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Sample records for channel identifies residues

  1. Mapping of Residues Forming the Voltage Sensor of the Voltage-Dependent Anion-Selective Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lorie; Blachly-Dyson, Elizabeth; Colombini, Marco; Forte, Michael

    1993-06-01

    Voltage-gated ion-channel proteins contain "voltage-sensing" domains that drive the conformational transitions between open and closed states in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to identify residues affecting the voltage sensitivity of a mitochondrial channel, the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC). Although charge changes at many sites had no effect, at other sites substitutions that increased positive charge also increased the steepness of voltage dependance and substitutions that decreased positive charge decreased voltage dependance by an appropriate amount. In contrast to the plasma membrane K^+ and Na^+ channels, these residues are distributed over large parts of the VDAC protein. These results have been used to define the conformational transitions that accompany voltage gating of an ion channel. This gating mechanism requires the movement of large portions of the VDAC protein through the membrane.

  2. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander

    2015-01-01

    modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp68, Lys170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp68...... or Lys170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 ms and 700 ms for Trp68Leu and Lys170Asn, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using phi-value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies...

  3. Functional validation of Ca2+-binding residues from the crystal structure of the BK ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshatri, Aravind S; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Alberto J; Giraldez, Teresa

    2018-04-01

    BK channels are dually regulated by voltage and Ca 2+ , providing a cellular mechanism to couple electrical and chemical signalling. Intracellular Ca 2+ concentration is sensed by a large cytoplasmic region in the channel known as "gating ring", which is formed by four tandems of regulator of conductance for K + (RCK1 and RCK2) domains. The recent crystal structure of the full-length BK channel from Aplysia californica has provided new information about the residues involved in Ca 2+ coordination at the high-affinity binding sites located in the RCK1 and RCK2 domains, as well as their cooperativity. Some of these residues have not been previously studied in the human BK channel. In this work we have investigated, through site directed mutagenesis and electrophysiology, the effects of these residues on channel activation by voltage and Ca 2+ . Our results demonstrate that the side chains of two non-conserved residues proposed to coordinate Ca 2+ in the A. californica structure (G523 and E591) have no apparent functional role in the human BK Ca 2+ sensing mechanism. Consistent with the crystal structure, our data indicate that in the human channel the conserved residue R514 participates in Ca 2+ coordination in the RCK1 binding site. Additionally, this study provides functional evidence indicating that R514 also interacts with residues E902 and Y904 connected to the Ca 2+ binding site in RCK2. Interestingly, it has been proposed that this interaction may constitute a structural correlate underlying the cooperative interactions between the two high-affinity Ca 2+ binding sites regulating the Ca 2+ dependent gating of the BK channel. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated homocysteine levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared to control subjects. We further observed that administration of homocysteine or acetylcysteine significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  5. Accounting for the residual stress effects on the creep deformation of channel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knizhnikov, Yu.N.; Platonov, P.A.; Ul'yanov, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the first kind residual stresses arising in the walls of the zirconium base alloy fules in the process of fabrication on the RBMK type reactor channel tube creep is investigated. Models for calculation of the reactor component creep with account for the relaxation of residual stresses distributed by the wall thickness as well as the radiation and temperature fields are developed. On the basis of the analysis of the data obtained it is concluded that the effect of the residual stresses on the RBMK channel tube deformation for a long-term operation is negligible. But for the short-term fests the results can be noticeably distorted by this factor. The role of internal stresses can also manifest when determining the deformation of radiation elongation of the zirconium base alloy samples

  6. Impacts of channel morphology on residues and ecological risks of polychlorinated biphenyls in water and sediment in Chahe River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-hua Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of channel morphology on the residues and ecological risks of 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congeners in water and sediment were investigated in summer (July and autumn (September in the Chahe River, in Nanjing, China. The residual concentrations of tri-chlorobiphenyls (tri-CBs, PCB 18 and tetra-CBs (PCB 52 in water were significantly higher than those of penta-CBs to deca-CBs, and the average residual concentration of ∑PCBs (sum of 14 PCB congeners in summer was about six times higher than in autumn. However, the residues in sediment did not change significantly. Redundancy analysis (RDA indicated that channel morphology and the corresponding environmental indices had significant impacts on PCB residues and their composition profiles in water and sediment. The overflow weir and lake-type watercourse may remarkably reduce the residual concentration and ecological risks of PCBs in water. The highest reduction percentages of the residual concentration and ecological risks of ∑PCBs induced by an overflow weir were 78% and 67%, respectively, and those induced by a lake-type watercourse were 36% and 70%, respectively. The watercourses with different channel morphologies were ranked by residual ∑PCBs concentrations in the following descending order: the natural ecological watercourse, vertical concrete watercourse, and vegetation-type riprap watercourse. However, they were ranked by residual ∑PCBs concentrations in sediment in the following descending order: the vertical concrete watercourse, vegetation-type riprap watercourse, and natural ecological watercourse.

  7. Nonsensing residues in S3-S4 linker's C terminus affect the voltage sensor set point in K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-de-Souza, Joao L; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2018-02-05

    Voltage sensitivity in ion channels is a function of highly conserved arginine residues in their voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), but this conservation does not explain the diversity in voltage dependence among different K + channels. Here we study the non-voltage-sensing residues 353 to 361 in Shaker K + channels and find that residues 358 and 361 strongly modulate the voltage dependence of the channel. We mutate these two residues into all possible remaining amino acids (AAs) and obtain Q-V and G-V curves. We introduced the nonconducting W434F mutation to record sensing currents in all mutants except L361R, which requires K + depletion because it is affected by W434F. By fitting Q-Vs with a sequential three-state model for two voltage dependence-related parameters ( V 0 , the voltage-dependent transition from the resting to intermediate state and V 1 , from the latter to the active state) and G-Vs with a two-state model for the voltage dependence of the pore domain parameter ( V 1/2 ), Spearman's coefficients denoting variable relationships with hydrophobicity, available area, length, width, and volume of the AAs in 358 and 361 positions could be calculated. We find that mutations in residue 358 shift Q-Vs and G-Vs along the voltage axis by affecting V 0 , V 1 , and V 1/2 according to the hydrophobicity of the AA. Mutations in residue 361 also shift both curves, but V 0 is affected by the hydrophobicity of the AA in position 361, whereas V 1 and V 1/2 are affected by size-related AA indices. Small-to-tiny AAs have opposite effects on V 1 and V 1/2 in position 358 compared with 361. We hypothesize possible coordination points in the protein that residues 358 and 361 would temporarily and differently interact with in an intermediate state of VSD activation. Our data contribute to the accumulating knowledge of voltage-dependent ion channel activation by adding functional information about the effects of so-called non-voltage-sensing residues on VSD dynamics. © 2018

  8. Seismic stochastic inversion identify river channel sand body

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The technology of seismic inversion is regarded as one of the most important part of geophysics. By using the technology of seismic inversion and the theory of stochastic simulation, the concept of seismic stochastic inversion is proposed.Seismic stochastic inversion can play an significant role in the identifying river channel sand body. Accurate sand body description is a crucial parameter to measure oilfield development and oilfield stimulation during the middle and later periods. Besides, rational well spacing density is an essential condition for efficient production. Based on the geological knowledge of a certain oilfield, in line with the use of seismic stochastic inversion, the river channel sand body in the work area is identified. In this paper, firstly, the single river channel body from the composite river channel body is subdivided. Secondly, the distribution of river channel body is ascertained in order to ascertain the direction of rivers. Morever, the superimposed relationship among the sand body is analyzed, especially among the inter-well sand body. The last but not at the least, via the analysis of inversion results of first vacuating the wells and continuous infilling later, it is meeted the most needs well spacing density that can obtain the optimal inversion result. It would serve effective guidance for oilfield stimulation.

  9. Channel Gating Dependence on Pore Lining Helix Glycine Residues in Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Mowrey, David D; Mendez Giraldez, Raul; Wang, Ying; Pasek, Daniel A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-07-10

    Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) release Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate skeletal muscle contraction. The role of RyR1-G4934 and -G4941 in the pore-lining helix in channel gating and ion permeation was probed by replacing them with amino acid residues of increasing side chain volume. RyR1-G4934A, -G4941A, and -G4941V mutant channels exhibited a caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release response in HEK293 cells and bound the RyR-specific ligand [(3)H]ryanodine. In single channel recordings, significant differences in the number of channel events and mean open and close times were observed between WT and RyR1-G4934A and -G4941A. RyR1-G4934A had reduced K(+) conductance and ion selectivity compared with WT. Mutations further increasing the side chain volume at these positions (G4934V and G4941I) resulted in reduced caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells, low [(3)H]ryanodine binding levels, and channels that were not regulated by Ca(2+) and did not conduct Ca(2+) in single channel measurements. Computational predictions of the thermodynamic impact of mutations on protein stability indicated that although the G4934A mutation was tolerated, the G4934V mutation decreased protein stability by introducing clashes with neighboring amino acid residues. In similar fashion, the G4941A mutation did not introduce clashes, whereas the G4941I mutation resulted in intersubunit clashes among the mutated isoleucines. Co-expression of RyR1-WT with RyR1-G4934V or -G4941I partially restored the WT phenotype, which suggested lessening of amino acid clashes in heterotetrameric channel complexes. The results indicate that both glycines are important for RyR1 channel function by providing flexibility and minimizing amino acid clashes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. External pH modulates EAG superfamily K+ channels through EAG-specific acidic residues in the voltage sensor

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    Kazmierczak, Marcin; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Bihan; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Shi, Yingtang; Wagner, Paul G.; Pivaroff-Ward, Kendra; Sassic, Jessica K.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Ether-a-go-go (EAG) superfamily of voltage-gated K+ channels consists of three functionally distinct gene families (Eag, Elk, and Erg) encoding a diverse set of low-threshold K+ currents that regulate excitability in neurons and muscle. Previous studies indicate that external acidification inhibits activation of three EAG superfamily K+ channels, Kv10.1 (Eag1), Kv11.1 (Erg1), and Kv12.1 (Elk1). We show here that Kv10.2, Kv12.2, and Kv12.3 are similarly inhibited by external protons, suggesting that high sensitivity to physiological pH changes is a general property of EAG superfamily channels. External acidification depolarizes the conductance–voltage (GV) curves of these channels, reducing low threshold activation. We explored the mechanism of this high pH sensitivity in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. We first examined the role of acidic voltage sensor residues that mediate divalent cation block of voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels because protons reduce the sensitivity of Kv12.1 to Zn2+. Low pH similarly reduces Mg2+ sensitivity of Kv10.1, and we found that the pH sensitivity of Kv11.1 was greatly attenuated at 1 mM Ca2+. Individual neutralizations of a pair of EAG-specific acidic residues that have previously been implicated in divalent block of diverse EAG superfamily channels greatly reduced the pH response in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. Our results therefore suggest a common mechanism for pH-sensitive voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels. The EAG-specific acidic residues may form the proton-binding site or alternatively are required to hold the voltage sensor in a pH-sensitive conformation. The high pH sensitivity of EAG superfamily channels suggests that they could contribute to pH-sensitive K+ currents observed in vivo. PMID:23712551

  11. External pH modulates EAG superfamily K+ channels through EAG-specific acidic residues in the voltage sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Marcin; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Bihan; Mulkey, Daniel K; Shi, Yingtang; Wagner, Paul G; Pivaroff-Ward, Kendra; Sassic, Jessica K; Bayliss, Douglas A; Jegla, Timothy

    2013-06-01

    The Ether-a-go-go (EAG) superfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels consists of three functionally distinct gene families (Eag, Elk, and Erg) encoding a diverse set of low-threshold K(+) currents that regulate excitability in neurons and muscle. Previous studies indicate that external acidification inhibits activation of three EAG superfamily K(+) channels, Kv10.1 (Eag1), Kv11.1 (Erg1), and Kv12.1 (Elk1). We show here that Kv10.2, Kv12.2, and Kv12.3 are similarly inhibited by external protons, suggesting that high sensitivity to physiological pH changes is a general property of EAG superfamily channels. External acidification depolarizes the conductance-voltage (GV) curves of these channels, reducing low threshold activation. We explored the mechanism of this high pH sensitivity in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. We first examined the role of acidic voltage sensor residues that mediate divalent cation block of voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels because protons reduce the sensitivity of Kv12.1 to Zn(2+). Low pH similarly reduces Mg(2+) sensitivity of Kv10.1, and we found that the pH sensitivity of Kv11.1 was greatly attenuated at 1 mM Ca(2+). Individual neutralizations of a pair of EAG-specific acidic residues that have previously been implicated in divalent block of diverse EAG superfamily channels greatly reduced the pH response in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. Our results therefore suggest a common mechanism for pH-sensitive voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels. The EAG-specific acidic residues may form the proton-binding site or alternatively are required to hold the voltage sensor in a pH-sensitive conformation. The high pH sensitivity of EAG superfamily channels suggests that they could contribute to pH-sensitive K(+) currents observed in vivo.

  12. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  13. Interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane segments of the voltage-sensing domain in the hERG channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Liu, J; Jiang, M; Wu, D-M; Sonawane, K; Guy, H R; Tseng, G-N

    2005-10-01

    Studies on voltage-gated K channels such as Shaker have shown that positive charges in the voltage-sensor (S4) can form salt bridges with negative charges in the surrounding transmembrane segments in a state-dependent manner, and different charge pairings can stabilize the channels in closed or open states. The goal of this study is to identify such charge interactions in the hERG channel. This knowledge can provide constraints on the spatial relationship among transmembrane segments in the channel's voltage-sensing domain, which are necessary for modeling its structure. We first study the effects of reversing S4's positive charges on channel activation. Reversing positive charges at the outer (K525D) and inner (K538D) ends of S4 markedly accelerates hERG activation, whereas reversing the 4 positive charges in between either has no effect or slows activation. We then use the 'mutant cycle analysis' to test whether D456 (outer end of S2) and D411 (inner end of S1) can pair with K525 and K538, respectively. Other positive charges predicted to be able, or unable, to interact with D456 or D411 are also included in the analysis. The results are consistent with predictions based on the distribution of these charged residues, and confirm that there is functional coupling between D456 and K525 and between D411 and K538.

  14. Specific residues of the cytoplasmic domains of cardiac inward rectifier potassium channels are effective antifibrillatory targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noujaim, Sami F.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Ferrer-Villada, Tania; López-Izquierdo, Angelica; Pandit, Sandeep; Calvo, Conrado J.; Grzeda, Krzysztof R.; Berenfeld, Omer; Sánchez Chapula, José A.; Jalife, José

    2010-01-01

    Atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmias can be perpetuated by up-regulation of inward rectifier potassium channels. Thus, it may be beneficial to block inward rectifier channels under conditions in which their function becomes arrhythmogenic (e.g., inherited gain-of-function mutation channelopathies, ischemia, and chronic and vagally mediated atrial fibrillation). We hypothesize that the antimalarial quinoline chloroquine exerts potent antiarrhythmic effects by interacting with the cytoplasmic domains of Kir2.1 (IK1), Kir3.1 (IKACh), or Kir6.2 (IKATP) and reducing inward rectifier potassium currents. In isolated hearts of three different mammalian species, intracoronary chloroquine perfusion reduced fibrillatory frequency (atrial or ventricular), and effectively terminated the arrhythmia with resumption of sinus rhythm. In patch-clamp experiments chloroquine blocked IK1, IKACh, and IKATP. Comparative molecular modeling and ligand docking of chloroquine in the intracellular domains of Kir2.1, Kir3.1, and Kir6.2 suggested that chloroquine blocks or reduces potassium flow by interacting with negatively charged amino acids facing the ion permeation vestibule of the channel in question. These results open a novel path toward discovering antiarrhythmic pharmacophores that target specific residues of the cytoplasmic domain of inward rectifier potassium channels.—Noujaim, S. F., Stuckey, J. A., Ponce-Balbuena, D., Ferrer-Villada, T., López-Izquierdo, A., Pandit, S., Calvo, C. J., Grzeda, K. R., Berenfeld, O., Sánchez Chapula, J. A., Jalife, J. Specific residues of the cytoplasmic domains of cardiac inward rectifier potassium channels are effective antifibrillatory targets. PMID:20585026

  15. Structural determinants of PIP(2) regulation of inward rectifier K(ATP) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyng, S L; Cukras, C A; Harwood, J; Nichols, C G

    2000-11-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) activates K(ATP) and other inward rectifier (Kir) channels. To determine residues important for PIP(2) regulation, we have systematically mutated each positive charge in the COOH terminus of Kir6.2 to alanine. The effects of these mutations on channel function were examined using (86)Rb efflux assays on intact cells and inside-out patch-clamp methods. Both methods identify essentially the same basic residues in two narrow regions (176-222 and 301-314) in the COOH terminus that are important for the maintenance of channel function and interaction with PIP(2). Only one residue (R201A) simultaneously affected ATP and PIP(2) sensitivity, which is consistent with the notion that these ligands, while functionally competitive, are unlikely to bind to identical sites. Strikingly, none of 13 basic residues in the terminal portion (residues 315-390) of the COOH terminus affected channel function when neutralized. The data help to define the structural requirements for PIP(2) sensitivity of K(ATP) channels. Moreover, the regions and residues defined in this study parallel those uncovered in recent studies of PIP(2) sensitivity in other inward rectifier channels, indicating a common structural basis for PIP(2) regulation.

  16. Chimeras Reveal a Single Lipid-Interface Residue that Controls MscL Channel Kinetics as well as Mechanosensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available MscL, the highly conserved bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, serves as an osmotic “emergency release valve,” is among the best-studied mechanosensors, and is a paradigm of how a channel senses and responds to membrane tension. Although all homologs tested thus far encode channel activity, many show functional differences. We tested Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus chimeras and found that the periplasmic region of the protein, particularly E. coli I49 and the equivalent S. aureus F47 at the periplasmic lipid-aqueous interface of the first transmembrane domain, drastically influences both the open dwell time and the threshold of channel opening. One mutant shows a severe hysteresis, confirming the importance of this residue in determining the energy barriers for channel gating. We propose that this site acts similarly to a spring for a clasp knife, adjusting the resistance for obtaining and stabilizing an open or closed channel structure.

  17. A novel hypothesis for the binding mode of HERG channel blockers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Han; Nah, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Soo Nam; Lee, Han Sam; Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Su Hyun; Leem, Chae Hun; Jang, Yeon Jin

    2006-01-01

    We present a new docking model for HERG channel blockade. Our new model suggests three key interactions such that (1) a protonated nitrogen of the channel blocker forms a hydrogen bond with the carbonyl oxygen of HERG residue T623; (2) an aromatic moiety of the channel blocker makes a π-π interaction with the aromatic ring of HERG residue Y652; and (3) a hydrophobic group of the channel blocker forms a hydrophobic interaction with the benzene ring of HERG residue F656. The previous model assumes two interactions such that (1) a protonated nitrogen of the channel blocker forms a cation-π interaction with the aromatic ring of HERG residue Y652; and (2) a hydrophobic group of the channel blocker forms a hydrophobic interaction with the benzene ring of HERG residue F656. To test these models, we classified 69 known HERG channel blockers into eight binding types based on their plausible binding modes, and further categorized them into two groups based on the number of interactions our model would predict with the HERG channel (two or three). We then compared the pIC 5 value distributions between these two groups. If the old hypothesis is correct, the distributions should not differ between the two groups (i.e., both groups show only two binding interactions). If our novel hypothesis is correct, the distributions should differ between Groups 1 and 2. Consistent with our hypothesis, the two groups differed with regard to pIC 5 , and the group having more predicted interactions with the HERG channel had a higher mean pIC 5 value. Although additional work will be required to further validate our hypothesis, this improved understanding of the HERG channel blocker binding mode may help promote the development of in silico predictions methods for identifying potential HERG channel blockers

  18. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  19. Identifying cochlear implant channels with poor electrode-neuron interface: partial tripolar, single-channel thresholds and psychophysical tuning curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, Julie Arenberg; Faulkner, Kathleen F

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of a threshold measure, made with a restricted electrode configuration, to identify channels exhibiting relatively poor spatial selectivity. With a restricted electrode configuration, channel-to-channel variability in threshold may reflect variations in the interface between the electrodes and auditory neurons (i.e., nerve survival, electrode placement, and tissue impedance). These variations in the electrode-neuron interface should also be reflected in psychophysical tuning curve (PTC) measurements. Specifically, it is hypothesized that high single-channel thresholds obtained with the spatially focused partial tripolar (pTP) electrode configuration are predictive of wide or tip-shifted PTCs. Data were collected from five cochlear implant listeners implanted with the HiRes90k cochlear implant (Advanced Bionics Corp., Sylmar, CA). Single-channel thresholds and most comfortable listening levels were obtained for stimuli that varied in presumed electrical field size by using the pTP configuration for which a fraction of current (sigma) from a center-active electrode returns through two neighboring electrodes and the remainder through a distant indifferent electrode. Forward-masked PTCs were obtained for channels with the highest, lowest, and median tripolar (sigma = 1 or 0.9) thresholds. The probe channel and level were fixed and presented with either the monopolar (sigma = 0) or a more focused pTP (sigma > or = 0.55) configuration. The masker channel and level were varied, whereas the configuration was fixed to sigma = 0.5. A standard, three-interval, two-alternative forced choice procedure was used for thresholds and masked levels. Single-channel threshold and variability in threshold across channels systematically increased as the compensating current, sigma, increased and the presumed electrical field became more focused. Across subjects, channels with the highest single-channel thresholds, when measured with a

  20. AQP4 plasma membrane trafficking or channel gating is not significantly modulated by phosphorylation at C-terminal serine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assentoft, Mette; Larsen, Brian R; Olesen, Emma T B

    2014-01-01

    heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes (along with serine-to-aspartate mutants of the same residues to mimic a phosphorylation). None of the mutant AQP4 constructs displayed alterations in the unit water permeability. Thus phosphorylation of six different serine residues in the COOH terminus of AQP4....... Phosphorylation of aquaporins can regulate plasma membrane localization and, possibly, the unit water permeability via gating of the AQP channel itself. In vivo phosphorylation of six serine residues in the COOH terminus of AQP4 has been detected by mass spectrometry: Ser(276), Ser(285), Ser(315), Ser(316), Ser...

  1. Three C-terminal residues from the sulphonylurea receptor contribute to the functional coupling between the KATP channel subunits SUR2A and Kir6.2

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    Dupuis, Julien P; Revilloud, Jean; Moreau, Christophe J; Vivaudou, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are metabolic sensors formed by the association of the inward rectifier potassium channel Kir6.2 and the sulphonylurea receptor SUR2A. SUR2A adjusts channel gating as a function of intracellular ATP and ADP and is the target of pharmaceutical openers and blockers which, respectively, up- and down-regulate Kir6.2. In an effort to understand how effector binding to SUR2A translates into Kir6.2 gating modulation, we examined the role of a 65-residue SUR2A fragment linking transmembrane domain TMD2 and nucleotide-binding domain NBD2 that has been shown to interact with Kir6.2. This fragment of SUR2A was replaced by the equivalent residues of its close homologue, the multidrug resistance protein MRP1. The chimeric construct was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized using the patch-clamp technique. We found that activation by MgADP and synthetic openers was greatly attenuated although apparent affinities were unchanged. Further chimeragenetic and mutagenetic studies showed that mutation of three residues, E1305, I1310 and L1313 (rat numbering), was sufficient to confer this defective phenotype. The same mutations had no effects on channel block by the sulphonylurea glibenclamide or by ATP, suggesting a role for these residues in activatory – but not inhibitory – transduction processes. These results indicate that, within the KATP channel complex, the proximal C-terminal of SUR2A is a critical link between ligand binding to SUR2A and Kir6.2 up-regulation. PMID:18450778

  2. A comprehensive search for calcium binding sites critical for TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Wong, Xiu Ming; Cheng, Tong; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Yang, Huanghe

    2014-01-01

    TMEM16A forms calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) that regulate physiological processes such as the secretions of airway epithelia and exocrine glands, the contraction of smooth muscles, and the excitability of neurons. Notwithstanding intense interest in the mechanism behind TMEM16A-CaCC calcium-dependent gating, comprehensive surveys to identify and characterize potential calcium sensors of this channel are still lacking. By aligning distantly related calcium-activated ion channels in the TMEM16 family and conducting systematic mutagenesis of all conserved acidic residues thought to be exposed to the cytoplasm, we identify four acidic amino acids as putative calcium-binding residues. Alterations of the charge, polarity, and size of amino acid side chains at these sites alter the ability of different divalent cations to activate the channel. Furthermore, TMEM16A mutant channels containing double cysteine substitutions at these residues are sensitive to the redox potential of the internal solution, providing evidence for their physical proximity and solvent accessibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02772.001 PMID:24980701

  3. A novel 13 residue acyclic peptide from the marine snail, Conus monile, targets potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarslal, Sadasivannair; Singaravadivelan, Govindaswamy; Ramasamy, Palanisamy; Ananda, Kuppanna; Sarma, Siddhartha P; Sikdar, Sujit K; Krishnan, K S; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2004-05-07

    A novel 13-residue peptide Mo1659 has been isolated from the venom of a vermivorous cone snail, Conus monile. HPLC fractions of the venom extract yielded an intense UV absorbing fraction with a mass of 1659Da. De novo sequencing using both matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization and electrospray MS/MS methods together with analysis of proteolytic fragments successfully yielded the amino acid sequence, FHGGSWYRFPWGY-NH(2). This was further confirmed by comparison with the chemically synthesized peptide and by conventional Edman sequencing. Mo1659 has an unusual sequence with a preponderance of aromatic residues and the absence of apolar, aliphatic residues like Ala, Val, Leu, and Ile. Mo1659 has no disulfide bridges distinguishing it from the conotoxins and bears no sequence similarity with any of the acyclic peptides isolated thus far from the venom of cone snails. Electrophysiological studies on the effect of Mo1659 on measured currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons suggest that the peptide targets non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium channels.

  4. Post-Translational Modifications of TRP Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Voolstra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP channels constitute an ancient family of cation channels that have been found in many eukaryotic organisms from yeast to human. TRP channels exert a multitude of physiological functions ranging from Ca2+ homeostasis in the kidney to pain reception and vision. These channels are activated by a wide range of stimuli and undergo covalent post-translational modifications that affect and modulate their subcellular targeting, their biophysical properties, or channel gating. These modifications include N-linked glycosylation, protein phosphorylation, and covalent attachment of chemicals that reversibly bind to specific cysteine residues. The latter modification represents an unusual activation mechanism of ligand-gated ion channels that is in contrast to the lock-and-key paradigm of receptor activation by its agonists. In this review, we summarize the post-translational modifications identified on TRP channels and, when available, explain their physiological role.

  5. Improper Gaussian signaling in full-duplex relay channels with residual self-interference

    KAUST Repository

    Gaafar, Mohamed

    2016-07-26

    We study the potential employment of improper Gaussian signaling (IGS) in full-duplex cooperative settings with residual self-interference (RSI). IGS is recently shown to outperform traditional proper Gaussian signaling (PGS) in several interference-limited channel settings. In this work, IGS is employed in an attempt to alleviate the RSI adverse effect in full-duplex relaying (FDR). To this end, we derive a tight upper bound expression for the end-to-end outage probability in terms of the relay signal parameters represented in its power and circularity coefficient. We further show that the derived upper bound is either monotonic or unimodal in the relay\\'s circularity coefficient. This result allows for easily locating the global optimal point using known numerical methods. Based on the analysis, IGS allows FDR systems to operate even with high RSI. It is shown that, while the communication totally fails with PGS as the RSI increases, the IGS outage probability approaches a fixed value that depends on the channel statistics and target rate. The obtained results show that IGS can leverage higher relay power budgets than PGS to improve the performance, meanwhile it relieves its RSI impact via tuning the signal impropriety. © 2016 IEEE.

  6. Improper Gaussian signaling in full-duplex relay channels with residual self-interference

    KAUST Repository

    Gaafar, Mohamed; Khafagy, Mohammad Galal; Amin, Osama; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    We study the potential employment of improper Gaussian signaling (IGS) in full-duplex cooperative settings with residual self-interference (RSI). IGS is recently shown to outperform traditional proper Gaussian signaling (PGS) in several interference-limited channel settings. In this work, IGS is employed in an attempt to alleviate the RSI adverse effect in full-duplex relaying (FDR). To this end, we derive a tight upper bound expression for the end-to-end outage probability in terms of the relay signal parameters represented in its power and circularity coefficient. We further show that the derived upper bound is either monotonic or unimodal in the relay's circularity coefficient. This result allows for easily locating the global optimal point using known numerical methods. Based on the analysis, IGS allows FDR systems to operate even with high RSI. It is shown that, while the communication totally fails with PGS as the RSI increases, the IGS outage probability approaches a fixed value that depends on the channel statistics and target rate. The obtained results show that IGS can leverage higher relay power budgets than PGS to improve the performance, meanwhile it relieves its RSI impact via tuning the signal impropriety. © 2016 IEEE.

  7. Identification of an evolutionarily conserved extracellular threonine residue critical for surface expression and its potential coupling of adjacent voltage-sensing and gating domains in voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeown, Lynn; Burnham, Matthew P; Hodson, Charlotte; Jones, Owen T

    2008-10-31

    The dynamic expression of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kvs) at the cell surface is a fundamental factor controlling membrane excitability. In exploring possible mechanisms controlling Kv surface expression, we identified a region in the extracellular linker between the first and second of the six (S1-S6) transmembrane-spanning domains of the Kv1.4 channel, which we hypothesized to be critical for its biogenesis. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, patch clamp electrophysiology, and mutagenesis, we identified a single threonine residue at position 330 within the Kv1.4 S1-S2 linker that is absolutely required for cell surface expression. Mutation of Thr-330 to an alanine, aspartate, or lysine prevented surface expression. However, surface expression occurred upon co-expression of mutant and wild type Kv1.4 subunits or mutation of Thr-330 to a serine. Mutation of the corresponding residue (Thr-211) in Kv3.1 to alanine also caused intracellular retention, suggesting that the conserved threonine plays a generalized role in surface expression. In support of this idea, sequence comparisons showed conservation of the critical threonine in all Kv families and in organisms across the evolutionary spectrum. Based upon the Kv1.2 crystal structure, further mutagenesis, and the partial restoration of surface expression in an electrostatic T330K bridging mutant, we suggest that Thr-330 hydrogen bonds to equally conserved outer pore residues, which may include a glutamate at position 502 that is also critical for surface expression. We propose that Thr-330 serves to interlock the voltage-sensing and gating domains of adjacent monomers, thereby yielding a structure competent for the surface expression of functional tetramers.

  8. A protein interaction mechanism for suppressing the mechanosensitive Piezo channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingxin; Chi, Shaopeng; Jiang, Fan; Zhao, Qiancheng; Xiao, Bailong

    2017-11-27

    Piezo proteins are bona fide mammalian mechanotransduction channels for various cell types including endothelial cells. The mouse Piezo1 of 2547 residues forms a three-bladed, propeller-like homo-trimer comprising a central pore-module and three propeller-structures that might serve as mechanotransduction-modules. However, the mechanogating and regulation of Piezo channels remain unclear. Here we identify the sarcoplasmic /endoplasmic-reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase (SERCA), including the widely expressed SERCA2, as Piezo interacting proteins. SERCA2 strategically suppresses Piezo1 via acting on a 14-residue-constituted intracellular linker connecting the pore-module and mechanotransduction-module. Mutating the linker impairs mechanogating and SERCA2-mediated modulation of Piezo1. Furthermore, the synthetic linker-peptide disrupts the modulatory effects of SERCA2, demonstrating the key role of the linker in mechanogating and regulation. Importantly, the SERCA2-mediated regulation affects Piezo1-dependent migration of endothelial cells. Collectively, we identify SERCA-mediated regulation of Piezos and the functional significance of the linker, providing important insights into the mechanogating and regulation mechanisms of Piezo channels.

  9. Energy dependence of fusion evaporation-residue cross sections in the 28Si+12C reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Mateja, J.F.; Beck, C.; Atencio, S.E.; Dennis, L.C.; Frawley, A.D.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Kemper, K.W.; Kovar, D.G.; Maguire, C.F.; Padalino, S.J.; Prosser, F.W.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Tiede, M.A.; Wilkins, B.D.; Zingarelli, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Fusion evaporation-residue cross sections for the 28 Si+ 12 C reaction have been measured in the energy range 18≤E c.m. ≤136 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. Velocity distributions of mass-identified reaction products were used to identify evaporation residues and to determine the complete-fusion cross sections at high energies. The data are in agreement with previously established systematics which indicate an entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of the incomplete-fusion evaporation-residue process. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with earlier measurements and the predictions of existing models

  10. Liquid-chromatographic determination of sarafloxacin residues in channel catfish muscle-tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, J.R.; Dawson, V.K.; Gingerich, W.H.; Cheng, B.; Tubergen, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of sarafloxacin hydrochloride residues i n channel catfish (ictalurus punctatus) fillets. Sarafloxacin was extracted from fillet tissue with acetonitrile=water (1 + 1). The extract was centrifuged and the supernatant was partitioned with hexane. The aqueous fraction was filtered through a 0.45 Mum filter and evaporated to dryness. The sample was redissolved with 20% acetonitrile-methanol (3 + 2) and 80% trifluoroacetic acid (0.1%), Centrifuged, and filtered to remove proteins. Samples were analyzed by chromatography with gradient elution on a c18 column and with fluorescence detection (excitation at 280 nm and emission above 389 nm). Mean recoveries ranged from 85.4 To 104%, and relative standard deviations ranged from 1.06 To 5.58% In samples spiked at concentrations of 10.0-863.8 Ng/g. The method detection limit for sarafloxacin was 1.4 Ng/g.

  11. A protein interaction mechanism for suppressing the mechanosensitive Piezo channels

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tingxin; Chi, Shaopeng; Jiang, Fan; Zhao, Qiancheng; Xiao, Bailong

    2017-01-01

    Piezo proteins are bona fide mammalian mechanotransduction channels for various cell types including endothelial cells. The mouse Piezo1 of 2547 residues forms a three-bladed, propeller-like homo-trimer comprising a central pore-module and three propeller-structures that might serve as mechanotransduction-modules. However, the mechanogating and regulation of Piezo channels remain unclear. Here we identify the sarcoplasmic /endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA), including the widely expres...

  12. Molecular interactions involved in proton-dependent gating in KcsA potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posson, David J.; Thompson, Ameer N.; McCoy, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial potassium channel KcsA is gated open by the binding of protons to amino acids on the intracellular side of the channel. We have identified, via channel mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography, two pH-sensing amino acids and a set of nearby residues involved in molecular interactions that influence gating. We found that the minimal mutation of one histidine (H25) and one glutamate (E118) near the cytoplasmic gate completely abolished pH-dependent gating. Mutation of nearby residues either alone or in pairs altered the channel’s response to pH. In addition, mutations of certain pairs of residues dramatically increased the energy barriers between the closed and open states. We proposed a Monod–Wyman–Changeux model for proton binding and pH-dependent gating in KcsA, where H25 is a “strong” sensor displaying a large shift in pKa between closed and open states, and E118 is a “weak” pH sensor. Modifying model parameters that are involved in either the intrinsic gating equilibrium or the pKa values of the pH-sensing residues was sufficient to capture the effects of all mutations. PMID:24218397

  13. The N-terminal tail of hERG contains an amphipathic α-helix that regulates channel deactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of the human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG K+ channel is critical for the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel. However, the mechanism(s by which the N-terminal domain regulates deactivation remains to be determined. Here we show that the solution NMR structure of the N-terminal 135 residues of hERG contains a previously described Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain (residues 26-135 as well as an amphipathic α-helix (residues 13-23 and an initial unstructured segment (residues 2-9. Deletion of residues 2-25, only the unstructured segment (residues 2-9 or replacement of the α-helix with a flexible linker all result in enhanced rates of deactivation. Thus, both the initial flexible segment and the α-helix are required but neither is sufficient to confer slow deactivation kinetics. Alanine scanning mutagenesis identified R5 and G6 in the initial flexible segment as critical for slow deactivation. Alanine mutants in the helical region had less dramatic phenotypes. We propose that the PAS domain is bound close to the central core of the channel and that the N-terminal α-helix ensures that the flexible tail is correctly orientated for interaction with the activation gating machinery to stabilize the open state of the channel.

  14. Iterative List Decoding of Concatenated Source-Channel Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayat Ahmadreza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Whenever variable-length entropy codes are used in the presence of a noisy channel, any channel errors will propagate and cause significant harm. Despite using channel codes, some residual errors always remain, whose effect will get magnified by error propagation. Mitigating this undesirable effect is of great practical interest. One approach is to use the residual redundancy of variable length codes for joint source-channel decoding. In this paper, we improve the performance of residual redundancy source-channel decoding via an iterative list decoder made possible by a nonbinary outer CRC code. We show that the list decoding of VLC's is beneficial for entropy codes that contain redundancy. Such codes are used in state-of-the-art video coders, for example. The proposed list decoder improves the overall performance significantly in AWGN and fully interleaved Rayleigh fading channels.

  15. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    The scorpion toxin BeKm-1 is unique among a variety of known short scorpion toxins affecting potassium channels in its selective action on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG)-type channels. BeKm-1 shares the common molecular scaffold with other short scorpion toxins. The toxin spatial structure...... resolved by NMR consists of a short alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. By toxin mutagenesis study we identified the residues that are important for the binding of BeKm-1 to the human ERG K+ (HERG) channel. The most critical residues (Tyr-11, Lys-18, Arg-20, Lys-23) are located...

  16. Electrostatics of aquaporin and aquaglyceroporin channels correlates with their transport selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Romina; Calamita, Giuseppe; Thornton, Janet M.; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa

    2010-01-01

    Aquaporins are homotetrameric channel proteins, which allow the diffusion of water and small solutes across biological membranes. According to their transport function, aquaporins can be divided into “orthodox aquaporins”, which allow the flux of water molecules only, and “aquaglyceroporins”, which facilitate the diffusion of glycerol and other small solutes in addition to water. The contribution of individual residues in the pore to the selectivity of orthodox aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins is not yet fully understood. To gain insights into aquaporin selectivity, we focused on the sequence variation and electrostatics of their channels. The continuum Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic potential along the channel was calculated and compared for ten three-dimensional-structures which are representatives of different aquaporin subfamilies, and a panel of functionally characterized mutants, for which high-accuracy three-dimensional-models could be derived. Interestingly, specific electrostatic profiles associated with the main selectivity to water or glycerol could be identified. In particular: (i) orthodox aquaporins showed a distinctive electrostatic potential maximum at the periplasmic side of the channel around the aromatic/Arg (ar/R) constriction site; (ii) aquaporin-0 (AQP0), a mammalian aquaporin with considerably low water permeability, had an additional deep minimum at the cytoplasmic side; (iii) aquaglyceroporins showed a rather flat potential all along the channel; and (iv) the bifunctional protozoan PfAQP had an unusual all negative profile. Evaluation of electrostatics of the mutants, along with a thorough sequence analysis of the aquaporin pore-lining residues, illuminated the contribution of specific residues to the electrostatics of the channels and possibly to their selectivity. PMID:20147624

  17. Development of a field testing protocol for identifying Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues trapped near Gulf of Mexico beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuling

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident, one of the largest oil spills in U.S. history, contaminated several beaches located along the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shoreline. The residues from the spill still continue to be deposited on some of these beaches. Methods to track and monitor the fate of these residues require approaches that can differentiate the DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. This is because, historically, the crude oil released from sources such as natural seeps and anthropogenic discharges have also deposited other types of petroleum residues on GOM beaches. Therefore, identifying the origin of these residues is critical for developing effective management strategies for monitoring the long-term environmental impacts of the DWH oil spill. Advanced fingerprinting methods that are currently used for identifying the source of oil spill residues require detailed laboratory studies, which can be cost-prohibitive. Also, most agencies typically use untrained workers or volunteers to conduct shoreline monitoring surveys and these worker will not have access to advanced laboratory facilities. Furthermore, it is impractical to routinely fingerprint large volumes of samples that are collected after a major oil spill event, such as the DWH spill. In this study, we propose a simple field testing protocol that can identify DWH oil spill residues based on their unique physical characteristics. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by testing a variety of oil spill samples, and the results are verified by characterizing the samples using advanced chemical fingerprinting methods. The verification data show that the method yields results that are consistent with the results derived from advanced fingerprinting methods. The proposed protocol is a reliable, cost-effective, practical field approach for differentiating DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. PMID:29329313

  18. Development of a field testing protocol for identifying Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues trapped near Gulf of Mexico beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuling; Clement, T Prabhakar

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident, one of the largest oil spills in U.S. history, contaminated several beaches located along the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shoreline. The residues from the spill still continue to be deposited on some of these beaches. Methods to track and monitor the fate of these residues require approaches that can differentiate the DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. This is because, historically, the crude oil released from sources such as natural seeps and anthropogenic discharges have also deposited other types of petroleum residues on GOM beaches. Therefore, identifying the origin of these residues is critical for developing effective management strategies for monitoring the long-term environmental impacts of the DWH oil spill. Advanced fingerprinting methods that are currently used for identifying the source of oil spill residues require detailed laboratory studies, which can be cost-prohibitive. Also, most agencies typically use untrained workers or volunteers to conduct shoreline monitoring surveys and these worker will not have access to advanced laboratory facilities. Furthermore, it is impractical to routinely fingerprint large volumes of samples that are collected after a major oil spill event, such as the DWH spill. In this study, we propose a simple field testing protocol that can identify DWH oil spill residues based on their unique physical characteristics. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by testing a variety of oil spill samples, and the results are verified by characterizing the samples using advanced chemical fingerprinting methods. The verification data show that the method yields results that are consistent with the results derived from advanced fingerprinting methods. The proposed protocol is a reliable, cost-effective, practical field approach for differentiating DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues.

  19. Space-Time Coded MC-CDMA: Blind Channel Estimation, Identifiability, and Receiver Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hongbin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrating the strengths of multicarrier (MC modulation and code division multiple access (CDMA, MC-CDMA systems are of great interest for future broadband transmissions. This paper considers the problem of channel identification and signal combining/detection schemes for MC-CDMA systems equipped with multiple transmit antennas and space-time (ST coding. In particular, a subspace based blind channel identification algorithm is presented. Identifiability conditions are examined and specified which guarantee unique and perfect (up to a scalar channel estimation when knowledge of the noise subspace is available. Several popular single-user based signal combining schemes, namely the maximum ratio combining (MRC and the equal gain combining (EGC, which are often utilized in conventional single-transmit-antenna based MC-CDMA systems, are extended to the current ST-coded MC-CDMA (STC-MC-CDMA system to perform joint combining and decoding. In addition, a linear multiuser minimum mean-squared error (MMSE detection scheme is also presented, which is shown to outperform the MRC and EGC at some increased computational complexity. Numerical examples are presented to evaluate and compare the proposed channel identification and signal detection/combining techniques.

  20. Activation gating kinetics of GIRK channels are mediated by cytoplasmic residues adjacent to transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadja, Rona; Reuveny, Eitan

    2009-01-01

    G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK/Kir3.x) are involved in neurotransmission-mediated reduction of excitability. The gating mechanism following G protein activation of these channels likely proceeds from movement of inner transmembrane helices to allow K(+) ions movement through the pore of the channel. There is limited understanding of how the binding of G-protein betagamma subunits to cytoplasmic regions of the channel transduces the signal to the transmembrane regions. In this study, we examined the molecular basis that governs the activation kinetics of these channels, using a chimeric approach. We identified two regions as being important in determining the kinetics of activation. One region is the bottom of the outer transmembrane helix (TM1) and the cytoplasmic domain immediately adjacent (the slide helix); and the second region is the bottom of the inner transmembrane helix (TM2) and the cytoplasmic domain immediately adjacent. Interestingly, both of these regions are sufficient in mediating the kinetics of fast activation gating. This result suggests that there is a cooperative movement of either one of these domains to allow fast and efficient activation gating of GIRK channels.

  1. In silico analysis of conformational changes induced by mutation of aromatic binding residues: consequences for drug binding in the hERG K+ channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Knape

    Full Text Available Pharmacological inhibition of cardiac hERG K(+ channels is associated with increased risk of lethal arrhythmias. Many drugs reduce hERG current by directly binding to the channel, thereby blocking ion conduction. Mutation of two aromatic residues (F656 and Y652 substantially decreases the potency of numerous structurally diverse compounds. Nevertheless, some drugs are only weakly affected by mutation Y652A. In this study we utilize molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies to analyze the different effects of mutation Y652A on a selected number of hERG blockers. MD simulations reveal conformational changes in the binding site induced by mutation Y652A. Loss of π-π-stacking between the two aromatic residues induces a conformational change of the F656 side chain from a cavity facing to cavity lining orientation. Docking studies and MD simulations qualitatively reproduce the diverse experimentally observed modulatory effects of mutation Y652A and provide a new structural interpretation for the sensitivity differences.

  2. Residual Defect Density in Random Disks Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic, Nikola; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A C

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the residual distribution of structural defects in very tall packings of disks deposited randomly in large channels. By performing simulations involving the sedimentation of up to 50 × 10(9) particles we find all deposits to consistently show a non-zero residual density of defects obeying a characteristic power-law as a function of the channel width. This remarkable finding corrects the widespread belief that the density of defects should vanish algebraically with growing height. A non-zero residual density of defects implies a type of long-range spatial order in the packing, as opposed to only local ordering. In addition, we find deposits of particles to involve considerably less randomness than generally presumed.

  3. Identifying inter-residue resonances in crowded 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra of membrane proteins by solid-state MAS NMR difference spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao Yimin; Cross, Timothy A. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fu Riqiang, E-mail: rfu@magnet.fsu.edu [National High Magnet Field Lab (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The feasibility of using difference spectroscopy, i.e. subtraction of two correlation spectra at different mixing times, for substantially enhanced resolution in crowded two-dimensional {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra is presented. With the analyses of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin diffusion in simple spin systems, difference spectroscopy is proposed to partially separate the spin diffusion resonances of relatively short intra-residue distances from the longer inter-residue distances, leading to a better identification of the inter-residue resonances. Here solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra of the full length M2 protein embedded in synthetic lipid bilayers have been used to illustrate the resolution enhancement in the difference spectra. The integral membrane M2 protein of Influenza A virus assembles as a tetrameric bundle to form a proton-conducting channel that is activated by low pH and is essential for the viral lifecycle. Based on known amino acid resonance assignments from amino acid specific labeled samples of truncated M2 sequences or from time-consuming 3D experiments of uniformly labeled samples, some inter-residue resonances of the full length M2 protein can be identified in the difference spectra of uniformly {sup 13}C labeled protein that are consistent with the high resolution structure of the M2 (22-62) protein (Sharma et al., Science 330(6003):509-512, 2010)

  4. Ion Permeation and Mechanotransduction Mechanisms of Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Wu, Kun; Geng, Jie; Chi, Shaopeng; Wang, Yanfeng; Zhi, Peng; Zhang, Mingmin; Xiao, Bailong

    2016-03-16

    Piezo proteins have been proposed as the long-sought-after mechanosensitive cation channels in mammals that play critical roles in various mechanotransduction processes. However, the molecular bases that underlie their ion permeation and mechanotransduction have remained functionally undefined. Here we report our finding of the miniature pore-forming module of Piezo1 that resembles the pore architecture of other trimeric channels and encodes the essential pore properties. We further identified specific residues within the pore module that determine unitary conductance, pore blockage and ion selectivity for divalent and monovalent cations and anions. The non-pore-containing region of Piezo1 confers mechanosensitivity to mechano-insensitive trimeric acid-sensing ion channels, demonstrating that Piezo1 channels possess intrinsic mechanotransduction modules separate from their pore modules. In conclusion, this is the first report on the bona fide pore module and mechanotransduction components of Piezo channels, which define their ion-conducting properties and gating by mechanical stimuli, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of niclosamide residues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fillet tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Theresa M.; Dawson, V.K.; Cho, Yirang; Spanjers, N.J.; Boogaard, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Bayluscide [the ethanolamine salt of niclosamide (NIC)] is a registered piscicide used in combination with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-4-nitrophenol (TFM) to control sea lamprey populations in streams tributary to the Great Lakes. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of NIC residues in muscle fillet tissues of fish exposed to NIC and TFM during sea lamprey control treatments. NIC was extracted from fortified channel catfish and rainbow trout fillet tissue with a series of acetone extractions and cleaned up on C-18 solid-phase extraction cartridges. NIC concentrations were determined by HPLC with detection at 360 and 335 nm for rainbow trout and catfish, respectively. Recovery of NIC from rainbow trout (n = 7) fortified at 0.04 mu g/g was 77 +/- 6.5% and from channel catfish (n = 7) fortified at 0.02 mu g/g was 113 +/- 11%. NIC detection limit was 0.0107 mu g/g for rainbow trout and 0.0063 mu g/g for catfish. Percent recovery of incurred radioactive residues by this method from catfish exposed to [C-14]NIC was 89.3 +/- 4.1%. Percent recoveries of NIC from fortified storage stability tissue samples for rainbow trout (n = 3) analyzed at 5 and 7.5 month periods were 78 +/- 5.1 and 68 +/- 2.4%, respectively. Percent recoveries of NIC from fortified storage stability tissue samples for channel catfish (n = 3) analyzed at 5 and 7.5 month periods were 88 +/- 13 and 76 +/- 21%, respectively.

  6. Scorpion β-toxin interference with NaV channel voltage sensor gives rise to excitatory and depressant modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, Enrico; Borges, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Scorpion β toxins, peptides of ∼70 residues, specifically target voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels to cause use-dependent subthreshold channel openings via a voltage–sensor trapping mechanism. This excitatory action is often overlaid by a not yet understood depressant mode in which NaV channel activity is inhibited. Here, we analyzed these two modes of gating modification by β-toxin Tz1 from Tityus zulianus on heterologously expressed NaV1.4 and NaV1.5 channels using the whole cell patch-clamp method. Tz1 facilitated the opening of NaV1.4 in a use-dependent manner and inhibited channel opening with a reversed use dependence. In contrast, the opening of NaV1.5 was exclusively inhibited without noticeable use dependence. Using chimeras of NaV1.4 and NaV1.5 channels, we demonstrated that gating modification by Tz1 depends on the specific structure of the voltage sensor in domain 2. Although residue G658 in NaV1.4 promotes the use-dependent transitions between Tz1 modification phenotypes, the equivalent residue in NaV1.5, N803, abolishes them. Gating charge neutralizations in the NaV1.4 domain 2 voltage sensor identified arginine residues at positions 663 and 669 as crucial for the outward and inward movement of this sensor, respectively. Our data support a model in which Tz1 can stabilize two conformations of the domain 2 voltage sensor: a preactivated outward position leading to NaV channels that open at subthreshold potentials, and a deactivated inward position preventing channels from opening. The results are best explained by a two-state voltage–sensor trapping model in that bound scorpion β toxin slows the activation as well as the deactivation kinetics of the voltage sensor in domain 2. PMID:22450487

  7. Inter-subunit interactions across the upper voltage sensing-pore domain interface contribute to the concerted pore opening transition of Kv channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzilhav Shem-Ad

    Full Text Available The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels.

  8. Inter-subunit interactions across the upper voltage sensing-pore domain interface contribute to the concerted pore opening transition of Kv channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Irit, Orr; Yifrach, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels.

  9. Fusion evaporation-residue cross sections for 28Si+40Ca at E(28Si)=309, 397, and 452 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Bauer, J.S.; Crum, J.F.; Gosdin, C.H.; Trotter, R.S.; Kovar, D.G.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Wilkins, B.D.; Maguire, C.F.; Mateja, J.F.; Prosser, F.W.; Stephans, G.S.F.

    1992-01-01

    Velocity distributions of mass-identified evaporation residues produced in the 28 Si+ 40 Ca reaction have been measured at bombarding energies of 309, 397, and 452 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. These distributions were used to identify evaporation residues and to separate the complete-fusion and incomplete-fusion components. Angular distributions and upper limits for the total evaporation-residue and complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections were extracted at all three bombarding energies. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with earlier measurements and the predictions of existing models. The ratios of the complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross section to the total evaporation-residue cross section, along with those measured for the 28 Si+ 12 C and 28 Si+ 28 Si systems at the same energies, support the entrance-channel mass-asymmetry dependence of the incomplete-fusion evaporation-residue process reported earlier

  10. Mutational analysis to identify the residues essential for the inhibition of N-acetyl glutamate kinase of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Hongming; Li, Cheng; Han, Shuangyan; Lin, Ying; Zheng, Suiping

    2015-09-01

    N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of L-arginine that is inhibited by its end product L-arginine in Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum). In this study, the potential binding sites of arginine and the residues essential for its inhibition were identified by homology modeling, inhibitor docking, and site-directed mutagenesis. The allosteric inhibition of NAGK was successfully alleviated by a mutation, as determined through analysis of mutant enzymes, which were overexpressed in vivo in C. glutamicum ATCC14067. Analysis of the mutant enzymes and docking analysis demonstrated that residue W23 positions an arginine molecule, and the interaction between arginine and residues L282, L283, and T284 may play an important role in the remote inhibitory process. Based on the results of the docking analysis of the effective mutants, we propose a linkage mechanism for the remote allosteric regulation of NAGK activity, in which residue R209 may play an essential role. In this study, the structure of the arginine-binding site of C. glutamicum NAGK (CgNAGK) was successfully predicted and the roles of the relevant residues were identified, providing new insight into the allosteric regulation of CgNAGK activity and a solid platform for the future construction of an optimized L-arginine producing strain.

  11. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

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    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium (Nav channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions, a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group.

  12. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Liu, Huihui; Xia, Mengdie; Gong, Haipeng

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group.

  13. Transmembrane helical interactions in the CFTR channel pore.

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    Jhuma Das

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR gene affect CFTR protein biogenesis or its function as a chloride channel, resulting in dysregulation of epithelial fluid transport in the lung, pancreas and other organs in cystic fibrosis (CF. Development of pharmaceutical strategies to treat CF requires understanding of the mechanisms underlying channel function. However, incomplete 3D structural information on the unique ABC ion channel, CFTR, hinders elucidation of its functional mechanism and correction of cystic fibrosis causing mutants. Several CFTR homology models have been developed using bacterial ABC transporters as templates but these have low sequence similarity to CFTR and are not ion channels. Here, we refine an earlier model in an outward (OWF and develop an inward (IWF facing model employing an integrated experimental-molecular dynamics simulation (200 ns approach. Our IWF structure agrees well with a recently solved cryo-EM structure of a CFTR IWF state. We utilize cysteine cross-linking to verify positions and orientations of residues within trans-membrane helices (TMHs of the OWF conformation and to reconstruct a physiologically relevant pore structure. Comparison of pore profiles of the two conformations reveal a radius sufficient to permit passage of hydrated Cl- ions in the OWF but not the IWF model. To identify structural determinants that distinguish the two conformations and possible rearrangements of TMHs within them responsible for channel gating, we perform cross-linking by bifunctional reagents of multiple predicted pairs of cysteines in TMH 6 and 12 and 6 and 9. To determine whether the effects of cross-linking on gating observed are the result of switching of the channel from open to close state, we also treat the same residue pairs with monofunctional reagents in separate experiments. Both types of reagents prevent ion currents indicating that pore blockage is primarily responsible.

  14. Long-pore Electrostatics in Inward-rectifier Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Janice L.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels differ from the canonical K+ channel structure in that they possess a long extended pore (∼85 Å) for ion conduction that reaches deeply into the cytoplasm. This unique structural feature is presumably involved in regulating functional properties specific to Kir channels, such as conductance, rectification block, and ligand-dependent gating. To elucidate the underpinnings of these functional roles, we examine the electrostatics of an ion along this extended pore. Homology models are constructed based on the open-state model of KirBac1.1 for four mammalian Kir channels: Kir1.1/ROMK, Kir2.1/IRK, Kir3.1/GIRK, and Kir6.2/KATP. By solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the electrostatic free energy of a K+ ion is determined along each pore, revealing that mammalian Kir channels provide a favorable environment for cations and suggesting the existence of high-density regions in the cytoplasmic domain and cavity. The contribution from the reaction field (the self-energy arising from the dielectric polarization induced by the ion's charge in the complex geometry of the pore) is unfavorable inside the long pore. However, this is well compensated by the electrostatic interaction with the static field arising from the protein charges and shielded by the dielectric surrounding. Decomposition of the static field provides a list of residues that display remarkable correspondence with existing mutagenesis data identifying amino acids that affect conduction and rectification. Many of these residues demonstrate interactions with the ion over long distances, up to 40 Å, suggesting that mutations potentially affect ion or blocker energetics over the entire pore. These results provide a foundation for understanding ion interactions in Kir channels and extend to the study of ion permeation, block, and gating in long, cation-specific pores. PMID:19001143

  15. A cyclic nucleotide-gated channel mutation associated with canine daylight blindness provides insight into a role for the S2 segment tri-Asp motif in channel biogenesis.

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    Naoto Tanaka

    Full Text Available Cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are tetramers formed by CNGA3 and CNGB3 subunits; CNGA3 subunits function as homotetrameric channels but CNGB3 exhibits channel function only when co-expressed with CNGA3. An aspartatic acid (Asp to asparagine (Asn missense mutation at position 262 in the canine CNGB3 (D262N subunit results in loss of cone function (daylight blindness, suggesting an important role for this aspartic acid residue in channel biogenesis and/or function. Asp 262 is located in a conserved region of the second transmembrane segment containing three Asp residues designated the Tri-Asp motif. This motif is conserved in all CNG channels. Here we examine mutations in canine CNGA3 homomeric channels using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. Mutations of these conserved Asp residues result in the absence of nucleotide-activated currents in heterologous expression. A fluorescent tag on CNGA3 shows mislocalization of mutant channels. Co-expressing CNGB3 Tri-Asp mutants with wild type CNGA3 results in some functional channels, however, their electrophysiological characterization matches the properties of homomeric CNGA3 channels. This failure to record heteromeric currents suggests that Asp/Asn mutations affect heteromeric subunit assembly. A homology model of S1-S6 of the CNGA3 channel was generated and relaxed in a membrane using molecular dynamics simulations. The model predicts that the Tri-Asp motif is involved in non-specific salt bridge pairings with positive residues of S3/S4. We propose that the D262N mutation in dogs with CNGB3-day blindness results in the loss of these inter-helical interactions altering the electrostatic equilibrium within in the S1-S4 bundle. Because residues analogous to Tri-Asp in the voltage-gated Shaker potassium channel family were implicated in monomer folding, we hypothesize that destabilizing these electrostatic interactions impairs the monomer folding state in D262N mutant CNG

  16. Combining modelling and mutagenesis studies of synaptic vesicle protein 2A to identify a series of residues involved in racetam binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiye; Anderson, Dina; Lynch, Berkley A; Castaigne, Jean-Gabriel; Foerch, Patrik; Lebon, Florence

    2011-10-01

    LEV (levetiracetam), an antiepileptic drug which possesses a unique profile in animal models of seizure and epilepsy, has as its unique binding site in brain, SV2A (synaptic vesicle protein 2A). Previous studies have used a chimaeric and site-specific mutagenesis approach to identify three residues in the putative tenth transmembrane helix of SV2A that, when mutated, alter binding of LEV and related racetam derivatives to SV2A. In the present paper, we report a combined modelling and mutagenesis study that successfully identifies another 11 residues in SV2A that appear to be involved in ligand binding. Sequence analysis and modelling of SV2A suggested residues equivalent to critical functional residues of other MFS (major facilitator superfamily) transporters. Alanine scanning of these and other SV2A residues resulted in the identification of residues affecting racetam binding, including Ile273 which differentiated between racetam analogues, when mutated to alanine. Integrating mutagenesis results with docking analysis led to the construction of a mutant in which six SV2A residues were replaced with corresponding SV2B residues. This mutant showed racetam ligand-binding affinity intermediate to the affinities observed for SV2A and SV2B.

  17. Molecular mechanism of voltage sensing in voltage-gated proton channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, Santiago; Perez, Marta E.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels play an essential role in phagocytic cells by generating a hyperpolarizing proton current that electrically compensates for the depolarizing current generated by the NADPH oxidase during the respiratory burst, thereby ensuring a sustained production of reactive oxygen species by the NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to neutralize engulfed bacteria. Despite the importance of the voltage-dependent Hv current, it is at present unclear which residues in Hv channels are responsible for the voltage activation. Here we show that individual neutralizations of three charged residues in the fourth transmembrane domain, S4, all reduce the voltage dependence of activation. In addition, we show that the middle S4 charged residue moves from a position accessible from the cytosolic solution to a position accessible from the extracellular solution, suggesting that this residue moves across most of the membrane electric field during voltage activation of Hv channels. Our results show for the first time that the charge movement of these three S4 charges accounts for almost all of the measured gating charge in Hv channels. PMID:23401575

  18. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate is required for KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel function but not anterograde trafficking.

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    Alice A Royal

    Full Text Available The slow delayed-rectifier potassium current (IKs is crucial for human cardiac action potential repolarization. The formation of IKs requires co-assembly of the KCNQ1 α-subunit and KCNE1 β-subunit, and mutations in either of these subunits can lead to hereditary long QT syndrome types 1 and 5, respectively. It is widely recognised that the KCNQ1/KCNE1 (Q1/E1 channel requires phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 binding for function. We previously identified a cluster of basic residues in the proximal C-terminus of KCNQ1 that form a PIP2/phosphoinositide binding site. Upon charge neutralisation of these residues we found that the channel became more retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, which raised the possibility that channel-phosphoinositide interactions could play a role in channel trafficking. To explore this further we used a chemically induced dimerization (CID system to selectively deplete PIP2 and/or phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI(4P at the plasma membrane (PM or Golgi, and we subsequently monitored the effects on both channel trafficking and function. The depletion of PIP2 and/or PI(4P at either the PM or Golgi did not alter channel cell-surface expression levels. However, channel function was extremely sensitive to the depletion of PIP2 at the PM, which is in contrast to the response of other cardiac potassium channels tested (Kir2.1 and Kv11.1. Surprisingly, when using the CID system IKs was dramatically reduced even before dimerization was induced, highlighting limitations regarding the utility of this system when studying processes highly sensitive to PIP2 depletion. In conclusion, we identify that the Q1/E1 channel does not require PIP2 or PI(4P for anterograde trafficking, but is heavily reliant on PIP2 for channel function once at the PM.

  19. Mechanism underlying selective regulation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels by the psychostimulant-sensitive sorting nexin 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balana, Bartosz; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Stern, Kalyn M.; Bahima, Laia; Choe, Senyon; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are important gatekeepers of neuronal excitability. The surface expression of neuronal GIRK channels is regulated by the psychostimulant-sensitive sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) protein through a class I (-X-Ser/Thr-X-Φ, where X is any residue and Φ is a hydrophobic amino acid) PDZ-binding interaction. The G protein-insensitive inward rectifier channel (IRK1) contains the same class I PDZ-binding motif but associates with a different synaptic PDZ protein, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95). The mechanism by which SNX27 and PSD95 discriminate these channels was previously unclear. Using high-resolution structures coupled with biochemical and functional analyses, we identified key amino acids upstream of the channel's canonical PDZ-binding motif that associate electrostatically with a unique structural pocket in the SNX27-PDZ domain. Changing specific charged residues in the channel's carboxyl terminus or in the PDZ domain converts the selective association and functional regulation by SNX27. Elucidation of this unique interaction site between ion channels and PDZ-containing proteins could provide a therapeutic target for treating brain diseases. PMID:21422294

  20. Oxygen-coupled Redox Regulation of the Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor/Ca2+ Release Channel (RyR1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-An; Wang, Benlian; Miyagi, Masaru; Hess, Douglas T.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian skeletal muscle, Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through the ryanodine receptor/Ca2+-release channel RyR1 can be enhanced by S-oxidation or S-nitrosylation of separate Cys residues, which are allosterically linked. S-Oxidation of RyR1 is coupled to muscle oxygen tension (pO2) through O2-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide by SR-resident NADPH oxidase 4. In isolated SR (SR vesicles), an average of six to eight Cys thiols/RyR1 monomer are reversibly oxidized at high (21% O2) versus low pO2 (1% O2), but their identity among the 100 Cys residues/RyR1 monomer is unknown. Here we use isotope-coded affinity tag labeling and mass spectrometry (yielding 93% coverage of RyR1 Cys residues) to identify 13 Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled S-oxidation in SR vesicles. Eight additional Cys residues are oxidized at high versus low pO2 only when NADPH levels are supplemented to enhance NADPH oxidase 4 activity. pO2-sensitive Cys residues were largely non-overlapping with those identified previously as hyperreactive by administration of exogenous reagents (three of 21) or as S-nitrosylated. Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled oxidation are distributed widely within the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1 in multiple functional domains implicated in RyR1 activity-regulating interactions with the L-type Ca2+ channel (dihydropyridine receptor) and FK506-binding protein 12 as well as in “hot spot” regions containing sites of mutation implicated in malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. pO2-coupled disulfide formation was identified, whereas neither S-glutathionylated nor sulfenamide-modified Cys residues were observed. Thus, physiological redox regulation of RyR1 by endogenously generated hydrogen peroxide is exerted through dynamic disulfide formation involving multiple Cys residues. PMID:23798702

  1. A Common Structural Component for β-Subunit Mediated Modulation of Slow Inactivation in Different KV Channels

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    Nathalie Strutz-Seebohm

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Potassium channels are tetrameric proteins providing potassium selective passage through lipid embedded proteinaceous pores with highest fidelity. The selectivity results from binding to discrete potassium binding sites and stabilization of a hydrated potassium ion in a central internal cavity. The four potassium binding sites, generated by the conserved TTxGYGD signature sequence are formed by the backbone carbonyls of the amino acids TXGYG. Residues KV1.5-Val481, KV4.3-Leu368 and KV7.1- Ile 313 represent the amino acids in the X position of the respective channels. Methods: Here, we study the impact of these residues on ion selectivity, permeation and inactivation kinetics as well as the modulation by β-subunits using site-specific mutagenesis, electrophysiological analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Results: We identify this position as key in modulation of slow inactivation by structurally dissimilar β-subunits in different KV channels. Conclusion: We propose a model in which structural changes accompanying activation and β-subunit modulation allosterically constrain the backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms via the side chain of the respective X-residue in the signature sequence to reduce conductance during slow inactivation.

  2. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2014-12-03

    Background Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. Results In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Conclusions Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  3. Expression and mutagenesis of the sea anemone toxin Av2 reveals key amino acid residues important for activity on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Yehu; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Karbat, Izhar; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2006-07-25

    Type I sea anemone toxins are highly potent modulators of voltage-gated Na-channels (Na(v)s) and compete with the structurally dissimilar scorpion alpha-toxins on binding to receptor site-3. Although these features provide two structurally different probes for studying receptor site-3 and channel fast inactivation, the bioactive surface of sea anemone toxins has not been fully resolved. We established an efficient expression system for Av2 (known as ATX II), a highly insecticidal sea anemone toxin from Anemonia viridis (previously named A. sulcata), and mutagenized it throughout. Each toxin mutant was analyzed in toxicity and binding assays as well as by circular dichroism spectroscopy to discern the effects derived from structural perturbation from those related to bioactivity. Six residues were found to constitute the anti-insect bioactive surface of Av2 (Val-2, Leu-5, Asn-16, Leu-18, and Ile-41). Further analysis of nine Av2 mutants on the human heart channel Na(v)1.5 expressed in Xenopus oocytes indicated that the bioactive surfaces toward insects and mammals practically coincide but differ from the bioactive surface of a structurally similar sea anemone toxin, Anthopleurin B, from Anthopleura xanthogrammica. Hence, our results not only demonstrate clear differences in the bioactive surfaces of Av2 and scorpion alpha-toxins but also indicate that despite the general conservation in structure and importance of the Arg-14 loop and its flanking residues Gly-10 and Gly-20 for function, the surface of interaction between different sea anemone toxins and Na(v)s varies.

  4. Spin distribution of evaporation residues formed in complete and incomplete fusion in 16O+154Sm system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Linda, Sneha B.; Giri, Pankaj K.; Mahato, Amritraj; Tripathi, R.; Kumar, Harish; Afzal Ansari, M.; Sathik, N. P. M.; Ali, Rahbar; Kumar, Rakesh; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2017-11-01

    Spin distributions for several evaporation residues populated in the 16O+154Sm system have been measured at projectile energy ≈ 6.2 MeV/A by using the charged particle-γ-coincidence technique. The measured spin distributions of the evaporation residues populated through incomplete fusion associated with 'fast' α and 2α-emission channels are found to be entirely different from fusion-evaporation channels. It is observed that the mean input angular momentum for the evaporation residues formed in incomplete fusion channel is relatively higher than that observed for evaporation residues in complete fusion channels. The feeding intensity profile of evaporation residues populated through complete fusion and incomplete fusion have also been studied. The incomplete fusion channels are found to have narrow range feeding only for high spin states, while complete fusion channels are strongly fed over a broad spin range and widely populated. Comparison of present results with earlier data suggests that the mean input angular momentum values are relatively smaller for spherical target than that of deformed target using the same projectile and incident energy highlighting the role of target deformation in incomplete fusion dynamics.

  5. Spin distribution of evaporation residues formed in complete and incomplete fusion in 16O+154Sm system

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    D. Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spin distributions for several evaporation residues populated in the 16O+154Sm system have been measured at projectile energy ≈ 6.2 MeV/A by using the charged particle–γ-coincidence technique. The measured spin distributions of the evaporation residues populated through incomplete fusion associated with ‘fast’ α and 2α-emission channels are found to be entirely different from fusion–evaporation channels. It is observed that the mean input angular momentum for the evaporation residues formed in incomplete fusion channel is relatively higher than that observed for evaporation residues in complete fusion channels. The feeding intensity profile of evaporation residues populated through complete fusion and incomplete fusion have also been studied. The incomplete fusion channels are found to have narrow range feeding only for high spin states, while complete fusion channels are strongly fed over a broad spin range and widely populated. Comparison of present results with earlier data suggests that the mean input angular momentum values are relatively smaller for spherical target than that of deformed target using the same projectile and incident energy highlighting the role of target deformation in incomplete fusion dynamics.

  6. Localization and Molecular Determinants of the Hanatoxin Receptors on the Voltage-Sensing Domains of a K+ Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Smerin, Yingying; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2000-01-01

    Hanatoxin inhibits voltage-gated K+ channels by modifying the energetics of activation. We studied the molecular determinants and physical location of the Hanatoxin receptors on the drk1 voltage-gated K+ channel. First, we made multiple substitutions at three previously identified positions in the COOH terminus of S3 to examine whether these residues interact intimately with the toxin. We also examined a region encompassing S1–S3 using alanine-scanning mutagenesis to identify additional determinants of the toxin receptors. Finally, guided by the structure of the KcsA K+ channel, we explored whether the toxin interacts with the peripheral extracellular surface of the pore domain in the drk1 K+ channel. Our results argue for an intimate interaction between the toxin and the COOH terminus of S3 and suggest that the Hanatoxin receptors are confined within the voltage-sensing domains of the channel, at least 20–25 Å away from the central pore axis. PMID:10828242

  7. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  8. Gating of a pH-sensitive K(2P potassium channel by an electrostatic effect of basic sensor residues on the selectivity filter.

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    Leandro Zúñiga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available K(+ channels share common selectivity characteristics but exhibit a wide diversity in how they are gated open. Leak K(2P K(+ channels TASK-2, TALK-1 and TALK-2 are gated open by extracellular alkalinization. The mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating has been proposed to be the neutralization of the side chain of a single arginine (lysine in TALK-2 residue near the pore of TASK-2, which occurs with the unusual pK(a of 8.0. We now corroborate this hypothesis by transplanting the TASK-2 extracellular pH (pH(o sensor in the background of a pH(o-insensitive TASK-3 channel, which leads to the restitution of pH(o-gating. Using a concatenated channel approach, we also demonstrate that for TASK-2 to open, pH(o sensors must be neutralized in each of the two subunits forming these dimeric channels with no apparent cross-talk between the sensors. These results are consistent with adaptive biasing force analysis of K(+ permeation using a model selectivity filter in wild-type and mutated channels. The underlying free-energy profiles confirm that either a doubly or a singly charged pH(o sensor is sufficient to abolish ion flow. Atomic detail of the associated mechanism reveals that, rather than a collapse of the pore, as proposed for other K(2P channels gated at the selectivity filter, an increased height of the energetic barriers for ion translocation accounts for channel blockade at acid pH(o. Our data, therefore, strongly suggest that a cycle of protonation/deprotonation of pH(o-sensing arginine 224 side chain gates the TASK-2 channel by electrostatically tuning the conformational stability of its selectivity filter.

  9. Gating of a pH-sensitive K(2P) potassium channel by an electrostatic effect of basic sensor residues on the selectivity filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Leandro; Márquez, Valeria; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Chipot, Christophe; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V; Niemeyer, María Isabel

    2011-01-25

    K(+) channels share common selectivity characteristics but exhibit a wide diversity in how they are gated open. Leak K(2P) K(+) channels TASK-2, TALK-1 and TALK-2 are gated open by extracellular alkalinization. The mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating has been proposed to be the neutralization of the side chain of a single arginine (lysine in TALK-2) residue near the pore of TASK-2, which occurs with the unusual pK(a) of 8.0. We now corroborate this hypothesis by transplanting the TASK-2 extracellular pH (pH(o)) sensor in the background of a pH(o)-insensitive TASK-3 channel, which leads to the restitution of pH(o)-gating. Using a concatenated channel approach, we also demonstrate that for TASK-2 to open, pH(o) sensors must be neutralized in each of the two subunits forming these dimeric channels with no apparent cross-talk between the sensors. These results are consistent with adaptive biasing force analysis of K(+) permeation using a model selectivity filter in wild-type and mutated channels. The underlying free-energy profiles confirm that either a doubly or a singly charged pH(o) sensor is sufficient to abolish ion flow. Atomic detail of the associated mechanism reveals that, rather than a collapse of the pore, as proposed for other K(2P) channels gated at the selectivity filter, an increased height of the energetic barriers for ion translocation accounts for channel blockade at acid pH(o). Our data, therefore, strongly suggest that a cycle of protonation/deprotonation of pH(o)-sensing arginine 224 side chain gates the TASK-2 channel by electrostatically tuning the conformational stability of its selectivity filter.

  10. Using Remote Sensing and High-Resolution Digital Elevation Models to Identify Potential Erosional Hotspots Along River Channels During High Discharge Storm Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orland, E. D.; Amidon, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    As global warming intensifies, large precipitation events and associated floods are becoming increasingly common. Channel adjustments during floods can occur by both erosion and deposition of sediment, often damaging infrastructure in the process. There is thus a need for predictive models that can help managers identify river reaches that are most prone to adjustment during storms. Because rivers in post-glacial landscapes often flow over a mixture of bedrock and alluvial substrates, the identification of bedrock vs. alluvial channel reaches is an important first step in predicting vulnerability to channel adjustment during flood events, especially because bedrock channels are unlikely to adjust significantly, even during floods. This study develops a semi-automated approach to predicting channel substrate using a high-resolution LiDAR-derived digital elevation model (DEM). The study area is the Middlebury River in Middlebury, VT-a well-studied watershed with a wide variety of channel substrates, including reaches with documented channel adjustments during recent flooding events. Multiple metrics were considered for reference—such as channel width and drainage area—but the study utilized channel slope as a key parameter for identifying morphological variations within the Middlebury River. Using data extracted from the DEM, a power law was fit to selected slope and drainage area values for each branch in order to model idealized slope-drainage area relationships, which were then compared with measured slope-drainage area relationships. Differences in measured slope minus predicted slope (called delta-slope) are shown to help predict river channel substrate. Compared with field observations, higher delta-slope values correlate with more stable, boulder rich channels or bedrock gorges; conversely the lowest delta-slope values correlate with flat, sediment rich alluvial channels. The delta-slope metric thus serves as a reliable first-order predictor of channel

  11. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  12. Multimode Interference: Identifying Channels and Ridges in Quantum Probability Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Ross C.; Loinaz, Will

    2004-01-01

    The multimode interference technique is a simple way to study the interference patterns found in many quantum probability distributions. We demonstrate that this analysis not only explains the existence of so-called "quantum carpets," but can explain the spatial distribution of channels and ridges in the carpets. With an understanding of the factors that govern these channels and ridges we have a limited ability to produce a particular pattern of channels and ridges by carefully choosing the ...

  13. Tuning the ion selectivity of two-pore channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Jiang, Youxing (UTSMC)

    2017-01-17

    Organellar two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in plants and animals. Interestingly, plant and animal TPCs share high sequence similarity in the filter region, yet exhibit drastically different ion selectivity. Plant TPC1 functions as a nonselective cation channel on the vacuole membrane, whereas mammalian TPC channels have been shown to be endo/lysosomal Na+-selective or Ca2+-release channels. In this study, we performed systematic characterization of the ion selectivity of TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTPC1) and compared its selectivity with the selectivity of human TPC2 (HsTPC2). We demonstrate that AtTPC1 is selective for Ca2+ over Na+, but nonselective among monovalent cations (Li+, Na+, and K+). Our results also confirm that HsTPC2 is a Na+-selective channel activated by phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate. Guided by our recent structure of AtTPC1, we converted AtTPC1 to a Na+-selective channel by mimicking the selectivity filter of HsTPC2 and identified key residues in the TPC filters that differentiate the selectivity between AtTPC1 and HsTPC2. Furthermore, the structure of the Na+-selective AtTPC1 mutant elucidates the structural basis for Na+ selectivity in mammalian TPCs.

  14. TRPV6 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher-Trost, Claudia; Weissgerber, Petra; Wissenbach, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    TRPV6 (former synonyms ECAC2, CaT1, CaT-like) displays several specific features which makes it unique among the members of the mammalian Trp gene family (1) TRPV6 (and its closest relative, TRPV5) are the only highly Ca(2+)-selective channels of the entire TRP superfamily (Peng et al. 1999; Wissenbach et al. 2001; Voets et al. 2004). (2) Translation of Trpv6 initiates at a non-AUG codon, at ACG, located upstream of the annotated AUG, which is not used for initiation (Fecher-Trost et al. 2013). The ACG codon is nevertheless decoded by methionine. Not only a very rare event in eukaryotic biology, the full-length TRPV6 protein existing in vivo comprises an amino terminus extended by 40 amino acid residues compared to the annotated truncated TRPV6 protein which has been used in most studies on TRPV6 channel activity so far. (In the following numbering occurs according to this full-length protein, with the numbers of the so far annotated truncated protein in brackets). (3) Only in humans a coupled polymorphism of Trpv6 exists causing three amino acid exchanges and resulting in an ancestral Trpv6 haplotype and a so-called derived Trpv6 haplotype (Wissenbach et al. 2001). The ancestral allele encodes the amino acid residues C197(157), M418(378) and M721(681) and the derived alleles R197(157), V418(378) and T721(681). The ancestral haplotype is found in all species, the derived Trpv6 haplotype has only been identified in humans, and its frequency increases with the distance to the African continent. Apparently the Trpv6 gene has been a strong target for selection in humans, and its derived variant is one of the few examples showing consistently differences to the orthologues genes of other primates (Akey et al. 2004, 2006; Stajich and Hahn 2005; Hughes et al. 2008). (4) The Trpv6 gene expression is significantly upregulated in several human malignancies including the most common cancers, prostate and breast cancer (Wissenbach et al. 2001; Zhuang et al. 2002; Fixemer et al

  15. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  16. Fluoride export (FEX) proteins from fungi, plants and animals are 'single barreled' channels containing one functional and one vestigial ion pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbasova, Tetyana; Nallur, Sunitha; Sells, Taylor; Smith, Kathryn D.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Tausta, Susan Lori

    2017-01-01

    The fluoride export protein (FEX) in yeast and other fungi provides tolerance to fluoride (F-), an environmentally ubiquitous anion. FEX efficiently eliminates intracellular fluoride that otherwise would accumulate at toxic concentrations. The FEX homolog in bacteria, Fluc, is a ‘double-barreled’ channel formed by dimerization of two identical or similar subunits. FEX in yeast and other eukaryotes is a monomer resulting from covalent fusion of the two subunits. As a result, both potential fluoride pores are created from different parts of the same protein. Here we identify FEX proteins from two multicellular eukaryotes, a plant Arabidopsis thaliana and an animal Amphimedon queenslandica, by demonstrating significant fluoride tolerance when these proteins are heterologously expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Residues important for eukaryotic FEX function were determined by phylogenetic sequence alignment and functional analysis using a yeast growth assay. Key residues of the fluoride channel are conserved in only one of the two potential fluoride-transporting pores. FEX activity is abolished upon mutation of residues in this conserved pore, suggesting that only one of the pores is functional. The same topology is conserved for the newly identified FEX proteins from plant and animal. These data suggest that FEX family of fluoride channels in eukaryotes are ‘single-barreled’ transporters containing one functional pore and a second non-functional vestigial remnant of a homologous gene fusion event. PMID:28472134

  17. Residual stress and its effect on the mechanical properties of Y-doped Mg alloy fabricated via back-pressure assisted equal channel angular pressing (ECAP-BP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jianghua, E-mail: j_shen@live.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States); School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Gärtnerová, Viera [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, CZ – 182 21, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kecskes, Laszlo J. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Kondoh, Katsuyoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaragi, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Jäger, Aleš, E-mail: jager@fzu.cz [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, CZ – 182 21, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Wei, Qiuming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    In this study, pure magnesium (Mg) and Mg-0.6 wt% yttrium (Y) binary alloy were fabricated via casting followed by room temperature equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using an applied back pressure (BP). Microstructural examination after ECAP-BP revealed a fine-grained Mg-Y alloy with a high residual stress level, whereas, the pure Mg exhibited a well-recrystallized microstructure with uniform and equiaxed grains, but retaining very little residual stress. The Y atoms were present in the Mg matrix as solid solutes and acted as dislocation and grain boundary blockers, thus suppressing dynamic recovery and/or recrystallization during the ECAP process. The Mg-Y alloy had an average grain size of ~400 nm, approximately one order smaller than that of pure Mg. The combination of high residual stress and ultrafine grains of the Mg-Y alloy gave rise to a significant difference in its mechanical behavior from that of the pure Mg, under both quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading.

  18. Cryo-EM structures of the TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Shangyu; Feng, Shengjie; Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Bulkley, David; Lolicato, Marco; Zhao, Jianhua; Zuberbühler, Kathrin; Ye, Wenlei; Qi, Lijun; Chen, Tingxu; Craik, Charles S; Jan, Yuh Nung; Minor, Daniel L; Cheng, Yifan; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2017-12-21

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) encoded by TMEM16A control neuronal signalling, smooth muscle contraction, airway and exocrine gland secretion, and rhythmic movements of the gastrointestinal system. To understand how CaCCs mediate and control anion permeation to fulfil these physiological functions, knowledge of the mammalian TMEM16A structure and identification of its pore-lining residues are essential. TMEM16A forms a dimer with two pores. Previous CaCC structural analyses have relied on homology modelling of a homologue (nhTMEM16) from the fungus Nectria haematococca that functions primarily as a lipid scramblase, as well as subnanometre-resolution electron cryo-microscopy. Here we present de novo atomic structures of the transmembrane domains of mouse TMEM16A in nanodiscs and in lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol as determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. These structures reveal the ion permeation pore and represent different functional states. The structure in lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol has one Ca 2+ ion resolved within each monomer with a constricted pore; this is likely to correspond to a closed state, because a CaCC with a single Ca 2+ occupancy requires membrane depolarization in order to open (C.J.P. et al., manuscript submitted). The structure in nanodiscs has two Ca 2+ ions per monomer and its pore is in a closed conformation; this probably reflects channel rundown, which is the gradual loss of channel activity that follows prolonged CaCC activation in 1 mM Ca 2+ . Our mutagenesis and electrophysiological studies, prompted by analyses of the structures, identified ten residues distributed along the pore that interact with permeant anions and affect anion selectivity, as well as seven pore-lining residues that cluster near pore constrictions and regulate channel gating. Together, these results clarify the basis of CaCC anion conduction.

  19. Electrostatics at the membrane define MscL channel mechanosensitivity and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dalian; Blount, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) serves as a biological emergency release valve, preventing the occurrence of cell lysis caused by acute osmotic stress. Its tractable nature allows it to serve as a paradigm for how a protein can directly sense membrane tension. Although much is known of the importance of the hydrophobicity of specific residues in channel gating, it has remained unclear whether electrostatics at the membrane plays any role. We studied MscL chimeras derived from functionally distinct orthologues: Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Dissection of one set led to an observation that changing the charge of a single residue, K101, of E. coli (Ec)-MscL, effects a channel phenotype: when mutated to a negative residue, the channel is less mechanosensitive and has longer open dwell times. Assuming electrostatic interactions, we determined whether they are due to protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions by performing site-directed mutagenesis elsewhere in the protein and reconstituting channels into defined lipids, with and without negative head groups. We found that although both interactions appear to play some role, the primary determinant of the channel phenotype seems to be protein-lipid electrostatics. The data suggest a model for the role of electrostatic interactions in the dynamics of MscL gating. © FASEB.

  20. Calcium-Activated Cl- Channel: Insights on the Molecular Identity in Epithelial Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottgen, Trey S; Nickerson, Andrew J; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M

    2018-05-10

    Calcium-activated chloride secretion in epithelial tissues has been described for many years. However, the molecular identity of the channel responsible for the Ca 2+ -activated Cl − secretion in epithelial tissues has remained a mystery. More recently, TMEM16A has been identified as a new putative Ca 2+ -activated Cl − channel (CaCC). The primary goal of this article will be to review the characterization of TMEM16A, as it relates to the physical structure of the channel, as well as important residues that confer voltage and Ca 2+ -sensitivity of the channel. This review will also discuss the role of TMEM16A in epithelial physiology and potential associated-pathophysiology. This will include discussion of developed knockout models that have provided much needed insight on the functional localization of TMEM16A in several epithelial tissues. Finally, this review will examine the implications of the identification of TMEM16A as it pertains to potential novel therapies in several pathologies.

  1. Path lumping: An efficient algorithm to identify metastable path channels for conformational dynamics of multi-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Luming; Sheong, Fu Kit; Zeng, Xiangze; Zhu, Lizhe; Huang, Xuhui

    2017-07-01

    Constructing Markov state models from large-scale molecular dynamics simulation trajectories is a promising approach to dissect the kinetic mechanisms of complex chemical and biological processes. Combined with transition path theory, Markov state models can be applied to identify all pathways connecting any conformational states of interest. However, the identified pathways can be too complex to comprehend, especially for multi-body processes where numerous parallel pathways with comparable flux probability often coexist. Here, we have developed a path lumping method to group these parallel pathways into metastable path channels for analysis. We define the similarity between two pathways as the intercrossing flux between them and then apply the spectral clustering algorithm to lump these pathways into groups. We demonstrate the power of our method by applying it to two systems: a 2D-potential consisting of four metastable energy channels and the hydrophobic collapse process of two hydrophobic molecules. In both cases, our algorithm successfully reveals the metastable path channels. We expect this path lumping algorithm to be a promising tool for revealing unprecedented insights into the kinetic mechanisms of complex multi-body processes.

  2. Phytotoxicity of vulpia residues: III. Biological activity of identified allelochemicals from Vulpia myuros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, M; Pratley, J E; Haig, T

    2001-02-01

    Twenty compounds identified in vulpia (Vulpia myuros) residues as allelochemicals were individually and collectively tested for biological activity. Each exhibited characteristic allelochemical behavior toward the test plant, i.e., inhibition at high concentrations and stimulation or no effect at low concentrations, but individual activities varied. Allelopathins present in large quantities, such as syringic, vanillic, and succinic acids, possessed low activity, while those present in small quantities, such as catechol and hydrocinnamic acid, possessed strong inhibitory activity. The concept of a phytotoxic strength index was developed for quantifying the biological properties of each individual allelopathin in a concise, comprehensive, and meaningful format. The individual contribution of each allelopathin, assessed by comparing the phytotoxic strength index to the overall toxicity of vulpia residues, was variable according to structure and was influenced by its relative proportion in the residue. The majority of compounds possessed low or medium biological activity and contributed most of the vulpia phytotoxicity, while compounds with high biological activity were in the minority and only present at low concentration. Artificial mixtures of these pure allelochemicals also produced phytotoxicity. There were additive/synergistic effects evident in the properties of these mixtures. One such mixture, formulated from allelochemicals found in the same proportions as occur in vulpia extract, produced stronger activity than another formulated from the same set of compounds but in equal proportions. These results suggest that the exploration of the relative composition of a cluster of allelopathins may be more important than simply focusing on the identification of one or two compounds with strong biological activity and that synergism is fundamental to the understanding of allelopathy.

  3. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs

  4. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet, E-mail: ayanjeet@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng, E-mail: ayanjeet@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V. [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Zanni, Martin [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  5. Common molecular determinants of tarantula huwentoxin-IV inhibition of Na+ channel voltage sensors in domains II and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yucheng; Jackson, James O; Liang, Songping; Cummins, Theodore R

    2011-08-05

    The voltage sensors of domains II and IV of sodium channels are important determinants of activation and inactivation, respectively. Animal toxins that alter electrophysiological excitability of muscles and neurons often modify sodium channel activation by selectively interacting with domain II and inactivation by selectively interacting with domain IV. This suggests that there may be substantial differences between the toxin-binding sites in these two important domains. Here we explore the ability of the tarantula huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV) to inhibit the activity of the domain II and IV voltage sensors. HWTX-IV is specific for domain II, and we identify five residues in the S1-S2 (Glu-753) and S3-S4 (Glu-811, Leu-814, Asp-816, and Glu-818) regions of domain II that are crucial for inhibition of activation by HWTX-IV. These data indicate that a single residue in the S3-S4 linker (Glu-818 in hNav1.7) is crucial for allowing HWTX-IV to interact with the other key residues and trap the voltage sensor in the closed configuration. Mutagenesis analysis indicates that the five corresponding residues in domain IV are all critical for endowing HWTX-IV with the ability to inhibit fast inactivation. Our data suggest that the toxin-binding motif in domain II is conserved in domain IV. Increasing our understanding of the molecular determinants of toxin interactions with voltage-gated sodium channels may permit development of enhanced isoform-specific voltage-gating modifiers.

  6. Structure of the CLC-1 chloride channel from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunyong; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2018-05-29

    CLC channels mediate passive Cl - conduction, while CLC transporters mediate active Cl - transport coupled to H + transport in the opposite direction. The distinction between CLC-0/1/2 channels and CLC transporters seems undetectable by amino acid sequence. To understand why they are different functionally we determined the structure of the human CLC-1 channel. Its 'glutamate gate' residue, known to mediate proton transfer in CLC transporters, adopts a location in the structure that appears to preclude it from its transport function. Furthermore, smaller side chains produce a wider pore near the intracellular surface, potentially reducing a kinetic barrier for Cl - conduction. When the corresponding residues are mutated in a transporter, it is converted to a channel. Finally, Cl - at key sites in the pore appear to interact with reduced affinity compared to transporters. Thus, subtle differences in glutamate gate conformation, internal pore diameter and Cl - affinity distinguish CLC channels and transporters. © 2018, Park & MacKinnon.

  7. Discovery and characterization of cnidarian peptide toxins that affect neuronal potassium ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Olga; Harvey, Alan L

    2009-12-15

    Peptides have been isolated from several species of sea anemones and shown to block currents through various potassium ion channels, particularly in excitable cells. The toxins can be grouped into four structural classes: type 1 with 35-37 amino acid residues and three disulphide bridges; type 2 with 58-59 residues and three disulphide bridges; type 3 with 41-42 residues and three disulphide bridges; and type 4 with 28 residues and two disulphide bridges. Examples from the first class are BgK from Bunodosoma granulifera, ShK from Stichodactyla helianthus and AsKS (or kaliseptine) from Anemonia sulcata (now A. viridis). These interfere with binding of radiolabelled dendrotoxin to synaptosomal membranes and block currents through channels with various Kv1 subunits and also intermediate conductance K(Ca) channels. Toxins in the second class are homologous to Kunitz-type inhibitors of serine proteases; these toxins include kalicludines (AsKC 1-3) from A. sulcata and SHTXIII from S. haddoni; they block Kv1.2 channels. The third structural group includes BDS-I, BDS-II (from A. sulcata) and APETx 1 (from Anthropleura elegantissima). Their pharmacological specificity differs: BDS-I and -II block currents involving Kv3 subunits, while APETx1 blocks ERG channels. The fourth group comprises the more recently discovered SHTX I and II from S. haddoni. Their channel blocking specificity is not yet known but they displace dendrotoxin binding from synaptosomal membranes. Sea anemones can be predicted to be a continued source of new toxins that will serve as molecular probes of various K(+) channels.

  8. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  9. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Robin Y; Yau, Michael C; Galpin, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2-5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific...

  10. Functional interactions at the interface between voltage-sensing and pore domains in the Shaker K(v) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Llavina, Gilberto J; Chang, Tsg-Hui; Swartz, Kenton J

    2006-11-22

    Voltage-activated potassium (K(v)) channels contain a central pore domain that is partially surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains. Recent X-ray structures suggest that the two domains lack extensive protein-protein contacts within presumed transmembrane regions, but whether this is the case for functional channels embedded in lipid membranes remains to be tested. We investigated domain interactions in the Shaker K(v) channel by systematically mutating the pore domain and assessing tolerance by examining channel maturation, S4 gating charge movement, and channel opening. When mapped onto the X-ray structure of the K(v)1.2 channel the large number of permissive mutations support the notion of relatively independent domains, consistent with crystallographic studies. Inspection of the maps also identifies portions of the interface where residues are sensitive to mutation, an external cluster where mutations hinder voltage sensor activation, and an internal cluster where domain interactions between S4 and S5 helices from adjacent subunits appear crucial for the concerted opening transition.

  11. Nicotinic receptor transduction zone: invariant arginine couples to multiple electron-rich residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtasimova, Nuriya; Sine, Steven M

    2013-01-22

    Gating of the muscle-type acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channel depends on communication between the ACh-binding site and the remote ion channel. A key region for this communication is located within the structural transition zone between the ligand-binding and pore domains. Here, stemming from β-strand 10 of the binding domain, the invariant αArg209 lodges within the hydrophobic interior of the subunit and is essential for rapid and efficient channel gating. Previous charge-reversal experiments showed that the contribution of αArg209 to channel gating depends strongly on αGlu45, also within this region. Here we determine whether the contribution of αArg209 to channel gating depends on additional anionic or electron-rich residues in this region. Also, to reconcile diverging findings in the literature, we compare the dependence of αArg209 on αGlu45 in AChRs from different species, and compare the full agonist ACh with the weak agonist choline. Our findings reveal that the contribution of αArg209 to channel gating depends on additional nearby electron-rich residues, consistent with both electrostatic and steric contributions. Furthermore, αArg209 and αGlu45 show a strong interdependence in both human and mouse AChRs, whereas the functional consequences of the mutation αE45R depend on the agonist. The emerging picture shows a multifaceted network of interdependent residues that are required for communication between the ligand-binding and pore domains. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nicotinic Receptor Transduction Zone: Invariant Arginine Couples to Multiple Electron-Rich Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtasimova, Nuriya; Sine, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Gating of the muscle-type acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channel depends on communication between the ACh-binding site and the remote ion channel. A key region for this communication is located within the structural transition zone between the ligand-binding and pore domains. Here, stemming from β-strand 10 of the binding domain, the invariant αArg209 lodges within the hydrophobic interior of the subunit and is essential for rapid and efficient channel gating. Previous charge-reversal experiments showed that the contribution of αArg209 to channel gating depends strongly on αGlu45, also within this region. Here we determine whether the contribution of αArg209 to channel gating depends on additional anionic or electron-rich residues in this region. Also, to reconcile diverging findings in the literature, we compare the dependence of αArg209 on αGlu45 in AChRs from different species, and compare the full agonist ACh with the weak agonist choline. Our findings reveal that the contribution of αArg209 to channel gating depends on additional nearby electron-rich residues, consistent with both electrostatic and steric contributions. Furthermore, αArg209 and αGlu45 show a strong interdependence in both human and mouse AChRs, whereas the functional consequences of the mutation αE45R depend on the agonist. The emerging picture shows a multifaceted network of interdependent residues that are required for communication between the ligand-binding and pore domains. PMID:23442857

  13. Identification of an HV 1 voltage-gated proton channel in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Gustavo; Derst, Christian; Franzen, Arne; Mashimo, Yuta; Machida, Ryuichiro; Musset, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The voltage-gated proton channel 1 (HV 1) is an important component of the cellular proton extrusion machinery and is essential for charge compensation during the respiratory burst of phagocytes. HV 1 has been identified in a wide range of eukaryotes throughout the animal kingdom, with the exception of insects. Therefore, it has been proposed that insects do not possess an HV 1 channel. In the present study, we report the existence of an HV 1-type proton channel in insects. We searched insect transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequence databases and found putative HV 1 orthologues in various polyneopteran insects. To confirm that these putative HV 1 orthologues were functional channels, we studied the HV 1 channel of Nicoletia phytophila (NpHV 1), an insect of the Zygentoma order, in more detail. NpHV 1 comprises 239 amino acids and is 33% identical to the human voltage-gated proton channel 1. Patch clamp measurements in a heterologous expression system showed proton selectivity, as well as pH- and voltage-dependent gating. Interestingly, NpHV 1 shows slightly enhanced pH-dependent gating compared to the human channel. Mutations in the first transmembrane segment at position 66 (Asp66), the presumed selectivity filter, lead to a loss of proton-selective conduction, confirming the importance of this aspartate residue in voltage-gated proton channels. Nucleotide sequence data have been deposited in the GenBank database under accession number KT780722. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Iterative key-residues interrogation of a phytase with thermostability increasing substitutions identified in directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivange, Amol V; Roccatano, Danilo; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial phytases have attracted industrial interest as animal feed supplement due to their high activity and sufficient thermostability (required for feed pelleting). We devised an approach named KeySIDE,  an iterative Key-residues interrogation of the wild type with Substitutions Identified in Directed Evolution for improving Yersinia mollaretii phytase (Ymphytase) thermostability by combining key beneficial substitutions and elucidating their individual roles. Directed evolution yielded in a discovery of nine positions in Ymphytase and combined iteratively to identify key positions. The "best" combination (M6: T77K, Q154H, G187S, and K289Q) resulted in significantly improved thermal resistance; the residual activity improved from 35 % (wild type) to 89 % (M6) at 58 °C and 20-min incubation. Melting temperature increased by 3 °C in M6 without a loss of specific activity. Molecular dynamics simulation studies revealed reduced flexibility in the loops located next to helices (B, F, and K) which possess substitutions (Helix-B: T77K, Helix-F: G187S, and Helix-K: K289E/Q). Reduced flexibility in the loops might be caused by strengthened hydrogen bonding network (e.g., G187S and K289E/K289Q) and a salt bridge (T77K). Our results demonstrate a promising approach to design phytases in food research, and we hope that the KeySIDE might become an attractive approach for understanding of structure-function relationships of enzymes.

  15. Cholesterol-Binding Sites in GIRK Channels: The Devil is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, it has become evident that cholesterol plays a direct role in the modulation of a variety of ion channels. In most cases, cholesterol downregulates channel activity. In contrast, our earlier studies have demonstrated that atrial G protein inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are upregulated by cholesterol. Recently, we have shown that hippocampal GIRK currents are also upregulated by cholesterol. A combined computational-experimental approach pointed to putative cholesterol-binding sites in the transmembrane domain of the GIRK2 channel, the primary subunit in hippocampal GIRK channels. In particular, the principal cholesterol-binding site was located in the center of the transmembrane domain in between the inner and outer α-helices of 2 adjacent subunits. Further studies pointed to a similar cholesterol-binding site in GIRK4, a major subunit in atrial GIRK channels. However, a close look at a sequence alignment of the transmembrane helices of the 2 channels reveals surprising differences among the residues that interact with the cholesterol molecule in these 2 channels. Here, we compare the residues that form putative cholesterol-binding sites in GIRK2 and GIRK4 and discuss the similarities and differences among them.

  16. Selection of Inhibitor-Resistant Viral Potassium Channels Identifies a Selectivity Filter Site that Affects Barium and Amantadine Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Arrigoni, Cristina; Domigan, Courtney; Ferrara, Giuseppina; Pantoja, Carlos; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna; Minor, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the interactions between ion channels and blockers remains an important goal that has implications for delineating the basic mechanisms of ion channel function and for the discovery and development of ion channel directed drugs. Methodology/Principal Findings We used genetic selection methods to probe the interaction of two ion channel blockers, barium and amantadine, with the miniature viral potassium channel Kcv. Selection for Kcv mutants that were resistant to either blocker identified a mutant bearing multiple changes that was resistant to both. Implementation of a PCR shuffling and backcrossing procedure uncovered that the blocker resistance could be attributed to a single change, T63S, at a position that is likely to form the binding site for the inner ion in the selectivity filter (site 4). A combination of electrophysiological and biochemical assays revealed a distinct difference in the ability of the mutant channel to interact with the blockers. Studies of the analogous mutation in the mammalian inward rectifier Kir2.1 show that the T→S mutation affects barium block as well as the stability of the conductive state. Comparison of the effects of similar barium resistant mutations in Kcv and Kir2.1 shows that neighboring amino acids in the Kcv selectivity filter affect blocker binding. Conclusions/Significance The data support the idea that permeant ions have an integral role in stabilizing potassium channel structure, suggest that both barium and amantadine act at a similar site, and demonstrate how genetic selections can be used to map blocker binding sites and reveal mechanistic features. PMID:19834614

  17. The Nav1.2 channel is regulated by GSK3

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Thomas F.; Nenov, Miroslav N.; Wildburger, Norelle C.; Lichti, Cheryl; Luisi, Jonathan; Vergara, Fernanda; Panova-Electronova, Neli I.; Nilsson, Carol L.; Rudra, Jai; Green, Thomas A.; Labate, Demetrio; Laezza, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background Phosphorylation plays an essential role in regulating the voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels and excitability. Yet, a surprisingly limited number of kinases have been identified as regulators of Nav channels. Herein, we posited that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a critical kinase found associated with numerous brain disorders, might directly regulate neuronal Nav channels. Methods We used patch-clamp electrophysiology to record sodium currents from Nav1.2 channels stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. mRNA and protein levels were quantified with RT-PCR, Western blot, or confocal microscopy, and in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to identify phosphorylated residues. Results We found that exposure of cells to GSK3 inhibitor XIII significantly potentiates the peak current density of Nav1.2, a phenotype reproduced by silencing GSK3 with siRNA. Contrarily, overexpression of GSK3β suppressed Nav1.2-encoded currents. Neither mRNA nor total protein expression were changed upon GSK3 inhibition. Cell surface labeling of CD4-chimeric constructs expressing intracellular domains of the Nav1.2 channel indicates that cell surface expression of CD4-Nav1.2-Ctail was up-regulated upon pharmacological inhibition of GSK3, resulting in an increase of surface puncta at the plasma membrane. Finally, using in vitro phosphorylation in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry, we further demonstrate that GSK3β phosphorylates T1966 at the C-terminal tail of Nav1.2. Conclusion These findings provide evidence for a new mechanism by which GSK3 modulate Nav channel function via its C-terminal tail. General Significance These findings provide fundamental knowledge in understanding signaling dysfunction common in several neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25615535

  18. C-terminus-mediated voltage gating of Arabidopsis guard cell anion channel QUAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Patrick; Imes, Dennis; Martinoia, Enrico; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Geiger, Dietmar; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer

    2013-09-01

    Anion transporters in plants play a fundamental role in volume regulation and signaling. Currently, two plasma membrane-located anion channel families—SLAC/SLAH and ALMT—are known. Among the ALMT family, the root-expressed ALuminium-activated Malate Transporter 1 was identified by comparison of aluminum-tolerant and Al(3+)-sensitive wheat cultivars and was subsequently shown to mediate voltage-independent malate currents. In contrast, ALMT12/QUAC1 (QUickly activating Anion Channel1) is expressed in guard cells transporting malate in an Al(3+)-insensitive and highly voltage-dependent manner. So far, no information is available about the structure and mechanism of voltage-dependent gating with the QUAC1 channel protein. Here, we analyzed gating of QUAC1-type currents in the plasma membrane of guard cells and QUAC1-expressing oocytes revealing similar voltage dependencies and activation–deactivation kinetics. In the heterologous expression system, QUAC1 was electrophysiologically characterized at increasing extra- and intracellular malate concentrations. Thereby, malate additively stimulated the voltage-dependent QUAC1 activity. In search of structural determinants of the gating process, we could not identify transmembrane domains common for voltage-sensitive channels. However, site-directed mutations and deletions at the C-terminus of QUAC1 resulted in altered voltage-dependent channel activity. Interestingly, the replacement of a single glutamate residue, which is conserved in ALMT channels from different clades, by an alanine disrupted QUAC1 activity. Together with C- and N-terminal tagging, these results indicate that the cytosolic C-terminus is involved in the voltage-dependent gating mechanism of QUAC1.

  19. Bywalled plasma formation in vacuum prolonged channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Rubin, N.B.

    1982-01-01

    To produce homogeneous along the channel length plasma the application of incomplete rate-in surface dielectric discharge for generating the bywalled plasma in prolonged cylindrical channels at a pressure of the residual gas of P approximately 10 -5 Torr is proposed. Experimental set-up consisted of a pulse voltage generator and a plasma channel. The plasma channel was a coaxial system of three tubes inserted into each other. The first outer tube is made of a stainless steel, the second - of a dielectric material, the third - of smallsized stainless steel greed. It is demonstrated that the plasma being formed in the process is sufficiently homogeneous by concentration of the components, by the channel length and azimuth. The length of the experimental channel under investigation was 1.6 m, its diameter amounted 0.05 m. The maximum concentration of electron component was 10 17 m -3

  20. Flavonoid Regulation of HCN2 Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Anne E.; Rosenbaum, Joel C.; Brelidze, Tinatin I.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels are pacemaker channels whose currents contribute to rhythmic activity in the heart and brain. HCN channels open in response to hyperpolarizing voltages, and the binding of cAMP to their cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) facilitates channel opening. Here, we report that, like cAMP, the flavonoid fisetin potentiates HCN2 channel gating. Fisetin sped HCN2 activation and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more depolarizing potentials with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 1.8 μm. When applied together, fisetin and cAMP regulated HCN2 gating in a nonadditive fashion. Fisetin did not potentiate HCN2 channels lacking their CNBD, and two independent fluorescence-based binding assays reported that fisetin bound to the purified CNBD. These data suggest that the CNBD mediates the fisetin potentiation of HCN2 channels. Moreover, binding assays suggest that fisetin and cAMP partially compete for binding to the CNBD. NMR experiments demonstrated that fisetin binds within the cAMP-binding pocket, interacting with some of the same residues as cAMP. Together, these data indicate that fisetin is a partial agonist for HCN2 channels. PMID:24085296

  1. Functionalized Fullerene Targeting Human Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, hNav1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Robinson, Anna; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2017-08-16

    Mutations of hNa v 1.7 that cause its activities to be enhanced contribute to severe neuropathic pain. Only a small number of hNa v 1.7 specific inhibitors have been identified, most of which interact with the voltage-sensing domain of the voltage-activated sodium ion channel. In our previous computational study, we demonstrated that a [Lys 6 ]-C 84 fullerene binds tightly (affinity of 46 nM) to Na v Ab, the voltage-gated sodium channel from the bacterium Arcobacter butzleri. Here, we extend this work and, using molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrate that the same [Lys 6 ]-C 84 fullerene binds strongly (2.7 nM) to the pore of a modeled human sodium ion channel hNa v 1.7. In contrast, the fullerene binds only weakly to a mutated model of hNa v 1.7 (I1399D) (14.5 mM) and a model of the skeletal muscle hNa v 1.4 (3.7 mM). Comparison of one representative sequence from each of the nine human sodium channel isoforms shows that only hNa v 1.7 possesses residues that are critical for binding the fullerene derivative and blocking the channel pore.

  2. The lysosomal potassium channel TMEM175 adopts a novel tetrameric architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Changkeun; Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Kim, Sunghoon; She, Ji; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang , Youxing (UPENN); (UTSMC); (HHMI)

    2017-07-19

    TMEM175 is a lysosomal K+ channel that is important for maintaining the membrane potential and pH stability in lysosomes1. It contains two homologous copies of a six-transmembrane-helix (6-TM) domain, which has no sequence homology to the canonical tetrameric K+ channels and lacks the TVGYG selectivity filter motif found in these channels2, 3, 4. The prokaryotic TMEM175 channel, which is present in a subset of bacteria and archaea, contains only a single 6-TM domain and functions as a tetramer. Here, we present the crystal structure of a prokaryotic TMEM175 channel from Chamaesiphon minutus, CmTMEM175, the architecture of which represents a completely different fold from that of canonical K+ channels. All six transmembrane helices of CmTMEM175 are tightly packed within each subunit without undergoing domain swapping. The highly conserved TM1 helix acts as the pore-lining inner helix, creating an hourglass-shaped ion permeation pathway in the channel tetramer. Three layers of hydrophobic residues on the carboxy-terminal half of the TM1 helices form a bottleneck along the ion conduction pathway and serve as the selectivity filter of the channel. Mutagenesis analysis suggests that the first layer of the highly conserved isoleucine residues in the filter is primarily responsible for channel selectivity. Thus, the structure of CmTMEM175 represents a novel architecture of a tetrameric cation channel whose ion selectivity mechanism appears to be distinct from that of the classical K+ channel family.

  3. Identifying SARS-CoV membrane protein amino acid residues linked to virus-like particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Tzu Tseng

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV membrane (M proteins are capable of self-assembly and release in the form of membrane-enveloped vesicles, and of forming virus-like particles (VLPs when coexpressed with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. According to previous deletion analyses, M self-assembly involves multiple M sequence regions. To identify important M amino acid residues for VLP assembly, we coexpressed N with multiple M mutants containing substitution mutations at the amino-terminal ectodomain, carboxyl-terminal endodomain, or transmembrane segments. Our results indicate that a dileucine motif in the endodomain tail (218LL219 is required for efficient N packaging into VLPs. Results from cross-linking VLP analyses suggest that the cysteine residues 63, 85 and 158 are not in close proximity to the M dimer interface. We noted a significant reduction in M secretion due to serine replacement for C158, but not for C63 or C85. Further analysis suggests that C158 is involved in M-N interaction. In addition to mutations of the highly conserved 107-SWWSFNPE-114 motif, substitutions at codons W19, W57, P58, W91, Y94 or F95 all resulted in significantly reduced VLP yields, largely due to defective M secretion. VLP production was not significantly affected by a tryptophan replacement of Y94 or F95 or a phenylalanine replacement of W19, W57 or W91. Combined, these results indicate the involvement of specific M amino acids during SARS-CoV virus assembly, and suggest that aromatic residue retention at specific positions is critical for M function in terms of directing virus assembly.

  4. Distributed Channel Allocation and Time Slot Optimization for Green Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiqi Ding

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In sustainable smart cities, power saving is a severe challenge in the energy-constrained Internet of Things (IoT. Efficient utilization of limited multiple non-overlap channels and time resources is a promising solution to reduce the network interference and save energy consumption. In this paper, we propose a joint channel allocation and time slot optimization solution for IoT. First, we propose a channel ranking algorithm which enables each node to rank its available channels based on the channel properties. Then, we propose a distributed channel allocation algorithm so that each node can choose a proper channel based on the channel ranking and its own residual energy. Finally, the sleeping duration and spectrum sensing duration are jointly optimized to maximize the normalized throughput and satisfy energy consumption constraints simultaneously. Different from the former approaches, our proposed solution requires no central coordination or any global information that each node can operate based on its own local information in a total distributed manner. Also, theoretical analysis and extensive simulations have validated that when applying our solution in the network of IoT: (i each node can be allocated to a proper channel based on the residual energy to balance the lifetime; (ii the network can rapidly converge to a collision-free transmission through each node’s learning ability in the process of the distributed channel allocation; and (iii the network throughput is further improved via the dynamic time slot optimization.

  5. Distributed Channel Allocation and Time Slot Optimization for Green Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kaiqi; Zhao, Haitao; Hu, Xiping; Wei, Jibo

    2017-10-28

    In sustainable smart cities, power saving is a severe challenge in the energy-constrained Internet of Things (IoT). Efficient utilization of limited multiple non-overlap channels and time resources is a promising solution to reduce the network interference and save energy consumption. In this paper, we propose a joint channel allocation and time slot optimization solution for IoT. First, we propose a channel ranking algorithm which enables each node to rank its available channels based on the channel properties. Then, we propose a distributed channel allocation algorithm so that each node can choose a proper channel based on the channel ranking and its own residual energy. Finally, the sleeping duration and spectrum sensing duration are jointly optimized to maximize the normalized throughput and satisfy energy consumption constraints simultaneously. Different from the former approaches, our proposed solution requires no central coordination or any global information that each node can operate based on its own local information in a total distributed manner. Also, theoretical analysis and extensive simulations have validated that when applying our solution in the network of IoT: (i) each node can be allocated to a proper channel based on the residual energy to balance the lifetime; (ii) the network can rapidly converge to a collision-free transmission through each node's learning ability in the process of the distributed channel allocation; and (iii) the network throughput is further improved via the dynamic time slot optimization.

  6. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channel Function and Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Human cardiomyocytes express 3 distinct types of delayed rectifier potassium channels. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels conduct the rapidly activating current IKr; KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels conduct the slowly activating current IKs; and Kv1.5 channels conduct an ultrarapid activating current IKur. Here the authors provide a general overview of the mechanistic and structural basis of ion selectivity, gating, and pharmacology of the 3 types of cardiac delayed rectifier potassium ion channels. Most blockers bind to S6 residues that line the central cavity of the channel, whereas activators interact with the channel at 4 symmetric binding sites outside the cavity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-equivalent role of TM2 gating hinges in heteromeric Kir4.1/Kir5.1 potassium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Lijun; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of the crystal structures of the KcsA and MthK potassium channels suggests that the process of opening a K+ channel involves pivoted bending of the inner pore-lining helices at a highly conserved glycine residue. This bending motion is proposed to splay the transmembrane domains outwards to widen the gate at the ?helix-bundle crossing?. However, in the inwardly rectifying (Kir) potassium channel family, the role of this ?hinge? residue in the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and t...

  8. Structural and functional characterization of Rpn12 identifies residues required for Rpn10 proteasome incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Jonas; Riedinger, Christiane; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos; Johnson, Eachan O D; Lowe, Edward D; Khoudian, Christina; Smith, Dominique; Noble, Martin E M; Gordon, Colin; Endicott, Jane A

    2012-11-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets selected proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Rpn12 is an essential component of the 19S regulatory particle and plays a role in recruiting the extrinsic ubiquitin receptor Rpn10. In the present paper we report the crystal structure of Rpn12, a proteasomal PCI-domain-containing protein. The structure helps to define a core structural motif for the PCI domain and identifies potential sites through which Rpn12 might form protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate that mutating residues at one of these sites impairs Rpn12 binding to Rpn10 in vitro and reduces Rpn10 incorporation into proteasomes in vivo.

  9. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    CERN Document Server

    Deng Ying Chun; Qian Min Ping; Feng Jian Feng

    2003-01-01

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included.

  10. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Yingchun; Peng Shenglun; Qian Minping; Feng Jianfeng

    2003-01-01

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included

  11. Identifying transition rates of ionic channels via observations at a single state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Yingchun [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Peng Shenglun [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Qian Minping [School of Mathematics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Feng Jianfeng [COGS, Sussex University, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-07

    We consider how to determine all transition rates of an ion channel when it can be described by a birth-death chain or a Markov chain on a star-graph with continuous time. It is found that all transition rates are uniquely determined by the distribution of its lifetime and death-time histograms at a single state. An algorithm to calculate the transition rates exactly, based on the statistics of the lifetime and death-time of the Markov chain at the state, is provided. Examples to illustrate how an ion channel activity is fully determined by the observation of a single state of the ion channel are included.

  12. Non-basic amino acids in the ROMK1 channels via an appropriate distance modulate PIP2 regulated pHi-gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Hsing; Huang, Po-Tsang; Liou, Horng-Huei; Lin, Mei-Ying; Lou, Kuo-Long; Chen, Chung-Yi

    2016-04-22

    The ROMK1 (Kir1.1) channel activity is predominantly regulated by intracellular pH (pHi) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Although several residues were reported to be involved in the regulation of pHi associated with PIP2 interaction, the detailed molecular mechanism remains unclear. We perform experiments in ROMK1 pHi-gating with electrophysiology combined with mutational and structural analysis. In the present study, non basic residues of C-terminal region (S219, N215, I192, L216 and L220) in ROMK1 channels have been found to mediate channel-PIP2 interaction and pHi gating. Further, our structural results show these residues with an appropriate distance to interact with membrane PIP2. Meanwhile, a cluster of basic residues (R188, R217 and K218), which was previously discovered regarding the interaction with PIP2, exists in this appropriate distance to discriminate the regulation of channel-PIP2 interaction and pHi-gating. This appropriate distance can be observed with high conservation in the Kir channel family. Our results provide insight that an appropriate distance cooperates with the electrostatics interaction of channel-PIP2 to regulate pHi-gating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Random mutagenesis screening indicates the absence of a separate H(+)-sensor in the pH-sensitive Kir channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Jennifer J; Shang, Lijun; Bollepalli, Murali K; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Tucker, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Several inwardly-rectifying (Kir) potassium channels (Kir1.1, Kir4.1 and Kir4.2) are characterised by their sensitivity to inhibition by intracellular H(+) within the physiological range. The mechanism by which these channels are regulated by intracellular pH has been the subject of intense scrutiny for over a decade, yet the molecular identity of the titratable pH-sensor remains elusive. In this study we have taken advantage of the acidic intracellular environment of S. cerevisiae and used a K(+) -auxotrophic strain to screen for mutants of Kir1.1 with impaired pH-sensitivity. In addition to the previously identified K80M mutation, this unbiased screening approach identified a novel mutation (S172T) in the second transmembrane domain (TM2) that also produces a marked reduction in pH-sensitivity through destabilization of the closed-state. However, despite this extensive mutagenic approach, no mutations could be identified which removed channel pH-sensitivity or which were likely to act as a separate H(+) -sensor unique to the pH-sensitive Kir channels. In order to explain these results we propose a model in which the pH-sensing mechanism is part of an intrinsic gating mechanism common to all Kir channels, not just the pH-sensitive Kir channels. In this model, mutations which disrupt this pH-sensor would result in an increase, not reduction, in pH-sensitivity. This has major implications for any future studies of Kir channel pH-sensitivity and explains why formal identification of these pH-sensing residues still represents a major challenge.

  14. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency.

  15. Identification of a probable pore-forming domain in the multimeric vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingbo; Baetz, Ulrike; Krügel, Undine; Martinoia, Enrico; De Angeli, Alexis

    2013-10-01

    Aluminum-activated malate transporters (ALMTs) form an important family of anion channels involved in fundamental physiological processes in plants. Because of their importance, the role of ALMTs in plant physiology is studied extensively. In contrast, the structural basis of their functional properties is largely unknown. This lack of information limits the understanding of the functional and physiological differences between ALMTs and their impact on anion transport in plants. This study aimed at investigating the structural organization of the transmembrane domain of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) vacuolar channel AtALMT9. For that purpose, we performed a large-scale mutagenesis analysis and found two residues that form a salt bridge between the first and second putative transmembrane α-helices (TMα1 and TMα2). Furthermore, using a combination of pharmacological and mutagenesis approaches, we identified citrate as an "open channel blocker" of AtALMT9 and used this tool to examine the inhibition sensitivity of different point mutants of highly conserved amino acid residues. By this means, we found a stretch within the cytosolic moiety of the TMα5 that is a probable pore-forming domain. Moreover, using a citrate-insensitive AtALMT9 mutant and biochemical approaches, we could demonstrate that AtALMT9 forms a multimeric complex that is supposedly composed of four subunits. In summary, our data provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence about the structural organization of an ion channel of the ALMT family. We suggest that AtALMT9 is a tetramer and that the TMα5 domains of the subunits contribute to form the pore of this anion channel.

  16. Diclofenac distinguishes among homomeric and heteromeric potassium channels composed of KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Mackie, Alexander R; Martin, Jody L; Cribbs, Leanne L; Byron, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 potassium channel subunits are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, although it remains uncertain how these subunits assemble to form functional channels. Using patch-clamp techniques, we compared the electrophysiological characteristics and effects of diclofenac, a known KCNQ channel activator, on human KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels expressed individually or together in A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. The conductance curves of the overexpressed channels were fitted by a single Boltzmann function in each case (V(0.5) values: -31, -44, and -38 mV for KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5, respectively). Diclofenac (100 μM) inhibited KCNQ5 channels, reducing maximum conductance by 53%, but increased maximum conductance of KCNQ4 channels by 38%. The opposite effects of diclofenac on KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 could not be attributed to the presence of a basic residue (lysine) in the voltage-sensing domain of KCNQ5, because mutation of this residue to neutral glycine (the residue present in KCNQ4) resulted in a more effective block of the channel. Differences in deactivation rates and distinct voltage-dependent effects of diclofenac on channel activation and deactivation observed with each of the subunit combinations (KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5) were used as diagnostic tools to evaluate native KCNQ currents in vascular smooth muscle cells. A7r5 cells express only KCNQ5 channels endogenously, and their responses to diclofenac closely resembled those of the overexpressed KCNQ5 currents. In contrast, mesenteric artery myocytes, which express both KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels, displayed whole-cell KCNQ currents with properties and diclofenac responses characteristic of overexpressed heteromeric KCNQ4/5 channels.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Orai Reveal How the Third Transmembrane Segment Contributes to Hydration and Ca2+ Selectivity in Calcium Release-Activated Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavizargar, Azadeh; Berti, Claudio; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Furini, Simone

    2018-04-26

    Calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels open upon depletion of Ca 2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum, and when open, they are permeable to a selective flux of calcium ions. The atomic structure of Orai, the pore domain of CRAC channels, from Drosophila melanogaster has revealed many details about conduction and selectivity in this family of ion channels. However, it is still unclear how residues on the third transmembrane helix can affect the conduction properties of the channel. Here, molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations were employed to analyze how a conserved glutamate residue on the third transmembrane helix (E262) contributes to selectivity. The comparison between the wild-type and mutated channels revealed a severe impact of the mutation on the hydration pattern of the pore domain and on the dynamics of residues K270, and Brownian dynamics simulations proved that the altered configuration of residues K270 in the mutated channel impairs selectivity to Ca 2+ over Na + . The crevices of water molecules, revealed by molecular dynamics simulations, are perfectly located to contribute to the dynamics of the hydrophobic gate and the basic gate, suggesting a possible role in channel opening and in selectivity function.

  18. Can MRI diffusion-weighted imaging identify postoperative residual/recurrent soft-tissue sarcomas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Maher ElDaly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI and quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC mapping in the detection of recurrent/residual postoperative soft tissue sarcomas. Materials and Methods: This study included 36 patients; 27 patients had postoperative recurrent/residual soft tissue sarcomas and 9 patients had postoperative and treatment-related changes (inflammation/fibrosis. The DWI was obtained with 3 b values including 0, 400, and 800 s/mm2. Calculation of the ADC value of the lesion was done via placing the region of interest (ROI to include the largest area of the lesion. ADC values were compared to histopathology. Results: Our results showed that including CE-MRI improved the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity in recurrence detection compared to conventional non-enhanced sequences. However, it showed low specificity (55.56% with a high false-positive rate that may lead to an unnecessary biopsy of a mass such as region of postoperative scar tissue. Conclusion: The joint use of gadolinium-enhanced MRI and quantitative DWI with ADC mapping offer added value in the detection of recurrent/residual postoperative soft tissue sarcoma. This combined use increased both the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity with a cut-off average ADC value for detecting nonmyxoid recurrent/residual lesions ≤1.3 × 10−3 mm2/s (100% specificity and 90.48% sensitivity. Our results showed limited value of DWI with ADC mapping in assessing myxoid sarcomatous tumor recurrences.

  19. Non-equivalent role of TM2 gating hinges in heteromeric Kir4.1/Kir5.1 potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Lijun; Tucker, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    Comparison of the crystal structures of the KcsA and MthK potassium channels suggests that the process of opening a K(+) channel involves pivoted bending of the inner pore-lining helices at a highly conserved glycine residue. This bending motion is proposed to splay the transmembrane domains outwards to widen the gate at the "helix-bundle crossing". However, in the inwardly rectifying (Kir) potassium channel family, the role of this "hinge" residue in the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and that of another putative glycine gating hinge at the base of TM2 remain controversial. We investigated the role of these two positions in heteromeric Kir4.1/Kir5.1 channels, which are unique amongst Kir channels in that both subunits lack a conserved glycine at the upper hinge position. Contrary to the effect seen in other channels, increasing the potential flexibility of TM2 by glycine substitutions at the upper hinge position decreases channel opening. Furthermore, the contribution of the Kir4.1 subunit to this process is dominant compared to Kir5.1, demonstrating a non-equivalent contribution of these two subunits to the gating process. A homology model of heteromeric Kir4.1/Kir5.1 shows that these upper "hinge" residues are in close contact with the base of the pore alpha-helix that supports the selectivity filter. Our results also indicate that the highly conserved glycine at the "lower" gating hinge position is required for tight packing of the TM2 helices at the helix-bundle crossing, rather than acting as a hinge residue.

  20. Consensus of sample-balanced classifiers for identifying ligand-binding residue by co-evolutionary physicochemical characteristics of amino acids

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is an important mechanism for some proteins to perform their functions, and those binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. So far, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. Due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we constructed several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier was trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers formed a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Experimental results on CASP9 targets demonstrated that our method compared favorably with the state-of-the-art. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  1. Point mutations in the transmembrane region of the clic1 ion channel selectively modify its biophysical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Averaimo

    Full Text Available Chloride intracellular Channel 1 (CLIC1 is a metamorphic protein that changes from a soluble cytoplasmic protein into a transmembrane protein. Once inserted into membranes, CLIC1 multimerises and is able to form chloride selective ion channels. Whilst CLIC1 behaves as an ion channel both in cells and in artificial lipid bilayers, its structure in the soluble form has led to some uncertainty as to whether it really is an ion channel protein. CLIC1 has a single putative transmembrane region that contains only two charged residues: arginine 29 (Arg29 and lysine 37 (Lys37. As charged residues are likely to have a key role in ion channel function, we hypothesized that mutating them to neutral alanine to generate K37A and R29A CLIC1 would alter the electrophysiological characteristics of CLIC1. By using three different electrophysiological approaches: i single channel Tip-Dip in artificial bilayers using soluble recombinant CLIC1, ii cell-attached and iii whole-cell patch clamp recordings in transiently transfected HEK cells, we determined that the K37A mutation altered the single-channel conductance while the R29A mutation affected the single-channel open probability in response to variation in membrane potential. Our results show that mutation of the two charged amino acids (K37 and R29 in the putative transmembrane region of CLIC1 alters the biophysical properties of the ion channel in both artificial bilayers and cells. Hence these charged residues are directly involved in regulating its ion channel activity. This strongly suggests that, despite its unusual structure, CLIC1 itself is able to form a chloride ion channel.

  2. Mode Switching for the Multi-Antenna Broadcast Channel Based on Delay and Channel Quantization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imperfect channel state information degrades the performance of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO communications; its effects on single-user (SU and multiuser (MU MIMO transmissions are quite different. In particular, MU-MIMO suffers from residual interuser interference due to imperfect channel state information while SU-MIMO only suffers from a power loss. This paper compares the throughput loss of both SU and MU-MIMO in the broadcast channel due to delay and channel quantization. Accurate closed-form approximations are derived for achievable rates for both SU and MU-MIMO. It is shown that SU-MIMO is relatively robust to delayed and quantized channel information, while MU-MIMO with zero-forcing precoding loses its spatial multiplexing gain with a fixed delay or fixed codebook size. Based on derived achievable rates, a mode switching algorithm is proposed, which switches between SU and MU-MIMO modes to improve the spectral efficiency based on average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, normalized Doppler frequency, and the channel quantization codebook size. The operating regions for SU and MU modes with different delays and codebook sizes are determined, and they can be used to select the preferred mode. It is shown that the MU mode is active only when the normalized Doppler frequency is very small, and the codebook size is large.

  3. Intracellular long-chain acyl CoAs activate TRPV1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yu

    Full Text Available TRPV1 channels are an important class of membrane proteins that play an integral role in the regulation of intracellular cations such as calcium in many different tissue types. The anionic phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 is a known positive modulator of TRPV1 channels and the negatively charged phosphate groups interact with several basic amino acid residues in the proximal C-terminal TRP domain of the TRPV1 channel. We and other groups have shown that physiological sub-micromolar levels of long-chain acyl CoAs (LC-CoAs, another ubiquitous anionic lipid, can also act as positive modulators of ion channels and exchangers. Therefore, we investigated whether TRPV1 channel activity is similarly regulated by LC-CoAs. Our results show that LC-CoAs are potent activators of the TRPV1 channel and interact with the same PIP2-binding residues in TRPV1. In contrast to PIP2, LC-CoA modulation of TRPV1 is independent of Ca2+i, acting in an acyl side-chain saturation and chain-length dependent manner. Elevation of LC-CoAs in intact Jurkat T-cells leads to significant increases in agonist-induced Ca2+i levels. Our novel findings indicate that LC-CoAs represent a new fundamental mechanism for regulation of TRPV1 channel activity that may play a role in diverse cell types under physiological and pathophysiological conditions that alter fatty acid transport and metabolism such as obesity and diabetes.

  4. Mutations in the voltage-sensing domain affect the alternative ion permeation pathway in the TRPM3 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Katharina; Gruss, Fabian; Aloi, Vincenzo Davide; Janssens, Annelies; Ulens, Chris; Voets, Thomas; Vriens, Joris

    2018-03-31

    Mutagenesis at positively charged amino acids (arginines and lysines) (R1-R4) in the voltage-sensor domain (transmembrane segment (S) 4) of voltage-gated Na + , K + and Ca 2+ channels can lead to an alternative ion permeation pathway distinct from the central pore. Recently, a non-canonical ion permeation pathway was described in TRPM3, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily. The non-canonical pore exists in the native TRPM3 channel and can be activated by co-stimulation of the endogenous agonist pregnenolone sulphate and the antifungal drug clotrimazole or by stimulation of the synthetic agonist CIM0216. Alignment of the voltage sensor of Shaker K + channels with the entire TRPM3 sequence revealed the highest degree of similarity in the putative S4 region of TRPM3, and suggested that only one single gating charge arginine (R2) in the putative S4 region is conserved. Mutagenesis studies in the voltage-sensing domain of TRPM3 revealed several residues in the voltage sensor (S4) as well as in S1 and S3 that are crucial for the occurrence of the non-canonical inward currents. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the involvement of the voltage-sensing domain of TRPM3 in the formation of an alternative ion permeation pathway. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cationic channels involved in a broad array of functions, including homeostasis, motility and sensory functions. TRP channel subunits consist of six transmembrane segments (S1-S6), and form tetrameric channels with a central pore formed by the region encompassing S5 and S6. Recently, evidence was provided for the existence of an alternative ion permeation pathway in TRPM3, which allows large inward currents upon hyperpolarization independently of the central pore. However, very little knowledge is available concerning the localization of this alternative pathway in the native TRPM3 channel protein. Guided by sequence homology with Shaker K + channels, in which

  5. Measurement and analysis of cross-section for some residues produced in 16O + 27Al system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Rakesh Kumar; Golda, K.S.; Bhardwaj, H.D.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, the theoretical estimate of the cross-section for the evaporation residues has been determined using code ALICE-91 which is based on statistical approach and considers the population of the residues only through CF channels, including PE emission

  6. Diclofenac Distinguishes among Homomeric and Heteromeric Potassium Channels Composed of KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 SubunitsS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Mackie, Alexander R.; Martin, Jody L.; Cribbs, Leanne L.

    2011-01-01

    KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 potassium channel subunits are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, although it remains uncertain how these subunits assemble to form functional channels. Using patch-clamp techniques, we compared the electrophysiological characteristics and effects of diclofenac, a known KCNQ channel activator, on human KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels expressed individually or together in A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. The conductance curves of the overexpressed channels were fitted by a single Boltzmann function in each case (V0.5 values: −31, −44, and −38 mV for KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5, respectively). Diclofenac (100 μM) inhibited KCNQ5 channels, reducing maximum conductance by 53%, but increased maximum conductance of KCNQ4 channels by 38%. The opposite effects of diclofenac on KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 could not be attributed to the presence of a basic residue (lysine) in the voltage-sensing domain of KCNQ5, because mutation of this residue to neutral glycine (the residue present in KCNQ4) resulted in a more effective block of the channel. Differences in deactivation rates and distinct voltage-dependent effects of diclofenac on channel activation and deactivation observed with each of the subunit combinations (KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5) were used as diagnostic tools to evaluate native KCNQ currents in vascular smooth muscle cells. A7r5 cells express only KCNQ5 channels endogenously, and their responses to diclofenac closely resembled those of the overexpressed KCNQ5 currents. In contrast, mesenteric artery myocytes, which express both KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels, displayed whole-cell KCNQ currents with properties and diclofenac responses characteristic of overexpressed heteromeric KCNQ4/5 channels. PMID:20876743

  7. Electrostatic tuning of permeation and selectivity in aquaporin water channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens O Stibius; Tajkhorshid, E.; Schulten, K.

    2003-01-01

    Water permeation and electrostatic interactions between water and channel are investigated in the Escherichia coli glycerol uptake facilitator GlpF, a member of the aquaporin water channel family, by molecular dynamics simulations. A tetrameric model of the channel embedded in a 16:0/ 18:1c9...... with the protein electrostatic fields enforce a bipolar water configuration inside the channel with dipole inversion at the NPA motifs. At the NPA motifs water-protein electrostatic interactions facilitate this inversion. Furthermore, water-water electrostatic interactions are in all regions inside the channel...... stronger than water-protein interactions, except near a conserved, positively charged Arg residue. We find that variations of the protein electrostatic field through the channel, owing to preserved structural features, completely explain the bipolar orientation of water. This orientation persists despite...

  8. Mutation of I696 and W697 in the TRP box of vanilloid receptor subtype I modulates allosteric channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio-Teruel, Lucia; Valente, Pierluigi; González-Ros, José Manuel; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype I (TRPV1) channel acts as a polymodal sensory receptor gated by chemical and physical stimuli. Like other TRP channels, TRPV1 contains in its C terminus a short, conserved domain called the TRP box, which is necessary for channel gating. Substitution of two TRP box residues-I696 and W697-with Ala markedly affects TRPV1's response to all activating stimuli, which indicates that these two residues play a crucial role in channel gating. We systematically replaced I696 and W697 with 18 native l-amino acids (excluding cysteine) and evaluated the effect on voltage- and capsaicin-dependent gating. Mutation of I696 decreased channel activation by either voltage or capsaicin; furthermore, gating was only observed with substitution of hydrophobic amino acids. Substitution of W697 with any of the 18 amino acids abolished gating in response to depolarization alone, shifting the threshold to unreachable voltages, but not capsaicin-mediated gating. Moreover, vanilloid-activated responses of W697X mutants showed voltage-dependent gating along with a strong voltage-independent component. Analysis of the data using an allosteric model of activation indicates that mutation of I696 and W697 primarily affects the allosteric coupling constants of the ligand and voltage sensors to the channel pore. Together, our findings substantiate the notion that inter- and/or intrasubunit interactions at the level of the TRP box are critical for efficient coupling of stimulus sensing and gate opening. Perturbation of these interactions markedly reduces the efficacy and potency of the activating stimuli. Furthermore, our results identify these interactions as potential sites for pharmacological intervention.

  9. MOLEonline 2.0: interactive web-based analysis of biomacromolecular channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berka, Karel; Hanák, Ondrej; Sehnal, David; Banás, Pavel; Navrátilová, Veronika; Jaiswal, Deepti; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Svobodová Vareková, Radka; Koca, Jaroslav; Otyepka, Michal

    2012-07-01

    Biomolecular channels play important roles in many biological systems, e.g. enzymes, ribosomes and ion channels. This article introduces a web-based interactive MOLEonline 2.0 application for the analysis of access/egress paths to interior molecular voids. MOLEonline 2.0 enables platform-independent, easy-to-use and interactive analyses of (bio)macromolecular channels, tunnels and pores. Results are presented in a clear manner, making their interpretation easy. For each channel, MOLEonline displays a 3D graphical representation of the channel, its profile accompanied by a list of lining residues and also its basic physicochemical properties. The users can tune advanced parameters when performing a channel search to direct the search according to their needs. The MOLEonline 2.0 application is freely available via the Internet at http://ncbr.muni.cz/mole or http://mole.upol.cz.

  10. Ion channels in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Rainer

    2012-10-01

    Since the first recordings of single potassium channel activities in the plasma membrane of guard cells more than 25 years ago, patch-clamp studies discovered a variety of ion channels in all cell types and plant species under inspection. Their properties differed in a cell type- and cell membrane-dependent manner. Guard cells, for which the existence of plant potassium channels was initially documented, advanced to a versatile model system for studying plant ion channel structure, function, and physiology. Interestingly, one of the first identified potassium-channel genes encoding the Shaker-type channel KAT1 was shown to be highly expressed in guard cells. KAT1-type channels from Arabidopsis thaliana and its homologs from other species were found to encode the K(+)-selective inward rectifiers that had already been recorded in early patch-clamp studies with guard cells. Within the genome era, additional Arabidopsis Shaker-type channels appeared. All nine members of the Arabidopsis Shaker family are localized at the plasma membrane, where they either operate as inward rectifiers, outward rectifiers, weak voltage-dependent channels, or electrically silent, but modulatory subunits. The vacuole membrane, in contrast, harbors a set of two-pore K(+) channels. Just very recently, two plant anion channel families of the SLAC/SLAH and ALMT/QUAC type were identified. SLAC1/SLAH3 and QUAC1 are expressed in guard cells and mediate Slow- and Rapid-type anion currents, respectively, that are involved in volume and turgor regulation. Anion channels in guard cells and other plant cells are key targets within often complex signaling networks. Here, the present knowledge is reviewed for the plant ion channel biology. Special emphasis is drawn to the molecular mechanisms of channel regulation, in the context of model systems and in the light of evolution.

  11. Dynamics of ceramide channels detected using a microfluidic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenren Shao

    Full Text Available Ceramide, a proapoptotic sphingolipid, has been shown to form channels, in mitochondrial outer membranes, large enough to translocate proteins. In phospholipid membranes, electrophysiological studies and electron microscopic visualization both report that these channels form in a range of sizes with a modal value of 10 nm in diameter. A hydrogen bonded barrel-like structure consisting of hundreds of ceramide molecules has been proposed for the structure of the channel and this is supported by electrophysiological studies and molecular dynamic simulations. To our knowledge, the mechanical strength and deformability of such a large diameter but extremely thin cylindrical structure has never been reported. Here we present evidence for a reversible mechanical distortion of the cylinder following the addition of La(3+. A microfluidic system was used to repeatedly lower and then restore the conductance by alternatively perfusing La(3+ and EDTA. Although aspects of the kinetics of conductance drop and recovery are consistent with a disassembly/diffusion/reassembly model, others are inconsistent with the expected time scale of lateral diffusion of disassembled channel fragments in the membrane. The presence of a residual conductance following La(3+ treatment and the relationship between the residual conductance and the initial conductance were both indicative of a distortion/recovery process in analogy with a pressure-induced distortion of a flexible cylinder.

  12. A four-disulphide-bridged toxin, with high affinity towards voltage-gated K+ channels, isolated from Heterometrus spinnifer (Scorpionidae) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, B; Romi-Lebrun, R; Martin-Eauclaire, M F; Yasuda, A; Ishiguro, M; Oyama, Y; Pongs, O; Nakajima, T

    1997-11-15

    A new toxin, named HsTX1, has been identified in the venom of Heterometrus spinnifer (Scorpionidae), on the basis of its ability to block the rat Kv1.3 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. HsTX1 has been purified and characterized as a 34-residue peptide reticulated by four disulphide bridges. HsTX1 shares 53% and 59% sequence identity with Pandinus imperator toxin1 (Pi1) and maurotoxin, two recently isolated four-disulphide-bridged toxins, whereas it is only 32-47% identical with the other scorpion K+ channel toxins, reticulated by three disulphide bridges. The amidated and carboxylated forms of HsTX1 were synthesized chemically, and identity between the natural and the synthetic amidated peptides was proved by mass spectrometry, co-elution on C18 HPLC and blocking activity on the rat Kv1.3 channels. The disulphide bridge pattern was studied by (1) limited reduction-alkylation at acidic pH and (2) enzymic cleavage on an immobilized trypsin cartridge, both followed by mass and sequence analyses. Three of the disulphide bonds are connected as in the three-disulphide-bridged scorpion toxins, and the two extra half-cystine residues of HsTX1 are cross-linked, as in Pi1. These results, together with those of CD analysis, suggest that HsTX1 probably adopts the same general folding as all scorpion K+ channel toxins. HsTX1 is a potent inhibitor of the rat Kv1.3 channels (IC50 approx. 12 pM). HsTX1 does not compete with 125I-apamin for binding to its receptor site on rat brain synaptosomal membranes, but competes efficiently with 125I-kaliotoxin for binding to the voltage-gated K+ channels on the same preparation (IC50 approx. 1 pM).

  13. AdE-1, a new inotropic Na(+) channel toxin from Aiptasia diaphana, is similar to, yet distinct from, known anemone Na(+) channel toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Nir; Shapira, Eli; Sher, Daniel; Moran, Yehu; Tsveyer, Liora; Turchetti-Maia, Ana Luiza; Horowitz, Michal; Hochner, Binyamin; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2013-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most prevalent causes of death in the western world. Sea anemone contains a myriad of short peptide neurotoxins affecting many pharmacological targets, several of which possess cardiotonic activity. In the present study we describe the isolation and characterization of AdE-1 (ion channel modifier), a novel cardiotonic peptide from the sea anemone Aiptasia diaphana, which differs from other cnidarian toxins. Although AdE-1 has the same cysteine residue arrangement as sea anemone type 1 and 2 Na(+) channel toxins, its sequence contains many substitutions in conserved and essential sites and its overall homology to other toxins identified to date is low (Anemonia viridis toxin II), AdE-1 markedly inhibits Na(+) current inactivation with no significant effect on current activation, suggesting a similar mechanism of action. However, its effects on twitch relaxation velocity, action potential amplitude and on the time to peak suggest that this novel toxin affects cardiomyocyte function via a more complex mechanism. Additionally, Av2's characteristic delayed and early after-depolarizations were not observed. Despite its structural differences, AdE-1 physiologic effectiveness is comparable with Av2 with a similar ED(50) value to blowfly larvae. This finding raises questions regarding the extent of the universality of structure-function in sea anemone Na(+) channel toxins.

  14. Potassium channels in brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Potassium channels are the most widely distributed class of ion channels. These channels are transmembrane proteins known to play important roles in both normal and pathophysiological functions in all cell types. Various potassium channels are recognised as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, brain/spinal cord ischaemia and sepsis. In addition to their importance as therapeutic targets, certain potassium channels are known for their beneficial roles in anaesthesia, cardioprotection and neuroprotection. Some types of potassium channels present in the plasma membrane of various cells have been found in the inner mitochondrial membrane as well. Potassium channels have been proposed to regulate mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration, matrix volume and Ca(+) ion homeostasis. It has been proposed that mitochondrial potassium channels mediate ischaemic preconditioning in various tissues. However, the specificity of a pharmacological agents and the mechanisms underlying their effects on ischaemic preconditioning remain controversial. The following potassium channels from various tissues have been identified in the inner mitochondrial membrane: ATP-regulated (mitoK(ATP)) channel, large conductance Ca(2+)-regulated (mitoBK(Ca)) channel, intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-regulated (mitoIK(Ca)) channel, voltage-gated (mitoKv1.3 type) channel, and twin-pore domain (mitoTASK-3) channel. It has been shown that increased potassium flux into brain mitochondria induced by either the mitoK(ATP) channel or mitoBK(Ca) channel affects the beneficial effects on neuronal cell survival under pathological conditions. Recently, differential distribution of mitoBK(Ca) channels has been observed in neuronal mitochondria. These findings may suggest a neuroprotective role for the mitoBK(Ca) channel in specific brain structures. This minireview summarises current data on brain mitochondrial potassium channels and the efforts to identify

  15. Adaption of the microbial community to continuous exposures of multiple residual antibiotics in sediments from a salt-water aquacultural farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiuping; Wang, Min; Chen, Yongshan; Yu, Shen; Hong, Youwei; Ma, Jun; Wu, Qian; Lin, Qiaoyin; Xu, Xiangrong

    2015-06-15

    Residual antibiotics from aquacultural farming may alter microbial community structure in aquatic environments in ways that may adversely or positively impact microbially-mediated ecological functions. This study investigated 26 ponds (26 composited samples) used to produce fish, razor clam and shrimp (farming and drying) and 2 channels (10 samples) in a saltwater aquacultural farm in southern China to characterize microbial community structure (represented by phospholipid fatty acids) in surface sediments (0-10 cm) with long-term exposure to residual antibiotics. 11 out of 14 widely-used antibiotics were quantifiable at μg kg(-1) levels in sediments but their concentrations did not statistically differ among ponds and channels, except norfloxacin in drying shrimp ponds and thiamphenicol in razor clam ponds. Concentrations of protozoan PLFAs were significantly increased in sediments from razor clam ponds while other microbial groups were similar among ponds and channels. Both canonical-correlation and stepwise-multiple-regression analyses on microbial community and residual antibiotics suggested that roxithromycin residuals were significantly related to shifts in microbial community structure in sediments. This study provided field evidence that multiple residual antibiotics at low environmental levels from aquacultural farming do not produce fundamental shifts in microbial community structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Site-Mutation of Hydrophobic Core Residues Synchronically Poise Super Interleukin 2 for Signaling: Identifying Distant Structural Effects through Affordable Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longcan Mei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A superkine variant of interleukin-2 with six site mutations away from the binding interface developed from the yeast display technique has been previously characterized as undergoing a distal structure alteration which is responsible for its super-potency and provides an elegant case study with which to get insight about how to utilize allosteric effect to achieve desirable protein functions. By examining the dynamic network and the allosteric pathways related to those mutated residues using various computational approaches, we found that nanosecond time scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations can identify the dynamic network as efficient as an ensemble algorithm. The differentiated pathways for the six core residues form a dynamic network that outlines the area of structure alteration. The results offer potentials of using affordable computing power to predict allosteric structure of mutants in knowledge-based mutagenesis.

  17. Toward High Carrier Mobility and Low Contact Resistance:Laser Cleaning of PMMA Residues on Graphene Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuehui Jia; Xin Gong; Pei Peng; Zidong Wang; Zhongzheng Tian; Liming Ren; Yunyi Fu; Han Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) is widely used for graphene transfer and device fabrication.However,it inevitably leaves a thin layer of polymer residues after acetone rinsing and leads to dramatic degradation of device performance.How to eliminate contamination and restore clean surfaces of graphene is still highly demanded.In this paper,we present a reliable and position-controllable method to remove the polymer residues on graphene films by laser exposure.Under proper laser conditions,PMMA residues can be substantially reduced without introducing defects to the underlying graphene.Furthermore,by applying this laser cleaning technique to the channel and contacts of graphene fieldeffect transistors(GFETs),higher carrier mobility as well as lower contact resistance can be realized.This work opens a way for probing intrinsic properties of contaminant-free graphene and fabricating high-performance GFETs with both clean channel and intimate graphene/metal contact.

  18. Molecular and kinetic determinants of local anaesthetic action on sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R J; Zamponi, G W; Sierralta, I E

    1998-11-23

    (1) Local anaesthetics (LA) rely for their clinical actions on state-dependent inhibition of voltage-dependent sodium channels. (2) Single, batrachoxin-modified sodium channels in planar lipid bilayers allow direct observation of drug-channel interactions. Two modes of inhibition of single-channel current are observed: fast block of the open channels and prolongation of a long-lived closed state, some of whose properties resemble those of the inactivated state of unmodified channels. (3) Analogues of different parts of the LA molecule separately mimic each blocking mode: amines--fast block, and water-soluble aromatics--closed state prolongation. (4) Interaction between a mu-conotoxin derivative and diethylammonium indicate an intrapore site of fast, open-state block. (5) Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that hydrophobic residues in transmembrane segment 6 of repeat domain 4 of sodium channels are critical for both LA binding and stabilization of the inactivated state.

  19. 40 CFR 721.9635 - Terpene residue distillates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Terpene residue distillates. 721.9635... Substances § 721.9635 Terpene residue distillates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as terpene residue distillates (PMN P-96-897...

  20. Ion Selectivity Mechanism in a Bacterial Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hailong; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    The proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. Recent emergence of a high resolution crystal structure of GLIC captured in a potentially open state allowed detailed, atomic-level insight into ion conduction and selectivity mechanisms in these channels. Herein, we have examined the barriers to ion conduction and origins of ion selectivity in the GLIC channel by the construction of potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for sodium and chloride ions inside the transmembrane region. Our calculations reveal that the GLIC channel is open for a sodium ion to transport, but presents a ∼10 kcal/mol free energy barrier for a chloride ion, which arises primarily from the unfavorable interactions with a ring of negatively charged glutamate residues (E-2) at the intracellular end and a ring of hydrophobic residues (I9) in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Our collective findings further suggest that the charge selection mechanism can, to a large extent, be attributed to the narrow intracellular end and a ring of glutamate residues in this position their strong negative electrostatics and ability to bind cations. By contrast, E19 at the extracellular entrance only plays a minor role in ion selectivity of GLIC. In addition to electrostatics, both ion hydration and protein dynamics are found to be crucial for ion conduction as well, which explains why a chloride ion experiences a much greater barrier than a sodium ion in the hydrophobic region of the pore.

  1. Ion channelling analysis of pre-amorphised silicon diodes using a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, J.; Paus, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    Aligned and random ion channelling analysis was performed on p + n diode structures in silicon, with the Surrey nuclear microprobe. Three different types of diode were investigated, each pre-amorphised by a different ion (Si + , Ge + or Sn + ) before the p + region was formed by BF 2 + implantation. The ion channelling measurements are presented and compared with previously published electrical measurements on these diodes. Relatively large residual disorder and junction leakage currents were found for the Si + pre-amorphised diodes; however, all the diodes were leaky. The results are consistent with dislocation loops within the depletion regions of the diodes causing both the residual disorder and the large leakage currents. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies support this model. (author)

  2. S1 constrains S4 in the voltage sensor domain of Kv7.1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoni Haitin

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated K(+ channels comprise a central pore enclosed by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs. While movement of the S4 helix is known to couple to channel gate opening and closing, the nature of S4 motion is unclear. Here, we substituted S4 residues of Kv7.1 channels by cysteine and recorded whole-cell mutant channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. In the closed state, disulfide and metal bridges constrain residue S225 (S4 nearby C136 (S1 within the same VSD. In the open state, two neighboring I227 (S4 are constrained at proximity while residue R228 (S4 is confined close to C136 (S1 of an adjacent VSD. Structural modeling predicts that in the closed to open transition, an axial rotation (approximately 190 degrees and outward translation of S4 (approximately 12 A is accompanied by VSD rocking. This large sensor motion changes the intra-VSD S1-S4 interaction to an inter-VSD S1-S4 interaction. These constraints provide a ground for cooperative subunit interactions and suggest a key role of the S1 segment in steering S4 motion during Kv7.1 gating.

  3. CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTRACELLULAR IONS TO Kv CHANNEL VOLTAGE SENSOR DYNAMICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eGoodchild

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage sensing domains of Kv channels control ionic conductance through coupling of the movement of charged residues in the S4 segment to conformational changes at the cytoplasmic region of the pore domain, that allow K+ ions to flow. Conformational transitions within the voltage sensing domain caused by changes in the applied voltage across the membrane field are coupled to the conducting pore region and the gating of ionic conductance. However, several other factors not directly linked to the voltage dependent movement of charged residues within the voltage sensor impact the dynamics of the voltage sensor, such as inactivation, ionic conductance, intracellular ion identity and block of the channel by intracellular ligands. The effect of intracellular ions on voltage sensor dynamics is of importance in the interpretation of gating current measurements and the physiology of pore/voltage sensor coupling. There is a significant amount of variability in the reported kinetics of voltage sensor deactivation kinetics of Kv channels attributed to different mechanisms such as open state stabilization, immobilization and relaxation processes of the voltage sensor. Here we separate these factors and focus on the causal role that intracellular ions can play in allosterically modulating the dynamics of Kv voltage sensor deactivation kinetics. These considerations are of critical importance in understanding the molecular determinants of the complete channel gating cycle from activation to deactivation.

  4. Ligand Access Channels in Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Urban

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity relationships may bring invaluable information on structural elements of both enzymes and substrates that, together, govern substrate specificity. Buried active sites in cytochrome P450 enzymes are connected to the solvent by a network of channels exiting at the distal surface of the protein. This review presents different in silico tools that were developed to uncover such channels in P450 crystal structures. It also lists some of the experimental evidence that actually suggest that these predicted channels might indeed play a critical role in modulating P450 functions. Amino acid residues at the entrance of the channels may participate to a first global ligand recognition of ligands by P450 enzymes before they reach the buried active site. Moreover, different P450 enzymes show different networks of predicted channels. The plasticity of P450 structures is also important to take into account when looking at how channels might play their role.

  5. Adaptive co-channel interference cancelation for power-limited applications

    KAUST Repository

    Radaydeh, Redha Mahmoud Mesleh

    2010-09-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive co-channel interference -steering algorithm for highly correlated receive antenna channels with an aim of reducing the power consumption at the receiver. With this algorithm, the receiver activates as many antennas as necessary to maintain the residual total interference instantaneous power within a tolerable range, which can be set to guarantee a target performance level. The mode of operation does not require perfect knowledge of the statistical ordering of interfering signals instantaneous powers, which further reduces the complexity of implementation. It is shown that the arbitrary interference cancelation technique and no cancelation scenario can be studied as limiting cases of the proposed scheme. Analytical expressions for the statistics of the residual total interference instantaneous power are derived, which are then used to obtain results for the average number of active antennas and system outage performance. Numerical studies supported by simulations are presented to clarify the usefulness of the proposed scheme. ©2010 IEEE.

  6. Identification of a Novel EF-Loop in the N-terminus of TRPM2 Channel Involved in Calcium Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhuan Luo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available As an oxidative stress sensor, transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 channel is involved in many physiological and pathological processes including warmth sensing, ischemia injury, inflammatory diseases and diabetes. Intracellular calcium is critical for TRPM2 channel activation and the IQ-like motif in the N-terminus has been shown to be important by mediating calmodulin binding. Sequence analysis predicted two potential EF-loops in the N-terminus of TRPM2. Site-directed mutagenesis combining with functional assay showed that substitution with alanine of several residues, most of which are conserved in the typical EF-loop, including D267, D278, D288, and E298 dramatically reduced TRPM2 channel currents. By further changing the charges or side chain length of these conserved residues, our results indicate that the negative charge of D267 and the side chain length of D278 are critical for calcium-induced TRPM2 channel activation. G272I mutation also dramatically reduced the channel currents, suggesting that this site is critical for calcium-induced TRPM2 channel activation. Furthermore, D267A mutant dramatically reduced the currents induced by calcium alone compared with that by ADPR, indicating that D267 residue in D267–D278 motif is the most important site for calcium sensitivity of TRPM2. In addition, inside-out recordings showed that mutations at D267, G272, D278, and E298 had no effect on single-channel conductance. Taken together, our data indicate that D267–D278 motif in the N-terminus as a novel EF-loop is critical for calcium-induced TRPM2 channel activation.

  7. The Arabidopsis vacuolar malate channel is a member of the ALMT family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovermann, Peter; Meyer, Stefan; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Picco, Cristiana; Scholz-Starke, Joachim; Ravera, Silvia; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2007-12-01

    In plants, malate is a central metabolite and fulfills a large number of functions. Vacuolar malate may reach very high concentrations and fluctuate rapidly, whereas cytosolic malate is kept at a constant level allowing optimal metabolism. Recently, a vacuolar malate transporter (Arabidopsis thaliana tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter, AttDT) was identified that did not correspond to the well-characterized vacuolar malate channel. We therefore hypothesized that a member of the aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) gene family could code for a vacuolar malate channel. Using GFP fusion constructs, we could show that AtALMT9 (A. thaliana ALMT9) is targeted to the vacuole. Promoter-GUS fusion constructs demonstrated that this gene is expressed in all organs, but is cell-type specific as GUS activity in leaves was detected nearly exclusively in mesophyll cells. Patch-clamp analysis of an Atalmt9 T-DNA insertion mutant exhibited strongly reduced vacuolar malate channel activity. In order to functionally characterize AtALMT9 as a malate channel, we heterologously expressed this gene in tobacco and in oocytes. Overexpression of AtALMT9-GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves strongly enhanced the malate current densities across the mesophyll tonoplasts. Functional expression of AtALMT9 in Xenopus oocytes induced anion currents, which were clearly distinguishable from endogenous oocyte currents. Our results demonstrate that AtALMT9 is a vacuolar malate channel. Deletion mutants for AtALMT9 exhibit only slightly reduced malate content in mesophyll protoplasts and no visible phenotype, indicating that AttDT and the residual malate channel activity are sufficient to sustain the transport activity necessary to regulate the cytosolic malate homeostasis.

  8. Pore dimensions and the role of occupancy in unitary conductance of Shaker K channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Navarro-Quezada, Nieves; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    K channels mediate the selective passage of K+ across the plasma membrane by means of intimate interactions with ions at the pore selectivity filter located near the external face. Despite high conservation of the selectivity filter, the K+ transport properties of different K channels vary widely, with the unitary conductance spanning a range of over two orders of magnitude. Mutation of Pro475, a residue located at the cytoplasmic entrance of the pore of the small-intermediate conductance K channel Shaker (Pro475Asp (P475D) or Pro475Gln (P475Q)), increases Shaker’s reported ∼20-pS conductance by approximately six- and approximately threefold, respectively, without any detectable effect on its selectivity. These findings suggest that the structural determinants underlying the diversity of K channel conductance are distinct from the selectivity filter, making P475D and P475Q excellent probes to identify key determinants of the K channel unitary conductance. By measuring diffusion-limited unitary outward currents after unilateral addition of 2 M sucrose to the internal solution to increase its viscosity, we estimated a pore internal radius of capture of ∼0.82 Å for all three Shaker variants (wild type, P475D, and P475Q). This estimate is consistent with the internal entrance of the Kv1.2/2.1 structure if the effective radius of hydrated K+ is set to ∼4 Å. Unilateral exposure to sucrose allowed us to estimate the internal and external access resistances together with that of the inner pore. We determined that Shaker resistance resides mainly in the inner cavity, whereas only ∼8% resides in the selectivity filter. To reduce the inner resistance, we introduced additional aspartate residues into the internal vestibule to favor ion occupancy. No aspartate addition raised the maximum unitary conductance, measured at saturating [K+], beyond that of P475D, suggesting an ∼200-pS conductance ceiling for Shaker. This value is approximately one third of the maximum

  9. Mapping allostery through computational glycine scanning and correlation analysis of residue-residue contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Nellas, Ricky B; Fernandez, Elias J; Shen, Tongye

    2015-02-24

    Understanding allosteric mechanisms is essential for the physical control of molecular switches and downstream cellular responses. However, it is difficult to decode essential allosteric motions in a high-throughput scheme. A general two-pronged approach to performing automatic data reduction of simulation trajectories is presented here. The first step involves coarse-graining and identifying the most dynamic residue-residue contacts. The second step is performing principal component analysis of these contacts and extracting the large-scale collective motions expressed via these residue-residue contacts. We demonstrated the method using a protein complex of nuclear receptors. Using atomistic modeling and simulation, we examined the protein complex and a set of 18 glycine point mutations of residues that constitute the binding pocket of the ligand effector. The important motions that are responsible for the allostery are reported. In contrast to conventional induced-fit and lock-and-key binding mechanisms, a novel "frustrated-fit" binding mechanism of RXR for allosteric control was revealed.

  10. Identifying cochlear implant channels with poor electrode-neuron interface: electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses measured with the partial tripolar configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, Julie Arenberg; Faulkner, Kathleen F.; Tremblay, Kelly L.

    2011-01-01

    obtained with both the monopolar and partial tripolar configurations. The Wave V amplitude growth functions with increasing stimulus level showed the predicted effect of shallower growth for the partial tripolar than for the monopolar configuration, but this was observed only for the low threshold channel. In contrast, high-threshold channels showed the opposite effect; steeper growth functions were seen for the partial tripolar configuration. Conclusions These results suggest that behavioral thresholds or EABRs measured with a restricted stimulus can be used to identify potentially impaired cochlear implant channels. Channels having high thresholds and steep growth functions would likely not activate the appropriate spatially restricted region of the cochlea, leading to suboptimal perception. As a clinical tool, quick identification of impaired channels could lead to patient-specific mapping strategies and result in improved speech and music perception. PMID:21178633

  11. Structure of calmodulin complexed with an olfactory CNG channel fragment and role of the central linker: Residual dipolar couplings to evaluate calmodulin binding modes outside the kinase family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contessa, Gian Marco; Orsale, Maria; Melino, Sonia; Torre, Vincent; Paci, Maurizio; Desideri, Alessandro; Cicero, Daniel O.

    2005-01-01

    The NMR high-resolution structure of calmodulin complexed with a fragment of the olfactory cyclic-nucleotide gated channel is described. This structure shows features that are unique for this complex, including an active role of the linker connecting the N- and C-lobes of calmodulin upon binding of the peptide. Such linker is not only involved in the formation of an hydrophobic pocket to accommodate a bulky peptide residue, but it also provides a positively charged region complementary to a negative charge of the target. This complex of calmodulin with a target not belonging to the kinase family was used to test the residual dipolar coupling (RDC) approach for the determination of calmodulin binding modes to peptides. Although the complex here characterized belongs to the (1--14) family, high Q values were obtained with all the 1:1 complexes for which crystalline structures are available. Reduction of the RDC data set used for the correlation analysis to structured regions of the complex allowed a clear identification of the binding mode. Excluded regions comprise calcium binding loops and loops connecting the EF-hand motifs

  12. Pharmacological modulation of SK3 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, M; Jespersen, Thomas; Angelo, K

    2001-01-01

    Small-conductance, calcium-activated K+ channels (SK channels) are voltage-insensitive channels that have been identified molecularly within the last few years. As SK channels play a fundamental role in most excitable cells and participate in afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and spike-frequency adapt...... at concentrations of 3 microM and above. Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressive widely used clinically, inhibits SK3 channels with an IC50 of 39.1 +/- 10 microM (n=6)....

  13. Mechanosensitive Channels: In Touch with Piezo

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2010-01-01

    Mechanosensory transduction underlies touch, hearing and proprioception and requires mechanosensitive channels that are directly gated by forces; however, the molecular identities of these channels remain largely elusive. A new study has identified Piezo1 and Piezo2 as a novel class of mechanosensitive channels.

  14. Identification of the pH sensor and activation by chemical modification of the ClC-2G Cl- channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroffekova, K; Kupert, E Y; Malinowska, D H; Cuppoletti, J

    1998-10-01

    Rabbit and human ClC-2G Cl- channels are voltage sensitive and activated by protein kinase A and low extracellular pH. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism involved in acid activation of the ClC-2G Cl- channel and to determine which amino acid residues play a role in this acid activation. Channel open probability (Po) at +/-80 mV holding potentials increased fourfold in a concentration-dependent manner with extracellular H+ concentration (that is, extracellular pH, pHtrans), with an apparent acidic dissociation constant of pH 4.95 +/- 0.27. 1-Ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide-catalyzed amidation of the channel with glycine methyl ester increased Po threefold at pHtrans 7.4, at which the channel normally exhibits low Po. With extracellular pH reduction (protonation) or amidation, increased Po was due to a significant increase in open time constants and a significant decrease in closed time constants of the channel gating, and this effect was insensitive to applied voltage. With the use of site-directed mutagenesis, the extracellular region EELE (amino acids 416-419) was identified as the pH sensor and amino acid Glu-419 was found to play the key or predominant role in activation of the ClC-2G Cl- channel by extracellular acid.

  15. The Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) voltage-gated sodium channel and mutations associated with pyrethroid resistance in field-collected adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, B W; Pietrantonio, P V

    2010-05-01

    Helicoverpa zea is one of the most costly insect pests of food and fiber crops throughout the Americas. Pyrethroid insecticides are widely applied for its control as they are effective and relatively inexpensive; however, resistance to pyrethroids threatens agricultural systems sustainability because alternative insecticides are often more expensive or less effective. Although pyrethroid resistance has been identified in this pest since 1990, the mechanisms of resistance have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Pyrethroids exert their toxicity by prolonging the open state of the voltage-gated sodium channel. Here we report the cDNA sequence of the H. zea sodium channel alpha-subunit homologous to the para gene from Drosophila melanogaster. In field-collected males which were resistant to cypermethrin as determined by the adult vial test, we identify known resistance-conferring mutations L1029H and V421M, along with two novel mutations at the V421 residue, V421A and V421G. An additional mutation, I951V, may be the first example of a pyrethroid resistance mutation caused by RNA editing. Identification of the sodium channel cDNA sequence will allow for testing hypotheses on target-site resistance for insecticides acting on this channel through modeling and expression studies. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for resistance will greatly improve our ability to identify and predict resistance, as well as preserve susceptibility to pyrethroid insecticides. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2013-08-31

    We present the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect interdomain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9.

  17. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kalescky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2 in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery.

  18. The two-pore domain potassium channel, TWIK-1, has a role in the regulation of heart rate and atrial size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Chatelain, Franck C; Huttner, Inken G

    2016-01-01

    distribution with predominant localization in the endosomal compartment. Two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments using Xenopus oocytes showed that both zebrafish and wild-type human TWIK-1 channels produced K(+) currents that are sensitive to external K(+) concentration as well as acidic pH. There were......The two-pore domain potassium (K(+)) channel TWIK-1 (or K2P1.1) contributes to background K(+) conductance in diverse cell types. TWIK-1, encoded by the KCNK1 gene, is present in the human heart with robust expression in the atria, however its physiological significance is unknown. To evaluate......-coding regions in two independent cohorts of patients (373 subjects) and identified three non-synonymous variants, p.R171H, p.I198M and p.G236S, that were all located in highly conserved amino acid residues. In transfected mammalian cells, zebrafish and wild-type human TWIK-1 channels had a similar cellular...

  19. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  20. Anion-sensitive regions of L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Babai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available L-type calcium currents (I(Ca are influenced by changes in extracellular chloride, but sites of anion effects have not been identified. Our experiments showed that CaV1.2 currents expressed in HEK293 cells are strongly inhibited by replacing extracellular chloride with gluconate or perchlorate. Variance-mean analysis of I(Ca and cell-attached patch single channel recordings indicate that gluconate-induced inhibition is due to intracellular anion effects on Ca(2+ channel open probability, not conductance. Inhibition of CaV1.2 currents produced by replacing chloride with gluconate was reduced from approximately 75%-80% to approximately 50% by omitting beta subunits but unaffected by omitting alpha(2delta subunits. Similarly, gluconate inhibition was reduced to approximately 50% by deleting an alpha1 subunit N-terminal region of 15 residues critical for beta subunit interactions regulating open probability. Omitting beta subunits with this mutant alpha1 subunit did not further diminish inhibition. Gluconate inhibition was unchanged with expression of different beta subunits. Truncating the C terminus at AA1665 reduced gluconate inhibition from approximately 75%-80% to approximately 50% whereas truncating it at AA1700 had no effect. Neutralizing arginines at AA1696 and 1697 by replacement with glutamines reduced gluconate inhibition to approximately 60% indicating these residues are particularly important for anion effects. Expressing CaV1.2 channels that lacked both N and C termini reduced gluconate inhibition to approximately 25% consistent with additive interactions between the two tail regions. Our results suggest that modest changes in intracellular anion concentration can produce significant effects on CaV1.2 currents mediated by changes in channel open probability involving beta subunit interactions with the N terminus and a short C terminal region.

  1. Contributions of counter-charge in a potassium channel voltage-sensor domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Niciforovic, Ana P

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains couple membrane potential to conformational changes in voltage-gated ion channels and phosphatases. Highly coevolved acidic and aromatic side chains assist the transfer of cationic side chains across the transmembrane electric field during voltage sensing. We investigated...... the functional contribution of negative electrostatic potentials from these residues to channel gating and voltage sensing with unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, electrophysiology, voltage-clamp fluorometry and ab initio calculations. The data show that neutralization of two conserved acidic side chains...

  2. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  3. Disturbances of ligand potency and enhanced degradation of the human glycine receptor at affected positions G160 and T162 originally identified in patients suffering from hyperekplexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem eAtak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ligand-binding of Cys-loop receptors is determined by N-terminal extracellular loop structures from the plus as well as from the minus side of two adjacent subunits in the pentameric receptor complex. An aromatic residue in loop B of the glycine receptor (GlyR undergoes direct interaction with the incoming ligand via cation-π interactions. Recently we showed that mutated residues in loop B identified from human patients suffering from hyperekplexia disturb ligand-binding. Here, we exchanged the affected human residues by amino acids found in related members of the Cys-loop receptor family to determine the effects of side chain volume for ion channel properties. GlyR variants were characterized in vitro following transfection into cell lines in order to analyze protein expression, trafficking, degradation and ion channel function. GlyR α1 G160 mutations significantly decrease glycine potency arguing for a positional effect on neighboring aromatic residues and consequently glycine-binding within the ligand-binding pocket. Disturbed glycinergic inhibition due to T162 α1 mutations is an additive effect of affected biogenesis and structural changes within the ligand-binding site. Protein trafficking from the ER towards ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, the secretory Golgi pathways and finally the cell surface is largely diminished, but still sufficient to deliver ion channels that are functional at least at high glycine concentrations. The majority of T162 mutant protein accumulates in the ER and is conducted to ER-associated proteasomal degradation. Hence, G160 is an important determinant during glycine binding. In contrast, T162 assigns primarily receptor biogenesis whereas exchanges in functionality are secondary effects thereof.

  4. Channel identification machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2012-01-01

    We present a formal methodology for identifying a channel in a system consisting of a communication channel in cascade with an asynchronous sampler. The channel is modeled as a multidimensional filter, while models of asynchronous samplers are taken from neuroscience and communications and include integrate-and-fire neurons, asynchronous sigma/delta modulators and general oscillators in cascade with zero-crossing detectors. We devise channel identification algorithms that recover a projection of the filter(s) onto a space of input signals loss-free for both scalar and vector-valued test signals. The test signals are modeled as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) with a Dirichlet kernel. Under appropriate limiting conditions on the bandwidth and the order of the test signal space, the filter projection converges to the impulse response of the filter. We show that our results hold for a wide class of RKHSs, including the space of finite-energy bandlimited signals. We also extend our channel identification results to noisy circuits.

  5. Channel Identification Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel A. Lazar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a formal methodology for identifying a channel in a system consisting of a communication channel in cascade with an asynchronous sampler. The channel is modeled as a multidimensional filter, while models of asynchronous samplers are taken from neuroscience and communications and include integrate-and-fire neurons, asynchronous sigma/delta modulators and general oscillators in cascade with zero-crossing detectors. We devise channel identification algorithms that recover a projection of the filter(s onto a space of input signals loss-free for both scalar and vector-valued test signals. The test signals are modeled as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS with a Dirichlet kernel. Under appropriate limiting conditions on the bandwidth and the order of the test signal space, the filter projection converges to the impulse response of the filter. We show that our results hold for a wide class of RKHSs, including the space of finite-energy bandlimited signals. We also extend our channel identification results to noisy circuits.

  6. Quantum incompatibility of channels with general outcome operator algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Yui

    2018-04-01

    A pair of quantum channels is said to be incompatible if they cannot be realized as marginals of a single channel. This paper addresses the general structure of the incompatibility of completely positive channels with a fixed quantum input space and with general outcome operator algebras. We define a compatibility relation for such channels by identifying the composite outcome space as the maximal (projective) C*-tensor product of outcome algebras. We show theorems that characterize this compatibility relation in terms of the concatenation and conjugation of channels, generalizing the recent result for channels with quantum outcome spaces. These results are applied to the positive operator valued measures (POVMs) by identifying each of them with the corresponding quantum-classical (QC) channel. We also give a characterization of the maximality of a POVM with respect to the post-processing preorder in terms of the conjugate channel of the QC channel. We consider another definition of compatibility of normal channels by identifying the composite outcome space with the normal tensor product of the outcome von Neumann algebras. We prove that for a given normal channel, the class of normally compatible channels is upper bounded by a special class of channels called tensor conjugate channels. We show the inequivalence of the C*- and normal compatibility relations for QC channels, which originates from the possibility and impossibility of copying operations for commutative von Neumann algebras in C*- and normal compatibility relations, respectively.

  7. Identifying cochlear implant channels with poor electrode-neuron interfaces: electrically evoked auditory brain stem responses measured with the partial tripolar configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierer, Julie Arenberg; Faulkner, Kathleen F; Tremblay, Kelly L

    2011-01-01

    tripolar configurations. The Wave V amplitude growth functions with increasing stimulus level showed the predicted effect of shallower growth for the partial tripolar than for the monopolar configuration, but this was observed only for the low-threshold channels. In contrast, high-threshold channels showed the opposite effect; steeper growth functions were seen for the partial tripolar configuration. These results suggest that behavioral thresholds or EABRs measured with a restricted stimulus can be used to identify potentially impaired cochlear implant channels. Channels having high thresholds and steep growth functions would likely not activate the appropriate spatially restricted region of the cochlea, leading to suboptimal perception. As a clinical tool, quick identification of impaired channels could lead to patient-specific mapping strategies and result in improved speech and music perception.

  8. CAB-Align: A Flexible Protein Structure Alignment Method Based on the Residue-Residue Contact Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genki Terashi

    Full Text Available Proteins are flexible, and this flexibility has an essential functional role. Flexibility can be observed in loop regions, rearrangements between secondary structure elements, and conformational changes between entire domains. However, most protein structure alignment methods treat protein structures as rigid bodies. Thus, these methods fail to identify the equivalences of residue pairs in regions with flexibility. In this study, we considered that the evolutionary relationship between proteins corresponds directly to the residue-residue physical contacts rather than the three-dimensional (3D coordinates of proteins. Thus, we developed a new protein structure alignment method, contact area-based alignment (CAB-align, which uses the residue-residue contact area to identify regions of similarity. The main purpose of CAB-align is to identify homologous relationships at the residue level between related protein structures. The CAB-align procedure comprises two main steps: First, a rigid-body alignment method based on local and global 3D structure superposition is employed to generate a sufficient number of initial alignments. Then, iterative dynamic programming is executed to find the optimal alignment. We evaluated the performance and advantages of CAB-align based on four main points: (1 agreement with the gold standard alignment, (2 alignment quality based on an evolutionary relationship without 3D coordinate superposition, (3 consistency of the multiple alignments, and (4 classification agreement with the gold standard classification. Comparisons of CAB-align with other state-of-the-art protein structure alignment methods (TM-align, FATCAT, and DaliLite using our benchmark dataset showed that CAB-align performed robustly in obtaining high-quality alignments and generating consistent multiple alignments with high coverage and accuracy rates, and it performed extremely well when discriminating between homologous and nonhomologous pairs of proteins

  9. CAB-Align: A Flexible Protein Structure Alignment Method Based on the Residue-Residue Contact Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashi, Genki; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are flexible, and this flexibility has an essential functional role. Flexibility can be observed in loop regions, rearrangements between secondary structure elements, and conformational changes between entire domains. However, most protein structure alignment methods treat protein structures as rigid bodies. Thus, these methods fail to identify the equivalences of residue pairs in regions with flexibility. In this study, we considered that the evolutionary relationship between proteins corresponds directly to the residue-residue physical contacts rather than the three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of proteins. Thus, we developed a new protein structure alignment method, contact area-based alignment (CAB-align), which uses the residue-residue contact area to identify regions of similarity. The main purpose of CAB-align is to identify homologous relationships at the residue level between related protein structures. The CAB-align procedure comprises two main steps: First, a rigid-body alignment method based on local and global 3D structure superposition is employed to generate a sufficient number of initial alignments. Then, iterative dynamic programming is executed to find the optimal alignment. We evaluated the performance and advantages of CAB-align based on four main points: (1) agreement with the gold standard alignment, (2) alignment quality based on an evolutionary relationship without 3D coordinate superposition, (3) consistency of the multiple alignments, and (4) classification agreement with the gold standard classification. Comparisons of CAB-align with other state-of-the-art protein structure alignment methods (TM-align, FATCAT, and DaliLite) using our benchmark dataset showed that CAB-align performed robustly in obtaining high-quality alignments and generating consistent multiple alignments with high coverage and accuracy rates, and it performed extremely well when discriminating between homologous and nonhomologous pairs of proteins in both

  10. CLC Chloride Channels and Transporters: Structure, Function, Physiology, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, Thomas J; Pusch, Michael

    2018-07-01

    CLC anion transporters are found in all phyla and form a gene family of eight members in mammals. Two CLC proteins, each of which completely contains an ion translocation parthway, assemble to homo- or heteromeric dimers that sometimes require accessory β-subunits for function. CLC proteins come in two flavors: anion channels and anion/proton exchangers. Structures of these two CLC protein classes are surprisingly similar. Extensive structure-function analysis identified residues involved in ion permeation, anion-proton coupling and gating and led to attractive biophysical models. In mammals, ClC-1, -2, -Ka/-Kb are plasma membrane Cl - channels, whereas ClC-3 through ClC-7 are 2Cl - /H + -exchangers in endolysosomal membranes. Biological roles of CLCs were mostly studied in mammals, but also in plants and model organisms like yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. CLC Cl - channels have roles in the control of electrical excitability, extra- and intracellular ion homeostasis, and transepithelial transport, whereas anion/proton exchangers influence vesicular ion composition and impinge on endocytosis and lysosomal function. The surprisingly diverse roles of CLCs are highlighted by human and mouse disorders elicited by mutations in their genes. These pathologies include neurodegeneration, leukodystrophy, mental retardation, deafness, blindness, myotonia, hyperaldosteronism, renal salt loss, proteinuria, kidney stones, male infertility, and osteopetrosis. In this review, emphasis is laid on biophysical structure-function analysis and on the cell biological and organismal roles of mammalian CLCs and their role in disease.

  11. Inactivation of Mechanically Activated Piezo1 Ion Channels Is Determined by the C-Terminal Extracellular Domain and the Inner Pore Helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezo proteins form mechanically activated ion channels that are responsible for our sense of light touch, proprioception, and vascular blood flow. Upon activation by mechanical stimuli, Piezo channels rapidly inactivate in a voltage-dependent manner through an unknown mechanism. Inactivation of Piezo channels is physiologically important, as it modulates overall mechanical sensitivity, gives rise to frequency filtering of repetitive mechanical stimuli, and is itself the target of numerous human disease-related channelopathies that are not well understood mechanistically. Here, we identify the globular C-terminal extracellular domain as a structure that is sufficient to confer the time course of inactivation and a single positively charged lysine residue at the adjacent inner pore helix as being required for its voltage dependence. Our results are consistent with a mechanism for inactivation that is mediated through voltage-dependent conformations of the inner pore helix and allosteric coupling with the C-terminal extracellular domain.

  12. Structural and functional determinants of conserved lipid interaction domains of inward rectifying Kir6.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Catherine A; Jeliazkova, Iana; Nichols, Colin G

    2002-06-01

    All members of the inward rectifiier K(+) (Kir) channel family are activated by phosphoinositides and other amphiphilic lipids. To further elucidate the mechanistic basis, we examined the membrane association of Kir6.2 fragments of K(ATP) channels, and the effects of site-directed mutations of these fragments and full-length Kir6.2 on membrane association and K(ATP) channel activity, respectively. GFP-tagged Kir6.2 COOH terminus and GFP-tagged pleckstrin homology domain from phospholipase C delta1 both associate with isolated membranes, and association of each is specifically reduced by muscarinic m1 receptor-mediated phospholipid depletion. Kir COOH termini are predicted to contain multiple beta-strands and a conserved alpha-helix (residues approximately 306-311 in Kir6.2). Systematic mutagenesis of D307-F315 reveals a critical role of E308, I309, W311 and F315, consistent with residues lying on one side of a alpha-helix. Together with systematic mutation of conserved charges, the results define critical determinants of a conserved domain that underlies phospholipid interaction in Kir channels.

  13. Simple measures of channel habitat complexity predict transient hydraulic storage in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stream thalweg depth profiles (along path of greatest channel depth) and woody debris tallies have recently become components of routine field procedures for quantifying physical habitat in national stream monitoring efforts. Mean residual depth, standard deviation of thalweg dep...

  14. Kir6.2 activation by sulfonylurea receptors: a different mechanism of action for SUR1 and SUR2A subunits via the same residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principalli, Maria A; Dupuis, Julien P; Moreau, Christophe J; Vivaudou, Michel; Revilloud, Jean

    2015-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATP channels) play a key role in adjusting the membrane potential to the metabolic state of cells. They result from the unique combination of two proteins: the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein, and the inward rectifier K+ channel Kir6.2. Both subunits associate to form a heterooctamer (4 SUR/4 Kir6.2). SUR modulates channel gating in response to the binding of nucleotides or drugs and Kir6.2 conducts potassium ions. The activity of K-ATP channels varies with their localization. In pancreatic β-cells, SUR1/Kir6.2 channels are partly active at rest while in cardiomyocytes SUR2A/Kir6.2 channels are mostly closed. This divergence of function could be related to differences in the interaction of SUR1 and SUR2A with Kir6.2. Three residues (E1305, I1310, L1313) located in the linker region between transmembrane domain 2 and nucleotide-binding domain 2 of SUR2A were previously found to be involved in the activation pathway linking binding of openers onto SUR2A and channel opening. To determine the role of the equivalent residues in the SUR1 isoform, we designed chimeras between SUR1 and the ABC transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), and used patch clamp recordings on Xenopus oocytes to assess the functionality of SUR1/MRP1 chimeric K-ATP channels. Our results reveal that the same residues in SUR1 and SUR2A are involved in the functional association with Kir6.2, but they display unexpected side-chain specificities which could account for the contrasted properties of pancreatic and cardiac K-ATP channels. PMID:26416970

  15. Channel formation by the binding component of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin: glutamate 307 of C2II affects channel properties in vitro and pH-dependent C2I translocation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöcker, Dagmar; Bachmeyer, Christoph; Benz, Roland; Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2003-05-13

    The binding component (C2II) of the binary Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin mediates transport of the actin ADP-ribosylating enzyme component (C2I) into the cytosol of target cells. C2II (80 kDa) is activated by trypsin cleavage, and proteolytically activated C2II (60 kDa) oligomerizes to heptamers in solution. Activated C2II forms channels in lipid bilayer membranes which are highly cation selective and voltage-gated. A role for this channel in C2I translocation across the cell membrane into the cytosol is discussed. Amino acid residues 303-331 of C2II contain a conserved pattern of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues, which likely facilitates membrane insertion and channel formation by creating two antiparallel beta-strands. Some of the residues are in strategic positions within the putative C2II channel, in particular, glutamate 307 (E307) localized in its center and glycine 316 (G316) localized on the trans side of the membrane. Here, single-lysine substitutions of these amino acids and the double mutant E307K/G316K of C2II were analyzed in vivo and in artificial lipid bilayer experiments. The pH dependence of C2I transport across cellular membranes was altered, and a pH of properties of C2II were substantially changed by the mutations, as evidenced by reduced cation selectivity. Interestingly, the voltage dependence of wild-type C2II was completely lost for the E307K mutant, which means that E307 is responsible for voltage gating. Chloroquine blocked the E307K mutant channel and intoxication of Vero cells by mutant C2II and C2I, indicating that chloroquine binding does not involve E307. Overall, the voltage gating and cation selectivity of the C2II channel do not play an important role in translocation of C2I into the cytosol.

  16. Yeast Fex1p Is a Constitutively Expressed Fluoride Channel with Functional Asymmetry of Its Two Homologous Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn D.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Rivetta, Alberto; Allen, Kenneth E.; Berbasova, Tetyana; Slayman, Clifford; Strobel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous environmental toxin with which all biological species must cope. A recently discovered family of fluoride export (FEX) proteins protects organisms from fluoride toxicity by removing it from the cell. We show here that FEX proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as ion channels that are selective for fluoride over chloride and that these proteins are constitutively expressed at the yeast plasma membrane. Continuous expression is in contrast to many other toxin exporters in yeast, and this, along with the fact that two nearly duplicate proteins are encoded in the yeast genome, suggests that the threat posed by fluoride ions is frequent and detrimental. Structurally, eukaryotic FEX proteins consist of two homologous four-transmembrane helix domains folded into an antiparallel dimer, where the orientation of the two domains is fixed by a single transmembrane linker helix. Using phylogenetic sequence conservation as a guide, we have identified several functionally important residues. There is substantial functional asymmetry in the effect of mutation at corresponding sites in the two domains. Specifically, mutations to residues in the C-terminal domain proved significantly more detrimental to function than did similar mutations in the N-terminal domain. Our data suggest particular residues that may be important to anion specificity, most notably the necessity of a positive charge near the end of TMH1 in the C-terminal domain. It is possible that a cationic charge at this location may create an electrostatic well for fluoride ions entering the channel from the cytoplasm. PMID:26055717

  17. Electrophysiological characterisation of KCNQ channel modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, R.L

    Potassium (K+) ion channels are ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells, and each channel serves a precise physiological role due to its specific biophysical characteristics and expression pattern. A few K+ channels are targets for certain drugs, and in this thesis it is suggested that the KCNQ K......+ channels may be targets for neuroprotective, anti-epileptic and anti-nociceptive compounds. The importance of these channels is underscored by the fact that four out of five KCNQ channel subtypes are involved in severe human diseases. However, the pharmacology of the KCNQ channels is yet poorly understood...... as these channels were identified only recently. Therefore, there is a need for understanding the biophysical behavior and pharmacology of these ion channels. KCNQ channels belong to the group of voltage-activated K+ channels. The subfamily consists of KCNQ1-5, which is primarily expressed in the CNS, heart, ear...

  18. Two Salt Bridges Differentially Contribute to the Maintenance of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channel Function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S.; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z.; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg352-Asp993 and Arg347-Asp924, that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg347 not only interacts with Asp924 but also interacts with Asp993. The tripartite interaction Arg347-Asp924-Asp993 mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg352-Asp993 salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg352 and Asp993, channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle. PMID:23709221

  19. Gating of the two-pore cation channel AtTPC1 in the plant vacuole is based on a single voltage-sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaślan, D; Mueller, T D; Becker, D; Schultz, J; Cuin, T A; Marten, I; Dreyer, I; Schönknecht, G; Hedrich, R

    2016-09-01

    The two-pore cation channel TPC1 operates as a dimeric channel in animal and plant endomembranes. Each subunit consists of two homologous Shaker-like halves, with 12 transmembrane domains in total (S1-S6, S7-S12). In plants, TPC1 channels reside in the vacuolar membrane, and upon voltage stimulation, give rise to the well-known slow-activating SV currents. Here, we combined bioinformatics, structure modelling, site-directed mutagenesis, and in planta patch clamp studies to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of voltage-dependent channel gating in TPC1 in its native plant background. Structure-function analysis of the Arabidopsis TPC1 channel in planta confirmed that helix S10 operates as the major voltage-sensing site, with Glu450 and Glu478 identified as possible ion-pair partners for voltage-sensing Arg537. The contribution of helix S4 to voltage sensing was found to be negligible. Several conserved negative residues on the luminal site contribute to calcium binding, stabilizing the closed channel. During evolution of plant TPC1s from two separate Shaker-like domains, the voltage-sensing function in the N-terminal Shaker-unit (S1-S4) vanished. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Identification of Loop D Domain Amino Acids in the Human Aquaporin-1 Channel Involved in Activation of the Ionic Conductance and Inhibition by AqB011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Kourghi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are integral proteins that facilitate the transmembrane transport of water and small solutes. In addition to enabling water flux, mammalian Aquaporin-1 (AQP1 channels activated by cyclic GMP can carry non-selective monovalent cation currents, selectively blocked by arylsulfonamide compounds AqB007 (IC50 170 μM and AqB011 (IC50 14 μM. In silico models suggested that ligand docking might involve the cytoplasmic loop D (between AQP1 transmembrane domains 4 and 5, but the predicted site of interaction remained to be tested. Work here shows that mutagenesis of two conserved arginine residues in loop D slowed the activation of the AQP1 ion conductance and impaired the sensitivity of the channel to block by AqB011. Substitution of residues in loop D with proline showed effects on ion conductance amplitude that varied with position, suggesting that the structural conformation of loop D is important for AQP1 channel gating. Human AQP1 wild type, AQP1 mutant channels with alanines substituted for two arginines (R159A+R160A, and mutants with proline substituted for single residues threonine (T157P, aspartate (D158P, arginine (R159P, R160P, or glycine (G165P were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Conductance responses were analyzed by two-electrode voltage clamp. Optical osmotic swelling assays and confocal microscopy were used to confirm mutant and wild type AQP1-expressing oocytes were expressed in the plasma membrane. After application of membrane-permeable cGMP, R159A+R160A channels had a significantly slower rate of activation as compared with wild type, consistent with impaired gating. AQP1 R159A+R160A channels showed no significant block by AqB011 at 50 μM, in contrast to the wild type channel which was blocked effectively. T157P, D158P, and R160P mutations had impaired activation compared to wild type; R159P showed no significant effect; and G165P appeared to augment the conductance amplitude. These findings provide evidence for the

  1. Structure of the Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase TrzD Reveals Product Exit Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Asim K; Aukema, Kelly G; Elias, Mikael; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2017-03-27

    Cyanuric acid hydrolases are of industrial importance because of their use in aquatic recreational facilities to remove cyanuric acid, a stabilizer for the chlorine. Degradation of excess cyanuric acid is necessary to maintain chlorine disinfection in the waters. Cyanuric acid hydrolase opens the cyanuric acid ring hydrolytically and subsequent decarboxylation produces carbon dioxide and biuret. In the present study, we report the X-ray structure of TrzD, a cyanuric acid hydrolase from Acidovorax citrulli. The crystal structure at 2.19 Å resolution shows a large displacement of the catalytic lysine (Lys163) in domain 2 away from the active site core, whereas the two other active site lysines from the two other domains are not able to move. The lysine displacement is proposed here to open up a channel for product release. Consistent with that, the structure also showed two molecules of the co-product, carbon dioxide, one in the active site and another trapped in the proposed exit channel. Previous data indicated that the domain 2 lysine residue plays a role in activating an adjacent serine residue carrying out nucleophilic attack, opening the cyanuric acid ring, and the mobile lysine guides products through the exit channel.

  2. Functional characterization of Kv11.1 (hERG) potassium channels split in the voltage-sensing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Pilar; Domínguez, Pedro; Barros, Francisco

    2018-03-23

    Voltage-dependent KCNH family potassium channel functionality can be reconstructed using non-covalently linked voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and pore modules (split channels). However, the necessity of a covalent continuity for channel function has not been evaluated at other points within the two functionally independent channel modules. We find here that by cutting Kv11.1 (hERG, KCNH2) channels at the different loops linking the transmembrane spans of the channel core, not only channels split at the S4-S5 linker level, but also those split at the intracellular S2-S3 and the extracellular S3-S4 loops, yield fully functional channel proteins. Our data indicate that albeit less markedly, channels split after residue 482 in the S2-S3 linker resemble the uncoupled gating phenotype of those split at the C-terminal end of the VSD S4 transmembrane segment. Channels split after residues 514 and 518 in the S3-S4 linker show gating characteristics similar to those of the continuous wild-type channel. However, breaking the covalent link at this level strongly accelerates the voltage-dependent accessibility of a membrane impermeable methanethiosulfonate reagent to an engineered cysteine at the N-terminal region of the S4 transmembrane helix. Thus, besides that of the S4-S5 linker, structural integrity of the intracellular S2-S3 linker seems to constitute an important factor for proper transduction of VSD rearrangements to opening and closing the cytoplasmic gate. Furthermore, our data suggest that the short and probably rigid characteristics of the extracellular S3-S4 linker are not an essential component of the Kv11.1 voltage sensing machinery.

  3. Analysis and radiological assessment of residues containing NORM materials resulting from earlier activities including modelling of typical industrial residues. Pt. 1. Historical investigation of the radiological relevance of NORM residues and concepts for site identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, Andreas; Niedermayer, Matthias; Sitte, Beate; Hamel, Peter Michael

    2007-01-01

    Natural radionuclides are part of the human environment and of the raw materials used. Technical processes may cause their accumulation in residues, and the result will be so-called NORM materials (Naturally occurring radioactive material). The amended Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV 2001) specifies how the public should be protected, but there are also residues dating back before the issuing of the StrlSchV 2001, the so-called NORM residues. The project intended to assess the risks resulting from these residues. It comprises four parts. Part 1 was for clarification of the radiological relevance of NORM residues and for the development of concepts to detect them. The criterion for their radiological relevance was their activity per mass unit and the material volume accumulated through the centuries. The former was calculated from a wide bibliographic search in the relevant literature on radiation protection, while the mass volume was obtained by a detailed historical search of the consumption of materials that may leave NORM residues. These are, in particular, residues from coal and ore mining and processing. To identify concrete sites, relevant data sources were identified, and a concept for identification of concrete NORM residues was developed on this basis. (orig.) [de

  4. Identifying Residual Speech Sound Disorders in Bilingual Children: A Japanese-English Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Seki, Ayumi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe (a) the assessment of residual speech sound disorders (SSDs) in bilinguals by distinguishing speech patterns associated with second language acquisition from patterns associated with misarticulations and (b) how assessment of domains such as speech motor control and phonological awareness can provide a more complete…

  5. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P.; Pont, D.

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research

  6. Structural organization of intercellular channels II. Amino terminal domain of the connexins: sequence, functional roles, and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Eric C; Lipkind, Gregory M; Kyle, John W; Berthoud, Viviana M

    2012-08-01

    The amino terminal domain (NT) of the connexins consists of their first 22-23 amino acids. Site-directed mutagenesis studies have demonstrated that NT amino acids are determinants of gap junction channel properties including unitary conductance, permeability/selectivity, and gating in response to transjunctional voltage. The importance of this region has also been emphasized by the identification of multiple disease-associated connexin mutants affecting amino acid residues in the NT region. The first part of the NT is α-helical. The structure of the Cx26 gap junction channel shows that the NT α-helix localizes within the channel, and lines the wall of the pore. Interactions of the amino acid residues in the NT with those in the transmembrane helices may be critical for holding the channel open. The predicted sites of these interactions and the applicability of the Cx26 structure to the NT of other connexins are considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Trans-Channel Interactions in Batrachotoxin-Modified Skeletal Muscle Sodium Channels: Voltage-Dependent Block by Cytoplasmic Amines, and the Influence of μ-Conotoxin GIIIA Derivatives and Permeant Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Evgeny; Britvina, Tatiana; McArthur, Jeff R.; Ma, Quanli; Sierralta, Iván; Zamponi, Gerald W.; French, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    External μ-conotoxins and internal amine blockers inhibit each other's block of voltage-gated sodium channels. We explore the basis of this interaction by measuring the shifts in voltage-dependence of channel inhibition by internal amines induced by two μ-conotoxin derivatives with different charge distributions and net charges. Charge changes on the toxin were made at residue 13, which is thought to penetrate most deeply into the channel, making it likely to have the strongest individual interaction with an internal charged ligand. When an R13Q or R13E molecule was bound to the channel, the voltage dependence of diethylammonium (DEA)-block shifted toward more depolarized potentials (23 mV for R13Q, and 16 mV for R13E). An electrostatic model of the repulsion between DEA and the toxin simulated these data, with a distance between residue 13 of the μ-conotoxin and the DEA-binding site of ∼15 Å. Surprisingly, for tetrapropylammonium, the shifts were only 9 mV for R13Q, and 7 mV for R13E. The smaller shifts associated with R13E, the toxin with a smaller net charge, are generally consistent with an electrostatic interaction. However, the smaller shifts observed for tetrapropylammonium than for DEA suggest that other factors must be involved. Two observations indicate that the coupling of permeant ion occupancy of the channel to blocker binding may contribute to the overall amine-toxin interaction: 1), R13Q binding decreases the apparent affinity of sodium for the conducting pore by ∼4-fold; and 2), increasing external [Na+] decreases block by DEA at constant voltage. Thus, even though a number of studies suggest that sodium channels are occupied by no more than one ion most of the time, measurable coupling occurs between permeant ions and toxin or amine blockers. Such interactions likely determine, in part, the strength of trans-channel, amine-conotoxin interactions. PMID:18658222

  8. Trans-channel interactions in batrachotoxin-modified skeletal muscle sodium channels: voltage-dependent block by cytoplasmic amines, and the influence of mu-conotoxin GIIIA derivatives and permeant ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Evgeny; Britvina, Tatiana; McArthur, Jeff R; Ma, Quanli; Sierralta, Iván; Zamponi, Gerald W; French, Robert J

    2008-11-01

    External mu-conotoxins and internal amine blockers inhibit each other's block of voltage-gated sodium channels. We explore the basis of this interaction by measuring the shifts in voltage-dependence of channel inhibition by internal amines induced by two mu-conotoxin derivatives with different charge distributions and net charges. Charge changes on the toxin were made at residue 13, which is thought to penetrate most deeply into the channel, making it likely to have the strongest individual interaction with an internal charged ligand. When an R13Q or R13E molecule was bound to the channel, the voltage dependence of diethylammonium (DEA)-block shifted toward more depolarized potentials (23 mV for R13Q, and 16 mV for R13E). An electrostatic model of the repulsion between DEA and the toxin simulated these data, with a distance between residue 13 of the mu-conotoxin and the DEA-binding site of approximately 15 A. Surprisingly, for tetrapropylammonium, the shifts were only 9 mV for R13Q, and 7 mV for R13E. The smaller shifts associated with R13E, the toxin with a smaller net charge, are generally consistent with an electrostatic interaction. However, the smaller shifts observed for tetrapropylammonium than for DEA suggest that other factors must be involved. Two observations indicate that the coupling of permeant ion occupancy of the channel to blocker binding may contribute to the overall amine-toxin interaction: 1), R13Q binding decreases the apparent affinity of sodium for the conducting pore by approximately 4-fold; and 2), increasing external [Na(+)] decreases block by DEA at constant voltage. Thus, even though a number of studies suggest that sodium channels are occupied by no more than one ion most of the time, measurable coupling occurs between permeant ions and toxin or amine blockers. Such interactions likely determine, in part, the strength of trans-channel, amine-conotoxin interactions.

  9. Improved performance and stability of field-effect transistors with polymeric residue-free graphene channel transferred by gold layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi; Trung, Tran Quang; Jung, Jin-Heak; Kim, Bo-Yeong; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2014-03-07

    One of the most significant issues that occurs when applying chemical-vapor deposited (CVD) graphene (Gr) to various high-performance device applications is the result of polymeric residues. Polymeric residues remain on the Gr surface during Gr polymer support transfer to an arbitrary substrate, and these residues degrade CVD Gr electrical properties. In this paper, we propose that a thin layer of gold be used as a CVD Gr transfer layer, instead of a polymer support layer, to enable a polymer residue-free transfer. Comparative investigation of the surface morphological and qualitative analysis of residues on Gr surfaces and Gr field-effect transistors (GFETs) using two transfer methods demonstrates that gold-transferred Gr, with uniform, smooth, and clean surfaces, enable GFETs to perform better than Gr transferred by the polymer, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). In GFETs fabricated by the gold transfer method, field-effect carrier mobility was greatly enhanced and the position of the Dirac point was significantly reduced compared to GFETs fabricated by the PMMA transfer method. In addition, compared to the PMMA-transferred GFETs, the gold-transferred GFETs showed greatly increased stability with smaller hysteresis and higher resistance to gate bias stress effects. These results suggest that the gold transfer method for Gr provides significant improvements in GFET performance and reliability by minimizing the polymeric residues and defects on Gr.

  10. Real-time sensing and discrimination of single chemicals using the channel of phi29 DNA packaging nanomotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Farzin; Lunn, Jennifer; Fang, Huaming; Smithrud, David; Guo, Peixuan

    2012-04-24

    A highly sensitive and reliable method to sense and identify a single chemical at extremely low concentrations and high contamination is important for environmental surveillance, homeland security, athlete drug monitoring, toxin/drug screening, and earlier disease diagnosis. This article reports a method for precise detection of single chemicals. The hub of the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor is a connector consisting of 12 protein subunits encircled into a 3.6 nm channel as a path for dsDNA to enter during packaging and to exit during infection. The connector has previously been inserted into a lipid bilayer to serve as a membrane-embedded channel. Herein we report the modification of the phi29 channel to develop a class of sensors to detect single chemicals. The lysine-234 of each protein subunit was mutated to cysteine, generating 12-SH ring lining the channel wall. Chemicals passing through this robust channel and interactions with the SH group generated extremely reliable, precise, and sensitive current signatures as revealed by single channel conductance assays. Ethane (57 Da), thymine (167 Da), and benzene (105 Da) with reactive thioester moieties were clearly discriminated upon interaction with the available set of cysteine residues. The covalent attachment of each analyte induced discrete stepwise blockage in current signature with a corresponding decrease in conductance due to the physical blocking of the channel. Transient binding of the chemicals also produced characteristic fingerprints that were deduced from the unique blockage amplitude and pattern of the signals. This study shows that the phi29 connector can be used to sense chemicals with reactive thioesters or maleimide using single channel conduction assays based on their distinct fingerprints. The results demonstrated that this channel system could be further developed into very sensitive sensing devices.

  11. The S4-S5 linker acts as a signal integrator for HERG K+ channel activation and deactivation gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG K(+ channels have unusual gating kinetics. Characterised by slow activation/deactivation but rapid inactivation/recovery from inactivation, the unique gating kinetics underlie the central role hERG channels play in cardiac repolarisation. The slow activation and deactivation kinetics are regulated in part by the S4-S5 linker, which couples movement of the voltage sensor domain to opening of the activation gate at the distal end of the inner helix of the pore domain. It has also been suggested that cytosolic domains may interact with the S4-S5 linker to regulate activation and deactivation kinetics. Here, we show that the solution structure of a peptide corresponding to the S4-S5 linker of hERG contains an amphipathic helix. The effects of mutations at the majority of residues in the S4-S5 linker of hERG were consistent with the previously identified role in coupling voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. However, mutations to Ser543, Tyr545, Gly546 and Ala548 had more complex phenotypes indicating that these residues are involved in additional interactions. We propose a model in which the S4-S5 linker, in addition to coupling VSD movement to the activation gate, also contributes to interactions that stabilise the closed state and a separate set of interactions that stabilise the open state. The S4-S5 linker therefore acts as a signal integrator and plays a crucial role in the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel.

  12. Improving probabilistic prediction of daily streamflow by identifying Pareto optimal approaches for modelling heteroscedastic residual errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, McInerney; Mark, Thyer; Dmitri, Kavetski; George, Kuczera

    2017-04-01

    This study provides guidance to hydrological researchers which enables them to provide probabilistic predictions of daily streamflow with the best reliability and precision for different catchment types (e.g. high/low degree of ephemerality). Reliable and precise probabilistic prediction of daily catchment-scale streamflow requires statistical characterization of residual errors of hydrological models. It is commonly known that hydrological model residual errors are heteroscedastic, i.e. there is a pattern of larger errors in higher streamflow predictions. Although multiple approaches exist for representing this heteroscedasticity, few studies have undertaken a comprehensive evaluation and comparison of these approaches. This study fills this research gap by evaluating 8 common residual error schemes, including standard and weighted least squares, the Box-Cox transformation (with fixed and calibrated power parameter, lambda) and the log-sinh transformation. Case studies include 17 perennial and 6 ephemeral catchments in Australia and USA, and two lumped hydrological models. We find the choice of heteroscedastic error modelling approach significantly impacts on predictive performance, though no single scheme simultaneously optimizes all performance metrics. The set of Pareto optimal schemes, reflecting performance trade-offs, comprises Box-Cox schemes with lambda of 0.2 and 0.5, and the log scheme (lambda=0, perennial catchments only). These schemes significantly outperform even the average-performing remaining schemes (e.g., across ephemeral catchments, median precision tightens from 105% to 40% of observed streamflow, and median biases decrease from 25% to 4%). Theoretical interpretations of empirical results highlight the importance of capturing the skew/kurtosis of raw residuals and reproducing zero flows. Recommendations for researchers and practitioners seeking robust residual error schemes for practical work are provided.

  13. The Kinetics and the Permeation Properties of Piezo Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasambandam, R; Gottlieb, P A; Sachs, F

    2017-01-01

    Piezo channels are eukaryotic, cation-selective mechanosensitive channels (MSCs), which show rapid activation and voltage-dependent inactivation. The kinetics of these channels are largely consistent across multiple cell types and different stimulation paradigms with some minor variability. No accessory subunits that associate with Piezo channels have been reported. They are homotrimers and each ∼300kD monomer has an N-terminal propeller blade-like mechanosensing module, which can confer mechanosensing capabilities on ASIC-1 (the trimeric non-MSC, acid-sensing ion channel-1) and a C-terminal pore module, which influences conductance, selectivity, and channel inactivation. Repeated stimulation can cause domain fracture and diffusion of these channels leading to synchronous loss of inactivation. The reconstituted channels spontaneously open only in asymmetric bilayers but lack inactivation. Mutations that cause hereditary xerocytosis alter PIEZO1 kinetics. The kinetics of the wild-type PIEZO1 and alterations thereof in mutants (M2225R, R2456K, and DhPIEZO1) are summarized in the form of a quantitative model and hosted online. The pore is permeable to alkali ions although Li + permeates poorly. Divalent cations, notably Ca 2+ , traverse the channel and inhibit the flux of monovalents. The large monovalent organic cations such as tetramethyl ammonium and tetraethyl ammonium can traverse the channel, but slowly, suggesting a pore diameter of ∼8Å, and the estimated in-plane area change upon opening is around 6-20nm 2 . Ruthenium red can enter the channel only from the extracellular side and seems to bind in a pocket close to residue 2496. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cl- channels in apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Sirianant, Lalida

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable feature of apoptosis is the initial massive cell shrinkage, which requires opening of ion channels to allow release of K(+), Cl(-), and organic osmolytes to drive osmotic water movement and cell shrinkage. This article focuses on the role of the Cl(-) channels LRRC8, TMEM16/anoctamin......, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cellular apoptosis. LRRC8A-E has been identified as a volume-regulated anion channel expressed in many cell types. It was shown to be required for regulatory and apoptotic volume decrease (RVD, AVD) in cultured cell lines. Its presence also......(-) channels or as regulators of other apoptotic Cl(-) channels, such as LRRC8. CFTR has been known for its proapoptotic effects for some time, and this effect may be based on glutathione release from the cell and increase in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although we find that CFTR is activated...

  15. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Jianhua Z; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction

  16. Prediction of interface residue based on the features of residue interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiong; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2017-11-07

    Protein-protein interaction plays a crucial role in the cellular biological processes. Interface prediction can improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the related processes and functions. In this work, we propose a classification method to recognize the interface residue based on the features of a weighted residue interaction network. The random forest algorithm is used for the prediction and 16 network parameters and the B-factor are acting as the element of the input feature vector. Compared with other similar work, the method is feasible and effective. The relative importance of these features also be analyzed to identify the key feature for the prediction. Some biological meaning of the important feature is explained. The results of this work can be used for the related work about the structure-function relationship analysis via a residue interaction network model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Key Residues for Enzymatic Carboxylate Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Stolterfoht

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylate reductases (CARs, E.C. 1.2.1.30 generate aldehydes from their corresponding carboxylic acid with high selectivity. Little is known about the structure of CARs and their catalytically important amino acid residues. The identification of key residues for carboxylate reduction provides a starting point to gain deeper understanding of enzymatic carboxylate reduction. A multiple sequence alignment of CARs with confirmed activity recently identified in our lab and from the literature revealed a fingerprint of conserved amino acids. We studied the function of conserved residues by multiple sequence alignments and mutational replacements of these residues. In this study, single-site alanine variants of Neurospora crassa CAR were investigated to determine the contribution of conserved residues to the function, expressability or stability of the enzyme. The effect of amino acid replacements was investigated by analyzing enzymatic activity of the variants in vivo and in vitro. Supported by molecular modeling, we interpreted that five of these residues are essential for catalytic activity, or substrate and co-substrate binding. We identified amino acid residues having significant impact on CAR activity. Replacement of His 237, Glu 433, Ser 595, Tyr 844, and Lys 848 by Ala abolish CAR activity, indicating their key role in acid reduction. These results may assist in the functional annotation of CAR coding genes in genomic databases. While some other conserved residues decreased activity or had no significant impact, four residues increased the specific activity of NcCAR variants when replaced by alanine. Finally, we showed that NcCAR wild-type and mutants efficiently reduce aliphatic acids.

  18. Lysine as helix C-capping residue in a synthetic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, G; Dhanapal, B; Dumy, P; Varma, V; Mutter, M; Bodenhausen, G

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the synthetic peptide CH3CO(Leu-Ser-Leu-Leu-Leu-Ser-Leu)3Lys-NH2 in trifluoroethanol/water 60/40 (volume ratio) was characterized by two-dimensional nmr spectroscopy. The peptide, closely related to the amphiphilic helix models designed by W. F. De-Grado and co-workers to mimic protein ion channels [(1988) Science, Vol. 240, p. 1177-1181], folds into a regular helix spanning residues 1-20. Evidence for a helix C-terminal capping conformation, involving the terminal lysine residue, was observed from Overhauser effects and checked for consistency by restrained molecular dynamics simulations. The side-chain amino group of Lys22 forms a hydrogen bond with the carbonyl of Leu18, and the distorted helical geometry of the terminal dipeptide allows the inclusion of a water bridge between the backbone NH of the Lys22 residue and the carbonyls of Leu19 and Ser20.

  19. Ca2+-dependent K+ Channels in Exocrine Salivary Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Marcelo A.; Peña-Munzenmayer, Gaspar; Melvin, James E.

    2014-01-01

    In the last 15 years, remarkable progress has been realized in identifying the genes that encode the ion-transporting proteins involved in exocrine gland function, including salivary glands. Among these proteins, Ca2+-dependent K+ channels take part in key functions including membrane potential regulation, fluid movement and K+ secretion in exocrine glands. Two K+ channels have been identified in exocrine salivary glands: 1) a Ca2+-activated K+ channel of intermediate single channel conductance encoded by the KCNN4 gene; and, 2) a voltage- and Ca2+-dependent K+ channel of large single channel conductance encoded by the KCNMA1 gene. This review focuses on the physiological roles of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels in exocrine salivary glands. We also discuss interesting recent findings on the regulation of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels by protein-protein interactions that may significantly impact exocrine gland physiology. PMID:24559652

  20. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  1. Distinctive fingerprints of erosional regimes in terrestrial channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau Galofre, A.; Jellinek, M.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite imagery and digital elevation maps capture the large scale morphology of channel networks attributed to long term erosional processes, such as fluvial, glacial, groundwater sapping and subglacial erosion. Characteristic morphologies associated with each of these styles of erosion have been studied in detail, but there exists a knowledge gap related to their parameterization and quantification. This knowledge gap prevents a rigorous analysis of the dominant processes that shaped a particular landscape, and a comparison across styles of erosion. To address this gap, we use previous morphological descriptions of glaciers, rivers, sapping valleys and tunnel valleys to identify and measure quantitative metrics diagnostic of these distinctive styles of erosion. From digital elevation models, we identify four geometric metrics: The minimum channel width, channel aspect ratio (longest length to channel width at the outlet), presence of undulating longitudinal profiles, and tributary junction angle. We also parameterize channel network complexity in terms of its stream order and fractal dimension. We then perform a statistical classification of the channel networks using a Principal Component Analysis on measurements of these six metrics on a dataset of 70 channelized systems. We show that rivers, glaciers, groundwater seepage and subglacial meltwater erode the landscape in rigorously distinguishable ways. Our methodology can more generally be applied to identify the contributions of different processes involved in carving a channel network. In particular, we are able to identify transitions from fluvial to glaciated landscapes or vice-versa.

  2. Channel estimation in DFT-based offset-QAM OFDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian

    2014-10-20

    Offset quadrature amplitude modulation (offset-QAM) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) exhibits enhanced net data rates compared to conventional OFDM, and reduced complexity compared to Nyquist FDM (N-FDM). However, channel estimation in discrete-Fourier-transform (DFT) based offset-QAM OFDM is different from that in conventional OFDM and requires particular study. In this paper, we derive a closed-form expression for the demultiplexed signal in DFT-based offset-QAM systems and show that although the residual crosstalk is orthogonal to the decoded signal, its existence degrades the channel estimation performance when the conventional least-square method is applied. We propose and investigate four channel estimation algorithms for offset-QAM OFDM that vary in terms of performance, complexity, and tolerance to system parameters. It is theoretically and experimentally shown that simple channel estimation can be realized in offset-QAM OFDM with the achieved performance close to the theoretical limit. This, together with the existing advantages over conventional OFDM and N-FDM, makes this technology very promising for optical communication systems.

  3. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  4. Profile Monitors Based on Residual Gas Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Forck, P; Giacomini, T; Peters, A

    2005-01-01

    The precise determination of transverse beam profiles at high current hadron accelerators has to be performed non-interceptingly. Two methods will be discussed based on the excitation of the residual gas molecules by the beam particles: Firstly, by beam induced fluorescence (BIF) light is emitted from the residual gas molecules and is observed with an image intensified CCD camera. At most laboratories N2 gas is inserted, which has a large cross section for emission in the blue wave length region. Secondly, a larger signal strength is achieved by detecting the ionization products in an Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM). By applying an electric field all ionization products are accelerated toward a spatial resolving Micro-Channel Plate. The signal read-out can either be performed by observing the light from a phosphor screen behind the MCP or electronically by a wire array. Methods to achieve a high spatial resolution and a fast turn-by-turn readout capability are discussed. Even though various approaches at dif...

  5. Biophysical and Pharmacological Characterization of Nav1.9 Voltage Dependent Sodium Channels Stably Expressed in HEK-293 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Lin

    Full Text Available The voltage dependent sodium channel Nav1.9, is expressed preferentially in peripheral sensory neurons and has been linked to human genetic pain disorders, which makes it target of interest for the development of new pain therapeutics. However, characterization of Nav1.9 pharmacology has been limited due in part to the historical difficulty of functionally expressing recombinant channels. Here we report the successful generation and characterization of human, mouse and rat Nav1.9 stably expressed in human HEK-293 cells. These cells exhibit slowly activating and inactivating inward sodium channel currents that have characteristics of native Nav1.9. Optimal functional expression was achieved by coexpression of Nav1.9 with β1/β2 subunits. While recombinantly expressed Nav1.9 was found to be sensitive to sodium channel inhibitors TC-N 1752 and tetracaine, potency was up to 100-fold less than reported for other Nav channel subtypes despite evidence to support an interaction with the canonical local anesthetic (LA binding region on Domain 4 S6. Nav1.9 Domain 2 S6 pore domain contains a unique lysine residue (K799 which is predicted to be spatially near the local anesthetic interaction site. Mutation of this residue to the consensus asparagine (K799N resulted in an increase in potency for tetracaine, but a decrease for TC-N 1752, suggesting that this residue can influence interaction of inhibitors with the Nav1.9 pore. In summary, we have shown that stable functional expression of Nav1.9 in the widely used HEK-293 cells is possible, which opens up opportunities to better understand channel properties and may potentially aid identification of novel Nav1.9 based pharmacotherapies.

  6. Channel Bottom Morphology in the Deltaic Reach of the Song Hau (mekong) River Channel in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. A.; Weathers, H. D., III; Meselhe, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Boat-based, channel bathymetry and bankline elevation studies were conducted in the tidal and estuarine Mekong River channel using multibeam bathymetry and LIDAR corrected for elevation by RTK satellite positioning. Two mapping campaigns, one at high discharge in October 2014 and one at low discharge in March 2015, were conducted in the lower 100 km reach of the Song Hau distributary channel to (1) examine bottom morphology and its relationship to sediment transport, and (2) to provide information to setup the grid for a multi-dimensional and reduced complexity models of channel hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics. Sand fields were identified in multibeam data by the presence of dunes that were as large as 2-4 m high and 40-80 m wavelength and by clean sands in bottom grabs. Extensive areas of sand at the head and toe of mid-channel islands displayed 10-25 m diameter circular pits that could be correlated with bucket dredge, sand mining activities observed at some of the sites. Large areas of the channel floor were relict (containing little or no modern sediment) in the high discharge campaign, identifiable by the presence of along channel erosional furrows and terraced outcrops along the channel floor and margins. Laterally extensive flat areas were also observed in the channel thalweg. Both these and the relict areas were sampled by bottom grab as stiff silty clays. Complex cross-channel combinations of these morphologies were observed in some transects, suggesting strong bottom steering of tidal and riverine currents. Relative to high discharge, transects above and below the salt penetration limit showed evidence of shallowing in the thalweg and adjacent sloping areas at low discharge in March 2015. This shallowing, combined with the reduced extent of sand fields and furrowed areas, and soft muds in grabs, suggests seasonal trapping of fine grained sediment is occurring by estuarine and tidal circulation.

  7. Plant ion channels: gene families, physiology, and functional genomics analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, John M; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-01-01

    Distinct potassium, anion, and calcium channels in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of plant cells have been identified and characterized by patch clamping. Primarily owing to advances in Arabidopsis genetics and genomics, and yeast functional complementation, many of the corresponding genes have been identified. Recent advances in our understanding of ion channel genes that mediate signal transduction and ion transport are discussed here. Some plant ion channels, for example, ALMT and SLAC anion channel subunits, are unique. The majority of plant ion channel families exhibit homology to animal genes; such families include both hyperpolarization- and depolarization-activated Shaker-type potassium channels, CLC chloride transporters/channels, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptor homologs. These plant ion channels offer unique opportunities to analyze the structural mechanisms and functions of ion channels. Here we review gene families of selected plant ion channel classes and discuss unique structure-function aspects and their physiological roles in plant cell signaling and transport.

  8. Mutual Information of Buffer-Aided Full-Duplex Relay Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Shafie, Ahmed El

    2017-04-09

    We derive closed-form expressions for the achievable rates of a buffer-aided full-duplex (FD) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Gaussian relay channel. The FD relay still suffers from residual self-interference (RSI) after the application of self-interference mitigation techniques. We investigate both cases of a slow-RSI channel where the RSI is fixed over the entire codeword, and a fast-RSI channel where the RSI changes from one symbol duration to another within the codeword. We show that the RSI can be completely eliminated in the slow-RSI case when the FD relay is equipped with a buffer while the fast RSI cannot be eliminated. For the fixed-rate data transmission scenario, we derive the optimal transmission strategy that should be adopted by the source node and relay node to maximize the system throughput. We verify our analytical findings through simulations.

  9. Mutual Information of Buffer-Aided Full-Duplex Relay Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Shafie, Ahmed El; Salem, Ahmed Sultan; Krikidis, Ioannis; Al-Dhahir, Naofal; Hamila, Ridha

    2017-01-01

    We derive closed-form expressions for the achievable rates of a buffer-aided full-duplex (FD) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Gaussian relay channel. The FD relay still suffers from residual self-interference (RSI) after the application of self-interference mitigation techniques. We investigate both cases of a slow-RSI channel where the RSI is fixed over the entire codeword, and a fast-RSI channel where the RSI changes from one symbol duration to another within the codeword. We show that the RSI can be completely eliminated in the slow-RSI case when the FD relay is equipped with a buffer while the fast RSI cannot be eliminated. For the fixed-rate data transmission scenario, we derive the optimal transmission strategy that should be adopted by the source node and relay node to maximize the system throughput. We verify our analytical findings through simulations.

  10. Transverse relaxation dispersion of the p7 membrane channel from hepatitis C virus reveals conformational breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, Jyoti; Brüschweiler, Sven; Ouyang, Bo; Chou, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The p7 membrane protein encoded by hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles into a homo-hexamer that selectively conducts cations. An earlier solution NMR structure of the hexameric complex revealed a funnel-like architecture and suggests that a ring of conserved asparagines near the narrow end of the funnel are important for cation interaction. NMR based drug-binding experiments also suggest that rimantadine can allosterically inhibit ion conduction via a molecular wedge mechanism. These results suggest the presence of dilation and contraction of the funnel tip that are important for channel activity and that the action of the drug is attenuating this motion. Here, we determined the conformational dynamics and solvent accessibility of the p7 channel. The proton exchange measurements show that the cavity-lining residues are largely water accessible, consistent with the overall funnel shape of the channel. Our relaxation dispersion data show that residues Val7 and Leu8 near the asparagine ring are subject to large chemical exchange, suggesting significant intrinsic channel breathing at the tip of the funnel. Moreover, the hinge regions connecting the narrow and wide regions of the funnel show strong relaxation dispersion and these regions are the binding sites for rimantadine. Presence of rimantadine decreases the conformational dynamics near the asparagine ring and the hinge area. Our data provide direct observation of μs–ms dynamics of the p7 channel and support the molecular wedge mechanism of rimantadine inhibition of the HCV p7 channel

  11. Transverse relaxation dispersion of the p7 membrane channel from hepatitis C virus reveals conformational breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, Jyoti; Brüschweiler, Sven [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Ouyang, Bo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (China); Chou, James J., E-mail: james-chou@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The p7 membrane protein encoded by hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles into a homo-hexamer that selectively conducts cations. An earlier solution NMR structure of the hexameric complex revealed a funnel-like architecture and suggests that a ring of conserved asparagines near the narrow end of the funnel are important for cation interaction. NMR based drug-binding experiments also suggest that rimantadine can allosterically inhibit ion conduction via a molecular wedge mechanism. These results suggest the presence of dilation and contraction of the funnel tip that are important for channel activity and that the action of the drug is attenuating this motion. Here, we determined the conformational dynamics and solvent accessibility of the p7 channel. The proton exchange measurements show that the cavity-lining residues are largely water accessible, consistent with the overall funnel shape of the channel. Our relaxation dispersion data show that residues Val7 and Leu8 near the asparagine ring are subject to large chemical exchange, suggesting significant intrinsic channel breathing at the tip of the funnel. Moreover, the hinge regions connecting the narrow and wide regions of the funnel show strong relaxation dispersion and these regions are the binding sites for rimantadine. Presence of rimantadine decreases the conformational dynamics near the asparagine ring and the hinge area. Our data provide direct observation of μs–ms dynamics of the p7 channel and support the molecular wedge mechanism of rimantadine inhibition of the HCV p7 channel.

  12. NMR investigation of the isolated second voltage-sensing domain of human Nav1.4 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, A S; Lyukmanova, E N; Myshkin, M Yu; Shulepko, M A; Kulbatskii, D S; Petrosian, N S; Chugunov, A O; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Arseniev, A S; Shenkarev, Z O

    2017-03-01

    Voltage-gated Na + channels are essential for the functioning of cardiovascular, muscular, and nervous systems. The α-subunit of eukaryotic Na + channel consists of ~2000 amino acid residues and encloses 24 transmembrane (TM) helices, which form five membrane domains: four voltage-sensing (VSD) and one pore domain. The structural complexity significantly impedes recombinant production and structural studies of full-sized Na + channels. Modular organization of voltage-gated channels gives an idea for studying of the isolated second VSD of human skeletal muscle Nav1.4 channel (VSD-II). Several variants of VSD-II (~150a.a., four TM helices) with different N- and C-termini were produced by cell-free expression. Screening of membrane mimetics revealed low stability of VSD-II samples in media containing phospholipids (bicelles, nanodiscs) associated with the aggregation of electrically neutral domain molecules. The almost complete resonance assignment of 13 C, 15 N-labeled VSD-II was obtained in LPPG micelles. The secondary structure of VSD-II showed similarity with the structures of bacterial Na + channels. The fragment of S4 TM helix between the first and second conserved Arg residues probably adopts 3 10 -helical conformation. Water accessibility of S3 helix, observed by the Mn 2+ titration, pointed to the formation of water-filled crevices in the micelle embedded VSD-II. 15 N relaxation data revealed characteristic pattern of μs-ms time scale motions in the VSD-II regions sharing expected interhelical contacts. VSD-II demonstrated enhanced mobility at ps-ns time scale as compared to isolated VSDs of K + channels. These results validate structural studies of isolated VSDs of Na + channels and show possible pitfalls in application of this 'divide and conquer' approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gating at the mouth of the acetylcholine receptor channel: energetic consequences of mutations in the alphaM2-cap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi A Bafna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gating of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from a C(losed to an O(pen conformation is the initial event in the postsynaptic signaling cascade at the vertebrate nerve-muscle junction. Studies of receptor structure and function show that many residues in this large, five-subunit membrane protein contribute to the energy difference between C and O. Of special interest are amino acids located at the two transmitter binding sites and in the narrow region of the channel, where CO gating motions generate a lowhigh change in the affinity for agonists and in the ionic conductance, respectively. We have measured the energy changes and relative timing of gating movements for residues that lie between these two locations, in the C-terminus of the pore-lining M2 helix of the alpha subunit ('alphaM2-cap'. This region contains a binding site for non-competitive inhibitors and a charged ring that influences the conductance of the open pore. alphaM2-cap mutations have large effects on gating but much smaller effects on agonist binding, channel conductance, channel block and desensitization. Three alphaM2-cap residues (alphaI260, alphaP265 and alphaS268 appear to move at the outset of channel-opening, about at the same time as those at the transmitter binding site. The results suggest that the alphaM2-cap changes its secondary structure to link gating motions in the extracellular domain with those in the channel that regulate ionic conductance.

  14. Constraints on voltage sensor movement in the shaker K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darman, Rachel B; Ivy, Allison A; Ketty, Vina; Blaustein, Robert O

    2006-12-01

    In nerve and muscle cells, the voltage-gated opening and closing of cation-selective ion channels is accompanied by the translocation of 12-14 elementary charges across the membrane's electric field. Although most of these charges are carried by residues in the S4 helix of the gating module of these channels, the precise nature of their physical movement is currently the topic of spirited debate. Broadly speaking, two classes of models have emerged: those that suggest that small-scale motions can account for the extensive charge displacement, and those that invoke a much larger physical movement. In the most recent incarnation of the latter type of model, which is based on structural and functional data from the archaebacterial K(+) channel KvAP, a "voltage-sensor paddle" comprising a helix-turn-helix of S3-S4 translocates approximately 20 A through the bilayer during the gating cycle (Jiang, Y., A. Lee, J. Chen, V. Ruta, M. Cadene, B.T. Chait, and R. MacKinnon. 2003. Nature. 423:33-41; Jiang, Y., V. Ruta, J. Chen, A. Lee, and R. MacKinnon. 2003. Nature. 423:42-48.; Ruta, V., J. Chen, and R. MacKinnon. 2005. Cell. 123:463-475). We used two methods to test for analogous motions in the Shaker K(+) channel, each examining the aqueous exposure of residues near S3. In the first, we employed a pore-blocking maleimide reagent (Blaustein, R.O., P.A. Cole, C. Williams, and C. Miller. 2000. Nat. Struct. Biol. 7:309-311) to probe for state-dependent changes in the chemical reactivity of substituted cysteines; in the second, we tested the state-dependent accessibility of a tethered biotin to external streptavidin (Qiu, X.Q., K.S. Jakes, A. Finkelstein, and S.L. Slatin. 1994. J. Biol. Chem. 269:7483-7488; Slatin, S.L., X.Q. Qiu, K.S. Jakes, and A. Finkelstein. 1994. Nature. 371:158-161). In both types of experiments, residues predicted to lie near the top of S3 did not exhibit any change in aqueous exposure during the gating cycle. This lack of state dependence argues against

  15. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis identify several autophosphorylated residues required for the activity of PrkC, a Ser/Thr kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madec, Edwige; Stensballe, Allan; Kjellström, Sven

    2003-01-01

    We have shown recently that PrkC, which is involved in developmental processes in Bacillus subtilis, is a Ser/Thr kinase with features of the receptor kinase family of eukaryotic Hanks kinases. In this study, we expressed and purified from Escherichia coli the cytoplasmic domain of PrkC containing...... the kinase and a short juxtamembrane region. This fragment, which we designate PrkCc, undergoes autophosphorylation in E.coli. PrkCc is further autophosphorylated in vitro, apparently through a trans-kinase, intermolecular reaction. PrkC also displays kinase activity with myelin basic protein. Using high...... mass accuracy electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified seven phosphorylated threonine and one serine residue in PrkCc. All the corresponding residues were replaced by systematic site-directed mutagenesis and the purified mutant...

  16. Cloning and characterization of BmK86, a novel K+-channel blocker from scorpion venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Xin; Cao, Zhijian; Yin, Shijin; Ma, Yibao; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin

    2007-01-01

    Scorpion venom represents a tremendous hitherto unexplored resource for understanding ion channels. BmK86 is a novel K + -channel toxin gene isolated from a cDNA library of Mesobuthus martensii Karsch, which encodes a signal peptide of 22 amino acid residues and a mature toxin of 35 residues with three disulfide bridges. The genomic sequence of BmK86 consists of two exons disrupted by an intron of 72 bp. Comparison with the other scorpion toxins BmK86 shows low sequence similarity. The GST-BmK86 fusion protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein was cleaved by enterokinase and the recombinant BmK86 was purified by HPLC. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, the recombinant BmK86 was found to inhibit the potassium current of mKv1.3 channel expressed in COS7 cells. These results indicated that BmK86 belongs to a representative member of a novel subfamily of α-KTxs. The systematic number assigned to BmK86 is α-KTx26.1

  17. A glycine residue essential for high ivermectin sensitivity in Cys-loop ion channel receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Ivermectin exerts its anthelmintic effect by activating nematode Cys-loop glutamate-gated receptors. Here we show that a glycine residue at a specific transmembrane domain location is essential for high ivermectin sensitivity in both glycine- and glutamate-gated Cys-loop receptors. We also show...

  18. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  19. Achievable Rates of Buffer-Aided Full-Duplex Gaussian Relay Channels

    KAUST Repository

    El Shafie, Ahmed

    2017-10-18

    We derive closed-form expressions for the achievable rates of a buffer-aided full-duplex (FD) multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) Gaussian relay channel. The FD relay still suffers from residual self-interference (RSI) after the application of self-interference mitigation techniques. We investigate both cases of a slow-RSI channel where the RSI is fixed over the entire codeword, and a fast-RSI channel where the RSI changes from one symbol duration to another within the codeword. We show that the RSI can be completely eliminated in the slow-RSI case when the FD relay is equipped with a buffer while the fast RSI cannot be eliminated. For the fixed-rate data transmission scenario, we derive the optimal transmission strategy that should be adopted by the source node and relay node to maximize the system throughput. We verify our analytical findings through simulations.

  20. Achievable Rates of Buffer-Aided Full-Duplex Gaussian Relay Channels

    KAUST Repository

    El Shafie, Ahmed; Salem, Ahmed Sultan; Krikidis, Ioannis; Al-Dhahir, Naofal; Hamila, Ridha

    2017-01-01

    We derive closed-form expressions for the achievable rates of a buffer-aided full-duplex (FD) multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) Gaussian relay channel. The FD relay still suffers from residual self-interference (RSI) after the application of self-interference mitigation techniques. We investigate both cases of a slow-RSI channel where the RSI is fixed over the entire codeword, and a fast-RSI channel where the RSI changes from one symbol duration to another within the codeword. We show that the RSI can be completely eliminated in the slow-RSI case when the FD relay is equipped with a buffer while the fast RSI cannot be eliminated. For the fixed-rate data transmission scenario, we derive the optimal transmission strategy that should be adopted by the source node and relay node to maximize the system throughput. We verify our analytical findings through simulations.

  1. The role of NH2-terminal positive charges in the activity of inward rectifier KATP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, C A; Jeliazkova, I; Nichols, C G

    2002-09-01

    Approximately half of the NH(2) terminus of inward rectifier (Kir) channels can be deleted without significant change in channel function, but activity is lost when more than approximately 30 conserved residues before the first membrane spanning domain (M1) are removed. Systematic replacement of the positive charges in the NH(2) terminus of Kir6.2 with alanine reveals several residues that affect channel function when neutralized. Certain mutations (R4A, R5A, R16A, R27A, R39A, K47A, R50A, R54A, K67A) change open probability, whereas an overlapping set of mutants (R16A, R27A, K39A, K47A, R50A, R54A, K67A) change ATP sensitivity. Further analysis of the latter set differentiates mutations that alter ATP sensitivity as a consequence of altered open state stability (R16A, K39A, K67A) from those that may affect ATP binding directly (K47A, R50A, R54A). The data help to define the structural determinants of Kir channel function, and suggest possible structural motifs within the NH(2) terminus, as well as the relationship of the NH(2) terminus with the extended cytoplasmic COOH terminus of the channel.

  2. Mechanisms of molecular transport through the urea channel of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Reginald; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.; Luecke, Hartmut; Ulmschneider, Martin B.

    2013-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori survival in acidic environments relies on cytoplasmic hydrolysis of gastric urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide, which buffer the pathogen’s periplasm. Urea uptake is greatly enhanced and regulated by HpUreI, a proton-gated inner membrane channel protein essential for gastric survival of H. pylori. The crystal structure of HpUreI describes a static snapshot of the channel with two constriction sites near the center of the bilayer that are too narrow to allow passage of urea or even water. Here we describe the urea transport mechanism at atomic resolution, revealed by unrestrained microsecond equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the hexameric channel assembly. Two consecutive constrictions open to allow conduction of urea, which is guided through the channel by interplay between conserved residues that determine proton rejection and solute selectivity. Remarkably, HpUreI conducts water at rates equivalent to aquaporins, which might be essential for efficient transport of urea at small concentration gradients.

  3. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  4. Identifying Plant Part Composition of Forest Logging Residue Using Infrared Spectral Data and Linear Discriminant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gifty E. Acquah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As new markets, technologies and economies evolve in the low carbon bioeconomy, forest logging residue, a largely untapped renewable resource will play a vital role. The feedstock can however be variable depending on plant species and plant part component. This heterogeneity can influence the physical, chemical and thermochemical properties of the material, and thus the final yield and quality of products. Although it is challenging to control compositional variability of a batch of feedstock, it is feasible to monitor this heterogeneity and make the necessary changes in process parameters. Such a system will be a first step towards optimization, quality assurance and cost-effectiveness of processes in the emerging biofuel/chemical industry. The objective of this study was therefore to qualitatively classify forest logging residue made up of different plant parts using both near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS together with linear discriminant analysis (LDA. Forest logging residue harvested from several Pinus taeda (loblolly pine plantations in Alabama, USA, were classified into three plant part components: clean wood, wood and bark and slash (i.e., limbs and foliage. Five-fold cross-validated linear discriminant functions had classification accuracies of over 96% for both NIRS and FTIRS based models. An extra factor/principal component (PC was however needed to achieve this in FTIRS modeling. Analysis of factor loadings of both NIR and FTIR spectra showed that, the statistically different amount of cellulose in the three plant part components of logging residue contributed to their initial separation. This study demonstrated that NIR or FTIR spectroscopy coupled with PCA and LDA has the potential to be used as a high throughput tool in classifying the plant part makeup of a batch of forest logging residue feedstock. Thus, NIR/FTIR could be employed as a tool to rapidly probe/monitor the variability

  5. Bimodal voltage dependence of TRPA1: mutations of a key pore helix residue reveal strong intrinsic voltage-dependent inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xia; Lu, Yungang; Chen, Xueqin; Xiong, Jian; Zhou, Yuanda; Li, Ping; Xia, Bingqing; Li, Min; Zhu, Michael X; Gao, Zhaobing

    2014-07-01

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is implicated in somatosensory processing and pathological pain sensation. Although not strictly voltage-gated, ionic currents of TRPA1 typically rectify outwardly, indicating channel activation at depolarized membrane potentials. However, some reports also showed TRPA1 inactivation at high positive potentials, implicating voltage-dependent inactivation. Here we report a conserved leucine residue, L906, in the putative pore helix, which strongly impacts the voltage dependency of TRPA1. Mutation of the leucine to cysteine (L906C) converted the channel from outward to inward rectification independent of divalent cations and irrespective to stimulation by allyl isothiocyanate. The mutant, but not the wild-type channel, displayed exclusively voltage-dependent inactivation at positive potentials. The L906C mutation also exhibited reduced sensitivity to inhibition by TRPA1 blockers, HC030031 and ruthenium red. Further mutagenesis of the leucine to all natural amino acids individually revealed that most substitutions at L906 (15/19) resulted in inward rectification, with exceptions of three amino acids that dramatically reduced channel activity and one, methionine, which mimicked the wild-type channel. Our data are plausibly explained by a bimodal gating model involving both voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of TRPA1. We propose that the key pore helix residue, L906, plays an essential role in responding to the voltage-dependent gating.

  6. TWIK-1 two-pore domain potassium channels change ion selectivity and conduct inward leak sodium currents in hypokalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liqun; Zhang, Xuexin; Chen, Haijun

    2011-06-07

    Background potassium (K+) channels, which are normally selectively permeable to K+, maintain the cardiac resting membrane potential at around -80 mV. In subphysiological extracellular K+ concentrations ([K+]o), which occur in pathological hypokalemia, the resting membrane potential of human cardiomyocytes can depolarize to around -50 mV, whereas rat and mouse cardiomyocytes become hyperpolarized, consistent with the Nernst equation for K+. This paradoxical depolarization of cardiomyocytes in subphysiological [K+]o, which may contribute to cardiac arrhythmias, is thought to involve an inward leak sodium (Na+) current. Here, we show that human cardiac TWIK-1 (also known as K2P1) two-pore domain K+ channels change ion selectivity, becoming permeable to external Na+, and conduct inward leak Na+ currents in subphysiological [K+]o. A specific threonine residue (Thr118) within the pore selectivity sequence TxGYG was required for this altered ion selectivity. Mouse cardiomyocyte-derived HL-1 cells exhibited paradoxical depolarization with ectopic expression of TWIK-1 channels, whereas TWIK-1 knockdown in human spherical primary cardiac myocytes eliminated paradoxical depolarization. These findings indicate that ion selectivity of TWIK-1 K+ channels changes during pathological hypokalemia, elucidate a molecular basis for inward leak Na+ currents that could trigger or contribute to cardiac paradoxical depolarization in lowered [K+]o, and identify a mechanism for regulating cardiac excitability.

  7. Multi-channel non-invasive fetal electrocardiography detection using wavelet decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Javier; Ruano, Josué; Corredor, Germán.; Romo-Bucheli, David; Navarro-Vargas, José Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Non-invasive fetal electrocardiography (fECG) has attracted the medical community because of the importance of fetal monitoring. However, its implementation in clinical practice is challenging: the fetal signal has a low Signal- to-Noise-Ratio and several signal sources are present in the maternal abdominal electrocardiography (AECG). This paper presents a novel method to detect the fetal signal from a multi-channel maternal AECG. The method begins by applying filters and signal detrending the AECG signals. Afterwards, the maternal QRS complexes are identified and subtracted. The residual signals are used to detect the fetal QRS complex. Intervals of these signals are analyzed by using a wavelet decomposition. The resulting representation feds a previously trained Random Forest (RF) classifier that identifies signal intervals associated to fetal QRS complex. The method was evaluated on a public available dataset: the Physionet2013 challenge. A set of 50 maternal AECG records were used to train the RF classifier. The evaluation was carried out in signals intervals extracted from additional 25 maternal AECG. The proposed method yielded an 83:77% accuracy in the fetal QRS complex classification task.

  8. The topogenic function of S4 promotes membrane insertion of the voltage-sensor domain in the KvAP channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Eriko; Sato, Yoko; Nanatani, Kei; Hoshi, Naomi; Lee, Jong-Kook; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Sakaguchi, Masao; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    Voltage-dependent K + (K V ) channels control K + permeability in response to shifts in the membrane potential. Voltage sensing in K V channels is mediated by the positively charged transmembrane domain S4. The best-characterized K V channel, KvAP, lacks the distinct hydrophilic region corresponding to the S3-S4 extracellular loop that is found in other K + channels. In the present study, we evaluated the topogenic properties of the transmembrane regions within the voltage-sensing domain in KvAP. S3 had low membrane insertion activity, whereas S4 possessed a unique type-I signal anchor (SA-I) function, which enabled it to insert into the membrane by itself. S4 was also found to function as a stop-transfer signal for retention in the membrane. The length and structural nature of the extracellular S3-S4 loop affected the membrane insertion of S3 and S4, suggesting that S3 membrane insertion was dependent on S4. Replacement of charged residues within the transmembrane regions with residues of opposite charge revealed that Asp 72 in S2 and Glu 93 in S3 contributed to membrane insertion of S3 and S4, and increased the stability of S4 in the membrane. These results indicate that the SA-I function of S4, unique among K + channels studied to date, promotes the insertion of S3 into the membrane, and that the charged residues essential for voltage sensing contribute to the membrane-insertion of the voltage sensor domain in KvAP. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Meng; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Yao, Xin-Qiu; She, Zhen-Su

    2010-01-01

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  10. Anion channels: master switches of stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelfsema, M Rob G; Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2012-04-01

    During stress, plant cells activate anion channels and trigger the release of anions across the plasma membrane. Recently, two new gene families have been identified that encode major groups of anion channels. The SLAC/SLAH channels are characterized by slow voltage-dependent activation (S-type), whereas ALMT genes encode rapid-activating channels (R-type). Both S- and R-type channels are stimulated in guard cells by the stress hormone ABA, which leads to stomatal closure. Besides their role in ABA-dependent stomatal movement, anion channels are also activated by biotic stress factors such as microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Given that anion channels occur throughout the plant kingdom, they are likely to serve a general function as master switches of stress responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantum privacy and Schur product channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levick, Jeremy; Kribs, David W.; Pereira, Rajesh

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the quantum privacy properties of an important class of quantum channels, by making use of a connection with Schur product matrix operations and associated correlation matrix structures. For channels implemented by mutually commuting unitaries, which cannot privatise qubits encoded directly into subspaces, we nevertheless identify private algebras and subsystems that can be privatised by the channels. We also obtain further results by combining our analysis with tools from the theory of quasi-orthogonal operator algebras and graph theory.

  12. Molecular analysis of a thylakoid K+channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The work undertaken sought to use a novel probe to identify and clone plant ion (K) channels. It was also proposed that in vitro biochemical studies of cation transport across purified preparations of thylakoid membrane be employed to characterize a putative K channel in this membrane system. Over the last several years, an enormous data base of partially-sequenced mRNAs and numerous genomes (including those of plants) has evolved and provides a powerful alternative to this brute-force approach to identify and clone cDNAs encoding physiologically important membrane proteins such as channels. The utility of searching genetic databases for relevant sequences, in addition to the difficulty of working with membrane proteins, led to changes in research focus during the granting period. During the course of the funding period, work was finished up which documented the presence of a K channel in the thylakoid membrane and demonstrated that K fluxes through this channel were required for optimal photosynthetic activity, likely due to the requirement for charge balancing of proton flux

  13. Molecular analysis of a thylakoid K+channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-10

    The work undertaken sought to use a novel probe to identify and clone plant ion (K) channels. It was also proposed that in vitro biochemical studies of cation transport across purified preparations of thylakoid membrane be employed to characterize a putative K channel in this membrane system. Over the last several years, an enormous data base of partially-sequenced mRNAs and numerous genomes (including those of plants) has evolved and provides a powerful alternative to this brute-force approach to identify and clone cDNAs encoding physiologically important membrane proteins such as channels. The utility of searching genetic databases for relevant sequences, in addition to the difficulty of working with membrane proteins, led to changes in research focus during the granting period. During the course of the funding period, work was finished up which documented the presence of a K channel in the thylakoid membrane and demonstrated that K fluxes through this channel were required for optimal photosynthetic activity, likely due to the requirement for charge balancing of proton flux.

  14. Voltage-gated calcium channels of Paramecium cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodh, Sukanya; Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-10-01

    Paramecium cells swim by beating their cilia, and make turns by transiently reversing their power stroke. Reversal is caused by Ca 2+ entering the cilium through voltage-gated Ca 2+ (Ca V ) channels that are found exclusively in the cilia. As ciliary Ca 2+ levels return to normal, the cell pivots and swims forward in a new direction. Thus, the activation of the Ca V channels causes cells to make a turn in their swimming paths. For 45 years, the physiological characteristics of the Paramecium ciliary Ca V channels have been known, but the proteins were not identified until recently, when the P. tetraurelia ciliary membrane proteome was determined. Three Ca V α1 subunits that were identified among the proteins were cloned and confirmed to be expressed in the cilia. We demonstrate using RNA interference that these channels function as the ciliary Ca V channels that are responsible for the reversal of ciliary beating. Furthermore, we show that Pawn (pw) mutants of Paramecium that cannot swim backward for lack of Ca V channel activity do not express any of the three Ca V 1 channels in their ciliary membrane, until they are rescued from the mutant phenotype by expression of the wild-type PW gene. These results reinforce the correlation of the three Ca V channels with backward swimming through ciliary reversal. The PwB protein, found in endoplasmic reticulum fractions, co-immunoprecipitates with the Ca V 1c channel and perhaps functions in trafficking. The PwA protein does not appear to have an interaction with the channel proteins but affects their appearance in the cilia. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Identification of residue pairing in interacting β-strands from a predicted residue contact map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenzhi; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Wenxuan; Gong, Haipeng

    2018-04-19

    Despite the rapid progress of protein residue contact prediction, predicted residue contact maps frequently contain many errors. However, information of residue pairing in β strands could be extracted from a noisy contact map, due to the presence of characteristic contact patterns in β-β interactions. This information may benefit the tertiary structure prediction of mainly β proteins. In this work, we propose a novel ridge-detection-based β-β contact predictor to identify residue pairing in β strands from any predicted residue contact map. Our algorithm RDb 2 C adopts ridge detection, a well-developed technique in computer image processing, to capture consecutive residue contacts, and then utilizes a novel multi-stage random forest framework to integrate the ridge information and additional features for prediction. Starting from the predicted contact map of CCMpred, RDb 2 C remarkably outperforms all state-of-the-art methods on two conventional test sets of β proteins (BetaSheet916 and BetaSheet1452), and achieves F1-scores of ~ 62% and ~ 76% at the residue level and strand level, respectively. Taking the prediction of the more advanced RaptorX-Contact as input, RDb 2 C achieves impressively higher performance, with F1-scores reaching ~ 76% and ~ 86% at the residue level and strand level, respectively. In a test of structural modeling using the top 1 L predicted contacts as constraints, for 61 mainly β proteins, the average TM-score achieves 0.442 when using the raw RaptorX-Contact prediction, but increases to 0.506 when using the improved prediction by RDb 2 C. Our method can significantly improve the prediction of β-β contacts from any predicted residue contact maps. Prediction results of our algorithm could be directly applied to effectively facilitate the practical structure prediction of mainly β proteins. All source data and codes are available at http://166.111.152.91/Downloads.html or the GitHub address of https://github.com/wzmao/RDb2C .

  16. Dual Regulation of Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels by PIP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo A Rodríguez Menchaca

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 16 years, there has been an impressive number of ion channels shown to be sensitive to the major phosphoinositide in the plasma membrane, phosphatidilinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Among them are voltage-gated channels, which are crucial for both neuronal and cardiac excitability. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav channels were shown to be regulated bidirectionally by PIP2. On one hand, PIP2 stabilized their activity by reducing current rundown but on the other hand it produced a voltage-dependent inhibition by shifting the activation curve to more positive voltages. For voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels PIP2 was first shown to prevent N-type inactivation. Careful examination of the effects of PIP2 on the activation mechanism of Kv1.2 has shown a similar bidirectional regulation as in the Cav channels. The two effects could be distinguished kinetically, in terms of their sensitivities to PIP2 and by distinct molecular determinants. The rightward shift of the Kv1.2 voltage dependence implicated basic residues in the S4-S5 linker and was consistent with stabilization of the inactive state of the voltage sensor. A third type of a voltage-gated ion channel modulated by PIP2 is the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channel. PIP2 has been shown to enhance the opening of HCN channels by shifting their voltage-dependent activation toward depolarized potentials. The sea urchin HCN channel, SpIH, showed again a PIP2-mediated bidirectional effect but in reverse order than the depolarization-activated Cav and Kv channels: a voltage-dependent potentiation, like the mammalian HCN channels, but also an inhibition of the cGMP-induced current activation. Just like the Kv1.2 channels, distinct molecular determinants underlied the PIP2 dual effects on SpIH channels. The dual regulation of these very different ion channels, all of which are voltage dependent, points to conserved mechanisms of regulation of these channels by PIP2.

  17. Quadratic residues and non-residues selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an account of the classical theory of quadratic residues and non-residues with the goal of using that theory as a lens through which to view the development of some of the fundamental methods employed in modern elementary, algebraic, and analytic number theory. The first three chapters present some basic facts and the history of quadratic residues and non-residues and discuss various proofs of the Law of Quadratic Reciprosity in depth, with an emphasis on the six proofs that Gauss published. The remaining seven chapters explore some interesting applications of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, prove some results concerning the distribution and arithmetic structure of quadratic residues and non-residues, provide a detailed proof of Dirichlet’s Class-Number Formula, and discuss the question of whether quadratic residues are randomly distributed. The text is a valuable resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate students as well as for mathematicians interested in number theory.

  18. Thickness of Residual Wetting Film in Liquid-Liquid Displacement in Capillary Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnev, I. A.; Gaul, W.; Vigil, D.

    2010-12-01

    Core-annular flow is common in nature, representing, for example, how streams of oil, surrounded by water, move in petroleum reservoirs. Oil, typically a non-wetting fluid, tends to occupy the middle (core) part of a channel, while water forms a surrounding wall-wetting film. What is the thickness of this wetting film? Understanding this question may determine the ultimate oil recovery. A classic theory has been in existence for nearly 50 years offering a solution, although in a controversial manner, for moving gas bubbles. On the other hand, an acceptable, experimentally verified theory for a body of one liquid flowing in another has not been available. We develop a hydrodynamic, testable theory providing an explicit relationship between the thickness of the wetting film and fluid properties for a blob of one fluid moving in another, with neither phase being gas. In its relationship to the capillary number Ca, the thickness of the film is predicted to be proportional to Ca2 at lower Ca and to level off at a constant value of about 20 % the channel radius at higher Ca. The thickness of the film is deduced to be approximately unaffected by the viscosity ratio of the fluids. We have conducted our own laboratory experiments and compiled experimental data from other studies, all of which are mutually consistent and confirm the salient features of the theory. At the same time, the classic law, originally deduced for films surrounding moving gas bubbles but often believed to hold for liquids as well, fails to explain the observations.

  19. Disulfide mapping the voltage-sensing mechanism of a voltage-dependent potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Shin-Ichiro; Harada, Hitomi; Kimura, Tomomi; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2016-11-17

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels allow for the selective permeability of potassium ions in a membrane potential dependent manner, playing crucial roles in neurotransmission and muscle contraction. Kv channel is a tetramer, in which each subunit possesses a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and a pore domain (PD). Although several lines of evidence indicated that membrane depolarization is sensed as the movement of helix S4 of the VSD, the detailed voltage-sensing mechanism remained elusive, due to the difficulty of structural analyses at resting potential. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive disulfide locking analysis of the VSD using 36 double Cys mutants, in order to identify the proximal residue pairs of the VSD in the presence or absence of a membrane potential. An intramolecular SS-bond was formed between 6 Cys pairs under both polarized and depolarized environment, and one pair only under depolarized environment. The multiple conformations captured by the SS-bond can be divided by two states, up and down, where S4 lies on the extracellular and intracellular sides of the membrane, respectively, with axial rotation of 180°. The transition between these two states is caused by the S4 translocation of 12 Å, enabling allosteric regulation of the gating at the PD.

  20. Simple Ion Channels: From Structure to Electrophysiology and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrzej

    2018-01-01

    A reliable way to establish whether our understanding of a channel is satisfactory is to reproduce its measured ionic conductance over a broad range of applied voltages in computer simulations. In molecular dynamics (MD), this can be done by way of applying an external electric field to the system and counting the number of ions that traverse the channel per unit time. Since this approach is computationally very expensive, we have developed a markedly more efficient alternative in which MD is combined with the electrodiffusion (ED) equation. In this approach, the assumptions of the ED equation can be rigorously tested, and the precision and consistency of the calculated conductance can be determined. We have demonstrated that the full current/voltage dependence and the underlying free energy profile for a simple channel can be reliably calculated from equilibrium or non-equilibrium MD simulations at a single voltage. To carry out MD simulations, a structural model of a channel has to be assumed, which is an important constraint, considering that high-resolution structures are available for only very few simple channels. If the comparison of calculated ionic conductance with electrophysiological data is satisfactory, it greatly increases our confidence that the structure and the function are described sufficiently accurately. We examined the validity of the ED for several channels embedded in phospholipid membranes - four naturally occurring channels: trichotoxin, alamethicin, p7 from hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Vpu from the HIV-1 virus, and a synthetic, hexameric channel, formed by a 21-residue peptide that contains only leucine and serine. All these channels mediate transport of potassium and chloride ions. It was found that the ED equation is satisfactory for these systems. In some of them experimental and calculated electrophysiological properties are in good agreement, whereas in others there are strong indications that the structural models are incorrect.

  1. The pH sensor of the plant K+-uptake channel KAT1 is built from a sensory cloud rather than from single key amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Wendy; Riedelsberger, Janin; Morales-Navarro, Samuel E; Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Dreyer, Ingo

    2012-02-15

    The uptake of potassium ions (K+) accompanied by an acidification of the apoplasm is a prerequisite for stomatal opening. The acidification (approximately 2-2.5 pH units) is perceived by voltage-gated inward potassium channels (K(in)) that then can open their pores with lower energy cost. The sensory units for extracellular pH in stomatal K(in) channels are proposed to be histidines exposed to the apoplasm. However, in the Arabidopsis thaliana stomatal K(in) channel KAT1, mutations in the unique histidine exposed to the solvent (His267) do not affect the pH dependency. We demonstrate in the present study that His267 of the KAT1 channel cannot sense pH changes since the neighbouring residue Phe266 shifts its pKa to undetectable values through a cation-π interaction. Instead, we show that Glu240 placed in the extracellular loop between transmembrane segments S5 and S6 is involved in the extracellular acid activation mechanism. Based on structural models we propose that this region may serve as a molecular link between the pH- and the voltage-sensor. Like Glu240, several other titratable residues could contribute to the pH-sensor of KAT1, interact with each other and even connect such residues far away from the voltage-sensor with the gating machinery of the channel.

  2. Improving probabilistic prediction of daily streamflow by identifying Pareto optimal approaches for modeling heteroscedastic residual errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, David; Thyer, Mark; Kavetski, Dmitri; Lerat, Julien; Kuczera, George

    2017-03-01

    Reliable and precise probabilistic prediction of daily catchment-scale streamflow requires statistical characterization of residual errors of hydrological models. This study focuses on approaches for representing error heteroscedasticity with respect to simulated streamflow, i.e., the pattern of larger errors in higher streamflow predictions. We evaluate eight common residual error schemes, including standard and weighted least squares, the Box-Cox transformation (with fixed and calibrated power parameter λ) and the log-sinh transformation. Case studies include 17 perennial and 6 ephemeral catchments in Australia and the United States, and two lumped hydrological models. Performance is quantified using predictive reliability, precision, and volumetric bias metrics. We find the choice of heteroscedastic error modeling approach significantly impacts on predictive performance, though no single scheme simultaneously optimizes all performance metrics. The set of Pareto optimal schemes, reflecting performance trade-offs, comprises Box-Cox schemes with λ of 0.2 and 0.5, and the log scheme (λ = 0, perennial catchments only). These schemes significantly outperform even the average-performing remaining schemes (e.g., across ephemeral catchments, median precision tightens from 105% to 40% of observed streamflow, and median biases decrease from 25% to 4%). Theoretical interpretations of empirical results highlight the importance of capturing the skew/kurtosis of raw residuals and reproducing zero flows. Paradoxically, calibration of λ is often counterproductive: in perennial catchments, it tends to overfit low flows at the expense of abysmal precision in high flows. The log-sinh transformation is dominated by the simpler Pareto optimal schemes listed above. Recommendations for researchers and practitioners seeking robust residual error schemes for practical work are provided.

  3. Channel Planform Dynamics Monitoring and Channel Stability Assessment in Two Sediment-Rich Rivers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent flood events induced by typhoons are powerful agents to modify channel morphology in Taiwan’s rivers. Frequent channel migrations reflect highly sensitive valley floors and increase the risk to infrastructure and residents along rivers. Therefore, monitoring channel planforms is essential for analyzing channel stability as well as improving river management. This study analyzed annual channel changes along two sediment-rich rivers, the Zhuoshui River and the Gaoping River, from 2008 to 2015 based on satellite images of FORMOSAT-2. Channel areas were digitized from mid-catchment to river mouth (~90 km. Channel stability for reaches was assessed through analyzing the changes of river indices including braid index, active channel width, and channel activity. In general, the valley width plays a key role in braided degree, active channel width, and channel activity. These indices increase as the valley width expands whereas the braid index decreases slightly close to the river mouth due to the change of river types. This downstream pattern in the Zhuoshui River was interrupted by hydraulic construction which resulted in limited changes downstream from the weir, due to the lack of water and sediment supply. A 200-year flood, Typhoon Morakot in 2009, induced significant changes in the two rivers. The highly active landscape in Taiwan results in very sensitive channels compared to other regions. An integrated Sensitivity Index was proposed for identifying unstable reaches, which could be a useful reference for river authorities when making priorities in river regulation strategy. This study shows that satellite image monitoring coupled with river indices analysis could be an effective tool to evaluate spatial and temporal changes in channel stability in highly dynamic river systems.

  4. Regional bankfull-channel dimensions of non-urban wadeable streams in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    During floods, damage to properties and community infrastructure may result from inundation and the processes of erosion. The damages imparted by erosion are collectively termed the fluvial erosion hazard (FEH), and the Indiana Silver Jackets Multi-agency Hazard Mitigation Taskforce is supporting a program to build tools that will assist Indiana property owners and communities with FEH-mitigation efforts. As part of that program, regional channel-dimension relations are identified for non-urban wadeable streams in Indiana. With a site-selection process that targeted the three largest physiographic regions of the state, field work was completed to measure channel-dimension and channel-geometry characteristics across Indiana. In total, 82 sites were identified for data collection; 25 in the Northern Moraine and Lake region, 31 in the Central Till Plain region, and 26 in the Southern Hills and Lowlands region. Following well established methods, for each data-collection site, effort was applied to identify bankfull stage, determine bankfull-channel dimensions, and document channel-geometry characteristics that allowed for determinations of channel classification. In this report, regional bankfull-channel dimension results are presented as a combination of plots and regression equations that identify the relations between drainage area and the bankfull-channel dimensions of width, mean depth, and cross-sectional area. This investigation found that the channel-dimension data support independent relations for each of the three physiographic regions noted above. Furthermore, these relations show that, for any given drainage area, northern Indiana channels have the smallest predicted dimensions, southern Indiana channels have the largest predicted dimensions, and central Indiana channels are intermediate in their predicted dimensions. When considering the suite of variables that influence bankfull-channel dimensions, it appears that contrasting runoff characteristics

  5. Relatively rapid loss of lampricide residues from fillet tissue of fish after routine treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vue, C.; Bernardy, J.A.; Hubert, T.D.; Gingerich, W.H.; Stehly, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    The selective sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvicide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) is currently used to control parasitic sea lampreys in tributaries to the Great Lakes basin. The concentration and persistence of TFM and its major metabolite, TFM glucuronide (TFM-glu), was determined in fillet tissue of fish after a typical stream application. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were exposed to a nominal concentration of 12.6 nmol/mL TFM for about 12 h during a sea lamprey control treatment of the Ford River in Michigan. Concentrations of TFM and TFM-glu were greatest in the fillet tissues during the exposure period, with greater residues in channel catfish (wet wt; mean, 6.95 nmol/g TFM; mean, 2.40 nmol/g TFM-glu) than in rainbow trout (wet wt; mean, 1.45 nmol/g TFM; mean, 0.93 nmol/g TFM-glu). After the exposure period, residues in both species decreased by 90-99% within 6-12 h and were less than the quantitation limit (<0.03 nmol/g) within 36 h.

  6. Calmodulin as a Ca2+-Sensing Subunit of Arabidopsis Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cornelia; DeFalco, Thomas A; Karia, Purva; Snedden, Wayne A; Moeder, Wolfgang; Yoshioka, Keiko; Dietrich, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Ca2+ serves as a universal second messenger in eukaryotic signaling pathways, and the spatial and temporal patterns of Ca2+ concentration changes are determined by feedback and feed-forward regulation of the involved transport proteins. Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are Ca2+-permeable channels that interact with the ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM). CNGCs interact with CaMs via diverse CaM-binding sites, including an IQ-motif, which has been identified in the C-termini of CNGC20 and CNGC12. Here we present a family-wide analysis of the IQ-motif from all 20 Arabidopsis CNGC isoforms. While most of their IQ-peptides interacted with conserved CaMs in yeast, some were unable to do so, despite high sequence conservation across the family. We showed that the CaM binding ability of the IQ-motif is highly dependent on its proximal and distal vicinity. We determined that two alanine residues positioned N-terminal to the core IQ-sequence play a significant role in CaM binding, and identified a polymorphism at this site that promoted or inhibited CaM binding in yeast. Through detailed biophysical analysis of the CNGC2 IQ-motif, we found that this polymorphism specifically affected the Ca2+-independent interactions with the C-lobe of CaM. This same polymorphism partially suppressed the induction of programmed cell death by CNGC11/12 in planta. Our work expands the model of CNGC regulation, and posits that the C-lobe of apo-CaM is permanently associated with the channel at the N-terminal part of the IQ-domain. This mode allows CaM to function as a Ca2+-sensing regulatory subunit of the channel complex, providing a mechanism by which Ca2+ signals may be fine-tuned. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Angular distributions of evaporation residues from near-barrier fusion of 32,36S on a ≅100 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The angular distributions of evaporation residues from near-barrier fusion of 32,36 S ions with 92,94,96,98,100 Mo, 100,101,102,104 Ru, 103 Rh, and 104,105,106,108,110 Pd were measured in the range of 3 to 11 degrees in the laboratory system. The relative yield of the four most abundant exit evaporation channels has been extracted for all target-projectile combination at two bombarding energies, by fitting the angular distributions expected for each channel as obtained from the Monte-Carlo program TRANMI to the measured angular distribution of the evaporation residues. The total detection efficiency for the Munich-RF-Recoil Spectrometer was obtained from the relative yields, taking into account the effect due to multiple scattering, and compared with that obtained previously from the recoil velocity distributions. (orig./HSI) [de

  8. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-07-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design.

  9. Predicting the residual life of plant equipment - Why worry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaske, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Predicting the residual life of plant equipment that has been in service for 20 to 30 years or more is a major concern of many industries. This paper reviews the reasons for increased concern for residual-life assessment and the general procedures used in performing such assessments. Some examples and case histories illustrating procedures for assessing remaining service life are discussed. Areas where developments are needed to improve the technology for remaining-life estimation are pointed out. Then, some of the critical issues involved in residual-life assessment are identified. Finally, the future role of residual-life prediction is addressed

  10. Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) reveals water and phosphate interactions with the KcsA potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, John A; Focia, Pamela J; Gross, Adrian

    2010-02-23

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of naturally occurring paramagnetic metal centers. The technique has been used to study copper complexes, hemes, enzyme mechanisms, micellar water content, and water permeation profiles in membranes, among other applications. In the present study, we combine ESEEM spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and X-ray crystallography in order to evaluate the technique's potential as a structural tool to describe the native environment of membrane proteins. Using the KcsA potassium channel as a model system, we demonstrate that deuterium ESEEM can detect water permeation along the lipid-exposed surface of the KcsA outer helix. We further demonstrate that (31)P ESEEM is able to identify channel residues that interact with the phosphate headgroup of the lipid bilayer. In combination with X-ray crystallography, the (31)P data may be used to define the phosphate interaction surface of the protein. The results presented here establish ESEEM as a highly informative technique for SDSL studies of membrane proteins.

  11. Channel Power in Multi-Channel Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); B. Skiera (Bernd)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the literature, little attention has been paid to instances where companies add an Internet channel to their direct channel portfolio. However, actively managing multiple sales channels requires knowing the customers’ channel preferences and the resulting channel power. Two key

  12. Annotating Protein Functional Residues by Coupling High-Throughput Fitness Profile and Homologous-Structure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yushen; Wu, Nicholas C; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Tianhao; Gong, Danyang; Shu, Sara; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2016-11-01

    Identification and annotation of functional residues are fundamental questions in protein sequence analysis. Sequence and structure conservation provides valuable information to tackle these questions. It is, however, limited by the incomplete sampling of sequence space in natural evolution. Moreover, proteins often have multiple functions, with overlapping sequences that present challenges to accurate annotation of the exact functions of individual residues by conservation-based methods. Using the influenza A virus PB1 protein as an example, we developed a method to systematically identify and annotate functional residues. We used saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing to measure the replication capacity of single nucleotide mutations across the entire PB1 protein. After predicting protein stability upon mutations, we identified functional PB1 residues that are essential for viral replication. To further annotate the functional residues important to the canonical or noncanonical functions of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (vRdRp), we performed a homologous-structure analysis with 16 different vRdRp structures. We achieved high sensitivity in annotating the known canonical polymerase functional residues. Moreover, we identified a cluster of noncanonical functional residues located in the loop region of the PB1 β-ribbon. We further demonstrated that these residues were important for PB1 protein nuclear import through the interaction with Ran-binding protein 5. In summary, we developed a systematic and sensitive method to identify and annotate functional residues that are not restrained by sequence conservation. Importantly, this method is generally applicable to other proteins about which homologous-structure information is available. To fully comprehend the diverse functions of a protein, it is essential to understand the functionality of individual residues. Current methods are highly dependent on evolutionary sequence conservation, which is

  13. Channelized Streams in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This draft dataset consists of all ditches or channelized pieces of stream that could be identified using three input datasets; namely the1:24,000 National...

  14. Development Of A Permanent Magnet Residual Gas Profile Monitor With Fast Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Barabin, S; Giacomini, T; Liakin, D; Orlov, A; Skachkov, V S

    2004-01-01

    The beam profile measurements at modern ion synchrotrons and storage rings require high timing performances on a turn-by-turn basis. On the other hand, high spatial resolutions are very desirable for cooled beams. We are developing a residual gas monitor to cover the wide range of beam intensities and dimensions. It supplies the needed high-resolution and high-speed tools for beam profiling. The new residual gas monitor will operate on scattered residual gas electrons whose trajectories are localized within 0.1 mm filaments by using appropriate magnetic field. The required magnetic field of 100 mT will be excited by either a permanent or an electromagnet. The high resolution mode of 0.1 mm is provided by a CCD camera with upstream MCP-phosphor screen assembly. In the fast turn-by-turn mode the beam profile will be read out with a resolution of 1 mm by a 100-channel photodiode-amplifier-digitizer, which will be explained in detail.

  15. Molecular analysis of a thylakoid K+ channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The work undertaken during the prior granting period sought to use a novel probe to identify and clone plant ion (K) channels. It was also proposed that in vitro biochemical studies of cation transport across purified preparations of thylakoid membrane be employed to characterize a putative K channel in this membrane system. Over the last several years (including those of the previous grant period), an enormous data base of partially-sequenced mRNAs and numerous genomes (including those of plants) has evolved and provides a powerful alternative to this brute-force approach to identify and clone cDNAs ending physiologically important membrane proteins such as channels. The utility of searching genetic databases for relevant sequences, in addition to the difficulty of working with membrane proteins, led to changes in research focus during the prior granting period, and has resulted in the identification of a new class of plant ion channels, which will be the focus of research during the proposed new granting period.

  16. A Novel KCNJ2 Mutation Identified in an Autistic Proband Affects the Single Channel Properties of Kir2.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Binda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir have been historically associated to several cardiovascular disorders. In particular, loss-of-function mutations in the Kir2.1 channel have been reported in cases affected by Andersen-Tawil syndrome while gain-of-function mutations in the same channel cause the short QT3 syndrome. Recently, a missense mutation in Kir2.1, as well as mutations in the Kir4.1, were reported to be involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs suggesting a role of potassium channels in these diseases and introducing the idea of the existence of K+ channel ASDs. Here, we report the identification in an Italian affected family of a novel missense mutation (p.Phe58Ser in the KCNJ2 gene detected in heterozygosity in a proband affected by autism and borderline for short QT syndrome type 3. The mutation is located in the N-terminal region of the gene coding for the Kir2.1 channel and in particular in a very conserved domain. In vitro assays demonstrated that this mutation results in an increase of the channel conductance and in its open probability. This gain-of-function of the protein is consistent with the autistic phenotype, which is normally associated to an altered neuronal excitability.

  17. A possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism in plant stomata SLAC1 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO(2 and HCO(3(- concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO(2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. METHODOLOGY: The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1 provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pK(a values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO(2 and anion HCO(3(- are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. CONCLUSIONS: The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO(2 concentration is enhanced around 10(4 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO(2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO(2 pool. The pH driven CO(2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl(- and NO(3(- from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO(2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells.

  18. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tung Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  19. Boundary vapor contentsin an annular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remizov, O.V.; Shurkin, N.G.; Podgornyj, K.K.; Gal'chenko, Eh.F.; Bukhteev, I.S.

    1978-01-01

    The work is aimed at the experimental investigation of the worsening of the heat transfer in an annular channel. The experiments have been carried out on the annular channel 32x28x3000 mm with the even distribution of the heat flux along the length at pressures of 6.9-19.6 MPa, flow rate of 350-1000 kg/m 2 s, and specific heat fluxes from 0.18 up to 0.6 MW/m 2 . Heating is external, oneside. Water monodistillate of the following composition has been used as a coolant: pH 9; dry residue - 0.8-1.2 mg/kg, oxygen -10-15 mg/kg. It is found out that the change character of the temperature field of the heating surface of the annular channel at the regime with the worsen of heat emission depends on the ratio of regime parameters. At pressures of 6.9-13.7 MPa and flow rate of 350-500 kg/m 2 s the channel wall temperature rises monotoneously, never reaching its maximum. With pressure rise > 13.7 MPa and mass velocity > 500 kg/m 2 s the temperature of the heat emitting surface reaches its maximum, and then slowly falls. At pressures of 6.9-11.8 MPa the boundary vapor content value within the whole range of mass velocities does not depend on the specific heat flux q. At pressures higher than 13.7 MPa and mass velocities of 350-1000 kg/m 2 s the boundary vapor content depends on q. The heating of the external or internal surface of the annular channel affects the value of the boundary vapor content within the whole range of regime parameters' change under investigation

  20. Applying alpha-channeling to mirror machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhmoginov, A. I.; Fisch, N. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The {alpha}-channeling effect entails the use of radio-frequency waves to expel and cool high-energetic {alpha} particles born in a fusion reactor; the device reactivity can then be increased even further by redirecting the extracted energy to fuel ions. Originally proposed for tokamaks, this technique has also been shown to benefit open-ended fusion devices. Here, the fundamental theory and practical aspects of {alpha} channeling in mirror machines are reviewed, including the influence of magnetic field inhomogeneity and the effect of a finite wave region on the {alpha}-channeling mechanism. For practical implementation of the {alpha}-channeling effect in mirror geometry, suitable contained weakly damped modes are identified. In addition, the parameter space of candidate waves for implementing the {alpha}-channeling effect can be significantly extended through the introduction of a suitable minority ion species that has the catalytic effect of moderating the transfer of power from the {alpha}-channeling wave to the fuel ions.

  1. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  2. Individual variation and hormonal modulation of a sodium channel beta subunit in the electric organ correlate with variation in a social signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Wu, Ming-Ming; Zakon, Harold H

    2007-09-01

    The sodium channel beta1 subunit affects sodium channel gating and surface density, but little is known about the factors that regulate beta1 expression or its participation in the fine control of cellular excitability. In this study we examined whether graded expression of the beta1 subunit contributes to the gradient in sodium current inactivation, which is tightly controlled and directly related to a social behavior, the electric organ discharge (EOD), in a weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus. We found the mRNA and protein levels of beta1 in the electric organ both correlate with EOD frequency. We identified a novel mRNA splice form of this gene and found the splicing preference for this novel splice form also correlates with EOD frequency. Androgen implants lowered EOD frequency and decreased the beta1 mRNA level but did not affect splicing. Coexpression of each splice form in Xenopus oocytes with either the human muscle sodium channel gene, hNav1.4, or a Sternopygus ortholog, smNav1.4b, sped the rate of inactivation of the sodium current and shifted the steady-state inactivation toward less negative membrane potentials. The translational product of the novel mRNA splice form lacks a previously identified important tyrosine residue but still functions normally. The properties of the fish alpha and coexpressed beta1 subunits in the oocyte replicate those of the electric organ's endogenous sodium current. These data highlight the role of ion channel beta subunits in regulating cellular excitability.

  3. On residual stress prescriptions for fitness for service assessment of pipe girth welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Pingsha; Song, Shaopin; Zhang, Jinmiao; Kim, Myung H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a detailed assessment of some of the existing residual stress profiles stipulated in widely used fitness-for-service assessment codes and standards, such as BS 7910 Appendix Q and API 579 RP Annex E, by taking advantage of some comprehensive residual stress studies that have recently become available. After presenting a case study on which residual stress measurements are available for validating finite element based residual stress analysis procedure, residual stress profiles stipulated in BS 7910 for pipe girth welds are selected for detailed evaluation by comparing residual stress distribution characteristics shown in parametric finite element results. A shell theory based full-field residual stress profile estimation scheme is then presented to illustrate how an improved estimation of residual stress profiles can be achieved in light of some of the deficiencies in BS 7910 and API 579 identified in this study. - Highlights: • Critically assessed girth weld residual stress profiles in major FFS Codes and Standards. • Identified deficiencies in relating to pipe geometry, heat input, and axial distance from weld. • Presented a shell theory based scheme for prescribing full-field residual stress profiles

  4. Connexin domains relevant to the chemical gating of gap junction channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Peracchia

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Most cells exchange ions and small metabolites via gap junction channels. These channels are made of two hemichannels (connexons, each formed by the radial arrangement of six connexin (Cx proteins. Connexins span the bilayer four times (M1-M4 and have both amino- and carboxy-termini (NT, CT at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, forming two extracellular loops (E1, E2 and one inner (IL loop. The channels are regulated by gates that close with cytosolic acidification (e.g., CO2 treatment or increased calcium concentration, possibly via calmodulin activation. Although gap junction regulation is still unclear, connexin domains involved in gating are being defined. We have recently focused on the CO2 gating sensitivity of Cx32, Cx38 and various mutants and chimeras expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied by double voltage clamp. Cx32 is weakly sensitive to CO2, whereas Cx38 is highly sensitive. A Cx32 chimera containing the second half of the inner loop (IL2 of Cx38 was as sensitive to CO2 as Cx38, indicating that this domain plays an important role. Deletion of CT by 84% did not affect CO2 sensitivity, but replacement of 5 arginines (R with sparagines (N at the beginning of CT (C1 greatly enhanced the CO2 sensitivity of Cx32. This suggests that whereas most of CT is irrelevant, positive charges of C1 maintain the CO2 sensitivity of Cx32 low. As a hypothesis we have proposed a model that involves charge interaction between negative residues of the beginning of IL1 and positive residues of either C1 or IL2. Open and closed channels would result from IL1-C1 and IL1-IL2 interactions, respectively

  5. Fusion evaporation residues and the distribution of reaction strength in 16O + 40Ca and 28Si + 28Si reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolata, J.J.; Hinnefeld, J.; Kovar, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    In measurements performed previously at ANL, studying the two entrance channels 16 O + 40 Ca and 28 Si + 28 Si which form the same compound nucleus 56 Ni, it was found that at higher bombarding energies (E/sub Lab/ > 5-7 MeV/nucleon) the distributions of reaction strength was dramatically different. Although the total reaction cross section behaviors for the two entrance channels are similar, the total evaporation residue (ER) cross sections for 28 Si + 28 Si decrease rapidly with increasing bombarding energies and up to the highest energy studied show no evidence for incomplete fusion processes. For 16 O + 40 Ca the ER cross section remains constant at approximately 1 barn with increasing bombarding energy and shows evidence of increasing contributions from incomplete fusion. To better understand this apparent dependence on the mass asymmetry in the entrance channel, coincidence measurements between evaporation residue-like products and heavy ions on the opposite side of the beam were performed for the two systems at E/sub Lab/ = 8 MeV/nucleon

  6. Downregulation of Kv7.4 channel activity in primary and secondary hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepps, Thomas Andrew; Chadha, Preet S; Davis, Alison J

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) channels encoded by KCNQ genes (Kv7 channels) have been identified in various rodent and human blood vessels as key regulators of vascular tone; however, nothing is known about the functional impact of these channels in vascular disease. We ascertained the effect of...... structurally different activators of Kv7.2 through Kv7.5 channels (BMS-204352, S-1, and retigabine) on blood vessels from normotensive and hypertensive animals.......Voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) channels encoded by KCNQ genes (Kv7 channels) have been identified in various rodent and human blood vessels as key regulators of vascular tone; however, nothing is known about the functional impact of these channels in vascular disease. We ascertained the effect of 3...

  7. An aberrant vascular channel in the petrous bone: persistent lateral capital vein?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, Robert; Rensburg, Leon J. van

    2009-01-01

    An aberrant channel was identified on CT in the petrous bone in four patients presenting with unrelated otological symptoms. These channels occurred unilaterally in each case. In two patients, the channel was seen to run between the sigmoid sinus sulcus and the superior petrosal sinus sulcus; in one of these patients, a vascular structure was identified within this channel on MRI, connecting the sigmoid sinus and the superior petrosal sinus. In the two other patients, an aberrant channel was seen between the superior petrosal sinus sulcus and the posterior genu of the facial nerve canal. There were no symptoms that could be attributed to the presence of these channels. We postulate that these aberrant vascular channels correspond to a persistent embryological vein, the lateral capital vein. (orig.)

  8. An aberrant vascular channel in the petrous bone: persistent lateral capital vein?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, Robert [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Rensburg, Leon J. van [University of the Western Cape, Department of Radiology and Diagnostics, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2009-12-15

    An aberrant channel was identified on CT in the petrous bone in four patients presenting with unrelated otological symptoms. These channels occurred unilaterally in each case. In two patients, the channel was seen to run between the sigmoid sinus sulcus and the superior petrosal sinus sulcus; in one of these patients, a vascular structure was identified within this channel on MRI, connecting the sigmoid sinus and the superior petrosal sinus. In the two other patients, an aberrant channel was seen between the superior petrosal sinus sulcus and the posterior genu of the facial nerve canal. There were no symptoms that could be attributed to the presence of these channels. We postulate that these aberrant vascular channels correspond to a persistent embryological vein, the lateral capital vein. (orig.)

  9. The role of solvation in the binding selectivity of the L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Dezső; Henderson, Douglas; Gillespie, Dirk

    2013-08-07

    We present grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation results for a reduced model of the L-type calcium channel. While charged residues of the protein amino acids in the selectivity filter are treated explicitly, most of the degrees of freedom (including the rest of the protein and the solvent) are represented by their dielectric response, i.e., dielectric continua. The new aspect of this paper is that the dielectric coefficient in the channel is different from that in the baths. The ions entering the channel, thus, cross a dielectric boundary at the entrance of the channel. Simulating this case has been made possible by our recent methodological development [D. Boda, D. Henderson, B. Eisenberg, and D. Gillespie, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064105 (2011)]. Our main focus is on the effect of solvation energy (represented by the Born energy) on monovalent vs. divalent ion selectivity in the channel. We find no significant change in selectivity by changing the dielectric coefficient in the channel because the larger solvation penalty is counterbalanced by the enhanced Coulomb attraction inside the channel as soon as we use the Born radii (fitted to experimental hydration energies) to compute the solvation penalty from the Born equation.

  10. Reverse Conservation Analysis Reveals the Specificity Determining Residues of Cytochrome P450 Family 2 (CYP 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Sung Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of conservation of amino acids is widely used to identify important alignment positions of orthologs. The assumption is that important amino acid residues will be conserved in the protein family during the evolutionary process. For paralog alignment, on the other hand, the opposite concept can be used to identify residues that are responsible for specificity. Assuming that the function-specific or ligand-specific residue positions will have higher diversity since they are under evolutionary pressure to fit the target specificity, these function-specific or ligand-specific residues positions will have a lower degree of conservation than other positions in a highly conserved paralog alignment. This study assessed the ability of reverse conservation analysis to identify function-specific and ligand-specific residue positions in closely related paralog. Reverse conservation analysis of paralog alignments successfully identified all six previously reported substrate recognition sites (SRSs in cytochrome P450 family 2 (CYP 2. Further analysis of each subfamily identified the specificity-determining residues (SDRs that have been experimentally found. New potential SDRs were also predicted and await confirmation by further experiments or modeling calculations. This concept may be also applied to identify SDRs in other protein families.

  11. Annotating Protein Functional Residues by Coupling High-Throughput Fitness Profile and Homologous-Structure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushen Du

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Identification and annotation of functional residues are fundamental questions in protein sequence analysis. Sequence and structure conservation provides valuable information to tackle these questions. It is, however, limited by the incomplete sampling of sequence space in natural evolution. Moreover, proteins often have multiple functions, with overlapping sequences that present challenges to accurate annotation of the exact functions of individual residues by conservation-based methods. Using the influenza A virus PB1 protein as an example, we developed a method to systematically identify and annotate functional residues. We used saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing to measure the replication capacity of single nucleotide mutations across the entire PB1 protein. After predicting protein stability upon mutations, we identified functional PB1 residues that are essential for viral replication. To further annotate the functional residues important to the canonical or noncanonical functions of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (vRdRp, we performed a homologous-structure analysis with 16 different vRdRp structures. We achieved high sensitivity in annotating the known canonical polymerase functional residues. Moreover, we identified a cluster of noncanonical functional residues located in the loop region of the PB1 β-ribbon. We further demonstrated that these residues were important for PB1 protein nuclear import through the interaction with Ran-binding protein 5. In summary, we developed a systematic and sensitive method to identify and annotate functional residues that are not restrained by sequence conservation. Importantly, this method is generally applicable to other proteins about which homologous-structure information is available.

  12. Two-phase flow instability and bifurcation analysis of inclined multiple uniformly heated channels - 15107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, A.M.; Paul, S.; Singh, S.; Panday, V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the two-phase flow instability analysis of multiple heated channels with various inclinations is studied. In addition, the bifurcation analysis is also carried out to capture the nonlinear dynamics of the system and to identify the regions in parameter space for which subcritical and supercritical bifurcations exist. In order to carry out the analysis, the system is mathematically represented by nonlinear Partial Differential Equation (PDE) for mass, momentum and energy in single as well as two-phase region. Then converted into Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE) using weighted residual method. Also, coupling equation is being used under the assumption that pressure drop in each channel is the same and the total mass flow rate is equal to sum of the individual mass flow rates. The homogeneous equilibrium model is used for the analysis. Stability Map is obtained in terms of phase change number (Npch) and Subcooling Number (Nsb) by solving a set of nonlinear, coupled algebraic equations obtained at equilibrium using Newton Raphson Method. MATLAB Code is verified by comparing it with results obtained by Matcont (Open source software) under same parametric values. Numerical simulations of the time-dependent, nonlinear ODEs are carried out for selected points in the operating parameter space to obtain the actual damped and growing oscillations in the channel inlet flow velocity which confirms the stability region across the stability map. Generalized Hopf (GH) points are observed for different inclinations, they are also points for subcritical and supercritical bifurcations. (authors)

  13. Control channels in the brain and their influence on brain executive functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglei; Choa, Fow-Sen; Hong, Elliot; Wang, Zhiguang; Islam, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    In a computer network there are distinct data channels and control channels where massive amount of visual information are transported through data channels but the information streams are routed and controlled by intelligent algorithm through "control channels". Recent studies on cognition and consciousness have shown that the brain control channels are closely related to the brainwave beta (14-40 Hz) and alpha (7-13 Hz) oscillations. The high-beta wave is used by brain to synchronize local neural activities and the alpha oscillation is for desynchronization. When two sensory inputs are simultaneously presented to a person, the high-beta is used to select one of the inputs and the alpha is used to deselect the other so that only one input will get the attention. In this work we demonstrated that we can scan a person's brain using binaural beats technique and identify the individual's preferred control channels. The identified control channels can then be used to influence the subject's brain executive functions. In the experiment, an EEG measurement system was used to record and identify a subject's control channels. After these channels were identified, the subject was asked to do Stroop tests. Binaural beats was again used to produce these control-channel frequencies on the subject's brain when we recorded the completion time of each test. We found that the high-beta signal indeed speeded up the subject's executive function performance and reduced the time to complete incongruent tests, while the alpha signal didn't seem to be able to slow down the executive function performance.

  14. Structural and functional analysis of the putative pH sensor in the Kir1.1 (ROMK) potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapedius, Markus; Haider, Shozeb; Browne, Katharine F; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark S P; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Tucker, Stephen J

    2006-06-01

    The pH-sensitive renal potassium channel Kir1.1 is important for K+ homeostasis. Disruption of the pH-sensing mechanism causes type II Bartter syndrome. The pH sensor is thought to be an anomalously titrated lysine residue (K80) that interacts with two arginine residues as part of an 'RKR triad'. We show that a Kir1.1 orthologue from Fugu rubripes lacks this lysine and yet is still highly pH sensitive, indicating that K80 is not the H+ sensor. Instead, K80 functionally interacts with A177 on transmembrane domain 2 at the 'helix-bundle crossing' and controls the ability of pH-dependent conformational changes to induce pore closure. Although not required for pH inhibition, K80 is indispensable for the coupling of pH gating to the extracellular K+ concentration, explaining its conservation in most Kir1.1 orthologues. Furthermore, we demonstrate that instead of interacting with K80, the RKR arginine residues form highly conserved inter- and intra-subunit interactions that are important for Kir channel gating and influence pH sensitivity indirectly.

  15. VKCDB: Voltage-gated potassium channel database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallin Warren J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of voltage-gated potassium channels comprises a functionally diverse group of membrane proteins. They help maintain and regulate the potassium ion-based component of the membrane potential and are thus central to many critical physiological processes. VKCDB (Voltage-gated potassium [K] Channel DataBase is a database of structural and functional data on these channels. It is designed as a resource for research on the molecular basis of voltage-gated potassium channel function. Description Voltage-gated potassium channel sequences were identified by using BLASTP to search GENBANK and SWISSPROT. Annotations for all voltage-gated potassium channels were selectively parsed and integrated into VKCDB. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data for the channels were collected from published journal articles. Transmembrane domain predictions by TMHMM and PHD are included for each VKCDB entry. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains of channels of the four Kv families and the KCNQ family are also included. Currently VKCDB contains 346 channel entries. It can be browsed and searched using a set of functionally relevant categories. Protein sequences can also be searched using a local BLAST engine. Conclusions VKCDB is a resource for comparative studies of voltage-gated potassium channels. The methods used to construct VKCDB are general; they can be used to create specialized databases for other protein families. VKCDB is accessible at http://vkcdb.biology.ualberta.ca.

  16. Residual radioactivity of treated green diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, Philippe; Notari, Franck; Lépy, Marie-Christine; Caplan, Candice; Pierre, Sylvie; Hainschwang, Thomas; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Treated green diamonds can show residual radioactivity, generally due to immersion in radium salts. We report various activity measurements on two radioactive diamonds. The activity was characterized by alpha and gamma ray spectrometry, and the radon emanation was measured by alpha counting of a frozen source. Even when no residual radium contamination can be identified, measurable alpha and high-energy beta emissions could be detected. The potential health impact of radioactive diamonds and their status with regard to the regulatory policy for radioactive products are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Some problems of residual activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katrik, P.; Mustafin, E.; Strasik, I.; Pavlovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    As a preparatory work for constructing the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI Darmstadt, samples of copper were irradiated by 500 MeV/u 238 U ion beam and investigated by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The nuclides that contribute dominantly to the residual activity have been identified and their contributions have been quantified by two different methods: from the whole-target gamma spectra and by integration of depth-profiles of residual activity of individual nuclides. Results obtained by these two methods are compared and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  18. Acoustic Imaging of a Turbidity Current Flowing along a Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Hiroji, A.; Cahill, L.; Fedele, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of a 3 month sequence of repetitive surveys and ADCP monitoring, more than 30 turbidity currents have been identified modifying a lobe channel in 130 to 190m of water on the Squamish prodelta. For a 6 day period, daily surveys at low tide tried to capture the change resulting from a single flow. On the 8thof June three flows occurred within a half hour. Along channel multibeam images of the seabed and water column were obtained from a moving vessel immediately before, during and after the passage of the third flow. In this manner the spatial extent of the in-channel and overbank flow could be constrained. By following the flow, the spatial pattern of scattering from the flow upper surface could be examined over a 2 km length of the channel. Along channel bands of high scattering appear related to enhanced release of gas along the channel flanks. Notably, no signature of the underlying across-channel bedform modulations were evident, suggesting that the upper surface of the flow does not feel the influence of the channel floor. Overbank spillage of the flow could be detected by perturbation of a plankton scattering layer just above the seabed. Additionally, evidence of enhanced overbank deposition due to flow stripping on the outer corner of a bend was identified from backscatter changes. The specific seabed alteration due to this flow could be identified and compared with the cumulative change over three months in the channel and adjacent channel-lobe transition zone. As the flow passed under the ADCP, it had a peak velocity of over 2 m/s, a thickness of 4-5m and duration of 35 minutes. Based on the timing of the flow head when in view of the surface vessel, it was decelerating as it exited the mouth of the channel.

  19. A cement channel-detection technique using the pulsed-neutron log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    A channel-detection technique has been developed using boron solutions and pulsed-neutron logging (PNL) tools. This technique relies on the extremely high-neutron-absorption cross section that boron exhibits relative to other common elements, including chlorine. The PNL tool is used to detect movement of a boron solution in a log-inject-log procedure. The technique has identified channels in such difficult applications as logging through two strings of pipe and in highly deviated wellbores. Logging procedures are simple and cement channels can be readily identified. The boron solutions are relatively inexpensive, safe to handle, and nonradioactive. Additional PNL information for reservoir performance evaluation is collected simultaneously during channel-detection logging. This paper describes the theory, development, field application, and limitations of this channel-detection logging technique

  20. Direct Interaction between the Voltage Sensors Produces Cooperative Sustained Deactivation in Voltage-gated H+ Channel Dimers*

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Hiroko; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Takano, Yu; Okamura, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated H+ channel (Hv) is a voltage sensor domain-like protein consisting of four transmembrane segments (S1?S4). The native Hv structure is a homodimer, with the two channel subunits functioning cooperatively. Here we show that the two voltage sensor S4 helices within the dimer directly cooperate via a ?-stacking interaction between Trp residues at the middle of each segment. Scanning mutagenesis showed that Trp situated around the original position provides the slow gating kineti...

  1. Maersk navigator oil spill in the great channel (Andaman Sea) in January 1993 and its environmental impact

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SenGupta, R.; Fondekar, S.P.; Shailaja, M.S.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Observations on oil slicks, tar residues and dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons (DPH) shortly after the oil spill resulting from the tanker accident in January 1993 showed negligible impact on the Indian EEZ of the Great Channel (Andaman Sea). DPH...

  2. A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III; Argonne National Lab., IL; Dames and Moore, West Valley, NY; Argonne National Lab., IL; USDOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, DC

    1989-06-01

    This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs

  3. On the channel box for the fuel bundle of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Hiroomi; Yamamoto, Takeo

    1976-01-01

    Channel boxes play the important roles of making coolant flow uniform and protecting fuel rods as the component of fuel assemblies for BWRs. About ten years ago, the domestic production of channel boxes was first investigated, and now, the original technology has been developed, and the channel boxes sufficiently satisfying the required quality can be produced. The actual experience by being charged in reactors has also been accumulated. At present, the supply capacity is almost sufficient to meet the domestic demand, and the future increase of demand can be dealt with promptly. The channel boxes are made of Zircaloy-4 plates which are favorable in view of neutron absorption, and are the boxes with 138 mm hollow square section, 2 mm thickness, and 4240 mm length. Two channels were welded together and made into a box. In order to eliminate the residual stress caused during the manufacture, high temperature heating with an electric furnace was adopted. The measurement of dimensions and the inspection of appearance of the channel boxes after irradiation proved that they were rather superior to imported ones. The production processes, the system for the quality guarantee, and the quality control in the Kobe Steel Ltd. are explained. The test and inspection are carried out at the time of accepting outside products, before starting the production, after the completion of longitudinal welding and after the completion of production. (Kako, I.)

  4. Identification of chemical signatures of gunshot residues in different fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Joao Carlos Dias de

    2010-01-01

    The modern forensic science goes hand in hand with scientific research. The forensic scientists are faced every day with many cases requiring the analysis of residues from firing gun (gunshot residues). This works describes the development of a methodology to determine chemical signatures of shots from a firearm, by measuring the concentrations of Pb, Ba e Sb in the residues from these shots deposited near the entrance hole of bullets, based on the technique with high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HRICP-MS). Shots were performed on five types of target-fabrics and collected testimonies from regions close to the entrance hole of projectiles. The results showed that the method enabled us to identify and distinguish the residues of the .38 caliber revolver and pistols .40 and 9mm caliber. The use of ternary graphs as a tool for data analysis helped to identify specific patterns of distribution of blank samples and gunshot residues deposited after firing revolvers and pistols. The methodology enabled the assignment of the origin of the shot through the confirmation of the residues collected also from the hands of shooters. As a result the methodology in police procedures and aims to add a valuable contribution to forensic investigations. (author)

  5. Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S.

    1993-01-01

    Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes

  6. Techniques for Handling Channeling in High Resolution Fourier Transform Spectra Recorded with Synchrotron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Amr; PredoiCross, Adriana; Teillet, P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Seven different techniques in dealing the problem of channel spectra in Fourier transform Spectroscopy utilizing synchrotron source were examined and compared. Five of these techniques deal with the artifacts (spikes) in the recorded interferogram which in turn result in channel spectra within the spectral domain. Such interferogram editing method include replacing these spikes with zeros, straight line, fitted polynomial curve, rescaled spike and spike reduced with Gauss Function. Another two techniques try to target this issue in the spectral domain instead by either generating a synthetic background simulating the channels or measuring the channels parameters (amplitude, spacing and phase) to use in the spectral fitting program. Results showed spectral domain techniques produces higher quality results in terms of signal to noise and fitting residual. The effect of each method on the line parameters such as position, intensity are air broadening are also measured and discussed.

  7. Residual stress analysis in reactor pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Pont, D.

    1991-08-01

    Residual stresses in cladding and welded attachments could contribute to the problem of stress-corrosion cracking in boiling-water reactors (BWR). As part of a larger program aimed at quantifying residual stress in BWR components, models that would be applicable for predicting residual stress in BWR components are reviewed and documented. The review includes simple methods of estimating residual stresses as well as advanced finite-element software. In general, simple methods are capable of predicting peak magnitudes of residual stresses but are incapable of adequately characterizing the distribution of residual stresses. Ten groups of researchers using finite-element software are reviewed in detail. For each group, the assumptions of the model, possible simplifications, material property data, and specific applications are discussed. The most accurate results are obtained when a metallurgical simulation is performed, transformation plasticity effects are included, and the heating and cooling parts of the welding thermal cycle are simulated. Two models are identified which can provide these features. The present state of these models and the material property data available in the literature are adequate to quantify residual stress in BWR components

  8. Effect of Continuous Current during Pauses between Successive Strokes on the Decay of the Lightning Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, N.L.; Bazelyan, E.M.; Shneider, M. N.

    2000-01-01

    A one-dimensional model is used to study the dynamics of the hydrodynamic parameters of the lightning channel in the return stroke and after the pulse current is damped. The effect of the continuous residual electric current during pauses between the successive strokes on the plasma cooling in the channel is analyzed. It is shown that a continuous electric current, which is several orders of magnitude lower than the peak current in the return stroke, is capable of maintaining the channel conductivity. This effect cannot be explained merely by Joule heating but is largely governed by the fact that the turbulent heat transport is substantially suppressed. In this case, even a continuous current as low as 50-100 A is capable of maintaining the conductivity of the lightning channel at a level at which only M-components can develop in the channel rather than the dart leader of the subsequent stroke

  9. The performance of random coefficient regression in accounting for residual confounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Paul; Greenland, Sander

    2006-09-01

    Greenland (2000, Biometrics 56, 915-921) describes the use of random coefficient regression to adjust for residual confounding in a particular setting. We examine this setting further, giving theoretical and empirical results concerning the frequentist and Bayesian performance of random coefficient regression. Particularly, we compare estimators based on this adjustment for residual confounding to estimators based on the assumption of no residual confounding. This devolves to comparing an estimator from a nonidentified but more realistic model to an estimator from a less realistic but identified model. The approach described by Gustafson (2005, Statistical Science 20, 111-140) is used to quantify the performance of a Bayesian estimator arising from a nonidentified model. From both theoretical calculations and simulations we find support for the idea that superior performance can be obtained by replacing unrealistic identifying constraints with priors that allow modest departures from those constraints. In terms of point-estimator bias this superiority arises when the extent of residual confounding is substantial, but the advantage is much broader in terms of interval estimation. The benefit from modeling residual confounding is maintained when the prior distributions employed only roughly correspond to reality, for the standard identifying constraints are equivalent to priors that typically correspond much worse.

  10. An evolutionarily conserved gene family encodes proton-selective ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yu-Hsiang; Cooper, Alexander J; Teng, Bochuan; Chang, Rui B; Artiga, Daniel J; Turner, Heather N; Mulhall, Eric M; Ye, Wenlei; Smith, Andrew D; Liman, Emily R

    2018-03-02

    Ion channels form the basis for cellular electrical signaling. Despite the scores of genetically identified ion channels selective for other monatomic ions, only one type of proton-selective ion channel has been found in eukaryotic cells. By comparative transcriptome analysis of mouse taste receptor cells, we identified Otopetrin1 (OTOP1), a protein required for development of gravity-sensing otoconia in the vestibular system, as forming a proton-selective ion channel. We found that murine OTOP1 is enriched in acid-detecting taste receptor cells and is required for their zinc-sensitive proton conductance. Two related murine genes, Otop2 and Otop3 , and a Drosophila ortholog also encode proton channels. Evolutionary conservation of the gene family and its widespread tissue distribution suggest a broad role for proton channels in physiology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  11. Reduction of negative environmental impact generated by residues of plant tissue culture laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusleidys Cortés Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is based on the activity developed by teaching and research laboratories for biotechnology purposes with an environmental approach to determine potential contamination risk and analyze the residuals generated. The physical - chemical characterization of the residuals was carried out from contamination indicators that can affect the dumping of residual water. In order to identify the environmental risks and sources of microbial contamination of plant material propagated by in vitro culture that generate residuals, all the risk activities were identified, the type of risk involved in each activity was analyzed, as well as whether or not the standards were met of aseptic normative. The dilution and neutralization was proposed for residuals with extreme values of pH. Since the results of the work a set of measures was proposed to reduce the negative environmental impact of the laboratory residuals. Key words: biosafety, environmental management, microbial contamination

  12. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue

  13. Isolation, chemical and functional characterization of several new K(+)-channel blocking peptides from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides tecomanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Bartok, Adam; Zamudio-Zuñiga, Fernando; Balajthy, Andras; Becerril, Baltazar; Panyi, Gyorgy; Possani, Lourival D

    2016-06-01

    Six new peptides were isolated from the venom of the Mexican scorpion Centruroides tecomanus; their primary structures were determined and the effects on ion channels were verified by patch-clamp experiments. Four are K(+)-channel blockers of the α-KTx family, containing 32 to 39 amino acid residues, cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. They all block Kv1.2 in nanomolar concentrations and show various degree of selectivity over Kv1.1, Kv1.3, Shaker and KCa3.1 channels. One peptide has 42 amino acids cross-linked by four disulfides; it blocks ERG-channels and belongs to the γ-KTx family. The sixth peptide has only 32 amino acid residues, three disulfide bonds and has no effect on the ion-channels assayed. It also does not have antimicrobial activity. Systematic numbers were assigned (time of elution on HPLC): α-KTx 10.4 (time 24.1); α-KTx 2.15 (time 26.2); α-KTx 2.16 (time 23.8); α-KTx 2.17 (time 26.7) and γ-KTx 1.9 (elution time 29.6). A partial proteomic analysis of the short chain basic peptides of this venom, which elutes on carboxy-methyl-cellulose column fractionation, is included. The pharmacological properties of the peptides described in this study may provide valuable tools for understanding the structure-function relationship of K(+) channel blocking scorpion toxins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel mechanism for fine-tuning open-state stability in a voltage-gated potassium channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Niciforovic, Ana P; Galpin, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    stabilization is the consequence of the amelioration of an inherently repulsive open-state interaction between the partial negative charge on the face of Phe481 and a highly co-evolved acidic side chain, Glu395, and this interaction is potentially modulated through the Tyr485 hydroxyl. We propose...... fluorinated derivatives of aromatic residues previously implicated in the gating of Shaker potassium channels. Here we show that stepwise dispersion of the negative electrostatic surface potential of only one site, Phe481, stabilizes the channel open state. Furthermore, these data suggest that this apparent...

  15. Binding modes and functional surface of anti-mammalian scorpion α-toxins to sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2012-10-02

    Scorpion α-toxins bind to the voltage-sensing domains of voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels and interfere with the inactivation mechanisms. The functional surface of α-toxins has been shown to contain an NC-domain consisting of the five-residue turn (positions 8-12) and the C-terminus (positions 56-64) and a core-domain centered on the residue 18. The NC- and core-domains are interconnected by the linker-domain (positions 8-18). Here with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we examine the binding modes between two α-toxins, the anti-mammalian AahII and the anti-insect LqhαIT, and the voltage-sensing domain of rat Na(V)1.2, a subtype of Na(V) channels expressed in nerve cells. Both toxins are docked to the extracellular side of the voltage-sensing domain of Na(V)1.2 using molecular dynamics simulations, with the linker-domain assumed to wedge into the binding pocket. Several salt bridges and hydrophobic clusters are observed to form between the NC- and core-domains of the toxins and Na(V)1.2 and stabilize the toxin-channel complexes. The binding modes predicted are consistent with available mutagenesis data and can readily explain the relative affinities of AahII and LqhαIT for Na(V)1.2. The dissociation constants for the two toxin-channel complexes are derived, which compare favorably with experiment. Our models demonstrate that the functional surface of anti-mammalian scorpion α-toxins is centered on the linker-domain, similar to that of β-toxins.

  16. Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels in exocrine salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Marcelo A; Peña-Munzenmayer, Gaspar; Melvin, James E

    2014-06-01

    In the last 15 years, remarkable progress has been realized in identifying the genes that encode the ion-transporting proteins involved in exocrine gland function, including salivary glands. Among these proteins, Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels take part in key functions including membrane potential regulation, fluid movement and K(+) secretion in exocrine glands. Two K(+) channels have been identified in exocrine salivary glands: (1) a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel of intermediate single channel conductance encoded by the KCNN4 gene, and (2) a voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channel of large single channel conductance encoded by the KCNMA1 gene. This review focuses on the physiological roles of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels in exocrine salivary glands. We also discuss interesting recent findings on the regulation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels by protein-protein interactions that may significantly impact exocrine gland physiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A molecular switch driving inactivation in the cardiac K+ channel HERG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Köpfer

    Full Text Available K(+ channels control transmembrane action potentials by gating open or closed in response to external stimuli. Inactivation gating, involving a conformational change at the K(+ selectivity filter, has recently been recognized as a major K(+ channel regulatory mechanism. In the K(+ channel hERG, inactivation controls the length of the human cardiac action potential. Mutations impairing hERG inactivation cause life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia, which also occur as undesired side effects of drugs. In this paper, we report atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, complemented by mutational and electrophysiological studies, which suggest that the selectivity filter adopts a collapsed conformation in the inactivated state of hERG. The selectivity filter is gated by an intricate hydrogen bond network around residues S620 and N629. Mutations of this hydrogen bond network are shown to cause inactivation deficiency in electrophysiological measurements. In addition, drug-related conformational changes around the central cavity and pore helix provide a functional mechanism for newly discovered hERG activators.

  18. Mineral CO2 sequestration in alkaline solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Witkamp, G.J.

    2004-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is a promising sequestration route for the permanent and safe storage of carbon dioxide. In addition to calcium- or magnesium-containing primary minerals, suitable alkaline solid residues can be used as feedstock. The use of alkaline residues has several advantages, such as their availability close to CO2 sources and their higher reactivity for carbonation than primary minerals. In addition, the environmental quality of residues can potentially be improved by carbonation. In this study, key factors of the mineral CO2 sequestration process are identified, their influence on the carbonation process is examined, and environmental properties of the reaction products with regard to their possible beneficial utilization are investigated. The use of alkaline solid residues forms a potentially attractive alternative for the first mineral sequestration plants

  19. Three-dimensional (3-D) video systems: bi-channel or single-channel optics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, P; Kunert, W; Buess, G F

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparison between two different three-dimensional (3-D) video systems, one with single-channel optics, the other with bi-channel optics. The latter integrates two lens systems, each transferring one half of the stereoscopic image; the former uses only one lens system, similar to a two-dimensional (2-D) endoscope, which transfers the complete stereoscopic picture. In our training centre for minimally invasive surgery, surgeons were involved in basic and advanced laparoscopic courses using both a 2-D system and the two 3-D video systems. They completed analog scale questionnaires in order to record a subjective impression of the relative convenience of operating in 2-D and 3-D vision, and to identify perceived deficiencies in the 3-D system. As an objective test, different experimental tasks were developed, in order to measure performance times and to count pre-defined errors made while using the two 3-D video systems and the 2-D system. Using the bi-channel optical system, the surgeon has a heightened spatial perception, and can work faster and more safely than with a single-channel system. However, single-channel optics allow the use of an angulated endoscope, and the free rotation of the optics relative to the camera, which is necessary for some operative applications.

  20. Asymmetric fluxes of water and sediments in a mesotidal mudflat channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, G.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a small tributary channel and its adjacent mudflat is studied in Willapa Bay, Washington State, USA. Velocity profiles and water levels are simultaneously measured at different locations in the channel and on the mudflat for two weeks. The above tidal flat and channel hydrodynamics differ remarkably during the tidal cycle. When the water surface level is above the tidal flat elevation, the channel is inactive. At this stage, the above tidal flat flow is predominantly aligned along the Bay axis, oscillating with the tide as a standing wave with peak velocities up to 0.3 m/s. When the mudflat becomes emergent, the flow concentrates in the channel. During this stage, current velocities up to 1 m/s are measured during ebb; and up to 0.6 m/s during flood. Standard equations for open-channel flow are utilized to study the channel hydrodynamics. From the continuity equation, a lateral inflow is predicted during ebb, which likely originates from the drainage of the mudflat through the lateral runnels. Both advective acceleration and lateral discharge terms, estimated directly from the velocity profiles, play a significant role in the momentum equation. The computed drag coefficient for bottom friction is small, due to an absence of vegetation and bottom bedforms in the channel. Sediment fluxes are calculated by combining flow and suspended sediment concentration estimated using the acoustic backscatter signal of the instruments. A net export of the sediment from the channel is found during ebb, which is not balanced by the sediment import during flood. When the mudflat is submerged, ebb-flood asymmetries in suspended sediment concentration are present, leading to a net sediment flux toward the inner part of the Willapa Bay. Finally, a residual flow is detected inside the channel at high slack water, probably associated with the thermohaline circulation.

  1. Relative transmembrane segment rearrangements during BK channel activation resolved by structurally assigned fluorophore–quencher pairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Antonios

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated proteins can sense, and respond to, changes in the electric field pervading the cell membrane by virtue of a transmembrane helix bundle, the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Canonical VSDs consist of four transmembrane helices (S1–S4) of which S4 is considered a principal component because it possesses charged residues immersed in the electric field. Membrane depolarization compels the charges, and by extension S4, to rearrange with respect to the field. The VSD of large-conductance voltage- and Ca-activated K+ (BK) channels exhibits two salient inconsistencies from the canonical VSD model: (1) the BK channel VSD possesses an additional nonconserved transmembrane helix (S0); and (2) it exhibits a “decentralized” distribution of voltage-sensing charges, in helices S2 and S3, in addition to S4. Considering these unique features, the voltage-dependent rearrangements of the BK VSD could differ significantly from the standard model of VSD operation. To understand the mode of operation of this unique VSD, we have optically tracked the relative motions of the BK VSD transmembrane helices during activation, by manipulating the quenching environment of site-directed fluorescent labels with native and introduced Trp residues. Having previously reported that S0 and S4 diverge during activation, in this work we demonstrate that S4 also diverges from S1 and S2, whereas S2, compelled by its voltage-sensing charged residues, moves closer to S1. This information contributes spatial constraints for understanding the BK channel voltage-sensing process, revealing the structural rearrangements in a non-canonical VSD. PMID:22802360

  2. Sub-nanometre channels embedded in two-dimensional materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yimo; Li, Ming-yang; Jung, Gang-Seob; Marsalis, Mark A.; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J.; Li, Lain-Jong; Muller, David A.

    2017-01-01

    with the embedding 2D matrix. Periodic dislocation arrays produce 2D superlattices of coherent MoS2 1D channels in WSe2. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have identified other combinations of 2D materials where 1D channels can also be formed. The electronic

  3. Detecting organic gunpowder residues from handgun use

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCrehan, William A.; Ricketts, K. Michelle; Baltzersen, Richard A.; Rowe, Walter F.

    1999-02-01

    The gunpowder residues that remain after the use of handguns or improvised explosive devices pose a challenge for the forensic investigator. Can these residues be reliably linked to a specific gunpowder or ammunition? We investigated the possibility by recovering and measuring the composition of organic additives in smokeless powder and its post-firing residues. By determining gunpowder additives such as nitroglycerin, dinitrotoluene, ethyl- and methylcentralite, and diphenylamine, we hope to identify the type of gunpowder in the residues and perhaps to provide evidence of a match to a sample of unfired powder. The gunpowder additives were extracted using an automated technique, pressurized fluid extraction (PFE). The conditions for the quantitative extraction of the additives using neat and solvent-modified supercritical carbon dioxide were investigated. All of the major gunpowder additives can be determined with baseline resolution using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with a micellar agent and UV absorbance detection. A study of candidate internal standards for use in the CE method is also presented. The PFE/CE technique is used to evaluate a new residue sampling protocol--asking shooters to blow their noses. In addition, an initial investigation of the compositional differences among unfired and post-fired .22 handgun residues is presented.

  4. @iMaersk navigator@@ oil spill in the great channel (Andaman Sea) in January 1993 and its environmental impact

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SenGupta, R.; Fondekar, S.P.; Shailaja, M.S.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Observations on oil slicks, tar residues and dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons (DPH) shortly after the oil spill resulting from the tanker accident in January 1993 showed negligible impact on the Indian EEZ of the Great Channel (Andaman Sea). DPH...

  5. Progress in stabilization of plutonium and residues since DNFSB recommendation 94-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.M.; Dustin, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    There are approximately 100 metric tons of residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site containing approximately 3 metric tons of plutonium. The residues are byproducts of past plutonium operations incinerator ash; pyrochemical salts; graphite; sand, slag, and crucible; and miscellaneous forms of combustibles, glass, metal, and sludges. In September 1993, a report was released (Reference 1) which identified concerns with the chemical stability of the residues and with the integrity of packaging. In May 1997, the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board published recommendation 94-1 citing a concern for the residue stability and requiring that the possibly unstable residues be processed within 3 years and all others within 5 years. A risk categorization scheme was developed which assigned a numerical risk to each residue type based on the probability and consequence of occurrence of failures associated with the hazards identified. The residues were ranked for priority of stabilization actions. Urgent concerns were resolved. All residue drums were vented to eliminate the potential for hydrogen and other explosive gas accumulation. Leaded rubber gloves and ion exchange resins were washed to eliminate the explosion potential. An aggressive characterization program was implemented to search for any additional safety or environmental concerns and to gain more definitive information concerning the choice of processes for stabilization and disposition of the residues. This paper provides background on the safety issues and summarizes recent characterization data. The residue processing and disposition plans, including schedule and cost, are also summarized in the paper. Finally, the paper addresses initiatives undertaken by Safe Sites of Colorado to accelerate the residue program

  6. Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Seright

    2007-09-30

    This final technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004, through May 16, 2007, for the project, 'Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling'. We explored the potential of pore-filling gels for reducing excess water production from both fractured and unfractured production wells. Several gel formulations were identified that met the requirements--i.e., providing water residual resistance factors greater than 2,000 and ultimate oil residual resistance factors (F{sub rro}) of 2 or less. Significant oil throughput was required to achieve low F{sub rro} values, suggesting that gelant penetration into porous rock must be small (a few feet or less) for existing pore-filling gels to provide effective disproportionate permeability reduction. Compared with adsorbed polymers and weak gels, strong pore-filling gels can provide greater reliability and behavior that is insensitive to the initial rock permeability. Guidance is provided on where relative-permeability-modification/disproportionate-permeability-reduction treatments can be successfully applied for use in either oil or gas production wells. When properly designed and executed, these treatments can be successfully applied to a limited range of oilfield excessive-water-production problems. We examined whether gel rheology can explain behavior during extrusion through fractures. The rheology behavior of the gels tested showed a strong parallel to the results obtained from previous gel extrusion experiments. However, for a given aperture (fracture width or plate-plate separation), the pressure gradients measured during the gel extrusion experiments were much higher than anticipated from rheology measurements. Extensive experiments established that wall slip and first normal stress difference were not responsible for the pressure gradient discrepancy. To explain the discrepancy, we noted that the aperture for gel flow (for mobile gel wormholing through concentrated

  7. Single channel and WDM transmission of 28 Gbaud zero-guard-interval CO-OFDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Mousa-Pasandi, Mohammad E; Xu, Xian; Chagnon, Mathieu; El-Sahn, Ziad A; Chen, Chen; Plant, David V

    2012-12-10

    We report on the experimental demonstration of single channel 28 Gbaud QPSK and 16-QAM zero-guard-interval (ZGI) CO-OFDM transmission with only 1.34% overhead for OFDM processing. The achieved transmission distance is 5120 km for QPSK assuming a 7% forward error correction (FEC) overhead, and 1280 km for 16-QAM assuming a 20% FEC overhead. We also demonstrate the improved tolerance of ZGI CO-OFDM to residual inter-symbol interference compared to reduced-guard-interval (RGI) CO-OFDM. In addition, we report an 8-channel wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) transmission of 28 Gbaud QPSK ZGI CO-OFDM signals over 4160 km.

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Targets the Cys320/Cys529 Motif in Kv4.2 to Inhibit the Ito Potassium Channels in Cardiomyocytes and Regularizes Fatal Arrhythmia in Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shan-Feng; Luo, Yan; Ding, Ying-Jiong; Chen, Ying; Pu, Shi-Xin; Wu, Hang-Jing; Wang, Zhong-Feng; Tao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The mechanisms underlying numerous biological roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) remain largely unknown. We have previously reported an inhibitory role of H2S in the L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes. This prompts us to examine the mechanisms underlying the potential regulation of H2S on the ion channels. Results: H2S showed a novel inhibitory effect on Ito potassium channels, and this effect was blocked by mutation at the Cys320 and/or Cys529 residues of the Kv4.2 subunit. H2S broke the disulfide bridge between a pair of oxidized cysteine residues; however, it did not modify single cysteine residues. H2S extended action potential duration in epicardial myocytes and regularized fatal arrhythmia in a rat model of myocardial infarction. H2S treatment significantly increased survival by ∼1.4-fold in the critical 2-h time window after myocardial infarction with a protection against ventricular premature beats and fatal arrhythmia. However, H2S did not change the function of other ion channels, including IK1 and INa. Innovation and Conclusion: H2S targets the Cys320/Cys529 motif in Kv4.2 to regulate the Ito potassium channels. H2S also shows a potent regularizing effect against fatal arrhythmia in a rat model of myocardial infarction. The study provides the first piece of evidence for the role of H2S in regulating Ito potassium channels and also the specific motif in an ion channel labile for H2S regulation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 129–147. PMID:25756524

  9. Investigating the properties of residues. Characterization of pellets from fermentation residues; Den Eigenschaften der Reststoffe auf der Spur. Untersuchung widmet sich der Charakterisierung von Pellets aus Gaerresten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzeisen, Martin; Mueller, Joachim [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Agrartechnik; Starcevic, Nikica [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Agrartechnik; Strabag Umweltanlagen GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Projekt Produktentwicklung/Schlammbehandlung

    2009-09-15

    Fermentation residues are by-products of the biogas process. Farmers use them as fertilizers, but as the size of biogas plants grows, so does the residues volume. It is now too much for local use, and transport to other sites is expensive. Fuel pellets production may be an alternative. Pellets from fermentation residues are not accepted as yet because too little is known about their characteristics. The contribution describes an investigation that intends to identify the fuel characteristics of pellets from fermentation residues. (orig.)

  10. Computational Investigations in Rectangular Convergent and Divergent Ribbed Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Karthikeyan; Kulasekharan, N.; Natarajan, E.

    2018-05-01

    Computational investigations on the rib turbulated flow inside a convergent and divergent rectangular channel with square ribs of different rib heights and different Reynolds numbers (Re=20,000, 40,000 and 60,000). The ribs were arranged in a staggered fashion between the upper and lower surfaces of the test section. Computational investigations are carried out using computational fluid dynamic software ANSYS Fluent 14.0. Suitable solver settings like turbulence models were identified from the literature and the boundary conditions for the simulations on a solution of independent grid. Computations were carried out for both convergent and divergent channels with 0 (smooth duct), 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 mm rib heights, to identify the ribbed channel with optimal performance, assessed using a thermo hydraulic performance parameter. The convergent and divergent rectangular channels show higher Nu values than the standard correlation values.

  11. Identifying the key factors in increasing recycling and reducing residual household waste: a case study of the Flemish region of Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellynck, X; Jacobsen, R; Verhelst, P

    2011-10-01

    The competent waste authority in the Flemish region of Belgium created the 'Implementation plan household waste 2003-2007' and the 'Implementation plan sustainable management 2010-2015' to comply with EU regulation. It incorporates European and regional requirements and describes strategies, goals, actions and instruments for the collection and treatment of household waste. The central mandatory goal is to reduce and maintain the amount of residual household waste to 150 kg per capita per year between 2010-2015. In literature, a reasonable body of information has been published on the effectiveness and efficiency of a variety of policy instruments, but the information is complex, often contradictory and difficult to interpret. The objective of this paper is to identify, through the development of a binary logistic regression model, those variables of the waste collection scheme that help municipalities to reach the mandatory 150 kg goal. The model covers a number of variables for household characteristics, provision of recycling services, frequency of waste collection and charging for waste services. This paper, however, is not about waste prevention and reuse. The dataset originates from 2003. Four out of 12 variables in the model contributed significantly: income per capita, cost of residual waste collection, collection frequency and separate curbside collection of organic waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Using higher doses to compensate for tubing residuals in extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy J; Bhowmick, Tanaya; Gross, Alan; Vanschooneveld, Trevor C; Weinstein, Melvin P

    2013-06-01

    To mathematically assess drug losses due to infusion line residuals and evaluate methods to compensate for drug loss due to residual volumes in intravenous pump tubing. Literature was accessed through Ovid MEDLINE (1996-February 2013), using combinations of the search terms tubing residuals, residual volume, residual medication, intravenous infusions, intravenous injections, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, β-lactams, equipment design, infusion pumps, extended infusion, extended administration, and prolonged infusion. In addition, select reference citations from publications identified were reviewed. All articles that involved extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam implementation strategies were included in the review. Infusion pump characteristics and tubing residuals can affect extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam dosing strategies. Two studies addressing tubing residuals were identified. Both studies recommended increasing infusion volumes to compensate for tubing residuals. One study also recommended decreasing infusion-line dead space by using alternative infusion pump systems. Study calculations suggest that higher doses of piperacillin-tazobactam may be used to account for medication left in tubing residuals if alternative infusion pump systems cannot be obtained, and increased infusion volumes are not an option. Extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam has been used as a method of maximizing pharmacodynamic target attainment. Use of higher doses of piperacillin-tazobactam may be a reasonable method to compensate for drug loss due to residual volumes in large-bore intravenous pump tubing.

  13. A Common Structural Component for β-Subunit Mediated Modulation of Slow Inactivation in Different KV Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Henrion, Ulrike; Schmitt, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: Potassium channels are tetrameric proteins providing potassium selective passage through lipid embedded proteinaceous pores with highest fidelity. The selectivity results from binding to discrete potassium binding sites and stabilization of a hydrated potassium ion in a central...... internal cavity. The four potassium binding sites, generated by the conserved TTxGYGD signature sequence are formed by the backbone carbonyls of the amino acids TXGYG. Residues KV1.5-Val481, KV4.3-Leu368 and KV7.1- Ile 313 represent the amino acids in the X position of the respective channels. Methods...

  14. KCNE1 constrains the voltage sensor of Kv7.1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liora Shamgar

    Full Text Available Kv7 potassium channels whose mutations cause cardiovascular and neurological disorders are members of the superfamily of voltage-gated K(+ channels, comprising a central pore enclosed by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs and sharing a homologous S4 sensor sequence. The Kv7.1 pore-forming subunit can interact with various KCNE auxiliary subunits to form K(+ channels with very different gating behaviors. In an attempt to characterize the nature of the promiscuous gating of Kv7.1 channels, we performed a tryptophan-scanning mutagenesis of the S4 sensor and analyzed the mutation-induced perturbations in gating free energy. Perturbing the gating energetics of Kv7.1 bias most of the mutant channels towards the closed state, while fewer mutations stabilize the open state or the inactivated state. In the absence of auxiliary subunits, mutations of specific S4 residues mimic the gating phenotypes produced by co-assembly of Kv7.1 with either KCNE1 or KCNE3. Many S4 perturbations compromise the ability of KCNE1 to properly regulate Kv7.1 channel gating. The tryptophan-induced packing perturbations and cysteine engineering studies in S4 suggest that KCNE1 lodges at the inter-VSD S4-S1 interface between two adjacent subunits, a strategic location to exert its striking action on Kv7.1 gating functions.

  15. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  16. Bioenergy from agricultural residues in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    and biomethane under Ghanaian conditions. Detailed characterisations of thirteen of the most common agricultural residues in Ghana are presented, enabling estimations of theoretical bioenergy potentials and identifying specific residues for future biorefinery applications. When aiming at residue-based ethanol...... to pursue increased implementation of anaerobic digestion in Ghana, as the first bioenergy option, since anaerobic digestion is more flexible than ethanol production with regard to both feedstock and scale of production. If possible, the available manure and municipal liquid waste should be utilised first....... A novel model for estimating BMP from compositional data of lignocellulosic biomasses is derived. The model is based on a statistical method not previously used in this area of research and the best prediction of BMP is: BMP = 347 xC+H+R – 438 xL + 63 DA , where xC+H+R is the combined content of cellulose...

  17. Functional Properties of a Newly Identified C-terminal Splice Variant of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Gabriella; Gebhart, Mathias; Scharinger, Anja; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Busquet, Perrine; Poggiani, Chiara; Sartori, Simone; Mangoni, Matteo E.; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Herzig, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    An intramolecular interaction between a distal (DCRD) and a proximal regulatory domain (PCRD) within the C terminus of long Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.3L) is a major determinant of their voltage- and Ca2+-dependent gating kinetics. Removal of these regulatory domains by alternative splicing generates Cav1.342A channels that activate at a more negative voltage range and exhibit more pronounced Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Here we describe the discovery of a novel short splice variant (Cav1.343S) that is expressed at high levels in the brain but not in the heart. It lacks the DCRD but, in contrast to Cav1.342A, still contains PCRD. When expressed together with α2δ1 and β3 subunits in tsA-201 cells, Cav1.343S also activated at more negative voltages like Cav1.342A but Ca2+-dependent inactivation was less pronounced. Single channel recordings revealed much higher channel open probabilities for both short splice variants as compared with Cav1.3L. The presence of the proximal C terminus in Cav1.343S channels preserved their modulation by distal C terminus-containing Cav1.3- and Cav1.2-derived C-terminal peptides. Removal of the C-terminal modulation by alternative splicing also induced a faster decay of Ca2+ influx during electrical activities mimicking trains of neuronal action potentials. Our findings extend the spectrum of functionally diverse Cav1.3 L-type channels produced by tissue-specific alternative splicing. This diversity may help to fine tune Ca2+ channel signaling and, in the case of short variants lacking a functional C-terminal modulation, prevent excessive Ca2+ accumulation during burst firing in neurons. This may be especially important in neurons that are affected by Ca2+-induced neurodegenerative processes. PMID:21998310

  18. Computational Tools for Interpreting Ion Channel pH-Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazanavets, Ivan; Warwicker, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Activity in many biological systems is mediated by pH, involving proton titratable groups with pKas in the relevant pH range. Experimental analysis of pH-dependence in proteins focusses on particular sidechains, often with mutagenesis of histidine, due to its pKa near to neutral pH. The key question for algorithms that predict pKas is whether they are sufficiently accurate to effectively narrow the search for molecular determinants of pH-dependence. Through analysis of inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), mutational effects on pH-dependence are probed, distinguishing between groups described as pH-coupled or pH-sensor. Whereas mutation can lead to a shift in transition pH between open and closed forms for either type of group, only for pH-sensor groups does mutation modulate the amplitude of the transition. It is shown that a hybrid Finite Difference Poisson-Boltzmann (FDPB) - Debye-Hückel continuum electrostatic model can filter mutation candidates, providing enrichment for key pH-coupled and pH-sensor residues in both ASICs and Kir channels, in comparison with application of FDPB alone.

  19. Computational Tools for Interpreting Ion Channel pH-Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Sazanavets

    Full Text Available Activity in many biological systems is mediated by pH, involving proton titratable groups with pKas in the relevant pH range. Experimental analysis of pH-dependence in proteins focusses on particular sidechains, often with mutagenesis of histidine, due to its pKa near to neutral pH. The key question for algorithms that predict pKas is whether they are sufficiently accurate to effectively narrow the search for molecular determinants of pH-dependence. Through analysis of inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir channels and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs, mutational effects on pH-dependence are probed, distinguishing between groups described as pH-coupled or pH-sensor. Whereas mutation can lead to a shift in transition pH between open and closed forms for either type of group, only for pH-sensor groups does mutation modulate the amplitude of the transition. It is shown that a hybrid Finite Difference Poisson-Boltzmann (FDPB - Debye-Hückel continuum electrostatic model can filter mutation candidates, providing enrichment for key pH-coupled and pH-sensor residues in both ASICs and Kir channels, in comparison with application of FDPB alone.

  20. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaino, C; Farrugia, G; Beyder, A

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types-epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechanosensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Residual strain in the Nb-H system measured by selected area diffraction (SAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulhoes, I.A.M.; Akune, K.; Pinatti, Dyonisio G.

    1981-07-01

    Various specimens of Nb were annealed in vacuum of 10 -3 torr for four hours at 1770 0 K. These speciments were doped with hydrogen up to 1000 ppm by weight and then were analyzed selected area diffraction. The line resolution of the electron channelling pattern was meassured for the specimens with different hydrogen content. These measurements, combined with the measurement of density, permitted one to estimate the residual strain caused by hydrogen. (Author) [pt

  2. Solid fuel residues inventory of fixtures and perspectives. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicocchi, S.; Tenza, A.

    2008-01-01

    The solid fuel residues, so called CSR, represent a fraction with high Lower Calorific value, with physicochemical characteristics conferring them the capacity to replace usual fuels. These last years, industrial applications seem to develop all over Europe. The present study thus sticks to draw up a panorama of the European situation in 2007. It develops the global regulation and normative context in which this waste processing channel must fit, while waiting for the presentation of the new Framework Directive of Waste during 2008, and the initiatives of certain precursory countries like Italy, Germany and the Netherlands. A scientific and technical inventory is presented being based on concrete cases identified within the Community territory. The study examines in particular a representative sample of 11 countries observed (Germany, Austria, Belgium, Spain, France, Italy, Netherlands, Finland, Denmark, Sweden and United Kingdom) and points out the local context, the layer and the practices developed in the use of this fraction. Finally, the study tries to position the French case in the European overview and highlights certain conditions (success factors, obstacles) allowing the development of CSR channel. Until few time, the CSR channel has increased without established regulation and normative framework. The diversity of the trade names listed through Europe testifies to the absence of common framework. To date, term CSR doesn't exist in European legislation. Only nomenclature NAPFUE (support for the declaration of the emissions in atmosphere) identifies fuels including the CSR. The working group CEN TC 343 (M325 Mandate) indicates that it only acts of solid waste, non made up of biomass, resulting from waste non dangerous and intended to be used in incineration or co-incineration. Regarding to existing European directives, a global tendency for the development of the channel is identified (management of waste, energy, environment). Thus, the objectives of

  3. Optical Communications Channel Combiner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified deep-space optical communications links as an integral part of a unified space communication network in order to provide data rates in excess of 100 Mb/s. The distances and limited power inherent in a deep-space optical downlink necessitate the use of photon-counting detectors and a power-efficient modulation such as pulse position modulation (PPM). For the output of each photodetector, whether from a separate telescope or a portion of the detection area, a communication receiver estimates a log-likelihood ratio for each PPM slot. To realize the full effective aperture of these receivers, their outputs must be combined prior to information decoding. A channel combiner was developed to synchronize the log-likelihood ratio (LLR) sequences of multiple receivers, and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for information decoding. The channel combiner synchronizes the LLR sequences of up to three receivers and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for output. The channel combiner has three channel inputs, each of which takes as input a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The cross-correlation between the channels LLR time series are calculated and used to synchronize the sequences prior to combining. The output of the channel combiner is a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The unit is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. A deep-space optical communication link has not yet been demonstrated. This ground-station channel combiner was developed to demonstrate this capability and is unique in its ability to process such a signal.

  4. Industrial, agricultural, and petroleum contaminants in cormorants wintering near the Houston Ship Channel, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, K.A.; Stafford, C.J.; Cain, B.W.; Mueller, A.J.; Hall, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    Double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus ) collected in the Houston Ship Channel, Texas, USA, in November shortly after their fall migration contained residues of several industrial, agricultural, and petroleum contaminants including polychlorinated styrenes (PCS's), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), DDE, and petroleum hydrocarbons. PCS concentrations in over-wintering birds collected in late February were three times higher than those in birds collected in November. PCB and petroleum concentrations remained at about the same level throughout the 3-month winter period. Petroleum hydrocarbons were present in all cormorants and residues in some individuals exceeded 25 ppm (wet weight). Mean DDE residues in samples collected in November and February were less than 1 ppm. Low concentrations of five other organochlorine compounds, not detected in cormorants collected in November, were recovered in birds collected in February.

  5. Utilization of the residual water resource from the Kozloduy NPP's hot channel for building a small hydropower plant (TK1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolev, T.

    2004-01-01

    A hydropower plant built on the hot channel of the NPP should be capable to utilise the whole changing water flow from the NPP cooling system. Tree factors - level of the hot channel, level of the Danube river and the water flow - determine the power potential of the HPP. The water level in the hot channel varies between 31.20 and 32.50 m with an optimum at 31.50 m. The Danube river level varies in a wide range. The head at 85% of the river level and at a level of the channel 31.50 m is 7.2 m. The water flow depends on the NPP operation and it is between 45 m 3 /s and 140 m 3 /s. Thus the nominal power of the HPP is 5 740 kW. The construction of the HPP is justified in case of at least 30 years of operation. The calculations are made for the operation of units 5 and 6 which are expected to work during this period. A significant role for the maximal utilisation of the resource of the hot channel plays the choice of the hydro-turbines. The horizontal PIT-Kaplan turbines are considered as the most appropriate. The integrating of the plant into the electric network and possible impact on the environment are also considered

  6. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  7. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures being the precision in recognizing contacts and the difference between the distribution of distances in the subset of predicted contact pairs versus all pairs of residues in the structure. The emphasis is placed on the prediction of long-range contacts (i.e., contacts between residues separated by at least 24 residues along sequence) in target proteins that cannot be easily modeled by homology. Although there is considerable activity in the field, the current analysis reports no discernable progress since CASP8.

  8. Mechanism of the modulation of BK potassium channel complexes with different auxiliary subunit compositions by the omega-3 fatty acid DHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Toshinori; Tian, Yutao; Xu, Rong; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hou, Shangwei

    2013-03-19

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels are well known for their functional versatility, which is bestowed in part by their rich modulatory repertoire. We recently showed that long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) found in oily fish lower blood pressure by activating vascular BK channels made of Slo1+β1 subunits. Here we examined the action of DHA on BK channels with different auxiliary subunit compositions. Neuronal Slo1+β4 channels were just as well activated by DHA as vascular Slo1+β1 channels. In contrast, the stimulatory effect of DHA was much smaller in Slo1+β2, Slo1+LRRC26 (γ1), and Slo1 channels without auxiliary subunits. Mutagenesis of β1, β2, and β4 showed that the large effect of DHA in Slo1+β1 and Slo1+β4 is conferred by the presence of two residues, one in the N terminus and the other in the first transmembrane segment of the β1 and β4 subunits. Transfer of this amino acid pair from β1 or β4 to β2 introduces a large response to DHA in Slo1+β2. The presence of a pair of oppositely charged residues at the aforementioned positions in β subunits is associated with a large response to DHA. The Slo1 auxiliary subunits are expressed in a highly tissue-dependent fashion. Thus, the subunit composition-dependent stimulation by DHA demonstrates that BK channels are effectors of omega-3 fatty acids with marked tissue specificity.

  9. Monitoring and Auditing Residual Information on the User’s Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladlena Sergeevna Oladk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of violation of information security components such as confidentiality and availability in the event of a computer user's residual information. Analyze the requirements of regulators and mechanisms to be applied in the organization to monitor the residual information or its destruction.Approach to monitoring and auditing residual information on the user's computer, which allows monitoring the residual information in certain areas proposed. Approach allows us to identify the detected information and rank it according to the degree of criticality, as well as calculate the risk of leakage and its potential to develop recommendations aimed at its reduction. The proposed approach is formally described and automated in a software system.

  10. Novel transcripts of the estrogen receptor α gene in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Reynaldo; Xia, Zhenfang; Gale, William L.; Wu, Chunfa; Maule, Alec G.; Chang, Xiaotian

    2000-01-01

    Complementary DNA libraries from liver and ovary of an immature female channel catfish were screened with a homologous ERα cDNA probe. The hepatic library yielded two new channel catfish ER cDNAs that encode N-terminal ERα variants of different sizes. Relative to the catfish ERα (medium size; 581 residues) previously reported, these new cDNAs encode Long-ERα (36 residues longer) and Short-ERα (389 residues shorter). The 5′-end of Long-ERα cDNA is identical to that of Medium-ERα but has an additional 503-bp segment with an upstream, in-frame translation-start codon. Recombinant Long-ERα binds estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 3.4 nM), similar to that previously reported for Medium-ERα but lower than reported for catfish ERβ. Short-ERα cDNA encodes a protein that lacks most of the receptor protein and does not bind estrogen. Northern hybridization confirmed the existence of multiple hepatic ERα RNAs that include the size range of the ERα cDNAs obtained from the libraries as well as additional sizes. Using primers for RT-PCR that target locations internal to the protein-coding sequence, we also established the presence of several ERα cDNA variants with in-frame insertions in the ligand-binding and DNA-binding domains and in-frame or out-of-frame deletions in the ligand-binding domain. These internal variants showed patterns of expression that differed between the ovary and liver. Further, the ovarian library yielded a full-length, ERα antisense cDNA containing a poly(A) signal and tail. A limited survey of histological preparations from juvenile catfish by in situ hybridization using directionally synthesized cRNA probes also suggested the expression of ERα antisense RNA in a tissue-specific manner. In conclusion, channel catfish seemingly have three broad classes of ERα mRNA variants: those encoding N-terminal truncated variants, those encoding internal variants (including C-terminal truncated variants), and antisense mRNA. The sense variants may

  11. Direct Binding between Pre-S1 and TRP-like Domains in TRPP Channels Mediates Gating and Functional Regulation by PIP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP channels are regulated by diverse stimuli comprising thermal, chemical, and mechanical modalities. They are also commonly regulated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2, with underlying mechanisms largely unknown. We here revealed an intramolecular interaction of the TRPP3 N and C termini (N-C that is functionally essential. The interaction was mediated by aromatic Trp81 in pre-S1 domain and cationic Lys568 in TRP-like domain. Structure-function analyses revealed similar N-C interaction in TRPP2 as well as TRPM8/-V1/-C4 via highly conserved tryptophan and lysine/arginine residues. PIP2 bound to cationic residues in TRPP3, including K568, thereby disrupting the N-C interaction and negatively regulating TRPP3. PIP2 had similar negative effects on TRPP2. Interestingly, we found that PIP2 facilitates the N-C interaction in TRPM8/-V1, resulting in channel potentiation. The intramolecular N-C interaction might represent a shared mechanism underlying the gating and PIP2 regulation of TRP channels.

  12. A novel potassium channel in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Zanetti

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the structure-function relationship of a small number of prokaryotic ion channels characterized so far greatly contributed to our knowledge on basic mechanisms of ion conduction. We identified a new potassium channel (SynK in the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, a photosynthetic model organism. SynK, when expressed in a K(+-uptake-system deficient E. coli strain, was able to recover growth of these organisms. The protein functions as a potassium selective ion channel when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The location of SynK in cyanobacteria in both thylakoid and plasmamembranes was revealed by immunogold electron microscopy and Western blotting of isolated membrane fractions. SynK seems to be conserved during evolution, giving rise to a TPK (two-pore K(+ channel family member which is shown here to be located in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis. Our work characterizes a novel cyanobacterial potassium channel and indicates the molecular nature of the first higher plant thylakoid cation channel, opening the way to functional studies.

  13. Functional properties of a newly identified C-terminal splice variant of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Gabriella; Gebhart, Mathias; Scharinger, Anja; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Busquet, Perrine; Poggiani, Chiara; Sartori, Simone; Mangoni, Matteo E; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Herzig, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2011-12-09

    An intramolecular interaction between a distal (DCRD) and a proximal regulatory domain (PCRD) within the C terminus of long Ca(v)1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels (Ca(v)1.3(L)) is a major determinant of their voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent gating kinetics. Removal of these regulatory domains by alternative splicing generates Ca(v)1.3(42A) channels that activate at a more negative voltage range and exhibit more pronounced Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. Here we describe the discovery of a novel short splice variant (Ca(v)1.3(43S)) that is expressed at high levels in the brain but not in the heart. It lacks the DCRD but, in contrast to Ca(v)1.3(42A), still contains PCRD. When expressed together with α2δ1 and β3 subunits in tsA-201 cells, Ca(v)1.3(43S) also activated at more negative voltages like Ca(v)1.3(42A) but Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation was less pronounced. Single channel recordings revealed much higher channel open probabilities for both short splice variants as compared with Ca(v)1.3(L). The presence of the proximal C terminus in Ca(v)1.3(43S) channels preserved their modulation by distal C terminus-containing Ca(v)1.3- and Ca(v)1.2-derived C-terminal peptides. Removal of the C-terminal modulation by alternative splicing also induced a faster decay of Ca(2+) influx during electrical activities mimicking trains of neuronal action potentials. Our findings extend the spectrum of functionally diverse Ca(v)1.3 L-type channels produced by tissue-specific alternative splicing. This diversity may help to fine tune Ca(2+) channel signaling and, in the case of short variants lacking a functional C-terminal modulation, prevent excessive Ca(2+) accumulation during burst firing in neurons. This may be especially important in neurons that are affected by Ca(2+)-induced neurodegenerative processes.

  14. Stimulation of Slack K(+) Channels Alters Mass at the Plasma Membrane by Triggering Dissociation of a Phosphatase-Regulatory Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Matthew R; Brown, Maile R; Kronengold, Jack; Zhang, Yalan; Jenkins, David P; Barcia, Gulia; Nabbout, Rima; Bausch, Anne E; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar S; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-30

    Human mutations in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Slack sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels result in childhood epilepsy with severe intellectual disability. Slack currents can be increased by pharmacological activators or by phosphorylation of a Slack C-terminal residue by protein kinase C. Using an optical biosensor assay, we find that Slack channel stimulation in neurons or transfected cells produces loss of mass near the plasma membrane. Slack mutants associated with intellectual disability fail to trigger any change in mass. The loss of mass results from the dissociation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) targeting protein, Phactr-1, from the channel. Phactr1 dissociation is specific to wild-type Slack channels and is not observed when related potassium channels are stimulated. Our findings suggest that Slack channels are coupled to cytoplasmic signaling pathways and that dysregulation of this coupling may trigger the aberrant intellectual development associated with specific childhood epilepsies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stimulation of Slack K+ channels alters mass at the plasma membrane by triggering dissociation of a phosphatase-regulatory complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Matthew R.; Brown, Maile R.; Kronengold, Jack; Zhang, Yalan; Jenkins, David P.; Barcia, Gulia; Nabbout, Rima; Bausch, Anne E.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar S.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human mutations in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Slack sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels result in childhood epilepsy with severe intellectual disability. Slack currents can be increased by pharmacological activators or by phosphorylation of a Slack C-terminal residue by protein kinase C. Using an optical biosensor assay, we find that Slack channel stimulation in neurons or transfected cells produces loss of mass near the plasma membrane. Slack mutants associated with intellectual disability fail to trigger any change in mass. The loss of mass results from the dissociation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) targeting protein, Phactr-1, from the channel. Phactr1 dissociation is specific to wild-type Slack channels and is not observed when related potassium channels are stimulated. Our findings suggest that Slack channels are coupled to cytoplasmic signaling pathways, and that dysregulation of this coupling may trigger the aberrant intellectual development associated with specific childhood epilepsies. PMID:27545877

  16. Stimulation of Slack K+ Channels Alters Mass at the Plasma Membrane by Triggering Dissociation of a Phosphatase-Regulatory Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Fleming

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human mutations in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Slack sodium-activated potassium (KNa channels result in childhood epilepsy with severe intellectual disability. Slack currents can be increased by pharmacological activators or by phosphorylation of a Slack C-terminal residue by protein kinase C. Using an optical biosensor assay, we find that Slack channel stimulation in neurons or transfected cells produces loss of mass near the plasma membrane. Slack mutants associated with intellectual disability fail to trigger any change in mass. The loss of mass results from the dissociation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 targeting protein, Phactr-1, from the channel. Phactr1 dissociation is specific to wild-type Slack channels and is not observed when related potassium channels are stimulated. Our findings suggest that Slack channels are coupled to cytoplasmic signaling pathways and that dysregulation of this coupling may trigger the aberrant intellectual development associated with specific childhood epilepsies.

  17. Activation of TRPM7 channels by small molecules under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, T; Schäfer, S; Linseisen, M; Sytik, L; Gudermann, T; Chubanov, V

    2014-12-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) is a cation channel covalently linked to a protein kinase domain. TRPM7 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates key cellular processes such as Mg(2+) homeostasis, motility, and proliferation. TRPM7 is involved in anoxic neuronal death, cardiac fibrosis, and tumor growth. The goal of this work was to identify small molecule activators of the TRPM7 channel and investigate their mechanism of action. We used an aequorin bioluminescence-based assay to screen for activators of the TRPM7 channel. Valid candidates were further characterized using patch clamp electrophysiology. We identified 20 drug-like compounds with various structural backbones that can activate the TRPM7 channel. Among them, the δ opioid antagonist naltriben was studied in greater detail. Naltriben's action was selective among the TRP channels tested. Naltriben activates TRPM7 currents without prior depletion of intracellular Mg(2+) even under conditions of low PIP2. Moreover, naltriben interfered with the effect of the TRPM7 inhibitor NS8593. Finally, our experiments with TRPM7 variants carrying mutations in the pore, TRP, and kinase domains indicate that the site of TRPM7 activation by this small-molecule ligand is most likely located in or near the TRP domain. In conclusion, we identified the first organic small-molecule activators of TRPM7 channels, thus providing new experimental tools to study TRPM7 function in native cellular environments.

  18. ASIC3 channels in multimodal sensory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Guang; Xu, Tian-Le

    2011-01-19

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which are members of the sodium-selective cation channels belonging to the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) family, act as membrane-bound receptors for extracellular protons as well as nonproton ligands. At least five ASIC subunits have been identified in mammalian neurons, which form both homotrimeric and heterotrimeric channels. The highly proton sensitive ASIC3 channels are predominantly distributed in peripheral sensory neurons, correlating with their roles in multimodal sensory perception, including nociception, mechanosensation, and chemosensation. Different from other ASIC subunit composing ion channels, ASIC3 channels can mediate a sustained window current in response to mild extracellular acidosis (pH 7.3-6.7), which often occurs accompanied by many sensory stimuli. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that the sustained component of ASIC3 currents can be enhanced by nonproton ligands including the endogenous metabolite agmatine. In this review, we first summarize the growing body of evidence for the involvement of ASIC3 channels in multimodal sensory perception and then discuss the potential mechanisms underlying ASIC3 activation and mediation of sensory perception, with a special emphasis on its role in nociception. We conclude that ASIC3 activation and modulation by diverse sensory stimuli represent a new avenue for understanding the role of ASIC3 channels in sensory perception. Furthermore, the emerging implications of ASIC3 channels in multiple sensory dysfunctions including nociception allow the development of new pharmacotherapy.

  19. Major Channels Involved In Neuropsychiatric Disorders And Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eImbrici

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated ion channels are important mediators of physiological functions in the central nervous system. The cyclic activation of these channels influences neurotransmitter release, neuron excitability, gene transcription and plasticity, providing distinct brain areas with unique physiological and pharmacological response. A growing body of data has implicated ion channels in the susceptibility or pathogenesis of psychiatric diseases. Indeed, population studies support the association of polymorphisms in calcium and potassium channels with the genetic risk for bipolar disorders or schizophrenia. Moreover, point mutations in calcium, sodium and potassium channel genes have been identified in some childhood developmental disorders. Finally, antibodies against potassium channel complexes occur in a series of autoimmune psychiatric diseases. Here we report recent studies assessing the role of calcium, sodium and potassium channels in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders, and briefly summarize promising pharmacological strategies targeted on ion channels for the therapy of mental illness and related genetic tests.

  20. The calmodulin-binding, short linear motif, NSCaTE is conserved in L-type channel ancestors of vertebrate Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Taiakina

    Full Text Available NSCaTE is a short linear motif of (xWxxx(I or Lxxxx, composed of residues with a high helix-forming propensity within a mostly disordered N-terminus that is conserved in L-type calcium channels from protostome invertebrates to humans. NSCaTE is an optional, lower affinity and calcium-sensitive binding site for calmodulin (CaM which competes for CaM binding with a more ancient, C-terminal IQ domain on L-type channels. CaM bound to N- and C- terminal tails serve as dual detectors to changing intracellular Ca(2+ concentrations, promoting calcium-dependent inactivation of L-type calcium channels. NSCaTE is absent in some arthropod species, and is also lacking in vertebrate L-type isoforms, Cav1.1 and Cav1.4 channels. The pervasiveness of a methionine just downstream from NSCaTE suggests that L-type channels could generate alternative N-termini lacking NSCaTE through the choice of translational start sites. Long N-terminus with an NSCaTE motif in L-type calcium channel homolog LCav1 from pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis has a faster calcium-dependent inactivation than a shortened N-termini lacking NSCaTE. NSCaTE effects are present in low concentrations of internal buffer (0.5 mM EGTA, but disappears in high buffer conditions (10 mM EGTA. Snail and mammalian NSCaTE have an alpha-helical propensity upon binding Ca(2+-CaM and can saturate both CaM N-terminal and C-terminal domains in the absence of a competing IQ motif. NSCaTE evolved in ancestors of the first animals with internal organs for promoting a more rapid, calcium-sensitive inactivation of L-type channels.

  1. Kv7 channels can function without constitutive calmodulin tethering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Camilo Gómez-Posada

    Full Text Available M-channels are voltage-gated potassium channels composed of Kv7.2-7.5 subunits that serve as important regulators of neuronal excitability. Calmodulin binding is required for Kv7 channel function and mutations in Kv7.2 that disrupt calmodulin binding cause Benign Familial Neonatal Convulsions (BFNC, a dominantly inherited human epilepsy. On the basis that Kv7.2 mutants deficient in calmodulin binding are not functional, calmodulin has been defined as an auxiliary subunit of Kv7 channels. However, we have identified a presumably phosphomimetic mutation S511D that permits calmodulin-independent function. Thus, our data reveal that constitutive tethering of calmodulin is not required for Kv7 channel function.

  2. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Taufiq; Smith, Ewan St. John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction

  3. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Taufiq, E-mail: mtur2@cam.ac.uk; Smith, Ewan St. John

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction.

  4. Waves for Alpha-Channeling in Mirror Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmoginov, A.I.; Fisch, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-channeling can, in principle, be implemented in mirror machines via exciting weaklydamped modes in the ion cyclotron frequency range with perpendicular wavelengths smaller than the alpha particle gyroradius. Assuming quasi-longitudinal or quasi-transverse wave propagation, we search systematically for suitable modes in mirror plasmas. Considering two device designs, a proof-of-principle facility and a fusion rector prototype, we in fact identify candidate modes suitable for alpha-channeling.

  5. Mechanism for modulation of gating of connexin26-containing channels by taurine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieken, Fabien; Tao, Liang; Sorgen, Paul L.; Harris, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of action of endogenous modulatory ligands of connexin channels are largely unknown. Previous work showed that protonated aminosulfonates (AS), notably taurine, directly and reversibly inhibit homomeric and heteromeric channels that contain Cx26, a widely distributed connexin, but not homomeric Cx32 channels. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of connexin channel modulation by taurine, using hemichannels and junctional channels composed of Cx26 (homomeric) and Cx26/Cx32 (heteromeric). The addition of a 28–amino acid “tag” to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CT) of Cx26 (Cx26T) eliminated taurine sensitivity of homomeric and heteromeric hemichannels in cells and liposomes. Cleavage of all but four residues of the tag (Cx26Tc) resulted in taurine-induced pore narrowing in homomeric hemichannels, and restored taurine inhibition of heteromeric hemichannels (Cx26Tc/Cx32). Taurine actions on junctional channels were fully consistent with those on hemichannels. Taurine-induced inhibition of Cx26/Cx32T and nontagged Cx26 junctional channels was blocked by extracellular HEPES, a blocker of the taurine transporter, confirming that the taurine-sensitive site of Cx26 is cytoplasmic. Nuclear magnetic resonance of peptides corresponding to Cx26 cytoplasmic domains showed that taurine binds to the cytoplasmic loop (CL) and not the CT, and that the CT and CL directly interact. ELISA showed that taurine disrupts a pH-dependent interaction between the CT and the CT-proximal half of the CL. These studies reveal that AS disrupt a pH-driven cytoplasmic interdomain interaction in Cx26-containing channels, causing closure, and that the Cx26CT has a modulatory role in Cx26 function. PMID:21844220

  6. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Distribution and transit times of plutonium-bearing particles throughout the channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boust, D.; Colin, C.; Leclerc, G.; Baron, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution and dispersive behaviour of Pu isotopes in the sediments of the Channel is presented and elucidated. The Pu concentrations vary by a factor of 70 and 1000, for 239,240 Pu and 238 Pu, respectively, which is consistent with the relative contributions of source terms (fallout versus industrial) and expected grain-size modulations. The Pu isotopic ratios ( 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu) increase from the western approaches of the Channel (0.05 or lower: atmospheric fallout) to 0.9 in the Central Channel (industrial input), then slightly decrease in the Eastern Channel. A relation between the Pu isotopic ratios and the passing time at Cherbourg enables us to estimate the transit time of sediments from Cherbourg to any sampling station. Average velocities derived from these data range between some km a -1 to some tens of km a -1 . They are ca 2 orders of magnitude lower than residual tide currents responsible for the dispersion of conservative elements (1000 km a -1 ), thus suggesting that the sediment movements occur only significantly during paroxysmic events. This approach gives access to the dynamics of the dispersion of Pu associated to these sediments and set new constraints to numerical models. (author)

  8. Sodium channel SCN8A (Nav1.6: properties and de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Elizabeth O'Brien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sodium channel Nav1.6, encoded by the gene SCN8A, is one of the major voltage-gated channels in human brain. The sequences of sodium channels have been highly conserved during evolution, and minor changes in biophysical properties can have a major impact in vivo. Insight into the role of Nav1.6 has come from analysis of spontaneous and induced mutations of mouse Scn8a during the past 18 years. Only within the past year has the role of SCN8A in human disease become apparent from whole exome and genome sequences of patients with sporadic disease. Unique features of Nav1.6 include its contribution to persistent current, resurgent current, repetitive neuronal firing, and subcellular localization at the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Loss of Nav1.6 activity results in reduced neuronal excitability, while gain-of-function mutations can increase neuronal excitability. Mouse Scn8a (med mutants exhibit movement disorders including ataxia, tremor and dystonia. Thus far, more than ten human de novo mutations have been identified in patients with two types of disorders, epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability. We review these human mutations as well as the unique features of Nav1.6 that contribute to its role in determining neuronal excitability in vivo. A supplemental figure illustrating the positions of amino acid residues within the 4 domains and 24 transmembrane segments of Nav1.6 is provided to facilitate the location of novel mutations within the channel protein.

  9. Scoring protein interaction decoys using exposed residues (SPIDER): a novel multibody interaction scoring function based on frequent geometric patterns of interfacial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashan, Raed; Zheng, Weifan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the structure of protein-protein complexes in computational docking experiments remains a formidable challenge. It has been recognized that identifying native or native-like poses among multiple decoys is the major bottleneck of the current scoring functions used in docking. We have developed a novel multibody pose-scoring function that has no theoretical limit on the number of residues contributing to the individual interaction terms. We use a coarse-grain representation of a protein-protein complex where each residue is represented by its side chain centroid. We apply a computational geometry approach called Almost-Delaunay tessellation that transforms protein-protein complexes into a residue contact network, or an undirectional graph where vertex-residues are nodes connected by edges. This treatment forms a family of interfacial graphs representing a dataset of protein-protein complexes. We then employ frequent subgraph mining approach to identify common interfacial residue patterns that appear in at least a subset of native protein-protein interfaces. The geometrical parameters and frequency of occurrence of each "native" pattern in the training set are used to develop the new SPIDER scoring function. SPIDER was validated using standard "ZDOCK" benchmark dataset that was not used in the development of SPIDER. We demonstrate that SPIDER scoring function ranks native and native-like poses above geometrical decoys and that it exceeds in performance a popular ZRANK scoring function. SPIDER was ranked among the top scoring functions in a recent round of CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions) blind test of protein-protein docking methods. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Ion channels in the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Jong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability and synaptic function in the brain. Recent evidence suggests that ion channels expressed by neurons within the brain are responsible for regulating energy and glucose homeostasis. In addition, the central effects of neurotransmitters and hormones are at least in part achieved by modifications of ion channel activity. This review focuses on ion channels and their neuronal functions followed by a discussion of the identified roles fo...

  11. Evaluation of portable near infrared spectrophotometer to stage maturity in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonadal maturity of channel catfish varies within the same cohort of fish. Female channel catfish with superior maturity need to be identified and staged for higher success to induce spawn wit ovulating hormones to produce channel x blue hybrid catfish fry in hatcheries. Maturation is not synchron...

  12. Identification of key residues for protein conformational transition using elastic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji Guo; Xu, Xian Jin; Li, Chun Hua; Chen, Wei Zu; Wang, Cun Xin

    2011-11-07

    Proteins usually undergo conformational transitions between structurally disparate states to fulfill their functions. The large-scale allosteric conformational transitions are believed to involve some key residues that mediate the conformational movements between different regions of the protein. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model is proposed to predict the key residues involved in protein conformational transitions. In our method, the key functional sites are identified as the residues whose perturbations largely influence the free energy difference between the protein states before and after transition. Two proteins, nucleotide binding domain of the heat shock protein 70 and human/rat DNA polymerase β, are used as case studies to identify the critical residues responsible for their open-closed conformational transitions. The results show that the functionally important residues mainly locate at the following regions for these two proteins: (1) the bridging point at the interface between the subdomains that control the opening and closure of the binding cleft; (2) the hinge region between different subdomains, which mediates the cooperative motions between the corresponding subdomains; and (3) the substrate binding sites. The similarity in the positions of the key residues for these two proteins may indicate a common mechanism in their conformational transitions.

  13. Channelling and electromagnetic radiation of channelling particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, N.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description is presented of the channelling of charged particles between atoms in the crystal lattice. The specificities are discussed of the transverse motion of channelling particles as are the origin and properties of quasi-characteristic radiation of channelling particles which accompany transfers from one band of permissible energies of the transverse motion of channelling particles to the other. (B.S.)

  14. Calcium homeostasis modulator (CALHM) ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongming; Tanis, Jessica E; Taruno, Akiyuki; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), formerly known as FAM26C, was recently identified as a physiologically important plasma membrane ion channel. CALHM1 and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, CLHM-1, are regulated by membrane voltage and extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]o). In the presence of physiological [Ca(2+)]o (∼1.5 mM), CALHM1 and CLHM-1 are closed at resting membrane potentials but can be opened by strong depolarizations. Reducing [Ca(2+)]o increases channel open probability, enabling channel activation at negative membrane potentials. Together, voltage and Ca(2+) o allosterically regulate CALHM channel gating. Through convergent evolution, CALHM has structural features that are reminiscent of connexins and pannexins/innexins/LRRC8 (volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC)) gene families, including four transmembrane helices with cytoplasmic amino and carboxyl termini. A CALHM1 channel is a hexamer of CALHM1 monomers with a functional pore diameter of ∼14 Å. CALHM channels discriminate poorly among cations and anions, with signaling molecules including Ca(2+) and ATP able to permeate through its pore. CALHM1 is expressed in the brain where it plays an important role in cortical neuron excitability induced by low [Ca(2+)]o and in type II taste bud cells in the tongue that sense sweet, bitter, and umami tastes where it functions as an essential ATP release channel to mediate nonsynaptic neurotransmitter release. CLHM-1 is expressed in C. elegans sensory neurons and body wall muscles, and its genetic deletion causes locomotion defects. Thus, CALHM is a voltage- and Ca(2+) o-gated ion channel, permeable to large cations and anions, that plays important roles in physiology.

  15. Ion channels in the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Woo eSohn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability and synaptic function in the brain. Recent evidence suggests that ion channels expressed by neurons within the brain are responsible for regulating energy and glucose homeostasis. In addition, the central effects of neurotransmitters and hormones are at least in part achieved by modifications of ion channel activity. This review focuses on ion channels and their neuronal functions followed by a discussion of the identified roles for specific ion channels in the central pathways regulating food intake, energy expenditure, and glucose balance.

  16. Influence of the entrance channel in the fusion reaction 318 MeV 74Ge+74Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, L.H.; Cinausero, M.; Angelis, G. de; De Poli, M.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Prete, G.; Lucarelli, F.

    1998-01-01

    Entrance channel effects in the fusion of heavy ions have been studied by using the 74 Ge+ 74 Ge reaction at 318 MeV. The population of the yrast superdeformed band in 144 Gd shows an increase when compared with the results obtained in the more asymmetric 48 Ti+ 100 Mo reaction at 215 MeV. The relative yields of the different evaporation residues produced in the 74 Ge+ 74 Ge and in the 48 Ti+ 100 Mo reactions are very similar, with the exception of the 145,144 Gd residual nuclei (3n and 4n decay channels) which are populated with a larger yield in the symmetric reaction. Statistical model calculations reproduce qualitatively such effect if a fission delay is explicitly taken into account. Effects related to fusion barrier fluctuations seem to be important in determining the spin distributions of the compound nucleus. The spectra of the high energy γ-rays emitted in the 74 Ge+ 74 Ge reaction have been measured as a function of the γ-ray multiplicity as well as in coincidence with selected evaporation residues. They are reproduced by standard statistical model calculations with GDR parameters taken from systematics, demonstrating that, in agreement with dynamical model prediction, the emission of γ-rays from the dinucleus formed in the earlier stage of the collision is unimportant. (orig.)

  17. A novel 13 residue acyclic peptide from the marine snail, Conus monile, targets potassium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarslal, Sadasivannair; Singaravadivelan, Govindaswamy; Ramasamy, Palanisamy; Ananda, Kuppanna; Sarma, Siddhartha P; Sikdar, Sujit K; Krishnan, KS; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2004-01-01

    A novel 13-residue peptide Mo1659 has been isolated from the venom of a vermivorous cone snail, Conus monile. HPLC fractions of the venom extract yielded an intense UV absorbing fraction with a mass of 1659 Da. De novo sequencing using both matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization and electrospray MS/MS methods together with analysis of proteolytic fragments successfully yielded the amino acid sequence, HGGSWYRFPWGY-NH2. This was further confirmed by comparison with the chemically synt...

  18. Hanford tank residual waste - Contaminant source terms and release models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael L.; Jeffery Serne, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Residual waste from five Hanford spent fuel process storage tanks was evaluated. → Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations. → Non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-P ± H phases are common in the U-rich residual. → Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples. → Uranium release is highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions. - Abstract: Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State, USA. In the long term, the residual wastes may represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt.%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt.%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2-29.1 wt.%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low ( 2 -saturated solution, or a CaCO 3 -saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO 3 -saturated solution than with the Ca(OH) 2 -saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH) 2 -saturated solution than by the CaCO 3 -saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt.% of the

  19. Imaging through scattering microfluidic channels by digital holography for information recovery in lab on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, V; Paturzo, M; Gennari, O; Finizio, A; Ferraro, P

    2013-10-07

    We tackle the problem of information recovery and imaging through scattering microfluidic chips by means of digital holography (DH). In many cases the chip can become opalescent due to residual deposits settling down the inner channel faces, biofilm formation, scattering particle uptake by the channel cladding or its damaging by corrosive substances, or even by condensing effect on the exterior channels walls. In these cases white-light imaging is severely degraded and no information is obtainable at all about the flowing samples. Here we investigate the problem of counting and estimating velocity of cells flowing inside a scattering chip. Moreover we propose and test a method based on the recording of multiple digital holograms to retrieve improved phase-contrast images despite the strong scattering effect. This method helps, thanks to DH, to recover information which, otherwise, would be completely lost.

  20. Study on the reduction and hysteresis effect of soil nitrogen pollution by Alfalfa in channel buffer bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yixia; Xue, Lianqing; Zhang, Zhanyu; Li, Dongying

    2018-01-01

    Based on the simulation experiments of solute transport in channel buffer bank and pot experiments, this study analyzed the transport of nitrogen pollution from farmland drains along the South-North Water Transfer east route project; and compared the nitrogen transport rule and purification effect of alfalfa in channel buffer bank soil under situations of bare land and alfalfa mulching. The results showed that: (1) soil nitrogen content decreased gradually with the width increase of channel buffer bank by the soil adsorption and decomposition; (2) the migration rates of nitrogen were 0.06 g·kg-1 by the alfalfa mulching; (3) the removed rates of nitrogen from the soil were 0.088 g·kg-1 by cutting alfalfa; (4) the residual nitrogen of soil with alfalfa was 10% of the bare land. Alfalfa in channel buffer bank had obvious reduction and hysteresis effect to soil nitrogen pollution.

  1. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Nguyen, Phuong Tran; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; DeCaen, Paul G; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V s) are activated by transiting the voltage sensor from the deactivated to the activated state. The crystal structures of several bacterial Na V s have captured the voltage sensor module (VSM) in an activated state, but structure of the deactivated voltage sensor remains elusive. In this study, we sought to identify peptide toxins stabilizing the deactivated VSM of bacterial Na V s. We screened fractions from several venoms and characterized a cystine knot toxin called JZTx-27 from the venom of tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao as a high-affinity antagonist of the prokaryotic Na V s Ns V Ba (nonselective voltage-gated Bacillus alcalophilus ) and NaChBac (bacterial sodium channel from Bacillus halodurans ) (IC 50 = 112 nM and 30 nM, respectively). JZTx-27 was more efficacious at weaker depolarizing voltages and significantly slowed the activation but accelerated the deactivation of Ns V Ba, whereas the local anesthetic drug lidocaine was shown to antagonize Ns V Ba without affecting channel gating. Mutation analysis confirmed that JZTx-27 bound to S3-4 linker of Ns V Ba, with F98 being the critical residue in determining toxin affinity. All electrophysiological data and in silico analysis suggested that JZTx-27 trapped VSM of Ns V Ba in one of the deactivated states. In mammalian Na V s, JZTx-27 preferably inhibited the inactivation of Na V 1.5 by targeting the fourth transmembrane domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peptide antagonist for prokaryotic Na V s. More important, we proposed that JZTx-27 stabilized the Ns V Ba VSM in the deactivated state and may be used as a probe to determine the structure of the deactivated VSM of Na V s.-Tang, C., Zhou, X., Nguyen, P. T., Zhang, Y., Hu, Z., Zhang, C., Yarov-Yarovoy, V., DeCaen, P. G., Liang, S., Liu, Z. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel. © FASEB.

  2. Improving the service life and performance of CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, A.R.; Cheadle, B.A.; Coleman, C.E.; Price, E.G.

    1997-01-01

    The development objective for CANDU fuel channels is to produce a design that can operate for 40 years at 90% capacity. Steady progress toward this objective is being made. The factors that determine the life of the channel are reviewed and the processes necessary to achieve the objectives identified. Performance of future fuel channels will be enhanced by reduced operating costs, increased safety margins to postulated accident conditions, and reduced retubing costs compared to current channels. The approaches to these issues are discussed briefly in the paper. (author)

  3. Improving the service life and performance of CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Cheadle, B.A.; Causey, A.R.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Venkatapathi, S.

    1996-03-01

    The development objective for CANDU fuel channels is to produce a design that can operate for 40 years at 90% capacity. Steady progress toward this objective is being made. The factors that determine the life of a CANDU fuel channel are reviewed and the processes necessary to achieve the objectives are identified. Performance of future fuel channels will be enhanced by reduced operating costs and increased safety margins to postulated accident conditions compared with those for current channels. The approaches to these issues are discussed briefly in this report. (author)

  4. Analysis of copy number variations in Holstein cows identify potential mechanisms contributing to differences in residual feed intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yali; Bickhart, Derek M; Chung, Hoyoung; Hutchison, Jana L; Norman, H Duane; Connor, Erin E; Liu, George E

    2012-11-01

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. In this study, we performed an initial analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) using BovineHD SNP genotyping data from 147 Holstein cows identified as having high or low feed efficiency as estimated by residual feed intake (RFI). We detected 443 candidate CNV regions (CNVRs) that represent 18.4 Mb (0.6 %) of the genome. To investigate the functional impacts of CNVs, we created two groups of 30 individual animals with extremely low or high estimated breeding values (EBVs) for RFI, and referred to these groups as low intake (LI; more efficient) or high intake (HI; less efficient), respectively. We identified 240 (~9.0 Mb) and 274 (~10.2 Mb) CNVRs from LI and HI groups, respectively. Approximately 30-40 % of the CNVRs were specific to the LI group or HI group of animals. The 240 LI CNVRs overlapped with 137 Ensembl genes. Network analyses indicated that the LI-specific genes were predominantly enriched for those functioning in the inflammatory response and immunity. By contrast, the 274 HI CNVRs contained 177 Ensembl genes. Network analyses indicated that the HI-specific genes were particularly involved in the cell cycle, and organ and bone development. These results relate CNVs to two key variables, namely immune response and organ and bone development. The data indicate that greater feed efficiency relates more closely to immune response, whereas cattle with reduced feed efficiency may have a greater capacity for organ and bone development.

  5. Liquid Water Transport in the Reactant Channels of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rupak

    Water management has been identified as a critical issue in the development of PEM fuel cells for automotive applications. Water is present inside the PEM fuel cell in three phases, i.e. liquid phase, vapor phase and mist phase. Liquid water in the reactant channels causes flooding of the cell and blocks the transport of reactants to the reaction sites at the catalyst layer. Understanding the behavior of liquid water in the reactant channels would allow us to devise improved strategies for removing liquid water from the reactant channels. In situ fuel cell tests have been performed to identify and diagnose operating conditions which result in the flooding of the fuel cell. A relationship has been identified between the liquid water present in the reactant channels and the cell performance. A novel diagnostic technique has been established which utilizes the pressure drop multiplier in the reactant channels to predict the flooding of the cell or the drying-out of the membrane. An ex-situ study has been undertaken to quantify the liquid water present in the reactant channels. A new parameter, the Area Coverage Ratio (ACR), has been defined to identify the interfacial area of the reactant channel which is blocked for reactant transport by the presence of liquid water. A parametric study has been conducted to study the effect of changing temperature and the inlet relative humidity on the ACR. The ACR decreases with increase in current density as the gas flow rates increase, removing water more efficiently. With increase in temperature, the ACR decreases rapidly, such that by 60°C, there is no significant ACR to be reported. Inlet relative humidity of the gases does change the saturation of the gases in the channel, but did not show any significant effect on the ACR. Automotive powertrains, which is the target for this work, are continuously faced with transient changes. Water management under transient operating conditions is significantly more challenging and has not

  6. Substitutions in the domain III voltage-sensing module enhance the sensitivity of an insect sodium channel to a scorpion beta-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weizhong; Du, Yuzhe; Liu, Zhiqi; Luo, Ningguang; Turkov, Michael; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Goldin, Alan L; Dong, Ke

    2011-05-06

    Scorpion β-toxins bind to the extracellular regions of the voltage-sensing module of domain II and to the pore module of domain III in voltage-gated sodium channels and enhance channel activation by trapping and stabilizing the voltage sensor of domain II in its activated state. We investigated the interaction of a highly potent insect-selective scorpion depressant β-toxin, Lqh-dprIT(3), from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus with insect sodium channels from Blattella germanica (BgNa(v)). Like other scorpion β-toxins, Lqh-dprIT(3) shifts the voltage dependence of activation of BgNa(v) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to more negative membrane potentials but only after strong depolarizing prepulses. Notably, among 10 BgNa(v) splice variants tested for their sensitivity to the toxin, only BgNa(v)1-1 was hypersensitive due to an L1285P substitution in IIIS1 resulting from a U-to-C RNA-editing event. Furthermore, charge reversal of a negatively charged residue (E1290K) at the extracellular end of IIIS1 and the two innermost positively charged residues (R4E and R5E) in IIIS4 also increased the channel sensitivity to Lqh-dprIT(3). Besides enhancement of toxin sensitivity, the R4E substitution caused an additional 20-mV negative shift in the voltage dependence of activation of toxin-modified channels, inducing a unique toxin-modified state. Our findings provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of the domain III voltage-sensing module in the action of scorpion β-toxins. This hypersensitivity most likely reflects an increase in IIS4 trapping via allosteric mechanisms, suggesting coupling between the voltage sensors in neighboring domains during channel activation.

  7. Delayed amputation following trauma increases residual lower limb infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhilash; Glass, Graeme E; Ahmadi, Hootan; Mackey, Simon; Simmons, Jon; Hettiaratchy, Shehan; Pearse, Michael; Nanchahal, Jagdeep

    2013-04-01

    Residual limb infection following amputation is a devastating complication, resulting in delayed rehabilitation, repeat surgery, prolonged hospitalisation and poor functional outcome. The aim of this study was to identify variables predicting residual limb infection following non-salvageable lower limb trauma. All cases of non-salvageable lower limb trauma presenting to a specialist centre over 5 years were evaluated from a prospective database and clinical and management variables correlated with the development of deep infection. Forty patients requiring 42 amputations were identified with a mean age of 49 years (±19.9, 1SD). Amputations were performed for 21 Gustilo IIIB injuries, 12 multi-planar degloving injuries, seven IIIC injuries and one open Schatzker 6 fracture. One limb was traumatically amputated at the scene and surgically revised. Amputation level was transtibial in 32, through-knee in one and transfemoral in nine. Median time from injury to amputation was 4 days (range 0-30 days). Amputation following only one debridement and within 5 days resulted in significantly fewer stump infections (p = 0.026 and p = 0.03, respectively, Fisher's exact test). The cumulative probability of infection-free residual limb closure declined steadily from day 5. Multivariate analyses revealed that neither the nature of the injury nor pre-injury patient morbidity independently influenced residual limb infection. Avoiding residual limb infection is critically dependent on prompt amputation of non-salvageable limbs. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Substrate Trapping in Crystals of the Thiolase OleA Identifies Three Channels That Enable Long Chain Olefin Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Jensen, Matthew R.; Mohamed, Fatuma A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2016-11-04

    Phylogenetically diverse microbes that produce long chain, olefinic hydrocarbons have received much attention as possible sources of renewable energy biocatalysts. One enzyme that is critical for this process is OleA, a thiolase superfamily enzyme that condenses two fatty acyl-CoA substrates to produce a β-ketoacid product and initiates the biosynthesis of long chain olefins in bacteria. Thiolases typically utilize a ping-pong mechanism centered on an active site cysteine residue. Reaction with the first substrate produces a covalent cysteine-thioester tethered acyl group that is transferred to the second substrate through formation of a carbon-carbon bond. Although the basics of thiolase chemistry are precedented, the mechanism by which OleA accommodates two substrates with extended carbon chains and a coenzyme moiety—unusual for a thiolase—are unknown. Gaining insights into this process could enable manipulation of the system for large scale olefin production with hydrocarbon chains lengths equivalent to those of fossil fuels. In this study, mutagenesis of the active site cysteine in Xanthomonas campestris OleA (Cys143) enabled trapping of two catalytically relevant species in crystals. In the resulting structures, long chain alkyl groups (C12 and C14) and phosphopantetheinate define three substrate channels in a T-shaped configuration, explaining how OleA coordinates its two substrates and product. The C143A OleA co-crystal structure possesses a single bound acyl-CoA representing the Michaelis complex with the first substrate, whereas the C143S co-crystal structure contains both acyl-CoA and fatty acid, defining how a second substrate binds to the acyl-enzyme intermediate. An active site glutamate (Gluβ117) is positioned to deprotonate bound acyl-CoA and initiate carbon-carbon bond formation.

  9. Substrate Trapping in Crystals of the Thiolase OleA Identifies Three Channels That Enable Long Chain Olefin Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goblirsch, Brandon R; Jensen, Matthew R; Mohamed, Fatuma A; Wackett, Lawrence P; Wilmot, Carrie M

    2016-12-23

    Phylogenetically diverse microbes that produce long chain, olefinic hydrocarbons have received much attention as possible sources of renewable energy biocatalysts. One enzyme that is critical for this process is OleA, a thiolase superfamily enzyme that condenses two fatty acyl-CoA substrates to produce a β-ketoacid product and initiates the biosynthesis of long chain olefins in bacteria. Thiolases typically utilize a ping-pong mechanism centered on an active site cysteine residue. Reaction with the first substrate produces a covalent cysteine-thioester tethered acyl group that is transferred to the second substrate through formation of a carbon-carbon bond. Although the basics of thiolase chemistry are precedented, the mechanism by which OleA accommodates two substrates with extended carbon chains and a coenzyme moiety-unusual for a thiolase-are unknown. Gaining insights into this process could enable manipulation of the system for large scale olefin production with hydrocarbon chains lengths equivalent to those of fossil fuels. In this study, mutagenesis of the active site cysteine in Xanthomonas campestris OleA (Cys 143 ) enabled trapping of two catalytically relevant species in crystals. In the resulting structures, long chain alkyl groups (C 12 and C 14 ) and phosphopantetheinate define three substrate channels in a T-shaped configuration, explaining how OleA coordinates its two substrates and product. The C143A OleA co-crystal structure possesses a single bound acyl-CoA representing the Michaelis complex with the first substrate, whereas the C143S co-crystal structure contains both acyl-CoA and fatty acid, defining how a second substrate binds to the acyl-enzyme intermediate. An active site glutamate (Gluβ 117 ) is positioned to deprotonate bound acyl-CoA and initiate carbon-carbon bond formation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Substrate Trapping in Crystals of the Thiolase OleA Identifies Three Channels That Enable Long Chain Olefin Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Jensen, Matthew R.; Mohamed, Fatuma A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetically diverse microbes that produce long chain, olefinic hydrocarbons have received much attention as possible sources of renewable energy biocatalysts. One enzyme that is critical for this process is OleA, a thiolase superfamily enzyme that condenses two fatty acyl-CoA substrates to produce a β-ketoacid product and initiates the biosynthesis of long chain olefins in bacteria. Thiolases typically utilize a ping-pong mechanism centered on an active site cysteine residue. Reaction with the first substrate produces a covalent cysteine-thioester tethered acyl group that is transferred to the second substrate through formation of a carbon-carbon bond. Although the basics of thiolase chemistry are precedented, the mechanism by which OleA accommodates two substrates with extended carbon chains and a coenzyme moiety—unusual for a thiolase—are unknown. Gaining insights into this process could enable manipulation of the system for large scale olefin production with hydrocarbon chains lengths equivalent to those of fossil fuels. In this study, mutagenesis of the active site cysteine in Xanthomonas campestris OleA (Cys143) enabled trapping of two catalytically relevant species in crystals. In the resulting structures, long chain alkyl groups (C12 and C14) and phosphopantetheinate define three substrate channels in a T-shaped configuration, explaining how OleA coordinates its two substrates and product. The C143A OleA co-crystal structure possesses a single bound acyl-CoA representing the Michaelis complex with the first substrate, whereas the C143S co-crystal structure contains both acyl-CoA and fatty acid, defining how a second substrate binds to the acyl-enzyme intermediate. An active site glutamate (Gluβ117) is positioned to deprotonate bound acyl-CoA and initiate carbon-carbon bond formation. PMID:27815501

  11. Deep Learning for Distribution Channels' Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina-Cristiana NECULA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experiment of using deep learning models for distribution channel management. We present an approach that combines self-organizing maps with artificial neural network with multiple hidden layers in order to identify the potential sales that might be addressed for channel distribution change/ management. Our study aims to highlight the evolution of techniques from simple features/learners to more complex learners and feature engineering or sampling techniques. This paper will allow researchers to choose best suited techniques and features to prepare their churn prediction models.

  12. Energy dependence of fusion evaporation-residue cross sections in the 28Si+28Si reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Bauer, J.S.; Gosdin, C.H.; Trotter, R.S.; Kovar, D.G.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Wilkins, B.D.; Rosner, G.; Chowdhury, P.; Ikezoe, H.; Kuhn, W.; Kolata, J.J.; Hinnefeld, J.D.; Maguire, C.F.; Mateja, J.F.; Prosser, F.W.; Stephans, G.S.F.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity distributions of mass-identified evaporation residues produced in the 28 Si+ 28 Si reaction have been measured at bombarding energies of 174, 215, 240, 309, 397, and 452 MeV using time-of-flight techniques. These distributions were used to identify evaporation residues and to separate the complete-fusion and incomplete-fusion components. Angular distributions and total cross sections were extracted at all six bombarding energies. The complete-fusion evaporation-residue cross sections and the deduced critical angular momenta are compared with lower energy data and the predictions of existing models

  13. Spectral line polarimetry with a channeled polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans; Rietjens, Jeroen H H; Martijn Smit, J; Keller, Christoph U

    2014-07-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry or spectral polarization modulation is an accurate technique for measuring the continuum polarization in one shot with no moving parts. We show how a dual-beam implementation also enables spectral line polarimetry at the intrinsic resolution, as in a classic beam-splitting polarimeter. Recording redundant polarization information in the two spectrally modulated beams of a polarizing beam-splitter even provides the possibility to perform a postfacto differential transmission correction that improves the accuracy of the spectral line polarimetry. We perform an error analysis to compare the accuracy of spectral line polarimetry to continuum polarimetry, degraded by a residual dark signal and differential transmission, as well as to quantify the impact of the transmission correction. We demonstrate the new techniques with a blue sky polarization measurement around the oxygen A absorption band using the groundSPEX instrument, yielding a polarization in the deepest part of the band of 0.160±0.010, significantly different from the polarization in the continuum of 0.2284±0.0004. The presented methods are applicable to any dual-beam channeled polarimeter, including implementations for snapshot imaging polarimetry.

  14. The NH2 terminus regulates voltage-dependent gating of CALHM ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Jessica E; Ma, Zhongming; Foskett, J Kevin

    2017-08-01

    Calcium homeostasis modulator protein-1 (CALHM1) and its Caenorhabditis elegans (ce) homolog, CLHM-1, belong to a new family of physiologically important ion channels that are regulated by voltage and extracellular Ca 2+ (Ca 2+ o ) but lack a canonical voltage-sensing domain. Consequently, the intrinsic voltage-dependent gating mechanisms for CALHM channels are unknown. Here, we performed voltage-clamp experiments on ceCLHM-1 chimeric, deletion, insertion, and point mutants to assess the role of the NH 2 terminus (NT) in CALHM channel gating. Analyses of chimeric channels in which the ceCLHM-1 and human (h)CALHM1 NH 2 termini were interchanged showed that the hCALHM1 NT destabilized channel-closed states, whereas the ceCLHM-1 NT had a stabilizing effect. In the absence of Ca 2+ o , deletion of up to eight amino acids from the ceCLHM-1 NT caused a hyperpolarizing shift in the conductance-voltage relationship with little effect on voltage-dependent slope. However, deletion of nine or more amino acids decreased voltage dependence and induced a residual conductance at hyperpolarized voltages. Insertion of amino acids into the NH 2 -terminal helix also decreased voltage dependence but did not prevent channel closure. Mutation of ceCLHM-1 valine 9 and glutamine 13 altered half-maximal activation and voltage dependence, respectively, in 0 Ca 2+ In 2 mM Ca 2+ o , ceCLHM-1 NH 2 -terminal deletion and point mutant channels closed completely at hyperpolarized voltages with apparent affinity for Ca 2+ o indistinguishable from wild-type ceCLHM-1, although the ceCLHM-1 valine 9 mutant exhibited an altered conductance-voltage relationship and kinetics. We conclude that the NT plays critical roles modulating voltage dependence and stabilizing the closed states of CALHM channels. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Apparent intermediate K conductance channel hyposmotic activation in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, Peter K; Misri, Sandeep; Chimote, Ameet A; Adragna, Norma C

    2008-03-01

    This study explores the nature of K fluxes in human lens epithelial cells (LECs) in hyposmotic solutions. Total ion fluxes, Na-K pump, Cl-dependent Na-K-2Cl (NKCC), K-Cl (KCC) cotransport, and K channels were determined by 85Rb uptake and cell K (Kc) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and cell water gravimetrically after exposure to ouabain +/- bumetanide (Na-K pump and NKCC inhibitors), and ion channel inhibitors in varying osmolalities with Na, K, or methyl-d-glucamine and Cl, sulfamate, or nitrate. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot analyses, and immunochemistry were also performed. In isosmotic (300 mosM) media approximately 90% of the total Rb influx occurred through the Na-K pump and NKCC and approximately 10% through KCC and a residual leak. Hyposmotic media (150 mosM) decreased K(c) by a 16-fold higher K permeability and cell water, but failed to inactivate NKCC and activate KCC. Sucrose replacement or extracellular K to >57 mM, but not Rb or Cs, in hyposmotic media prevented Kc and water loss. Rb influx equaled Kc loss, both blocked by clotrimazole (IC50 approximately 25 microM) and partially by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl) diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34) inhibitors of the IK channel KCa3.1 but not by other K channel or connexin hemichannel blockers. Of several anion channel blockers (dihydro-indenyl)oxy]alkanoic acid (DIOA), 4-2(butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl)oxybutyric acid (DCPIB), and phloretin totally or partially inhibited Kc loss and Rb influx, respectively. RT-PCR and immunochemistry confirmed the presence of KCa3.1 channels, aside of the KCC1, KCC2, KCC3 and KCC4 isoforms. Apparently, IK channels, possibly in parallel with volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl channels, effect regulatory volume decrease in LECs.

  16. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene A Morrill

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb; neuroglobin (Ngb; myoglobin (Mb; hemoglobin (Hb subunits Hba(α and Hbb(β] contain either a transmembrane (TM helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba and pore-lining region (Hbb. The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, band 3, which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions. The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane band 3 attachment site. Band 3 contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO movement within the large internal cavities and

  17. Quantification of Drive-Response Relationships Between Residues During Protein Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yifei; Im, Wonpil

    2013-08-13

    Mutual correlation and cooperativity are commonly used to describe residue-residue interactions in protein folding/function. However, these metrics do not provide any information on the causality relationships between residues. Such drive-response relationships are poorly studied in protein folding/function and difficult to measure experimentally due to technical limitations. In this study, using the information theory transfer entropy (TE) that provides a direct measurement of causality between two times series, we have quantified the drive-response relationships between residues in the folding/unfolding processes of four small proteins generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Instead of using a time-averaged single TE value, the time-dependent TE is measured with the Q-scores based on residue-residue contacts and with the statistical significance analysis along the folding/unfolding processes. The TE analysis is able to identify the driving and responding residues that are different from the highly correlated residues revealed by the mutual information analysis. In general, the driving residues have more regular secondary structures, are more buried, and show greater effects on the protein stability as well as folding and unfolding rates. In addition, the dominant driving and responding residues from the TE analysis on the whole trajectory agree with those on a single folding event, demonstrating that the drive-response relationships are preserved in the non-equilibrium process. Our study provides detailed insights into the protein folding process and has potential applications in protein engineering and interpretation of time-dependent residue-based experimental observables for protein function.

  18. Side-gated ultrathin-channel nanopore FET sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Itaru; Haga, Takanobu; Ando, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Jiro; Mine, Toshiyuki; Ishida, Takeshi; Hatano, Toshiyuki; Akahori, Rena; Yokoi, Takahide; Anazawa, Takashi; Oura, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    A side-gated, ultrathin-channel nanopore FET (SGNAFET) is proposed for fast and label-free DNA sequencing. The concept of the SGNAFET comprises the detection of changes in the channel current during DNA translocation through a nanopore and identifying the four types of nucleotides as a result of these changes. To achieve this goal, both p- and n-type SGNAFETs with a channel thicknesses of 2 or 4 nm were fabricated, and the stable transistor operation of both SGNAFETs in air, water, and a KCl buffer solution were confirmed. In addition, synchronized current changes were observed between the ionic current through the nanopore and the SGNAFET’s drain current during DNA translocation through the nanopore. (paper)

  19. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammond, Deanne W; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E; Yin, Hang; Crowley, Michael F; Bomble, Yannick J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  20. Feasibility Studies of Alpha-Channeling in Mirror Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmoginov, A.I.; Fisch, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    The linear magnetic trap is an attractive concept both for fusion reactors and for other plasma applications due to its relative engineering simplicity and high-beta operation. Applying the α-channeling technique to linear traps, such as mirror machines, can benefit this concept by efficiently redirecting α particle energy to fuel ion heating or by otherwise sustaining plasma confinement, thus increasing the effective fusion reactivity. To identify waves suitable for α-channeling a rough optimization of the energy extraction rate with respect to the wave parameters is performed. After the optimal regime is identified, a systematic search for modes with similar parameters in mirror plasmas is performed, assuming quasi-longitudinal or quasi-transverse wave propagation. Several modes suitable for α particle energy extraction are identified for both reactor designs and for proof- of-principle experiments.

  1. The RCK1 high-affinity Ca2+ sensor confers carbon monoxide sensitivity to Slo1 BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shangwei; Xu, Rong; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2008-03-11

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a lethal gas, but it is also increasingly recognized as a physiological signaling molecule capable of regulating a variety of proteins. Among them, large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-gated K(+) (Slo1 BK) channels, important in vasodilation and neuronal firing, have been suggested to be directly stimulated by CO. However, the molecular mechanism of the stimulatory action of CO on the Slo1 BK channel has not been clearly elucidated. We report here that CO reliably and repeatedly activates Slo1 BK channels in excised membrane patches in the absence of Ca(2+) in a voltage-sensor-independent manner. The stimulatory action of CO on the Slo1 BK channel requires an aspartic acid and two histidine residues located in the cytoplasmic RCK1 domain, and the effect persists under the conditions known to inhibit the conventional interaction between CO and heme in other proteins. We propose that CO acts as a partial agonist for the high-affinity divalent cation sensor in the RCK1 domain of the Slo1 BK channel.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation of Kv1.3 channel is disregulated by adaptor proteins Grb10 and nShc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are important regulators of growth and regeneration, and acutely, they can modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Previously we have shown that acute brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activation of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB suppresses the Shaker voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3 via phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues in the N and C terminal aspects of the channel protein. It is not known how adaptor proteins, which lack catalytic activity, but interact with members of the neurotrophic signaling pathway, might scaffold with ion channels or modulate channel activity. Results We report the co-localization of two adaptor proteins, neuronal Src homology and collagen (nShc and growth factor receptor-binding protein 10 (Grb10, with Kv1.3 channel as demonstrated through immunocytochemical approaches in the olfactory bulb (OB neural lamina. To further explore the specificity and functional ramification of adaptor/channel co-localization, we performed immunoprecipitation and Western analysis of channel, kinase, and adaptor transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK 293. nShc formed a direct protein-protein interaction with Kv1.3 that was independent of BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3, whereas Grb10 did not complex with Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells. Both adaptors, however, co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.3 in native OB. Grb10 was interestingly able to decrease the total expression of Kv1.3, particularly at the membrane surface, and subsequently eliminated the BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3. To examine the possibility that the Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of Grb10 were directly binding to basally phosphorylated tyrosines in Kv1.3, we utilized point mutations to substitute multiple tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Removal of the tyrosines 111–113 and 449 prevented Grb10 from decreasing Kv1.3 expression. In the absence of either adaptor protein

  3. An Effective Channel Allocation Scheme to Reduce Co-Channel and Adjacent Channel Interference for WMN Backhaul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, S.; Ismaili, I.A.; Khuhawar, F.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Two folded work presents channel allocation scheme sustaining channel orthogonality and channel spacing to reduce CCI (Co-Channel Interference) and ACI (Adjacent Channel Interference) for inter flow of an intra-flow link. Proposed scheme as a part of radio resource allocation is applied on infrastructure based backhaul of wireless mesh network using directional antennas. The proposed approach is applied separately on 2.4 and 5GHz bands. Interference of connectivity graph is modelled by strongly connected directed graph and greedy algorithms are used for channel allocation. We have used OPNET Modeller suite to simulate network models for this research. The proposed arrangement reduces the channel interference and increases system throughput. In this research, the influence of channel is computed in terms of network throughput and delay. (author)

  4. Basolateral localisation of KCNQ1 potassium channels in MDCK cells: molecular identification of an N-terminal targeting motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Grunnet, Morten

    2004-01-01

    of the tyrosine residue at position 51 resulted in a non-polarized steady-state distribution of the channel. The importance of tyrosine 51 in basolateral localisation was emphasized by the fact that a short peptide comprising this tyrosine was able to redirect the p75 neurotrophin receptor, an otherwise apically...

  5. Angiotensin II stimulates basolateral 50-pS K channels in the thick ascending limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxiao; Luan, Haiyan; Wu, Peng; Fan, Lili; Wang, Lijun; Duan, Xinpeng; Zhang, Dandan; Wang, Wen-Hui; Gu, Ruimin

    2014-03-01

    We used the patch-clamp technique to examine the effect of angiotensin II (ANG II) on the basolateral K channels in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the rat kidney. Application of ANG II increased the channel activity and the current amplitude of the basolateral 50-pS K channel. The stimulatory effect of ANG II on the K channels was completely abolished by losartan, an inhibitor of type 1 angiotensin receptor (AT1R), but not by PD123319, an AT2R antagonist. Moreover, inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) also abrogated the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the basolateral K channels in the TAL. This suggests that the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the K channels was induced by activating PLC and PKC pathways. Western blotting demonstrated that ANG II increased the phosphorylation of c-Src at tyrosine residue 416, an indication of c-Src activation. This effect was mimicked by PKC stimulator but abolished by calphostin C. Moreover, inhibition of NADPH oxidase (NOX) also blocked the effect of ANG II on c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation. The role of Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in mediating the effect of ANG II on the basolateral K channel was further suggested by the experiments in which inhibition of SFK abrogated the stimulatory effect of ANG II on the basolateral 50-pS K channel. We conclude that ANG II increases basolateral 50-pS K channel activity via AT1R and that activation of AT1R stimulates SFK by a PLC-PKC-NOX-dependent mechanism.

  6. Assessment of effect of SSSC stabilizer in different control channels on damping inter-area oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakarami, M.R., E-mail: shakarami@iust.ac.i [Centre of Excellence for Power System Automation and Operation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemi, A. [Centre of Excellence for Power System Automation and Operation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    A static synchronous series compensator (SSSC) is one of the series flexible ac transmission system (FACTS) devices that injects a balanced three-phase voltage in quadrature with the transmission line current. There are two channels for controlling of phase and magnitude of the voltage. When the SSSC is used for damping of inter-area oscillations, a SSSC-based stabilizer can be included in both channels. In this paper, the best location and suitable input control signal for SSSC in order to enhance the damping of inter-area oscillations are selected by residue analysis. A method by quadratic mathematic programming has been presented to the design of the stabilizer. By this method, the effect of the stabilizer in both control channels of the SSSC on damping of inter-area oscillations has been assessed. By considering the gain of stabilizer as a criterion, obtained results from studying on a small and a large multi-machine power system show that the stabilizer in the phase control channel is more effective for damping inter-are oscillations.

  7. Residual Stress Analysis of Severe Plastic Deformed Materials using the Finite Element Method and the Neutron Diffraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mi Hyun; Seong, Back Suck; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2009-01-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) is one of the most promising top-down techniques, moving towards industrialization to fabricate bulk ultrafine grain materials. The strain distribution and deformation behavior during the ECAP (equal channel angular pressing), influenced by tool angles, friction and material behavior, was studied through experimental and numerical analyses. The residual stress of work piece which was straight before ECAP produces many serious problems in the next processing e.g. input of the work piece for the next ECAP. The bent work piece needs additional straightening or surface polishing even if the amount of bending is small, and residual stress need to be released before service applications. Residual stress, particularly tensile residual stress can be a very important factor in affecting the reliability and integrity of working parts. The formation of tensile residual stress may result in initiation of fatigue cracks, stress corrosion cracking, or other types of fracture. Hence, residual stress and resulting bending need to be controlled during ECAP. Thus, in current study the bending behavior and the residual stress of the work piece in ECAP are analyzed through experimental and finite element analyses by considering the effects of material, geometric, and processing parameters individually. The stress states in the ECAP processed work piece were measured by the non-destructive way using neutron diffraction. Efforts were made to suggest the alternate routes to reduce the residual stress and bending of work piece in ECAP

  8. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren, E-mail: hxr_nwnu@163.com; Sun, Jian-An, E-mail: sunja@nwnu.edu.cn; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-07-12

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam. - Highlights: • Some behaviors for Gaussian laser are also found for q-Gaussian one. • The parameter regions corresponding to different laser behaviors are given. • Influence of q on the laser propagation behavior is obvious. • The q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than the Gaussian one.

  9. Effects of relativistic and channel focusing on q-Gaussian laser beam propagating in a preformed parabolic plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Hong, Xue-Ren; Sun, Jian-An; Tang, Rong-An; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Tian, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of q-Gaussian laser beam in a preformed plasma channel is investigated by means of the variational method. A differential equation for the spot size has been obtained by including the effects of relativistic self-focusing, ponderomotive self-channeling and preformed channel focusing. The propagation behaviors and their corresponding physical conditions are identified. The comparison of the propagation between q-Gaussian and Gaussian laser beams is done by theoretical and numerical analysis. It is shown that, in the same channel, the focusing power of q-Gaussian laser beam is lower than that of Gaussian laser beam, i.e., the q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than Gaussian laser beam. - Highlights: • Some behaviors for Gaussian laser are also found for q-Gaussian one. • The parameter regions corresponding to different laser behaviors are given. • Influence of q on the laser propagation behavior is obvious. • The q-Gaussian laser beam is easier to focus than the Gaussian one.

  10. Identification of mannose interacting residues using local composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Agarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose binding proteins (MBPs play a vital role in several biological functions such as defense mechanisms. These proteins bind to mannose on the surface of a wide range of pathogens and help in eliminating these pathogens from our body. Thus, it is important to identify mannose interacting residues (MIRs in order to understand mechanism of recognition of pathogens by MBPs. RESULTS: This paper describes modules developed for predicting MIRs in a protein. Support vector machine (SVM based models have been developed on 120 mannose binding protein chains, where no two chains have more than 25% sequence similarity. SVM models were developed on two types of datasets: 1 main dataset consists of 1029 mannose interacting and 1029 non-interacting residues, 2 realistic dataset consists of 1029 mannose interacting and 10320 non-interacting residues. In this study, firstly, we developed standard modules using binary and PSSM profile of patterns and got maximum MCC around 0.32. Secondly, we developed SVM modules using composition profile of patterns and achieved maximum MCC around 0.74 with accuracy 86.64% on main dataset. Thirdly, we developed a model on a realistic dataset and achieved maximum MCC of 0.62 with accuracy 93.08%. Based on this study, a standalone program and web server have been developed for predicting mannose interacting residues in proteins (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/premier/. CONCLUSIONS: Compositional analysis of mannose interacting and non-interacting residues shows that certain types of residues are preferred in mannose interaction. It was also observed that residues around mannose interacting residues have a preference for certain types of residues. Composition of patterns/peptide/segment has been used for predicting MIRs and achieved reasonable high accuracy. It is possible that this novel strategy may be effective to predict other types of interacting residues. This study will be useful in annotating the function

  11. Improving the service life and performance of CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, A.R.; Cheadle, B.A.; Coleman, C.E.; Price, E.G.

    1996-02-01

    The development objective for CANDU fuel channels is to produce a design that can operate for 40 years at 90% capacity. Steady progress toward this objective is being made. The factors that determine the life of a CANDU fuel channel are reviewed and the processes necessary to achieve the objectives identified. Performance of future fuel channels will be enhanced by reduced operating costs, increased safety margins to postulated accident conditions, and reduced retubing costs compared with those for current channels. The approaches to these issues are discussed briefly in this report. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  12. Direct Binding between Pre-S1 and TRP-like Domains in TRPP Channels Mediates Gating and Functional Regulation by PIP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wang; Cai, Ruiqi; Hofmann, Laura; Nesin, Vasyl; Hu, Qiaolin; Long, Wentong; Fatehi, Mohammad; Liu, Xiong; Hussein, Shaimaa; Kong, Tim; Li, Jingru; Light, Peter E; Tang, Jingfeng; Flockerzi, Veit; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2018-02-06

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are regulated by diverse stimuli comprising thermal, chemical, and mechanical modalities. They are also commonly regulated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), with underlying mechanisms largely unknown. We here revealed an intramolecular interaction of the TRPP3 N and C termini (N-C) that is functionally essential. The interaction was mediated by aromatic Trp81 in pre-S1 domain and cationic Lys568 in TRP-like domain. Structure-function analyses revealed similar N-C interaction in TRPP2 as well as TRPM8/-V1/-C4 via highly conserved tryptophan and lysine/arginine residues. PIP2 bound to cationic residues in TRPP3, including K568, thereby disrupting the N-C interaction and negatively regulating TRPP3. PIP2 had similar negative effects on TRPP2. Interestingly, we found that PIP2 facilitates the N-C interaction in TRPM8/-V1, resulting in channel potentiation. The intramolecular N-C interaction might represent a shared mechanism underlying the gating and PIP2 regulation of TRP channels. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of color-coded sleeve shutters accelerates oscillograph channel selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchlas, T.; Bowden, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Sleeve-type shutters mechanically adjust individual galvanometer light beams onto or away from selected channels on oscillograph papers. In complex test setups, the sleeve-type shutters are color coded to separately identify each oscillograph channel. This technique could be used on any equipment using tubular galvanometer light sources.

  14. Logarithmic residues of analytic Banach algebra valued functions possessing a simply meromorphic inverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bart (Harm); T. Ehrhardt; B. Silbermann

    2001-01-01

    textabstractA logarithmic residue is a contour integral of a logarithmic derivative (left or right) of an analytic Banach algebra valued function. For functions possessing a meromorphic inverse with simple poles only, the logarithmic residues are identified as the sums of idempotents. With the help

  15. Residual biomass resources for energy production. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevot, G.

    2010-06-01

    This report covers the whole problematic of energy production from biomass residues in France except the production of biofuels. It is made of two parts. The first one gives an overview of the availability of residual biomass resources, The concept of residue (or waste) is placed in its economic and regulatory context (the major part of the resource cannot be considered as waste without any further potential use). The conditions of availability of the resource for each market segment are identified. The second part describes the conditions for the use of 5 different conversion options of these residues into energy. The logistics constraints for the procurement of the fuel and the intermediate operations to prepare it are briefly summarised. The objective was the identification of key issues in all relevant aspects, without giving too much emphasis to one of them at the expense of another one in order to avoid duplicating the frequent cases of facilities that do not meet environmental and economic targets because the designers of the system have not paid enough attention to a parameter of the system. (author)

  16. SK2 channels regulate mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honrath, Birgit; Matschke, Lina; Meyer, Tammo; Magerhans, Lena; Perocchi, Fabiana; Ganjam, Goutham K; Zischka, Hans; Krasel, Cornelius; Gerding, Albert; Bakker, Barbara M; Bünemann, Moritz; Strack, Stefan; Decher, Niels; Culmsee, Carsten; Dolga, Amalia M

    Mitochondrial calcium ([Ca(2+)]m) overload and changes in mitochondrial metabolism are key players in neuronal death. Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels provide protection in different paradigms of neuronal cell death. Recently, SK channels were identified at the inner

  17. Chemical analysis of solid residue from liquid and solid fuel combustion: Method development and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkmic, M. [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecturek Zagreb (Croatia); Curkovic, L. [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Zagreb (Croatia); Asperger, D. [HEP-Proizvodnja, Thermal Power Plant Department, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-06-15

    This paper deals with the development and validation of methods for identifying the composition of solid residue after liquid and solid fuel combustion in thermal power plant furnaces. The methods were developed for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer analysis. Due to the fuels used, the different composition and the location of creation of solid residue, it was necessary to develop two methods. The first method is used for identifying solid residue composition after fuel oil combustion (Method 1), while the second method is used for identifying solid residue composition after the combustion of solid fuels, i. e. coal (Method 2). Method calibration was performed on sets of 12 (Method 1) and 6 (Method 2) certified reference materials (CRM). CRMs and analysis test samples were prepared in pellet form using hydraulic press. For the purpose of method validation the linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity were determined, and the measurement uncertainty of methods for each analyte separately was assessed. The methods were applied in the analysis of real furnace residue samples. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Opportunities and Barriers to Resource Recovery and Recycling from Shredder Residue in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Naren; Apelian, Diran

    2014-11-01

    Shredder residue is the by-product remaining after ferrous and nonferrous metals have been recovered from the processing of vehicles, white goods, and peddler scrap. Shredder residue consists of glass, plastics, rubber, dirt, and small amounts of metal. It is estimated that 5-7 million tons of this shredder residue are landfilled each year in the United States. Technical advancements, coupled with European Union directives and the economic climate, have transformed the recycling of shredder residue in Europe. In the United States, however, regulatory controls and the cheap cost of landfill have worked against the advancement of recycling and recovery of this resource. The Argonne National Laboratory, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, has investigated the effectiveness of recycling shredder residue into polymers. Other research has examined the use of shredder residue in waste-to-energy applications. To improve our ability to process and recycle shredder residue, an investigation of the regulatory, economic, and technological challenges was undertaken. The objective was to conduct a comprehensive review of work done to date, to document the composition of typical shredder output and to identify potential recoverable items (residual metals, plastics, rubber, foam, etc.). Along with uncovering potential new markets, the research would identify the technical, regulatory, and economic barriers to developing those markets.

  19. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  20. HPLC identification of isoniazid residues in bovine milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite R.M.H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC was used for the identification of isoniazid (isonicotinic acid hydrazide in the milk of cattle treated with a dose of 25 mg/kg/day in alternated days. The effect of milk pasteurization on the isoniazid residue concentration was also studied. The drug excretion presented a cyclic variation, with higher levels in the first day after administration (aa, a mean of 1104.48µg/l, and a decrease two days aa, with a mean of 104.12µg/l. Four days after the last administration of the drug it was not possible to identify residues of isoniazid in the milk of treated animals. Body weight and milk yield influenced the amount of the excreted drug, and pasteurization decreased (mean 47.07% the concentration of isoniazid residue in milk.

  1. Structural and sequence features of two residue turns in beta-hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Bharat; Seo, Sung Yong; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2014-09-01

    Beta-turns in beta-hairpins have been implicated as important sites in protein folding. In particular, two residue β-turns, the most abundant connecting elements in beta-hairpins, have been a major target for engineering protein stability and folding. In this study, we attempted to investigate and update the structural and sequence properties of two residue turns in beta-hairpins with a large data set. For this, 3977 beta-turns were extracted from 2394 nonhomologous protein chains and analyzed. First, the distribution, dihedral angles and twists of two residue turn types were determined, and compared with previous data. The trend of turn type occurrence and most structural features of the turn types were similar to previous results, but for the first time Type II turns in beta-hairpins were identified. Second, sequence motifs for the turn types were devised based on amino acid positional potentials of two-residue turns, and their distributions were examined. From this study, we could identify code-like sequence motifs for the two residue beta-turn types. Finally, structural and sequence properties of beta-strands in the beta-hairpins were analyzed, which revealed that the beta-strands showed no specific sequence and structural patterns for turn types. The analytical results in this study are expected to be a reference in the engineering or design of beta-hairpin turn structures and sequences. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A survey of residual analysis and a new test of residual trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, J J; Calvin, Olivia L; Klapes, Bryan

    2016-05-01

    A survey of residual analysis in behavior-analytic research reveals that existing methods are problematic in one way or another. A new test for residual trends is proposed that avoids the problematic features of the existing methods. It entails fitting cubic polynomials to sets of residuals and comparing their effect sizes to those that would be expected if the sets of residuals were random. To this end, sampling distributions of effect sizes for fits of a cubic polynomial to random data were obtained by generating sets of random standardized residuals of various sizes, n. A cubic polynomial was then fitted to each set of residuals and its effect size was calculated. This yielded a sampling distribution of effect sizes for each n. To test for a residual trend in experimental data, the median effect size of cubic-polynomial fits to sets of experimental residuals can be compared to the median of the corresponding sampling distribution of effect sizes for random residuals using a sign test. An example from the literature, which entailed comparing mathematical and computational models of continuous choice, is used to illustrate the utility of the test. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  3. A MHD channel study for the ETF conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. Y.; Staiger, P. J.; Smith, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The procedures and computations used to identify an MHD channel for a 540 mW(I) EFT-scale plant are presented. Under the assumed constraints of maximum E(x), E(y), J(y) and Beta; results show the best plant performance is obtained for active length, L is approximately 12 M, whereas in the initial ETF studies, L is approximately 16 M. As MHD channel length is reduced from 16 M, the channel enthalpy extraction falls off, slowly. This tends to reduce the MHD power output; however, the shorter channels result in lower heat losses to the MHD channel cooling water which allows for the incorporation of more low pressure boiler feedwater heaters into the system and an increase in steam plant efficiency. The net result of these changes is a net increase in the over all MHD/steam plant efficiency. In addition to the sensitivity of various channel parameters, the trade-offs between the level of oxygen enrichment and the electrical stress on the channel are also discussed.

  4. Logarithmic residues of analytic Banach algebra valued functions possessing a simply meromorphic inverse

    OpenAIRE

    Bart, Harm; Ehrhardt, T.; Silbermann, B.

    2001-01-01

    textabstractA logarithmic residue is a contour integral of a logarithmic derivative (left or right) of an analytic Banach algebra valued function. For functions possessing a meromorphic inverse with simple poles only, the logarithmic residues are identified as the sums of idempotents. With the help of this observation, the issue of left versus right logarithmic residues is investigated, both for connected and nonconnected underlying Cauchy domains. Examples are given to elucidate the subject ...

  5. To4, the first Tityus obscurus β-toxin fully electrophysiologically characterized on human sodium channel isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Harry Morales; Mourão, Caroline Barbosa Farias; Tibery, Diogo Vieira; Barbosa, Eder Alves; Campos, Leandro Ambrósio; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni

    2017-09-01

    Many scorpion toxins that act on sodium channels (NaScTxs) have been characterized till date. These toxins may act modulating the inactivation or the activation of sodium channels and are named α- or β-types, respectively. Some venom toxins from Tityus obscurus (Buthidae), a scorpion widely distributed in the Brazilian Amazon, have been partially characterized in previous studies; however, little information about their electrophysiological role on sodium ion channels has been published. In the present study, we describe the purification, identification and electrophysiological characterization of a NaScTx, which was first described as Tc54 and further fully sequenced and renamed To4. This toxin shows a marked β-type effect on different sodium channel subtypes (hNa v 1.1-hNa v 1.7) at low concentrations, and has more pronounced activity on hNa v 1.1, hNa v 1.2 and hNa v 1.4. By comparing To4 primary structure with other Tityus β-toxins which have already been electrophysiologically tested, it is possible to establish some key amino acid residues for the sodium channel activity. Thus, To4 is the first toxin from T. obscurus fully electrophysiologically characterized on different human sodium channel isoforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. IT IN COMMERCE: E-COMMERCE AND OMNI-CHANNEL SALES IN RUSSIA

    OpenAIRE

    PHILIPP A. ANTIPIN

    2017-01-01

    The article discusses the use of information technologies and possibilities provided by the Internet in commerce. The global and European experience of omni-channel sales is discussed. The prospects and conditions of the development of e-commerce and omni-channel sales are identified.

  7. Identification of a tetrameric assembly domain in the C terminus of heat-activated TRPV1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Shuang; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei

    2011-04-29

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as cellular sensors are thought to function as tetramers. Yet, the molecular determinants governing channel multimerization remain largely elusive. Here we report the identification of a segment comprising 21 amino acids (residues 752-772 of mouse TRPV1) after the known TRP-like domain in the channel C terminus that functions as a tetrameric assembly domain (TAD). Purified recombinant C-terminal proteins of TRPV1-4, but not the N terminus, mediated the protein-protein interaction in an in vitro pulldown assay. Western blot analysis combined with electrophysiology and calcium imaging demonstrated that TAD exerted a robust dominant-negative effect on wild-type TRPV1. When fused with the membrane-tethered peptide Gap43, the TAD blocked the formation of stable homomultimers. Calcium imaging and current recordings showed that deletion of the TAD in a poreless TRPV1 mutant subunit suppressed its dominant-negative phenotype, confirming the involvement of the TAD in assembly of functional channels. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal TAD in TRPV1 channels functions as a domain that is conserved among TRPV1-4 and mediates a direct subunit-subunit interaction for tetrameric assembly.

  8. Transform domain Wyner-Ziv video coding with refinement of noise residue and side information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2010-01-01

    are successively updating the estimated noise residue for noise modeling and side information frame quality during decoding. Experimental results show that the proposed decoder can improve the Rate- Distortion (RD) performance of a state-of-the-art Wyner Ziv video codec for the set of test sequences.......Distributed Video Coding (DVC) is a video coding paradigm which mainly exploits the source statistics at the decoder based on the availability of side information at the decoder. This paper considers feedback channel based Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) DVC. The coding efficiency of TDWZ video...... coding does not match that of conventional video coding yet, mainly due to the quality of side information and inaccurate noise estimation. In this context, a novel TDWZ video decoder with noise residue refinement (NRR) and side information refinement (SIR) is proposed. The proposed refinement schemes...

  9. Dopamine negatively modulates the NCA ion channels in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalidou, Irini; Cooper, Kirsten; Pereira, Laura; Ailion, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The NALCN/NCA ion channel is a cation channel related to voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. NALCN has been reported to be a sodium leak channel with a conserved role in establishing neuronal resting membrane potential, but its precise cellular role and regulation are unclear. The Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of NALCN, NCA-1 and NCA-2, act in premotor interneurons to regulate motor circuit activity that sustains locomotion. Recently we found that NCA-1 and NCA-2 are activated by a signal transduction pathway acting downstream of the heterotrimeric G protein Gq and the small GTPase Rho. Through a forward genetic screen, here we identify the GPCR kinase GRK-2 as a new player affecting signaling through the Gq-Rho-NCA pathway. Using structure-function analysis, we find that the GPCR phosphorylation and membrane association domains of GRK-2 are required for its function. Genetic epistasis experiments suggest that GRK-2 acts on the D2-like dopamine receptor DOP-3 to inhibit Go signaling and positively modulate NCA-1 and NCA-2 activity. Through cell-specific rescuing experiments, we find that GRK-2 and DOP-3 act in premotor interneurons to modulate NCA channel function. Finally, we demonstrate that dopamine, through DOP-3, negatively regulates NCA activity. Thus, this study identifies a pathway by which dopamine modulates the activity of the NCA channels.

  10. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  11. Drug and chemical residues in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussman, H C

    1975-02-01

    Given the large number of chemical substances that may find their way into the food supply, a system is needed to monitor their presence. The U. S. Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Inspection Program routinely tests for chemical residues in animals coming to slaughter. Pesticides, heavy metals, growth promotants (hormones and hormonelike agents), and antibiotics are included. Samples are taken statistically so that inferences as to national incidence of residues can be drawn. When a problem is identified, a more selective sampling is designed to help follow up on the initial regulatory action. In testing for pesticides, only DDT and dieldrin are found with any frequency and their levels are decreasing; violative residues of any chlorinated hydrocarbon are generally a result of an industrial accident rather than agricultural usage. Analyses for heavy metals have revealed detectable levels of mercury, lead, and others, but none at levels that are considered a health hazard. Of the hormone or hormonelike substances, only diethylstilbestrol has been a residue problem and its future is uncertain. The most extensive monitoring for veterinary drugs is on the antimicrobials, including sulfonamides, streptomycin, and the tetracycline group of antibiotics that constitute the bulk of the violations; their simultaneous use prophylactically and therapeutically has contributed to the problem in certain cases. A strong, well-designed user education program on proper application of pesticides, chemicals, and veterinary drugs appears to be one method of reducing the incidence of unwanted residues.

  12. Pesticide residues and bees--a risk assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sanchez-Bayo

    Full Text Available Bees are essential pollinators of many plants in natural ecosystems and agricultural crops alike. In recent years the decline and disappearance of bee species in the wild and the collapse of honey bee colonies have concerned ecologists and apiculturalists, who search for causes and solutions to this problem. Whilst biological factors such as viral diseases, mite and parasite infections are undoubtedly involved, it is also evident that pesticides applied to agricultural crops have a negative impact on bees. Most risk assessments have focused on direct acute exposure of bees to agrochemicals from spray drift. However, the large number of pesticide residues found in pollen and honey demand a thorough evaluation of all residual compounds so as to identify those of highest risk to bees. Using data from recent residue surveys and toxicity of pesticides to honey and bumble bees, a comprehensive evaluation of risks under current exposure conditions is presented here. Standard risk assessments are complemented with new approaches that take into account time-cumulative effects over time, especially with dietary exposures. Whilst overall risks appear to be low, our analysis indicates that residues of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides pose the highest risk by contact exposure of bees with contaminated pollen. However, the synergism of ergosterol inhibiting fungicides with those two classes of insecticides results in much higher risks in spite of the low prevalence of their combined residues. Risks by ingestion of contaminated pollen and honey are of some concern for systemic insecticides, particularly imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, chlorpyrifos and the mixtures of cyhalothrin and ergosterol inhibiting fungicides. More attention should be paid to specific residue mixtures that may result in synergistic toxicity to bees.

  13. Multiple roles of the extracellular vestibule amino acid residues in the function of the rat P2X4 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos B Rokic

    Full Text Available The binding of ATP to trimeric P2X receptors (P2XR causes an enlargement of the receptor extracellular vestibule, leading to opening of the cation-selective transmembrane pore, but specific roles of vestibule amino acid residues in receptor activation have not been evaluated systematically. In this study, alanine or cysteine scanning mutagenesis of V47-V61 and F324-N338 sequences of rat P2X4R revealed that V49, Y54, Q55, F324, and G325 mutants were poorly responsive to ATP and trafficking was only affected by the V49 mutation. The Y54F and Y54W mutations, but not the Y54L mutation, rescued receptor function, suggesting that an aromatic residue is important at this position. Furthermore, the Y54A and Y54C receptor function was partially rescued by ivermectin, a positive allosteric modulator of P2X4R, suggesting a rightward shift in the potency of ATP to activate P2X4R. The Q55T, Q55N, Q55E, and Q55K mutations resulted in non-responsive receptors and only the Q55E mutant was ivermectin-sensitive. The F324L, F324Y, and F324W mutations also rescued receptor function partially or completely, ivermectin action on channel gating was preserved in all mutants, and changes in ATP responsiveness correlated with the hydrophobicity and side chain volume of the substituent. The G325P mutant had a normal response to ATP, suggesting that G325 is a flexible hinge. A topological analysis revealed that the G325 and F324 residues disrupt a β-sheet upon ATP binding. These results indicate multiple roles of the extracellular vestibule amino acid residues in the P2X4R function: the V49 residue is important for receptor trafficking to plasma membrane, the Y54 and Q55 residues play a critical role in channel gating and the F324 and G325 residues are critical for vestibule widening.

  14. Evolutionary and Structural Perspectives of Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Cation Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Kira Zelman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ligand-gated cation channels are a frequent component of signaling cascades in eukaryotes. Eukaryotes contain numerous diverse gene families encoding ion channels, some of which are shared and some of which are unique to particular kingdoms. Among the many different types are cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs. CNGCs are cation channels with varying degrees of ion conduction selectivity. They are implicated in numerous signaling pathways and permit diffusion of divalent and monovalent cations, including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD and a calmodulin binding domain (CaMBD as well as a 6 transmembrane/1 pore tertiary structure. This review summarizes existing knowledge about the functional domains present in these cation-conducting channels, and considers the evidence indicating that plant and animal CNGCs evolved separately. Additionally, an amino acid motif that is only found in the phosphate binding cassette and hinge regions of plant CNGCs, and is present in all experimentally confirmed CNGCs but no other channels was identified. This CNGC-specific amino acid motif provides an additional diagnostic tool to identify plant CNGCs, and can increase confidence in the annotation of open reading frames in newly sequenced genomes as putative CNGCs. Conversely, the absence of the motif in some plant sequences currently identified as probable CNGCs may suggest that they are misannotated or protein fragments.

  15. Evolutionary and structural perspectives of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2012-05-29

    Ligand-gated cation channels are a frequent component of signaling cascades in eukaryotes. Eukaryotes contain numerous diverse gene families encoding ion channels, some of which are shared and some of which are unique to particular kingdoms. Among the many different types are cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs). CNGCs are cation channels with varying degrees of ion conduction selectivity. They are implicated in numerous signaling pathways and permit diffusion of divalent and monovalent cations, including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain and a calmodulin binding domain as well as a six transmembrane/one pore tertiary structure. This review summarizes existing knowledge about the functional domains present in these cation-conducting channels, and considers the evidence indicating that plant and animal CNGCs evolved separately. Additionally, an amino acid motif that is only found in the phosphate binding cassette and hinge regions of plant CNGCs, and is present in all experimentally confirmed CNGCs but no other channels was identified. This CNGC-specific amino acid motif provides an additional diagnostic tool to identify plant CNGCs, and can increase confidence in the annotation of open reading frames in newly sequenced genomes as putative CNGCs. Conversely, the absence of the motif in some plant sequences currently identified as probable CNGCs may suggest that they are misannotated or protein fragments. 2012 Zelman, Dawe, Gehring and Berkowitz.

  16. MMSE-NP-RISIC-Based Channel Equalization for MIMO-SC-FDE Troposcatter Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zedong Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of intersymbol interference (ISI on single-carrier frequency-domain equalization with multiple input multiple output (MIMO-SC-FDE troposcatter communication systems is severe. Most of the channel equalization methods fail to solve it completely. In this paper, given the disadvantages of the noise-predictive (NP MMSE-based and the residual intersymbol interference cancellation (RISIC equalization in the single input single output (SISO system, we focus on the combination of both equalization schemes mentioned above. After extending both of them into MIMO system for the first time, we introduce a novel MMSE-NP-RISIC equalization method for MIMO-SC-FDE troposcatter communication systems. Analysis and simulation results validate the performance of the proposed method in time-varying frequency-selective troposcatter channel at an acceptable computational complexity cost.

  17. Evaporation channel as a tool to study fission dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nitto, A.; Vardaci, E.; La Rana, G.; Nadtochy, P. N.; Prete, G.

    2018-03-01

    The dynamics of the fission process is expected to affect the evaporation residue cross section because of the fission hindrance due to the nuclear viscosity. Systems of intermediate fissility constitute a suitable environment for testing such hypothesis since they are characterized by evaporation residue cross sections comparable or larger than the fission ones. Observables related to emitted charged particles, due to their relatively high emission probability, can be used to put stringent constraints on models describing the excited nucleus decay and to recognize the effects of fission dynamics. In this work model simulations are compared with the experimental data collected via the 32S +100 Mo reaction at Elab = 200 MeV. Consequently we pointed out, exploring an extended set of evaporation channel observables, the limits of the statistical model and the large improvement obtained with a dynamical model. Moreover we stress the importance of using an apparatus covering a large fraction of 4π to extract observables. Finally, we discuss the opportunity to measure more sensitive observables by a new detection device in operation at LNL.

  18. Efficient identification of critical residues based only on protein structure by network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Cusack

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing number of published protein structures, and the fact that each protein's function relies on its three-dimensional structure, there is limited access to automatic programs used for the identification of critical residues from the protein structure, compared with those based on protein sequence. Here we present a new algorithm based on network analysis applied exclusively on protein structures to identify critical residues. Our results show that this method identifies critical residues for protein function with high reliability and improves automatic sequence-based approaches and previous network-based approaches. The reliability of the method depends on the conformational diversity screened for the protein of interest. We have designed a web site to give access to this software at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/jamming/. In summary, a new method is presented that relates critical residues for protein function with the most traversed residues in networks derived from protein structures. A unique feature of the method is the inclusion of the conformational diversity of proteins in the prediction, thus reproducing a basic feature of the structure/function relationship of proteins.

  19. Persistence of malathion residues in stored wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farghaly, M.; Zayed, S.M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The persistence of succinate- 14 C-malathion in stored wheat was investigated under local conditions during a storage period of 32 weeks. The insecticide penetrated readily into the seed and up to 16% of the applied dose was found to be bound after 32 weeks in storage. Total terminal residues declined to 9.3 and 21.0 mg/kg from initially applied doses of 12.2 and 24.4 mg/kg respectively. A small percentage of malaoxon was detected only during the early weeks after treatment (3-5%). Malathion was the major constituent of the extractable residues. In addition, seven degradation products were detected and identified. (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  20. A CACNA1C variant associated with reduced voltage-dependent inactivation, increased CaV1.2 channel window current, and arrhythmogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hennessey

    Full Text Available Mutations in CACNA1C that increase current through the CaV1.2 L-type Ca2+ channel underlie rare forms of long QT syndrome (LQTS, and Timothy syndrome (TS. We identified a variant in CACNA1C in a male child of Filipino descent with arrhythmias and extracardiac features by candidate gene sequencing and performed functional expression studies to electrophysiologically characterize the effects of the variant on CaV1.2 channels. As a baby, the subject developed seizures and displayed developmental delays at 30 months of age. At age 5 years, he displayed a QTc of 520 ms and experienced recurrent VT. Physical exam at 17 years of age was notable for microcephaly, short stature, lower extremity weakness and atrophy with hyperreflexia, spastic diplegia, multiple dental caries and episodes of rhabdomyolysis. Candidate gene sequencing identified a G>C transversion at position 5731 of CACNA1C (rs374528680 predicting a glycine>arginine substitution at residue 1911 (p.G1911R of CaV1.2. The allele frequency of this variant is 0.01 in Malays, but absent in 984 Caucasian alleles and in the 1000 genomes project. In electrophysiological analyses, the variant decreased voltage-dependent inactivation, thus causing a gain of function of CaV1.2. We also observed a negative shift of V1/2 of activation and positive shift of V1/2 of channel inactivation, resulting in an increase of the window current. Together, these suggest a gain-of-function effect on CaV1.2 and suggest increased susceptibility for arrhythmias in certain clinical settings. The p.G1911R variant was also identified in a case of sudden unexplained infant death (SUID, for which an increasing number of clinical observations have demonstrated can be associated with arrhythmogenic mutations in cardiac ion channels. In summary, the combined effects of the CACNA1C variant to diminish voltage-dependent inactivation of CaV1.2 and increase window current expand our appreciation of mechanisms by which a gain of

  1. Structures of Preferred Human IgV Genes-Based Protective Antibodies Identify How Conserved Residues Contact Diverse Antigens and Assign Source of Specificity to CDR3 Loop Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Steve; Thomson, Christy A; Risnes, Louise F; Dasgupta, Somnath; Smith, Kenneth; Schrader, John W; Pai, Emil F

    2016-06-01

    The human Ab response to certain pathogens is oligoclonal, with preferred IgV genes being used more frequently than others. A pair of such preferred genes, IGVK3-11 and IGVH3-30, contributes to the generation of protective Abs directed against the 23F serotype of the pneumonococcal capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae and against the AD-2S1 peptide of the gB membrane protein of human CMV. Structural analyses of Fab fragments of mAbs 023.102 and pn132p2C05 in complex with portions of the 23F polysaccharide revealed five germline-encoded residues in contact with the key component, l-rhamnose. In the case of the AD-2S1 peptide, the KE5 Fab fragment complex identified nine germline-encoded contact residues. Two of these germline-encoded residues, Arg91L and Trp94L, contact both the l-rhamnose and the AD-2S1 peptide. Comparison of the respective paratopes that bind to carbohydrate and protein reveals that stochastic diversity in both CDR3 loops alone almost exclusively accounts for their divergent specificity. Combined evolutionary pressure by human CMV and the 23F serotype of S. pneumoniae acted on the IGVK3-11 and IGVH3-30 genes as demonstrated by the multiple germline-encoded amino acids that contact both l-rhamnose and AD-2S1 peptide. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Analysis of twisted tape solutions for cooling of the residual ion dump of the ITER HNB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Guamán, Santiago, E-mail: santiago.ochoa@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Technical Physics, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hanke, Stefan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Technical Physics, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sartori, Emanuele; Palma, Mauro Dalla [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padua (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Due to manufacturing deviations, the cooling channels are made by double side drilling. • Twisted tapes with two different thicknesses are necessary for a better cooling performance. • The manufacturing of cooling channels and twisted tapes was demonstrated to be feasible. • The water critical heat flux safety margin is higher than 1.5 for the total channel length. • Geometry optimization shown better cooling performance and higher CHF safety margins. - Abstract: The ITER HNB residual ion dump is exposed to a heat load about 17 MW on the dump panels with a peak power density of 7 MW/m{sup 2}. Water flows through cooling channels, 2 m long and 14 mm diameter, realized by double side deep drilling. Unavoidable manufacturing deviations could generate a discontinuity at the channel length center. It is necessary to verify the influence of issues such as cavitation, fluid stagnation, low boiling margins, among others, in the cooling performance. Assuming worst case conditions, analytical and CFD methods showed a subcooled boiling operation with high safety margins to the water critical heat flux. Additionally, by analysing several thermo-hydraulic parameters, the twisted tape cross sections were optimized. Per cooling channel, two twisted tapes are inserted from the sides of the panels, thus, a study of a separation gap between them at the channel length center presented an optimal distance. This paper demonstrates that common machining techniques and drilling tolerances allow the manufacturing of panels able to withstand safely the required beam operation heat loads, even under worst case operation scenarios.

  3. Immunolocalization and expression of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in human myometrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Sofia T; Svalø, Julie; Nielsen, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK3) channels have been detected in human myometrium and we have previously shown a functional role of SK channels in human myometrium in vitro. The aims of this study were to identify the precise localization of SK3 channels and to quantify SK3 m....... This is the first report to provide evidence for a possible role of SK3 channels in human uterine telocytes....

  4. Role of TRP Channels in Dinoflagellate Mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, J B; Pierce, N T; Latz, M I

    2017-10-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are common components of mechanosensing pathways, mainly described in mammals and other multicellular organisms. To gain insight into the evolutionary origins of eukaryotic mechanosensory proteins, we investigated the involvement of TRP channels in mechanosensing in a unicellular eukaryotic protist, the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedra. BLASTP analysis of the protein sequences predicted from the L. polyedra transcriptome revealed six sequences with high similarity to human TRPM2, TRPM8, TRPML2, TRPP1, and TRPP2; and characteristic TRP domains were identified in all sequences. In a phylogenetic tree including all mammalian TRP subfamilies and TRP channel sequences from unicellular and multicellular organisms, the L. polyedra sequences grouped with the TRPM, TPPML, and TRPP clades. In pharmacological experiments, we used the intrinsic bioluminescence of L. polyedra as a reporter of mechanoresponsivity. Capsaicin and RN1734, agonists of mammalian TRPV, and arachidonic acid, an agonist of mammalian TRPV, TRPA, TRPM, and Drosophila TRP, all stimulated bioluminescence in L. polyedra. Mechanical stimulation of bioluminescence, but not capsaicin-stimulated bioluminescence, was inhibited by gadolinium (Gd 3+ ), a general inhibitor of mechanosensitive ion channels, and the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122. These pharmacological results are consistent with the involvement of TRP-like channels in mechanosensing by L. polyedra. The TRP channels do not appear to be mechanoreceptors but rather are components of the mechanotransduction signaling pathway and may be activated via a PLC-dependent mechanism. The presence and function of TRP channels in a dinoflagellate emphasize the evolutionary conservation of both the channel structures and their functions.

  5. Multi-channel imaging cytometry with a single detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locknar, Sarah; Barton, John; Entwistle, Mark; Carver, Gary; Johnson, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Multi-channel microscopy and multi-channel flow cytometry generate high bit data streams. Multiple channels (both spectral and spatial) are important in diagnosing diseased tissue and identifying individual cells. Omega Optical has developed techniques for mapping multiple channels into the time domain for detection by a single high gain, high bandwidth detector. This approach is based on pulsed laser excitation and a serial array of optical fibers coated with spectral reflectors such that up to 15 wavelength bins are sequentially detected by a single-element detector within 2.5 μs. Our multichannel microscopy system uses firmware running on dedicated DSP and FPGA chips to synchronize the laser, scanning mirrors, and sampling clock. The signals are digitized by an NI board into 14 bits at 60MHz - allowing for 232 by 174 pixel fields in up to 15 channels with 10x over sampling. Our multi-channel imaging cytometry design adds channels for forward scattering and back scattering to the fluorescence spectral channels. All channels are detected within the 2.5 μs - which is compatible with fast cytometry. Going forward, we plan to digitize at 16 bits with an A-toD chip attached to a custom board. Processing these digital signals in custom firmware would allow an on-board graphics processing unit to display imaging flow cytometry data over configurable scanning line lengths. The scatter channels can be used to trigger data buffering when a cell is present in the beam. This approach enables a low cost mechanically robust imaging cytometer.

  6. Citral Sensing by TRANSient Receptor Potential Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Stephanie C.; Vriens, Joris; Martyn, Derek; Clardy, Jon; Clapham, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels mediate key aspects of taste, smell, pain, temperature sensation, and pheromone detection. To deepen our understanding of TRP channel physiology, we require more diverse pharmacological tools. Citral, a bioactive component of lemongrass, is commonly used as a taste enhancer, as an odorant in perfumes, and as an insect repellent. Here we report that citral activates TRP channels found in sensory neurons (TRPV1 and TRPV3, TRPM8, and TRPA1), and produces long-lasting inhibition of TRPV1–3 and TRPM8, while transiently blocking TRPV4 and TRPA1. Sustained citral inhibition is independent of internal calcium concentration, but is state-dependent, developing only after TRP channel opening. Citral's actions as a partial agonist are not due to cysteine modification of the channels nor are they a consequence of citral's stereoisoforms. The isolated aldehyde and alcohol cis and trans enantiomers (neral, nerol, geranial, and geraniol) each reproduce citral's actions. In juvenile rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, prolonged citral inhibition of native TRPV1 channels enabled the separation of TRPV2 and TRPV3 currents. We find that TRPV2 and TRPV3 channels are present in a high proportion of these neurons (94% respond to 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate), consistent with our immunolabeling experiments and previous in situ hybridization studies. The TRPV1 activation requires residues in transmembrane segments two through four of the voltage-sensor domain, a region previously implicated in capsaicin activation of TRPV1 and analogous menthol activation of TRPM8. Citral's broad spectrum and prolonged sensory inhibition may prove more useful than capsaicin for allodynia, itch, or other types of pain involving superficial sensory nerves and skin. PMID:18461159

  7. Twenty-four-hour exposure to altered blood flow modifies endothelial Ca2+-activated K+ channels in rat mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilgers, Rob H P; Janssen, Ger M J; Fazzi, Gregorio E

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that changes in arterial blood flow modify the function of endothelial Ca2+-activated K+ channels [calcium-activated K+ channel (K(Ca)), small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel (SK3), and intermediate calcium-activated K+ channel (IK1)] before arterial structural...... remodeling. In rats, mesenteric arteries were exposed to increased [+90%, high flow (HF)] or reduced blood flow [-90%, low flow (LF)] and analyzed 24 h later. There were no detectable changes in arterial structure or in expression level of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase, SK3, or IK1. Arterial relaxing...... arteries, the balance between the NO/prostanoid versus EDHF response was unaltered. However, the contribution of IK1 to the EDHF response was enhanced, as indicated by a larger effect of TRAM-34 and a larger residual NS309-induced relaxation in the presence of UCL 1684. Reduction of blood flow selectively...

  8. Citral sensing by Transient [corrected] receptor potential channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Stephanie C; Vriens, Joris; Martyn, Derek; Clardy, Jon; Clapham, David E

    2008-05-07

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels mediate key aspects of taste, smell, pain, temperature sensation, and pheromone detection. To deepen our understanding of TRP channel physiology, we require more diverse pharmacological tools. Citral, a bioactive component of lemongrass, is commonly used as a taste enhancer, as an odorant in perfumes, and as an insect repellent. Here we report that citral activates TRP channels found in sensory neurons (TRPV1 and TRPV3, TRPM8, and TRPA1), and produces long-lasting inhibition of TRPV1-3 and TRPM8, while transiently blocking TRPV4 and TRPA1. Sustained citral inhibition is independent of internal calcium concentration, but is state-dependent, developing only after TRP channel opening. Citral's actions as a partial agonist are not due to cysteine modification of the channels nor are they a consequence of citral's stereoisoforms. The isolated aldehyde and alcohol cis and trans enantiomers (neral, nerol, geranial, and geraniol) each reproduce citral's actions. In juvenile rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, prolonged citral inhibition of native TRPV1 channels enabled the separation of TRPV2 and TRPV3 currents. We find that TRPV2 and TRPV3 channels are present in a high proportion of these neurons (94% respond to 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate), consistent with our immunolabeling experiments and previous in situ hybridization studies. The TRPV1 activation requires residues in transmembrane segments two through four of the voltage-sensor domain, a region previously implicated in capsaicin activation of TRPV1 and analogous menthol activation of TRPM8. Citral's broad spectrum and prolonged sensory inhibition may prove more useful than capsaicin for allodynia, itch, or other types of pain involving superficial sensory nerves and skin.

  9. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanne W Sammond

    Full Text Available Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  10. Citizens and service channels: channel choice and channel management implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterson, Willem Jan

    2010-01-01

    The arrival of electronic channels in the 1990s has had a huge impact on governmental service delivery. The new channels have led to many new opportunities to improve public service delivery, not only in terms of citizen satisfaction, but also in cost reduction for governmental agencies. However,

  11. Influence of Hot Implantation on Residual Radiation Damage in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawski, M.; Zuk, J.; Kulik, M.; Drozdziel, A.; Pyszniak, K.; Turek, M.; Lin, L.; Prucnal, S.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable thermomechanical and electrical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this material very attractive for high-temperature, high-power, and high-frequency applications. Because of very low values of diffusion coefficient of most impurities in SiC, ion implantation is the best method to selectively introduce dopants over well-defined depths in SiC. Aluminium is commonly used for creating p-type regions in SiC. However, post-implantation radiation damage, which strongly deteriorates required electric properties of the implanted layers, is difficult to anneal even at high temperatures because of remaining residual damage. Therefore implantation at elevated target temperatures (hot implantation) is nowadays an accepted method to decrease the level of the residual radiation damage by avoiding ion beam-induced amorphization. The main objective of this study is to compare the results of the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy with channeling and micro-Raman spectroscopy investigations of room temperature and 500 o C Al + ion implantation-induced damage in 6H-SiC and its removal by high temperature (up to 1600 o C) thermal annealing. (author)

  12. Relationship between hot spot residues and ligand binding hot spots in protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Brandon S; Hall, David R; Vajda, Sandor; Whitty, Adrian; Kozakov, Dima

    2012-08-27

    In the context of protein-protein interactions, the term "hot spot" refers to a residue or cluster of residues that makes a major contribution to the binding free energy, as determined by alanine scanning mutagenesis. In contrast, in pharmaceutical research, a hot spot is a site on a target protein that has high propensity for ligand binding and hence is potentially important for drug discovery. Here we examine the relationship between these two hot spot concepts by comparing alanine scanning data for a set of 15 proteins with results from mapping the protein surfaces for sites that can bind fragment-sized small molecules. We find the two types of hot spots are largely complementary; the residues protruding into hot spot regions identified by computational mapping or experimental fragment screening are almost always themselves hot spot residues as defined by alanine scanning experiments. Conversely, a residue that is found by alanine scanning to contribute little to binding rarely interacts with hot spot regions on the partner protein identified by fragment mapping. In spite of the strong correlation between the two hot spot concepts, they fundamentally differ, however. In particular, while identification of a hot spot by alanine scanning establishes the potential to generate substantial interaction energy with a binding partner, there are additional topological requirements to be a hot spot for small molecule binding. Hence, only a minority of hot spots identified by alanine scanning represent sites that are potentially useful for small inhibitor binding, and it is this subset that is identified by experimental or computational fragment screening.

  13. Immunohistochemical Localization of the Water Channels AQP4 and AQP5 in the Rat Pituitary Gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Inahata, Yuki; Sawai, Nobuhiko; Yang, Chun-Ying; Kobayashi, Makito; Takata, Kuniaki; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The pituitary gland is composed of the adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis. The adenohypophysis contains endocrine cells, folliculo-stellate (FS) cells, and marginal layer cells, whereas the neurohypophysis mainly comprises axons and pituicytes. To understand the molecular nature of water transfer in the pituitary gland, we examined the immunohistochemical localization of the membrane water channels aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and AQP5 in rat tissue. Double immunofluorescence analysis of AQP4 and S100 protein, a known marker for FS cells, marginal layer cells, and pituicytes, clearly revealed that FS cells and marginal layer cells in the adenohypophysis and the pituicytes in pars nervosa are positive for AQP4. AQP5 was found to be localized at the apical membrane in some marginal layer cells surrounding the Rathke’s residual pouch, in which AQP4 was observed to be localized on the basolateral membranes. These results suggest the following possibilities: 1) FS cells especially require water for their functions and 2) transepithelial water transfer could occur between the lumen of Rathke’s residual pouch and the interstitial fluid in the adenohypophysis through the AQP4 and AQP5 channels in the marginal layer cells

  14. A computational design approach for virtual screening of peptide interactions across K+ channel families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Doupnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels represent a large family of membrane proteins with many being well established targets in pharmacotherapy. The ‘druggability’ of heteromeric channels comprised of different subunits remains obscure, due largely to a lack of channel-specific probes necessary to delineate their therapeutic potential in vivo. Our initial studies reported here, investigated the family of inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir channels given the availability of high resolution crystal structures for the eukaryotic constitutively active Kir2.2 channel. We describe a ‘limited’ homology modeling approach that can yield chimeric Kir channels having an outer vestibule structure representing nearly any known vertebrate or invertebrate channel. These computationally-derived channel structures were tested in silico for ‘docking’ to NMR structures of tertiapin (TPN, a 21 amino acid peptide found in bee venom. TPN is a highly selective and potent blocker for the epithelial rat Kir1.1 channel, but does not block human or zebrafish Kir1.1 channel isoforms. Our Kir1.1 channel-TPN docking experiments recapitulated published in vitro findings for TPN-sensitive and TPN-insensitive channels. Additionally, in silico site-directed mutagenesis identified ‘hot spots’ within the channel outer vestibule that mediate energetically favorable docking scores and correlate with sites previously identified with in vitro thermodynamic mutant-cycle analysis. These ‘proof-of-principle’ results establish a framework for virtual screening of re-engineered peptide toxins for interactions with computationally derived Kir channels that currently lack channel-specific blockers. When coupled with electrophysiological validation, this virtual screening approach may accelerate the drug discovery process, and can be readily applied to other ion channels families where high resolution structures are available.

  15. Single-channel kinetics of BK (Slo1 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan eGeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-channel kinetics has proven a powerful tool to reveal information about the gating mechanisms that control the opening and closing of ion channels. This introductory review focuses on the gating of large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK or Slo1 channels at the single-channel level. It starts with single-channel current records and progresses to presentation and analysis of single-channel data and the development of gating mechanisms in terms of discrete state Markov (DSM models. The DSM models are formulated in terms of the tetrameric modular structure of BK channels, consisting of a central transmembrane pore-gate domain (PGD attached to four surrounding transmembrane voltage sensing domains (VSD and a large intracellular cytosolic domain (CTD, also referred to as the gating ring. The modular structure and data analysis shows that the Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating considered separately can each be approximated by 10-state two-tiered models with 5 closed states on the upper tier and 5 open states on the lower tier. The modular structure and joint Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating are consistent with a 50 state two-tiered model with 25 closed states on the upper tier and 25 open states on the lower tier. Adding an additional tier of brief closed (flicker states to the 10-state or 50-state models improved the description of the gating. For fixed experimental conditions a channel would gate in only a subset of the potential number of states. The detected number of states and the correlations between adjacent interval durations are consistent with the tiered models. The examined models can account for the single-channel kinetics and the bursting behavior of gating. Ca2+ and voltage activate BK channels by predominantly increasing the effective opening rate of the channel with a smaller decrease in the effective closing rate. Ca2+ and depolarization thus activate by mainly destabilizing the closed states.

  16. Sedimentary Facies Mapping Based on Tidal Channel Network and Topographic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J. H.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, K.; Kim, B.

    2015-12-01

    Tidal flats on the west coast of Korea suffer intensive changes in their surface sedimentary facies as a result of the influence of natural and artificial changes. Spatial relationships between surface sedimentary facies distribution and benthic environments were estimated for the open-type Ganghwa tidal flat and semi closed-type Hwangdo tidal flat, Korea. In this study, we standardized the surface sedimentary facies and tidal channel index of the channel density, distance, thickness and order. To extract tidal channel information, we used remotely sensed data, such as those from the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT)-2, KOMPSAT-3, and aerial photographs. Surface sedimentary facies maps were generated based on field data using an interpolation method.The tidal channels in each sediment facies had relatively constant meandering patterns, but the density and complexity were distinguishable. The second fractal dimension was 1.7-1.8 in the mud flat, about 1.4 in the mixed flat, and about 1.3 in the sand flat. The channel density was 0.03-0.06 m/m2 in the mud flat and less than 0.02 m/m2 in the mixed and sand flat areas of the two test areas. Low values of the tidal channel index, which indicated a simple pattern of tidal channel distribution, were identified at areas having low elevation and coarse-grained sediments. By contrast, high values of the tidal channel index, which indicated a dendritic pattern of tidal channel distribution, were identified at areas having high elevation and fine-grained sediments. Surface sediment classification based on remotely sensed data must circumspectly consider an effective critical grain size, water content, local topography, and intertidal structures.

  17. Bauxite and bauxite residue, characterization and electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, M.L.P.; Conceicao, F.T.; Toledo, S.P.; Kiyohara, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Through the Bayer process, bauxite is refined and alumina is produced. In this process, a highly alkaline residue, red mud is generated and its disposal represents an environmental problem. The aim of this paper is to present the characterization of Brazilian bauxite and Brazilian red mud by: X-ray diffraction, specific surface area, chemical composition analysis by ICP-MS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and discuss possible applications of this residue. The results identify as a constituent of both materials: Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and SiO 2 and the presence of Na 2 O in residue. The analysis by electron microscopy of Bauxite shows particles with hexagonal shape and red mud shows small particles size. (author)

  18. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Tramontano, Anna; Kryshtafovych, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures

  19. Consensus of sample-balanced classifiers for identifying ligand-binding residue by co-evolutionary physicochemical characteristics of amino acids

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is an important mechanism for some proteins to perform their functions, and those binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. So far, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known

  20. Block of GABA(A) receptor ion channel by penicillin: electrophysiological and modeling insights toward the mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossokhin, Alexey V; Sharonova, Irina N; Bukanova, Julia V; Kolbaev, Sergey N; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2014-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R) mainly mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Different classes of modulators target GABA(A)R properties. Penicillin G (PNG) belongs to the class of noncompetitive antagonists blocking the open GABA(A)R and is a prototype of β-lactam antibiotics. In this study, we combined electrophysiological and modeling approaches to investigate the peculiarities of PNG blockade of GABA-activated currents recorded from isolated rat Purkinje cells and to predict the PNG binding site. Whole-cell patch-сlamp recording and fast application system was used in the electrophysiological experiments. PNG block developed after channel activation and increased with membrane depolarization suggesting that the ligand binds within the open channel pore. PNG blocked stationary component of GABA-activated currents in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 value of 1.12mM at -70mV. The termination of GABA and PNG co-application was followed by a transient tail current. Protection of the tail current from bicuculline block and dependence of its kinetic parameters on agonist affinity suggest that PNG acts as a sequential open channel blocker that prevents agonist dissociation while the channel remains blocked. We built the GABA(A)R models based on nAChR and GLIC structures and performed an unbiased systematic search of the PNG binding site. Monte-Carlo energy minimization was used to find the lowest energy binding modes. We have shown that PNG binds close to the intracellular vestibule. In both models the maximum contribution to the energy of ligand-receptor interactions revealed residues located on the level of 2', 6' and 9' rings formed by a bundle of M2 transmembrane segments, indicating that these residues most likely participate in PNG binding. The predicted structural models support the described mechanism of PNG block. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A new candidate of calcium channel blocker in silico from Tectona grandis for treatment of gestational hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizah, A.; Suselo, Y. H.; Muthmainah, M.; Indarto, D.

    2018-05-01

    Gestational Hypertension is one of the three main causes of maternal mortality in Indonesia. Nifedipine which blockes the Cav1.2 calcium channel has frequently been used to treat gestational hypertension. However the efficacy of nifedipine has not been established yet and the prevalence of gestational hypertension is still high (27.1 %). Indonesian herbal plants have potential to be developed as natural drugs. Molecular docking, a computational method, is very often used to depict interaction between molecules and target receptor This study was therefore to identify Indonesian herbal plants that could inhibit the calcium channel in silico. This was a bioinformatics study with molecular docking approach. Three-dimensional structure of human calcium channel Cav1.2 was determined by modelling with rabbit calcium channel (ID:5GJW) as template and using the SWISS MODEL software. Nifedipine was used as a standard ligand and obtained from ZINC database with the access code ZINC19594578. Active compounds of Indonesian herbal plants were registered in HerbalDB database and their molecular structure was obtained from PubChem. Binding affinity of human Cav1.2 model-ligand complexes were assesed using AutoDock Vina 1.1.2 software and visualization of molecular conformation used Chimera 1.10 and PyMol 1.3 softwares. The Lipinsky’s rules of five were used to determine active compounds which fullfilled drug criteria. The human Cav1-2 model had 72.35% sequence identity with rabbit Cav1.1. Nifedipine bound to the human Cav1.2 model with -2.1 kcal/mol binding affinity and had binding sites at Gln1060, Phe1129, Ser1132, and Ile1173 residues. A lower binding affinity was observed in 8 phytochemicals but only obtusifolin 2-glucoside (-2.2 kcal/mol) had similar binding sites as nifedipin did. In addition, obtusifolin 2-glucoside met the Lipinsky criteria and the molecule conformation was similar with nifedipine. From the HerbalDB database, obtusifolin 2-glucoside is found in Tectona

  2. Improvement and Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modelling Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Weilin; Gunnars, Jens; Dong, Pingsha; Hong, Jeong K.

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this work is to identify and evaluate improvements for the residual stress modelling procedure currently used in Sweden. There is a growing demand to eliminate any unnecessary conservatism involved in residual stress assumptions. The study was focused on the development and validation of an improved weld residual stress modelling procedure, by taking advantage of the recent advances in residual stress modelling and stress measurement techniques. The major changes applied in the new weld residual stress modelling procedure are: - Improved procedure for heat source calibration based on use of analytical solutions. - Use of an isotropic hardening model where mixed hardening data is not available. - Use of an annealing model for improved simulation of strain relaxation in re-heated material. The new modelling procedure is demonstrated to capture the main characteristics of the through thickness stress distributions by validation to experimental measurements. Three austenitic stainless steel butt-welds cases are analysed, covering a large range of pipe geometries. From the cases it is evident that there can be large differences between the residual stresses predicted using the new procedure, and the earlier procedure or handbook recommendations. Previously recommended profiles could give misleading fracture assessment results. The stress profiles according to the new procedure agree well with the measured data. If data is available then a mixed hardening model should be used

  3. Utilization of organic residues using heterotrophic microalgae and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleissner, Daniel; Rumpold, Birgit A

    2018-02-01

    Various organic residues occur globally in the form of straw, wood, green biomass, food waste, feces, manure etc. Other utilization strategies apart from anaerobic digestion, composting and incineration are needed to make use of the whole potential of organic residues as sources of various value added compounds. This review compares the cultivation of heterotrophic microalgae and insects using organic residues as nutrient sources and illuminates their potential with regard to biomass production, productivity and yield, and utilization strategies of produced biomasses. Furthermore, cultivation processes as well as advantages and disadvantages of utilization processes are identified and discussed. It was shown that both heterotrophic algae and insects are able to reduce a sufficient amount of organic residues by converting it into biomass. The biomass composition of both organisms is similar which allows similar utilization strategies in food and feed, chemicals and materials productions. Even though insect is the more complex organism, biomass production can be carried out using simple equipment without sterilization and hydrolysis of organic residues. Contrarily, heterotrophic microalgae require a pretreatment of organic residues in form of sterilization and in most cases hydrolysis. Interestingly, the volumetric productivity of insect biomass exceeds the productivity of algal biomass. Despite legal restrictions, it is expected that microalgae and insects will find application as alternative food and feed sources in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Improvement and Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modelling Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Weilin; Gunnars, Jens (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Dong, Pingsha; Hong, Jeong K. (Center for Welded Structures Research, Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States))

    2009-06-15

    The objective of this work is to identify and evaluate improvements for the residual stress modelling procedure currently used in Sweden. There is a growing demand to eliminate any unnecessary conservatism involved in residual stress assumptions. The study was focused on the development and validation of an improved weld residual stress modelling procedure, by taking advantage of the recent advances in residual stress modelling and stress measurement techniques. The major changes applied in the new weld residual stress modelling procedure are: - Improved procedure for heat source calibration based on use of analytical solutions. - Use of an isotropic hardening model where mixed hardening data is not available. - Use of an annealing model for improved simulation of strain relaxation in re-heated material. The new modelling procedure is demonstrated to capture the main characteristics of the through thickness stress distributions by validation to experimental measurements. Three austenitic stainless steel butt-welds cases are analysed, covering a large range of pipe geometries. From the cases it is evident that there can be large differences between the residual stresses predicted using the new procedure, and the earlier procedure or handbook recommendations. Previously recommended profiles could give misleading fracture assessment results. The stress profiles according to the new procedure agree well with the measured data. If data is available then a mixed hardening model should be used

  5. Identification of Distribution Channels to Create Sustainable Vegetable Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aflit Nuryulia Praswati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The price of vegetables has a role as a contributor to the rate of inflation. Currently the number of vegetable production in Boyolali region can no longer meet the needs of local communities. The limited amount of vegetable production and the inhibition of the vegetable distribution channel creates a scarcity of vegetables that result in price increases. This study aims to identify the distribution channel and the formation of vegetable prices derived from Boyolali area. The method used in this research is quantitative and qualitative. Respondents from this study consisted of farmers, wholesalers, small trader and end consumers. The type of distribution channel prevailing in Boyolali area are traditional and modern distribution channels. Intermediate distribution channels play a greater role in determining vegetable prices. If farmers want to improve their economic condition, it needs innovation and creativity in the process of planting, harvesting, packaging and marketing vegetable products.

  6. An acid-sensing ion channel from shark (Squalus acanthias) mediates transient and sustained responses to protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springauf, Andreas; Gründer, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated Na(+) channels. They are implicated in synaptic transmission, detection of painful acidosis, and possibly sour taste. The typical ASIC current is a transient, completely desensitizing current that can be blocked by the diuretic amiloride. ASICs are present in chordates but are absent in other animals. They have been cloned from urochordates, jawless vertebrates, cartilaginous shark and bony fish, from chicken and different mammals. Strikingly, all ASICs that have so far been characterized from urochordates, jawless vertebrates and shark are not gated by protons, suggesting that proton gating evolved relatively late in bony fish and that primitive ASICs had a different and unknown gating mechanism. Recently, amino acids that are crucial for the proton gating of rat ASIC1a have been identified. These residues are completely conserved in shark ASIC1b (sASIC1b), prompting us to re-evaluate the proton sensitivity of sASIC1b. Here we show that, contrary to previous findings, sASIC1b is indeed gated by protons with half-maximal activation at pH 6.0. sASIC1b desensitizes quickly but incompletely, efficiently encoding transient as well as sustained proton signals. Our results show that the conservation of the amino acids crucial for proton gating can predict proton sensitivity of an ASIC and increase our understanding of the evolution of ASICs.

  7. Characterization and extraction of volatile compounds from pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merril processing residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lília Calheiros de Oliveira Barretto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to extract and identify volatile compounds from pineapple residues generated during concentrated juice processing. Distillates of pineapple residues were obtained using the following techniques: simple hydrodistillation and hydrodistillation by passing nitrogen gas. The volatile compounds present in the distillates were captured by the solid-phase microextraction technique. The volatile compounds were identified in a system of high resolution gas chromatography system coupled with mass spectrometry using a polyethylene glycol polar capillary column as stationary phase. The pineapple residues constituted mostly of esters (35%, followed by ketones (26%, alcohols (18%, aldehydes (9%, acids (3% and other compounds (9%. Odor-active volatile compounds were mainly identified in the distillate obtained using hydrodistillation by passing nitrogen gas, namely decanal, ethyl octanoate, acetic acid, 1-hexanol, and ketones such as γ-hexalactone, γ-octalactone, δ-octalactone, γ-decalactone, and γ-dodecalactone. This suggests that the use of an inert gas and lower temperatures helped maintain higher amounts of flavor compounds. These data indicate that pineapple processing residue contained important volatile compounds which can be extracted and used as aroma enhancing products and have high potential for the production of value-added natural essences.

  8. Inhibitory effects and mechanism of dihydroberberine on hERG channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahai Yu

    Full Text Available The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel conducts rapid delayed rectifier potassium currents (IKr and contributes to phase III cardiac action potential repolarization. Drugs inhibit hERG channels by binding to aromatic residues in hERG helixes. Berberine (BBR has multiple actions, and its hydrogenated derivative dihydroberberine (DHB is a potential candidate for developing new drugs. Previous studies have demonstrated that BBR blocks hERG channels and prolongs action potential duration (APD. Our present study aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of DHB on hERG channels. Protein expression and the hERG current were analyzed using western blotting and patch-clamp, respectively. DHB inhibited the hERG current concentration-dependently after instantaneous perfusion, accelerated channel inactivation by directly binding tyrosine (Tyr652 and phenylalanine (Phe656, and decreased mature (155-kDa and simultaneously increased immature (135-kDa hERG expression, respectively. This suggests disruption of forward trafficking of hERG channels. Besides, DHB remarkably reduced heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 expression and its interaction with hERG, indicating that DHB disrupted hERG trafficking by impairing channel folding. Meanwhie, DHB enhanced the expression of cleaved activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6, a biomarker of unfolded protein response (UPR. Expression of calnexin and calreticulin, chaperones activated by ATF-6 to facilitate channel folding, were also increased, which indicating UPR activation. Additionally, the degradation rate of mature 155-kDa hERG increased following DHB exposure. In conclusion, we demonstrated that DHB acutely blocked hERG channels by binding the aromatic Tyr652 and Phe656. DHB may decrease hERG plasma membrane expression through two pathways involving disruption of forward trafficking of immature hERG channels and enhanced degradation of mature hERG channels. Furthermore, forward trafficking was

  9. Identification of cyclic nucleotide gated channels using regular expressions

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2013-09-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are nonselective cation channels found in plants, animals, and some bacteria. They have a six-transmembrane/one- pore structure, a cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, and a cytosolic calmodulin-binding domain. Despite their functional similarities, the plant CNGC family members appear to have different conserved amino acid motifs within corresponding functional domains than animal and bacterial CNGCs do. Here we describe the development and application of methods employing plant CNGC-specific sequence motifs as diagnostic tools to identify novel candidate channels in different plants. These methods are used to evaluate the validity of annotations of putative orthologs of CNGCs from plant genomes. The methods detail how to employ regular expressions of conserved amino acids in functional domains of annotated CNGCs and together with Web tools such as PHI-BLAST and ScanProsite to identify novel candidate CNGCs in species including Physcomitrella patens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  10. Strategies for sustainable channel relations in mobile telecom sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Githa Heggde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The telecom sector in India largely comprises of wireless connections for phones. As of today, there are approximately 21 network providers in the country with about 7 per each circle, each offering competitive pricing to the consumers. The main objective of the study is to provide an accurate role for the company executive in developing channel relations. Further to this, the study explores the strategies which can sustain a good working relationship between the company and its channel members in the mobile telecom sector. The constructs identified for developing sustainable relationships were Setting distribution objectives, Channel design, Logistics, Image Building, Inventory management, Channel management, Payment & credit, Promotional assistance, Setting targets, Coverage frequency , Motivating channel members to perform. The sample selected contained distributors from the Mobile telecom sector and company executives/channel managers of leading telecom companies. Factor analysis and Friedman’s test was applied. The findings revealed a correlation in attitude between distributors and the executives. Motivating distributors was rated as the most important strategy by the company. The distributors felt that all channel partners needed to have positive attitude towards the channel while company executives felt that aggression made channel members perform effectively. Such findings will be of use to mobile telecom companies who are new entrants to the Indian market and to existing companies who plan to expand their coverage.

  11. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. French

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10-70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  12. Criteria for the restoration of mining residues in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.; Ettenhuber, E.; Gehrcke, K.; Przyborowski, S.

    2000-01-01

    Residues from uranium mines and mills and from the mining of silver, tin, cobalt, nickel and other ores, as well as of coal mineralized with uranium, are situated in densely populated regions of Germany. Social and political pressure required an urgent investigation and evaluation of these residues in order to identify relevant residues which could not be disregarded from the radiation protection point of view. There were two categories of residues. First, for huge former uranium mining and milling sites, the original owner could be made liable for restoration. A large Federal rehabilitation programme for the Wismut sites was started immediately after the political change in the former East Germany in 1990 and was based on radiological as well as on social and economic concerns. Secondly, for a large number of smaller residues, sometimes dating back to the middle ages, an evaluation of their radiological relevance was necessary before decisions could be taken on the justification of a restoration. This was the objective of a Federal programme on registration, investigation and evaluation of mining residues. Up to now only minor remedial activities have been carried out in cases where an urgent need had been detected. Criteria developed by the German Commission on radiological protection (SSK) were applied for the evaluation of the residues. The primary criterion for the justification of a restoration was an annual individual effective dose of 1 mSv for all exposure pathways except for the inhalation of radon. For inhalation of radon, the primary criterion for justification was a long term average outdoor radon concentration of 50 Bq/m 3 caused by the residues. Both levels were taken in addition to the natural background radiation level at a given site. These criteria were based on the upper end of the 'normal' range of naturally occurring exposure or concentration levels. SSK established reference levels in measurable quantities (activity concentration in soil

  13. Materials challenges for repeatable RF wireless device reconfiguration with microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Anthony S.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, adaptive wireless devices have utilized displacement of EGaIn within microchannels as an electrical switching mechanism to enable reconfigurable electronics. Device reconfiguration using EGaIn in microchannels overcomes many challenges encountered by more traditional reconfiguration mechanisms such as diodes and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Reconfiguration using EGaIn is severely limited by undesired permanent shorting due to retention of the liquid in microchannels caused by wetting and rapid oxide skin formation. Here, we investigate the conditions which prevent repeatable electrical switching using EGaIn in microchannels. Initial contact angle tests of EGaIn on epoxy surfaces demonstrate the wettability of EGaIn on flat surfaces. SEM cross-sections of microchannels reveal adhesion of EGaIn residue to channel walls. Micro-computed tomography (microCT) scans of provide volumetric measurements of EGaIn remaining inside channels after flow cycling. Non-wetting coatings are proposed as materials based strategy to overcome these issues in future work.

  14. CHARACTERIZING RESIDUE TRANSFER EFFICIENCIES USING A FLUORESCENT IMAGING TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    To reduce the uncertainty associated with current estimates of children's exposure to pesticides by dermal contact and indirect ingestion, residue transfer data are required. Prior to conducting exhaustive studies, a screening study to identify the important parameters for chara...

  15. Molecular Evolution of Slow and Quick Anion Channels (SLACs and QUACs/ALMTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Ingo; Gomez-Porras, Judith Lucia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Electrophysiological analyses conducted about 25 years ago detected two types of anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells. One type of channel responds slowly to changes in membrane voltage while the other responds quickly. Consequently, they were named SLAC, for SLow Anion Channel, and QUAC, for QUick Anion Channel. Recently, genes SLAC1 and QUAC1/ALMT12, underlying the two different anion current components, could be identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the gene products in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the quick and slow current kinetics. In this study we provide an overview on our current knowledge on slow and quick anion channels in plants and analyze the molecular evolution of ALMT/QUAC-like and SLAC-like channels. We discovered fingerprints that allow screening databases for these channel types and were able to identify 192 (177 non-redundant) SLAC-like and 422 (402 non-redundant) ALMT/QUAC-like proteins in the fully sequenced genomes of 32 plant species. Phylogenetic analyses provided new insights into the molecular evolution of these channel types. We also combined sequence alignment and clustering with predictions of protein features, leading to the identification of known conserved phosphorylation sites in SLAC1-like channels along with potential sites that have not been yet experimentally confirmed. Using a similar strategy to analyze the hydropathicity of ALMT/QUAC-like channels, we propose a modified topology with additional transmembrane regions that integrates structure and function of these membrane proteins. Our results suggest that cross-referencing phylogenetic analyses with position-specific protein properties and functional data could be a very powerful tool for genome research approaches in general.

  16. Molecular evolution of slow and quick anion channels (SLACs and QUACs/ALMTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eDreyer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological analyses conducted about 25 years ago detected two types of anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells. One type of channel responds slowly to changes in membrane voltage while the other responds quickly. Consequently, they were named SLAC, for SLow Anion Channel, and QUAC, for QUick Anion Channel. Recently, genes SLAC1 and QUAC1/ALMT12, underlying the two different anion current components, could be identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the gene products in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the quick and slow current kinetics. In this study we provide an overview on our current knowledge on slow and quick anion channels in plants and analyze the molecular evolution of ALMT/QUAC-like and SLAC-like channels. We discovered fingerprints that allow screening databases for these channel types and were able to identify 192 (177 non-redundant SLAC-like and 422 (402 non-redundant ALMT/QUAC-like proteins in the fully sequenced genomes of 32 plant species. Phylogenetic analyses provided new insights into the molecular evolution of these channel types. We also combined sequence alignment and clustering with predictions of protein features, leading to the identification of known conserved phosphorylation sites in SLAC1-like channels along with potential sites that have not been yet experimentally confirmed. Using a similar strategy to analyze the hydropathicity of ALMT/QUAC-like channels, we propose a modified topology with additional transmembrane regions that integrates structure and function of these membrane proteins. Our results suggest that cross-referencing phylogenetic analyses with position-specific protein properties and functional data could be a very powerful tool for genome research approaches in general.

  17. Note: Optical receiver system for 152-channel magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong [Center for Biosignals, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    An optical receiver system composing 13 serial data restore/synchronizer modules and a single module combiner converted optical 32-bit serial data into 32-bit synchronous parallel data for a computer to acquire 152-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. A serial data restore/synchronizer module identified 32-bit channel-voltage bits from 48-bit streaming serial data, and then consecutively reproduced 13 times of 32-bit serial data, acting in a synchronous clock. After selecting a single among 13 reproduced data in each module, a module combiner converted it into 32-bit parallel data, which were carried to 32-port digital input board in a computer. When the receiver system together with optical transmitters were applied to 152-channel superconducting quantum interference device sensors, this MEG system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz at a sample rate of 1 kSample/s per channel.

  18. Mechanically Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufeng Qiu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells in the inner ear convert mechanical stimuli provided by sound waves and head movements into electrical signal. Several mechanically evoked ionic currents with different properties have been recorded in hair cells. The search for the proteins that form the underlying ion channels is still in progress. The mechanoelectrical transduction (MET channel near the tips of stereociliary in hair cells, which is responsible for sensory transduction, has been studied most extensively. Several components of the sensory mechanotransduction machinery in stereocilia have been identified, including the multi-transmembrane proteins tetraspan membrane protein in hair cell stereocilia (TMHS/LHFPL5, transmembrane inner ear (TMIE and transmembrane channel-like proteins 1 and 2 (TMC1/2. However, there remains considerable uncertainty regarding the molecules that form the channel pore. In addition to the sensory MET channel, hair cells express the mechanically gated ion channel PIEZO2, which is localized near the base of stereocilia and not essential for sensory transduction. The function of PIEZO2 in hair cells is not entirely clear but it might have a role in damage sensing and repair processes. Additional stretch-activated channels of unknown molecular identity and function have been found to localize at the basolateral membrane of hair cells. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the different mechanically gated ion channels in hair cells and discuss open questions concerning their molecular composition and function.

  19. [Synopsis about the hypothesis of "information channel" of channel-collateral system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xi-Lang

    2008-10-01

    The author of the present paper founded a theorem about the "incompleteness of single channel structure" (nerve, blood vessel, lymphatic, interspace, aperture, etc.) through quantitative and qualitative analysis about the economic information channel in the human body, which eliminates the probability of single channel structure in the information channel of channel (meridian)-collateral system. After comprehensive analysis on the current researches, the author puts forward a neodoxy, i.e., the body "information channel" structure of the channel-collateral system, mainly follows the distribution regularity of systemic statistics, and is not a single specific entity; various layers of the information channel in the main stems of the channel-collaterals are composed of optimized structure tissues. Hence, the structure of this information channel of channel-collateral system is an overall-optimized, sequential and compatible systemic structure. From this neodoxy, the author brings forward a working principle of channel-collaterals, which is supported theoretically by bio-auxology. The longitudinal distribution of the main stems of meridian-collaterals is considered to result from that in the process of the animal evolution, in the animals moving forward, the microscopic complicated movement of intracorporeal information and energy molecules is related to the forward macroscopic and non-uniform movement of organism in trans-measure. Its impulse and kinetic momentum forms a main vector in the longitudinal direction of the body (the direction of the main stem of channel-collaterals). In order to adapt to and utilize natural regularities, the main stems of the channel-collaterals gradually differentiate and evolve in the living organism, forming a whole system. The "hypothesis of biological origin of channel-collateral system" and "that of information channel of the channel-collaterals in the body" constitute a relatively complete theoretical system framework.

  20. An L319F mutation in transmembrane region 3 (TM3) selectively reduces sensitivity to okaramine B of the Bombyx mori l-glutamate-gated chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shogo; Okuhara, Daiki; Hashimoto, Anju; Ihara, Makoto; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Sattelle, David B; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Okaramines produced by Penicillium simplicissimum AK-40 activate l-glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) and thus paralyze insects. However, the okaramine binding site on insect GluCls is poorly understood. Sequence alignment shows that the equivalent of residue Leucine319 of the okaramine B sensitive Bombyx mori (B. mori) GluCl is a phenylalanine in the okaramine B insensitive B. mori γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel of the same species. This residue is located in the third transmembrane (TM3) region, a location which in a nematode GluCl is close to the ivermectin binding site. The B. mori GluCl containing the L319F mutation retained its sensitivity to l-glutamate, but responses to ivermectin were reduced and those to okaramine B were completely blocked.