients and grown in vitro and in in vivo models of this disease both show several lysosome-associated defects. However, it is still unclear how TRPML1 regulates the transport steps implicated by these defects. Identifying proteins that associate with ...

  9. On the ion-mediated interaction between protein and DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Barbi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism allowing a protein to search of a target sequence on DNA is currently described as an intermittent process composed of 3D diffusion in bulk and 1D diffusion along the DNA molecule. Due to the relevant charge of protein and DNA, electrostatic interaction should play a crucial role during this search. In this paper, we explicitly derive the mean field theory allowing for a description of the protein-DNA electrostatics in solution. This approach leads to a unified model of the search process, where 1D and 3D diffusion appear as a natural consequence of the diffusion on an extended interaction energy profile.

  10. Interaction of Protein and Cell with Different Chitosan Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between proteins, cells and biomaterial surfaces is commonly observed and often used to measure biocompatibility of biomaterials.In this investigation, three kinds of biomaterials derived from chitosan were prepared.The surface wettability of these polymers, interaction of protein with material surface, and their effects on cell adhesion and growth were studied.The results show that the surface contact angle and surface charge of biomaterials have a close bearing on protein adsorption as well as cell adhesion and growth, indicating that through different chemical modifications, chitosan can be made into different kinds of biomedical materials to satisfy various needs.

  11. A cell-based method for screening RNA-protein interactions: identification of constitutive transport element-interacting proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Nakamura

    Full Text Available We have developed a mammalian cell-based screening platform to identify proteins that assemble into RNA-protein complexes. Based on Tat-mediated activation of the HIV LTR, proteins that interact with an RNA target elicit expression of a GFP reporter and are captured by fluorescence activated cell sorting. This "Tat-hybrid" screening platform was used to identify proteins that interact with the Mason Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV constitutive transport element (CTE, a structured RNA hairpin that mediates the transport of unspliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Several hnRNP-like proteins, including hnRNP A1, were identified and shown to interact with the CTE with selectivity in the reporter system comparable to Tap, a known CTE-binding protein. In vitro gel shift and pull-down assays showed that hnRNP A1 is able to form a complex with the CTE and Tap and that the RGG domain of hnRNP A1 mediates binding to Tap. These results suggest that hnRNP-like proteins may be part of larger export-competent RNA-protein complexes and that the RGG domains of these proteins play an important role in directing these binding events. The results also demonstrate the utility of the screening platform for identifying and characterizing new components of RNA-protein complexes.

  12. Characterization of protein-protein interaction interfaces from a single species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, David; Robertson, David L; Lovell, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    Most proteins attain their biological functions through specific interactions with other proteins. Thus, the study of protein-protein interactions and the interfaces that mediate these interactions is of prime importance for the understanding of biological function. In particular the precise determinants of binding specificity and their contributions to binding energy within protein interfaces are not well understood. In order to better understand these determinants an appropriate description of the interaction surface is needed. Available data from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae allow us to focus on a single species and to use all the available structures, correcting for redundancy, instead of using structural representatives. This allows us to control for potentially confounding factors that may affect sequence propensities. We find a significant contribution of main-chain atoms to protein-protein interactions. These include interactions both with other main-chain and side-chain atoms on the interacting chain. We find that the type of interaction depends on both amino acid and secondary structure type involved in the contact. For example, residues in α-helices and large amino acids are the most likely to be involved in interactions through their side-chain atoms. We find an intriguing homogeneity when calculating the average solvation energy of different areas of the protein surface. Unexpectedly, homo- and hetero-complexes have quite similar results for all analyses. Our findings demonstrate that the manner in which protein-protein interactions are formed is determined by the residue type and the secondary structure found in the interface. However the homogeneity of the desolvation energy despite heterogeneity of interface properties suggests a complex relationship between interface composition and binding energy.

  13. Effect of ceramic membrane channel diameter on limiting retentate protein concentration during skim milk microfiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael C; Barbano, David M

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of retentate flow channel diameter (4 or 6mm) of nongraded permeability 100-nm pore size ceramic membranes operated in nonuniform transmembrane pressure mode on the limiting retentate protein concentration (LRPC) while microfiltering (MF) skim milk at a temperature of 50°C, a flux of 55 kg · m(-2) · h(-1), and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m · s(-1). At the above conditions, the retentate true protein concentration was incrementally increased from 7 to 11.5%. When temperature, flux, and average cross-flow velocity were controlled, ceramic membrane retentate flow channel diameter did not affect the LRPC. This indicates that LRPC is not a function of the Reynolds number. Computational fluid dynamics data, which indicated that both membranes had similar radial velocity profiles within their retentate flow channels, supported this finding. Membranes with 6-mm flow channels can be operated at a lower pressure decrease from membrane inlet to membrane outlet (ΔP) or at a higher cross-flow velocity, depending on which is controlled, than membranes with 4-mm flow channels. This implies that 6-mm membranes could achieve a higher LRPC than 4-mm membranes at the same ΔP due to an increase in cross-flow velocity. In theory, the higher LRPC of the 6-mm membranes could facilitate 95% serum protein removal in 2 MF stages with diafiltration between stages if no serum protein were rejected by the membrane. At the same flux, retentate protein concentration, and average cross-flow velocity, 4-mm membranes require 21% more energy to remove a given amount of permeate than 6-mm membranes, despite the lower surface area of the 6-mm membranes. Equations to predict skim milk MF retentate viscosity as a function of protein concentration and temperature are provided. Retentate viscosity, retentate recirculation pump frequency required to maintain a given cross-flow velocity at a given retentate viscosity, and retentate protein

  14. Energetic pathway sampling in a protein interaction domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hultqvist, Greta; Haq, S. Raza; Punekar, Avinash S.;

    2013-01-01

    The affinity and specificity of protein-ligand interactions are influenced by energetic crosstalk within the protein domain. However, the molecular details of such intradomain allostery are still unclear. Here, we have experimentally detected and computationally predicted interaction pathways...... changes may reshape energetic signaling. The results were analyzed in the context of other members of the PDZ family, which were found to contain distinct interaction pathways for different peptide ligands. The data reveal a fascinating scenario whereby several energetic pathways are sampled within one...

  15. The system of indicators to measure the effectiveness of interaction between enterprises in marketing channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Dobroskok

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to systematize the use of marketing approaches to interaction in modern management techniques, which allowed the detailed characterization of network, competitive and innovative approaches to consolidate network main role in sales policy formation of the enterprises in the consumer sector of economics. The theory of marketing channels management does not sufficiently reflect the role of marketing interaction, strategic marketing, forming the ideological basis for the relationship of market actors and defining the strategic direction of their joint work to obtain a synergistic effect. Issues related to the new paradigm of modern marketing, based on the interaction are the subject of attention of both foreign and domestic researchers, dictated by the need to establish long-term relationships with partners and customers. There is no consensus that there are no clear methodological tools of the use of «marketing interaction». So it is difficult to form its further development. In recent years, with the rise of the crisis, when markets were approaching the saturation state and intensified competition, the need for scientific and methodological approach to finding ways to improve relations with business partners became apparent. The results of the analysis. On the basis of in-depth analysis of the role of marketing interaction in production and marketing of retail businesses as subjects of marketing channels strengthened its analytical component and, on the instrumental level proposed authoring system performance evaluation of the effectiveness of variants of interaction of business entities in marketing channels. Testing methodology for assessing proposed indicators will improve the efficiency of monitoring and evaluation of strategic cooperation, including equity capital of trust and authority, promote the growth of the participants arrived marketing channel. The implementation of principles of

  16. Improving accuracy of protein-protein interaction prediction by considering the converse problem for sequence representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the development of genome-sequencing technologies, protein sequences are readily obtained by translating the measured mRNAs. Therefore predicting protein-protein interactions from the sequences is of great demand. The reason lies in the fact that identifying protein-protein interactions is becoming a bottleneck for eventually understanding the functions of proteins, especially for those organisms barely characterized. Although a few methods have been proposed, the converse problem, if the features used extract sufficient and unbiased information from protein sequences, is almost untouched. Results In this study, we interrogate this problem theoretically by an optimization scheme. Motivated by the theoretical investigation, we find novel encoding methods for both protein sequences and protein pairs. Our new methods exploit sufficiently the information of protein sequences and reduce artificial bias and computational cost. Thus, it significantly outperforms the available methods regarding sensitivity, specificity, precision, and recall with cross-validation evaluation and reaches ~80% and ~90% accuracy in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae respectively. Our findings here hold important implication for other sequence-based prediction tasks because representation of biological sequence is always the first step in computational biology. Conclusions By considering the converse problem, we propose new representation methods for both protein sequences and protein pairs. The results show that our method significantly improves the accuracy of protein-protein interaction predictions.

  17. A proteomics strategy to elucidate functional protein-protein interactions applied to EGF signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.; Ong, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    employ stable isotopic amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to differentially label proteins in EGF-stimulated versus unstimulated cells. Combined cell lysates were affinity-purified over the SH2 domain of the adapter protein Grb2 (GST-SH2 fusion protein) that specifically binds phosphorylated EGFR......Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can reveal protein-protein interactions on a large scale, but it has been difficult to separate background binding from functionally important interactions and still preserve weak binders. To investigate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, we...

  18. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...

  19. Claudins reign: The claudin/EMP/PMP22/γ channel protein family in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simske, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    The claudin family of integral membrane proteins was identified as the major protein component of the tight junctions in all vertebrates. Since their identification, claudins, and their associated pfam00822 superfamily of proteins have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes. Claudin homologs have been identified in invertebrates as well, including Drosophila and C. elegans. Recent studies demonstrate that the C. elegans claudins, clc-1-clc- 5, and similar proteins in the greater PMP22/EMP/claudin/voltage-gated calcium channel γ subunit family, including nsy-4, and vab-9, while highly divergent at a sequence level from each other and from the vertebrate claudins, in many cases play roles similar to those traditionally assigned to their vertebrate homologs. These include regulating cell adhesion and passage of small molecules through the paracellular space, channel activity, protein aggregation, sensitivity to pore-forming toxins, intercellular signaling, cell fate specification and dynamic changes in cell morphology. Study of claudin superfamily proteins in C. elegans should continue to provide clues as to how claudin family protein function has been adapted to perform diverse functions at specialized cell-cell contacts in metazoans.

  20. Protein-surface interactions on stimuli-responsive polymeric biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Michael C; Toomey, Ryan G; Gallant, Nathan D

    2016-03-04

    Responsive surfaces: a review of the dependence of protein adsorption on the reversible volume phase transition in stimuli-responsive polymers. Specifically addressed are a widely studied subset: thermoresponsive polymers. Findings are also generalizable to other materials which undergo a similarly reversible volume phase transition. As of 2015, over 100,000 articles have been published on stimuli-responsive polymers and many more on protein-biomaterial interactions. Significantly, fewer than 100 of these have focused specifically on protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers. These report a clear trend of increased protein adsorption in the collapsed state compared to the swollen state. This control over protein interactions makes stimuli-responsive polymers highly useful in biomedical applications such as wound repair scaffolds, on-demand drug delivery, and antifouling surfaces. Outstanding questions are whether the protein adsorption is reversible with the volume phase transition and whether there is a time-dependence. A clear understanding of protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers will advance theoretical models, experimental results, and biomedical applications.