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Sample records for channel density regulates

  1. Ion channel density regulates switches between regular and fast spiking in soma but not in axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Zeberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The threshold firing frequency of a neuron is a characterizing feature of its dynamical behaviour, in turn determining its role in the oscillatory activity of the brain. Two main types of dynamics have been identified in brain neurons. Type 1 dynamics (regular spiking shows a continuous relationship between frequency and stimulation current (f-I(stim and, thus, an arbitrarily low frequency at threshold current; Type 2 (fast spiking shows a discontinuous f-I(stim relationship and a minimum threshold frequency. In a previous study of a hippocampal neuron model, we demonstrated that its dynamics could be of both Type 1 and Type 2, depending on ion channel density. In the present study we analyse the effect of varying channel density on threshold firing frequency on two well-studied axon membranes, namely the frog myelinated axon and the squid giant axon. Moreover, we analyse the hippocampal neuron model in more detail. The models are all based on voltage-clamp studies, thus comprising experimentally measurable parameters. The choice of analysing effects of channel density modifications is due to their physiological and pharmacological relevance. We show, using bifurcation analysis, that both axon models display exclusively Type 2 dynamics, independently of ion channel density. Nevertheless, both models have a region in the channel-density plane characterized by an N-shaped steady-state current-voltage relationship (a prerequisite for Type 1 dynamics and associated with this type of dynamics in the hippocampal model. In summary, our results suggest that the hippocampal soma and the two axon membranes represent two distinct kinds of membranes; membranes with a channel-density dependent switching between Type 1 and 2 dynamics, and membranes with a channel-density independent dynamics. The difference between the two membrane types suggests functional differences, compatible with a more flexible role of the soma membrane than that of the axon membrane.

  2. Regulation of Kv2.1 K+ conductance by cell surface channel density

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Philip D.; Loftus, Rob J.; Tamkun, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The Kv2.1 voltage-gated K+ channel is found both freely diffusing over the plasma membrane and concentrated in micron-sized clusters localized to the soma, proximal dendrites and axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. In transfected HEK cells, Kv2.1 channels within cluster microdomains are non-conducting. Using TIRF microscopy the number of GFP-tagged Kv2.1 channels on the HEK cell surface was compared to K+ channel conductance measured by whole-cell voltage-clamp of the same cell. This...

  3. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    - serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...... of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......, controlled cell death and cellular migration. Volume regulatory mechanisms has long been in focus for regulating cellular proliferation and my thesis work have been focusing on the role of Cl- channels in proliferation with specific emphasis on ICl, swell. Pharmacological blockage of the ubiquitously...

  4. Postsynaptic density-95 scaffolding of Shaker-type K⁺ channels in smooth muscle cells regulates the diameter of cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Biny K; Thakali, Keshari M; Pathan, Asif R; Kang, Eunju; Rusch, Nancy J; Rhee, Sung W

    2011-11-01

    Postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95) is a 95 kDa scaffolding molecule in the brain that clusters postsynaptic proteins including ion channels, receptors, enzymes and other signalling partners required for normal cognition. The voltage-gated, Shaker-type K(+) (K(V)1) channel is one key binding partner of PSD95 scaffolds in neurons. However, K(V)1 channels composed of α1.2 and α1.5 pore-forming subunits also are expressed in the vascular smooth muscle cells (cVSMCs) of the cerebral circulation, although the identity of their molecular scaffolds is unknown. Since α1.2 contains a binding motif for PSD95, we explored the possibility that cVSMCs express PSD95 as a scaffold to promote K(V)1 channel expression and cerebral vasodilatation. Cerebral arteries from Sprague-Dawley rats were isolated for analysis of PSD95 and K(V)1 channel proteins. PSD95 was detected in cVSMCs and it co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized with the pore-forming α1.2 subunit of the K(V)1 channel. Antisense-mediated knockdown of PSD95 profoundly reduced K(V)1 channel expression and suppressed K(V)1 current in patch-clamped cVSMCs. Loss of PSD95 also depolarized cVSMCs in pressurized cerebral arteries and induced a strong constriction associated with a loss of functional K(V)1 channels. Our findings provide initial evidence that PSD95 is expressed in cVSMCs, and the K(V)1 channel is one of its important binding partners. PSD95 appears to function as a critical 'dilator' scaffold in cerebral arteries by increasing the number of functional K(V)1 channels at the plasma membrane.

  5. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR chloride channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, L.J.; Kleizen, B.; Jonge, H.R. de

    2000-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ABC transporter encoded by the cystic fibrosis gene, is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells where it functions as a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel and as a regulator of other ion channels and transporters. Wh

  6. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  7. Ion channels regulating mast cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmole, I; Bradding, P

    2013-05-01

    Mast cells play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma and related allergic conditions. Mast cell activation leads to the degranulation of preformed mediators such as histamine and the secretion of newly synthesised proinflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes and cytokines. Excess release of these mediators contributes to allergic disease states. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ is essential for mast cell mediator release. From the Ca2+ channels that mediate this influx, to the K+ , Cl- and transient receptor potential channels that set the cell membrane potential and regulate Ca2+ influx, ion channels play a critical role in mast cell biology. In this review we provide an overview of our current knowledge of ion channel expression and function in mast cells with an emphasis on how channels interact to regulate Ca2+ signalling.

  8. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleizen, B; Braakman, I; de Jonge, H R

    2000-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ABC transporter encoded by the cystic fibrosis gene, is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells where it functions as a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel and as a regulator of other ion channels and transporters. Whereas a key role of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in CFTR-channel gating has been firmly established, more recent studies have provided clear evidence for the existence of a second level of cAMP regulation, i.e. the exocytotic recruitment of CFFR to the plasma membrane and its endocytotic retrieval. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR Cl- channel has sofar been demonstrated only in a subset of CFTR-expressing cell types. However, with the introduction of more sensitive methods to measure CFTR cycling and submembrane localization, it might turn out to be a more general phenomenon that could contribute importantly to both the regulation of CFTR-mediated chloride transport itself and to the regulation of other transporters and CFTR-modulated cellular functions. This review aims to summarize the present state of knowledge regarding polarized and regulated CFTR trafficking and endosomal recycling in epithelial cells, to discuss present gaps in our understanding of these processes at the cellular and molecular level, and to consider its possible implications for cystic fibrosis.

  9. Voltage regulation of connexin channel conductance.

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    Oh, Seunghoon; Bargiello, Thaddeus A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage is an important parameter that regulates the conductance of both intercellular and plasma membrane channels (undocked hemichannels) formed by the 21 members of the mammalian connexin gene family. Connexin channels display two forms of voltage-dependence, rectification of ionic currents and voltage-dependent gating. Ionic rectification results either from asymmetries in the distribution of fixed charges due to heterotypic pairing of different hemichannels, or by channel block, arising from differences in the concentrations of divalent cations on opposite sides of the junctional plaque. This rectification likely underpins the electrical rectification observed in some electrical synapses. Both intercellular and undocked hemichannels also display two distinct forms of voltage-dependent gating, termed Vj (fast)-gating and loop (slow)-gating. This review summarizes our current understanding of the molecular determinants and mechanisms underlying these conformational changes derived from experimental, molecular-genetic, structural, and computational approaches.

  10. Ion channel density and threshold dynamics of repetitive firing in a cortical neuron model.

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    Arhem, Peter; Blomberg, Clas

    2007-01-01

    Modifying the density and distribution of ion channels in a neuron (by natural up- and down-regulation, by pharmacological intervention or by spontaneous mutations) changes its activity pattern. In the present investigation, we analyze how the impulse patterns are regulated by the density of voltage-gated channels in a model neuron, based on voltage clamp measurements of hippocampal interneurons. At least three distinct oscillatory patterns, associated with three distinct regions in the Na-K channel density plane, were found. A stability analysis showed that the different regions are characterized by saddle-node, double-orbit, and Hopf bifurcation threshold dynamics, respectively. Single strongly graded action potentials occur in an area outside the oscillatory regions, but less graded action potentials occur together with repetitive firing over a considerable range of channel densities. The presently found relationship between channel densities and oscillatory behavior may be relevance for understanding principal spiking patterns of cortical neurons (regular firing and fast spiking). It may also be of relevance for understanding the action of pharmacological compounds on brain oscillatory activity.

  11. Regulation of voltage gated calcium channels by GPCRs and post-translational modification.

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    Huang, Junting; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-10-18

    Calcium entry via voltage gated calcium channels mediates a wide range of physiological functions, whereas calcium channel dysregulation has been associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions. There are myriad cell signaling pathways that act on voltage gated calcium channels to fine tune their activities and to regulate their cell surface expression. These regulatory mechanisms include the activation of G protein-coupled receptors and downstream phosphorylation events, and their control over calcium channel trafficking through direct physical interactions. Calcium channels also undergo post-translational modifications that alter both function and density of the channels in the plasma membrane. Here we focus on select aspects of these regulatory mechanisms and highlight recent developments.

  12. Developmental regulation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The developmental regulation of the voltage-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel in rat skeletal muscle was studied in vivo and in vitro. In triceps surae muscle developing in vivo the development of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel occurred primarily during the first three postnatal weeks as determined by the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin. This development proceeded in two separate phases. The first phase occurs independently of continuing motor neuron innervation and accounts for 60% of the adult density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The second phase, which begins about day 11, requires innervation. Muscle cells in primary culture were found to have both TTX-sensitive and insensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The development of the TTX-sensitive channel, in vitro, paralleled the initial innervation-independent phase of development observed in vivo. The density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels in cultured muscle cells was regulated by electrical activity and cytosolic Ca/sup + +/ levels. Pharmacological blockade of the spontaneous electrical activity present in these cells lead to a nearly 2-fold increase in the surface density of TTX-sensitive channels. The turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel was measured by blocking the incorporation of newly synthesized channels with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked protein glycosylation. The regulation of channel density by electrical activity, cytosolic Ca/sup + +/levels, and agents affecting cyclic neucleotide levels had no effect on the turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel, indicating that these regulatory agents instead affect the synthesis of the channel.

  13. Src regulates membrane trafficking of the Kv3.1b channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Seong Han; Kim, Dong Hyun; Shin, Seok Kyo; Choi, Jin Sung; Park, Kang-Sik

    2014-01-03

    The Kv3.1 channel plays a crucial role in regulating the high-frequency firing properties of neurons. Here, we determined whether Src regulates the subcellular distributions of the Kv3.1b channel. Co-expression of active Src induced a dramatic redistribution of Kv3.1b to the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, co-expression of the Kv3.1b channel with active Src induced a remarkable decrease in the pool of Kv3.1b at the cell surface. Moreover, the co-expression of active Src results in a significant decrease in the peak current densities of the Kv3.1b channel, and a substantial alteration in the voltage dependence of its steady-state inactivation. Taken together, these results indicate that Src kinase may play an important role in regulating membrane trafficking of Kv3.1b channels.

  14. Regulation of sodium channel function by bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, Jens A; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J

    2004-01-01

    be a general mechanism regulating membrane protein function, we examined whether voltage-dependent skeletal-muscle sodium channels, expressed in HEK293 cells, are regulated by bilayer elasticity, as monitored using gramicidin A (gA) channels. Nonphysiological amphiphiles (beta-octyl-glucoside, Genapol X-100......, Triton X-100, and reduced Triton X-100) that make lipid bilayers less "stiff", as measured using gA channels, shift the voltage dependence of sodium channel inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials. At low amphiphile concentration, the magnitude of the shift is linearly correlated to the change...... in gA channel lifetime. Cholesterol-depletion, which also reduces bilayer stiffness, causes a similar shift in sodium channel inactivation. These results provide strong support for the notion that bilayer-protein hydrophobic coupling allows the bilayer elastic properties to regulate membrane protein...

  15. VEGF regulates TRPC6 channels in podocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Loddenkemper, Christoph;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both, increased plasma concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and increased expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channels in podocytes have been associated with proteinuric kidney diseases. Now, we investigated the hypothesis that VE...

  16. FASEB Science Research Conference on Ion Channel Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Regulation of ion channel function is essential for physiological functions including pain , nervous signaling and beating of the heart. The study of ion...functions including pain , nervous signaling and beating of the heart. The study of ion channel structure and function requires technically challenging...U.Iowa) 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Effects of bark scorpion (Centruroides) toxins on nociceptive Na+ and K+ ion channels: molecular and biophysical

  17. Physiological regulation of epithelial sodium channel by proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Friis, Ulla G; Bistrup, Claus

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Activation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by proteolysis appears to be relevant for day-to-day physiological regulation of channel activity in kidney and other epithelial tissues. Pathophysiogical, proteolytic activation of ENaC in kidney has been demonstrated in proteinuric...

  18. Factors influencing the density profiles of granular flux in a two-dimensional inclined channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional dilute granular flow on a smooth incline bounded by rough sidewalls is investigated experimentally, and the transverse density profiles of granular flux (ξ = ρ v) across the channel are measured. The results show that the transverse density profiles of granular flux are symmetric about the channel center and that the density of granular flux near the boundary is clearly lower than that of the center. There is a critical width of channel Wc for the transition of the density of granular flux. The density of granular flux near the boundary decays with the increasing of inclination (sinθ ) of the channel.

  19. Factors influencing the density profiles of granular flux in a two-dimensional inclined channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO DeSong; ZHOU Ying; ZHANG XunSheng; TANG XiaoWei

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional dilute granular flow on a smooth incline bounded by rough sidewalls is investigated experimentally, and the transverse density profiles of granular flux (ξ=pv) across the channel are measured. The results show that the transverse density profiles of granular flux are symmetric about the channel center and that the density of granular flux near the boundary is clearly lower than that of the center. There is a critical width of channel Wc for the transition of the density of granular flux. The density of granular flux near the boundary decays with the increasing of inclination (sinθ) of the channel.

  20. Na+ channel function, regulation, structure, trafficking and sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Shaw, Robin M; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Sack, Jon T; Abriel, Hugues; Aldrich, Richard W; Belardinelli, Luiz; Cannell, Mark B; Catterall, William A; Chazin, Walter J; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Deschenes, Isabelle; Grandi, Eleonora; Hund, Thomas J; Izu, Leighton T; Maier, Lars S; Maltsev, Victor A; Marionneau, Celine; Mohler, Peter J; Rajamani, Sridharan; Rasmusson, Randall L; Sobie, Eric A; Clancy, Colleen E; Bers, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second of a series of three reviews published in this issue resulting from the University of California Davis Cardiovascular Symposium 2014: Systems approach to understanding cardiac excitation–contraction coupling and arrhythmias: Na+ channel and Na+ transport. The goal of the symposium was to bring together experts in the field to discuss points of consensus and controversy on the topic of sodium in the heart. The present review focuses on Na+ channel function and regulation, Na+ channel structure and function, and Na+ channel trafficking, sequestration and complexing. PMID:25772290

  1. Carbon monoxide: an emerging regulator of ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, William J; Kemp, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Carbon monoxide is rapidly emerging as an important cellular messenger, regulating a wide range of physiological processes. Crucial to its role in both physiology and disease is its ability differentially to regulate several classes of ion channels, including examples from calcium-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)), voltage-activated K(+) (K(v)) and Ca(2+) channel (L-type) families, ligand-gated P2X receptors (P2X2 and P2X4), tandem P domain K(+) channels (TREK1) and the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). The mechanisms by which CO regulates these ion channels are still unclear and remain somewhat controversial. However, available structure-function studies suggest that a limited range of amino acid residues confer CO sensitivity, either directly or indirectly, to particular ion channels and that cellular redox state appears to be important to the final integrated response. Whatever the molecular mechanism by which CO regulates ion channels, endogenous production of this gasotransmitter has physiologically important roles and is currently being explored as a potential therapeutic.

  2. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-14

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na⁺/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca(2+) in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca(2+) channels, K⁺ channels, Na⁺/Ca(2+) exchangers, and Na⁺/H⁺ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes.

  3. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1, although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2 may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca2+ in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca2+ channels, K+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, and Na+/H+ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes.

  4. 43. Calmodulin regulating calcium sensitivity of Na channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vegiraju

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available By extrapolating information from existing research and observing previous assumptions regarding the structure of the Na Channel, this experiment was conducted under the hypothesis that the Na Channel is in part regulated by the calmodulin protein, as a result proving calcium sensitivity of the Na Channel. Furthermore, we assume that there is a one to one stoichiometry between the Na Channel and the Calmodulin. There has been extensive research into the functionality and structure of sodium ion channels (Na channels, as several diseases are associated with the lack of regulation of sodium ions, that is caused by the disfunction of these Na channels. However, one highly controversial matter in the field is the importance of the protein calmodulin (CaM and calcium in Na channel function. Calmodulin is a protein that is well known for its role as a calcium binding messenger protein, and that association is believed to play an indirect role in regulating the Na channel through the Na channel’s supposed calcium sensitivity. While there are proponents for both sides, there has been relatively little research that provides strong evidence for either case. In this experiment, the effect of calmodulin on NaV 1.5 is tested by preparing a set of cardiac cells (of the human specie with the NaV 1.5 C-Termini and CaM protein, which were then to be placed in solutions with varying concentrations of calcium. We took special care to test multiple concentrations of calcium, as previous studies have tested very low concentrations, with Manu Ben-Johny’s team from the John Hopkins laboratory in particular testing up to a meager 50 micromolar, despite producing a well-respected paper (By comparison, the average Na channel can naturally sustain a concentration of almost 1-2 millimolar and on some occasions, reaching even higher concentrations. After using light scattering and observing the signals given off by the calcium interacting with these Nav1.5/Ca

  5. Regulation of BK channels by auxiliary γ subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyuan eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK channel has the largest single-channel conductance among potassium channels and can be activated by both membrane depolarization and increases in intracellular calcium concentration. BK channels consist of pore-forming, voltage- and calcium-sensing α subunits, either alone or in association with regulatory subunits. BK channels are widely expressed in various tissues and cells including both excitable and non-excitable cells and display diverse biophysical and pharmacological characteristics. This diversity can be explained in part by posttranslational modifications and alternative splicing of the α subunit, which is encoded by a single gene, KCNMA1, as well as by tissue-specific β subunit modulation. Recently, a leucine-rich repeat-containing membrane protein, LRRC26, was found to interact with BK channels and cause an unprecedented large negative shift (~-140 mV in the voltage dependence of the BK channel activation. LRRC26 allows BK channels to open even at near-physiological calcium concentration and membrane voltage in non-excitable cells. Three LRRC26-related proteins, LRRC52, LRRC55, and LRRC38, were subsequently identified as BK channel modulators. These LRRC proteins are structurally and functionally distinct from the BK channel β subunits and were designated as γ subunits. The discovery of the γ subunits adds a new dimension to BK channel regulation and improves our understanding of the physiological functions of BK channels in various tissues and cell types. Unlike BK channel β subunits, which have been intensively investigated both mechanistically and physiologically, our understanding of the γ subunits is very limited at this stage. This article reviews the structure, modulatory mechanisms, physiological relevance, and potential therapeutic implications of γ subunits as they are currently understood.

  6. Ion Channels Involved in Cell Volume Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume...

  7. Heterodimerization within the TREK channel subfamily produces a diverse family of highly regulated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, Joshua; Royal, Perrine; Comoglio, Yannick; Wdziekonski, Brigitte; Schaub, Sébastien; Clemens, Daniel M; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Sandoz, Guillaume

    2016-04-12

    Twik-related K(+) channel 1 (TREK1), TREK2, and Twik-related arachidonic-acid stimulated K(+) channel (TRAAK) form the TREK subfamily of two-pore-domain K(+) (K2P) channels. Despite sharing up to 78% sequence homology and overlapping expression profiles in the nervous system, these channels show major differences in their regulation by physiological stimuli. For instance, TREK1 is inhibited by external acidification, whereas TREK2 is activated. Here, we investigated the ability of the members of the TREK subfamily to assemble to form functional heteromeric channels with novel properties. Using single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) from HEK cell lysate and subunit counting in the plasma membrane of living cells, we show that TREK1, TREK2, and TRAAK readily coassemble. TREK1 and TREK2 can each heterodimerize with TRAAK, but do so less efficiently than with each other. We functionally characterized the heterodimers and found that all combinations form outwardly rectifying potassium-selective channels but with variable voltage sensitivity and pH regulation. TREK1-TREK2 heterodimers show low levels of activity at physiological external pH but, unlike their corresponding homodimers, are activated by both acidic and alkaline conditions. Modeling based on recent crystal structures, along with mutational analysis, suggests that each subunit within a TREK1-TREK2 channel is regulated independently via titratable His. Finally, TREK1/TRAAK heterodimers differ in function from TRAAK homodimers in two critical ways: they are activated by both intracellular acidification and alkalinization and are regulated by the enzyme phospholipase D2. Thus, heterodimerization provides a means for diversifying functionality through an expansion of the channel types within the K2P channels.

  8. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  9. Regulation of epileptiform discharges in rat neocortex by HCN channels.

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    Albertson, Asher J; Williams, Sidney B; Hablitz, John J

    2013-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, nonspecific cation (HCN) channels have a well-characterized role in regulation of cellular excitability and network activity. The role of these channels in control of epileptiform discharges is less thoroughly understood. This is especially pertinent given the altered HCN channel expression in epilepsy. We hypothesized that inhibition of HCN channels would enhance bicuculline-induced epileptiform discharges. Whole cell recordings were obtained from layer (L)2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons and L1 and L5 GABAergic interneurons. In the presence of bicuculline (10 μM), HCN channel inhibition with ZD 7288 (20 μM) significantly increased the magnitude (defined as area) of evoked epileptiform events in both L2/3 and L5 neurons. We recorded activity associated with epileptiform discharges in L1 and L5 interneurons to test the hypothesis that HCN channels regulate excitatory synaptic inputs differently in interneurons versus pyramidal neurons. HCN channel inhibition increased the magnitude of epileptiform events in both L1 and L5 interneurons. The increased magnitude of epileptiform events in both pyramidal cells and interneurons was due to an increase in network activity, since holding cells at depolarized potentials under voltage-clamp conditions to minimize HCN channel opening did not prevent enhancement in the presence of ZD 7288. In neurons recorded with ZD 7288-containing pipettes, bath application of the noninactivating inward cationic current (Ih) antagonist still produced increases in epileptiform responses. These results show that epileptiform discharges in disinhibited rat neocortex are modulated by HCN channels.

  10. Gene transcription and splicing of T-type channels are evolutionarily-conserved strategies for regulating channel expression and gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels operate within tightly regulated biophysical constraints for supporting rhythmic firing in the brain, heart and secretory organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. The snail T-type gene, LCa(v3 from Lymnaea stagnalis, possesses alternative, tandem donor splice sites enabling a choice of a large exon 8b (201 aa or a short exon 25c (9 aa in cytoplasmic linkers, similar to mammalian homologs. Inclusion of optional 25c exons in the III-IV linker of T-type channels speeds up kinetics and causes hyperpolarizing shifts in both activation and steady-state inactivation of macroscopic currents. The abundant variant lacking exon 25c is the workhorse of embryonic Ca(v3 channels, whose high density and right-shifted activation and availability curves are expected to increase pace-making and allow the channels to contribute more significantly to cellular excitation in prenatal tissue. Presence of brain-enriched, optional exon 8b conserved with mammalian Ca(v3.1 and encompassing the proximal half of the I-II linker, imparts a ~50% reduction in total and surface-expressed LCa(v3 channel protein, which accounts for reduced whole-cell calcium currents of +8b variants in HEK cells. Evolutionarily conserved optional exons in cytoplasmic linkers of Ca(v3 channels regulate expression (exon 8b and a battery of biophysical properties (exon 25c for tuning specialized firing patterns in different tissues and throughout development.

  11. ROMK1 channel activity is regulated by monoubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Wang, Zhijian; Babilonia, Elisa; Yang, Baofeng; Dong, Ke; Hebert, Steven C; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2005-03-22

    The ubiquitination of proteins can signal their degradation, modify their activity or target them to specific membranes or cellular organelles. Here, we show that monoubiquitination regulates the plasma membrane abundance and function of the potassium channel, ROMK. Immunoprecipitation of proteins obtained from renal cortex and outer medulla with ROMK antibody revealed that this channel was monoubiquitinated. To determine the ubiquitin binding site on ROMK1, all intracellular lysine (Lys) residues of ROMK1 were individually mutated to arginine (Arg), and a two-electrode voltage clamp was used to measure the ROMK1 channel activity in Xenopus oocytes. ROMK1 channel activity increased from 8.1 to 27.2 microA only when Lys-22 was mutated to Arg. Furthermore, Western blotting failed to detect the ubiquitinated ROMK1 in oocytes injected with R1K22R. Patch-clamp experiments showed that biophysical properties of R1K22R were identical to those of wild-type ROMK1. Although total protein expression levels of GFP-ROMK1 and GFP-R1K22R in oocytes were similar, confocal microscopy showed that the surface fluorescence intensity in oocytes injected with GFP-R1K22R was higher than that of GFP-ROMK1. In addition, biotin labeling of ROMK1 and R1K22R proteins expressed in HEK293 cells showed increased surface expression of the Lys-22 mutant channel. Finally, expression of R1K22R in COS7 cells significantly stimulated the surface expression of ROMK1. We conclude that ROMK1 can be monoubiquitinated and that Lys-22 is an ubiquitin-binding site. Thus, monoubiquitination of ROMK1 regulates channel activity by reducing the surface expression of channel protein. This finding implicates the linking of a single ubiquitin molecule to channels as an important posttranslational regulatory signal.

  12. Regulation of CFTR chloride channel macroscopic conductance by extracellular bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man-Song; Holstead, Ryan G; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR contributes to Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ transport across epithelial cell apical membranes. The extracellular face of CFTR is exposed to varying concentrations of Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ in epithelial tissues, and there is evidence that CFTR is sensitive to changes in extracellular anion concentrations. Here we present functional evidence that extracellular Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ regulate anion conduction in open CFTR channels. Using cell-attached and inside-out patch-clamp recordings from constitutively active mutant E1371Q-CFTR channels, we show that voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR currents in intact cells is significantly stronger when the extracellular solution contains HCO₃⁻ than when it contains Cl⁻. This difference appears to reflect differences in the ability of extracellular HCO₃⁻ and Cl⁻ to interact with and repel intracellular blocking anions from the pore. Strong block by endogenous cytosolic anions leading to reduced CFTR channel currents in intact cells occurs at physiologically relevant HCO₃⁻ concentrations and membrane potentials and can result in up to ∼50% inhibition of current amplitude. We propose that channel block by cytosolic anions is a previously unrecognized, physiologically relevant mechanism of channel regulation that confers on CFTR channels sensitivity to different anions in the extracellular fluid. We further suggest that this anion sensitivity represents a feedback mechanism by which CFTR-dependent anion secretion could be regulated by the composition of the secretions themselves. Implications for the mechanism and regulation of CFTR-dependent secretion in epithelial tissues are discussed.

  13. Collimation of fast electrons in critical density plasma channel

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is generated through the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with a uniform critical density plasma in experiments and 2D PIC simulations. In the experiment, the uniform critical density plasma is created by ionizing an ultra-low density foam target. The spacial distribution of the fast electron is observed by Imaging Plate. 2D PIC simulation and post process analysis reveal magnetic collimation of energetic e...

  14. Regulation of the water channel aquaporin-2 by posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Hanne B; Olesen, Emma T B; Fenton, Robert A

    2011-05-01

    The cellular functions of many eukaryotic membrane proteins, including the vasopressin-regulated water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2), are regulated by posttranslational modifications. In this article, we discuss the experimental discoveries that have advanced our understanding of how posttranslational modifications affect AQP2 function, especially as they relate to the role of AQP2 in the kidney. We review the most recent data demonstrating that glycosylation and, in particular, phosphorylation and ubiquitination are mechanisms that regulate AQP2 activity, subcellular sorting and distribution, degradation, and protein interactions. From a clinical perspective, posttranslational modification resulting in protein misrouting or degradation may explain certain forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In addition to providing major insight into the function and dynamics of renal AQP2 regulation, the analysis of AQP2 posttranslational modification may provide general clues as to the role of posttranslational modification for regulation of other membrane proteins.

  15. Guiding Supersonic Projectiles Using Optically Generated Air Density Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-24

    ideal case, when ( ) (0)T T  , the collapse point of the laser spot goes off to infinity as the pulse power approaches the critical power, i.e. 0.6...laser pulse . We propose changing the laser pulse energy from shot-to-shot to build longer effective channels. We find that current femtosecond lasers...systems with multi-millijoules laser pulses could provide trajectory correction of several meters on 5 km trajectories for sub-kilogram projectiles

  16. Down-regulation of endogenous KLHL1 decreases voltage-gated calcium current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Ethington, Elizabeth G; Cribbs, Leanne; Koob, Michael D; Martin, Jody; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S

    2014-05-01

    The actin-binding protein Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) can modulate voltage-gated calcium channels in vitro. KLHL1 interacts with actin and with the pore-forming subunits of Cav2.1 and CaV3.2 calcium channels, resulting in up-regulation of P/Q and T-type current density. Here we tested whether endogenous KLHL1 modulates voltage gated calcium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons by down-regulating the expression of KLHL1 via adenoviral delivery of shRNA targeted against KLHL1 (shKLHL1). Control adenoviruses did not affect any of the neuronal properties measured, yet down-regulation of KLHL1 resulted in HVA current densities ~68% smaller and LVA current densities 44% smaller than uninfected controls, with a concomitant reduction in α(1A) and α(1H) protein levels. Biophysical analysis and western blot experiments suggest Ca(V)3.1 and 3.3 currents are also present in shKLHL1-infected neurons. Synapsin I levels, miniature postsynaptic current frequency, and excitatory and inhibitory synapse number were reduced in KLHL1 knockdown. This study corroborates the physiological role of KLHL1 as a calcium channel modulator and demonstrates a novel, presynaptic role.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2017-03-31

    The transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV ) channels is an emerging research area that promises to improve our understanding of how many relevant physiological events are shaped in the central nervous system, the skeletal muscle, and other tissues. Interestingly, a picture of how transcription of CaV channel subunit genes is controlled is evolving with the identification of the promoter regions required for tissue-specific expression, and the identification of transcription factors that control their expression. These promoters share several characteristics that include multiple transcriptional start sites, lack of a TATA box, and the presence of elements conferring tissue-selective expression. Likewise, changes in CaV channel expression occur throughout development, following ischemia, seizures, or chronic drug administration. This review focuses on insights achieved regarding the control of CaV channel gene expression. To further understand the complexities of expression and to increase the possibilities of detecting CaV channel alterations causing human disease, a deeper knowledge on the structure of the 5' upstream regions of the genes encoding these remarkable proteins will be necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. The structure and regulation of magnesium selective ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Jian; Pfoh, Roland; Pai, Emil F

    2013-11-01

    The magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) is the most abundant divalent cation within cells. In man, Mg(2+)-deficiency is associated with diseases affecting the heart, muscle, bone, immune, and nervous systems. Despite its impact on human health, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate magnesium transport and storage. Complete structural information on eukaryotic Mg(2+)-transport proteins is currently lacking due to associated technical challenges. The prokaryotic MgtE and CorA magnesium transport systems have recently succumbed to structure determination by X-ray crystallography, providing first views of these ubiquitous and essential Mg(2+)-channels. MgtE and CorA are unique among known membrane protein structures, each revealing a novel protein fold containing distinct arrangements of ten transmembrane-spanning α-helices. Structural and functional analyses have established that Mg(2+)-selectivity in MgtE and CorA occurs through distinct mechanisms. Conserved acidic side-chains appear to form the selectivity filter in MgtE, whereas conserved asparagines coordinate hydrated Mg(2+)-ions within the selectivity filter of CorA. Common structural themes have also emerged whereby MgtE and CorA sense and respond to physiologically relevant, intracellular Mg(2+)-levels through dedicated regulatory domains. Within these domains, multiple primary and secondary Mg(2+)-binding sites serve to staple these ion channels into their respective closed conformations, implying that Mg(2+)-transport is well guarded and very tightly regulated. The MgtE and CorA proteins represent valuable structural templates to better understand the related eukaryotic SLC41 and Mrs2-Alr1 magnesium channels. Herein, we review the structure, function and regulation of MgtE and CorA and consider these unique proteins within the expanding universe of ion channel and transporter structural biology.

  19. Regulation of Connexin-Based Channels by Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Carlos; Retamal, Mauricio A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Sáez, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the effects of fatty acids (FAs) on connexin-based channels, as well as discuss the limited information about the impact FAs may have on pannexins (Panxs). FAs regulate diverse cellular functions, some of which are explained by changes in the activity of channels constituted by connexins (Cxs) or Panxs, which are known to play critical roles in maintaining the functional integrity of diverse organs and tissues. Cxs are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize into hexamers to form hemichannels (HCs), which in turn can assemble into dodecamers to form gap junction channels (GJCs). While GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of contacting cells, HCs serve as pathways for the exchange of ions and small molecules between the intra and extracellular milieu. Panxs, as well as Cx HCs, form channels at the plasma membrane that enable the interchange of molecules between the intra and extracellular spaces. Both Cx- and Panx-based channels are controlled by several post-translational modifications. However, the mechanism of action of FAs on these channels has not been described in detail. It has been shown however that FAs frequently decrease GJC-mediated cell-cell communication. The opposite effect also has been described for HC or Panx-dependent intercellular communication, where, the acute FA effect can be reversed upon washout. Additionally, changes in GJCs mediated by FAs have been associated with post-translational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation), and seem to be directly related to chemical properties of FAs (e.g., length of carbon chain and/or degree of saturation), but this possible link remains poorly understood.

  20. Regulation of Connexin-Based Channels by Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Carlos; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Sáez, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the effects of fatty acids (FAs) on connexin-based channels, as well as discuss the limited information about the impact FAs may have on pannexins (Panxs). FAs regulate diverse cellular functions, some of which are explained by changes in the activity of channels constituted by connexins (Cxs) or Panxs, which are known to play critical roles in maintaining the functional integrity of diverse organs and tissues. Cxs are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize into hexamers to form hemichannels (HCs), which in turn can assemble into dodecamers to form gap junction channels (GJCs). While GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of contacting cells, HCs serve as pathways for the exchange of ions and small molecules between the intra and extracellular milieu. Panxs, as well as Cx HCs, form channels at the plasma membrane that enable the interchange of molecules between the intra and extracellular spaces. Both Cx- and Panx-based channels are controlled by several post-translational modifications. However, the mechanism of action of FAs on these channels has not been described in detail. It has been shown however that FAs frequently decrease GJC-mediated cell-cell communication. The opposite effect also has been described for HC or Panx-dependent intercellular communication, where, the acute FA effect can be reversed upon washout. Additionally, changes in GJCs mediated by FAs have been associated with post-translational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation), and seem to be directly related to chemical properties of FAs (e.g., length of carbon chain and/or degree of saturation), but this possible link remains poorly understood. PMID:28174541

  1. DISCONTINUOUS FLOW OF TURBID DENSITY CURRENTS I. CHANNEL EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua FAN

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on turbid density currents were conducted to observe the flow features of these currents with abrupt contracted and expanded reaches. Experimental data were used to determine water entrainment coefficients for both channel expansion and contraction. Expressions for turbid density currents with water entrainment coefficients in abrupt contracted and expanded reaches were derived,and compared with experimental data.

  2. Isovector coupling channel and central properties of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Haddad

    2010-09-01

    The influence of the isovector coupling channel on the central depression parameter and the central value of the charge density distribution in heavy spherical nuclei was studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to about 50% increase of the central depression parameter, and weakens the dependency of both central depression parameter and central density on the asymmetry, impressively contributing to the semibubble form of the charge density distribution in heavy nuclei, and increasing the probability of larger nuclei with higher proton numbers and higher neutron-to-proton ratios stable.

  3. Regulation of heartbeat by G protein-coupled ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M

    1990-12-01

    The coupling of ion channels to receptors by G proteins is the subject of this American Physiological Society Walter B. Cannon Memorial "Physiology in Perspective" Lecture. This subject is particularly appropriate because it includes a molecular explanation of a homeostatic mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system and the latter subject preoccupied Dr. Cannon during most of his career. With the use of reconstitution methods, we and others have shown that heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins couple receptors to ion channels by both membrane-delimited, direct pathways and cytoplasmic second messenger pathways. Furthermore, one set of receptors may be coupled to as many as three different sets of ion channels to form networks. Dual G protein pathways lead to the prediction of biphasic ion current responses in cell signaling, and this prediction was confirmed. In sinoatrial pacemaker cells, the pacemaking hyperpolarization-activated inward current (If) is directly regulated by the G proteins Gs and Go, and the two can act simultaneously. This could explain the classical observation that vagal inhibition of heart rate is greater during sympathetic stimulation. Because deactivation of the muscarinic response occurs much faster than the G protein alpha-subunit hydrolyzes guanosine 5'-triphosphate, we looked for accessory cellular factors. A surprising result was that the small monomeric ras G protein blocked the muscarinic pathway. The significance of this observation is unknown, but it appears that small and large G proteins may interact in ion channel signaling pathways.

  4. Typical performance of regular low-density parity-check codes over general symmetric channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Saad, David [Neural Computing Research Group, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-31

    Typical performance of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes over a general binary-input output-symmetric memoryless channel is investigated using methods of statistical mechanics. Relationship between the free energy in statistical-mechanics approach and the mutual information used in the information-theory literature is established within a general framework; Gallager and MacKay-Neal codes are studied as specific examples of LDPC codes. It is shown that basic properties of these codes known for particular channels, including their potential to saturate Shannon's bound, hold for general symmetric channels. The binary-input additive-white-Gaussian-noise channel and the binary-input Laplace channel are considered as specific channel models.

  5. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Sonu Sen; Meenu Asthana Varshney; Dinesh Varshney

    2014-01-01

    In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have num...

  6. KCNE regulation of K+ channel trafficking – a Sisyphean task?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Anmol Kanda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels shape the action potentials of excitable cells and regulate membrane potential and ion homeostasis in excitable and nonexcitable cells. With forty known members in the human genome and a variety of homomeric and heteromeric pore-forming alpha subunit interactions, post-translational modifications, cellular locations and expression patterns, the functional repertoire of the Kv alpha subunit family is monumental. This versatility is amplified by a host of interacting proteins, including the single membrane-spanning KCNE ancillary subunits. Here, examining both the secretory and the endocytic pathways, we review recent findings illustrating the surprising virtuosity of the KCNE proteins in orchestrating not just the function, but also the composition, diaspora and retrieval of channels formed by their Kv alpha subunit partners.

  7. The effect of cell size and channel density on neuronal information encoding and energy efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Biswa; Faisal, A Aldo; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2013-09-01

    Identifying the determinants of neuronal energy consumption and their relationship to information coding is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Three of the main determinants are cell size, ion channel density, and stimulus statistics. Here we investigate their impact on neuronal energy consumption and information coding by comparing single-compartment spiking neuron models of different sizes with different densities of stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels and different statistics of synaptic inputs. The largest compartments have the highest information rates but the lowest energy efficiency for a given voltage-gated ion channel density, and the highest signaling efficiency (bits spike(-1)) for a given firing rate. For a given cell size, our models revealed that the ion channel density that maximizes energy efficiency is lower than that maximizing information rate. Low rates of small synaptic inputs improve energy efficiency but the highest information rates occur with higher rates and larger inputs. These relationships produce a Law of Diminishing Returns that penalizes costly excess information coding capacity, promoting the reduction of cell size, channel density, and input stimuli to the minimum possible, suggesting that the trade-off between energy and information has influenced all aspects of neuronal anatomy and physiology.

  8. [Mechanically gated cardiac ion channels and their regulation by cytokines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkin, A G; Makarenko, E Iu

    2012-01-01

    The publication presents discussion of the modern vision of mechanisms of mechanoelectric feedback in heart as well as most recent findings regarding possible regulation of cardiomyocyte mechanically gated ion channels by endogenous compounds of immune origin--cytokines. Special attention is devoted to description of cytokine action on cardiac cells, in particular to nitrogen oxide effects on ionic currents, which contribute to generation of the action potential of the cardiomyocyte. We hypothesize that cytokines can potentially trigger such mechano-dependent cardiac pathologies as arrhythmias and fibrillation.

  9. Fibrinolytic Regulation of Pulmonary Epithelial Sodium Channels: a Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Luminal fluid homeostasis in the respiratory system is crucial to maintain the gas-\\ud blood exchange in normal lungs and mucociliary clearance in the airways. Epithelial\\ud sodium channels (ENaC) govern ~70% of alveolar fluid clearance. Four ENaC subunits\\ud have been cloned, namely, α, β, γ, and δ ENaC subunits in mammalian cells. This\\ud critical review focuses on the expression and function of ENaC in human and murine\\ud lungs, and the post-translational regulation by fibrinolysins. Nebul...

  10. Experimental study of the velocity of density currents in convergent and divergent channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan Torabi POUDEH; Samad EMAMGHOLIZADEH; Manoocher Fathi-MOGHADAM

    2014-01-01

    The head velocity of the density current in the convergent and divergent channel is a key parameter for evaluating the extent to which suspended material travels, and for determining the type and distribution of sediment in the water body. This study experimentally evaluated the effects of the reach degree of convergence and divergence on the head velocity of the density current. Experiments were conducted in the flume with 6.0 m long, 0.72 m width and 0.6 m height. The head velocity was measured at three convergent degrees (-8o;-12o;-26o), at three divergent degrees (8o; 12o; 26o) and two slopes (0.009, 0.016) for various discharges. The measured head velocity of the density current is compared with the head velocity of the density current in the constant cross section channel. Based on non-dimensional and statistical analysis, relations as linear multiple regression are offered for predicting head velocity of the density current in the convergent, divergent and constant cross section channel. Also the results of this research show that for the same slope and discharge, the head velocity of the density current in the convergent and divergent channel are greater and less than the head velocity of the constant cross section, respectively.

  11. Critical role of gap junction coupled KATP channel activity for regulated insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan V Rocheleau

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP channels, which causes membrane depolarization and a concomitant rise in intracellular Ca2+ (Cai. In intact islets, beta-cells are coupled by gap junctions, which are proposed to synchronize electrical activity and Cai oscillations after exposure to stimulatory glucose (>7 mM. To determine the significance of this coupling in regulating insulin secretion, we examined islets and beta-cells from transgenic mice that express zero functional KATP channels in approximately 70% of their beta-cells, but normal KATP channel density in the remainder. We found that KATP channel activity from approximately 30% of the beta-cells is sufficient to maintain strong glucose dependence of metabolism, Cai, membrane potential, and insulin secretion from intact islets, but that glucose dependence is lost in isolated transgenic cells. Further, inhibition of gap junctions caused loss of glucose sensitivity specifically in transgenic islets. These data demonstrate a critical role of gap junctional coupling of KATP channel activity in control of membrane potential across the islet. Control via coupling lessens the effects of cell-cell variation and provides resistance to defects in excitability that would otherwise lead to a profound diabetic state, such as occurs in persistent neonatal diabetes mellitus.

  12. Critical role of gap junction coupled KATP channel activity for regulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Jonathan V; Remedi, Maria S; Granada, Butch; Head, W Steven; Koster, Joseph C; Nichols, Colin G; Piston, David W

    2006-02-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells secrete insulin in response to closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, which causes membrane depolarization and a concomitant rise in intracellular Ca2+ (Cai). In intact islets, beta-cells are coupled by gap junctions, which are proposed to synchronize electrical activity and Cai oscillations after exposure to stimulatory glucose (>7 mM). To determine the significance of this coupling in regulating insulin secretion, we examined islets and beta-cells from transgenic mice that express zero functional KATP channels in approximately 70% of their beta-cells, but normal KATP channel density in the remainder. We found that KATP channel activity from approximately 30% of the beta-cells is sufficient to maintain strong glucose dependence of metabolism, Cai, membrane potential, and insulin secretion from intact islets, but that glucose dependence is lost in isolated transgenic cells. Further, inhibition of gap junctions caused loss of glucose sensitivity specifically in transgenic islets. These data demonstrate a critical role of gap junctional coupling of KATP channel activity in control of membrane potential across the islet. Control via coupling lessens the effects of cell-cell variation and provides resistance to defects in excitability that would otherwise lead to a profound diabetic state, such as occurs in persistent neonatal diabetes mellitus.

  13. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease.

  14. KCNQ channels regulate age-related memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cavaliere

    Full Text Available In humans KCNQ2/3 heteromeric channels form an M-current that acts as a brake on neuronal excitability, with mutations causing a form of epilepsy. The M-current has been shown to be a key regulator of neuronal plasticity underlying associative memory and ethanol response in mammals. Previous work has shown that many of the molecules and plasticity mechanisms underlying changes in alcohol behaviour and addiction are shared with those of memory. We show that the single KCNQ channel in Drosophila (dKCNQ when mutated show decrements in associative short- and long-term memory, with KCNQ function in the mushroom body α/βneurons being required for short-term memory. Ethanol disrupts memory in wildtype flies, but not in a KCNQ null mutant background suggesting KCNQ maybe a direct target of ethanol, the blockade of which interferes with the plasticity machinery required for memory formation. We show that as in humans, Drosophila display age-related memory impairment with the KCNQ mutant memory defect mimicking the effect of age on memory. Expression of KCNQ normally decreases in aging brains and KCNQ overexpression in the mushroom body neurons of KCNQ mutants restores age-related memory impairment. Therefore KCNQ is a central plasticity molecule that regulates age dependent memory impairment.

  15. Membrane-localized β-subunits alter the PIP2 regulation of high-voltage activated Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Byung-Chang; Kim, Dong-Il; Falkenburger, Björn H; Hille, Bertil

    2012-02-21

    The β-subunits of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Ca(V)) channels regulate the functional expression and several biophysical properties of high-voltage-activated Ca(V) channels. We find that Ca(V) β-subunits also determine channel regulation by the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). When Ca(V)1.3, -2.1, or -2.2 channels are cotransfected with the β3-subunit, a cytosolic protein, they can be inhibited by activating a voltage-sensitive lipid phosphatase to deplete PIP(2). When these channels are coexpressed with a β2a-subunit, a palmitoylated peripheral membrane protein, the inhibition is much smaller. PIP(2) sensitivity could be increased by disabling the two palmitoylation sites in the β2a-subunit. To further test effects of membrane targeting of Ca(V) β-subunits on PIP(2) regulation, the N terminus of Lyn was ligated onto the cytosolic β3-subunit to confer lipidation. This chimera, like the Ca(V) β2a-subunit, displayed plasma membrane localization, slowed the inactivation of Ca(V)2.2 channels, and increased the current density. In addition, the Lyn-β3 subunit significantly decreased Ca(V) channel inhibition by PIP(2) depletion. Evidently lipidation and membrane anchoring of Ca(V) β-subunits compete with the PIP(2) regulation of high-voltage-activated Ca(V) channels. Compared with expression with Ca(V) β3-subunits alone, inhibition of Ca(V)2.2 channels by PIP(2) depletion could be significantly attenuated when β2a was coexpressed with β3. Our data suggest that the Ca(V) currents in neurons would be regulated by membrane PIP(2) to a degree that depends on their endogenous β-subunit combinations.

  16. Aquaporins: highly regulated channels controlling plant water relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumont, François; Tyerman, Stephen D

    2014-04-01

    Plant growth and development are dependent on tight regulation of water movement. Water diffusion across cell membranes is facilitated by aquaporins that provide plants with the means to rapidly and reversibly modify water permeability. This is done by changing aquaporin density and activity in the membrane, including posttranslational modifications and protein interaction that act on their trafficking and gating. At the whole organ level aquaporins modify water conductance and gradients at key "gatekeeper" cell layers that impact on whole plant water flow and plant water potential. In this way they may act in concert with stomatal regulation to determine the degree of isohydry/anisohydry. Molecular, physiological, and biophysical approaches have demonstrated that variations in root and leaf hydraulic conductivity can be accounted for by aquaporins but this must be integrated with anatomical considerations. This Update integrates these data and emphasizes the central role played by aquaporins in regulating plant water relations.

  17. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating.

  18. Molecular determinants of voltage-gated sodium channel regulation by the Nedd4/Nedd4-like proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Bruce, M Christine

    2004-01-01

    -ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family. We recently reported that cardiac Na(v)1.5 is regulated by Nedd4-2. In this study, we further investigated the molecular determinants of regulation of Na(v) proteins. When expressed in HEK-293 cells and studied using whole cell voltage clamping, the neuronal Na(v)1.2 and Na......The voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)) form a family composed of 10 genes. The COOH termini of Na(v) contain a cluster of amino acids that are nearly identical among 7 of the 10 members. This COOH-terminal sequence, PPSYDSV, is a PY motif known to bind to WW domains of E3 protein...... that Nedd4-dependent ubiquitination of Na(v) channels may represent a general mechanism regulating the excitability of neurons and myocytes via modulation of channel density at the plasma membrane....

  19. Eag1 K+ Channel: Endogenous Regulation and Functions in Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokay, Tursonjan; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Ether-à-go-go1 (Eag1, Kv10.1, KCNH1) K+ channel is a member of the voltage-gated K+ channel family mainly distributed in the central nervous system and cancer cells. Like other types of voltage-gated K+ channels, the EAG1 channels are regulated by a variety of endogenous signals including reactive oxygen species, rendering the EAG1 to be in the redox-regulated ion channel family. The role of EAG1 channels in tumor development and its therapeutic significance have been well established. Meanwhile, the importance of hEAG1 channels in the nervous system is now increasingly appreciated. The present review will focus on the recent progress on the channel regulation by endogenous signals and the potential functions of EAG1 channels in normal neuronal signaling as well as neurological diseases.

  20. Eag1 K+ Channel: Endogenous Regulation and Functions in Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ether-à-go-go1 (Eag1, Kv10.1, KCNH1 K+ channel is a member of the voltage-gated K+ channel family mainly distributed in the central nervous system and cancer cells. Like other types of voltage-gated K+ channels, the EAG1 channels are regulated by a variety of endogenous signals including reactive oxygen species, rendering the EAG1 to be in the redox-regulated ion channel family. The role of EAG1 channels in tumor development and its therapeutic significance have been well established. Meanwhile, the importance of hEAG1 channels in the nervous system is now increasingly appreciated. The present review will focus on the recent progress on the channel regulation by endogenous signals and the potential functions of EAG1 channels in normal neuronal signaling as well as neurological diseases.

  1. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  2. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hille, Bertil

    2012-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (K(ir)) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P(2). Wide expression of K(V) channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of K(V) channels by PI(4,5)P(2), we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (M(1)R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P(2) with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited K(V)7.1, K(V)7.2/7.3, and K(ir)2.1 channel current by 90-95%. Activation of M(1)R inhibited K(V)7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P(2) regulation of activity of K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1, K(V)1.3, K(V)1.4, and K(V)1.5/K(V)β1.3, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.4, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1 and K(V)3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M(1)R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested K(V) channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the K(V)7 and K(ir) families.

  3. Purinergic regulation of CFTR and Ca2+ -activated Cl- channels and K+ channels in human pancreatic duct epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Haanes, Kristian A; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Apically applied ATP/UTP stimulated CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (CaCC) channels, which were inhibited by CFTRinh-172 and niflumic acid, respectively. The basolaterally applied ATP stimulated CFTR. In CFPAC-1 cells, which have...... mutated CFTR, basolateral ATP and UTP had negligible effects. In addition to Cl(-) transport in Capan-1 cells, the effects of 5,6-dichloro-1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (DC-EBIO) and clotrimazole indicated functional expression of the intermediate conductance K(+) channels (IK, KCa3...... receptors both Cl(-) channels (TMEM16A/ANO1 and CFTR) and K(+) channels (IK). The K(+) channels provide the driving force for Cl(-)-channel-dependent secretion, and luminal ATP provided locally or secreted from acini may potentiate secretory processes. Future strategies in augmenting pancreatic duct...

  4. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  5. Influence of throat configuration and fish density on escapement of channel catfish from hoop nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porath, Mark T.; Pape, Larry D.; Richters, Lindsey K.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several state agencies have adopted the use of baited, tandemset hoop nets to assess lentic channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus populations. Some level of escapement from the net is expected because an opening exists in each throat of the net, although factors influencing rates of escapement from hoop nets have not been quantified. We conducted experiments to quantify rates of escapement and to determine the influence of throat configuration and fish density within the net on escapement rates. An initial experiment to determine the rate of escapement from each net compartment utilized individually tagged channel catfish placed within the entrance (between the two throats) and cod (within the second throat) compartments of a single hoop net for overnight sets. From this experiment, the mean rate (±SE) of channel catfish escaping was 4.2% (±1.5) from the cod (cod throat was additionally restricted from the traditionally manufactured product), and 74% (±4.2) from the entrance compartments. In a subsequent experiment, channel catfish were placed only in the cod compartment with different throat configurations (restricted or unrestricted) and at two densities (low [6 fish per net] and high [60 fish per net]) for overnight sets to determine the influence of fish density and throat configuration on escapement rates. Escapement rates between throat configurations were doubled at low fish density (13.3 ± 5.4% restricted versus 26.7 ± 5.6% unrestricted) and tripled at high fish density (14.3 ± 4.9% restricted versus 51.9 ± 5.0% unrestricted). These results suggest that retention efficiency is high from cod compartments with restricted throat entrances. However, managers and researchers need to be aware that modification to the cod throats (restrictions) is needed for hoop nets ordered from manufacturers. Managers need to be consistent in their use and reporting of cod end throat configurations when using this gear.

  6. 76 FR 11679 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Belmar, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Belmar... operation of the S71 Bridge across Shark River (South Channel), mile 0.8, at Belmar, NJ. The deviation is... INFORMATION: The S71 Bridge, a bascule lift drawbridge, across Shark River (South Channel), at mile 0.8,...

  7. Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Lv

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic ribbons are structures made largely of the protein Ribeye that hold synaptic vesicles near release sites in non-spiking cells in some sensory systems. Here, we introduce frameshift mutations in the two zebrafish genes encoding for Ribeye and thus remove Ribeye protein from neuromast hair cells. Despite Ribeye depletion, vesicles collect around ribbon-like structures that lack electron density, which we term “ghost ribbons.” Ghost ribbons are smaller in size but possess a similar number of smaller vesicles and are poorly localized to synapses and calcium channels. These hair cells exhibit enhanced exocytosis, as measured by capacitance, and recordings from afferent neurons post-synaptic to hair cells show no significant difference in spike rates. Our results suggest that Ribeye makes up most of the synaptic ribbon density in neuromast hair cells and is necessary for proper localization of calcium channels and synaptic ribbons.

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates Ca channel in early developmental cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Miao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiomyocytes derived from murine embryonic stem (ES cells possess various membrane currents and signaling cascades link to that of embryonic hearts. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP in regulation of membrane potentials and Ca(2+ currents has not been investigated in developmental cardiomyocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the role of ANP in regulating L-type Ca(2+ channel current (I(CaL in different developmental stages of cardiomyocytes derived from ES cells. ANP decreased the frequency of action potentials (APs in early developmental stage (EDS cardiomyocytes, embryonic bodies (EB as well as whole embryo hearts. ANP exerted an inhibitory effect on basal I(CaL in about 70% EDS cardiomyocytes tested but only in about 30% late developmental stage (LDS cells. However, after stimulation of I(CaL by isoproterenol (ISO in LDS cells, ANP inhibited the response in about 70% cells. The depression of I(CaL induced by ANP was not affected by either Nomega, Nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthetase (NOS inhibitor, or KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG selective inhibitor, in either EDS and LDS cells; whereas depression of I(CaL by ANP was entirely abolished by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl adenine (EHNA, a selective inhibitor of type 2 phosphodiesterase(PDE2 in most cells tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCES: Taken together, these results indicate that ANP induced depression of action potentials and I(CaL is due to activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC, cGMP production and cGMP-activation of PDE2 mediated depression of adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophophate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in early cardiomyogenesis.

  9. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] Channels at Single Residues Regulates Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Jeffrey; Irvine, Elaine E.; Peters, Marco; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Giese, K. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins, and a known physiological regulator of K[superscript +] channel function. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] channels by kinases has long been presumed to regulate neuronal processing and behavior. Although circumstantial evidence has accumulated from behavioral studies…

  10. CaV1.2 calcium channels: just cut out to be regulated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Rachel D; Tirko, Natasha N; Tsien, Richard W

    2014-06-04

    Tight regulation of calcium entry through the L-type calcium channel CaV1.2 ensures optimal excitation-response coupling. In this issue of Neuron, Michailidis et al. (2014) demonstrate that CaV1.2 activity triggers negative feedback regulation through proteolytic cleavage of the channel within the core of the pore-forming subunit.

  11. Soft Matter-Regulated Active Nanovalves Locally Self-Assembled in Femtoliter Nanofluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Shinomiya, Misato; Harada, Atsushi

    2016-03-16

    Well-tailored thermoresponsive polymer brushes locally self-assembled in tiny nanofluidic channels enable the active regulation of femtoliter-scale fluids. Such soft-matter-regulated active nanovalves within nanofluidic channels can be extended to build well-controlled functional nanofluidic systems, allowing complex fluidic processes to be performed at the nanometer scales.

  12. Glutamate Transporters Regulate Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptor Modulation of Kv2.1 Potassium Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Mulholland, Patrick J.; Carpenter-Hyland, Ezekiel P.; Hearing, Matthew C.; Becker, Howard C.; Woodward, John J.; Chandler, L. Judson

    2008-01-01

    Delayed-rectifier Kv2.1 potassium channels regulate somatodendritic excitability during periods of repetitive, high-frequency activity. Recent evidence suggests Kv2.1 channel modulation is linked to glutamatergic neurotransmission. Since NMDA-type glutamate receptors are critical regulators of synaptic plasticity, we investigated NMDA receptor modulation of Kv2.1 channels in rodent hippocampus and cortex. Bath application of NMDA potently unclustered and dephosphorylated Kv2.1 and produced a ...

  13. Endocytic regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kuniaki; Norota, Ikuo; Obara, Yutaro

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of cardiac ion channels is critical for the prevention of arrhythmia caused by abnormal excitability. Ion channels can be regulated by a change in function (qualitative) and a change in number (quantitative). Functional changes have been extensively investigated for many ion channels including cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels. By contrast, the regulation of ion channel numbers has not been widely examined, particularly with respect to acute modulation of ion channels. This article briefly summarizes stimulus-induced endocytic regulation of major voltage-dependent potassium channels in the heart. The stimuli known to cause their endocytosis include receptor activation, drugs, and low extracellular [K(+)], following which the potassium channels undergo either clathrin-mediated or caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytic regulation has been demonstrated for Kv1.2, Kv1.5, KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), and Kv4.3, while drug-induced endocytosis has been demonstrated for Kv1.5 and hERG. Low [K(+)](o)-induced endocytosis might be unique for hERG channels, whose electrophysiological characteristics are known to be under strong influence of [K(+)](o). Although the precise mechanisms have not been elucidated, it is obvious that major cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels are modulated by endocytosis, which leads to changes in cardiac excitability.

  14. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  15. Regulation of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel function, trafficking, and membrane stability by auxiliary subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Ricardo; Calderón-Rivera, Aida; Andrade, Arturo

    2013-09-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels mediate Ca(2+) ions influx into cells in response to depolarization of the plasma membrane. They are responsible for initiation of excitation-contraction and excitation-secretion coupling, and the Ca(2+) that enters cells through this pathway is also important in the regulation of protein phosphorylation, gene transcription, and many other intracellular events. Initial electrophysiological studies divided CaV channels into low-voltage-activated (LVA) and high-voltage-activated (HVA) channels. The HVA CaV channels were further subdivided into L, N, P/Q, and R-types which are oligomeric protein complexes composed of an ion-conducting CaVα1 subunit and auxiliary CaVα2δ, CaVβ, and CaVγ subunits. The functional consequences of the auxiliary subunits include altered functional and pharmacological properties of the channels as well as increased current densities. The latter observation suggests an important role of the auxiliary subunits in membrane trafficking of the CaVα1 subunit. This includes the mechanisms by which CaV channels are targeted to the plasma membrane and to appropriate regions within a given cell. Likewise, the auxiliary subunits seem to participate in the mechanisms that remove CaV channels from the plasma membrane for recycling and/or degradation. Diverse studies have provided important clues to the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of CaV channels by the auxiliary subunits, and the roles that these proteins could possibly play in channel targeting and membrane Stabilization.

  16. Ginseng ginsenoside pharmacology in nervous systems: involvement of the regulations of ion channels and receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Yeol eNah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, is one of the oldest traditional medicines and is thought to be a tonic. It has been claimed that ginseng may improve vitality and health. Recent studies have advanced ginseng pharmacology and shown that ginseng has various pharmacological effects in the nervous system. Ginsenosides, steroid glycosides extracted from ginseng, were one of the first class of biologically active plant glycosides identified. The diverse pharmacological effects of ginsenosides have been investigated through the regulation of various types of ion channels and receptors in neuronal cells and heterologous expression systems. Ginsenoside Rg3 regulates voltage-gated ion channels such as Ca2+, K+, and Na+ channels, and ligand-gated ion channels such as GABAA, 5-HT3, nicotinic acetylcholine, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors through interactions with various sites including channel blocker binding sites, toxin-binding sites, channel gating regions, and allosteric channel regulator binding sites when the respective ion channels or receptors are stimulated with depolarization or ligand treatment. Treatment with ginsenoside Rg3 has been found to stabilize excitable cells by blocking influxes of cations such as Ca2+ and Na+, or by enhancing Cl- influx. The aim of this review is to present recent findings on the pharmacological functions of the ginsenosides through the interactions with ion channels and receptors. This review will detail the pharmacological applications of ginsenosides as neuroprotective drugs that target ion channels and ligand-gated ion channels.

  17. Transient receptor potential channels in mechanosensing and cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Nilius, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are unique cellular sensors responding to a wide variety of extra- and intracellular signals, including mechanical and osmotic stress. In recent years, TRP channels from multiple subfamilies have been added to the list of mechano- and/or osmosensitive c...

  18. GATE REGULATION SPEED AND TRANSITION PROCESS OF UNSTEADY FLOW IN CHANNEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Guang-ming; DING Zhi-liang; WANG Chang-de; YAO Xiong

    2008-01-01

    The operation methods of channel and the speed of gate regulation have great influence on the transformation of flow in water conveyance channels. Based on characteristics method, a 1-D unsteady flow numerical model for gate regulation was established in this study. The process of water flow was simulated under different boundary conditions. The influence of gate regulation speed and channel operation methods on flow transition process was analyzed. The numerical results show that under the same conditions, with increasing regulation speed of the gate, the change rates of discharge and water level increase, while the response time of channel becomes shorter, and ultimately the discharge and water level will transit to the same equilibrium states. Moreover, the flow is easier to reach stable state, if the water level in front of the sluice is kept constant, instead of behind the sluice. This study will be important to the scheme design of automatic operation control in water conveyance channels.

  19. Pressure, density, temperature and entropy fluctuations in compressible turbulent plane channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gerolymos, G A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of thermodynamic state-variables in compressible aerodynamic wall-turbulence, using results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent plane channel flow. The basic transport equations governing the behaviour of thermodynamic variables (density, pressure, temperature and entropy) are reviewed and used to derive the exact transport equations for the variances and fluxes (transport by the fluctuating velocity field) of the thermodynamic fluctuations. The scaling with Reynolds and Mach number of compressible turbulent plane channel flow is discussed. Correlation coefficients and higher-order statistics of the thermodynamic fluctuations are examined. Finally, detailed budgets of the transport equations for the variances and fluxes of the thermodynamic variables from a well-resolved DNS are analysed. Implications of these results both to the understanding of the thermodynamic interactions in compressible wall-turbulence and to possible improvements in statistical...

  20. The mucolipidosis IV Ca2+ channel TRPML1 (MCOLN1) is regulated by the TOR kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyenwoke, Rob U; Sexton, Jonathan Z; Yan, Feng; Díaz, María Cristina Huertas; Forsberg, Lawrence J; Major, Michael B; Brenman, Jay E

    2015-09-15

    Autophagy is a complex pathway regulated by numerous signalling events that recycles macromolecules and may be perturbed in lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). During autophagy, aberrant regulation of the lysosomal Ca(2+) efflux channel TRPML1 [transient receptor potential mucolipin 1 (MCOLN1)], also known as MCOLN1, is solely responsible for the human LSD mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV); however, the exact mechanisms involved in the development of the pathology of this LSD are unknown. In the present study, we provide evidence that the target of rapamycin (TOR), a nutrient-sensitive protein kinase that negatively regulates autophagy, directly targets and inactivates the TRPML1 channel and thereby functional autophagy, through phosphorylation. Further, mutating these phosphorylation sites to unphosphorylatable residues proved to block TOR regulation of the TRPML1 channel. These findings suggest a mechanism for how TOR activity may regulate the TRPML1 channel.

  1. A role for BK channels in heart rate regulation in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy L Imlach

    Full Text Available The heart generates and propagates action potentials through synchronized activation of ion channels allowing inward Na(+ and Ca(2+ and outward K(+ currents. There are a number of K(+ channel types expressed in the heart that play key roles in regulating the cardiac cycle. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK ion channels are not thought to be directly involved in heart function. Here we present evidence that heart rate can be significantly reduced by inhibiting the activity of BK channels. Agents that specifically inhibit BK channel activity, including paxilline and lolitrem B, slowed heart rate in conscious wild-type mice by 30% and 42%, respectively. Heart rate of BK channel knock-out mice (Kcnma1(-/- was not affected by these BK channel inhibitors, suggesting that the changes to heart rate were specifically mediated through BK channels. The possibility that these effects were mediated through BK channels peripheral to the heart was ruled out with experiments using isolated, perfused rat hearts, which showed a significant reduction in heart rate when treated with the BK channel inhibitors paxilline (1 microM, lolitrem B (1 microM, and iberiotoxin (0.23 microM, of 34%, 60%, and 42%, respectively. Furthermore, paxilline was shown to decrease heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. These results implicate BK channels located in the heart to be directly involved in the regulation of heart rate.

  2. Swelling-Activated Anion Channels Are Essential for Volume Regulation of Mouse Thymocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravshan Z. Sabirov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Channel-mediated trans-membrane chloride movement is a key process in the active cell volume regulation under osmotic stress in most cells. However, thymocytes were hypothesized to regulate their volume by activating a coupled K-Cl cotransport mechanism. Under the patch-clamp, we found that osmotic swelling activates two types of macroscopic anion conductance with different voltage-dependence and pharmacology. At the single-channel level, we identified two types of events: one corresponded to the maxi-anion channel, and the other one had characteristics of the volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR chloride channel of intermediate conductance. A VSOR inhibitor, phloretin, significantly suppressed both macroscopic VSOR-type conductance and single-channel activity of intermediate amplitude. The maxi-anion channel activity was largely suppressed by Gd3+ ions but not by phloretin. Surprisingly, [(dihydroindenyloxy] alkanoic acid (DIOA, a known antagonist of K-Cl cotransporter, was found to significantly suppress the activity of the VSOR-type single-channel events with no effect on the maxi-anion channels at 10 μM. The regulatory volume decrease (RVD phase of cellular response to hypotonicity was mildly suppressed by Gd3+ ions and was completely abolished by phloretin suggesting a major impact of the VSOR chloride channel and modulatory role of the maxi-anion channel. The inhibitory effect of DIOA was also strong, and, most likely, it occurred via blocking the VSOR Cl− channels.

  3. Discoordinate regulation of different K channels in cultured rat skeletal muscle by nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdor-Alboim, S; Rothman, C; Braiman, L; Bak, A; Langzam, L; Yosef, O; Sterengarz, B B; Nawrath, H; Brodie, C; Sampson, S R

    1999-05-01

    We investigated the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on expression of K+ channels in cultured skeletal muscle. The channels studied were (1) charybdotoxin (ChTx)-sensitive channels by using a polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits against ChTx, (2) Kv1.5 voltage-sensitive channels, and (3) apamin-sensitive (afterhyperpolarization) channels. Crude homogenates were prepared from cultures made from limb muscles of 1-2-day-old rat pups for identification of ChTx-sensitive and Kv1.5 channels by Western blotting techniques. Apamin-sensitive K+ channels were studied by measurement of specific [125I]-apamin binding by whole cell preparations. ChTx-sensitive channels display a fusion-related increase in expression, and NGF downregulates these channels in both myoblasts and myotubes. Voltage-dependent Kv1.5 channel expression is low in myoblasts and increases dramatically with fusion; NGF induces early expression of these channels and causes expression after fusion to increase even further. NGF downregulates apamin-sensitive channels. NGF increases the rate of fall of the action potential recorded intracellularly from single myotubes with intracellular microelectrodes. The results confirm and extend those of previous studies in showing a functional role for NGF in the regulation of membrane properties of skeletal muscle. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that the different K+ channels in this preparation are regulated in a discoordinate manner. The divergent effects of NGF on expression of different K+ channels, however, do not appear sufficient to explain the NGF-induced increase in the rate of fall of the action potential. The changes during the falling phase may rather be due to increases in channel properties or may result from an increased driving force on the membrane potential secondary to the NGF-induced hyperpolarization.

  4. A heme-binding domain controls regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mark J; Kapetanaki, Sofia M; Chernova, Tatyana; Jamieson, Andrew G; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Moody, Peter C E; Mitcheson, John S; Davies, Noel W; Schmid, Ralf; Raven, Emma L; Storey, Nina M

    2016-04-01

    Heme iron has many and varied roles in biology. Most commonly it binds as a prosthetic group to proteins, and it has been widely supposed and amply demonstrated that subtle variations in the protein structure around the heme, including the heme ligands, are used to control the reactivity of the metal ion. However, the role of heme in biology now appears to also include a regulatory responsibility in the cell; this includes regulation of ion channel function. In this work, we show that cardiac KATP channels are regulated by heme. We identify a cytoplasmic heme-binding CXXHX16H motif on the sulphonylurea receptor subunit of the channel, and mutagenesis together with quantitative and spectroscopic analyses of heme-binding and single channel experiments identified Cys628 and His648 as important for heme binding. We discuss the wider implications of these findings and we use the information to present hypotheses for mechanisms of heme-dependent regulation across other ion channels.

  5. Recent advances in therapeutic strategies that focus on the regulation of ion channel expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Susumu; Kito, Hiroaki; Hatano, Noriyuki; Muraki, Katsuhiko

    2016-04-01

    A number of different ion channel types are involved in cell signaling networks, and homeostatic regulatory mechanisms contribute to the control of ion channel expression. Profiling of global gene expression using microarray technology has recently provided novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the homeostatic and pathological control of ion channel expression. It has demonstrated that the dysregulation of ion channel expression is associated with the pathogenesis of neural, cardiovascular, and immune diseases as well as cancers. In addition to the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulation of ion channels, potentially important evidence on the mechanisms controlling ion channel expression has recently been accumulated. The regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing is therefore a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of dominant-negative splicing disorders. Epigenetic modification plays a key role in various pathological conditions through the regulation of pluripotency genes. Inhibitors of pre-mRNA splicing and histone deacetyalase/methyltransferase have potential as potent therapeutic drugs for cancers and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Moreover, membrane-anchoring proteins, lysosomal and proteasomal degradation-related molecules, auxiliary subunits, and pharmacological agents alter the protein folding, membrane trafficking, and post-translational modifications of ion channels, and are linked to expression-defect channelopathies. In this review, we focused on recent insights into the transcriptional, spliceosomal, epigenetic, and proteasomal regulation of ion channel expression: Ca(2+) channels (TRPC/TRPV/TRPM/TRPA/Orai), K(+) channels (voltage-gated, KV/Ca(2+)-activated, KCa/two-pore domain, K2P/inward-rectifier, Kir), and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (TMEM16A/TMEM16B). Furthermore, this review highlights expression of these ion channels in expression-defect channelopathies.

  6. 78 FR 19155 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville... Channel Sprint'' swim event, to be held on the waters adjacent to and surrounding Harbor Island in... Channel Sprint'' on the waters adjacent to and surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach,...

  7. Polarized axonal surface expression of neuronal KCNQ potassium channels is regulated by calmodulin interaction with KCNQ2 subunit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Cavaretta

    Full Text Available KCNQ potassium channels composed of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits give rise to the M-current, a slow-activating and non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium current that limits repetitive firing of action potentials. KCNQ channels are enriched at the surface of axons and axonal initial segments, the sites for action potential generation and modulation. Their enrichment at the axonal surface is impaired by mutations in KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail that cause benign familial neonatal convulsion and myokymia, suggesting that their correct surface distribution and density at the axon is crucial for control of neuronal excitability. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating enrichment of KCNQ channels at the neuronal axon remain elusive. Here, we show that enrichment of KCNQ channels at the axonal surface of dissociated rat hippocampal cultured neurons is regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. Using immunocytochemistry and the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 membrane protein as a trafficking reporter, we demonstrate that fusion of KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail is sufficient to target CD4 protein to the axonal surface whereas inhibition of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 abolishes axonal surface expression of CD4 fusion proteins by retaining them in the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 also impairs enrichment of heteromeric KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels at the axonal surface by blocking their trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the axon. Consistently, hippocampal neuronal excitability is dampened by transient expression of wild-type KCNQ2 but not mutant KCNQ2 deficient in calmodulin binding. Furthermore, coexpression of mutant calmodulin, which can interact with KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels but not calcium, reduces but does not abolish their enrichment at the axonal surface, suggesting that apo calmodulin but not calcium-bound calmodulin is necessary for their preferential targeting to the axonal

  8. Energy density of sub-Antarctic fishes from the Beagle Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, D A; Lattuca, M E; Boy, C C; Pérez, A F; Ceballos, S G; Vanella, F A; Morriconi, E R; Malanga, G F; Aureliano, D R; Rimbau, S; Calvo, J

    2009-03-01

    The energy density (ED) of nine species of sub-Antarctic fishes was estimated by calorimetry. The fish, seven notothenioids, one atherinopsid and one galaxiid, represents some of the more abundant species in the ichthyofauna of the Beagle Channel. Principal-components analysis (PCA) of the ED of the different organs/tissues indicated that PC(1) and PC(2) accounted for 87% of the variability. Separation along PC(1) corresponded to differences in muscle and liver energy densities whereas separation along PC(2) corresponded to differences in the ED of the gonads. Differences between species were significant except for P. sima. Inclusion of the gonadosomatic index (GSI) as an explanatory variable enabled us to establish the existence of energy transfer from muscle and liver to the gonads in ripe P. tessellata females. Total ED values varied between 4.21 and 6.26 kJ g(-1), the pelagic Odontesthes sp. being the species with the highest ED. A significant relationship between ED and muscle dry weight (DW(M)) was found for all the species except P. tessellata. These data are the first direct estimates of ED of fishes from the Beagle Channel.

  9. IKK regulates the deubiquitinase CYLD at the postsynaptic density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thein, Soe; Pham, Anna [Laboratory of Neurobiology, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Bayer, K. Ulrich [Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa [EM Facility, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Dosemeci, Ayse, E-mail: dosemeca@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Neurobiology, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • CYLD is phosphorylated by IKK in isolated PSDs in the absence of Ca{sup 2+}. • CYLD is phosphorylated by IKK at the PSDs of intact neurons in basal conditions. • Phosphorylation of CYLD by IKK increases its deubiquitinase activity. • The process is likely to influence protein trafficking at the PSD in basal conditions. - Abstract: K63-linked polyubiquitination of proteins regulates their trafficking into specific cellular pathways such as endocytosis and autophagy. CYLD, a deubiquitinase specific for K63-linked polyubiquitins, is present in high quantities at the postsynaptic density (PSD). It was previously shown that, under excitatory conditions, CaMKII activates CYLD in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. The observation that CYLD can also be phosphorylated in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} in isolated PSDs led us to further explore the regulation of CYLD under basal conditions. A possible involvement of the autonomous form of CaMKII and IKK, both kinases known to be localized at the PSD, was examined. A CaMKII inhibitor CN21 had no effect on CYLD phosphorylation in the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, but two different IKK inhibitors, IKK16 and tatNEMO, inhibited its phosphorylation. Immuno-electron microscopy on hippocampal cultures, using an antibody for CYLD phosphorylated at S-418, revealed that the phosphorylated form of CYLD is present at the PSD under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of CYLD under basal conditions was inhibited by IKK16. NMDA treatment further promoted phosphorylation of CYLD at the PSD, but IKK16 failed to block the NMDA-induced effect. In vitro experiments using purified proteins demonstrated direct phosphorylation and activation of CYLD by the beta catalytic subunit of IKK. Activation of IKK in isolated PSDs also promoted phosphorylation of CYLD and an increase in endogenous deubiquitinase activity for K63-linked polyubiquitins. Altogether, the results suggest that in the absence of excitatory conditions, constitutive IKK activity

  10. Voltage-dependent metabolic regulation of Kv2.1 channels in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masashi; Nakata, Masanori; Yamato, Shiho; Dezaki, Katsuya; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, San-e; Kawakami, Masanobu; Yada, Toshihiko; Kakei, Masafumi

    2010-05-28

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) play a crucial role in formation of action potentials in response to glucose stimulation in pancreatic beta-ells. We previously reported that the Kv channel is regulated by glucose metabolism, particularly by MgATP. We examined whether the regulation of Kv channels is voltage-dependent and mechanistically related with phosphorylation of the channels. In rat pancreatic beta-cells, suppression of glucose metabolism with low glucose concentrations of 2.8mM or less or by metabolic inhibitors decreased the Kv2.1-channel activity at positive membrane potentials, while increased it at potentials negative to -10 mV, suggesting that modulation of Kv channels by glucose metabolism is voltage-dependent. Similarly, in HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant Kv2.1 channels, 0mM but not 10mM MgATP modulated the channel activity in a manner similar to that in beta-cells. Both steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel were shifted toward the negative potential in association with the voltage-dependent modulation of the channels by cytosolic dialysis of alkaline phosphatase in beta-cells. The modulation of Kv-channel current-voltage relations were also observed during and after glucose-stimulated electrical excitation. These results suggest that the cellular metabolism including MgATP production and/or channel phosphorylation/dephosphorylation underlie the physiological modulation of Kv2.1 channels during glucose-induced insulin secretion.

  11. Optimized Irregular Low-Density Parity-Check Codes for Multicarrier Modulations over Frequency-Selective Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelle Guillaume

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with optimized channel coding for OFDM transmissions (COFDM over frequency-selective channels using irregular low-density parity-check (LDPC codes. Firstly, we introduce a new characterization of the LDPC code irregularity called “irregularity profile.” Then, using this parameterization, we derive a new criterion based on the minimization of the transmission bit error probability to design an irregular LDPC code suited to the frequency selectivity of the channel. The optimization of this criterion is done using the Gaussian approximation technique. Simulations illustrate the good performance of our approach for different transmission channels.

  12. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  13. Slow conversions among subconductance states of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, T.; Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J.; Davis, P B; Ma, J.

    1996-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel exhibits multiple subconductance states. To study the regulation of conductance states of the CFTR channel, we expressed the wild-type CFTR protein in HEK 293 cells, and isolated microsomal membrane vesicles for reconstitution studies in lipid bilayer membranes. A single CFTR channel had a dominant conductance of 7.8 pS (H), plus two sub-open states with conductances of approximately 6 pS (M) and 2.7 pS (L) in 200...

  14. Screen-based identification and validation of four new ion channels as regulators of renal ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaats, Gisela G; Wheway, Gabrielle; Foletto, Veronica; Szymanska, Katarzyna; van Balkom, Bas W M; Logister, Ive; Den Ouden, Krista; Keijzer-Veen, Mandy G; Lilien, Marc R; Knoers, Nine V; Johnson, Colin A; Giles, Rachel H

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the contribution of ion channels to ciliogenesis, we carried out a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based reverse genetics screen of all ion channels in the mouse genome in murine inner medullary collecting duct kidney cells. This screen revealed four candidate ion channel genes: Kcnq1, Kcnj10, Kcnf1 and Clcn4. We show that these four ion channels localize to renal tubules, specifically to the base of primary cilia. We report that human KCNQ1 Long QT syndrome disease alleles regulate renal ciliogenesis; KCNQ1-p.R518X, -p.A178T and -p.K362R could not rescue ciliogenesis after Kcnq1-siRNA-mediated depletion in contrast to wild-type KCNQ1 and benign KCNQ1-p.R518Q, suggesting that the ion channel function of KCNQ1 regulates ciliogenesis. In contrast, we demonstrate that the ion channel function of KCNJ10 is independent of its effect on ciliogenesis. Our data suggest that these four ion channels regulate renal ciliogenesis through the periciliary diffusion barrier or the ciliary pocket, with potential implication as genetic contributors to ciliopathy pathophysiology. The new functional roles of a subset of ion channels provide new insights into the disease pathogenesis of channelopathies, which might suggest future therapeutic approaches.

  15. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have numerical appreciation of the results the propagation equation for plasma is solved using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the initial plane wave front of the beam, using boundary conditions. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma and significantly adds self-focusing in plasma. This causes the laser beam to become more focused by reduction of diffraction effect, which is an important phenomenon in inertial confinement fusion and also for the understanding of self-focusing of laser pulses. Numerical computations are presented and discussed in the form of graphs for typical parameters of laser-plasma interaction.

  16. The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on turbulence in channel flows

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ashish; Pecnik, Rene

    2016-01-01

    The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on near-wall turbulence in a channel are studied by means of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the low-Mach number approximation of the Navier--Stokes equations. Different constitutive relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are used in order to mimic a wide range of fluid behaviours and to develop a generalised framework for studying turbulence modulations in variable property flows. Instead of scaling the velocity solely based on local density, as done for the van Driest transformation, we derive an extension of the scaling that is based on gradients of the semi-local Reynolds number $Re_\\tau^*$. This extension of the van Driest transformation is able to collapse velocity profiles for flows with near-wall property gradients as a function of the semi-local wall coordinate. However, flow quantities like mixing length, turbulence anisotropy and turbulent vorticity fluctuations do not show a universal scaling very close to th...

  17. Developmental changes in Ca2+ channel subtypes regulating endocytosis at the calyx of Held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Okamoto, Yuji; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2014-08-15

    At the mammalian central synapse, Ca(2+) influx through Ca(2+) channels triggers neurotransmitter release by exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, which fuse with the presynaptic membrane and are subsequently retrieved by endocytosis. At the calyx of Held terminal, P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels mainly mediate exocytosis, while N- and R-type channels have a minor role in young terminals (postnatal days 8-11). The role of each Ca(2+) channel subtype in endocytosis remains to be elucidated; therefore, we examined the role of each type of Ca(2+) channel in endocytosis, by using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in conjunction with capacitance measurement techniques. We found that at the young calyx terminal, when R-type Ca(2+) channels were blocked, the slow mode of endocytosis was further slowed, while blocking of either P/Q- or N-type Ca(2+) channels had no major effect. In more mature terminals (postnatal days 14-17), the slow mode of endocytosis was mainly triggered by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, suggesting developmental changes in the regulation of the slow mode of endocytosis by different Ca(2+) channel subtypes. In contrast, a fast mode of endocytosis was observed after strong stimulation in young terminals that was mediated mainly by P/Q-type, but not R- or N-type Ca(2+) channels. These results suggest that different types of Ca(2+) channels regulate the two different modes of endocytosis. The results may also suggest that exo- and endocytosis are regulated independently at different sites in young animals but are more tightly coupled in older animals, allowing more efficient synaptic vesicle cycling adapted for fast signalling.

  18. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  19. Dual Regulation of Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels by PIP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo A Rodríguez Menchaca

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 16 years, there has been an impressive number of ion channels shown to be sensitive to the major phosphoinositide in the plasma membrane, phosphatidilinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Among them are voltage-gated channels, which are crucial for both neuronal and cardiac excitability. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav channels were shown to be regulated bidirectionally by PIP2. On one hand, PIP2 stabilized their activity by reducing current rundown but on the other hand it produced a voltage-dependent inhibition by shifting the activation curve to more positive voltages. For voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels PIP2 was first shown to prevent N-type inactivation. Careful examination of the effects of PIP2 on the activation mechanism of Kv1.2 has shown a similar bidirectional regulation as in the Cav channels. The two effects could be distinguished kinetically, in terms of their sensitivities to PIP2 and by distinct molecular determinants. The rightward shift of the Kv1.2 voltage dependence implicated basic residues in the S4-S5 linker and was consistent with stabilization of the inactive state of the voltage sensor. A third type of a voltage-gated ion channel modulated by PIP2 is the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channel. PIP2 has been shown to enhance the opening of HCN channels by shifting their voltage-dependent activation toward depolarized potentials. The sea urchin HCN channel, SpIH, showed again a PIP2-mediated bidirectional effect but in reverse order than the depolarization-activated Cav and Kv channels: a voltage-dependent potentiation, like the mammalian HCN channels, but also an inhibition of the cGMP-induced current activation. Just like the Kv1.2 channels, distinct molecular determinants underlied the PIP2 dual effects on SpIH channels. The dual regulation of these very different ion channels, all of which are voltage dependent, points to conserved mechanisms of regulation of these channels by PIP2.

  20. Control of Energy Density inside a Disordered Medium by Coupling to Open or Closed Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Raktim; Yamilov, Alexey G.; Petrenko, Sasha; Bromberg, Yaron; Cao, Hui

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the efficient control of light intensity distribution inside a random scattering system. The adaptive wave front shaping technique is applied to a silicon waveguide containing scattering nanostructures, and the on-chip coupling scheme enables access to all input spatial modes. By selectively coupling the incident light to the open or closed channels of the disordered system, we not only vary the total energy stored inside the system by a factor of 7.4, but also change the energy density distribution from an exponential decay to a linear decay and to a profile peaked near the center. This work provides an on-chip platform for controlling light-matter interactions in turbid media.

  1. Accounting for Finite Size of Ions in Nanofluidic Channels Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Christopher; Gillespie, Dirk; Pennathur, Sumita

    2016-11-01

    The physics of nanofluidic devices are dominated by ion-wall interactions within the electric double layer (EDL). A full understanding of the EDL allows for better exploitation of micro and nanofluidic devices for applications such as biologic separations, desalination, and energy conversion, Although continuum theory is generally used to study the fluidics within these channels, in very confined geometries, high surface charge channels, or significant solute concentration systems, continuum theories such as Poisson-Boltzmann cease to be valid because the finite size of ions is not considered. Density functional theory (DFT) provides an accurate and efficient method for predicting the concentration of ions and the electrostatic potential near a charged wall because it accounts for more complex electrostatic and hard-sphere correlations. This subsequently allows for a better model for ion flux, fluid flow, and current in electrokinetic systems at high surface charge, confined geometries, and concentrated systems. In this work, we present a theoretical approach utilizing DFT to predict unique flow phenomena in nanofluidic, electrokinetic systems. CBET-1402736 from the National Science Foundation.

  2. 77 FR 56115 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Fort Point Channel, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Fort Point Channel, Boston, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The...

  3. 78 FR 34881 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville... Guard is establishing a Special Local Regulation for the ``Swim the Loop/Motts Channel Sprint'' swim... Sprint'' on the waters adjacent to and surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North...

  4. 77 FR 70372 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Avon Township, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South..., across Shark River (South Channel) at Avon Township, NJ. The existing regulation contains a drawbridge... Transportation (NJDOT) to replace the existing bascule bridge, which carries S35 over Shark River (South...

  5. 77 FR 45247 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gallants Channel, Beaufort, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Foundation Sprint Triathlon. DATES: This deviation is effective 12:30 p.m. until 3 p.m. on Saturday... accommodate the Neuse River Keeper Foundation Sprint Triathlon. Under the current operating regulations...

  6. Dual Regulation of Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels by PIP(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Adney, Scott K; Zhou, Lei; Logothetis, Diomedes E

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, there has been an impressive number of ion channels shown to be sensitive to the major phosphoinositide in the plasma membrane, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). Among them are voltage-gated channels, which are crucial for both neuronal and cardiac excitability. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels were shown to be regulated bidirectionally by PIP(2). On one hand, PIP(2) stabilized their activity by reducing current rundown but on the other hand it produced a voltage-dependent inhibition by shifting the activation curve to more positive voltages. For voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels PIP(2) was first shown to prevent N-type inactivation regardless of whether the fast inactivation gate was part of the pore-forming α subunit or of an accessory β subunit. Careful examination of the effects of PIP(2) on the activation mechanism of Kv1.2 has shown a similar bidirectional regulation as in the Cav channels. The two effects could be distinguished kinetically, in terms of their sensitivities to PIP(2) and by distinct molecular determinants. The rightward shift of the Kv1.2 voltage dependence implicated basic residues in the S4-S5 linker and was consistent with stabilization of the inactive state of the voltage sensor. A third type of a voltage-gated ion channel modulated by PIP(2) is the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel. PIP(2) has been shown to enhance the opening of HCN channels by shifting their voltage-dependent activation toward depolarized potentials. The sea urchin HCN channel, SpIH, showed again a PIP(2)-mediated bidirectional effect but in reverse order than the depolarization-activated Cav and Kv channels: a voltage-dependent potentiation, like the mammalian HCN channels, but also an inhibition of the cGMP-induced current activation. Just like the Kv1.2 channels, distinct molecular determinants underlied the PIP(2) dual effects on SpIH, with the proximal C-terminus implicated in the

  7. Identifying regulators for EAG1 channels with a novel electrophysiology and tryptophan fluorescence based screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinatin I Brelidze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ether-à-go-go (EAG channels are expressed throughout the central nervous system and are also crucial regulators of cell cycle and tumor progression. The large intracellular amino- and carboxy- terminal domains of EAG1 each share similarity with known ligand binding motifs in other proteins, yet EAG1 channels have no known regulatory ligands. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we screened a library of small biologically relevant molecules against EAG1 channels with a novel two-pronged screen to identify channel regulators. In one arm of the screen we used electrophysiology to assess the functional effects of the library compounds on full-length EAG1 channels. In an orthogonal arm, we used tryptophan fluorescence to screen for binding of the library compounds to the isolated C-terminal region. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Several compounds from the flavonoid, indole and benzofuran chemical families emerged as binding partners and/or regulators of EAG1 channels. The two-prong screen can aid ligand and drug discovery for ligand-binding domains of other ion channels.

  8. Down-regulation of BK channel expression in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Otalora, Luis F; Hernandez, Eder F; Arshadmansab, Massoud F; Francisco, Sebastian; Willis, Michael; Ermolinsky, Boris; Zarei, Masoud; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R

    2008-03-20

    In the hippocampus, BK channels are preferentially localized in presynaptic glutamatergic terminals including mossy fibers where they are thought to play an important role regulating excessive glutamate release during hyperactive states. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK, MaxiK, Slo) have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic epilepsy. However, the role of BK channels in acquired mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) remains unknown. Here we used immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), Western immunoblotting and RT-PCR to investigate the expression pattern of the alpha-pore-forming subunit of BK channels in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats obtained by the pilocarpine model of MTLE. All epileptic rats experiencing recurrent spontaneous seizures exhibited a significant down-regulation of BK channel immunostaining in the mossy fibers at the hilus and stratum lucidum of the CA3 area. Quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence signals by LSCM revealed a significant 47% reduction in BK channel immunofluorescent signals in epileptic rats when compared to age-matched non-epileptic control rats. These data correlate with a similar reduction in BK channel protein levels and transcripts in the cortex and hippocampus. Our data indicate a seizure-related down-regulation of BK channels in chronically epileptic rats. Further functional assays are necessary to determine whether altered BK channel expression is an acquired channelopathy or a compensatory mechanism affecting the network excitability in MTLE. Moreover, seizure-mediated BK down-regulation may disturb neuronal excitability and presynaptic control at glutamatergic terminals triggering exaggerated glutamate release and seizures.

  9. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Belén Pérez-Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal projection neurons (SPNs process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson’s disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit.

  10. T-type voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the tone of mouse efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Cribbs, Leanne L;

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the regulation of renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate. Excitation-contraction coupling in afferent arterioles is known to require activation of these channels and we studied their role in the regulation of cortical efferent arteriolar...... tone. We used microdissected perfused mouse efferent arterioles and found a transient vasoconstriction in response to depolarization with potassium; an effect abolished by removal of extracellular calcium. The T-type voltage-gated calcium channel antagonists mibefradil and nickel blocked this potassium....... Low concentrations of nickel, an agent that blocks Ca(v)3.2, had a similar effect. Thus, T-type voltage-gated calcium channels are functionally important for depolarization-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent dilatation in mouse cortical efferent arterioles.Kidney International advance online...

  11. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression in cancer: hormones, growth factors and auto-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Scott P; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Brackenbury, William J; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M; Campbell, Thomas M; Coombes, R Charles; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2014-03-19

    Although ion channels are increasingly being discovered in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and shown to contribute to different aspects and stages of the cancer process, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling their expression. Here, we focus on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) which are upregulated in many types of carcinomas where their activity potentiates cell behaviours integral to the metastatic cascade. Regulation of VGSCs occurs at a hierarchy of levels from transcription to post-translation. Importantly, mainstream cancer mechanisms, especially hormones and growth factors, play a significant role in the regulation. On the whole, in major hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, there is a negative association between genomic steroid hormone sensitivity and functional VGSC expression. Activity-dependent regulation by positive feedback has been demonstrated in strongly metastatic cells whereby the VGSC is self-sustaining, with its activity promoting further functional channel expression. Such auto-regulation is unlike normal cells in which activity-dependent regulation occurs mostly via negative feedback. Throughout, we highlight the possible clinical implications of functional VGSC expression and regulation in cancer.

  12. A TRP Channel in the Lysosome Regulates Large Particle Phagocytosis via Focal Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis of large extracellular particles such as apoptotic bodies requires delivery of the intracellular endosomal and lysosomal membranes to form plasmalemmal pseudopods. Here we identified Mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) as the key lysosomal Ca2+ channel regulating focal exocytosis and phagosome biogenesis. Both particle ingestion and lysosomal exocytosis are inhibited by synthetic TRPML1 blockers, and are defective in macrophages isolated from TRPML1 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRPML...

  13. Gasotransmitter regulation of ion channels: a key step in O2 sensing by the carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Peers, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Carotid bodies detect hypoxia in arterial blood, translating this stimulus into physiological responses via the CNS. It is long established that ion channels are critical to this process. More recent evidence indicates that gasotransmitters exert powerful influences on O2 sensing by the carotid body. Here, we review current understanding of hypoxia-dependent production of gasotransmitters, how they regulate ion channels in the carotid body, and how this impacts carotid body function.

  14. Kv3 channel assembly, trafficking and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-05-15

    Zinc, a divalent heavy metal ion and an essential mineral for life, regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via ion channels. However, its binding sites and regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report that Kv3 channel assembly, localization and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites. Local perfusion of zinc reversibly reduced spiking frequency of cultured neurons most likely by suppressing Kv3 channels. Indeed, zinc inhibited Kv3.1 channel activity and slowed activation kinetics, independent of its site in the N-terminal T1 domain. Biochemical assays surprisingly identified a novel zinc-binding site in the Kv3.1 C-terminus, critical for channel activity and axonal targeting, but not for the zinc inhibition. Finally, mutagenesis revealed an important role of the junction between the first transmembrane (TM) segment and the first extracellular loop in sensing zinc. Its mutant enabled fast spiking with relative resistance to the zinc inhibition. Therefore, our studies provide novel mechanistic insights into the multifaceted regulation of Kv3 channel activity and localization by divalent heavy metal ions.

  15. Correlation of apical fluid-regulating channel proteins with lung function in human COPD lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runzhen Zhao

    Full Text Available Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, and aquaporin 5 (AQP5 proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI and II (ATII-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD.

  16. Activity-dependent regulation of T-type calcium channels by submembrane calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazade, Magali; Bidaud, Isabelle; Lory, Philippe; Chemin, Jean

    2017-01-21

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are involved in numerous physiological functions and various mechanisms finely tune their activity, including the Ca(2+) ion itself. This is well exemplified by the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca(2+) channels, whose alteration contributes to the dramatic disease Timothy Syndrome. For T-type Ca(2+) channels, a long-held view is that they are not regulated by intracellular Ca(2+). Here we challenge this notion by using dedicated electrophysiological protocols on both native and expressed T-type Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate that a rise in submembrane Ca(2+) induces a large decrease in T-type current amplitude due to a hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state inactivation. Activation of most representative Ca(2+)-permeable ionotropic receptors similarly regulate T-type current properties. Altogether, our data clearly establish that Ca(2+) entry exerts a feedback control on T-type channel activity, by modulating the channel availability, a mechanism that critically links cellular properties of T-type Ca(2+) channels to their physiological roles.

  17. KCNE1 and KCNE3: The yin and yang of voltage-gated K(+) channel regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-15

    The human KCNE gene family comprises five genes encoding single transmembrane-spanning ion channel regulatory subunits. The primary function of KCNE subunits appears to be regulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the best-understood KCNE complexes are with the KCNQ1 Kv α subunit. Here, we review the often opposite effects of KCNE1 and KCNE3 on Kv channel biology, with an emphasis on regulation of KCNQ1. Slow-activating IKs channel complexes formed by KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are essential for human ventricular myocyte repolarization, while constitutively active KCNQ1-KCNE3 channels are important in the intestine. Inherited sequence variants in human KCNE1 and KCNE3 cause cardiac arrhythmias but by different mechanisms, and each is important for hearing in unique ways. Because of their contrasting effects on KCNQ1 function, KCNE1 and KCNE3 have proved invaluable tools in the mechanistic understanding of how channel gating can be manipulated, and each may also provide a window into novel insights and new therapeutic opportunities in K(+) channel pharmacology. Finally, findings from studies of Kcne1(-/-) and Kcne3(-/-) mouse lines serve to illustrate the complexity of KCNE biology and KCNE-linked disease states.

  18. The Proteoglycan Syndecan 4 Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 6 Channels via RhoA/ROCK Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Echtermeyer, Frank; Thilo, Florian;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Syndecan 4 (Sdc4) modulates signal transduction and regulates activity of protein channels. Sdc4 is essential for the regulation of cellular permeability. We hypothesized that Sdc4 may regulate transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) channels, a determinant of glomerular perme...

  19. Functional coupling of TRPV4 channels and BK channels in regulating spontaneous contractions of the guinea pig urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogai, Ayu; Lee, Ken; Mitsui, Retsu; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the role of TRPV4 channels (TRPV4) in regulating the contractility of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) and muscularis mucosae (MM) of the urinary bladder. Distribution of TRPV4 in DSM and MM of guinea-pig bladders was examined by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Changes in the contractility of DSM and MM bundles were measured using isometric tension recording. Intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics were visualized by Cal-520 fluorescent Ca(2+) imaging, while membrane potential changes were recorded using intracellular microelectrode technique. DSM and MM expressed TRPV4 immunoreactivity. GSK1016790A (GSK, 1 nM), a TRPV4 agonist, evoked a sustained contraction in both DSM and MM associated with a cessation of spontaneous phasic contractions in a manner sensitive to HC-067047 (10 μM), a TRPV4 antagonist. Iberiotoxin (100 nM) and paxilline (1 μM), large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel blockers restored the spontaneous contractions in GSK. The sustained contractions in DSM and MM were reduced by nifedipine (10 μM), a blocker of L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (LVDCCs) by about 40 % and by nominally Ca(2+)-free solution by some 90 %. GSK (1 nM) abolished spontaneous Ca(2+) transients, increased basal Ca(2+) levels and also prevented spontaneous action potential discharge associated with DSM membrane hyperpolarization. In conclusion, Ca(2+) influx through TRPV4 appears to activate BK channels to suppress spontaneous contractions and thus a functional coupling of TRPV4 with BK channels may act as a self-limiting mechanism for bladder contractility during its storage phase. Despite the membrane hyperpolarization in GSK, Ca(2+) entry mainly through TRPV4 develops the tonic contraction.

  20. Fading probability density function of free-space optical communication channels with pointing error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2011-06-01

    The turbulent atmosphere causes wavefront distortion, beam wander, and beam broadening of a laser beam. These effects result in average power loss and instantaneous power fading at the receiver aperture and thus degrade performance of a free-space optical (FSO) communication system. In addition to the atmospheric turbulence, a FSO communication system may also suffer from laser beam pointing error. The pointing error causes excessive power loss and power fading. This paper proposes and studies an analytical method for calculating the FSO channel fading probability density function (pdf) induced by both atmospheric turbulence and pointing error. This method is based on the fast-tracked laser beam fading profile and the joint effects of beam wander and pointing error. In order to evaluate the proposed analytical method, large-scale numerical wave-optics simulations are conducted. Three types of pointing errors are studied , namely, the Gaussian random pointing error, the residual tracking error, and the sinusoidal sway pointing error. The FSO system employs a collimated Gaussian laser beam propagating along a horizontal path. The propagation distances range from 0.25 miles to 2.5 miles. The refractive index structure parameter is chosen to be Cn2 = 5×10-15m-2/3 and Cn2 = 5×10-13m-2/3. The studied cases cover from weak to strong fluctuations. The fading pdf curves of channels with pointing error calculated using the analytical method match accurately the corresponding pdf curves obtained directly from large-scale wave-optics simulations. They also give accurate average bit-error-rate (BER) curves and outage probabilities. Both the lognormal and the best-fit gamma-gamma fading pdf curves deviate from those of corresponding simulation curves, and they produce overoptimistic average BER curves and outage probabilities.

  1. Bilirubin oxidation end products directly alter K+ channels important in the regulation of vascular tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shangwei; Xu, Rong; Clark, Joseph F; Wurster, William L; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2011-01-01

    The exact etiology of delayed cerebral vasospasm following cerebral hemorrhage is not clear, but a family of compounds termed 'bilirubin oxidation end products (BOXes)' derived from heme has been implicated. As proper regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone involves large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-dependent Slo1 K(+) (BK, maxiK, K(Ca)1.1) channels, we examined whether BOXes altered functional properties of the channel. Electrophysiological measurements of Slo1 channels heterologously expressed in a human cell line and of native mouse BK channels in isolated cerebral myocytes showed that BOXes markedly diminished open probability. Biophysically, BOXes specifically stabilized the conformations of the channel with its ion conduction gate closed. The results of chemical amino-acid modifications and molecular mutagenesis together suggest that two specific lysine residues in the structural element linking the transmembrane ion-permeation domain to the carboxyl cytosolic domain of the Slo1 channel are critical in determining the sensitivity of the channel to BOXes. Inhibition of Slo1 BK channels by BOXes may contribute to the development of delayed cerebral vasospasm following brain hemorrhage.

  2. PKC and AMPK regulation of Kv1.5 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.5 potassium channel, conducting the ultra-rapid rectifier K(+) current (IKur), is regulated through several pathways. Here we investigate if Kv1.5 surface expression is controlled by the 2 kinases PKC and AMPK, using Xenopus oocytes, MDCK cells and atrial derived HL-1 cells......-expression of Nedd4-2 in Xenopus oocytes. These results indicate that Kv1.5 channels are regulated by both kinases, although through different molecular mechanisms in different cell systems....

  3. Down regulation of sodium channels in the central nervous system of hibernating snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, T; Battonyai, I; Pirger, Z

    2014-05-28

    Hibernation, as behavior, is an evolutionary mode of adaptation of animal species to unfavorable environmental conditions. It is generally characterized by suppressed metabolism, which also includes down regulation of the energy consuming ion-channel functioning. Experimental data regarding decreased ion-channel function are scarce. Therefore, our goal was to study the possible down regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) subtypes in the neurons of hibernating snails. Our immunohistochemical experiments revealed that the expression of NaV1.8-like channels in the central nervous system was substantially down regulated in hibernating animals. In contrast to NaV1.8-like, the NaV1.9-like channels were present in neurons independently from hibernating and non-hibernating states. Our western blot data supported the immunohistochemical results according to which the band of the NaV1.8-like channel protein was less intensively labeled in the homogenate of the hibernating snails. The NaV1.9-like immunoreactivity was equally present both in hibernating and active snails. Micro-electrophysiological experiments show that in hibernating snails both NaV1.8- and NaV1.9-like currents are substantially decreased compared to that of the active snails. The contradictory electrophysiological and immunohistochemical or western blot data suggest that the molecular mechanisms of the "channel arrest" could be different in diverse NaV channel subtypes. Climate changes will affect temperature extremes and a question is how different species beyond their physiological tolerance will or able to adapt to changing environment. Hibernation is an important mode of adaptation to extreme climatic variations, and pursuant to this the present results may contribute to the study of the behavioral ecology.

  4. Pannexin 1 channels: new actors in the regulation of catecholamine release from adrenal chromaffin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momboisse, Fanny; Olivares, María José; Báez-Matus, Ximena; Guerra, María José; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland medulla synthesize and store hormones and peptides, which are released into the blood circulation in response to stress. Among them, adrenaline is critical for the fight-or-flight response. This neurosecretory process is highly regulated and depends on cytosolic [Ca2+]. By forming channels at the plasma membrane, pannexin-1 (Panx1) is a protein involved in many physiological and pathological processes amplifying ATP release and/or Ca2+ signals. Here, we show that Panx1 is expressed in the adrenal gland where it plays a role by regulating the release of catecholamines. In fact, inhibitors of Panx1 channels, such as carbenoxolone (Cbx) and probenecid, reduced the secretory activity induced with the nicotinic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium (DMPP, 50 μM) in whole adrenal glands. A similar inhibitory effect was observed in single chromaffin cells using Cbx or 10Panx1 peptide, another Panx1 channel inhibitors. Given that the secretory response depends on cytosolic [Ca2+] and Panx1 channels are permeable to Ca2+, we studied the possible implication of Panx1 channels in the Ca2+ signaling occurring during the secretory process. In support of this possibility, Panx1 channel inhibitors significantly reduced the Ca2+ signals evoked by DMPP in single chromaffin cells. However, the Ca2+ signals induced by caffeine in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ was not affected by Panx1 channel inhibitors, suggesting that this mechanism does not involve Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Conversely, Panx1 inhibitors significantly blocked the DMPP-induce dye uptake, supporting the idea that Panx1 forms functional channels at the plasma membrane. These findings indicate that Panx1 channels participate in the control the Ca2+ signal that triggers the secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells. This mechanism could have physiological implications during the response to stress. PMID:25237296

  5. Pannexin 1 channels: new actors in the regulation of catecholamine release from adrenal chromaffin cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny eMomboisse

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland medulla synthesize and store hormones and peptides, which are released into the blood circulation in response to stress. Among them, adrenaline is critical for the fight-or-flight response. This neurosecretory process is highly regulated and depends on cytosolic [Ca2+]. By forming channels at the plasma membrane, pannexin-1 (Panx1 is a protein involved in many physiological and pathological processes amplifying ATP release and/or Ca2+ signals. Here, we show that Panx1 is expressed in the adrenal gland where it plays a role by regulating the release of catecholamines. In fact, inhibitors of Panx1 channels, such as carbenoxolone (Cbx and probenecid, reduced the secretory activity induced with the nicotinic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium (DMPP, 50 µM in whole adrenal glands. A similar inhibitory effect was observed in single chromaffin cells using Cbx or 10Panx1 peptide, another Panx1 channel inhibitors. Given that the secretory response depends on cytosolic [Ca2+] and Panx1 channels are permeable to Ca2+, we studied the possible implication of Panx1 channels in the Ca2+ signaling occurring during the secretory process. In support of this possibility, Panx1 channel inhibitors significantly reduced the Ca2+ signals evoked by DMPP in single chromaffin cells. However, the Ca2+ signals induced by caffeine in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ was not affected by Panx1 channel inhibitors, suggesting that this mechanism does not involve Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Conversely, Panx1 inhibitors significantly blocked the DMPP-induce dye uptake, supporting the idea that Panx1 forms functional channels at the plasma membrane. These findings indicate that Panx1 channels participate in the control the Ca2+ signal that triggers the secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells. This mechanism could have physiological implications during the response to stress.

  6. The H-loop in the second nucleotide-binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is required for efficient chloride channel closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine residue within the H-loop located in the C-terminal part of the NBD. However, the contribution of the corresponding region (H-loop) of NBD2 to the CFTR channel gating has not been examined so far. Here we report that the alanine substitution of the conserved dipeptide HR motif (HR-->AA) in the H-loop of NBD2 leads to prolonged open states of CFTR channel, indicating that the H-loop is required for efficient channel closing. On the other hand, the HR-->AA substitution lead to the substantial decrease of CFTR-mediated current density (pA/pF) in transfected HEK 293 cells, as recorded in the whole-cell patch-clamp analysis. These results suggest that the H-loop of NBD2, apart from being required for CFTR channel closing, may be involved in regulating CFTR trafficking to the cell surface.

  7. Trap density of states in n-channel organic transistors: variable temperature characteristics and band transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung-min Cho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated trap density of states (trap DOS in n-channel organic field-effect transistors based on N,N ’-bis(cyclohexylnaphthalene diimide (Cy-NDI and dimethyldicyanoquinonediimine (DMDCNQI. A new method is proposed to extract trap DOS from the Arrhenius plot of the temperature-dependent transconductance. Double exponential trap DOS are observed, in which Cy-NDI has considerable deep states, by contrast, DMDCNQI has substantial tail states. In addition, numerical simulation of the transistor characteristics has been conducted by assuming an exponential trap distribution and the interface approximation. Temperature dependence of transfer characteristics are well reproduced only using several parameters, and the trap DOS obtained from the simulated characteristics are in good agreement with the assumed trap DOS, indicating that our analysis is self-consistent. Although the experimentally obtained Meyer-Neldel temperature is related to the trap distribution width, the simulation satisfies the Meyer-Neldel rule only very phenomenologically. The simulation also reveals that the subthreshold swing is not always a good indicator of the total trap amount, because it also largely depends on the trap distribution width. Finally, band transport is explored from the simulation having a small number of traps. A crossing point of the transfer curves and negative activation energy above a certain gate voltage are observed in the simulated characteristics, where the critical VG above which band transport is realized is determined by the sum of the trapped and free charge states below the conduction band edge.

  8. Trap density of states in n-channel organic transistors: variable temperature characteristics and band transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Joung-min, E-mail: cho.j.ad@m.titech.ac.jp; Akiyama, Yuto; Kakinuma, Tomoyuki [Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Mori, Takehiko [Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); ACT-C, JST, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    We have investigated trap density of states (trap DOS) in n-channel organic field-effect transistors based on N,N ’-bis(cyclohexyl)naphthalene diimide (Cy-NDI) and dimethyldicyanoquinonediimine (DMDCNQI). A new method is proposed to extract trap DOS from the Arrhenius plot of the temperature-dependent transconductance. Double exponential trap DOS are observed, in which Cy-NDI has considerable deep states, by contrast, DMDCNQI has substantial tail states. In addition, numerical simulation of the transistor characteristics has been conducted by assuming an exponential trap distribution and the interface approximation. Temperature dependence of transfer characteristics are well reproduced only using several parameters, and the trap DOS obtained from the simulated characteristics are in good agreement with the assumed trap DOS, indicating that our analysis is self-consistent. Although the experimentally obtained Meyer-Neldel temperature is related to the trap distribution width, the simulation satisfies the Meyer-Neldel rule only very phenomenologically. The simulation also reveals that the subthreshold swing is not always a good indicator of the total trap amount, because it also largely depends on the trap distribution width. Finally, band transport is explored from the simulation having a small number of traps. A crossing point of the transfer curves and negative activation energy above a certain gate voltage are observed in the simulated characteristics, where the critical V{sub G} above which band transport is realized is determined by the sum of the trapped and free charge states below the conduction band edge.

  9. Regulation of photosynthesis by ion channels in cyanobacteria and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Teardo, Enrico; Carraretto, Luca; Formentin, Elide; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Szabo, Ildiko

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthesis converts light energy into chemical energy, and supplies ATP and NADPH for CO2 fixation into carbohydrates and for the synthesis of several compounds which are essential for autotrophic growth. Oxygenic photosynthesis takes place in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and photosynthetic prokaryote cyanobacteria. An ancestral photoautotrophic prokaryote related to cyanobacteria has been proposed to give rise to chloroplasts of plants and algae through an endosymbiotic event. Indeed, photosynthetic complexes involved in the electron transport coupled to H(+) translocation and ATP synthesis are similar in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Furthermore, some of the protein and solute/ion conducting machineries also share common structure and function. Electrophysiological and biochemical evidence support the existence of ion channels in the thylakoid membrane in both types of organisms. By allowing specific ion fluxes across thylakoid membranes, ion channels have been hypothesized to either directly or indirectly regulate photosynthesis, by modulating the proton motive force. Recent molecular identification of some of the thylakoid-located channels allowed to obtain genetic proof in favor of such hypothesis. Furthermore, some ion channels of the envelope membrane in chloroplasts have also been shown to impact on this light-driven process. Here we give an overview of thylakoid/chloroplast located ion channels of higher plants and of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We focus on channels shown to be implicated in the regulation of photosynthesis and discuss the possible mechanisms of action.

  10. The unc-8 and sup-40 genes regulate ion channel function in Caenorhabditis elegans motorneurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shreffler, W.; Magardino, T.; Shekdar, K.; Wolinsky, E. [New York Univ. Medical School, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Two Caenorhabditis elegans genes, unc-8 and sup-40, have been newly identified, by genetic criteria, as regulating ion channel function in motorneurons. Two dominant unc-8 alleles cause motorneuron swelling similar to that of other neuronal types in dominant mutants of the deg-1 gene family, which is homologous to a mammalian gene family encoding amiloride-sensitive sodium channel subunits. As for previously identified deg-1 family members, unc-8 dominant mutations are recessively suppressed by mutations in the mec-6 gene, which probably encodes a second type of channel component. An unusual dominant mutation, sup-41 (lb125), also co-suppresses unc-8 and deg-1, suggesting the existence of yet another common component of ion channels containing unc-8 or deg-1 subunits. Dominant, transacting, intragenic suppressor mutations have been isolated for both unc-8 and deg-1, consistent with the idea that, like their mammalian homologues, the two gene products function as multimers. The sup-40 (lb130) mutation dominantly suppresses unc-8 motorneuron swelling and produces a novel swelling phenotype in hypodermal nuclei. sup-40 may encode an ion channel component or regulator that can correct the osmotic defect caused by abnormal unc-8 channels. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction.

  12. Forms of density regulation and (quasi-) stationary distributions of population sizes in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Bernt-Erik; Engen, Steinar; Grøtan, Vidar;

    2008-01-01

    that have grown from very small population sizes followed by a period of fluctuations around K. We then use these parameters to estimate the quasi-stationary distribution of population size. There were often large uncertainties in these parameters specifying the form of density regulation that were...... generally independent of the duration of the study period. In contrast, precision in the estimates of environmental variance increased with the length of the time series. In most of the populations, a large proportion of the probability density of the (quasi-) stationary distribution of population sizes......The theta-logistic model of density regulation is an especially flexible class of density regulation models where different forms of non-linear density regulation can be expressed by only one parameter, u. Estimating the parameters of the thetalogistic model is, however, challenging. This is mainly...

  13. Nanoparticle Density: A Critical Biophysical Regulator of Endothelial Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Leong, David Tai

    2017-03-17

    The integrity of the vasculature system is intrinsically sensitive to a short list of biophysical cues spanning from nano to micro scales. We have earlier found that certain nanomaterials could induce endothelial leakiness (nanoparticle induced endothelial leakiness, nanoEL). In this study, we report that the density of the nanomaterial, a basic intrinsic material property not implicated in many nanoparticle-mediated biological effects, predominantly dictates the nanoEL effect. We demonstrated that the impinging force exerted by a library of increasing effective densities but consistently sized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) could directly increase endothelial permeability. The crossover effective particle density that induced nanoEL was determined to be between 1.57 g/cm(3) to 1.72 g/cm(3). It was also found that a cumulative gravitational-mediated force of around 1.8 nN/μm along the boundaries of the vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cad) adherens junctions appeared to be a critical threshold force required to perturb endothelial cell-cell adhesion. The net result is the "snapping" of the mechanically pretensed VE-cad (Nanosnap), leading to the formation of micron-sized gaps that would dramatically increase endothelial leakiness.

  14. A C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior: regulation by TRP-family channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Li, Wei; Ward, Alex; Piggott, Beverly J; Larkspur, Erin R; Sternberg, Paul W; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2006-11-03

    Nicotine, the primary addictive substance in tobacco, induces profound behavioral responses in mammals, but the underlying genetic mechanisms are not well understood. Here we develop a C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior. We show that worms exhibit behavioral responses to nicotine that parallel those observed in mammals, including acute response, tolerance, withdrawal, and sensitization. These nicotine responses require nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family genes that are known to mediate nicotine dependence in mammals, suggesting functional conservation of nAChRs in nicotine responses. Importantly, we find that mutant worms lacking TRPC (transient receptor potential canonical) channels are defective in their response to nicotine and that such a defect can be rescued by a human TRPC channel, revealing an unexpected role for TRPC channels in regulating nicotine-dependent behavior. Thus, C. elegans can be used to characterize known genes as well as to identify new genes regulating nicotine responses.

  15. A C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior: regulation by TRP family channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Li, Wei; Ward, Alex; Piggott, Beverly J.; Larkspur, Erin R.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Shawn Xu, X. Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Nicotine, the primary addictive substance in tobacco, induces profound behavioral responses in mammals, but the underlying genetic mechanisms are not well understood. Here we develop a C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior. We show that worms exhibit behavioral responses to nicotine that parallel those observed in mammals, including acute response, tolerance, withdrawal and sensitization. These nicotine responses require nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family genes that are known to mediate nicotine dependence in mammals, suggesting functional conservation of nAChRs in nicotine responses. Importantly, we find that mutant worms lacking TRPC (transient-receptor-potential canonical) channels are defective in response to nicotine and that such a defect can be rescued by a human TRPC channel, revealing an unexpected role for TRPC channels in regulating nicotine-dependent behavior. Thus, C. elegans can be used to characterize known genes as well as to identify new genes regulating nicotine responses. PMID:17081982

  16. An update on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential proteins in brain physiology, as they generate the sodium currents that initiate neuronal action potentials. Voltage-gated sodium channels expression, localisation and function are regulated by a range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Here, we review our understanding of regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels, in particular SCN1A (NaV1.1), SCN2A (NaV1.2), SCN3A (NaV1.3) and SCN8A (NaV1.6), by transcription factors, by alternative splicing, and by post-translational modifications. Our focus is strongly centred on recent research lines, and newly generated knowledge.

  17. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  18. 78 FR 33219 - Special Local Regulations; Swim Across the Potomac, Potomac River; National Harbor Access Channel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... Access Channel, MD'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 67). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Swim Across the...

  19. Involvement of Ca2+-activated K+ Channels in Receptor-Regulated Sperm Motility in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Previous voltage-clamp studies have demonstrated the modulation of sperm Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes by angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ)and extracellular ATP via AT1 receptor and P2U receptor, respectively. In the presentstudy, we investigated the involvement of KCa channels in receptor-regulated spermmotility of the rat using a computer-aided sperm analysis system, HTM-IVOS, in con-junction with Ca2+-mobilizing agents, receptor agonists/antagonists and KCa channelsblockers.The percentage of motile sperm was increased by ionomycin (0. 5 μmol/L), whichcould be inhibited by K+ channel blockers, tetraethylammonium (TEA 1 μmol/L ) orcharybdotoxin (ChTX, 300 nmol/L) indicating the presence of KCa channels. AngⅡ, at low concentration, 10 nmol/L, was found to increase motility, however, athigher concentration, 1 μmol/L, percentage of motility was found to be suppressed.Both stimulatory and inhibitory effects of Ang Ⅱ could be reversed by losartan, aspecific antagonist of AT 1 receptors, but not AT 2 antagonist PD123177, indicating theinvolvement of AT1 but not AT2 receptor in mediating both effects. ChTX also abol-ished both stimulatory and inhibitory effects of Ang H, suggesting the involvement ofKCa channels. The percentage of motility was also enhanced by extracellular ATP, afactor known to be involved in sperm activation. The ATP-enhanced sperm motilitywas mimicked by UTP , and inhibited by ChTX and reactive blue, an antagonist of P2receptor, indicating the involvement of both P2U and KCa channels. RT-PCR studywas also conducted to confirm the expression of KCa channels, AT1 receptors and P2Ureceptor, but not AT2 receptor, in rat caudal epididymal sperm. The present findingssuggest an important role of KCa channels in the regulation of sperm motility by AT1and P 2U receptors.

  20. Molecular Basis of Regulating High Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels by S-Nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meng-Hua; Bavencoffe, Alexis; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-12-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in a variety of physiological processes, such as vasoregulation and neurotransmission, and has a complex role in the regulation of pain transduction and synaptic transmission. We have shown previously that NO inhibits high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels in primary sensory neurons and excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn. However, the molecular mechanism involved in this inhibitory action remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of S-nitrosylation in the NO regulation of high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP) rapidly reduced N-type currents when Cav2.2 was coexpressed with the Cavβ1 or Cavβ3 subunits in HEK293 cells. In contrast, SNAP only slightly inhibited P/Q-type and L-type currents reconstituted with various Cavβ subunits. SNAP caused a depolarizing shift in voltage-dependent N-type channel activation, but it had no effect on Cav2.2 protein levels on the membrane surface. The inhibitory effect of SNAP on N-type currents was blocked by the sulfhydryl-specific modifying reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium. Furthermore, the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation were much more abundant in Cav2.2 than in Cav1.2 and Cav2.1. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that Cys-805, Cys-930, and Cys-1045 in the II-III intracellular loop, Cys-1835 and Cys-2145 in the C terminus of Cav2.2, and Cys-346 in the Cavβ3 subunit were nitrosylation sites mediating NO sensitivity of N-type channels. Our findings demonstrate that the consensus motifs of S-nitrosylation in cytoplasmically accessible sites are critically involved in post-translational regulation of N-type Ca(2+) channels by NO. S-Nitrosylation mediates the feedback regulation of N-type channels by NO.

  1. The KCNQ1 potassium channel is down-regulated by ubiquitylating enzymes of the Nedd4/Nedd4-like family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Membrez, Mathieu; Nicolas, Céline S;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The voltage-gated KCNQ1 potassium channel regulates key physiological functions in a number of tissues. In the heart, KCNQ1 alpha-subunits assemble with KCNE1 beta-subunits forming a channel complex constituting the delayed rectifier current I(Ks). In epithelia, KCNQ1 channels...

  2. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, Joel C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hilley, George E [STANFORD UNIV; Fildani, Andrea [CHEVRON ETC

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to

  3. Life-history evolution in guppies VIII: the demographics of density regulation in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, David N; Bassar, Ronald D; Travis, Joseph; Helen Rodd, F

    2012-09-01

    In prior research, we found the way guppy life histories evolve in response to living in environments with a high or low risk of predation is consistent with life-history theory that assumes no density dependence. We later found that guppies from high-predation environments experience higher mortality rates than those from low-predation environments, but the increased risk was evenly distributed across all age/size classes. Life-history theory that assumes density-independent population growth predicts that life histories will not evolve under such circumstances, yet we have shown with field introduction experiments that they do evolve. However, theory that incorporates density regulation predicts this pattern of mortality can result in the patterns of life-history evolution we had observed. Here we report on density manipulation experiments performed in populations of guppies from low-predation environments to ask whether natural populations normally experience density regulation and, if so, to characterize the short-term demographic changes that underlie density regulation. Our experiments reveal that these populations are density regulated. Decreased density resulted in higher juvenile growth, decreased juvenile mortality rates, and increased reproductive investment by adult females. Increased density causes reduced offspring size, decreased fat storage by adult females, and increased adult mortality.

  4. Slow conversions among subconductance states of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, T; Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J; Davis, P B; Ma, J

    1996-02-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel exhibits multiple subconductance states. To study the regulation of conductance states of the CFTR channel, we expressed the wild-type CFTR protein in HEK 293 cells, and isolated microsomal membrane vesicles for reconstitution studies in lipid bilayer membranes. A single CFTR channel had a dominant conductance of 7.8 pS (H), plus two sub-open states with conductances of approximately 6 pS (M) and 2.7 pS (L) in 200 mM KCl with 1 mM MgCl2 (intracellular) and 50 mM KCl with no MgCl2 (extracellular), with pH maintained at 7.4 by 10 mM HEPES-Tris on both sides of the channel. In 200 mM KCl, both H and L states could be measured in stable single-channel recordings, whereas M could not. Spontaneous transitions between H and L were slow; it took 4.5 min for L-->H, and 3.2 min for H-->L. These slow conversions among subconductance states of the CFTR channel were affected by extracellular Mg; in the presence of millimolar Mg, the channel remained stable in the H state. Similar phenomena were also observed with endogenous CFTR channels in T84 cells. In high-salt conditions (1.5 M KCl), all three conductance states of the expressed CFTR channel, 12.1 pS, 8.2 pS, and 3.6 pS, became stable and seemed to gate independently from each other. The existence of multiple stable conductance states associated with the CFTR channel suggests two possibilities: either a single CFTR molecule can exist in multiple configurations with different conductance values, or the CFTR channel may contain multimers of the 170-kDa CFTR protein, and different conductance states are due to different aggregation states of the CFTR protein.

  5. Redox and trace metal regulation of ion channels in the pain pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J Grayson; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2015-09-15

    Given the clinical significance of pain disorders and the relative ineffectiveness of current therapeutics, it is important to identify alternative means of modulating nociception. The most obvious pharmacological targets are the ion channels that facilitate nervous transmission from pain sensors in the periphery to the processing regions within the brain and spinal cord. In order to design effective pharmacological tools for this purpose, however, it is first necessary to understand how these channels are regulated. A growing area of research involves the investigation of the role that trace metals and endogenous redox agents play in modulating the activity of a diverse group of ion channels within the pain pathway. In the present review, the most recent literature concerning trace metal and redox regulation of T-type calcium channels, NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors, GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptors and TRP (transient receptor potential) channels are described to gain a comprehensive understanding of the current state of the field as well as to provide a basis for future thought and experimentation.

  6. STIM1 and STIM2 proteins differently regulate endogenous store-operated channels in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygin, Alexey; Skopin, Anton; Kalinina, Vera; Zimina, Olga; Glushankova, Lyuba; Mozhayeva, Galina N; Kaznacheyeva, Elena

    2015-02-20

    The endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensors stromal interaction molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2) are key modulators of store-operated calcium entry. Both these sensors play a major role in physiological functions in normal tissue and in pathology, but available data on native STIM2-regulated plasma membrane channels are scarce. Only a few studies have recorded STIM2-induced CRAC (calcium release-activated calcium) currents. On the other hand, many cell types display store-operated currents different from CRAC. The STIM1 protein regulates not only CRAC but also transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, but it has remained unclear whether STIM2 is capable of regulating store-operated non-CRAC channels. Here we present for the first time experimental evidence for the existence of endogenous non-CRAC STIM2-regulated channels. As shown in single-channel patch clamp experiments on HEK293 cells, selective activation of native STIM2 proteins or STIM2 overexpression results in store-operated activation of Imin channels, whereas STIM1 activation blocks this process. Changes in the ratio between active STIM2 and STIM1 proteins can switch the regulation of Imin channels between store-operated and store-independent modes. We have previously characterized electrophysiological properties of different Ca(2+) influx channels coexisting in HEK293 cells. The results of this study show that STIM1 and STIM2 differ in the ability to activate these store-operated channels; Imin channels are regulated by STIM2, TRPC3-containing INS channels are induced by STIM1, and TRPC1-composed Imax channels are activated by both STIM1 and STIM2. These new data about cross-talk between STIM1 and STIM2 and their different roles in store-operated channel activation are indicative of an additional level in the regulation of store-operated calcium entry pathways.

  7. Cytosolic nucleotides block and regulate the Arabidopsis vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingbo; Martinoia, Enrico; De Angeli, Alexis

    2014-09-12

    The aluminum-activated malate transporters (ALMTs) form a membrane protein family exhibiting different physiological roles in plants, varying from conferring tolerance to environmental Al(3+) to the regulation of stomatal movement. The regulation of the anion channels of the ALMT family is largely unknown. Identifying intracellular modulators of the activity of anion channels is fundamental to understanding their physiological functions. In this study we investigated the role of cytosolic nucleotides in regulating the activity of the vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9. We found that cytosolic nucleotides modulate the transport activity of AtALMT9. This modulation was based on a direct block of the pore of the channel at negative membrane potentials (open channel block) by the nucleotide and not by a phosphorylation mechanism. The block by nucleotides of AtALMT9-mediated currents was voltage dependent. The blocking efficiency of intracellular nucleotides increased with the number of phosphate groups and ATP was the most effective cellular blocker. Interestingly, the ATP block induced a marked modification of the current-voltage characteristic of AtALMT9. In addition, increased concentrations of vacuolar anions were able to shift the ATP block threshold to a more negative membrane potential. The block of AtALMT9-mediated anion currents by ATP at negative membrane potentials acts as a gate of the channel and vacuolar anion tune this gating mechanism. Our results suggest that anion transport across the vacuolar membrane in plant cells is controlled by cytosolic nucleotides and the energetic status of the cell.

  8. Endogenous polyamines regulate cortical neuronal excitability by blocking voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleidervish, Ilya A; Libman, Lior; Katz, Efrat; Gutnick, Michael J

    2008-12-02

    Because the excitable properties of neurons in the neocortex depend on the characteristics of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, factors which regulate those characteristics can fundamentally modify the dynamics of cortical circuits. Here, we report on a novel neuromodulatory mechanism that links the availability of Na(+) channels to metabolism of polyamines (PAs) in the cerebral cortex. Using single channel and whole-cell recordings, we found that products of PA metabolism, the ubiquitous aliphatic polycations spermine and spermidine, are endogenous blockers of Na(+) channels in layer 5 pyramidal cells. Because the blockade is activity-dependent, it is particularly effective against Na(+) channels which fail to inactivate rapidly and thus underlie the persistent Na(+) current. At the level of the local cortical circuit, pharmacological depletion of PAs led to increased spontaneous spiking and periods of hypersynchronous discharge. Our data suggest that changes in PA levels, whether associated with normal brain states or pathological conditions, profoundly modify Na(+) channel availability and thereby shape the integrative behavior of single neurons and neocortical circuits.

  9. Trafficking and intracellular regulation of Kv7.1 potassium channels in the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie Hélix

    abnormalities induced by “loss of function” Kv7.1 mutations increase the risk of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. These cardiac arrhythmias, typically in the form of torsades de pointes, may underlie ventricular fibrillation, recurrent syncope, and sudden death. To date, nearly 300 Kv7.1 mutations have been...... to the regulation of the Kv7.1 channel, which displays a consensus site in the N-terminus for this kinase. Our study, with the support of others, tends to demonstrate that the Kv7.1 channel forms a macromolecular signaling complex with its interactions partners in order to allow a fast response to external signals....

  10. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel blockers: Pharmacological, biophysical and physiological relevance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul; Linsdell

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane con-ductance regulator(CFTR) chloride channel causes cys-tic fibrosis, while inappropriate activity of this channeloccurs in secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney dis-ease. Drugs that interact directly with CFTR are there-fore of interest in the treatment of a number of diseasestates. This review focuses on one class of small mol-ecules that interacts directly with CFTR, namely inhibi-tors that act by directly blocking chloride movementthrough the open channel pore. In theory such com-pounds could be of use in the treatment of diarrheaand polycystic kidney disease, however in practice allknown substances acting by this mechanism to inhibitCFTR function lack either the potency or specificity forin vivo use. Nevertheless, this theoretical pharmaco-logical usefulness set the scene for the developmentof more potent, specific CFTR inhibitors. Biophysically,open channel blockers have proven most useful as ex-perimental probes of the structure and function of theCFTR chloride channel pore. Most importantly, the useof these blockers has been fundamental in developing afunctional model of the pore that includes a wide innervestibule that uses positively charged amino acid sidechains to attract both permeant and blocking anionsfrom the cell cytoplasm. CFTR channels are also subjectto this kind of blocking action by endogenous anionspresent in the cell cytoplasm, and recently this blocking effect has been suggested to play a role in the physio-logical control of CFTR channel function, in particular as a novel mechanism linking CFTR function dynamically to the composition of epithelial cell secretions. It has also been suggested that future drugs could target this same pathway as a way of pharmacologically increasing CFTR activity in cystic fibrosis. Studying open channel blockers and their mechanisms of action has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of CFTR as a pharmacological target in disease states, of

  11. Voltage-sensing phosphatase reveals temporal regulation of TRPC3/C6/C7 channels by membrane phosphoinositides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsuki, Kyohei; Imai, Yuko; Okamura, Yasushi; Abe, Kihachiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Mori, Masayuki X

    2012-01-01

    TRPC3/C6/C7 channels, a subgroup of classical/canonical TRP channels, are activated by diacylglycerol produced via activation of phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled receptors. Recognition of the physiological importance of these channels has been steadily growing, but the mechanism by which they are regulated remains largely unknown. We recently used a membrane-resident danio rerio voltage-sensing phosphatase (DrVSP) to study TRPC3/C6/C7 regulation and found that the channel activity was controlled by PtdIns(4,5)P(2)-DAG signaling in a self-limiting manner (Imai Y et al., the Journal of Physiology, 2012). In this addendum, we present the advantages of using DrVSP as a molecular tool to study PtdIns(4,5)P(2) regulation. DrVSP should be readily applicable for studying phosphoinositide metabolism-linked channel regulation as well as lipid dynamics. Furthermore, in comparison to other modes of self-limiting ion channel regulation, the regulation of TRPC3/C6/C7 channels seems highly susceptible to activation signal strength, which could potentially affect both open duration and the time to peak activation and inactivation. Dysfunction of such self-limiting regulation may contribute to the pathology of the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract and brain, as these channels are broadly distributed and affected by numerous neurohormonal agonists.

  12. Syntaxin 1A binds to the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv2.1 to regulate channel gating and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yuk M; Kang, Youhou; Gao, Xiaodong; Xia, Fuzhen; Xie, Huanli; Sheu, Laura; Tsuk, Sharon; Lotan, Ilana; Tsushima, Robert G; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2003-05-09

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) 2.1 is the dominant Kv channel that controls membrane repolarization in rat islet beta-cells and downstream insulin exocytosis. We recently showed that exocytotic SNARE protein SNAP-25 directly binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv 2.1 channel protein at the cytoplasmic N terminus. We now show that SNARE protein syntaxin 1A (Syn-1A) binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv2.1 at its cytoplasmic C terminus (Kv2.1C). In HEK293 cells overexpressing Kv2.1, we observed identical effects of channel inhibition by dialyzed GST-Syn-1A, which could be blocked by Kv2.1C domain proteins (C1: amino acids 412-633, C2: amino acids 634-853), but not the Kv2.1 cytoplasmic N terminus (amino acids 1-182). This was confirmed by direct binding of GST-Syn-1A to the Kv2.1C1 and C2 domains proteins. These findings are in contrast to our recent report showing that Syn-1A binds and modulates the cytoplasmic N terminus of neuronal Kv1.1 and not by its C terminus. Co-expression of Syn-1A in Kv2.1-expressing HEK293 cells inhibited Kv2.1 surfacing, which caused a reduction of Kv2.1 current density. In addition, Syn-1A caused a slowing of Kv2.1 current activation and reduction in the slope factor of steady-state inactivation, but had no affect on inactivation kinetics or voltage dependence of activation. Taken together, SNAP-25 and Syn-1A mediate secretion not only through its participation in the exocytotic SNARE complex, but also by regulating membrane potential and calcium entry through their interaction with Kv and Ca(2+) channels. In contrast to Ca(2+) channels, where these SNARE proteins act on a common synprint site, the SNARE proteins act not only on distinct sites within a Kv channel, but also on distinct sites between different Kv channel families.

  13. Structural basis of dual Ca(2+)/pH regulation of the endolysosomal TRPML1 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghui; Zhang, Wei K; Benvin, Nicole M; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Su, Deyuan; Li, Huan; Wang, Shu; Michailidis, Ioannis E; Tong, Liang; Li, Xueming; Yang, Jian

    2017-01-23

    The activities of organellar ion channels are often regulated by Ca(2+) and H(+), which are present in high concentrations in many organelles. Here we report a structural element critical for dual Ca(2+)/pH regulation of TRPML1, a Ca(2+)-release channel crucial for endolysosomal function. TRPML1 mutations cause mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), a severe lysosomal storage disorder characterized by neurodegeneration, mental retardation and blindness. We obtained crystal structures of the 213-residue luminal domain of human TRPML1 containing three missense MLIV-causing mutations. This domain forms a tetramer with a highly electronegative central pore formed by a novel luminal pore loop. Cysteine cross-linking and cryo-EM analyses confirmed that this architecture occurs in the full-length channel. Structure-function studies demonstrated that Ca(2+) and H(+) interact with the luminal pore and exert physiologically important regulation. The MLIV-causing mutations disrupt the luminal-domain structure and cause TRPML1 mislocalization. Our study reveals the structural underpinnings of TRPML1's regulation, assembly and pathogenesis.

  14. Bidirectional regulation of dendritic voltage-gated potassium channels by the fragile X mental retardation protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Young; Ge, Woo-Ping; Huang, Wendy; He, Ye; Wang, Gordon X; Rowson-Baldwin, Ashley; Smith, Stephen J; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2011-11-17

    How transmitter receptors modulate neuronal signaling by regulating voltage-gated ion channel expression remains an open question. Here we report dendritic localization of mRNA of Kv4.2 voltage-gated potassium channel, which regulates synaptic plasticity, and its local translational regulation by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) linked to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable mental retardation. FMRP suppression of Kv4.2 is revealed by elevation of Kv4.2 in neurons from fmr1 knockout (KO) mice and in neurons expressing Kv4.2-3'UTR that binds FMRP. Moreover, treating hippocampal slices from fmr1 KO mice with Kv4 channel blocker restores long-term potentiation induced by moderate stimuli. Surprisingly, recovery of Kv4.2 after N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced degradation also requires FMRP, likely due to NMDAR-induced FMRP dephosphorylation, which turns off FMRP suppression of Kv4.2. Our study of FMRP regulation of Kv4.2 deepens our knowledge of NMDAR signaling and reveals a FMRP target of potential relevance to FXS.

  15. Quantifying habitat benefits of channel reconfigurations on a highly regulated river system, Lower Missouri River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Susannah O.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of habitat availability in a highly regulated lowland river, comparing a restored reach with two reference reaches: an un-restored, channelized reach, and a least-altered reach. We evaluate the effects of channel modifications in terms of distributions of depth and velocity as well as distributions and availability of habitats thought to be supportive of an endangered fish, the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). It has been hypothesized that hydraulic conditions that support food production and foraging may limit growth and survival of juvenile pallid sturgeon. To evaluate conditions that support these habitats, we constructed two-dimensional hydrodynamic models for the three study reaches, two located in the Lower Missouri River (channelized and restored reaches) and one in the Yellowstone River (least-altered reach). Comparability among the reaches was improved by scaling by bankfull discharge and bankfull channel area. The analysis shows that construction of side-channel chutes and increased floodplain connectivity increase the availability of foraging habitat, resulting in a system that is more similar to the reference reach on the Yellowstone River. The availability of food-producing habitat is low in all reaches at flows less than bankfull, but the two reaches in the Lower Missouri River – channelized and restored – display a threshold-like response as flows overtop channel banks, reflecting the persistent effects of channelization on hydraulics in the main channel. These high lateral gradients result in punctuated ecological events corresponding to flows in excess of bankfull discharge. This threshold effect in the restored reach remains distinct from that of the least-altered reference reach, where hydraulic changes are less abrupt and overbank flows more gradually inundate the adjacent floodplain. The habitat curves observed in the reference reach on the Yellowstone River may not be attainable within the

  16. Regulation of KCNQ/Kv7 family voltage-gated K(+) channels by lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Keenan C; Sanders, Charles R

    2017-04-01

    Many years of studies have established that lipids can impact membrane protein structure and function through bulk membrane effects, by direct but transient annular interactions with the bilayer-exposed surface of protein transmembrane domains, and by specific binding to protein sites. Here, we focus on how phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) impact ion channel function and how the structural details of the interactions of these lipids with ion channels are beginning to emerge. We focus on the Kv7 (KCNQ) subfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which are regulated by both PIP2 and PUFAs and play a variety of important roles in human health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  17. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, S A; McDougal, R A; Bulanova, A S; Zeki, M; Lakatos, P; Terman, D; Hines, M L; Lytton, W W

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca(2+)-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca(2+) release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ∼1min. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca(2+) at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca(2+) could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in

  18. Two tonoplast MATE proteins function as turgor-regulating chloride channels in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiwen; Zhao, Fu-Geng; Tang, Ren-Jie; Yu, Yuexuan; Song, Jiali; Wang, Yuan; Li, Legong; Luan, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The central vacuole in a plant cell occupies the majority of the cellular volume and plays a key role in turgor regulation. The vacuolar membrane (tonoplast) contains a large number of transporters that mediate fluxes of solutes and water, thereby adjusting cell turgor in response to developmental and environmental signals. We report that two tonoplast Detoxification efflux carrier (DTX)/Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporters, DTX33 and DTX35, function as chloride channels essential for turgor regulation in Arabidopsis. Ectopic expression of each transporter in Nicotiana benthamiana mesophyll cells elicited a large voltage-dependent inward chloride current across the tonoplast, showing that DTX33 and DTX35 each constitute a functional channel. Both channels are highly expressed in Arabidopsis tissues, including root hairs and guard cells that experience rapid turgor changes during root-hair elongation and stomatal movements. Disruption of these two genes, either in single or double mutants, resulted in shorter root hairs and smaller stomatal aperture, with double mutants showing more severe defects, suggesting that these two channels function additively to facilitate anion influx into the vacuole during cell expansion. In addition, dtx35 single mutant showed lower fertility as a result of a defect in pollen-tube growth. Indeed, patch-clamp recording of isolated vacuoles indicated that the inward chloride channel activity across the tonoplast was impaired in the double mutant. Because MATE proteins are widely known transporters of organic compounds, finding MATE members as chloride channels expands the functional definition of this large family of transporters. PMID:28202726

  19. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Teresa K; Grieco-Calub, Tina M; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2009-02-18

    The beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming alpha subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, beta1, beta2, and beta3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the beta4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected beta4 into HEK (human embryonic kidney) cells stably expressing Na(V)1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the beta4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length beta4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, beta4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of noninactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of beta1 or chimeric subunits including the beta1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Coexpressing Na(V)1.1 and beta4 with beta1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that beta1 overcomes the effects of beta4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, beta1(C121W), which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by beta4 and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with beta4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in beta4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that beta1 and beta4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation, and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted beta1 subunits.

  20. Axonal action-potential initiation and Na+ channel densities in the soma and axon initial segment of subicular pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, C M; Johnston, D

    1996-11-01

    A long-standing hypothesis is that action potentials initiate first in the axon hillock/initial segment (AH-IS) region because of a locally high density of Na+ channels. We tested this idea in subicular pyramidal neurons by using patch-clamp recordings in hippocampal slices. Simultaneous recordings from the soma and IS confirmed that orthodromic action potentials initiated in the axon and then invaded the soma. However, blocking Na+ channels in the AH-IS with locally applied tetrodotoxin (TTX) did not raise the somatic threshold membrane potential for orthodromic spikes. TTX applied to the axon beyond the AH-IS (30-60 microm from the soma) raised the apparent somatic threshold by approximately 8 mV. We estimated the Na+ current density in the AH-IS and somatic membranes by using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings and found similar magnitudes (3-4 pA/microm2). Thus, the present results suggest that orthodromic action potentials initiate in the axon beyond the AH-IS and that the minimum threshold for spike initiation of the neuron is not determined by a high density of Na+ channels in the AH-IS region.

  1. Proteolytic fragmentation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors: a novel mechanism regulating channel activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Alzayady, Kamil J; Yule, David I

    2016-06-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 Rs) are a family of ubiquitously expressed intracellular Ca(2+) release channels. Regulation of channel activity by Ca(2+) , nucleotides, phosphorylation, protein binding partners and other cellular factors is thought to play a major role in defining the specific spatiotemporal characteristics of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. These properties are, in turn, believed pivotal for the selective and specific physiological activation of Ca(2+) -dependent effectors. IP3 Rs are also substrates for the intracellular cysteine proteases, calpain and caspase. Cleavage of the IP3 R has been proposed to play a role in apoptotic cell death by uncoupling regions important for IP3 binding from the channel domain, leaving an unregulated leaky Ca(2+) pore. Contrary to this hypothesis, we demonstrate following proteolysis that N- and C-termini of IP3 R1 remain associated, presumably through non-covalent interactions. Further, we show that complementary fragments of IP3 R1 assemble into tetrameric structures and retain their ability to be regulated robustly by IP3 . While peptide continuity is clearly not necessary for IP3 -gating of the channel, we propose that cleavage of the IP3 R peptide chain may alter other important regulatory events to modulate channel activity. In this scenario, stimulation of the cleaved IP3 R may support distinct spatiotemporal Ca(2+) signals and activation of specific effectors. Notably, in many adaptive physiological events, the non-apoptotic activities of caspase and calpain are demonstrated to be important, but the substrates of the proteases are poorly defined. We speculate that proteolytic fragmentation may represent a novel form of IP3 R regulation, which plays a role in varied adaptive physiological processes.

  2. ZBTB20 regulates nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channel expression in nociceptive sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, An-Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Anjun; Ma, Xianhua; Liang, Qing; Cao, Dongmei; Wood, John N; He, David Z; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2014-11-05

    In mammals, pain sensation is initiated by the detection of noxious stimuli through specialized transduction ion channels and receptors in nociceptive sensory neurons. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are the key sensory transducers that confer nociceptors distinct sensory modalities. However, the regulatory mechanisms about their expression are poorly defined. Here we show that the zinc-finger protein ZBTB20 regulates TRP channels expression in nociceptors. ZBTB20 is highly expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia. Disruption of ZBTB20 in nociceptors led to a marked decrease in the expression levels of TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 and the response of calcium flux and whole-cell currents evoked by their respective specific agonists. Phenotypically, the mice lacking ZBTB20 specifically in nociceptors showed a defect in nociception and pain sensation in response to thermal, mechanical and inflammatory stimulation. Our findings point to ZBTB20 as a critical regulator of nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channels expression in nociceptors.

  3. The G. L. Brown Prize Lecture. Hypoxic regulation of ion channel function and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2002-07-01

    Acute hypoxia regulates the activity of specific ion channels in a rapid and reversible manner. Such effects underlie appropriate cellular responses to hypoxia which are designed to initiate cardiorespiratory reflexes and contribute importantly to other tissue responses, all of which are designed to improve tissue O2 supply. These responses include excitation of chemoreceptors as well as pulmonary vasoconstriction and systemic vasodilatation. However, such responses may also contribute to the adverse responses to hypoxia, such as excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. Whilst numerous ion channel types are known to be modulated by acute hypoxia, the nature of the O2 sensor in most tissues remains to be identified. Prolonged (chronic) hypoxia regulates functional expression of ion channels, and so remodels excitability of various cell types. Whilst this may contribute to adaptive responses such as high-altitude acclimatization, such altered channel expression may also contribute to the onset of pathological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, evidence is emerging that production of pathological peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease is increased during prolonged hypoxia. Such effects may account for the known increased incidence of this disease in patients who have previously endured hypoxic episodes, such as congestive heart failure and stroke. Identification of the mechanisms coupling hypoxia to the increased production of these peptides is likely to be of therapeutic benefit.

  4. The role of DPO-1 and XE991-sensitive potassium channels in perivascular adipose tissue-mediated regulation of vascular tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Tsvetkov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The anti-contractile effect of perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT is an important mechanism in the modulation of vascular tone in peripheral arteries. Recent evidence has implicated the XE991-sensitive voltage-gated Kv (KCNQ channels in the regulation of arterial tone by PVAT. However, until now the in vivo pharmacology of the involved vascular Kv channels with regard to XE991 remains undetermined, since XE991 effects may involve Ca2+ activated BKCa channels and/or voltage-dependent Kv1.5 channels sensitive to diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (DPO-1. In this study, we tested whether Kv1.5 channels are involved in the control of mesenteric arterial tone and its regulation by PVAT. Our study was also aimed at extending our current knowledge on the in situ vascular pharmacology of DPO-1 and XE991 regarding Kv1.5 and BKCa channels, in helping to identify the nature of K+ channels that could contribute to PVAT-mediated relaxation. XE991 at 30 µM reduced the anti-contractile response of PVAT, but had no effects on vasocontraction induced by phenylephrine (PE in the absence of PVAT. Similar effects were observed for XE991 at 0.3 µM, which is known to almost completely inhibit mesenteric artery VSMC Kv currents. 30 µM XE991 did not affect BKCa currents in VSMCs. Kcna5-/- arteries and wild-type arteries incubated with 1 µM DPO-1 showed normal vasocontractions in response to PE in the presence and absence of PVAT. Kv current density and inhibition by 30 µM XE991 were normal in mesenteric artery VSMCs isolated from Kcna5-/- mice. We conclude that Kv channels are involved in the control of arterial vascular tone by PVAT. These channels are present in VSMCs and very potently inhibited by the KCNQ channel blocker XE991. BKCa channels and/or DPO-1 sensitive Kv1.5 channels in VSMCs are not the downstream mediators of the XE991 effects on PVAT-dependent arterial vasorelaxation. Further studies will need to be undertaken to examine the role of other Kv channels in

  5. A plasma membrane-targeted cytosolic domain of STIM1 selectively activates ARC channels, an arachidonate-regulated store-independent Orai channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    The Orai family of calcium channels includes the store-operated CRAC channels and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated ARC channels. Both depend on STIM1 for their activation but, whereas CRAC channel activation involves sensing the depletion of intracellular calcium stores via a luminal N terminal EF-hand of STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, ARC channels are exclusively activated by the pool of STIM1 that constitutively resides in the plasma membrane (PM). Here, the EF-hand is extracellular and unlikely to ever lose its bound calcium, suggesting that STIM1-dependent activation of ARC channels is very different from that of CRAC channels. We now show that attachment of the cytosolic portion of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM via an N terminal Lck-domain sequence is sufficient to enable normal AA-dependent activation of ARC channels, while failing to allow activation of store-operated CRAC channels. Introduction of a point mutation within the Lck-domain resulted in the loss of both PM localization and ARC channel activation. Reversing the orientation of the PM-anchored STIM1 C terminus via a C-terminal CAAX-box fails to support either CRAC or ARC channel activation. Finally, the Lck-anchored STIM1 C-terminal domain also enabled the exclusive activation of the ARC channels following physiological agonist addition. These data demonstrate that simple tethering of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM is sufficient to allow the full, normal and exclusive activation of ARC channels, and that the N-terminal regions of STIM1 (including the EF-hand domain) play no significant role in this activation.

  6. Direct block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel by niflumic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Ward, T S; Li, H; Schmidt, A; Cai, Z; Sheppard, D N

    2004-01-01

    Niflumic acid is widely used to inhibit Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channels. However, the chemical structure of niflumic acid resembles that of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a drug that inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. To investigate how niflumic acid inhibits CFTR Cl(-) channel, we studied recombinant wild-type human CFTR in excised inside-out membrane patches. When added to the intracellular solution, niflumic acid caused a concentration- and voltage-dependent decrease of CFTR Cl(-) current with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (K(i)) of 253 microM and Hill co-efficient of approximately 1, at -50 mV. Niflumic acid inhibition of single CFTR Cl(-) channels was characterized by a very fast, flickery block that decreased dramatically current amplitude without altering open-probability. Consistent with these data, spectral analysis of CFTR Cl(-) currents suggested that channel block by niflumic acid was described by the closed open blocked kinetic scheme with blocker on rate (k(on)) = 13.9 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1), off rate (k(off))=3348 s(-1) and dissociation constant (K(d)) = 241 microM, at -50 mV. Based on these data, we tested the effects of niflumic acid on transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and cyst growth using type I MDCK epithelial cells. Niflumic acid (200 microM) inhibited cAMP-stimulated, bumetanide-sensitive short-circuit current by 55%. Moreover, the drug potently retarded cyst growth. We conclude that niflumic acid is an open-channel blocker of CFTR that inhibits Cl(-) permeation by plugging the channel pore. It or related agents might be of value in the development of new therapies for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  7. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Zaydman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD and pore-gate (PGD structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7 channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  8. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD) and pore-gate (PGD) structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7) channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1 channels. In this review, we put these findings in the context of the current understanding of voltage-dependent gating, lipid modulation of Kv channel activation, and PIP2-regulation of KCNQ channels. We suggest that lipid-mediated coupling of functional domains is a common mechanism among KCNQ channels that may be applicable to other Kv channels and membrane proteins.

  9. 17β-estradiol regulation of T-type calcium channels in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rick, Elizabeth A.; Kelly, Martin J.; Ronnekleiv, Oline K.

    2009-01-01

    T-type calcium channels are responsible for generating low-threshold spikes that facilitate burst firing and neurotransmitter release in neurons. GnRH neurons exhibit burst firing, but the underlying conductances are not known. Previously, we have found that 17β-estradiol (E2) increases T-type channel expression and excitability of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus neurons. Therefore, we used ovariectomized oil- or E2-treated EGFP-GnRH mice to explore the expression and E2-regulation of T-type channels in GnRH neurons. Based on single cell RT-PCR and real-time PCR quantification of the T-type channel α1-subunits, we found that all three subunits were expressed in GnRH neurons with Cav3.3≥Cav3.2>Cav3.1. The mRNA expression of the three subunits was increased with surge-inducing levels of E2 during the morning. During the afternoon, Cav3.3 mRNA expression remained elevated, whereas Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were decreased. The membrane estrogen receptor agonist STX increased the expression of Cav3.3, but not Cav3.2 in GnRH neurons. Whole-cell patch recordings in GnRH neurons revealed that E2 treatment significantly augmented T-type current density at both time-points, and increased the rebound excitation during the afternoon. Although E2 regulated the mRNA expression of all three subunits in GnRH neurons, the increased expression combined with the slower inactivation kinetics of the T-type current indicates that Cav3.3 may be the most important for bursting activity associated with the GnRH/LH surge. The E2-induced increase in mRNA expression, which depends in part on membrane-initiated signaling, leads to increased channel function and neuronal excitability, and could be a mechanism by which E2 facilitates burst firing and cyclic GnRH neurosecretion. PMID:19710308

  10. Effects of ethanol on voltage-sensitive Na-channels in cultured skeletal muscle: Up-regulation as a result of chronic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, C.; Sampson, S.R. (Bar-Ilan Univ., Ramat-Gan (Israel))

    1990-12-01

    The effects of acute and chronic treatment with ethanol were studied on the number and activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na-channels in cultured rat skeletal muscle. The number of channels was determined by measurements of specific binding of (3H) saxitoxin (STX) in whole cell preparations. Measurements were also made of the frequency and rate of rise of spontaneously occurring action potentials, which are the physiologic expression of Na-channel density. Acute ethanol (37.5-150 mM), while causing depolarization of membrane potential and blockade of electrical activity, was without effect on specific STX binding. Neither methanol, acetaldehyde nor ethylene glycol had significant effects on these properties when given acutely in the same concentrations as ethanol. Chronic ethanol caused dose-related increases in STX binding and action potential properties with maximal levels being attained after 3 days of treatment at a concentration of 150 mM. On removal of ethanol from the culture medium all properties returned to control levels after 48 hr. Both increased external K+ and tetrodotoxin, which up-regulate Na-channels by reducing cytosolic Ca++, potentiated the ethanol-induced increase in Na-channel density. The increase in STX binding was not associated with changes in affinity of the binding sites for the ligand but was completely prevented by treatment with cycloheximide and actinomycin D. The results demonstrate that ethanol interacts with the cell membrane to induce synthesis of STX-binding sites.

  11. High-density expression of Ca2+-permeable ASIC1a channels in NG2 glia of rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chu Lin

    Full Text Available NG2 cells, a fourth type of glial cell in the mammalian CNS, undergo reactive changes in response to a wide variety of brain insults. Recent studies have demonstrated that neuronally expressed acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are implicated in various neurological disorders including brain ischemia and seizures. Acidosis is a common feature of acute neurological conditions. It is postulated that a drop in pH may be the link between the pathological process and activation of NG2 cells. Such postulate immediately prompts the following questions: Do NG2 cells express ASICs? If so, what are their functional properties and subunit composition? Here, using a combination of electrophysiology, Ca2+ imaging and immunocytochemistry, we present evidence to demonstrate that NG2 cells of the rat hippocampus express high density of Ca2+-permeable ASIC1a channels compared with several types of hippocampal neurons. First, nucleated patch recordings from NG2 cells revealed high density of proton-activated currents. The magnitude of proton-activated current was pH dependent, with a pH for half-maximal activation of 6.3. Second, the current-voltage relationship showed a reversal close to the equilibrium potential for Na+. Third, psalmotoxin 1, a blocker specific for the ASIC1a channel, largely inhibited proton-activated currents. Fourth, Ca2+ imaging showed that activation of proton-activated channels led to an increase of [Ca2+]i. Finally, immunocytochemistry showed co-localization of ASIC1a and NG2 proteins in the hippocampus. Thus the acid chemosensor, the ASIC1a channel, may serve for inducing membrane depolarization and Ca2+ influx, thereby playing a crucial role in the NG2 cell response to injury following ischemia.

  12. Actin Dynamics Regulates Voltage-Dependent Calcium-Permeable Channels of the Vicia faba Guard Cell Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Liu-Min Fan

    2009-01-01

    Free cytosolic Ca~(2+) ([Ca~(2+)]_(cyt)) is an ubiquitous second messenger in plant cell signaling, and [Ca~(2+)]_(cyt) elevation is associated with Ca~(2+)-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and endomembranes regulated by a wide range of stimuli. However, knowledge regarding Ca~(2+) channels and their regulation remains limited in planta. A type of voltage-dependent Ca~(2+)-permeable channel was identified and characterized for the Vicia faba L. guard cell plasma membrane by using patch-clamp techniques. These channels are permeable to both Ba~(2+) and Ca~(2+), and their activities can be inhibited by micromolar Gd~(3+). The unitary conductance and the reversal potential of the channels depend on the Ca~(2+) or Ba~(2+) gradients across the plasma membrane. The inward whole-cell Ca~(2+) (Ba~(2+)) current, as well as the unitary current amplitude and NP. of the single Ca~(2+) channel, increase along with the membrane hyperpolarization. Pharmacological experiments suggest that actin dynamics may serve as an upstream regulator of this type of calcium channel of the guard cell plasma membrane. Cytochalasin D, an actin polymerization blocker, activated the NP_o of these channels at the single channel level and increased the current amplitude at the whole-cell level. But these channel activations and current increments could be restrained by pretreatment with an F-actin stabilizer, phalloidin. The potential physiological significance of this regulatory mechanism is also discussed.

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Defective function of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in Caucasian populations. The disease is manifested in defective chloride transport across the epithelial cells in various tissues. To date, more than 1400 different mutations have been identified as CF-associated. CFTR is regulated by phosphorylation in its regulatory (R) domain, and gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF.

  14. Nitric oxide regulates neuronal activity via calcium-activated potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ray Zhong

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons.

  15. Differential CaMKII regulation by voltage-gated calcium channels in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Johanna G; Wang, Xiaohan; Colbran, Roger J

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and many other functions in striatal medium spiny neurons to modulate basal ganglia function. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major calcium-dependent signaling protein that couples calcium entry to diverse cellular changes. CaMKII activation results in autophosphorylation at Thr286 and sustained calcium-independent CaMKII activity after calcium signals dissipate. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating striatal CaMKII. To address this, mouse brain slices were treated with pharmacological modulators of calcium channels and punches of dorsal striatum were immunoblotted for CaMKII Thr286 autophosphorylation as an index of CaMKII activation. KCl depolarization increased levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation ~2-fold; this increase was blocked by an LTCC antagonist and was mimicked by treatment with pharmacological LTCC activators. The chelation of extracellular calcium robustly decreased basal CaMKII autophosphorylation within 5min and increased levels of total CaMKII in cytosolic fractions, in addition to decreasing the phosphorylation of CaMKII sites in the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors and the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors. We also found that the maintenance of basal levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation requires low-voltage gated T-type calcium channels, but not LTCCs or R-type calcium channels. Our findings indicate that CaMKII activity is dynamically regulated by multiple calcium channels in the striatum thus coupling calcium entry to key downstream substrates.

  16. Up-regulation of lysosomal TRPML1 channels is essential for lysosomal adaptation to nutrient starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Lu; Lawas, Maria; Li, Xinran; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel T; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2015-03-17

    Upon nutrient starvation, autophagy digests unwanted cellular components to generate catabolites that are required for housekeeping biosynthesis processes. A complete execution of autophagy demands an enhancement in lysosome function and biogenesis to match the increase in autophagosome formation. Here, we report that mucolipin-1 (also known as TRPML1 or ML1), a Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome that regulates many aspects of lysosomal trafficking, plays a central role in this quality-control process. By using Ca(2+) imaging and whole-lysosome patch clamping, lysosomal Ca(2+) release and ML1 currents were detected within hours of nutrient starvation and were potently up-regulated. In contrast, lysosomal Na(+)-selective currents were not up-regulated. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) mimicked a starvation effect in fed cells. The starvation effect also included an increase in lysosomal proteostasis and enhanced clearance of lysosomal storage, including cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) cells. However, this effect was not observed when ML1 was pharmacologically inhibited or genetically deleted. Furthermore, overexpression of ML1 mimicked the starvation effect. Hence, lysosomal adaptation to environmental cues such as nutrient levels requires mTOR/TFEB-dependent, lysosome-to-nucleus regulation of lysosomal ML1 channels and Ca(2+) signaling.

  17. Wavelet Packet Feature Assessment for High-density Myoelectric Pattern Recognition and Channel Selection toward Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presented wavelet packet feature assessment of neural control information in paretic upper-limb muscles of stroke survivors for myoelectric pattern recognition, taking advantage of high-resolution time-frequency representations of surface electromyographic (EMG signals. On this basis, a novel channel selection method was developed by combining the Fisher's class separability index (FCSI and the sequential feedforward selection (SFS analyses, in order to determine a small number of appropriate EMG channels from original high-density EMG electrode array. The advantages of the wavelet packet features and the channel selection analyses were further illustrated by comparing with previous conventional approaches, in terms of classification performance when identifying 20 functional arm/hand movements implemented by 12 stroke survivors. This study offers a practical approach including paretic EMG feature extraction and channel selection that enables active myoelectric control of multiple degrees of freedom with paretic muscles. All these efforts will facilitate upper-limb dexterity restoration and improved stroke rehabilitation.

  18. Coupled-channels calculations of nonelastic cross sections using a density-functional structure model

    CERN Document Server

    Nobre, G P A; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J; Dupuis, M; Terasaki, J; Engel, J

    2010-01-01

    A microscopic calculation of the reaction cross-section for nucleon-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all particle-hole (p-h) excitation states in the target and to all one-nucleon pickup channels. The p-h states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and subsequently to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. Target excitations for 40,48Ca, 58Ni, 90Zr and 144Sm were described in a QRPA framework using a Skyrme functional. Reaction cross sections calculated in this approach were compared to predictions of a fitted optical potential and to experimental data, reaching very good agreement. Couplings between inelastic states were found to be negligible, while the couplings to pickup channels contribute significantly. For the first time observed reaction cross-sections are completely accounted for by explicit channel coupling, for incident energies between 10 and 40 MeV.

  19. Post-translational regulation of P2X receptor channels: modulation by phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe eBernier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptor channels mediate fast excitatory signaling by ATP and play major roles in sensory transduction, neuro-immune communication and inflammatory response. P2X receptors constitute a gene family of calcium-permeable ATP-gated cation channels therefore the regulation of P2X signaling is critical for both membrane potential and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Phosphoinositides (PIPn are anionic signaling phospholipids that act as functional regulators of many types of ion channels. Direct PIPn binding was demonstrated for several ligand- or voltage-gated ion channels, however no generic motif emerged to accurately predict lipid-protein binding sites. This review presents what is currently known about the modulation of the different P2X subtypes by phospholipids and about critical determinants underlying their sensitivity to PIPn levels in the plasma membrane.All functional mammalian P2X subtypes tested, with the notable exception of P2X5, have been shown to be positively modulated by PIPn, i.e. homomeric P2X1, P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, as well as heteromeric P2X1/5 and P2X2/3 receptors. Based on various results reported on the aforementioned subtypes including mutagenesis of the prototypical PIPn-sensitive P2X4 and PIPn-insensitive P2X5 receptor subtypes, an increasing amount of functional, biochemical and structural evidence converges on the modulatory role of a short polybasic domain located in the proximal C-terminus of P2X subunits. This linear motif, semi-conserved in the P2X family, seems necessary and sufficient for encoding direct modulation of ATP-gated channels by PIPn. Furthermore, the physiological impact of the regulation of ionotropic purinergic responses by phospholipids on pain pathways was recently revealed in the context of native crosstalks between phospholipase C-linked metabotropic receptors and P2X receptor channels in DRG sensory neurons and microglia.

  20. S-acylation dependent post-translational cross-talk regulates large conductance calcium- and voltage- activated potassium (BK channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Shipston

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms that control surface expression and/or activity of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK channels are important determinants of their (pathophysiological function. Indeed, BK channel dysfunction is associated with major human disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. S-acylation (S-palmitoylation represents a major reversible, post-translational modification controlling the properties and function of many proteins including ion channels. Recent evidence reveals that both pore-forming and regulatory subunits of BK channels are S-acylated and control channel trafficking and regulation by AGC-family protein kinases. The pore-forming α-subunit is S-acylated at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus, each site being regulated by different palmitoyl acyl transferases (zDHHCs and acyl thioesterases. (APTs. S-acylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas S-acylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. S-acylation of the regulatory β4-subunit controls ER exit and surface expression of BK channels but does not affect ion channel kinetics at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, a significant number of previously identified BK-channel interacting proteins have been shown, or are predicted to be, S-acylated. Thus, the BK channel multi-molecular signalling complex may be dynamically regulated by this fundamental post-translational modification and thus S-acylation likely represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease.

  1. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation.

  2. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  3. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs: therapeutic targets for neurological diseases and their regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Jin Kweon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular acidification occurs not only in pathologicalconditions such as inflammation and brain ischemia, but alsoin normal physiological conditions such as synaptic transmission.Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs can detect a broadrange of physiological pH changes during pathological andsynaptic cellular activities. ASICs are voltage-independent,proton-gated cation channels widely expressed throughout thecentral and peripheral nervous system. Activation of ASICs isinvolved in pain perception, synaptic plasticity, learning andmemory, fear, ischemic neuronal injury, seizure termination,neuronal degeneration, and mechanosensation. Therefore,ASICs emerge as potential therapeutic targets for manipulatingpain and neurological diseases. The activity of these channelscan be regulated by many factors such as lactate, Zn2+, andPhe-Met-Arg-Phe amide (FMRFamide-like neuropeptides byinteracting with the channel’s large extracellular loop. ASICsare also modulated by G protein-coupled receptors such asCB1 cannabinoid receptors and 5-HT2. This review focuses onthe physiological roles of ASICs and the molecularmechanisms by which these channels are regulated. [BMBReports 2013; 46(6: 295-304

  4. Amphiphile regulation of ion channel function by changes in the bilayer spring constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Koeppe, R.E.; Andersen, Oluf Sten

    2010-01-01

    Many drugs are amphiphiles that, in addition to binding to a particular target protein, adsorb to cell membrane lipid bilayers and alter intrinsic bilayer physical properties (e. g., bilayer thickness, monolayer curvature, and elastic moduli). Such changes can modulate membrane protein function b......-dependent sodium channels in living cells. The use of gA channels as molecular force probes provides a tool for quantitative, predictive studies of bilayer-mediated regulation of membrane protein function by amphiphiles....... by altering the energetic cost (Delta G(bilayer)) of bilayer deformations associated with protein conformational changes that involve the protein-bilayer interface. But amphiphiles have complex effects on the physical properties of lipid bilayers, meaning that the net change in Delta G(bilayer) cannot...... be predicted from measurements of isolated changes in such properties. Thus, the bilayer contribution to the promiscuous regulation of membrane proteins by drugs and other amphiphiles remains unknown. To overcome this problem, we use gramicidin A (gA) channels as molecular force probes to measure the net...

  5. Regulation of GIRK channel deactivation by Galpha(q) and Galpha(i/o) pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Ruppersberg, J P; Herlitze, S

    2000-09-01

    G protein regulated inward rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) are activated by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) via the G protein betagamma subunits. However, little is known about the effects of different GPCRs on the deactivation kinetics of transmitter-mediated GIRK currents. In the present study we investigated the influence of different GPCRs in the presence and absence of RGS proteins on the deactivation kinetics of GIRK channels by coexpressing the recombinant protein subunits in Xenopus oocytes. The stimulation of both G(i/o)- and G(q)-coupled pathways accelerated GIRK deactivation. GIRK currents deactivated faster upon stimulation of G(i/o)- and G(q)-coupled pathways by P(2)Y(2) receptors (P(2)Y(2)Rs) than upon activation of the G(i/o)-coupled pathway alone via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (M(2) mAChRs). This acceleration was found to be dependent on phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) activities and intracellular calcium. With the assumption that RGS2 has a higher affinity for Galpha(q) than Galpha(i/o), we demonstrated that the deactivation kinetics of GIRK channels can be differentially regulated by the relative amount of RGS proteins. These data indicate that transmitter-mediated deactivation of GIRK currents is modulated by crosstalk between G(i/o)- and G(q)-coupled pathways.

  6. Regulation of Na(+) channel inactivation by the DIII and DIV voltage-sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric J; Zhu, Wandi; Schubert, Angela R; Voelker, Taylor; Varga, Zoltan; Silva, Jonathan R

    2017-03-06

    Functional eukaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels comprise four domains (DI-DIV), each containing six membrane-spanning segments (S1-S6). Voltage sensing is accomplished by the first four membrane-spanning segments (S1-S4), which together form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). A critical NaV channel gating process, inactivation, has previously been linked to activation of the VSDs in DIII and DIV. Here, we probe this interaction by using voltage-clamp fluorometry to observe VSD kinetics in the presence of mutations at locations that have been shown to impair NaV channel inactivation. These locations include the DIII-DIV linker, the DIII S4-S5 linker, and the DIV S4-S5 linker. Our results show that, within the 10-ms timeframe of fast inactivation, the DIV-VSD is the primary regulator of inactivation. However, after longer 100-ms pulses, the DIII-DIV linker slows DIII-VSD deactivation, and the rate of DIII deactivation correlates strongly with the rate of recovery from inactivation. Our results imply that, over the course of an action potential, DIV-VSDs regulate the onset of fast inactivation while DIII-VSDs determine its recovery.

  7. Ion channels, guidance molecules, intracellular signaling and transcription factors regulating nervous and vascular system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Tenpei; Kumada, Tatsuro; Yoshihara, Sei-ichi; Egea, Joaquim; Yamagishi, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Our sophisticated thoughts and behaviors are based on the miraculous development of our complex nervous network system, in which many different types of proteins and signaling cascades are regulated in a temporally and spatially ordered manner. Here we review our recent attempts to grasp the principles of nervous system development in terms of general cellular phenomena and molecules, such as volume-regulated anion channels, intracellular Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signaling, the Npas4 transcription factor and the FLRT family of axon guidance molecules. We also present an example illustrating that the same FLRT family may regulate the development of vascular networks as well. The aim of this review is to open up new vistas for understanding the intricacy of nervous and vascular system development.

  8. P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors regulate pancreatic Ca²+-activated K+ channels differently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klærke, Susanne Edeling Hede; Amstrup, Jan; Klærke, Dan Arne;

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular ATP is an important regulator of transepithelial transport in a number of tissues. In pancreatic ducts, we have shown that ATP modulates epithelial K+ channels via purinergic receptors, most likely the P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors, but the identity of the involved K+ channels was not clear....... In this study, we show by RT-PCR analysis that rat pancreatic ducts express Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels of intermediate conductance (IK) and big conductance (BK), but not small conductance (SK). Possible interactions between P2Y receptors and these Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels were examined in co......-expression experiments in Xenopus laevis oocytes. K+ channel activity was measured electrophysiologically in oocytes stimulated with UTP (0.1 mM). UTP stimulation of oocytes expressing P2Y4 receptors and BK channels resulted in a 30% increase in the current through the expressed channels. In contrast, stimulation of P2Y...

  9. Queuing Theory Based Co-Channel Interference Analysis Approach for High-Density Wireless Local Area Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Han, Guangjie; Qian, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Increased co-channel interference (CCI) in wireless local area networks (WLANs) is bringing serious resource constraints to today’s high-density wireless environments. CCI in IEEE 802.11-based networks is inevitable due to the nature of the carrier sensing mechanism however can be reduced by resource optimization approaches. That means the CCI analysis is basic, but also crucial for an efficient resource management. In this article, we present a novel CCI analysis approach based on the queuing theory, which considers the randomness of end users’ behavior and the irregularity and complexity of network traffic in high-density WLANs that adopts the M/M/c queuing model for CCI analysis. Most of the CCIs occur when multiple networks overlap and trigger channel contentions; therefore, we use the ratio of signal-overlapped areas to signal coverage as a probabilistic factor to the queuing model to analyze the CCI impacts in highly overlapped WLANs. With the queuing model, we perform simulations to see how the CCI influences the quality of service (QoS) in high-density WLANs. PMID:27563896

  10. Queuing Theory Based Co-Channel Interference Analysis Approach for High-Density Wireless Local Area Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Han, Guangjie; Qian, Yujie

    2016-08-23

    Increased co-channel interference (CCI) in wireless local area networks (WLANs) is bringing serious resource constraints to today's high-density wireless environments. CCI in IEEE 802.11-based networks is inevitable due to the nature of the carrier sensing mechanism however can be reduced by resource optimization approaches. That means the CCI analysis is basic, but also crucial for an efficient resource management. In this article, we present a novel CCI analysis approach based on the queuing theory, which considers the randomness of end users' behavior and the irregularity and complexity of network traffic in high-density WLANs that adopts the M/M/c queuing model for CCI analysis. Most of the CCIs occur when multiple networks overlap and trigger channel contentions; therefore, we use the ratio of signal-overlapped areas to signal coverage as a probabilistic factor to the queuing model to analyze the CCI impacts in highly overlapped WLANs. With the queuing model, we perform simulations to see how the CCI influences the quality of service (QoS) in high-density WLANs.

  11. Linear Modeling and Regulation Quality Analysis for Hydro-Turbine Governing System with an Open Tailrace Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the state–space method (SSM, a novel linear mathematical model of the unsteady flow for the tailrace system with an open channel is proposed. This novel model is an elastic linearized model of water hammer. The validity of the model has been verified by several examples of numerical simulation, which are based on a finite difference technique. Then, the complete mathematical model for the hydro-turbine governing system of hydropower station with an open tailrace channel, which is used for simulating the transient process of the hydro-turbine governing system under load disturbance, is established by combining the models of hydro-turbine, generator, governor and open tailrace channel. Finally, according to the complete model, the regulation quality for hydro-turbine governing system with an open tailrace channel under load disturbance is studied, and the effects of open tailrace channel and tailrace surge tank on regulation quality are analyzed. The results indicate that: The open tailrace channel has a strong influence on the regulation quality by observing the water level fluctuations in tailrace surge tank. The surge shows a piecewise periodical change along with the variation in the length of an open channel. The open tailrace channel can be used to improve the regulation quality of hydro-turbine governing system.

  12. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  13. Reciprocal regulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-CREB regulates voltage gated calcium channel expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Selvakumar

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, Protein Kinase C (PKC and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection.

  14. On fading probability density functions of fast-tracked and untracked free-space optical communication channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2011-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication systems suffer from average power loss and instantaneous power fading due to the atmospheric turbulence. The channel fading probability density function (pdf) is of critical importance for FSO communication system design and evaluation. The performance and reliability of FSO communication systems can be greatly enhanced if fast-tacking devices are employed at the transmitter in order to compensate laser beam wander at the receiver aperture. The fast-tracking method is especially effective when communication distance is long. This paper studies the fading probability density functions of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO communication channels. Large-scale wave-optics simulations are conducted for both tracked and untracked lasers. In the simulations, the Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, and it is assumed that the outer scale is infinitely large and the inner scale is negligibly small. The fading pdfs of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO channels are obtained from the simulations. Results show that the fast-tracked channel fading can be accurately modeled as gamma-distributed if receiver aperture size is smaller than the coherence radius. An analytical method is given for calculating the untracked fading pdfs of both point-like and finite-size receiver apertures from the fast-tracked fading pdf. For point-like apertures, the analytical method gives pdfs close to the well-known gamma-gamma pdfs if off-axis effects are omitted in the formulation. When off-axis effects are taken into consideration, the untracked pdfs obtained using the analytical method fit the simulation pdfs better than gamma-gamma distributions for point-like apertures, and closely fit the simulation pdfs for finite-size apertures where gamma-gamma pdfs deviate from those of the simulations significantly.

  15. FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic information transmission by modulating action potential duration via BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2013-02-20

    Loss of FMRP causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx, and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel's regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology.

  16. The demography of climate-driven and density-regulated population dynamics in a perennial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan; Bengstsson, Karin; Ehrlén, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the internal and external drivers of population dynamics is a key objective in ecology, currently accentuated by the need to forecast the effects of climate change on species distributions and abundances. The interplay between environmental and density effects is one particularly...... to be driven solely by the environment can overestimate extinction risks if there is density dependence. We conclude that density regulation can dampen effects of climate change on Fumana population size, and discuss the need to quantify density dependence in predictions of population responses...... important aspect of such forecasts. We examined the simultaneous impact of climate and intraspecific density on vital rates of the dwarf shrub Fumana procumbens over 20 yr, using generalized additive mixed models. We then analyzed effects on population dynamics using integral projection models...

  17. BK channels regulate spontaneous action potential rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Kent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian ( approximately 24 hr rhythms are generated by the central pacemaker localized to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Although the basis for intrinsic rhythmicity is generally understood to rely on transcription factors encoded by "clock genes", less is known about the daily regulation of SCN neuronal activity patterns that communicate a circadian time signal to downstream behaviors and physiological systems. Action potentials in the SCN are necessary for the circadian timing of behavior, and individual SCN neurons modulate their spontaneous firing rate (SFR over the daily cycle, suggesting that the circadian patterning of neuronal activity is necessary for normal behavioral rhythm expression. The BK K(+ channel plays an important role in suppressing spontaneous firing at night in SCN neurons. Deletion of the Kcnma1 gene, encoding the BK channel, causes degradation of circadian behavioral and physiological rhythms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that loss of robust behavioral rhythmicity in Kcnma1(-/- mice is due to the disruption of SFR rhythms in the SCN, we used multi-electrode arrays to record extracellular action potentials from acute wild-type (WT and Kcnma1(-/- slices. Patterns of activity in the SCN were tracked simultaneously for up to 3 days, and the phase, period, and synchronization of SFR rhythms were examined. Loss of BK channels increased arrhythmicity but also altered the amplitude and period of rhythmic activity. Unexpectedly, Kcnma1(-/- SCNs showed increased variability in the timing of the daily SFR peak. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that BK channels regulate multiple aspects of the circadian patterning of neuronal activity in the SCN. In addition, these data illustrate the characteristics of a disrupted SCN rhythm downstream of clock gene-mediated timekeeping and its relationship to behavioral rhythms.

  18. Kv7 channels regulate pairwise spiking covariability in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocker, Gabriel Koch; Doiron, Brent

    2014-07-15

    Low-threshold M currents are mediated by the Kv7 family of potassium channels. Kv7 channels are important regulators of spiking activity, having a direct influence on the firing rate, spike time variability, and filter properties of neurons. How Kv7 channels affect the joint spiking activity of populations of neurons is an important and open area of study. Using a combination of computational simulations and analytic calculations, we show that the activation of Kv7 conductances reduces the covariability between spike trains of pairs of neurons driven by common inputs. This reduction is beyond that explained by the lowering of firing rates and involves an active cancellation of common fluctuations in the membrane potentials of the cell pair. Our theory shows that the excess covariance reduction is due to a Kv7-induced shift from low-pass to band-pass filtering of the single neuron spike train response. Dysfunction of Kv7 conductances is related to a number of neurological diseases characterized by both elevated firing rates and increased network-wide correlations. We show how changes in the activation or strength of Kv7 conductances give rise to excess correlations that cannot be compensated for by synaptic scaling or homeostatic modulation of passive membrane properties. In contrast, modulation of Kv7 activation parameters consistent with pharmacological treatments for certain hyperactivity disorders can restore normal firing rates and spiking correlations. Our results provide key insights into how regulation of a ubiquitous potassium channel class can control the coordination of population spiking activity.

  19. AMP kinase regulates ligand-gated K-ATP channels in substantia nigra dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ke-Zhong; Wu, Yan-Na; Munhall, Adam C; Johnson, Steven W

    2016-08-25

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master enzyme that regulates ATP-sensitive K(+) (K-ATP) channels in pancreatic beta-cells and cardiac myocytes. We used patch pipettes to record currents and potentials to investigate effects of AMPK on K-ATP currents in substantia nigra compacta (SNC) dopamine neurons in slices of rat midbrain. When slices were superfused repeatedly with the K-ATP channel opener diazoxide, we were surprised to find that diazoxide currents gradually increased in magnitude, reaching 300% of the control value 60min after starting whole-cell recording. However, diazoxide current increased significantly more, to 472% of control, when recorded in the presence of the AMPK activator A769662. Moreover, superfusing the slice with the AMPK blocking agent dorsomorphin significantly reduced diazoxide current to 38% of control. Control experiments showed that outward currents evoked by the K-ATP channel opener NN-414 also increased over time, but not currents evoked by the GABAB agonist baclofen. Delaying the application of diazoxide after starting whole-cell recording correlated with augmentation of current. Loose-patch recording showed that diazoxide produced a 34% slowing of spontaneous firing rate that did not intensify with repeated applications of diazoxide. However, superfusion with A769662 significantly augmented the inhibitory effect of diazoxide on firing rate. We conclude that K-ATP channel function is augmented by AMPK, which is activated during the process of making whole-cell recordings. Our results suggest that AMPK and K-ATP interactions may play an important role in regulating dopamine neuronal excitability.

  20. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D'Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2015-05-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a "leaky" RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis.

  1. Activation of volume-regulated Cl− channels by ACh and ATP in Xenopus follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Samartín, Alberto L; Miledi, Ricardo; Arellano, Rogelio O

    2000-01-01

    Osmolarity-dependent ionic currents from follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes (follicles) were studied using electrophysiological techniques. Whole follicle currents were monitored using a two-electrode voltage clamp and single-channel activity was measured using the patch-clamp technique.In follicles held at -60 mV two chloride currents were activated in external hyposmotic solutions. One was the habitual volume-regulated current elicited by external hyposmolarity (ICl,swell), and the second was a slow and smooth current (Sin) generated by ACh or ATP application.In follicles, the permeability ratios for different anions with respect to Cl− were similar for both ICl,swell and Sin, with a sequence of: SCN− > I− > Br−≥ NO3−≥ Cl− > gluconate ≥ cyclamate > acetate > SO42−.Extracellular ATP blocked the outward component of Sin. Also, extracellular pH modulated the inactivation kinetics of Sin elicited by ACh; e.g. inactivation at +80 mV was ∼100% slower at pH 8.0 compared with that at pH 6.0.Lanthanides inhibited ICl,swell and Sin. La3+ completely inhibited ICl,swell with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 17 ± 1.9 μm, while Sin was blocked up to 55% with an apparent IC50 of 36 ± 2.6 μm.Patch-clamp recordings in follicular cells showed that hyposmotic challenge opened inward single-channel currents. The single channel conductance (4.7 ± 0.4 pS) had a linear current-voltage relationship with a reversal membrane potential close to −20 mV. This single-channel activity was increased by application of ACh or ATP.The ICl,swell generation was not affected by pirenzepine or metoctramine, and did not affect the purinergic activation of the chloride current named Fin. Thus, ICl,swell was not generated via neurotransmitters released during cellular swelling.All together, equal discrimination for different anions, similar modulatory effects by extracellular pH, the blocking effects by ATP and La3+, and the same single-channel activity

  2. Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.

  3. The N-terminal domain allosterically regulates cleavage and activation of the epithelial sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2014-08-15

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr(370) in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation.

  4. The N-terminal Domain Allosterically Regulates Cleavage and Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L.; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M. Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr370 in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation. PMID:24973914

  5. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-min LIANG; Su-yun LI; Ling-ling LAI; Juergen HESCHELER; Ming TANG; Chang-jin LIU; Hong-yan LUO; Yuan-long SONG; Xin-wu HU; Jiao-ya XI; Lin-lin GAO; Bin NIE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Ica- L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of Ica-L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action.IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-Lcurrent by 71.2 %±9.2 % (n=8) and 11.3 %±2.5 % (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5 %±3.5 % (n=5) and 82.7 %±10.4 % (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on ICa-L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  6. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-minLIANG; MingTANG; Chang-jinLIU; Hong-yanLUO; Yuan-longSONG; Xin-wuHU; Jiao-yaXI; Lin-linGAO; BinNIE; Su-yunLI; Ling-lingLAI; JuergenHESCHELER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ICa-L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of lCa.L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L current by 71.2 %±9.2% (n=8) and 11.3%±2.5% (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5%±3.5% (n=5) and 82.7%± 10.4% (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on lca.L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on lCa.L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  7. Phospholipase D2 specifically regulates TREK potassium channels via direct interaction and local production of phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoglio, Yannick; Levitz, Joshua; Kienzler, Michael A; Lesage, Florian; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Sandoz, Guillaume

    2014-09-16

    Membrane lipids serve as second messengers and docking sites for proteins and play central roles in cell signaling. A major question about lipid signaling is whether diffusible lipids can selectively target specific proteins. One family of lipid-regulated membrane proteins is the TWIK-related K channel (TREK) subfamily of K2P channels: TREK1, TREK2, and TWIK-related arachdonic acid stimulated K(+) channel (TRAAK). We investigated the regulation of TREK channels by phosphatidic acid (PA), which is generated by phospholipase D (PLD) via hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. Even though all three of the channels are sensitive to PA, we found that only TREK1 and TREK2 are potentiated by PLD2 and that none of these channels is modulated by PLD1, indicating surprising selectivity. We found that PLD2, but not PLD1, directly binds to the C terminus of TREK1 and TREK2, but not to TRAAK. The results have led to a model for selective lipid regulation by localization of phospholipid enzymes to specific effector proteins. Finally, we show that regulation of TREK channels by PLD2 occurs natively in hippocampal neurons.

  8. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milici, Barbara [Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Cittadella Universitaria - 94100 - Enna (Italy)

    2015-12-31

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  9. G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type calcium channels by regulators of G protein signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Wittemann, S; Herlitze, S

    2000-10-01

    1. Fast synaptic transmission is triggered by the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels which can be inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which are responsible for >100-fold increases in the GTPase activity of G proteins and might be involved in the regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels. In this study we investigated the effects of RGS2 on G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type channels expressed in a human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell line using whole-cell recordings. 2. RGS2 markedly accelerates transmitter-mediated inhibition and recovery from inhibition of Ba2+ currents (IBa) through P/Q-type channels heterologously expressed with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (mAChR M2). 3. Both RGS2 and RGS4 modulate the prepulse facilitation properties of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. G protein reinhibition is accelerated, while release from inhibition is slowed. These kinetics depend on the availability of G protein alpha and betagamma subunits which is altered by RGS proteins. 4. RGS proteins unmask the Ca2+ channel beta subunit modulation of Ca2+ channel G protein inhibition. In the presence of RGS2, P/Q-type channels containing the beta2a and beta3 subunits reveal significantly altered kinetics of G protein modulation and increased facilitation compared to Ca2+ channels coexpressed with the beta1b or beta4 subunit.

  10. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, B. D.; Pollock, N. M.; Mackaman-Lofland, C. A.; Bendana, S.

    2013-12-01

    The May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced multiple pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), burying the area north of the volcano under 10s of meters of deposits. Detailed measurements of recently exposed strata from these PDCs provide substantial insight into the dynamics of concentrated currents including inferences on particle-particle interactions, current mobility due to sedimentation fluidization and internal pore pressure, particle support mechanisms, the influence of surface roughness and the conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization. Four primary flow units are identified along the extensive drainage system north of the volcano. The PDCs associated with Units I and II likely occurred during the pre-climactic, waxing phase of the eruption. These currents flowed around and filled in the hummocky topography left behind by the earlier debris avalanche, leaving the massive to diffusely-stratified deposits of Units I and II. The deposits of both Units I and II are generally massive in low lying areas and stratified in areas of high surface roughness, suggesting that surface roughness enhanced basal shear stress within the flow boundary. Units III and IV are associated with the climactic phase of the eruption, which produced the most voluminous and wide-spread PDCs. Both flow units are characteristically massive and enriched in vent-derived lithic blocks. However, an increase in the proportion and size of lithic blocks is found (1) downstream of debris avalanche hummocks, suggesting the PDCs flowed over and around debris avalanche hummocks and were energetic enough to locally entrain accidental lithics from the hummocks and transport them tens of meters downstream, and (2) within large channels cut by later PDCs into earlier PDC deposits, suggesting self-channelization of the flows increased the carrying capacity of the subsequent channelized currents. Unit III is massive, poorly sorted, and shows little to no evidence of

  11. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Mackaman-Lofland, Chelsea; Pollock, Nicholas M.; Bendaña, Sylvana; Dawson, Blaine; Wichgers, Pamela

    2014-04-01

    The May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced multiple pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), burying the area north of the volcano under 10s of meters of deposits. Detailed measurements of recently exposed strata from these PDCs provide substantial insight into the dynamics of concentrated currents including inferences on particle-particle interactions, current mobility due to sedimentation fluidization and internal pore pressure, particle support mechanisms, the influence of surface roughness and the conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization. Four primary flow units are identified along the extensive drainage system north of the volcano. Each flow unit has intricate vertical and lateral facies changes and complex cross-cutting relationships away from source. Each flow unit is an accumulation from an unsteady but locally sustained PDC or an amalgamation of several PDC pulses. The PDCs associated with Units I and II likely occurred during the pre-climactic, waxing phase of the eruption. These currents flowed around and filled in the hummocky topography, leaving the massive to diffusely-stratified deposits of Units I and II. The deposits of both Units I and II are generally more massive in low lying areas and more stratified in areas of high surface roughness, suggesting that surface roughness enhanced basal shear stress within the flow boundary. Units III and IV are associated with the climactic phase of the eruption, which produced the most voluminous and wide-spread PDCs. Both flow units are characteristically massive and enriched in vent-derived lithic blocks. These currents flowed over and around the debris avalanche deposits, as evidenced by the erosion of blocks from the hummocks. Unit III is massive, poorly sorted, and shows little to no evidence of elutriation or segregation of lithics and pumice, suggesting a highly concentrated current where size-density segregation was suppressed. Unit IV shows similar depositional

  12. Flow distribution and maximum current density studies in redox flow batteries with a single passage of the serpentine flow channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    Flow batteries show promise for very large-scale stationary energy storage such as needed for the grid and renewable energy implementation. In recent years, researchers and developers of redox flow batteries (RFBs) have found that electrode and flow field designs of PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) technology can increase the power density and consequently push down the cost of flow battery stacks. In this paper we present a macroscopic model of a typical PEMFC-like RFB electrode-flow field design. The model is a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer). The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, permeability of the porous layer, thickness of the porous layer and thickness of the flow channel on the flow penetration into the porous layer are investigated. The maximum current density corresponding to stoichiometry is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2 and 724 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experiments of ∼400 mA cm-2 and ∼750 mA cm-2, for a single layer and three layers of the carbon fiber paper, respectively.

  13. Mode switching is the major mechanism of ligand regulation of InsP3 receptor calcium release channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Lucian; White, Carl; Cheung, King-Ho; Shuai, Jianwei; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E; Foskett, J Kevin; Mak, Don-On Daniel

    2007-12-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) receptor (InsP(3)R) plays a critical role in generation of complex Ca(2+) signals in many cell types. In patch clamp recordings of isolated nuclei from insect Sf9 cells, InsP(3)R channels were consistently detected with regulation by cytoplasmic InsP(3) and free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) very similar to that observed for vertebrate InsP(3)R. Long channel activity durations of the Sf9-InsP(3)R have now enabled identification of a novel aspect of InsP(3)R gating: modal gating. Using a novel algorithm to analyze channel modal gating kinetics, InsP(3)R gating can be separated into three distinct modes: a low activity mode, a fast kinetic mode, and a burst mode with channel open probability (P(o)) within each mode of 0.007 +/- 0.002, 0.24 +/- 0.03, and 0.85 +/- 0.02, respectively. Channels reside in each mode for long periods (tens of opening and closing events), and transitions between modes can be discerned with high resolution (within two channel opening and closing events). Remarkably, regulation of channel gating by [Ca(2+)](i) and [InsP(3)] does not substantially alter channel P(o) within a mode. Instead, [Ca(2+)](i) and [InsP(3)] affect overall channel P(o) primarily by changing the relative probability of the channel being in each mode, especially the high and low P(o) modes. This novel observation therefore reveals modal switching as the major mechanism of physiological regulation of InsP(3)R channel activity, with implications for the kinetics of Ca(2+) release events in cells.

  14. PIP2 in pancreatic β-cells regulates voltage-gated calcium channels by a voltage-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Lizbeth; Puente, Erika I; Reyes-Vaca, Arturo; Arenas, Isabel; Garduño, Julieta; Bravo-Martínez, Jorge; Garcia, David E

    2016-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phosphoinositide that regulates the activity of many ion channels. Influx of calcium primarily through voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels promotes insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. However, whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2, as is the case for some non-insulin-secreting cells, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2 depletion in pancreatic β-cells through activation of a muscarinic pathway induced by oxotremorine methiodide (Oxo-M). CaV channel currents were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. The CaV current amplitude was reduced by activation of the muscarinic receptor 1 (M1R) in the absence of kinetic changes. The Oxo-M-induced inhibition exhibited the hallmarks of voltage-independent regulation and did not involve PKC activation. A small fraction of the Oxo-M-induced CaV inhibition was diminished by a high concentration of Ca(2+) chelator, whereas ≥50% of this inhibition was prevented by diC8-PIP2 dialysis. Localization of PIP2 in the plasma membrane was examined by transfecting INS-1 cells with PH-PLCδ1, which revealed a close temporal association between PIP2 hydrolysis and CaV channel inhibition. Furthermore, the depletion of PIP2 by a voltage-sensitive phosphatase reduced CaV currents in a way similar to that observed following M1R activation. These results indicate that activation of the M1R pathway inhibits the CaV channel via PIP2 depletion by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism in pancreatic β- and INS-1 cells and thereby support the hypothesis that membrane phospholipids regulate ion channel activity by interacting with ion channels.

  15. Influence of carrier density on the electronic cooling channels of bilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limmer, T.; Houtepen, A.J.; Niggebaum, A.; Tautz, R.; Da Como, E.

    2011-01-01

    We study the electronic cooling dynamics in a single flake of bilayer graphene by femtosecond transient absorption probing the photon-energy range 0.25–1.3 eV. From the transients, we extract the carrier cooling curves for different initial temperatures and densities of the photoexcited electrons an

  16. Cadmium regulates the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennolds, Jessica; Butler, Susie; Maloney, Kevin; Boyaka, Prosper N; Davis, Ian C; Knoell, Daren L; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal ranked seventh on the Priority List of Hazardous Substances. As a byproduct of smelters, cadmium is a prevalent environmental contaminant. It is also a major component of cigarette smoke, and its inhalation is associated with decreased pulmonary function, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), play a central role in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lung functions. CFTR is mostly expressed in epithelial cells, and little is known about the effect of cadmium exposure on lung epithelial cell function. We show that exposure to cadmium decreases the expression of the CFTR protein and subsequent chloride transport in human airway epithelial cells in vitro. Impairment of CFTR protein expression was also observed in vivo in the lung of mice after intranasal instillation of cadmium. We established that the inhibitory effect of cadmium was not a nonspecific effect of heavy metals, as nickel had no effect on CFTR protein levels. Finally, we show that selected antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), but not N-acetylcysteine, can prevent the cadmium-induced suppression of CFTR. In summary, we have identified cadmium as a regulator of the CFTR chloride channel present in lung epithelial cells. Future strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of cadmium on epithelial cells and lung functions may benefit from the finding that alpha-tocopherol protects CFTR expression and function.

  17. Regulation of mitochondrial function by voltage dependent anion channels in ethanol metabolism and the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasters, John J; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Czerny, Christoph; Zhong, Zhi; Maldonado, Eduardo N

    2012-06-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) are highly conserved proteins that are responsible for permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane to hydrophilic metabolites like ATP, ADP and respiratory substrates. Although previously assumed to remain open, VDAC closure is emerging as an important mechanism for regulation of global mitochondrial metabolism in apoptotic cells and also in cells that are not dying. During hepatic ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, VDAC closure suppresses exchange of mitochondrial metabolites, resulting in inhibition of ureagenesis. In vivo, VDAC closure after ethanol occurs coordinately with mitochondrial uncoupling. Since acetaldehyde passes through membranes independently of channels and transporters, VDAC closure and uncoupling together foster selective and more rapid oxidative metabolism of toxic acetaldehyde to nontoxic acetate by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. In single reconstituted VDAC, tubulin decreases VDAC conductance, and in HepG2 hepatoma cells, free tubulin negatively modulates mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect enhanced by protein kinase A. Tubulin-dependent closure of VDAC in cancer cells contributes to suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and may underlie the Warburg phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: VDAC structure, function, and regulation of mitochondrial metabolism.

  18. Role of volume-regulated and calcium-activated anion channels in cell volume homeostasis, cancer and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Sauter, Daniel Rafael Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Volume-regulated channels for anions (VRAC) / organic osmolytes (VSOAC) play essential roles in cell volume regulation and other cellular functions, e.g. proliferation, cell migration and apoptosis. LRRC8A, which belongs to the leucine rich-repeat containing protein family, was recently shown to ...

  19. Magnetic topology and current channels in plasmas with toroidal current density inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciro, D.; Caldas, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is considered. Previous works have shown that internal regions with negative current density lead to non-nested magnetic surfaces inside the plasma. Following these results, we derive a general expression relating the positive and negative currents inside the non-nested surfaces. This is done in terms of an anisotropy parameter that is model-independent and is based in very general properties of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the positive currents in axisymmetric islands screen the negative one in the plasma center by reaching about twice its magnitude. Further, we illustrate these results by developing a family of analytical local solutions for the poloidal magnetic field in a region of interest that contains the inverted current. These local solutions exhibit non-nested magnetic surfaces with a combined current of at least twice the magnitude of the negative one, as prescribed from the topological arguments, and allow to study topological transitions driven by geometrical changes in the current profile. To conclude, we discuss the signatures of internal current density inversions in a confinement device and show that magnetic pitch measurements may be inappropriate to differentiate current reversals and small current holes in plasmas.

  20. The Fleming-Viot limit of an interacting spatial population with fast density regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ankit

    2012-01-01

    We consider population models in which the individuals reproduce, die and also migrate in space. The population size scales according to some parameter $N$, which can have different interpretations depending on the context. Each individual is assigned a mass of 1/N and the total mass in the system is called population density. The dynamics has an intrinsic density regulation mechanism that drives the population density towards an equilibrium. We show that under a timescale separation between the slow migration mechanism and the fast density regulation mechanism, the population dynamics converges to a Fleming-Viot process as the scaling parameter $N \\to \\infty$. We first prove this result for a basic model in which the birth and death rates can only depend on the population density. In this case we obtain a neutral Fleming-Viot process. We then extend this model by including position-dependence in the birth and death rates, as well as, offspring dispersal and immigration mechanisms. We show how these extension...

  1. A monomer is the minimum functional unit required for channel and ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Kogan, I; Wang, Y; Huan, L J; Bear, C E

    2001-09-04

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) normally functions as a phosphorylation-regulated chloride channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells, and lack of this function is the primary cause for the fatal disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies showed that purified, reconstituted CFTR can function as a chloride channel and, further, that its intrinsic ATPase activity is required to regulate opening and closing of the channel gate. However, these previous studies did not identify the quaternary structure required to mediate conduction and catalysis. Our present studies show that CFTR molecules may self-associate in CHO and Sf9 membranes, as complexes close to the predicted size of CFTR dimers can be captured by chemical cross-linking reagents and detected using nondissociative PAGE. However, CFTR function does not require a multimeric complex for function as we determined that purified, reconstituted CFTR monomers are sufficient to mediate regulated chloride conduction and ATPase activity.

  2. Heteromultimeric TRPML channel assemblies play a crucial role in the regulation of cell viability models and starvation-induced autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David A; Lev, Shaya; Frumkin, Ayala; Minke, Baruch; Bach, Gideon

    2010-09-15

    The mucolipin (TRPML) subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels consists of three members that play various roles in the regulation of membrane and protein sorting along endo-lysosomal pathways. Loss-of-function mutations in TRPML1 cause the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder, mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), whereas a gain-of-function mutation in TRPML3 is principally implicated in the hearing-impaired and abnormally pigmented varitint-waddler mouse. Currently, TRPML2 is not implicated in any pathological disorder, but we have recently shown that it is a functional cation channel that physically interacts with TRPML1 and TRPML3 to potentially regulate lysosomal integrity. Here, we show that mutant TRPMLs heteromultimerize with other mutant and wild-type TRPMLs to regulate cell viability and starvation-induced autophagy, a process that mediates macromolecular and organellar turnover under cell starvation conditions. Heteromultimerization of dominant-negative TRPMLs with constitutively active TRPMLs rescues cells from the cytotoxic effects of TRPML constitutive activity. Moreover, dominant-negative TRPML1 channels, including a mutant channel directly implicated in MLIV pathology, also inhibit starvation-induced autophagy by interacting with and affecting native TRPML channel function. Collectively, our results indicate that heteromultimerization of TRPML channels plays a role in various TRPML-regulated mechanisms.

  3. Small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium type 2 channels regulate the formation of contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana R K Murthy

    Full Text Available Small-conductance, Ca2+ activated K+ channels (SK channels are expressed at high levels in brain regions responsible for learning and memory. In the current study we characterized the contribution of SK2 channels to synaptic plasticity and to different phases of hippocampal memory formation. Selective SK2 antisense-treatment facilitated basal synaptic transmission and theta-burst induced LTP in hippocampal brain slices. Using the selective SK2 antagonist Lei-Dab7 or SK2 antisense probes, we found that hippocampal SK2 channels are critical during two different time windows: 1 blockade of SK2 channels before the training impaired fear memory, whereas, 2 blockade of SK2 channels immediately after the training enhanced contextual fear memory. We provided the evidence that the post-training cleavage of the SK2 channels was responsible for the observed bidirectional effect of SK2 channel blockade on memory consolidation. Thus, Lei-Dab7-injection before training impaired the C-terminal cleavage of SK2 channels, while Lei-Dab7 given immediately after training facilitated the C-terminal cleavage. Application of the synthetic peptide comprising a leucine-zipper domain of the C-terminal fragment to Jurkat cells impaired SK2 channel-mediated currents, indicating that the endogenously cleaved fragment might exert its effects on memory formation by blocking SK2 channel-mediated currents. Our present findings suggest that SK2 channel proteins contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory not only as ion channels but also by additionally generating a SK2 C-terminal fragment, involved in both processes. The modulation of fear memory by down-regulating SK2 C-terminal cleavage might have applicability in the treatment of anxiety disorders in which fear conditioning is enhanced.

  4. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: application to the hydrogen molecule ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B

    2012-03-22

    This article presents the results of the first quantum simulations of the electronic flux density (j(e)) by the "coupled-channels" (CC) theory, the fundamentals of which are presented in the previous article [Diestler, D. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, DOI: 10.1021/jp207843z]. The principal advantage of the CC scheme is that it employs exclusively standard methods of quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA). The CC theory goes beyond the BOA in that it yields a nonzero j(e) for electronically adiabatic processes, in contradistinction to the BOA itself, which always gives j(e) = 0. The CC is applied to oriented H(2)(+) vibrating in the electronic ground state ((2)Σ(g)(+)), for which the nuclear and electronic flux densities evolve on a common time scale of about 22 fs per vibrational period. The system is chosen as a touchstone for the CC theory, because it is the only one for which highly accurate flux densities have been calculated numerically without invoking the BOA [Barth et al, Chem. Phys. Lett. 2009, 481, 118]. Good agreement between CC and accurate results supports the CC approach, another advantage of which is that it allows a transparent interpretation of the temporal and spatial properties of j(e).

  5. The tyrosine kinase p60c-src regulates the fast gate of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, H.; Machen, T E

    1996-01-01

    The role of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src on the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel was investigated with the cell-attached and excised patch clamp technique in conjunction with current noise analysis of recordings containing multiple channels per patch. Spectra of CFTR-generated current noise contained a low-frequency and a high-frequency Lorentzian noise component. In the cell-attached mode, the high-frequency Lorentzian was significantl...

  6. Spurious finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals: Spin channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, A.; Tarpanov, D.; Davesne, D.; Navarro, J.

    2015-08-01

    Background: It has been recently shown that some Skyrme functionals can lead to nonconverging results in the calculation of some properties of atomic nuclei. A previous study has pointed out a possible link between these convergence problems and the appearance of finite-size instabilities in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) around saturation density. Purpose: We show that the finite-size instabilities not only affect the ground-state properties of atomic nuclei, but they can also influence the calculations of vibrational excited states in finite nuclei. Method: We perform systematic fully-self consistent random phase approximation (RPA) calculations in spherical doubly magic nuclei. We employ several Skyrme functionals and vary the isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the time-odd term s .Δ s . We determine critical values of these coupling constants beyond which the RPA calculations do not converge because the RPA stability matrix becomes nonpositive. Results: By comparing the RPA calculations of atomic nuclei with those performed for SNM we establish a correspondence between the critical densities in the infinite system and the critical coupling constants for which the RPA calculations do not converge. Conclusions: We find a quantitative stability criterion to detect finite-size instabilities related to the spin s .Δ s term of a functional. This criterion could be easily implemented in the standard fitting protocols to fix the coupling constants of the Skyrme functional.

  7. Inter-individual variability and conspecific densities: consequences for population regulation and range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, Laura; Carrete, Martina; Mañosa, Santi

    2012-01-01

    The presence of conspecifics can strongly modulate the quality of a breeding site. Both positive and negative effects of conspecifics can act on the same individuals, with the final balance between its costs and benefits depending on individual characteristics. A particular case of inter-individual variation found in many avian species is chromatic variability. Among birds, plumage coloration can co-vary with morphology, physiology and behavior as well as with age. These relationships suggest that cost-benefit balances of conspecific presence may be different for individuals with different colorations. We investigated whether inter-individual variability affects population regulation and expansion processes by analyzing potential differences in density-dependent productivity and settlement patterns in relation to plumage coloration in a population of a long-lived avian species recently undergoing a notable increase in numbers and distribution range. Our results show strong variation in the effect of density on productivity of breeding pairs depending on plumage coloration of their members. Productivity of dark birds decreased along the breeding density gradient while that of lighter breeders remained unchanged with conspecific density. In a similar way, our results showed an uneven occupation of localities by individuals with different plumage coloration in relation to local densities, with the breeding of lighter harriers more aggregated than that of dark-brown ones. At a population scale, darker birds had higher probability of colonization of the most isolated, empty sites. Explanations for species range expansion and population regulation usually make the inferred assumption that species traits are similar among individuals. However, in most species, there could be individual variation in niche requirements or dispersal propensities among individuals with different traits. Our results contribute to the growing appreciation that the individual traits, but not the

  8. Inter-individual variability and conspecific densities: consequences for population regulation and range expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cardador

    Full Text Available The presence of conspecifics can strongly modulate the quality of a breeding site. Both positive and negative effects of conspecifics can act on the same individuals, with the final balance between its costs and benefits depending on individual characteristics. A particular case of inter-individual variation found in many avian species is chromatic variability. Among birds, plumage coloration can co-vary with morphology, physiology and behavior as well as with age. These relationships suggest that cost-benefit balances of conspecific presence may be different for individuals with different colorations. We investigated whether inter-individual variability affects population regulation and expansion processes by analyzing potential differences in density-dependent productivity and settlement patterns in relation to plumage coloration in a population of a long-lived avian species recently undergoing a notable increase in numbers and distribution range. Our results show strong variation in the effect of density on productivity of breeding pairs depending on plumage coloration of their members. Productivity of dark birds decreased along the breeding density gradient while that of lighter breeders remained unchanged with conspecific density. In a similar way, our results showed an uneven occupation of localities by individuals with different plumage coloration in relation to local densities, with the breeding of lighter harriers more aggregated than that of dark-brown ones. At a population scale, darker birds had higher probability of colonization of the most isolated, empty sites. Explanations for species range expansion and population regulation usually make the inferred assumption that species traits are similar among individuals. However, in most species, there could be individual variation in niche requirements or dispersal propensities among individuals with different traits. Our results contribute to the growing appreciation that the individual

  9. TRPML cation channels regulate the specialized lysosomal compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yumei; Dayalu, Rashmi; Matthews, Sharon A; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2006-12-01

    B-lymphocytes possess a specialized lysosomal compartment, the regulated transformation of which has been implicated in B-cell antigen presentation. Members of the mucolipin (TRPML) family of cation channels have been implicated in regulated vesicular transport in several tissues, but a role for TRPML function in lymphocyte vesicular transport physiology has not been previously described. To address the role of TRPML proteins in lymphocyte vesicular transport, we analyzed the lysosomal compartment in cultured B-lymphocytes engineered to lack TRPML1 or after expression of N- or C-terminal GFP fusion proteins of TRPML1 or TRPML2. Consistent with previous analyses of lymphocytes derived from human patients with mutations in TRPML1, we were not able to detect abnormalities in the lysosomes of TRPML1-deficient DT40 B-lymphocytes. However, while N-terminal GFP fusions of TRPML2 localized to normal appearing lysosomes, C-terminal GFP fusions of either TRPML1 or TRPML2 acted to antagonize endogenous TRPML function, localizing to large vesicular structures, the histological properties of which were indistinguishable from the enlarged lysosomes observed in affected tissues of TRPML1-deficient humans. Endocytosed B-cell receptors were delivered to these enlarged lysosomes, demonstrating that a TRPML-dependent process is required for normal regulation of the specialized lysosome compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

  10. New experimental trends for phosphoinositides research on ion transporter/channel regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masayuki X; Inoue, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides(4,5)-bisphosphates [PI(4,5)P2] critically controls membrane excitability, the disruption of which leads to pathophysiological states. PI(4,5)P2 plays a primary role in regulating the conduction and gating properties of ion channels/transporters, through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions that allow direct associations. In recent years, the development of many molecular tools have brought deep insights into the mechanisms underlying PI(4,5)P2-mediated regulation. This review summarizes the methods currently available to manipulate the cell membrane PI(4,5)P2 level including pharmacological interventions as well as newly designed molecular tools. We concisely introduce materials and experimental designs suitable for the study of PI(4,5)P2-mediated regulation of ion-conducting molecules, in order to assist researchers who are interested in this area. It is our further hope that the knowledge introduced in this review will help to promote our understanding about the pathology of diseases such as cardiac arrhythmias, bipolar disorders, and Alzheimer's disease which are somehow associated with a disruption of PI(4,5)P2 metabolism.

  11. TRPM7 channels regulate glioma stem cell through STAT3 and Notch signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingli; Inoue, Koichi; Leng, Tiandong; Guo, Shanchun; Xiong, Zhi-gang

    2014-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults with median survival time of 14.6 months. A small fraction of cancer stem cells (CSC) initiate and maintain tumors thus driving glioma tumorigenesis and being responsible for resistance to classical chemo- and radio-therapies. It is desirable to identify signaling pathways related to CSC to develop novel therapies to selectively target them. Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7, also known as TRPM7 is a ubiquitous, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) permeable ion channels that are special in being both an ion channel and a serine/threonine kinase. In studies of glioma cells silenced for TRPM7, we demonstrated that Notch (Notch1, JAG1, Hey2, and Survivin) and STAT3 pathways are down regulated in glioma cells grown in monolayer. Furthermore, phospho-STAT3, Notch target genes and CSC markers (ALDH1 and CD133) were significantly higher in spheroid glioma CSCs when compared with monolayer cultures. The results further show that tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3 binds and activates the ALDH1 promoters in glioma cells. We found that TRMP7-induced upregulation of ALDH1 expression is associated with increases in ALDH1 activity and is detectable in stem-like cells when expanded as spheroid CSCs. Finally, TRPM7 promotes proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. These demonstrate that TRPM7 activates JAK2/STAT3 and/or Notch signaling pathways and leads to increased cell proliferation and migration. These findings for the first time demonstrates that TRPM7 (1) activates a previously unrecognized STAT3→ALDH1 pathway, and (2) promotes the induction of ALDH1 activity in glioma cells.

  12. The cardiac L-type calcium channel distal carboxy terminus autoinhibition is regulated by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Shawn M; Andres, Douglas A; Sievert, Gail; Satin, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) provides trigger Ca(2+) for sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-release, and LTCC function is influenced by interacting proteins including the LTCC distal COOH terminus (DCT) and calmodulin. DCT is proteolytically cleaved and reassociates with the LTCC complex to regulate calcium channel function. DCT reduces LTCC barium current (I(Ba,L)) in reconstituted channel complexes, yet the contribution of DCT to LTCC Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) in cardiomyocyte systems is unexplored. This study tests the hypothesis that DCT attenuates cardiomyocyte I(Ca,L). We measured LTCC current and Ca(2+) transients with DCT coexpressed in murine cardiomyocytes. We also heterologously coexpressed DCT and Ca(V)1.2 constructs with truncations corresponding to the predicted proteolytic cleavage site, Ca(V)1.2Δ1801, and a shorter deletion corresponding to well-studied construct, Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. DCT inhibited I(Ba,L) in cardiomyocytes, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing Ca(V)1.2Δ1801 and Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. Ca(2+)-CaM relieved DCT block in cardiomyocytes and HEK cells. The selective block of I(Ba,L) combined with Ca(2+)-CaM effects suggested that DCT-mediated blockade may be relieved under conditions of elevated Ca(2+). We therefore tested the hypothesis that DCT block is dynamic, increasing under relatively low Ca(2+), and show that DCT reduced diastolic Ca(2+) at low stimulation frequencies but spared high frequency Ca(2+) entry. DCT reduction of diastolic Ca(2+) and relief of block at high pacing frequencies and under conditions of supraphysiological bath Ca(2+) suggests that a physiological function of DCT is to increase the dynamic range of Ca(2+) transients in response to elevated pacing frequencies. Our data motivate the new hypothesis that DCT is a native reverse use-dependent inhibitor of LTCC current.

  13. Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels regulate firing properties and excitability in parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Hatcher, Jeff T; Chen, Qin-Hui; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2010-12-01

    Small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK) regulate action potential (AP) firing properties and excitability in many central neurons. However, the functional roles of SK channels of parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons (PCMNs) in the nucleus ambiguus have not yet been well characterized. In this study, the tracer X-rhodamine-5 (and 6)-isothiocyanate (XRITC) was injected into the pericardial sac to retrogradely label PCMNs in FVB mice at postnatal days 7-9. Two days later, XRITC-labeled PCMNs in brain stem slices were identified. With the use of whole cell current clamp, single APs and spike trains of different frequencies were evoked by current injections. We found that 1) PCMNs have two different firing patterns: the majority of PCMNs (90%) exhibited spike frequency adaptation (SFA) and the rest (10%) showed less or no adaptation; 2) application of the specific SK channel blocker apamin significantly increased spike half-width in single APs and trains and reduced the spike frequency-dependent AP broadening in trains; 3) SK channel blockade suppressed afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude following single APs and trains and abolished spike-frequency dependence of AHP in trains; and 4) SK channel blockade increased the spike frequency but did not alter the pattern of SFA. Using whole cell voltage clamp, we measured outward currents and afterhyperpolarization current (I(AHP)). SK channel blockade revealed that SK-mediated outward currents had both transient and persistent components. After bath application of apamin and Ca(2+)-free solution, we found that apamin-sensitive and Ca(2+)-sensitive I(AHP) were comparable, confirming that SK channels may contribute to a major portion of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel-mediated I(AHP). These results suggest that PCMNs have SK channels that significantly regulate AP repolarization, AHP, and spike frequency but do not affect SFA. We conclude that activation of SK channels underlies one of the mechanisms for negative

  14. A TRP channel in the lysosome regulates large particle phagocytosis via focal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Mohammad; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Goschka, Andrew; Li, Xinran; Cheng, Xiping; Gregg, Evan; Azar, Marlene; Zhuo, Yue; Garrity, Abigail G; Gao, Qiong; Slaugenhaupt, Susan; Pickel, Jim; Zolov, Sergey N; Weisman, Lois S; Lenk, Guy M; Titus, Steve; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel; Juan, Marugan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-09-16

    Phagocytosis of large extracellular particles such as apoptotic bodies requires delivery of the intracellular endosomal and lysosomal membranes to form plasmalemmal pseudopods. Here, we identified mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) as the key lysosomal Ca2+ channel regulating focal exocytosis and phagosome biogenesis. Both particle ingestion and lysosomal exocytosis are inhibited by synthetic TRPML1 blockers and are defective in macrophages isolated from TRPML1 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRPML1 overexpression and TRPML1 agonists facilitate both lysosomal exocytosis and particle uptake. Using time-lapse confocal imaging and direct patch clamping of phagosomal membranes, we found that particle binding induces lysosomal PI(3,5)P2 elevation to trigger TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca2+ release specifically at the site of uptake, rapidly delivering TRPML1-resident lysosomal membranes to nascent phagosomes via lysosomal exocytosis. Thus phagocytic ingestion of large particles activates a phosphoinositide- and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis pathway to provide membranes necessary for pseudopod extension, leading to clearance of senescent and apoptotic cells in vivo.

  15. Regulation of Mitochondrial Function by Voltage Dependent Anion Channels in Ethanol Metabolism and the Warburg Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasters, John J.; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L.; Czerny, Christoph; Zhong, Zhi; Maldonado, Eduardo N.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) are highly conserved proteins that are responsible for permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane to hydrophilic metabolites like ATP, ADP and respiratory substrates. Although previously assumed to remain open, VDAC closure is emerging as an important mechanism for regulation of global mitochondrial metabolism in apoptotic cells and also in cells that are not dying. During hepatic ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, VDAC closure suppresses exchange of mitochondrial metabolites, resulting in inhibition of ureagenesis. In vivo, VDAC closure after ethanol occurs coordinately with mitochondrial uncoupling. Since acetaldehyde passes through membranes independently of channels and transporters, VDAC closure and uncoupling together foster selective and more rapid oxidative metabolism of toxic acetaldehyde to nontoxic acetate by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. In single reconstituted VDAC, tubulin decreases VDAC conductance, and in HepG2 hepatoma cells, free tubulin negatively modulates mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect enhanced by protein kinase A. Tubulin-dependent closure of VDAC in cancer cells contributes to suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and may underlie the Warburg phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis. PMID:22172804

  16. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator- an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuning Hou; Xiaoqing Guan; Zhe Yang; Chunying Li

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

  17. CFTR channel in oocytes from Xenopus laevis and its regulation by xShroom1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Alejandra G; Galizia, Luciano; Kotsias, Basilio A; Marino, Gabriela I

    2016-05-01

    Shroom is a family of related proteins linked to the actin cytoskeleton. xShroom1 is constitutively expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and it is required for the expression of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). As there is a close relationship between ENaC and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), we examined the action of xShroom1 on CFTR expression and activity. Biotinylation was used to measure CFTR surface expression, and currents were registered with voltage clamp when stimulated with forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Oocytes were coinjected with CFTR complementary RNAs (cRNAs) and xShroom1 sense or antisense oligonucleotides. We observed an increment in CFTR currents and CFTR surface expression in oocytes coinjected with CFTR and xShroom1 antisense oligonucleotides. MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor, did not prevent the increment in currents when xShroom1 was suppressed by antisense oligonucleotides. In addition, we inhibited the delivery of newly synthesized proteins to the plasma membrane with BFA and we found that the half-life of plasma membrane CFTR was prolonged when coinjected with the xShroom1 antisense oligonucleotides. Chloroquine, an inhibitor of the late endosome/lysosome, did not significantly increase CFTR currents when xShroom1 expression was inhibited. The higher expression of CFTR when xShroom1 is suppressed is in concordance with the functional studies suggesting that the suppression of the xShroom1 protein resulted in an increment in CFTR currents by promoting the increase of the half-life of CFTR in the plasma membrane. The role of xShroom1 in regulating CFTR expression could be relevant in the understanding of the channel malfunction in several diseases.

  18. Spurious finite-size instabilities in nuclear energy density functionals: spin channel

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, A; Davesne, D; Navarro, J

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently shown, that some Skyrme functionals can lead to non-converging results in the calculation of some properties of atomic nuclei. A previous study has pointed out a possible link between these convergence problems and the appearance of finite-size instabilities in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) around saturation density. We show that the finite-size instabilities not only affect the ground state properties of atomic nuclei, but they can also influence the calculations of vibrational excited states in finite nuclei. We perform systematic fully-self consistent Random Phase Approximation (RPA) calculations in spherical doubly-magic nuclei. We employ several Skyrme functionals and vary the isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the time-odd term $\\mathbf{s}\\cdot \\Delta \\mathbf{s}$ . We determine critical values of these coupling constants beyond which the RPA calculations do not converge because RPA the stability matrix becomes non-positive.By comparing the RPA calculations of atomic nucl...

  19. The Caenorhabditis elegans iodotyrosine deiodinase ortholog SUP-18 functions through a conserved channel SC-box to regulate the muscle two-pore domain potassium channel SUP-9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Perez de la Cruz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene sup-18 suppress the defects in muscle contraction conferred by a gain-of-function mutation in SUP-10, a presumptive regulatory subunit of the SUP-9 two-pore domain K(+ channel associated with muscle membranes. We cloned sup-18 and found that it encodes the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD, an NADH oxidase/flavin reductase that functions in iodine recycling and is important for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism. The FMN-binding site of mammalian IYD is conserved in SUP-18, which appears to require catalytic activity to function. Genetic analyses suggest that SUP-10 can function with SUP-18 to activate SUP-9 through a pathway that is independent of the presumptive SUP-9 regulatory subunit UNC-93. We identified a novel evolutionarily conserved serine-cysteine-rich region in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of SUP-9 required for its specific activation by SUP-10 and SUP-18 but not by UNC-93. Since two-pore domain K(+ channels regulate the resting membrane potentials of numerous cell types, we suggest that the SUP-18 IYD regulates the activity of the SUP-9 channel using NADH as a coenzyme and thus couples the metabolic state of muscle cells to muscle membrane excitability.

  20. Diverse roles for auxiliary subunits in phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mammalian brain voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Helene; Trimmer, James S

    2011-11-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are a diverse family of signaling proteins that mediate rapid electrical signaling events. Among these, voltage-gated potassium or Kv channels are the most diverse partly due to the large number of principal (or α) subunits and auxiliary subunits that can assemble in different combinations to generate Kv channel complexes with distinct structures and functions. The diversity of Kv channels underlies much of the variability in the active properties between different mammalian central neurons and the dynamic changes that lead to experience-dependent plasticity in intrinsic excitability. Recent studies have revealed that Kv channel α subunits and auxiliary subunits are extensively phosphorylated, contributing to additional structural and functional diversity. Here, we highlight recent studies that show that auxiliary subunits exert some of their profound effects on dendritic Kv4 and axonal Kv1 channels through phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms, either due to phosphorylation on the auxiliary subunit itself or by influencing the extent and/or impact of α subunit phosphorylation. The complex effects of auxiliary subunits and phosphorylation provide a potent mechanism to generate additional diversity in the structure and function of Kv4 and Kv1 channels, as well as allowing for dynamic reversible regulation of these important ion channels.

  1. TRESK background K(+ channel is inhibited by PAR-1/MARK microtubule affinity-regulating kinases in Xenopus oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Braun

    Full Text Available TRESK (TWIK-related spinal cord K(+ channel, KCNK18 is a major background K(+ channel of sensory neurons. Dominant-negative mutation of TRESK is linked to familial migraine. This important two-pore domain K(+ channel is uniquely activated by calcineurin. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase directly binds to the channel and activates TRESK current several-fold in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells. We have recently shown that the kinase, which is responsible for the basal inhibition of the K(+ current, is sensitive to the adaptor protein 14-3-3. Therefore we have examined the effect of the 14-3-3-inhibited PAR-1/MARK, microtubule-associated-protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase on TRESK in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. MARK1, MARK2 and MARK3 accelerated the return of TRESK current to the resting state after the calcium-dependent activation. Several other serine-threonine kinase types, generally involved in the modulation of other ion channels, failed to influence TRESK current recovery. MARK2 phosphorylated the primary determinant of regulation, the cluster of three adjacent serine residues (S274, 276 and 279 in the intracellular loop of mouse TRESK. In contrast, serine 264, the 14-3-3-binding site of TRESK, was not phosphorylated by the kinase. Thus MARK2 selectively inhibits TRESK activity via the S274/276/279 cluster, but does not affect the direct recruitment of 14-3-3 to the channel. TRESK is the first example of an ion channel phosphorylated by the dynamically membrane-localized MARK kinases, also known as general determinants of cellular polarity. These results raise the possibility that microtubule dynamics is coupled to the regulation of excitability in the neurons, which express TRESK background potassium channel.

  2. Amyloid-β-induced reactive oxygen species production and priming are differentially regulated by ion channels in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Tom; Eder, Claudia

    2011-12-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by microglial cells and subsequent oxidative stress are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Although it is recognized that amyloid-β (Aβ) plays a major role in inducing and regulating microglial ROS production in Alzheimer's disease, to date little is known about cellular mechanisms underlying Aβ-stimulated ROS production. Here, we identified ion channels involved in Aβ-induced microglial ROS production and in Aβ-induced microglial priming. Acute stimulation of microglial cells with either fibrillar Aβ(1-42) (fAβ(1-42) ) or soluble Aβ(1-42) (sAβ(1-42) ) caused significant increases in microglial ROS production, which were abolished by inhibition of TRPV1 cation channels with 5-iodo-resiniferatoxin (I-RTX), but were unaffected by inhibition of K(+) channels with charybdotoxin (CTX). Furthermore, pretreatment with either fAβ(1-42) or sAβ(1-42) induced microglial priming, that is, increased ROS production upon secondary stimulation with the phorbol ester PMA. Microglial priming induced by fAβ(1-42) or sAβ(1-42) remained unaffected by TRPV1 channel inhibition with I-RTX. However, sAβ(1-42) -induced priming was inhibited by CTX and margatoxin, but not by TRAM-34 or paxilline, indicating a role of Kv1.3 voltage-gated K(+) channels, but not of Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels, in the priming process. In summary, our data suggest that in microglia Aβ-induced ROS production and priming are differentially regulated by ion channels, and that TRPV1 cation channels and Kv1.3 K(+) channels may provide potential therapeutic targets to reduce microglia-induced oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Hippo signaling regulates microprocessor and links cell-density-dependent miRNA biogenesis to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masaki; Triboulet, Robinson; Mohseni, Morvarid; Schlegelmilch, Karin; Shrestha, Kriti; Camargo, Fernando D; Gregory, Richard I

    2014-02-27

    Global downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in human cancers and can have a causative role in tumorigenesis. The mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we show that YAP, the downstream target of the tumor-suppressive Hippo-signaling pathway regulates miRNA biogenesis in a cell-density-dependent manner. At low cell density, nuclear YAP binds and sequesters p72 (DDX17), a regulatory component of the miRNA-processing machinery. At high cell density, Hippo-mediated cytoplasmic retention of YAP facilitates p72 association with Microprocessor and binding to a specific sequence motif in pri-miRNAs. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or expression of constitutively active YAP causes widespread miRNA suppression in cells and tumors and a corresponding posttranscriptional induction of MYC expression. Thus, the Hippo pathway links contact-inhibition regulation to miRNA biogenesis and may be responsible for the widespread miRNA repression observed in cancer.

  4. Yield components in wheat affected by sowing density and growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Luiz Fioreze

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Improvement on yield potential of plants by crop management is the main research challenge due to the growing of food demand worldwide. The objective of this work was to study physiological and morphological traits and its relationship with yield components and yield of wheat as affected by sowing densities and plant growth regulators. The experimental design was a split-plot design with four replications. The plots were consisted by four sowing densities (30, 50 70 and 90 plants m-1 and the subplots were consisted by plant growth regulators [control, (IBA+GA+KT, Trinexapac-Ethyl e (IBA+GA+KT + Trinexapac-Ethyl]. Dry matter accumulation, plant height, source-sink distance, gas exchange and yield were determined. Trinexapac-Ethyl application resulted in decreasing of plant height, source-sink distance and flag leaf length; however, the grain yield was not affected. The number of plants per unit area affected dry matter accumulation. Higher dry matter accumulation showed direct relationship with yield and yield components in lower plant densities.

  5. Intron retention in mRNA encoding ancillary subunit of insect voltage-gated sodium channel modulates channel expression, gating regulation and drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Céline M; Moignot, Bénédicte; Wang, Lingxin; Murillo, Laurence; Juchaux, Marjorie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Dong, Ke; Legros, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Insect voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are formed by a well-known pore-forming α-subunit encoded by para-like gene and ancillary subunits related to TipE from the mutation "temperature-induced-paralysis locus E." The role of these ancillary subunits in the modulation of biophysical and pharmacological properties of Na(+) currents are not enough documented. The unique neuronal ancillary subunit TipE-homologous protein 1 of Drosophila melanogaster (DmTEH1) strongly enhances the expression of insect Nav channels when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Here we report the cloning and functional expression of two neuronal DmTEH1-homologs of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, PaTEH1A and PaTEH1B, encoded by a single bicistronic gene. In PaTEH1B, the second exon encoding the last 11-amino-acid residues of PaTEH1A is shifted to 3'UTR by the retention of a 96-bp intron-containing coding-message, thus generating a new C-terminal end. We investigated the gating and pharmacological properties of the Drosophila Nav channel variant (DmNav1-1) co-expressed with DmTEH1, PaTEH1A, PaTEH1B or a truncated mutant PaTEH1Δ(270-280) in Xenopus oocytes. PaTEH1B caused a 2.2-fold current density decrease, concomitant with an equivalent α-subunit incorporation decrease in the plasma membrane, compared to PaTEH1A and PaTEH1Δ(270-280). PaTEH1B positively shifted the voltage-dependences of activation and slow inactivation of DmNav1-1 channels to more positive potentials compared to PaTEH1A, suggesting that the C-terminal end of both proteins may influence the function of the voltage-sensor and the pore of Nav channel. Interestingly, our findings showed that the sensitivity of DmNav1-1 channels to lidocaine and to the pyrazoline-type insecticide metabolite DCJW depends on associated TEH1-like subunits. In conclusion, our work demonstrates for the first time that density, gating and pharmacological properties of Nav channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes can be modulated by an

  6. UBE3A Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning and Memory by Controlling SK2 Channel Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gated solely by activity-induced changes in intracellular calcium, small-conductance potassium channels (SKs are critical for a variety of functions in the CNS, from learning and memory to rhythmic activity and sleep. While there is a wealth of information on SK2 gating, kinetics, and Ca2+ sensitivity, little is known regarding the regulation of SK2 subcellular localization. We report here that synaptic SK2 levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A, whose deficiency results in Angelman syndrome and overexpression in increased risk of autistic spectrum disorder. UBE3A directly ubiquitinates SK2 in the C-terminal domain, which facilitates endocytosis. In UBE3A-deficient mice, increased postsynaptic SK2 levels result in decreased NMDA receptor activation, thereby impairing hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. Impairments in both synaptic plasticity and fear conditioning memory in UBE3A-deficient mice are significantly ameliorated by blocking SK2. These results elucidate a mechanism by which UBE3A directly influences cognitive function.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): CLOSED AND OPEN STATE CHANNEL MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of "rational" approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287-288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287-288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel.

  8. MAPK Hog1 closes the S. cerevisiae glycerol channel Fps1 by phosphorylating and displacing its positive regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongmin; Reiter, Wolfgang; Dohnal, Ilse; Gregori, Christa; Beese-Sims, Sara; Kuchler, Karl; Ammerer, Gustav; Levin, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The aquaglyceroprin Fps1 is responsible for glycerol transport in yeast in response to changes in extracellular osmolarity. Control of Fps1 channel activity in response to hyperosmotic shock involves a redundant pair of regulators, Rgc1 (regulator of the glycerol channel 1) and Rgc2, and the MAPK Hog1 (high-osmolarity glycerol response 1). However, the mechanism by which these factors influence channel activity is unknown. We show that Rgc2 maintains Fps1 in the open channel state in the absence of osmotic stress by binding to its C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. This interaction involves a tripartite pleckstrin homology (PH) domain within Rgc2 and a partial PH domain within Fps1. Activation of Hog1 in response to hyperosmotic shock induces the rapid eviction of Rgc2 from Fps1 and consequent channel closure. Hog1 was recruited to the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of Fps1, which it uses as a platform from which to multiply phosphorylate Rgc2. Thus, these results reveal the mechanism by which Hog1 regulates Fps1 in response to hyperosmotic shock. PMID:24298058

  9. Pruning for crop regulation in high density guava (Psidium guajava L.) plantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, M.; Lal, S.; Uniyal, S.; Goswami, A.K. Prakash. P.

    2016-11-01

    High density management and crop regulation are two important aspects in guava (Psidium guajava L.) production. Therefore, to find out the economic way of managing high density planting and crop regulation, the present work was carried out on 6-year-old guava trees of cv. Pant Prabhat under double-hedge row system of planting during 2009-10 and 2010-11. Seven different forms of pruning [FBT: flower bud thinning by hand, FBTT: flower bud thinning by hand followed by removal of terminal one leaf pair, RLFO: removal of leaves and flower buds by hand, retaining one leaf pair at the top, RLF: removal of all leaves and flowers by hand, OLPS: one leaf pair shoot pruning, FSP: full shoot pruning, OLPF: one leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only] were studied along with control (C).Minimum annual increase in tree volume (6.764 m3) was recorded with the treatment OLPF, which was 2.31 times less than the control (15.682 m3). Highest yield during winter season (55.30 kg/tree) and total yield (59.87 kg/tree) was obtained from treatment OLPF. One leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only (OLPF) was also found profitable among other treatments by recording cost:benefit ratio of 1:2.96. This treatment also recorded the highest return distributed in rainy as well as in winter season. On the basis of findings it can be concluded that one leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only is suitable for profitable high density management as well as crop regulation of guava in farmer friendly manner. (Author)

  10. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses the toxic effects of amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Kong; Maowen Ba; Hui Liang; Peng Shao; Tianxia Yu; Ying Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we treated PC12 cells with 0-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) for 24 hours to induce cytotoxicity, and found that 5-20 μM amyloid-β peptide (25-35) decreased PC12 cell viability, but adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel activator diazoxide suppressed the decrease reactive oxygen species levels. These protective effects were reversed by the selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate. An inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine, also protected PC12 cells from intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. However, the H2O2-degrading enzyme catalase could that the increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species levels adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and nitric oxide. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses PC12 cell cytotoxicity induced by amyloid-β

  11. Temporal and spatial mouse brain expression of cereblon, an ionic channel regulator involved in human intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Joseph J; Tal, Adit L; Sun, Xiaowei; Hauck, Stefanie C R; Hao, Jin; Kosofosky, Barry E; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M

    2010-03-01

    A mild form of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromal intellectual disability (ARNSID) in humans is caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in the cereblon gene (mutCRBN). Rodent crbn protein binds to the intracellular C-terminus of the large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+)channel (BK(Ca)). An mRNA variant (human SITE 2 INSERT or mouse strex) of the BK(Ca) gene (KCNMA1) that is normally expressed during embryonic development is aberrantly expressed in mutCRBN human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as compared to wild-type (wt) LCLs. The present study analyzes the temporal and spatial distribution of crbn and kcnma1 mRNAs in the mouse brain by the quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The spatial expression pattern of endogenous and exogenous crbn proteins is characterized by immunostaining. The results show that neocortical (CTX) crbn and kcnma1 mRNA expression increases from embryonic stages to adulthood. The strex mRNA variant is >3.5-fold higher in embryos and decreases rapidly postnatally. Mouse crbn mRNA is abundant in the cerebellum (CRBM), with less expression in the CTX, hippocampus (HC), and striatum (Str) in adult mice. The intracytoplasmic distribution of endogenous crbn protein in the mouse CRBM, CTX, HC, and Str is similar to the immunostaining pattern described previously for the BK(Ca) channel. Exogenous hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged human wt- and mutCRBN proteins using cDNA transfection in HEK293T cell lines showed the same intracellular expression distribution as endogenous mouse crbn protein. The results suggest that mutCRBN may cause ARNSID by disrupting the developmental regulation of BK(Ca) in brain regions that are critical for memory and learning.

  12. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Related Proteins as Regulators of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loic Auderset

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS is a highly organised structure. Many signalling systems work in concert to ensure that neural stem cells are appropriately directed to generate progenitor cells, which in turn mature into functional cell types including projection neurons, interneurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Herein we explore the role of the low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor family, in particular family members LRP1 and LRP2, in regulating the behaviour of neural stem and progenitor cells during development and adulthood. The ability of LRP1 and LRP2 to bind a diverse and extensive range of ligands, regulate ligand endocytosis, recruit nonreceptor tyrosine kinases for direct signal transduction and signal in conjunction with other receptors, enables them to modulate many crucial neural cell functions.

  13. H{sub 2}S does not regulate proliferation via T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elies, Jacobo; Johnson, Emily; Boyle, John P.; Scragg, Jason L.; Peers, Chris, E-mail: c.s.peers@leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-12

    T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels (Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3) strongly influence proliferation of various cell types, including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and certain cancers. We have recently shown that the gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) inhibits T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels and, in so doing, attenuates proliferation of VSMC. We have also shown that the T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel Cav3.2 is selectively inhibited by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) whilst the other channel isoforms (Cav3.1 and Cav3.3) are unaffected. Here, we explored whether inhibition of Cav3.2 by H{sub 2}S could account for the anti-proliferative effects of this gasotransmitter. H{sub 2}S suppressed proliferation in HEK293 cells expressing Cav3.2, as predicted by our previous observations. However, H{sub 2}S was similarly effective in suppressing proliferation in wild type (non-transfected) HEK293 cells and those expressing the H{sub 2}S insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Further studies demonstrated that T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels in the smooth muscle cell line A7r5 and in human coronary VSMCs strongly influenced proliferation. In both cell types, H{sub 2}S caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation, yet by far the dominant T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel isoform was the H{sub 2}S-insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Our data indicate that inhibition of T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel-mediated proliferation by H{sub 2}S is independent of the channels’ sensitivity to H{sub 2}S. - Highlights: • T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels regulate proliferation and are sensitive to the gasotransmitters CO and H{sub 2}S. • H{sub 2}S reduced proliferation in HEK293 cells expressing the H{sub 2}S sensitive Cav3.2 channel. • H{sub 2}S also inhibited proliferation in non-transfected cells and HEK293 cells expressing Cav3.1. • Native smooth muscle cells primarily express Cav3.1. Their proliferation was also inhibited by H{sub 2}S. • Unlike CO, H{sub 2}S does not regulate smooth muscle proliferation via T-type Ca{sup 2

  14. dTULP, the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of tubby, regulates transient receptor potential channel localization in cilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jina Park

    Full Text Available Mechanically gated ion channels convert sound into an electrical signal for the sense of hearing. In Drosophila melanogaster, several transient receptor potential (TRP channels have been implicated to be involved in this process. TRPN (NompC and TRPV (Inactive channels are localized in the distal and proximal ciliary zones of auditory receptor neurons, respectively. This segregated ciliary localization suggests distinct roles in auditory transduction. However, the regulation of this localization is not fully understood. Here we show that the Drosophila Tubby homolog, King tubby (hereafter called dTULP regulates ciliary localization of TRPs. dTULP-deficient flies show uncoordinated movement and complete loss of sound-evoked action potentials. Inactive and NompC are mislocalized in the cilia of auditory receptor neurons in the dTulp mutants, indicating that dTULP is required for proper cilia membrane protein localization. This is the first demonstration that dTULP regulates TRP channel localization in cilia, and suggests that dTULP is a protein that regulates ciliary neurosensory functions.

  15. Epidermal growth factor regulation in adult rat alveolar type II cells of amiloride-sensitive cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P J; Borok, Z; Kim, K J; Lubman, R L; Danto, S I; Crandall, E D

    1999-12-01

    Using the patch-clamp technique, we studied the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on whole cell and single channel currents in adult rat alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture in the presence or absence of EGF for 48 h. In symmetrical sodium isethionate solutions, EGF exposure caused a significant increase in the type II cell whole cell conductance. Amiloride (10 microM) produced approximately 20-30% inhibition of the whole cell conductance in both the presence and absence of EGF, such that EGF caused the magnitude of the amiloride-sensitive component to more than double. Northern analysis showed that alpha-, beta- and gamma-subunits of rat epithelial Na(+) channel (rENaC) steady-state mRNA levels were all significantly decreased by EGF. At the single channel level, all active inside-out patches demonstrated only 25-pS channels that were amiloride sensitive and relatively nonselective for cations (P(Na(+))/P(K(+)) approximately 1.0:0.48). Although the biophysical characteristics (conductance, open-state probability, and selectivity) of the channels from EGF-treated and untreated cells were essentially identical, channel density was increased by EGF; the modal channel per patch was increased from 1 to 2. These findings indicate that EGF increases expression of nonselective, amiloride-sensitive cation channels in adult alveolar epithelial type II cells. The contribution of rENaC to the total EGF-dependent cation current under these conditions is quantitatively less important than that of the nonselective cation channels in these cells.

  16. Photosynthetic photon flux density and phytochrome B interact to regulate branching in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hongwen; Abernathy, Scott D; White, Richard H; Finlayson, Scott A

    2011-11-01

    Branching is regulated by environmental signals including phytochrome B (phyB)-mediated responses to the ratio of red to far red light. While the mechanisms associated with phytochrome regulation of branching are beginning to be elucidated, there is little information regarding other light signals, including photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and how it influences phytochrome-mediated responses. This study shows that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) branching is modified by both varying PPFD and phyB status and that significant interactions occur between these variables. While phyB deficiency decreased branching when the PPFD was low, the effect was suppressed by high PPFD and some branching aspects were actually promoted. Photosynthesis measurements showed that PPFD may influence branching in phyB-deficient plants at least partially through a specific signalling pathway rather than directly through energy effects on the shoot. The expression of various genes in unelongated buds of phyB-deficient and phyB-sufficient plants grown under high and low PPFD demonstrated potential roles for several hormones, including auxin, cytokinins and ABA, and also showed imperfect correlation between expression of the branching regulators BRC1 and BRC2 and bud fate. These results may implicate additional undiscovered bud autonomous mechanisms and/or components contributing to bud outgrowth regulation by environmental signals.

  17. Regulation of cell proliferation and cell density by the inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byskov Kristina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstact Background The inorganic phosphate (Pi transporter, PiT1 (SLC20A1, is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. It has previously been shown that down-regulation of PiT1 severely impaired the proliferation of two transformed human cells lines, HepG2 and HeLa, and the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. Moreover, PiT1 knock-out mice do not survive past E12.5 and from E10.5, the embryos were found to be growth-retarded and showed reduced proliferation of liver cells. Isolated mouse embryonic fibroblasts with knocked out as well as reduced PiT1 expression levels also exhibited impaired proliferation. Together these results suggest that a certain level of PiT1 is important for proliferation. We have here investigated the role of PiT1 in regulation of cell proliferation using two strictly density-inhibited cells lines, the murine MC3T3-E1 and NIH3T3 cells. Results We found that knock-down of PiT1 in MC3T3-E1 cells led to impaired proliferation supporting that at least a certain level of PiT1 is important for wildtype level of proliferation. We, however, also observed that MC3T3-E1 and NIH3T3 cells themselves regulate their endogenous PiT1 mRNA levels with lower levels in general correlating with decreased proliferation/increased cell density. Moreover, over-expression of human PiT1 led to increased proliferation of both MC3T3-E1 and NIH3T3 cultures and resulted in higher cell densities in cultures of these two strictly density-inhibited cell lines. In addition, when we transformed NIH3T3 cells by cultivation in fetal bovine serum, cells over-expressing human PiT1 formed more colonies in soft agar than control cells. Conclusions We conclude that not only is a certain level of PiT1 necessary for normal cell division as suggested by previously published studies, rather the cellular PiT1 level is involved in regulating cell proliferation and cell density and an increased PiT1 expression can indeed make NIH3T3 cells more sensitive to

  18. Function and regulation of the channel-kinase TRPM7 in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, D.; Middelbeek, J.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Jalink, K.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels represent a large and diverse family of ion channels that act as important transducers of sensory information. The Melastatin subfamily member TRPM7 has garnered much interest due to its functional kinase domain; a unique feature among ion channels.

  19. Screen-based identification and validation of four novel ion channels as regulators of renal ciliogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaats, Gisela G; Wheway, Gabrielle; Foletto, Veronica; Szymanska, Katarzyna; van Balkom, Bas W M; Logister, Ive; Den Ouden, Krista; Keijzer-Veen, Mandy G; Lilien, Marc R; Knoers, Nine V; Johnson, Colin A; Giles, Rachel H

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of ion channels to ciliogenesis we carried out an siRNA-based reverse genetics screen of all ion channels in the mouse genome in murine inner medullary collecting duct kidney cells. This screen revealed four candidate ion channel genes: Kcnq1, Kcnj10, Kcnf1 and Clcn4.

  20. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Fengping He; Xin Xu; Shuguo Yuan; Liangqiu Tan; Lingjun Gao; Shaochun Ma; Shebin Zhang; Zhanzhong Ma; Wei Jiang; Fenglian Liu; Baofeng Chen; Beibei Zhang; Jungang Pang; Xiuyan Huang; Jiaqiang Weng

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. ...

  1. Population regulation in a changing environment: Long-term changes in growth, condition and survival of sprat, Sprattus sprattus L. in the Bristol Channel, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Peter A.; Henderson, Rowena C.

    2017-02-01

    Sprat, Sprattus sprattus, is the dominant pelagic species in British inshore and estuarine waters. Within the Bristol Channel the population is almost totally composed of fish 140 mm standard length lost to the population by 1999. Further, adult condition, measured as the average weight of a 103 mm standard length adult, declined rapidly from 13.7 g in 2007 to 9 g in 2011. Despite these changes, which would have reduced age-specific fecundity, a sign-rank test showed abundance of adult sprat has shown no long-term trend and Bulmer's test indicates density-dependent regulation is operating. While sprat recruitment is shown to be responding to the sunspot cycle, the North Atlantic Oscillation and sea water temperature, the impact of these variables on adult population density is damped because of density-dependent regulation. The result is that sprat respond to environmental change with large changes in their growth and condition, but the adult abundance is constrained and shows no long-term trend. Recruitment was modelled by combining a Ricker curve with terms for the response of sprat to solar activity, the North Atlantic Oscillation and spring temperature. It is shown that the stock-recruitment relationship does not form a simple curve, but is bounded within a region in which the upper and lower constraints are defined by environmental conditions. Within this bounded region the population trajectory under differing environmental regimes can be predicted.

  2. Loop diuretics are open-channel blockers of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator with distinct kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Min; Scott-Ward, Toby S; Liu, Jia; Khuituan, Pissared; Li, Hongyu; Cai, Zhiwei; Husbands, Stephen M; Sheppard, David N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Loop diuretics are widely used to inhibit the Na+, K+, 2Cl− co-transporter, but they also inhibit the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. Here, we investigated the mechanism of CFTR inhibition by loop diuretics and explored the effects of chemical structure on channel blockade. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using the patch-clamp technique, we tested the effects of bumetanide, furosemide, piretanide and xipamide on recombinant wild-type human CFTR. KEY RESULTS When added to the intracellular solution, loop diuretics inhibited CFTR Cl− currents with potency approaching that of glibenclamide, a widely used CFTR blocker with some structural similarity to loop diuretics. To begin to study the kinetics of channel blockade, we examined the time dependence of macroscopic current inhibition following a hyperpolarizing voltage step. Like glibenclamide, piretanide blockade of CFTR was time and voltage dependent. By contrast, furosemide blockade was voltage dependent, but time independent. Consistent with these data, furosemide blocked individual CFTR Cl− channels with ‘very fast’ speed and drug-induced blocking events overlapped brief channel closures, whereas piretanide inhibited individual channels with ‘intermediate’ speed and drug-induced blocking events were distinct from channel closures. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Structure–activity analysis of the loop diuretics suggests that the phenoxy group present in bumetanide and piretanide, but absent in furosemide and xipamide, might account for the different kinetics of channel block by locking loop diuretics within the intracellular vestibule of the CFTR pore. We conclude that loop diuretics are open-channel blockers of CFTR with distinct kinetics, affected by molecular dimensions and lipophilicity. PMID:24117047

  3. A secondary structural transition in the C-helix promotes gating of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljung, Michael C; Zagotta, William N

    2013-05-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels bind second messengers like cAMP to a C-terminal domain, consisting of a β-roll, followed by two α-helices (B- and C-helices). We monitored the cAMP-dependent changes in the structure of the C-helix of a C-terminal fragment of HCN2 channels using transition metal ion FRET between fluorophores on the C-helix and metal ions bound between histidine pairs on the same helix. cAMP induced a change in the dimensions of the C-helix and an increase in the metal binding affinity of the histidine pair. cAMP also caused an increase in the distance between a fluorophore on the C-helix and metal ions bound to the B-helix. Stabilizing the C-helix of intact CNGA1 channels by metal binding to a pair of histidines promoted channel opening. These data suggest that ordering of the C-helix is part of the gating conformational change in cyclic nucleotide-regulated channels.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Mammalian GIRK2 KplusChannel and Gating Regulation by G Proteins PIP2 and Sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Whorton; R MacKinnon

    2011-12-31

    G protein-gated K{sup +} channels (Kir3.1--Kir3.4) control electrical excitability in many different cells. Among their functions relevant to human physiology and disease, they regulate the heart rate and govern a wide range of neuronal activities. Here, we present the first crystal structures of a G protein-gated K{sup +} channel. By comparing the wild-type structure to that of a constitutively active mutant, we identify a global conformational change through which G proteins could open a G loop gate in the cytoplasmic domain. The structures of both channels in the absence and presence of PIP{sub 2} suggest that G proteins open only the G loop gate in the absence of PIP{sub 2}, but in the presence of PIP{sub 2} the G loop gate and a second inner helix gate become coupled, so that both gates open. We also identify a strategically located Na{sup +} ion-binding site, which would allow intracellular Na{sup +} to modulate GIRK channel activity. These data provide a structural basis for understanding multiligand regulation of GIRK channel gating.

  5. Down-regulation of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ryanodine channel in severely food-restricted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Vizotto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine channel (RYR2 mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats or 50% diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50% food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01. The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively. Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

  6. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation-independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel’s regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology. PMID:23439122

  7. PGC-1α and PGC-1β Regulate Mitochondrial Density in Neurons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareski, Przemyslaw; Vaarmann, Annika; Choubey, Vinay; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Liiv, Joanna; Kuum, Malle; Kaasik, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that regulation of cellular oxidative capacity through enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis may be beneficial for neuronal recovery and survival in human neurodegenerative disorders. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) has been shown to be a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular energy metabolism in muscle and liver. The aim of our study was to establish whether PGC-1α and PGC-1β control mitochondrial density also in neurons and if these coactivators could be up-regulated by deacetylation. The results demonstrate that PGC-1α and PGC-1β control mitochondrial capacity in an additive and independent manner. This effect was observed in all studied subtypes of neurons, in cortical, midbrain, and cerebellar granule neurons. We also observed that endogenous neuronal PGC-1α but not PGC-1β could be activated through its repressor domain by suppressing it. Results demonstrate also that overexpression of SIRT1 deacetylase or suppression of GCN5 acetyltransferase activates transcriptional activity of PGC-1α in neurons and increases mitochondrial density. These effects were mediated exclusively via PGC-1α, since overexpression of SIRT1 or suppression of GCN5 was ineffective where PGC-1α was suppressed by short hairpin RNA. Moreover, the results demonstrate that overexpression of PGC-1β or PGC-1α or activation of the latter by SIRT1 protected neurons from mutant α-synuclein- or mutant huntingtin-induced mitochondrial loss. These evidences demonstrate that activation or overexpression of the PGC-1 family of coactivators could be used to compensate for neuronal mitochondrial loss and suggest that therapeutic agents activating PGC-1 would be valuable for treating neurodegenerative diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage play an important pathogenic role. PMID:19542216

  8. Enhanced ability of TRPV1 channels in regulating glutamatergic transmission after repeated morphine exposure in the nucleus accumbens of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Jia, Dong; Wang, Yuan; Qu, Liang; Wang, Xuelian; Song, Jian; Heng, Lijun; Gao, Guodong

    2017-04-01

    Glutamatergic projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) drive drug-seeking behaviors during opioids withdrawal. Modulating glutamatergic neurotransmission provides a novel pharmacotherapeutic avenue for treatment of opioids dependence. Great deals of researches have verified that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels alters synaptic transmitter release and regulate neural plasticity. In the present study, whole-cell patch clamp recordings were adopted to examine the activity of TRPV1 Channels in regulating glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in NAc of rat during morphine withdrawal for 3days and 3weeks. The data showed that the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and the amplitudes of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were increased during morphine withdrawal after applied with capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist). Capsaicin decreased the paired pulse ratio (PPR) and increased sEPSCs frequency but not their amplitudes suggesting a presynaptic locus of action during morphine withdrawal. All these effects were fully blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist Capsazepine. Additionally, In the presence of AM251 (CB1 receptor antagonist), depolarization-induced release of endogenous cannabinoids activated TRPV1 channels to enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission during morphine withdrawal. The functional enhancement of TRPV1 Channels in facilitating glutamatergic transmission was not recorded in dorsal striatum. Our findings demonstrate the ability of TRPV1 in regulating excitatory glutamatergic transmission is enhanced during morphine withdrawal in NAc, which would deepen our understanding of glutamatergic modulation during opioids withdrawal.

  9. Metal bridges illuminate transmembrane domain movements during gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-10

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd(2+) bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd(2+) bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd(2+) bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd(2+) bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd(2+) bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close.

  10. Interaction between 2 extracellular loops influences the activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Steven D; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is thought to be controlled by cytoplasmic factors. However, recent evidence has shown that overall channel activity is also influenced by extracellular anions that interact directly with the extracellular loops (ECLs) of the CFTR protein. Very little is known about the structure of the ECLs or how substances interacting with these ECLs might affect CFTR function. We used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced throughout ECL1 and 2 key sites in ECL4. Furthermore, interactions between ECL1 and ECL4 were investigated by the formation of disulfide crosslinks between cysteines introduced into these 2 regions. Crosslinks could be formed between R899C (in ECL4) and a number of sites in ECL1 in a manner that was dependent on channel activity, suggesting that the relative orientation of these 2 loops changes on activation. Formation of these crosslinks inhibited channel function, suggesting that relative movement of these ECLs is important to normal channel function. Implications of these findings for the effects of mutations in the ECLs that are associated with cystic fibrosis and interactions with extracellular substances that influence channel activity are discussed.

  11. Negative regulation of opioid receptor-G protein-Ca2+ channel pathway by the nootropic nefiracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Mitsunobu; Furukawa, Taiji; Ogihara, Yoshiyasu; Watabe, Shigeo; Shiotani, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Yasuro; Nishimura, Masao; Nukada, Toshihide

    2004-10-01

    It has recently been reported that nefiracetam, a nootropic agent, is capable of attenuating the development of morphine dependence and tolerance in mice. The mechanism of this antimorphine action is not clear. The present study was designed to address this issue using Xenopus oocytes expressing delta-opioid receptors, G proteins (G(i3alpha) or G(o1alpha)), and N-type (alpha1B) Ca2+ channels. Membrane currents through Ca2+ channels were recorded from the oocytes under voltage-clamp conditions. The Ca2+ channel currents were reduced reversibly by 40-60% in the presence of 1 microM leucine-enkephalin (Leu-Enk). The Leu-Enk-induced current inhibition was recovered promptly by nefiracetam (1 microM), while control currents in the absence of Leu-Enk were not influenced by nefiracetam. A binding assay revealed that 3H-nefiracetam preferentially bound to the membrane fraction of oocytes expressing G(i3alpha). When delta-opioid receptors were coexpressed, the binding was significantly increased. However, an additional expression of alpha1B Ca2+ channels decreased the binding. The results suggest that nefiracetam preferentially binds to G(i3alpha) associated with delta-opioid receptors, thereby inhibiting the association of G proteins with Ca2+ channels. In conclusion, nefiracetam negatively regulates the inhibitory pathway of opioid receptor-G protein-Ca2+ channel.

  12. Maize yield and quality in response to plant density and application of a novel plant growth regulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, L.; Evers, J.B.; Werf, van der W.; Zhang, W.; Duan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Farmers in China have gradually increased plant density in maize to achieve higher yields, but this has increased risk of lodging due to taller and weaker stems at higher plant densities. Plant growth regulators can be used to reduce lodging risk. In this study, for the first time, the performance o

  13. Geomorphic Framework to assess changes to aquatic habitat due to flow regulation and channel and floodplain alteration, Cedar River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Little, Rand

    2010-01-01

    Flow regulation, bank armoring, and floodplain alteration since the early 20th century have contributed to significant changes in the hydrologic regime and geomorphic processes of the Cedar River in Washington State. The Cedar River originates in the Cascade Range, provides drinking water to the Seattle metropolitan area, and supports several populations of anadromous salmonids. Flow regulation currently has limited influence on the magnitude, duration, and timing of high-flow events, which affect the incubation of salmonids as well as the production and maintenance of their habitat. Unlike structural changes to the channel and floodplain, flow regulation may be modified in the short-term to improve the viability of salmon populations. An understanding of the effects of flow regulation on those populations must be discerned over a range of scales from individual floods that affect the size of individual year classes to decadal high flow regime that influences the amount and quality of channel and off-channel habitat available for spawning and rearing. We present estimates of reach-scale sediment budgets and changes to channel morphology derived from historical orthoimagery, specific gage analyses at four long-term streamflow-gaging stations to quantify trends in aggradation, and hydrologic statistics of the magnitude and duration of peak streamflows. These data suggest a gradient of channel types from unconfined, sediment-rich segments to confined, sediment-poor segments that are likely to have distinct responses to high flows. Particle-size distribution data and longitudinal water surface and streambed profiles for the 56 km downstream of Chester Morse Lake measured in 2010 show the spatial extent of preferred salmonid habitat along the Cedar River. These historical and current data constitute a geomorphic framework to help assess different river management scenarios for salmonid habitat and population viability. PDF version of a presentation on changes to aquatic

  14. HCN channel dendritic targeting requires bipartite interaction with TRIP8b and regulates antidepressant-like behavioral effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J.; Lyman, Kyle A.; Fisher, Daniel; Ismail, Quratul-Ain; Chetkovich, Dane M.

    2016-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder is a prevalent psychiatric condition with limited therapeutic options beyond monoaminergic therapies. Although effective in some individuals, many patients fail to respond adequately to existing treatments and new pharmacologic targets are needed. HCN channels regulate excitability in neurons and blocking HCN channel function has been proposed as a novel antidepressant strategy. However, systemic blockade of HCN channels produces cardiac effects that limit this approach. Knockout (KO) of the brain-specific HCN channel auxiliary subunit TRIP8b also produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects and suggests that inhibiting TRIP8b function could produce antidepressant-like effects without affecting the heart. We examined the structural basis of TRIP8b-mediated HCN channel trafficking and its relationship to antidepressant-like behavior using a viral rescue approach in TRIP8b KO mice. We found that restoring TRIP8b to the hippocampus was sufficient to reverse the impaired HCN channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavioral effects caused by TRIP8b KO. Moreover, we found that hippocampal expression of a mutated version of TRIP8b further impaired HCN channel trafficking and increased the antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype of TRIP8b KO mice. Thus, modulating the TRIP8b-HCN interaction bidirectionally influences channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavior. Overall, our work suggests that small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TRIP8b and HCN should produce antidepressant-like behaviors and could represent a new paradigm for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. PMID:27400855

  15. Kv3.3 Channels Bind Hax-1 and Arp2/3 to Assemble a Stable Local Actin Network that Regulates Channel Gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yalan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Fleming, Matthew R; Amiri, Anahita; El-Hassar, Lynda; Surguchev, Alexei A; Hyland, Callen; Jenkins, David P; Desai, Rooma; Brown, Maile R; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Waters, Michael F; Large, Charles H; Horvath, Tamas L; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Vaccarino, Flora M; Forscher, Paul; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-04-07

    Mutations in the Kv3.3 potassium channel (KCNC3) cause cerebellar neurodegeneration and impair auditory processing. The cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 contains a proline-rich domain conserved in proteins that activate actin nucleation through Arp2/3. We found that Kv3.3 recruits Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in formation of a relatively stable cortical actin filament network resistant to cytochalasin D that inhibits fast barbed end actin assembly. These Kv3.3-associated actin structures are required to prevent very rapid N-type channel inactivation during short depolarizations of the plasma membrane. The effects of Kv3.3 on the actin cytoskeleton are mediated by the binding of the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 to Hax-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that regulates actin nucleation through Arp2/3. A human Kv3.3 mutation within a conserved proline-rich domain produces channels that bind Hax-1 but are impaired in recruiting Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in growth cones with deficient actin veils in stem cell-derived neurons.

  16. Evidence for functional interaction of plasma membrane electron transport, voltage-dependent anion channel and volume-regulated anion channel in frog aorta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashmi P Rao; J Prakasa Rao

    2010-12-01

    Frog aortic tissue exhibits plasma membrane electron transport (PMET) owing to its ability to reduce ferricyanide even in the presence of mitochondrial poisons, such as cyanide and azide. Exposure to hypotonic solution (108 mOsmol/kg H2O) enhanced the reduction of ferricyanide in excised aortic tissue of frog. Increment in ferricyanide reductase activity was also brought about by the presence of homocysteine (100 M dissolved in isotonic frog Ringer solution), a redox active compound and a potent modulator of PMET. Two plasma-membrane-bound channels, the volume regulated anion channel (VRAC) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), are involved in the response to hypotonic stress. The presence of VRAC and VDAC antagonists–tamoxifen, glibenclamide, fluoxetine and verapamil, and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS), respectively–inhibited this enhanced activity brought about by either hypotonic stress or homocysteine. The blockers do not affect the ferricyanide reductase activity under isotonic conditions. Taken together, these findings indicate a functional interaction of the three plasma membrane proteins, namely, ferricyanide reductase (PMET), VDAC and VRAC.

  17. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  18. TRPV4 and AQP4 Channels Synergistically Regulate Cell Volume and Calcium Homeostasis in Retinal Müller Glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Andrew O; Ryskamp, Daniel A; Phuong, Tam T T

    2015-01-01

    and facilitates the time course and amplitude of hypotonicity-induced swelling and regulatory volume decrease. We confirm the crucial facets of the signaling mechanism in heterologously expressing oocytes. These results identify the molecular mechanism that contributes to dynamic regulation of glial volume...... through TRPV4 channels reciprocally modulates volume regulation, swelling, and Aqp4 gene expression. Therefore, TRPV4-AQP4 interactions constitute a molecular system that fine-tunes astroglial volume regulation by integrating osmosensing, calcium signaling, and water transport and, when overactivated...... set of mechanisms involving reciprocal interactions at the level of glial gene expression, calcium homeostasis, swelling, and volume regulation. Specifically, water influx through AQP4 drives calcium influx via TRPV4 in the glial end foot, which regulates expression of Aqp4 and Kir4.1 genes...

  19. Origin of the voltage dependence of G-protein regulation of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Yu-Hang; Bangaru, Saroja D; He, Linling; Abele, Kathryn; Tanabe, Shihori; Kozasa, Tohru; Yang, Jian

    2008-12-24

    G-protein (Gbetagamma)-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition of N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels contributes to presynaptic inhibition and short-term synaptic plasticity. The voltage dependence derives from the dissociation of Gbetagamma from the inhibited channels, but the underlying molecular and biophysical mechanisms remain largely unclear. In this study we investigated the role in this process of Ca(2+) channel beta subunit (Ca(v)beta) and a rigid alpha-helical structure between the alpha-interacting domain (AID), the primary Ca(v)beta docking site on the channel alpha(1) subunit, and the pore-lining IS6 segment. Gbetagamma inhibition of P/Q-type channels was reconstituted in giant inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes. Large populations of channels devoid of Ca(v)beta were produced by washing out a mutant Ca(v)beta with a reduced affinity for the AID. These beta-less channels were still inhibited by Gbetagamma, but without any voltage dependence, indicating that Ca(v)beta is indispensable for voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition. A truncated Ca(v)beta containing only the AID-binding guanylate kinase (GK) domain could fully confer voltage dependence to Gbetagamma inhibition. Gbetagamma did not alter inactivation properties, and channels recovered from Gbetagamma inhibition exhibited the same activation property as un-inhibited channels, indicating that Gbetagamma does not dislodge Ca(v)beta from the inhibited channel. Furthermore, voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition was abolished when the rigid alpha-helix between the AID and IS6 was disrupted by insertion of multiple glycines, which also eliminated Ca(v)beta regulation of channel gating, revealing a pivotal role of this rigid alpha-helix in both processes. These results suggest that depolarization-triggered movement of IS6, coupled to the subsequent conformational change of the Gbetagamma-binding pocket through a rigid alpha-helix induced partly by the Ca(v)beta GK domain, causes the

  20. Novel algorithm for identifying T-wave current density alternans using synthesized 187-channel vector-projected body surface mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kenji; Takahashi, Shin; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Futagawa, Keisuke; Shoda, Morio; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Ken; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Itoh, Manabu; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    The noninvasive evaluation of ventricular T-wave alternans (TWA) in patients with lethal ventricular arrhythmias is an important issue. In this study, we propose a novel algorithm to identify T-wave current density alternans (TWCA) using synthesized 187-channel vector-projected body surface mapping (187-ch SAVP-ECG). We recorded 10 min of 187-ch SAVP-ECG using a Mason-Likar lead system in the supine position. A recovery time (RT) dispersion map was obtained by averaging the 187-ch SAVP-ECG. The TWCA value was determined from the relative changes in the averaged current density in the T-wave zone (Tpeak ± 50 ms) for two T-wave types. We registered 20 ECG recordings from normal controls and 11 ECG recordings from nine subjects with long QT syndrome (LQT). We divided LQT syndrome subjects into two groups: group 1 provided 9 ECG recordings without visually apparent TWAs, and group 2 provided 2 ECG recordings with visually apparent TWAs. The QTc interval values in the LQT groups were higher than those in the control (515 ± 60 ms in LQT G-1, 600 ± 27 ms in LQT G-2 vs. 415 ± 19 ms in control, P < 0.001). The RTendc dispersion values among the LQT subjects were higher than those of the control subjects (48 ± 19 ms in LQT G-1, 65 ± 30 ms in LQT G-2 vs. 24 ± 10 ms in control, P < 0.01). The mean TWCA value was significantly higher in the LQT G-2 group with visually apparent TWCAs (0.5 ± 0.2% in control, 2.1 ± 1.2% in LQT G-1, and 32.3 ± 6.9% in LQT G-2). Interestingly, the two-dimensional distribution of TWCA in LQT was inhomogeneous and correlated with the distribution of increased RT dispersion. We conclude that a novel algorithm using 187-ch SAVP-ECG might provide new insights into body surface TWCA.

  1. High-density interspecific genetic linkage mapping provides insights into genomic incompatibility between channel catfish and blue catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Li, Y; Qin, Z; Geng, X; Bao, L; Kaltenboeck, L; Kucuktas, H; Dunham, R; Liu, Z

    2016-02-01

    Catfish is the leading aquaculture species in the United States. The interspecific hybrid catfish produced by mating female channel catfish with male blue catfish outperform both of their parent species in a number of traits. However, mass production of the hybrids has been difficult because of reproductive isolation. Investigations of genome structure and organization of the hybrids provide insights into the genetic basis for maintenance of species divergence in the face of gene flow, thereby helping develop strategies for introgression and efficient production of the hybrids for aquaculture. In this study, we constructed a high-density genetic linkage map using the hybrid catfish system with the catfish 250K SNP array. A total of 26,238 SNPs were mapped to 29 linkage groups, with 12,776 unique marker positions. The linkage map spans approximately 3240 cM with an average intermarker distance of 0.25 cM. A fraction of markers (986 of 12,776) exhibited significant deviation from the expected Mendelian ratio of segregation, and they were clustered in major genomic blocks across 15 LGs, most notably LG9 and LG15. The distorted markers exhibited significant bias for maternal alleles among the backcross progenies, suggesting strong selection against the blue catfish alleles. The clustering of distorted markers within genomic blocks should lend insights into speciation as marked by incompatibilities between the two species. Such findings should also have profound implications for understanding the genomic evolution of closely related species as well as the introgression of hybrid production programs in aquaculture.

  2. Interacting influence of diuretics and diet on BK channel-regulated K homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Donghai; Cornelius, Ryan J.; Sansom, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca-activated K channels are abundantly located in cells of vasculature, glomerulus and distal nephron, where they are involved in maintaining blood volume, blood pressure and K homeostasis. In mesangial cells and smooth muscle cells of vessels, the BK-α pore associates with BK-β1 subunits and regulates contraction in a Ca-mediated feedback manner. The BK-β1 also resides in connecting tubule cells of the nephron. BK-β1 knockout mice (β1KO) exhibit fluid retention, hypertension, and compromised K handling. The BK-α/β4resides in acid/base transporting intercalated cells (IC) of the distal nephron, where they mediate K secretion in mammals on a high K, alkaline diet. BK-α expression in IC is increased by a high K diet via aldosterone. The BK-β4 subunit and alkaline urine are necessary for the luminal expression and function of BK-α in mouse IC. In distal nephron cells, membrane BK-α expression is inhibited by WNK4 in in vitro expression systems, indicating a role in the hyperkalemic phenotype in patients with familial hyperkalemic hypertension type 2 (FHHt2). β1KO and BK-β4 knockout mice (β4KO) are hypertensive because of exaggerated ENaC-mediated Na retention in an effort to secrete K via only ROMK. BK hypertension is resistant to thiazides and furosemide, and would be more amenable to ENaC and aldosterone inhibiting drugs. Activators of BK-α/β1 or BK-α/β4 might be effective blood pressure lowering agents for a subset of hypertensive patients. Inhibitors of renal BK would effectively spare K in patients with Bartter Syndrome, a renal K wasting disease. PMID:24721651

  3. Neuroprotective effects of volume-regulated anion channel blocker DCPIB on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar ALIBRAHIM; Li-yan ZHAO; Christine You-jin BAE; Andrew BARSZCZYK; Christopher LF SUN; Guan-lei WANG; Hong-shuo SUN

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the role of swelling-induced activation of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) in a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury model using the selective VRAC blocker 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on5-yl) oxobutyric acid (DCPIB).Methods:Cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury was induced in 7-day-old mouse pups with Rice-Vannucci method.Prior to the onset of ischemia,the animals were ip administered DCPIB (10 mg/kg).The animals were sacrificed 24 h afterwards,coronal sections of the brains were cut and the areas of infarct were examined using TTC staining and an image-analysis system.Cultured PC12 cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 4 h.The cellular viability was assessed using Cell Counting Kit 8.Intracellular chloride concentration [Clˉ]i was measured using 6-methoxy-N-ethylquinolinium iodide.Results:DCPIB-treated mice showed a significant reduction in hemispheric corrected infarct volume (26.65%+2.23%) compared to that in vehicle-treated mice (45.52%+1.45%,P<O.O01).DCPIB-treated mice also showed better functional recovery as they were more active than vehicle-treated mice at 4 and 24 h post injury.In cultured PC12 cells,DCPIB (10 μmol/L) significantly reduced OGD-induced cell death.Moreover,DCPIB (20 μmol/L) blocked hypotonic-induced decrease in [Clˉ]i in PC12 cells of both control and OGD groups.Conclusion:The results further support the pathophysiological role of VRACs in ischemic brain injury,and suggest DCPIB as a potential,easily administrable agent targeting VRACs in the context of perinatal and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  4. The Epithelial Calcium Channel TRPV5 Is Regulated Differentially by Klotho and Sialidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, E.H.P.; Nair, A.V.; Büll, C.; Lefeber, D.J.; Delft, F.L. van; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 5 (TRPV5) Ca(2+) channel facilitates transcellular Ca(2+) transport in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) of the kidney. The channel is glycosylated with a complex type N-glycan and it has been postulated that hydrolysis of the terminal sialic acid(s)

  5. Regulation of cloned, Ca2+-activated K+ channels by cell volume changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; MacAulay, Nanna; Jorgensen, Nanna K;

    2002-01-01

    Ca2+-activated K+ channels of big (hBK), intermediate (hIK) or small (rSK3) conductance were co-expressed with aquaporin 1 (AQP1) in Xenopus laevis oocytes. hBK channels were activated by depolarization, whereas hIK and rSK3 channels were activated by direct injection of Ca2+ or Cd2+ into the ooc......Ca2+-activated K+ channels of big (hBK), intermediate (hIK) or small (rSK3) conductance were co-expressed with aquaporin 1 (AQP1) in Xenopus laevis oocytes. hBK channels were activated by depolarization, whereas hIK and rSK3 channels were activated by direct injection of Ca2+ or Cd2......+ into the oocyte cytoplasm, before the oocytes were subjected to hyperosmolar or hypoosmolar (+/-50 mOsm mannitol) challenges. In all cases, the oocytes responded rapidly to the osmotic changes with shrinkage or swelling and the effects on the K+ currents were measured. hIK and rSK3 currents were highly sensitive......IK/rSK3 and hBK channels suggest that the significant stimulation of hIK and rSK3 channels during swelling is not mediated by changes in intracellular Ca2+, but rather through interactions with the cytoskeleton, provided that a sufficient basal concentration of intracellular Ca2+ or Cd2+ is present....

  6. UCP3 Regulates Single-Channel Activity of the Cardiac mCa1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motloch, Lukas J; Gebing, Tina; Reda, Sara; Schwaiger, Astrid; Wolny, Martin; Hoppe, Uta C

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (mCa(2+) uptake) is thought to be mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). UCP2 and UCP3 belong to a superfamily of mitochondrial ion transporters. Both proteins are expressed in the inner mitochondrial membrane of the heart. Recently, UCP2 was reported to modulate the function of the cardiac MCU related channel mCa1. However, the possible role of UCP3 in modulating cardiac mCa(2+) uptake via the MCU remains inconclusive. To understand the role of UCP3, we analyzed cardiac mCa1 single-channel activity in mitoplast-attached single-channel recordings from isolated murine cardiac mitoplasts, from adult wild-type controls (WT), and from UCP3 knockout mice (UCP3(-/-)). Single-channel registrations in UCP3(-/-) confirmed a murine voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel, i.e., mCa1, which was inhibited by Ru360. Compared to WT, mCa1 in UCP3(-/-) revealed similar single-channel characteristics. However, in UCP3(-/-) the channel exhibited decreased single-channel activity, which was insensitive to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) inhibition. Our results suggest that beyond UCP2, UCP3 also exhibits regulatory effects on cardiac mCa1/MCU function. Furthermore, we speculate that UCP3 might modulate previously described inhibitory effects of ATP on mCa1/MCU activity as well.

  7. Role of vascular potassium channels in the regulation of renal hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    of one or more classes of K+ channels will lead to a change in hemodynamic resistance and therefore of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration pressure. Through these effects, the activity of renal vascular K+ channels influences renal salt and water excretion, fluid homeostasis, and ultimately blood...

  8. Tyrosine phosphatases epsilon and alpha perform specific and overlapping functions in regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in Schwann cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiran, Zohar; Peretz, Asher; Sines, Tal

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) epsilon and alpha are closely related and share several molecular functions, such as regulation of Src family kinases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. Functional interrelationships between PTPepsilon and PTPalpha and the mechanisms by which they regulate K...... but are not fully redundant. We conclude that PTPepsilon and PTPalpha differ significantly in their regulation of Kv channels and Src in the system examined and that similarity between PTPs does not necessarily result in full functional redundancy in vivo....

  9. Role of nitric oxide in the regulation of mechanosensitive ionic channels in cardiomyocytes: contribution of NO-synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanski, V E; Kamkin, A G; Makarenko, E Yu; Lysenko, N N; Sutiagin, P V; Kiseleva, I S

    2010-12-01

    The role of NO in the regulation of currents passing through ion channels activated by cell stretching (mechanically gated channels, MGC), particularly through cation-selective K(+)-channels TRPC6, TREK1 (K(2P)2.1), and TREK2 (K(2P)10.1), was studied on isolated mouse, rat, and guinea pig cardiomyocytes using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In non-deformed cells, binding of endogenous NO with PTIO (2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-1-oxy-3-oxide) irreversibly shifted the diastolic membrane potential towards negative values, modulates K(ir)-channels by reducing I(K1), and blocks MGC. Perfusion of stretched cells with PTIO solution completely blocked MG-currents. NO-synthase inhibitors L-NAME and L-NMMA completely blocked MGC. Stretching of cardiomyocytes isolated from wild type mice and from NOS1(-/-)- and NOS2(-/-)- knockout mice led to the appearance in MG-currents typical for the specified magnitude of stretching, while stretching of cardiomyocytes from NOS3(-/-)- knockout mice did not produce in MG-current. These findings suggest that NO plays a role in the regulation of MGC activity and that endothelial NO-synthase predominates as NO source in cardiomyocyte response to stretching.

  10. Ion channel regulation by β-secretase BACE1 - enzymatic and non-enzymatic effects beyond Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Sandra; Hartmann, Stephanie; Hessler, Sabine; Adelsberger, Helmuth; Huth, Tobias; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-09-02

    β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) has become infamous for its pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Consequently, BACE1 represents a prime target in drug development. Despite its detrimental involvement in AD, it should be quite obvious that BACE1 is not primarily present in the brain to drive mental decline. In fact, additional functions have been identified. In this review, we focus on the regulation of ion channels, specifically voltage-gated sodium and KCNQ potassium channels, by BACE1. These studies provide evidence for a highly unexpected feature in the functional repertoire of BACE1. Although capable of cleaving accessory channel subunits, BACE1 exerts many of its physiologically significant effects through direct, non-enzymatic interactions with main channel subunits. We discuss how the underlying mechanisms can be conceived and develop scenarios how the regulation of ion conductances by BACE1 might shape electric activity in the intact and diseased brain and heart.

  11. DCIV Technique for Extracting Front Channel and Back Channel Interface Traps Density in SOI Device%DCIV 技术提取 SOI器件前栅界面与背界面态密度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵洪利; 高林春; 曾传滨; 刘魁勇; 罗家俊; 韩郑生

    2015-01-01

    直流电流电压(DCIV )方法不仅可以提取SOI器件前栅沟道界面态密度,也可应用于背界面态密度的提取.给出了具体的测试步骤与方法,以0.13μm SOI工艺制造的NMOS器件为测试对象,对前栅界面与背界面分别进行了测试.基于DCIV理论,将实验得到的界面复合电流值与理论公式做最小二乘拟合,不仅获得了各界面态密度,也得到界面态密度所在的等效能级.结果表明,采用了智能剥离技术制备的SOI NMOS器件背界面态密度量级为1010 cm -2,前栅界面的态密度小于背界面的,量级为109 cm -2,并给出了两界面态面密度所在的等效能级.%Direct Current Current Voltage(DCIV) technique can extract not only the front channel interface traps but also the back channel interface traps .The concrete steps and methods is presented and is applied to measure the front channel interface and the back channel interface traps in SOI NMOSFET which is fabricated in 0 .13 μm technologie .On the basis of the DCIV theory ,the interface recombination current obtained can be used to fit the theoretical equation with least‐squares optimization ,then both the interface trap density and its equivalent energy can be acquired . The results indicate that the back channel interface trap density of SOI NMOSFET adopting SMRT‐CUT technique are larger than1010cm-2 ,and the front channel interface trap density is smaller than the back channel interfaces′.The corresponding interface trap density equivalent energy is also presented .

  12. The sigma receptor as a ligand-regulated auxiliary potassium channel subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydar, Ebru; Palmer, Christopher P; Klyachko, Vitaly A; Jackson, Meyer B

    2002-04-25

    The sigma receptor is a novel protein that mediates the modulation of ion channels by psychotropic drugs through a unique transduction mechanism depending neither on G proteins nor protein phosphorylation. The present study investigated sigma receptor signal transduction by reconstituting responses in Xenopus oocytes. Sigma receptors modulated voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv1.4 or Kv1.5) in different ways in the presence and absence of ligands. Association between Kv1.4 channels and sigma receptors was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation. These results indicate a novel mechanism of signal transduction dependent on protein-protein interactions. Domain accessibility experiments suggested a structure for the sigma receptor with two cytoplasmic termini and two membrane-spanning segments. The ligand-independent effects on channels suggest that sigma receptors serve as auxiliary subunits to voltage-gated K+ channels with distinct functional interactions, depending on the presence or absence of ligand.

  13. Regulation of cough and action potentials by voltage-gated Na channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    The classical role ascribed to voltage-gated Na channels is the conduction of action potentials. Some excitable tissues such as cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle predominantly express a single voltage-gated Na channels isoform. Of the nine voltage-gated Na channels, seven are expressed in neurons, of these Nav 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 are expressed in sensory neurons including vagal sensory neurons that innervate the airways and initiate cough. Nav 1.7 and Nav 1.9 are of particular interest as they represent two extremes in the functional diversity of voltage-gated Na channels. Voltage-gated Na channel isoforms expressed in airway sensory neurons produce multiple distinct Na currents that underlie distinct aspects of sensory neuron function. The interaction between voltage-gated Na currents underlies the characteristic ability of airway sensory nerves to encode encounters with irritant stimuli into action potential discharge and evoke the cough reflex.

  14. Nav1.5 cardiac sodium channels, regulation and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Humberto León-Ariza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels constitute a group of membrane proteins widely distributed thought the body. In the heart, there are at least six different isoforms, being the Nav1.5 the most abundant. The channel is composed of an α subunit that is formed by four domains of six segments each, and four much smaller β subunits that provide stability and integrate other channels into the α subunit. The function of the Nav1.5 channel is modulated by intracellular cytoskeleton proteins, extracellular proteins, calcium concentration, free radicals, and medications, among other things. The study of the channel and its alterations has grown thanks to its association with pathogenic conditions such as Long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, atrial fibrillation, arrhythmogenic ventricular dysplasia and complications during ischemic processes.

  15. Regulation of the membrane insertion and conductance activity of the metamorphic chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 by cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Valenzuela

    Full Text Available The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer.

  16. Regulation of the membrane insertion and conductance activity of the metamorphic chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 by cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Stella M; Alkhamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J; Almond, Oscar C; Goodchild, Sophia C; Carne, Sonia; Curmi, Paul M G; Holt, Stephen A; Cornell, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer.

  17. Ischemic postconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury by up-regulation of acid-sensing ion channel 2a

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-sheng Duanmu; Liu Cao; Jing-yu Chen; Hong-fei Ge; Rong Hu; Hua Feng

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning renders brain tissue tolerant to brain ischemia, thereby alleviating ischemic brain injury. However, the exact mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study, a rat model of global brain ischemia was subjected to ischemic postconditioning treat-ment using the vessel occlusion method. After 2 hours of ischemia, the bilateral common carotid arteries were blocked immediately for 10 seconds and then perfused for 10 seconds. This procedure was repeated six times. Ischemic postconditioning was found to mitigate hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage in rats with brain ischemia, and up-regulate acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression at the mRNA and protein level. These ifndings suggest that ischemic postconditioning up-regulates acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression in the rat hippo-campus after global brain ischemia, which promotes neuronal tolerance to ischemic brain injury.

  18. Regulation of Ca2+ channels by SNAP-25 via recruitment of syntaxin-1 from plasma membrane clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Bertelsen, Trine Lisberg; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Houy, Sébastien;

    2016-01-01

    SNAP-25 regulates Ca(2+) channels, with potentially important consequences for diseases involving an aberrant SNAP-25 expression level. How this regulation is executed mechanistically remains unknown. We investigated this question in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells and found that SNAP-25 inhibits Ca......(2+) currents, with the B-isoform being more potent than the A-isoform, but not when syntaxin-1 is cleaved by botulinum neurotoxin C. In contrast, syntaxin-1 inhibits Ca(2+) currents independently of SNAP-25. Further experiments using immunostaining showed that endogenous or exogenous SNAP-25...... expression recruits syntaxin-1 from clusters on the plasma membrane, thereby increasing the immunoavailability of syntaxin-1 and leading indirectly to Ca(2+) current inhibition. Expression of Munc18-1, which recruits syntaxin-1 within the exocytotic pathway, does not modulate Ca(2+) channels, whereas...

  19. H2S does not regulate proliferation via T-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elies, Jacobo; Johnson, Emily; Boyle, John P; Scragg, Jason L; Peers, Chris

    2015-06-12

    T-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3) strongly influence proliferation of various cell types, including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and certain cancers. We have recently shown that the gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) inhibits T-type Ca(2+) channels and, in so doing, attenuates proliferation of VSMC. We have also shown that the T-type Ca(2+) channel Cav3.2 is selectively inhibited by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) whilst the other channel isoforms (Cav3.1 and Cav3.3) are unaffected. Here, we explored whether inhibition of Cav3.2 by H2S could account for the anti-proliferative effects of this gasotransmitter. H2S suppressed proliferation in HEK293 cells expressing Cav3.2, as predicted by our previous observations. However, H2S was similarly effective in suppressing proliferation in wild type (non-transfected) HEK293 cells and those expressing the H2S insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Further studies demonstrated that T-type Ca(2+) channels in the smooth muscle cell line A7r5 and in human coronary VSMCs strongly influenced proliferation. In both cell types, H2S caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation, yet by far the dominant T-type Ca(2+) channel isoform was the H2S-insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Our data indicate that inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated proliferation by H2S is independent of the channels' sensitivity to H2S.

  20. Power lateral pnp transistor operating with high current density in irradiated voltage regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukić Vladimir Đ.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The operation of power lateral pnp transistors in gamma radiation field was examined by detection of the minimum dropout voltage on heavily loaded low-dropout voltage regulators LM2940CT5, clearly demonstrating their low radiation hardness, with unacceptably low values of output voltage and collector-emitter voltage volatility. In conjunction with previous results on base current and forward emitter current gain of serial transistors, it was possible to determine the positive influence of high load current on a slight improvement of voltage regulator LM2940CT5 radiation hardness. The high-current flow through the wide emitter aluminum contact of the serial transistor above the isolation oxide caused intensive annealing of the positive oxide-trapped charge, leading to decrease of the lateral pnp transistor's current gain, but also a more intensive recovery of the small-signal npn transistors in the control circuit. The high current density in the base area of the lateral pnp transistor immediately below the isolation oxide decreased the concentration of negative interface traps. Consequently, the positive influence of the reduced concentration of the oxide-trapped charge on the negative feedback reaction circuit, together with the favourable effect of reduced interface traps concentration, exceeded negative influence of the annealed oxide-trapped charge on the serial pnp transistor's forward emitter current gain.

  1. High-density cell systems incorporating polymer microspheres as microenvironmental regulators in engineered cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorio, Loran D; Vieregge, Eran L; Dhami, Chirag D; Alsberg, Eben

    2013-06-01

    To address the significant clinical need for tissue-engineered therapies for the repair and regeneration of articular cartilage, many systems have recently been developed using bioactive polymer microspheres as regulators of the chondrogenic microenvironment within high-density cell cultures. In this review, we highlight various densely cellular systems utilizing polymer microspheres as three-dimensional (3D) structural elements within developing engineered cartilage tissue, carriers for cell expansion and delivery, vehicles for spatiotemporally controlled growth factor delivery, and directors of cell behavior via regulation of cell-biomaterial interactions. The diverse systems described herein represent a shift from the more traditional tissue engineering approach of combining cells and growth factors within a biomaterial scaffold, to the design of modular systems that rely on the assembly of cells and bioactive polymer microspheres as building blocks to guide the creation of articular cartilage. Cell-based assembly of 3D microsphere-incorporated structures represents a promising avenue for the future of tissue engineering.

  2. S1-S3 counter charges in the voltage sensor module of a mammalian sodium channel regulate fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groome, James R; Winston, Vern

    2013-05-01

    The movement of positively charged S4 segments through the electric field drives the voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Studies of prokaryotic sodium channels provide a mechanistic view of activation facilitated by electrostatic interactions of negatively charged residues in S1 and S2 segments, with positive counterparts in the S4 segment. In mammalian sodium channels, S4 segments promote domain-specific functions that include activation and several forms of inactivation. We tested the idea that S1-S3 countercharges regulate eukaryotic sodium channel functions, including fast inactivation. Using structural data provided by bacterial channels, we constructed homology models of the S1-S4 voltage sensor module (VSM) for each domain of the mammalian skeletal muscle sodium channel hNaV1.4. These show that side chains of putative countercharges in hNaV1.4 are oriented toward the positive charge complement of S4. We used mutagenesis to define the roles of conserved residues in the extracellular negative charge cluster (ENC), hydrophobic charge region (HCR), and intracellular negative charge cluster (INC). Activation was inhibited with charge-reversing VSM mutations in domains I-III. Charge reversal of ENC residues in domains III (E1051R, D1069K) and IV (E1373K, N1389K) destabilized fast inactivation by decreasing its probability, slowing entry, and accelerating recovery. Several INC mutations increased inactivation from closed states and slowed recovery. Our results extend the functional characterization of VSM countercharges to fast inactivation, and support the premise that these residues play a critical role in domain-specific gating transitions for a mammalian sodium channel.

  3. Motion of small cross-channel clusters on W(2 1 1) surface: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczyszyn, L.; Antczak, G.

    2014-04-01

    The adsorption and diffusion of cross-channel ad-dimers and ad-trimers was investigated using ab-initio DFT calculations. In contrast to in-channel dimers, the motion of cross-channel dimers proceeds one ad-atom at the time with an activation energy comparable to observed for quasi-isolated ad-atoms. The separation of ad-atoms by the surface channel wall lowers, but not eliminates, ad-atoms interactions. Pair interactions show long-range oscillatory behavior with an electronic origin. The short range interactions are modified by creation of straight and staggered direct bonds. Motion of ad-trimers proceeds in the same fashion as for cross-channel ad-dimers.

  4. Tuning the allosteric regulation of artificial muscarinic and dopaminergic ligand-gated potassium channels by protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Christophe J.; Revilloud, Jean; Caro, Lydia N.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Trouchet, Amandine; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Nieścierowicz, Katarzyna; Sapay, Nicolas; Crouzy, Serge; Vivaudou, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels enable intercellular transmission of action potential through synapses by transducing biochemical messengers into electrical signal. We designed artificial ligand-gated ion channels by coupling G protein-coupled receptors to the Kir6.2 potassium channel. These artificial channels called ion channel-coupled receptors offer complementary properties to natural channels by extending the repertoire of ligands to those recognized by the fused receptors, by generating more sustained signals and by conferring potassium selectivity. The first artificial channels based on the muscarinic M2 and the dopaminergic D2L receptors were opened and closed by acetylcholine and dopamine, respectively. We find here that this opposite regulation of the gating is linked to the length of the receptor C-termini, and that C-terminus engineering can precisely control the extent and direction of ligand gating. These findings establish the design rules to produce customized ligand-gated channels for synthetic biology applications. PMID:28145461

  5. Insulin-producing cells regulate the sexual receptivity through the painless TRP channel in Drosophila virgin females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaomi Sakai

    Full Text Available In a variety of animal species, females hold a leading position in evaluating potential mating partners. The decision of virgin females to accept or reject a courting male is one of the most critical steps for mating success. In the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, however, the molecular and neuronal mechanisms underlying female receptivity are still poorly understood, particularly for virgin females. The Drosophila painless (pain gene encodes a transient receptor potential (TRP ion channel. We previously demonstrated that mutations in pain significantly enhance the sexual receptivity of virgin females and that pain expression in pain(GAL4 -positive neurons is necessary and sufficient for pain-mediated regulation of the virgin receptivity. Among the pain(GAL4 -positive neurons in the adult female brain, here we have found that insulin-producing cells (IPCs, a neuronal subset in the pars intercerebralis, are essential in virgin females for the regulation of sexual receptivity through Pain TRP channels. IPC-specific knockdown of pain expression or IPC ablation strongly enhanced female sexual receptivity as was observed in pain mutant females. When pain expression or neuronal activity was conditionally suppressed in adult IPCs, female sexual receptivity was similarly enhanced. Furthermore, both pain mutations and the conditional knockdown of pain expression in IPCs depressed female rejection behaviors toward courting males. Taken together, our results indicate that the Pain TRP channel in IPCs plays an important role in controlling the sexual receptivity of Drosophila virgin females by positively regulating female rejection behaviors during courtship.

  6. Up-regulation of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Ester; Noé, Véronique; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Lluis, Carmen; Ferrer, Isidre; Ciudad, Carlos J; Franco, Rafael

    2004-11-01

    Gene expression throughout the different stages of Alzheimer's disease was analysed in samples from cerebral cortex. The gene encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.4 was already overexpressed in early stages of the disease, and in advanced stages Kv3.4 was present at high levels in neurodegenerative structures. This subunit regulates delayed-rectifier currents, which are primary determinants of spike repolarization in neurones. In unique samples from a patient with Alzheimer's disease whose amount of amyloid plaques was decreased by beta amyloid immunization, Kv3.4 was overexpressed. The channel subunit was expressed in the neuropil, in the remaining conventional plaques in the frontal cortex and in collapsed plaques in the orbitary cortex. Therefore, amyloid deposition in plaques does not seem to be responsible for the increase in Kv3.4 levels. Nevertheless, Kv3.4 up-regulation is related to amyloid pathology, given that transgenic mice with the Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein showed increased expression of Kv3.4. Up-regulation of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits alters potassium currents in neurones and leads to altered synaptic activity that may underlie the neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, Kv3.4 likely represents a novel therapeutic target for the disease.

  7. Regulation of Voltage-Activated K(+) Channel Gating by Transmembrane β Subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. K(V) channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD) surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many K(V) channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the K(V) β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM) segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of K(V) α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening, and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into K(V) channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  8. Regulation of KV channel voltage-dependent activation by transmembrane β subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eSun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-activated K+ (KV channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. KV channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSD. The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many KV channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the KV β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of KV α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into KV channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  9. BK channels regulate sinoatrial node firing rate and cardiac pacing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Michael H; Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Anderson, Mark E; Dalziel, Julie E; Meredith, Andrea L

    2014-11-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels play prominent roles in shaping muscle and neuronal excitability. In the cardiovascular system, BK channels promote vascular relaxation and protect against ischemic injury. Recently, inhibition of BK channels has been shown to lower heart rate in intact rodents and isolated hearts, suggesting a novel role in heart function. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we recorded ECGs from mice injected with paxilline (PAX), a membrane-permeable BK channel antagonist, and examined changes in cardiac conduction. ECGs revealed a 19 ± 4% PAX-induced reduction in heart rate in wild-type but not BK channel knockout (Kcnma1(-/-)) mice. The heart rate decrease was associated with slowed cardiac pacing due to elongation of the sinus interval. Action potential firing recorded from isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) was reduced by 55 ± 15% and 28 ± 9% by application of PAX (3 μM) and iberiotoxin (230 nM), respectively. Furthermore, baseline firing rates from Kcnma1(-/-) SANCs were 33% lower than wild-type SANCs. The slowed firing upon BK current inhibition or genetic deletion was due to lengthening of the diastolic depolarization phase of the SANC action potential. Finally, BK channel immunoreactivity and PAX-sensitive currents were identified in SANCs with HCN4 expression and pacemaker current, respectively, and BK channels cloned from SANCs recapitulated similar activation as the PAX-sensitive current. Together, these data localize BK channels to SANCs and demonstrate that loss of BK current decreases SANC automaticity, consistent with slowed sinus pacing after PAX injection in vivo. Furthermore, these findings suggest BK channels are potential therapeutic targets for disorders of heart rate.

  10. Effects of hatchery fish density on emigration, growth, survival, and predation risk of natural steelhead parr in an experimental stream channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Christopher P.; Riley, Stephen C.; Berejikian, Barry A.

    2011-01-01

    Hatchery supplementation of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss raises concerns about the impacts on natural populations, including reduced growth and survival, displacement, and increased predation. The potential risks may be density dependent.We examined how hatchery stocking density and the opportunity to emigrate affect the responses of natural steelhead parr in an experimental stream channel and after 15 d found no density-dependent effects on growth, emigration, or survival at densities ranging from 1-6 hatchery parr/m2. The opportunity for steelhead parr to emigrate reduced predation by coastal cutthroat trout O. clarkii clarkii on both hatchery and natural steelhead parr. The cutthroat trout exhibited a type-I functional response (constant predation rate with increased prey density) for the hatchery and composite populations. In contrast, the predation rate on natural parr decreased as hatchery stocking density increased. Supplementation with hatchery parr at any experimental stocking density reduced the final natural parr density. This decline was explained by increased emigration fromthe supplemented groups. Natural parr had higher mean instantaneous growth rates than hatchery parr. The proportion of parr emigrating decreased as parr size increased over successive experimental trials. Smaller parr had lower survival and suffered higher predation. The final density of the composite population, a measure of supplementation effectiveness, increased with the hatchery steelhead stocking rate. Our results indicate that stocking larger hatchery parr (over 50 d postemergence) at densities within the carrying capacity would have low short-term impact on the growth, survival, and emigration of natural parr while increasing the density of the composite population; in addition, a stocking density greater than 3 fish/m2 might be a good starting point for the evaluation of parr stocking in natural streams.

  11. Analysis of the impact of coolant density variations in the high efficiency channel of a pressure tube super critical water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scriven, M.G.; Hummel, D.W.; Novog, D.R.; Luxat, J.C. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The Pressure Tube (PT) Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) is based on a light water coolant operating at pressures above the thermodynamic critical pressure; a separate low temperature and low pressure moderator. The coolant density changes by an order of magnitude depending on its local enthalpy in the porous ceramic insulator tube. This causes significant changes in the neutron transport characteristics, axially and radially, in the fuel channel. This work performs lattice physics calculations for a 78-element Pu-Th fuel at zero burnup and examines the effect of assumptions related to coolant density in the radial direction of a HEC, using the neutron transport code WIMS-AECL. (author)

  12. 75 FR 61096 - Regulated Navigation Area; Reserved Channel, Boston Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... Harbor, Boston, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... Navigation Areas: Reserved Channel, Boston Harbor, Boston, MA (a) Location. The following areas are...

  13. Novel expression and regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in placentas from women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hiten D; McCallum, Laura A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Greenwood, Iain A; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Tribe, Rachel M

    2011-09-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with structural/functional alterations in placental and maternal vasculature. Voltage-dependant potassium channels encoded by KCNQ1-5 genes have been detected in several types of blood vessels where they promote vascular relaxation. Voltage-dependant potassium channel function can be modulated by KCNE1-5-encoded accessory proteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether KCNQ and KCNE genes are differentially expressed in placentas from women with preeclampsia compared with normotensive controls and to examine any differences in those who delivered preterm (voltage-dependant potassium channels are expressed and markedly modulated in placentas from preeclamptic women. Differential expression of isoforms may lead to altered cell proliferation. The correlation between KCNQ3 and KCNE5 expression is indicative of a novel channel complex and warrants further investigation.

  14. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Cécile eBoulay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction protein Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30 allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ, we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (SG, a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-Sarcoglycan, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions.

  15. The HO-1/CO system regulates mitochondrial-capillary density relationships in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorella, Shelly R. H.; Potter, Jennifer V. F.; Cherry, Anne D.; Peacher, Dionne F.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Moon, Richard E.; Suliman, Hagir B.

    2015-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) system induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but its biological impact in human skeletal muscle is uncertain. The enzyme system generates CO, which stimulates mitochondrial proliferation in normal muscle. Here we examined whether CO breathing can be used to produce a coordinated metabolic and vascular response in human skeletal muscle. In 19 healthy subjects, we performed vastus lateralis muscle biopsies and tested one-legged maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) before and after breathing air or CO (200 ppm) for 1 h daily for 5 days. In response to CO, there was robust HO-1 induction along with increased mRNA levels for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), cytochrome c, cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COX IV), and mitochondrial-encoded COX I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NDI). CO breathing did not increase V̇o2max (1.96 ± 0.51 pre-CO, 1.87 ± 0.50 post-CO l/min; P = not significant) but did increase muscle citrate synthase, mitochondrial density (139.0 ± 34.9 pre-CO, 219.0 ± 36.2 post-CO; no. of mitochondrial profiles/field), myoglobin content and glucose transporter (GLUT4) protein level and led to GLUT4 localization to the myocyte membrane, all consistent with expansion of the tissue O2 transport system. These responses were attended by increased cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31)-positive muscle capillaries (1.78 ± 0.16 pre-CO, 2.37 ± 0.59 post-CO; capillaries/muscle fiber), implying the enrichment of microvascular O2 reserve. The findings support that induction of the HO-1/CO system by CO not only improves muscle mitochondrial density, but regulates myoglobin content, GLUT4 localization, and capillarity in accordance with current concepts of skeletal muscle plasticity. PMID:26186946

  16. TGF-β1, released by myofibroblasts, differentially regulates transcription and function of sodium and potassium channels in adult rat ventricular myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljeet Kaur

    Full Text Available Cardiac injury promotes fibroblasts activation and differentiation into myofibroblasts, which are hypersecretory of multiple cytokines. It is unknown whether any of such cytokines are involved in the electrophysiological remodeling of adult cardiomyocytes. We cultured adult cardiomyocytes for 3 days in cardiac fibroblast conditioned medium (FCM from adult rats. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, FCM-treated myocytes had 41% more peak inward sodium current (I(Na density at -40 mV than myocytes in control medium (p3 fold greater in FCM than control, which suggested that FCM effects could be mediated by TGF-β1. This was confirmed by pre-treatment with TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody, which abolished the FCM-induced changes in both I(Na and I(to. In current-clamp experiments TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml prolonged the action potential duration at 30, 50, and 90 repolarization (p<0.05; at 50 ng/ml it gave rise to early afterdepolarizations. In voltage-clamp experiments, TGF-β1 increased I(Na density in a dose-dependent manner without affecting voltage dependence of activation or inactivation. I(Na density was -36.25±2.8 pA/pF in control, -59.17±6.2 pA/pF at 0.1 ng/ml (p<0.01, and -58.22±6.6 pA/pF at 1 ng/ml (p<0.01. In sharp contrast, I(to density decreased from 22.2±1.2 pA/pF to 12.7±0.98 pA/pF (p<0.001 at 10 ng/ml. At 1 ng/ml TGF-β1 significantly increased SCN5A (Na(V1.5 (+73%; p<0.01, while reducing KCNIP2 (Kchip2; -77%; p<0.01 and KCND2 (K(V4.2; -50% p<0.05 mRNA levels. Further, the TGF-β1-induced increase in I(Na was mediated through activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway via phosphorylation of FOXO1 (a negative regulator of SCN5A. TGF-β1 released by myofibroblasts differentially regulates transcription and function of the main cardiac sodium channel and of the channel responsible for the transient outward current. The results provide new mechanistic insight into the electrical remodeling associated with myocardial injury.

  17. TGF-β1, Released by Myofibroblasts, Differentially Regulates Transcription and Function of Sodium and Potassium Channels in Adult Rat Ventricular Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kuljeet; Zarzoso, Manuel; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Hou, Luqia; Musa, Hassan; Jalife, José

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac injury promotes fibroblasts activation and differentiation into myofibroblasts, which are hypersecretory of multiple cytokines. It is unknown whether any of such cytokines are involved in the electrophysiological remodeling of adult cardiomyocytes. We cultured adult cardiomyocytes for 3 days in cardiac fibroblast conditioned medium (FCM) from adult rats. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, FCM-treated myocytes had 41% more peak inward sodium current (INa) density at −40 mV than myocytes in control medium (p3 fold greater in FCM than control, which suggested that FCM effects could be mediated by TGF-β1. This was confirmed by pre-treatment with TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody, which abolished the FCM-induced changes in both INa and Ito. In current-clamp experiments TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) prolonged the action potential duration at 30, 50, and 90 repolarization (p<0.05); at 50 ng/ml it gave rise to early afterdepolarizations. In voltage-clamp experiments, TGF-β1 increased INa density in a dose-dependent manner without affecting voltage dependence of activation or inactivation. INa density was −36.25±2.8 pA/pF in control, −59.17±6.2 pA/pF at 0.1 ng/ml (p<0.01), and −58.22±6.6 pA/pF at 1 ng/ml (p<0.01). In sharp contrast, Ito density decreased from 22.2±1.2 pA/pF to 12.7±0.98 pA/pF (p<0.001) at 10 ng/ml. At 1 ng/ml TGF-β1 significantly increased SCN5A (NaV1.5) (+73%; p<0.01), while reducing KCNIP2 (Kchip2; −77%; p<0.01) and KCND2 (KV4.2; −50% p<0.05) mRNA levels. Further, the TGF-β1-induced increase in INa was mediated through activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway via phosphorylation of FOXO1 (a negative regulator of SCN5A). TGF-β1 released by myofibroblasts differentially regulates transcription and function of the main cardiac sodium channel and of the channel responsible for the transient outward current. The results provide new mechanistic insight into the electrical remodeling associated with myocardial injury. PMID:23393573

  18. A Novel Modulator of Kv3 Potassium Channels Regulates the Firing of Parvalbumin-Positive Cortical Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato-Siri, Marcelo D; Zambello, Erika; Mutinelli, Chiara; Garbati, Nicoletta; Benedetti, Roberto; Aldegheri, Laura; Graziani, Francesca; Virginio, Caterina; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 high voltage-activated potassium channels, which display fast activation and deactivation kinetics, are known to make a crucial contribution to the fast-spiking phenotype of certain neurons. Pharmacological experiments show that the blockade of native Kv3 currents with low concentrations of tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine impairs the expression of this firing phenotype. In particular, Kv3 channels are highly expressed by fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive interneurons in corticolimbic brain circuits, which modulate the synchronization of cortical circuits and the generation of brain rhythms. Here, we describe a novel small molecule, (5R)-5-ethyl-3-(6-{[4-methyl-3-(methyloxy)phenyl]oxy}-3-pyridinyl)-2,4-imidazolidinedione (AUT1), which modulates Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels in human recombinant and rodent native neurons. AUT1 increased whole currents mediated by human Kv3.1b and Kv3.2a channels, with a concomitant leftward shift in the voltage dependence of activation. A less potent effect was observed on hKv3.3 currents. In mouse somatosensory cortex slices in vitro, AUT1 rescued the fast-spiking phenotype of parvalbumin-positive-fast-spiking interneurons following an impairment of their firing capacity by blocking a proportion of Kv3 channels with a low concentration of tetraethylammonium. Notably, AUT1 had no effect on interneuron firing when applied alone. Together, these data confirm the role played by Kv3 channels in the regulation of the firing phenotype of somatosensory interneurons and suggest that AUT1 and other Kv3 modulators could represent a new and promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of disorders associated with dysfunction of inhibitory feedback in corticolimbic circuits, such as schizophrenia.

  19. Characteristics of single large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels and their regulation of action potentials and excitability in parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Hatcher, Jeff T; Wurster, Robert D; Chen, Qin-Hui; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2014-01-15

    Large-conductance Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels (BK) regulate action potential (AP) properties and excitability in many central neurons. However, the properties and functional roles of BK channels in parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons (PCMNs) in the nucleus ambiguus (NA) have not yet been well characterized. In this study, the tracer X-rhodamine-5 (and 6)-isothiocyanate (XRITC) was injected into the pericardial sac to retrogradely label PCMNs in FVB mice at postnatal 7-9 days. Two days later, XRITC-labeled PCMNs in brain stem slices were identified. Using excised patch single-channel recordings, we identified voltage-gated and Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels in PCMNs. The majority of BK channels exhibited persistent channel opening during voltage holding. These BK channels had a conductance of 237 pS and a 50% opening probability at +27.9 mV, the channel open time constant was 3.37 ms at +20 mV, and dwell time increased exponentially as the membrane potential depolarized. At the +20-mV holding potential, the [Ca2+]50 was 15.2 μM with a P0.5 of 0.4. Occasionally, some BK channels showed a transient channel opening and fast inactivation. Using whole cell voltage clamp, we found that BK channel mediated outward currents and afterhyperpolarization currents (IAHP). Using whole cell current clamp, we found that application of BK channel blocker iberiotoxin (IBTX) increased spike half-width and suppressed fast afterhyperpolarization (fAHP) amplitude following single APs. In addition, IBTX application increased spike half-width and reduced the spike frequency-dependent AP broadening in trains and spike frequency adaption (SFA). Furthermore, BK channel blockade decreased spike frequency. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PCMNs have BK channels that significantly regulate AP repolarization, fAHP, SFA, and spike frequency. We conclude that activation of BK channels underlies one of the mechanisms for facilitation of PCMN excitability.

  20. Sildenafil prevents the up-regulation of transient receptor potential canonical channels in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiso, Hironori [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Medicine, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ohba, Takayoshi [Department of Cell Physiology, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Iino, Kenji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Terata, Yutaka [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Medicine, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Murakami, Manabu [Department of Pharmacology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ono, Kyoichi [Department of Cell Physiology, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hirow@doc.med.akita-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Medicine, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Medicine, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC1, 3 and 6) are up-regulated by ET-1. •Sildenafil inhibited hypertrophic responses (BNP, Ca entry, NFAT activation). •Sildenafil suppressed TRPC1, 3 and 6 expression. -- Abstract: Background: Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels are up-regulated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Sildenafil inhibits TRPC6 activation and expression, leading to the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the effects of sildenafil on the expression of other TRPCs remain unknown. We hypothesized that in addition to its effects of TRPC6, sildenafil blocks the up-regulation of other TRPC channels to suppress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Methods and results: In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, a 48 h treatment with 10 nM endothelin (ET)-1 induced hypertrophic responses characterized by nuclear factor of activated T cells activation and enhancement of brain natriuretic peptide expression and cell surface area. Co-treatment with sildenafil (1 μM, 48 h) inhibited these ET-1-induced hypertrophic responses. Although ET-1 enhanced the gene expression of TRPCs, sildenafil inhibited the enhanced gene expression of TRPC1, C3 and C6. Moreover, co-treatment with sildenafil abolished the augmentation of SOCE in the hypertrophied cardiomyocytes. Conclusions: These results suggest that sildenafil inhibits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by suppressing the up-regulation of TRPC expression.

  1. PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis regulates activation and inactivation of TRPC6/7 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsuki, Kyohei; Imai, Yuko; Hase, Hideharu; Okamura, Yasushi; Inoue, Ryuji; Mori, Masayuki X

    2014-02-01

    Transient receptor potential classical (or canonical) (TRPC)3, TRPC6, and TRPC7 are a subfamily of TRPC channels activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) produced through the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) by phospholipase C (PLC). PI(4,5)P2 depletion by a heterologously expressed phosphatase inhibits TRPC3, TRPC6, and TRPC7 activity independently of DAG; however, the physiological role of PI(4,5)P2 reduction on channel activity remains unclear. We used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure PI(4,5)P2 or DAG dynamics concurrently with TRPC6 or TRPC7 currents after agonist stimulation of receptors that couple to Gq and thereby activate PLC. Measurements made at different levels of receptor activation revealed a correlation between the kinetics of PI(4,5)P2 reduction and those of receptor-operated TRPC6 and TRPC7 current activation and inactivation. In contrast, DAG production correlated with channel activation but not inactivation; moreover, the time course of channel inactivation was unchanged in protein kinase C-insensitive mutants. These results suggest that inactivation of receptor-operated TRPC currents is primarily mediated by the dissociation of PI(4,5)P2. We determined the functional dissociation constant of PI(4,5)P2 to TRPC channels using FRET of the PLCδ Pleckstrin homology domain (PHd), which binds PI(4,5)P2, and used this constant to fit our experimental data to a model in which channel gating is controlled by PI(4,5)P2 and DAG. This model predicted similar FRET dynamics of the PHd to measured FRET in either human embryonic kidney cells or smooth muscle cells, whereas a model lacking PI(4,5)P2 regulation failed to reproduce the experimental data, confirming the inhibitory role of PI(4,5)P2 depletion on TRPC currents. Our model also explains various PLC-dependent characteristics of channel activity, including limitation of maximum open probability, shortening of the peak time, and the bell-shaped response of total

  2. Walker mutations reveal loose relationship between catalytic and channel-gating activities of purified CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Garami, E; Huan, L J; Galley, K; Wang, Y; Bear, C E

    1999-02-02

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as an ATPase and as a chloride channel. It has been hypothesized, on the basis of electrophysiological findings, that the catalytic activity of CFTR is tightly coupled to the opening and closing of the channel gate. In the present study, to determine the structural basis for the ATPase activity of CFTR, we assessed the effect of mutations within the "Walker A" consensus motifs on ATP hydrolysis by the purified, intact protein. Mutation of the lysine residue in the "Walker A" motif of either the first nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK464A) or the second nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK1250A) inhibited the ATPase activity of the purified intact CFTR protein significantly, by greater than 50%. This finding suggests that the two nucleotide binding folds of CFTR are functioning cooperatively in catalysis. However, the rate of channel gating was only significantly inhibited in one of these purified mutants, CFTRK1250A, suggesting that ATPase activity may not be tightly coupled to channel gating as previously hypothesized.

  3. Single-channel and whole-cell recordings of mitogen-regulated inward currents in human cloned helper T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, M; Goronzy, J; Weyand, C M; Gardner, P

    Cytoplasmic free Ca2+ [( Ca2+]i) appears to be an important signal for DNA synthesis in early stages of lymphocyte activation. In spite of many experimental studies which employ fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye to demonstrate an early increase of [Ca2+]i in T-lymphocytes after stimulation with lectins, specific antigens, and monoclonal antibodies to T-lymphocyte receptors, the mechanism responsible for the rise of [Ca2+]i is unknown. We have used the extracellular patch clamp technique to investigate this mechanism. Unitary inward currents, mediated by Ca2+ or Ba2+, were recorded in the membrane of T-lymphocytes. The inward current channel was characterized by a conductance of 7 pS and extrapolated reversal potential (Erev) 110 mV positive to resting potential (Vr). While gating kinetic parameters were not affected by membrane potential changes, the probability of channel opening markedly increased upon activation of the T-lymphocyte by the mitogenic lectin, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). PHA also evoked a cadmium-sensitive, inward Ba2+ current on whole-cell clamp. We suggest that this mitogen-regulated channel introduces Ca2+ into the cytoplasm upon activation and represents a new class of voltage-independent Ca2+ channels.

  4. Definitive Endoderm Formation from Plucked Human Hair-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and SK Channel Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Illing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells present an extraordinary powerful tool to investigate embryonic development in humans. Essentially, they provide a unique platform for dissecting the distinct mechanisms underlying pluripotency and subsequent lineage commitment. Modest information currently exists about the expression and the role of ion channels during human embryogenesis, organ development, and cell fate determination. Of note, small and intermediate conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels have been reported to modify stem cell behaviour and differentiation. These channels are broadly expressed throughout human tissues and are involved in various cellular processes, such as the after-hyperpolarization in excitable cells, and also in differentiation processes. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated from plucked human hair keratinocytes have been exploited in vitro to recapitulate endoderm formation and, concomitantly, used to map the expression of the SK channel (SKCa subtypes over time. Thus, we report the successful generation of definitive endoderm from hiPSCs of ectodermal origin using a highly reproducible and robust differentiation system. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence that SKCas subtypes are dynamically regulated in the transition from a pluripotent stem cell to a more lineage restricted, endodermal progeny.

  5. Science Signaling Podcast for 24 January 2017: Tissue-specific regulation of L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Johannes W; Navedo, Manuel F; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2017-01-24

    This Podcast features an interview with Johannes Hell and Manuel Navedo, senior authors of two Research Articles that appear in the 24 January 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about tissue-specific regulation of the L-type calcium channel CaV1.2. This channel is present in many tissues, including the heart, vasculature, and brain, and allows calcium to flow into cells when it is activated. Signaling through the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulates CaV1.2 activity in heart cells and neurons to accelerate heart rate and increase neuronal excitability, respectively. Using mouse models, Qian et al found that βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the brain required phosphorylation of Ser(1928), whereas βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the heart did not require phosphorylation of this residue. In a related study, Nystoriak et al demonstrated that phosphorylation of Ser(1928) in arterial myocytes was required for vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and in diabetic mice. These findings demonstrate tissue-specific differences in CaV1.2 regulation and suggest that it may be possible to design therapies to target this channel in specific tissues.Listen to Podcast.

  6. Functional KCa1.1 channels are crucial for regulating the proliferation, migration and differentiation of human primary skeletal myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajhya, Rajeev B; Hu, Xueyou; Tanner, Mark R; Huq, Redwan; Kongchan, Natee; Neilson, Joel R; Rodney, George G; Horrigan, Frank T; Timchenko, Lubov T; Beeton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Myoblasts are mononucleated precursors of myofibers; they persist in mature skeletal muscles for growth and regeneration post injury. During myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a complex autosomal-dominant neuromuscular disease, the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts into functional myotubes is impaired, resulting in muscle wasting and weakness. The mechanisms leading to this altered differentiation are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the calcium- and voltage-dependent potassium channel, KCa1.1 (BK, Slo1, KCNMA1), regulates myoblast proliferation, migration, and fusion. We also show a loss of plasma membrane expression of the pore-forming α subunit of KCa1.1 in DM1 myoblasts. Inhibiting the function of KCa1.1 in healthy myoblasts induced an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and altered nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) levels without affecting cell survival. In these normal cells, KCa1.1 block resulted in enhanced proliferation and decreased matrix metalloproteinase secretion, migration, and myotube fusion, phenotypes all observed in DM1 myoblasts and associated with disease pathogenesis. In contrast, introducing functional KCa1.1 α-subunits into DM1 myoblasts normalized their proliferation and rescued expression of the late myogenic marker Mef2. Our results identify KCa1.1 channels as crucial regulators of skeletal myogenesis and suggest these channels as novel therapeutic targets in DM1. PMID:27763639

  7. Neuronal actin dynamics, spine density and neuronal dendritic complexity are regulated by CAP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2gt/gt mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2gt/gt with increased number of excitatory synapse. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2gt/gt neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics.

  8. CALCIUM REGULATING HORMONES IN SERUM AND BONE MASS DENSITY IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜晓东; 黄忠; 胡映玉

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of calcium regulating hormones in serum and bone mass in patients with diabetes mellitus.Methods The levels of estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), total triiodthyronine (TT3), total thyroid hormone(TT4), parathyroid hormone (PTH-SP), calci-tonin (CT) were measured in serum of 227 patients with diabetes and 268 healthy controls by radioim-munoassay, and bone mass density (BMD) at lumbar vertebrae, hip, foream were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The subjects were divided into three age groups.Results T of male in three age subgroups of diabetes was significantly lower (P<0.01 or P<0.05) and PTH was significantly higher (P< 0.001 or P< 0.01) than that in controls. BMD at lumbar 3, lumbar 4 in diabetes was lower than that in controls but BMD at hip, foream was higher.Conclusion The level of T declines and PTH increases in diabetes. Bone mass loss mostly occurs at lumbar vertebrae in diabetes patients.

  9. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefeng Piao

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  10. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Tiefeng; Chun, Jung Hwa; Yang, Hee Moon; Cheon, Kwangil

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD) and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height) ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r) function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata) species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  11. Erosion and deposition by supercritical density flows during channel avulsion and backfilling: Field examples from coarse-grained deepwater channel-levée complexes (Sandino Forearc Basin, southern Central America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jörg; Brandes, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2017-03-01

    Erosion and deposition by supercritical density flows can strongly impact the facies distribution and architecture of submarine fans. Field examples from coarse-grained channel-levée complexes from the Sandino Forearc Basin (southern Central America) show that cyclic-step and antidune deposits represent common sedimentary facies of these depositional systems and relate to the different stages of avulsion, bypass, levée construction and channel backfilling. During channel avulsion, large-scale scour-fill complexes (18 to 29 m deep, 18 to 25 m wide, 60 to > 120 m long) were incised by supercritical density flows. The multi-storey infill of the large-scale scour-fill complexes comprises amalgamated massive, normally coarse-tail graded or widely spaced subhorizontally stratified conglomerates and pebbly sandstones, interpreted as deposits of the hydraulic-jump zone of cyclic steps. The large-scale scour-fill complexes can be distinguished from small-scale channel fills based on the preservation of a steep upper margin and a coarse-grained infill comprising mainly amalgamated hydraulic-jump zone deposits. Channel fills include repeated successions deposited by cyclic steps with superimposed antidunes. The deposits of the hydraulic-jump zone of cyclic steps comprise regularly spaced scours (0.2 to 2.6 m deep, 0.8 to 23 m long) infilled by intraclast-rich conglomerates or pebbly sandstones, displaying normal coarse-tail grading or backsets. These deposits are laterally and vertically associated with subhorizontally stratified, low-angle cross-stratified or sinusoidally stratified sandstones and pebbly sandstones, which were deposited by antidunes on the stoss side of the cyclic steps during flow re-acceleration. The field examples indicate that so-called spaced stratified deposits may commonly represent antidune deposits with varying stratification styles controlled by the aggradation rate, grain-size distribution and amalgamation. The deposits of small-scale cyclic

  12. Voltage-gated K(+) channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 regulate myogenic and neurogenic contractions of rat urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Muyan; Kellett, Whitney F; Petkov, Georgi V

    2010-07-01

    Members of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channel family are suggested to control the resting membrane potential and the repolarization phase of the action potential in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Recent studies report that stromatoxin-1, a peptide isolated from tarantulas, selectively inhibits K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, K(V)4.2, and K(V)2.1/9.3 channels. The objective of this study was to investigate whether K(V) channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 participate in the regulation of rat UBSM contractility and to identify their molecular fingerprints. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude, muscle force, and tone in isolated UBSM strips. However, stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) had no effect on the UBSM contractions induced by depolarizing agents such as KCl (20 mM) or carbachol (1 microM). This indicates that, under conditions of sustained membrane depolarization, the K(V) channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 have no further contribution to the membrane excitability and contractility. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions, suggesting also a role for these channels in neurogenic contractions. RT-PCR experiments on freshly isolated UBSM cells showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3, but not K(V)4.2 channel subunits. Protein expression of K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 channels was detected using Western blot and was further confirmed by immunocytochemical detection in freshly isolated UBSM cells. These novel findings indicate that K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2, but not K(V)4.2, channel subunits are expressed in rat UBSM and play a key role in opposing both myogenic and neurogenic UBSM contractions.

  13. SPAK and OSR1 Dependent Down-Regulation of Murine Renal Outer Medullary K+ Channel ROMK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Elvira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The kinases SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1 participate in the regulation of the NaCl cotransporter NCC and the Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter NKCC2. The kinases are regulated by WNK (with-no-K[Lys] kinases. Mutations of genes encoding WNK kinases underly Gordon's syndrome, a monogenic disease leading to hypertension and hyperkalemia. WNK kinases further regulate the renal outer medullary K+ channel ROMK1. The present study explored, whether SPAK and/or OSR1 have similarly the potential to modify the activity of ROMK1. Methods: ROMK1 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without additional expression of wild-type SPAK, constitutively active T233ESPAK, catalytically inactive D212ASPAK, wild-type OSR1, constitutively active T185EOSR1 and catalytically inactive D164AOSR1. Channel activity was determined utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp and ROMK1 protein abundance in the cell membrane utilizing chemiluminescence of ROMK1 containing an extracellular hemagglutinin epitope (ROMK1-HA. Results: ROMK1 activity and ROMK1-HA protein abundance were significantly down-regulated by wild-type SPAK and T233ESPAK, but not by D212ASPAK. Similarly, ROMK1 activity and ROMK1-HA protein abundance were significantly down-regulated by wild-type OSR1 and T185EOSR1, but not by D164AOSR1. Conclusion: ROMK1 protein abundance and activity are down-regulated by SPAK and OSR1.

  14. Malignant hyperthermia domain in the regulation of ca(2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzato, F; Ronjat, M; Treves, S

    1997-11-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a potentially lethal condition that is manifested in humans as an acute increase of body temperature in response to stress and exposure to volatile anaesthetics (halothane, enflurane) and muscle relaxants. To date, eight point mutations in the ryanodine receptor gene, the Ca(2+) release channel of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum, segregate with the MH phenotype, yet direct evidence linking altered [Ca(2+)](i) homeostasis to mutation in recombinant RYR has been obtained only for one such mutation. Most of these mutations appear in an "MH domain" that is localized at the NH(2) terminus of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel. In this review, we summarize the available data concerning the role of the MH domain in the altered functions of the ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:312-316). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  15. Regulation of gap junction channels by infectious agents and inflammation in the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eCastellano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are conglomerates of intercellular channels that connect the cytoplasm of two or more cells, and facilitate the transfer of second messengers, small peptides and RNA resulting in metabolic and electrical coordination. In general, loss of gap junctional communication (GJC has been associated with cellular damage and inflammation resulting in compromise of physiological functions. Recently, it has become evident that gap junction channels also play a critical role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and associated inflammation. Several pathogens use the transfer of intracellular signals through GJ channels to spread infection and toxic signals that amplify inflammation to neighboring cells. Thus, identification of the mechanisms by which several infectious agents alter GJC could result in new potential therapeutic approaches to reduce inflammation and their pathogenesis.

  16. PEDV ORF3 encodes an ion channel protein and regulates virus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Lu, Wei; Chen, Jianfei; Xie, Shiqi; Shi, Hongyan; Hsu, Haojen; Yu, Wenjing; Xu, Ke; Bian, Chao; Fischer, Wolfgang B; Schwarz, Wolfgang; Feng, Li; Sun, Bing

    2012-02-17

    Several studies suggest that the open reading frame 3 (ORF3) gene of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is related to viral infectivity and pathogenicity, but its function remains unknown. Here, we propose a structure model of the ORF3 protein consisting of four TM domains and forming a tetrameric assembly. ORF3 protein can be detected in PEDV-infected cells and it functions as an ion channel in both Xenopus laevis oocytes and yeast. Mutation analysis showed that Tyr170 in TM4 is important for potassium channel activity. Furthermore, viral production is reduced in infected Vero cells when ORF3 gene is silenced by siRNA. Interestingly, the ORF3 gene from an attenuated PEDV encodes a truncated protein with 49 nucleotide deletions, which lacks the ion channel activity.

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Inward-Rectifying K+ Channels in Conjunction with Stomatal Closure1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanatsiou, Maria; Scuffi, Denisse; Blatt, Michael R.; García-Mata, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third biological gasotransmitter, and in animals, it affects many physiological processes by modulating ion channels. H2S has been reported to protect plants from oxidative stress in diverse physiological responses. H2S closes stomata, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the selective inactivation of current carried by inward-rectifying K+ channels of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) guard cells and show its close parallel with stomatal closure evoked by submicromolar concentrations of H2S. Experiments to scavenge H2S suggested an effect that is separable from that of abscisic acid, which is associated with water stress. Thus, H2S seems to define a unique and unresolved signaling pathway that selectively targets inward-rectifying K+ channels. PMID:25770153

  18. Touch, Tension, and Transduction - The Function and Regulation of Piezo Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jason; Lewis, Amanda H; Grandl, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    In 2010, two proteins, Piezo1 and Piezo2, were identified as the long-sought molecular carriers of an excitatory mechanically activated current found in many cells. This discovery has opened the floodgates for studying a vast number of mechanotransduction processes. Over the past 6 years, groundbreaking research has identified Piezos as ion channels that sense light touch, proprioception, and vascular blood flow, ruled out roles for Piezos in several other mechanotransduction processes, and revealed the basic structural and functional properties of the channel. Here, we review these findings and discuss the many aspects of Piezo function that remain mysterious, including how Piezos convert a variety of mechanical stimuli into channel activation and subsequent inactivation, and what molecules and mechanisms modulate Piezo function.

  19. Hypoxia-induced 15-HETE enhances the constriction of internal carotid arteries by down-regulating potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanmei; Chen, Li; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Weizhi; Zhu, Daling; Zhu, Yulan

    2010-08-15

    Severe hypoxia induces the constriction of internal carotid arteries (ICA), which worsens ischemic stroke in the brain. A few metabolites are presumably involved in hypoxic vasoconstriction, however, less is known about how such molecules provoke this vasoconstriction. We have investigated the influence of 15-hydroxyeicosatetrienoic acid (15-HETE) produced by 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX) on vasoconstriction during hypoxia. As showed in our results, 15-LOX level increases in ICA endothelia and smooth muscles. 15-HETE enhances the tension of ICA ring in a dose-dependent manner, as well as attenuates the activities and expression of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv 1.5 and Kv 2.1). Therefore, the down-regulation of Kv channels by 15-HETE during hypoxia may weaken the repolarization of action potentials and causes a dominant influx of calcium ions to enhance smooth muscle tension and ICA constriction.

  20. Distribution of Water Channel Protein RWC3 and Its Regulation by GA and Sucrose in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNMei-Hao; ZHANGMin-Hua; LIUHong-Yan; LILe-Gong; YUXin; SUWei-Ai; TANGZhang-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    Water channel proteins facilitate water flux across cell membranes and play important roles in plant growth and development. By GUS histochemical assay in RWC3 promoter-GUS transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Shenxiangjin 4), one of the members of water channel proteins in rice, RWC3, was found to distribute widely in variety of organs, from vegetative and reproductive organs. Further studies showed that gibberellin (GA) enhanced the GUS activity in the transgenic calli, suspension cells and leaves, whereas ancymidol (anc), an inhibitor of GA synthesis, reduced the GUS activity. Sucrose was found to inhibit the effects induced by addition of GA, suggesting a possible cross-talk between GA and sucrose signaling on regulation of the RWC3 gene expression.

  1. Calcium homeostasis and cone signaling are regulated by interactions between calcium stores and plasma membrane ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Szikra

    Full Text Available Calcium is a messenger ion that controls all aspects of cone photoreceptor function, including synaptic release. The dynamic range of the cone output extends beyond the activation threshold for voltage-operated calcium entry, suggesting another calcium influx mechanism operates in cones hyperpolarized by light. We have used optical imaging and whole-cell voltage clamp to measure the contribution of store-operated Ca(2+ entry (SOCE to Ca(2+ homeostasis and its role in regulation of neurotransmission at cone synapses. Mn(2+ quenching of Fura-2 revealed sustained divalent cation entry in hyperpolarized cones. Ca(2+ influx into cone inner segments was potentiated by hyperpolarization, facilitated by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+ stores, unaffected by pharmacological manipulation of voltage-operated or cyclic nucleotide-gated Ca(2+ channels and suppressed by lanthanides, 2-APB, MRS 1845 and SKF 96365. However, cation influx through store-operated channels crossed the threshold for activation of voltage-operated Ca(2+ entry in a subset of cones, indicating that the operating range of inner segment signals is set by interactions between store- and voltage-operated Ca(2+ channels. Exposure to MRS 1845 resulted in approximately 40% reduction of light-evoked postsynaptic currents in photopic horizontal cells without affecting the light responses or voltage-operated Ca(2+ currents in simultaneously recorded cones. The spatial pattern of store-operated calcium entry in cones matched immunolocalization of the store-operated sensor STIM1. These findings show that store-operated channels regulate spatial and temporal properties of Ca(2+ homeostasis in vertebrate cones and demonstrate their role in generation of sustained excitatory signals across the first retinal synapse.

  2. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes.

  3. Inhibitors of arachidonate-regulated calcium channel signaling suppress triggered activity induced by the late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, Paul; Umeda, Patrick K; Sharifov, Oleg F; White, C Roger; Huang, Jian; Mahtani, Harry; Urthaler, Ferdinand

    2014-02-05

    Disturbances in myocyte calcium homeostasis are hypothesized to be one cause for cardiac arrhythmia. The full development of this hypothesis requires (i) the identification of all sources of arrhythmogenic calcium and (ii) an understanding of the mechanism(s) through which calcium initiates arrhythmia. To these ends we superfused rat left atria with the late sodium current activator type II Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATXII). This toxin prolonged atrial action potentials, induced early afterdepolarization, and provoked triggered activity. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 (N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphon-amide) suppressed ATXII triggered activity but its inactive congener KN-92 (2-[N-(4-methoxy benzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine) did not. Neither drug affected normal atrial contractility. Calcium entry via L-type channels or calcium leakage from sarcoplasmic reticulum stores are not critical for this type of ectopy as neither verapamil ((RS)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-{[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-(methyl)amino}-2-prop-2-ylpentanenitrile) nor ryanodine affected ATXII triggered activity. By contrast, inhibitors of the voltage independent arachidonate-regulated calcium (ARC) channel and the store-operated calcium channel specifically suppressed ATXII triggered activity without normalizing action potentials or affecting atrial contractility. Inhibitors of cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 also suppressed triggered activity suggesting that this lipase, which generates free arachidonate, plays a key role in ATXII ectopy. Thus, increased left atrial late sodium current appears to activate atrial Orai-linked ARC and store operated calcium channels, and these voltage-independent channels may be unexpected sources for the arrhythmogenic calcium that underlies triggered activity.

  4. Differential regulation of proton-sensitive ion channels by phospholipids: a comparative study between ASICs and TRPV1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Jin Kweon

    Full Text Available Protons are released in pain-generating pathological conditions such as inflammation, ischemic stroke, infection, and cancer. During normal synaptic activities, protons are thought to play a role in neurotransmission processes. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are typical proton sensors in the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS. In addition to ASICs, capsaicin- and heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 channels can also mediate proton-mediated pain signaling. In spite of their importance in perception of pH fluctuations, the regulatory mechanisms of these proton-sensitive ion channels still need to be further investigated. Here, we compared regulation of ASICs and TRPV1 by membrane phosphoinositides, which are general cofactors of many receptors and ion channels. We observed that ASICs do not require membrane phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4P or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2 for their function. However, TRPV1 currents were inhibited by simultaneous breakdown of PI(4P and PI(4,5P2. By using a novel chimeric protein, CF-PTEN, that can specifically dephosphorylate at the D3 position of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P3, we also observed that neither ASICs nor TRPV1 activities were altered by depletion of PI(3,4,5P3 in intact cells. Finally, we compared the effects of arachidonic acid (AA on two proton-sensitive ion channels. We observed that AA potentiates the currents of both ASICs and TRPV1, but that they have different recovery aspects. In conclusion, ASICs and TRPV1 have different sensitivities toward membrane phospholipids, such as PI(4P, PI(4,5P2, and AA, although they have common roles as proton sensors. Further investigation about the complementary roles and respective contributions of ASICs and TRPV1 in proton-mediated signaling is necessary.

  5. Regulating effect of TongXie-YaoFang on colonic epithelial secretion via Cl- and HCO3- channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Sheng-Sheng; An, Fang-Mei; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Qing-Lin; Zhan, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the pharmacological effect of TongXie-YaoFang (TXYF) formula, a Chinese herbal formula, on Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS) rats. METHODS In a neonatal maternal separation plus restraint stress (NMS + RS) model of D-IBS, male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups (NMS + RS group and TXYF-formula group) with no handlings were used as controls (NH group). Starting from postnatal day 60, rats in TXYF-formula group were administered TXYF-formula (4.92 g/100 g bodyweight) orally twice a day for 14 consecutive days while NH group and NMS + RS group were given distilled water. Using short-circuit current technology, we observed 5-HT-induced changes of current across ion channels, such as cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel, epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), Ca2+-dependent Cl- channel (CACC), Na+-K+-2Cl- co-transporter (NKCC), and Na+-HCO3- co-transporter (NBC), in the colonic epithelium of three groups after exposure to drugs and specific blockers with a Power Lab System (AD Instruments International). RESULTS Under basal conditions, the changes of short-circuit current (∆Isc, µA/cm2) induced by 5-HT were similar in NH group and TXYF-formula group, and both higher than NMS + RS group (70.86 µA/cm2 ± 12.32 µA/cm2, 67.67 µA/cm2 ± 11.68 µA/cm2 vs 38.8 µA/cm2 ± 7.25 µA/cm2, P CFTR Cl- channel was blocked by 1,1-dimethyl piperidinium chloride (DPC), 5-HT-induced ∆Isc did not significantly differ in three groups (42.28 µA/cm2 ± 10.61 µA/cm2 vs 51.48 µA/cm2 ± 6.56 µA/cm2 vs 47.75 µA/cm2 ± 7.99 µA/cm2, P > 0.05, respectively). The similar results could also be obtained in three groups when NBC and NKCC were respectively blocked by their blockers. CONCLUSION TXYF-formula can regulate the Cl- and HCO3- secretion of colonic mucosa via CFTR Cl- channel, Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, NBC and NKCC co-transporters. PMID:28082810

  6. Role of KATP channels in the regulation of rat dura and pia artery diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gozalov, A.; Petersen, K.A.; Mortensen, C.;

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of K(ATP) channel openers pinacidil and levcromakalim on rat dural and pial arteries as well as their inhibition by glibenclamide. We used an in-vivo genuine closed cranial window model and an in-vitro organ bath. Glibenclamide alone reduced ...

  7. Conduction velocity is regulated by sodium channel inactivation in unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2008-02-15

    Axonal conduction velocity varies according to the level of preceding impulse activity. In unmyelinated axons this typically results in a slowing of conduction velocity and a parallel increase in threshold. It is currently held that Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-dependent axonal hyperpolarization is responsible for this slowing but this has long been equivocal. We therefore examined conduction velocity changes during repetitive activation of single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges. In direct contradiction to the currently accepted postulate, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blockade actually enhanced activity-induced conduction velocity slowing, while the degree of velocity slowing was curtailed in the presence of lidocaine (10-300 microm) and carbamazepine (30-500 microm) but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-80 nm). This suggests that a change in the number of available sodium channels is the most prominent factor responsible for activity-induced changes in conduction velocity in unmyelinated axons. At moderate stimulus frequencies, axonal conduction velocity is determined by an interaction between residual sodium channel inactivation following each impulse and the retrieval of channels from inactivation by a concomitant Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-mediated hyperpolarization. Since the process is primarily dependent upon sodium channel availability, tracking conduction velocity provides a means of accessing relative changes in the excitability of nociceptive neurons.

  8. Insight into the molecular regulation of the epithelial magnesium channel TRPM6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, G.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent studies have greatly increased our knowledge concerning the molecular mechanisms of renal magnesium handling. This review highlights the functional features of the newly identified transient receptor potential channel melastatin subtype 6 (TRPM6), which forms the gatekeeper

  9. TRPC1 regulates calcium-activated chloride channels in salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuyang; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Singh, Brij B

    2015-11-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) plays an important role in modulating epithelial secretion. It has been suggested that in salivary tissues, sustained fluid secretion is dependent on Ca(2+) influx that activates ion channels such as CaCC to initiate Cl(-) efflux. However direct evidence as well as the molecular identity of the Ca(2+) channel responsible for activating CaCC in salivary tissues is not yet identified. Here we provide evidence that in human salivary cells, an outward rectifying Cl(-) current was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)]i, which was inhibited by the addition of pharmacological agents niflumic acid (NFA), an antagonist of CaCC, or T16Ainh-A01, a specific TMEM16a inhibitor. Addition of thapsigargin (Tg), that induces store-depletion and activates TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+) entry, potentiated the Cl(-) current, which was inhibited by the addition of a non-specific TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 or removal of external Ca(2+). Stimulation with Tg also increased plasma membrane expression of TMEM16a protein, which was also dependent on Ca(2+) entry. Importantly, in salivary cells, TRPC1 silencing, but not that of TRPC3, inhibited CaCC especially upon store depletion. Moreover, primary acinar cells isolated from submandibular gland also showed outward rectifying Cl(-) currents upon increasing [Ca(2+)]i. These Cl(-) currents were again potentiated with the addition of Tg, but inhibited in the presence of T16Ainh-A01. Finally, acinar cells isolated from the submandibular glands of TRPC1 knockout mice showed significant inhibition of the outward Cl(-) currents without decreasing TMEM16a expression. Together the data suggests that Ca(2+) entry via the TRPC1 channels is essential for the activation of CaCC.

  10. Differential regulation of voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels in human B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partiseti, M; Choquet, D; Diu, A; Korn, H

    1992-06-01

    The expression and characteristics of K+ channels of human B lymphocytes were studied by using single and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. They were gated by depolarization (voltage-gated potassium current, IKv, 11-20 pS) and by an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (calcium-activated potassium current, IKCa, 26 pS), respectively. The level of expression of these channels was correlated with the activational status of the cell. Both conductances are blocked by tetraethylammonium, verapamil, and charybdotoxin, and are insensitive to apamin; 4-aminopyridine blocks IK, preferentially. We used a protein kinase C activator (PMA) or antibodies to membrane Ig (anti-mu) to activate resting splenocytes in culture. Although IKv was recorded in the majority of the resting lymphocytic population, less than 20% of the activated cells expressed this conductance. However, in this subset the magnitude of IKv was 20-fold larger than in resting cells. On the other hand, IKCa was detected in nearly one half of the resting cells, whereas all activated cells expressed this current. The magnitude of IKCa was, on average, 30 times larger in activated than in nonactivated cells. These results probably reflect that during the course of activation 1) the number of voltage-dependent K+ channels per cell decreases and increases in a small subset and 2) the number of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels per cell increases in all cells. We suggest that the expression of functional Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K+ channels are under the control of different regulatory signals.

  11. Src family protein tyrosine kinase regulates the basolateral K channel in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) by phosphorylation of KCNJ10 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengbiao; Wang, Lijun; Thomas, Sherin; Wang, Kemeng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Rinehart, Jesse; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-09-01

    The loss of function of the basolateral K channels in the distal nephron causes electrolyte imbalance. The aim of this study is to examine the role of Src family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in regulating K channels in the basolateral membrane of the mouse initial distal convoluted tubule (DCT1). Single-channel recordings confirmed that the 40-picosiemen (pS) K channel was the only type of K channel in the basolateral membrane of DCT1. The suppression of SFK reversibly inhibited the basolateral 40-pS K channel activity in cell-attached patches and decreased the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K currents in DCT1. Inhibition of SFK also shifted the K reversal potential from -65 to -43 mV, suggesting a role of SFK in determining the membrane potential in DCT1. Western blot analysis showed that KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a key component of the basolateral 40-pS K channel in DCT1, was a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. LC/MS analysis further confirmed that SFK phosphorylated KCNJ10 at Tyr(8) and Tyr(9). The single-channel recording detected the activity of a 19-pS K channel in KCNJ10-transfected HEK293T cells and a 40-pS K channel in the cells transfected with KCNJ10+KCNJ16 (Kir.5.1) that form a heterotetramer in the basolateral membrane of the DCT. Mutation of Tyr(9) did not alter the channel conductance of the homotetramer and heterotetramer. However, it decreased the whole-cell K currents, the probability of finding K channels, and surface expression of KCNJ10 in comparison to WT KCNJ10. We conclude that SFK stimulates the basolateral K channel activity in DCT1, at least partially, by phosphorylating Tyr(9) on KCNJ10. We speculate that the modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of KCNJ10 should play a role in regulating membrane transport function in DCT1.

  12. Regulation of ClC-1 and KATP channels in action potential-firing fast-twitch muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; de Paoli, Frank Vinzenco; Flatman, John A; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2009-10-01

    Action potential (AP) excitation requires a transient dominance of depolarizing membrane currents over the repolarizing membrane currents that stabilize the resting membrane potential. Such stabilizing currents, in turn, depend on passive membrane conductance (G(m)), which in skeletal muscle fibers covers membrane conductances for K(+) (G(K)) and Cl(-) (G(Cl)). Myotonic disorders and studies with metabolically poisoned muscle have revealed capacities of G(K) and G(Cl) to inversely interfere with muscle excitability. However, whether regulation of G(K) and G(Cl) occur in AP-firing muscle under normal physiological conditions is unknown. This study establishes a technique that allows the determination of G(Cl) and G(K) with a temporal resolution of seconds in AP-firing muscle fibers. With this approach, we have identified and quantified a biphasic regulation of G(m) in active fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus fibers of the rat. Thus, at the onset of AP firing, a reduction in G(Cl) of approximately 70% caused G(m) to decline by approximately 55% in a manner that is well described by a single exponential function characterized by a time constant of approximately 200 APs (phase 1). When stimulation was continued beyond approximately 1,800 APs, synchronized elevations in G(K) ( approximately 14-fold) and G(Cl) ( approximately 3-fold) caused G(m) to rise sigmoidally to approximately 400% of its level before AP firing (phase 2). Phase 2 was often associated with a failure to excite APs. When AP firing was ceased during phase 2, G(m) recovered to its level before AP firing in approximately 1 min. Experiments with glibenclamide (K(ATP) channel inhibitor) and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (ClC-1 Cl(-) channel inhibitor) revealed that the decreased G(m) during phase 1 reflected ClC-1 channel inhibition, whereas the massively elevated G(m) during phase 2 reflected synchronized openings of ClC-1 and K(ATP) channels. In conclusion, G(Cl) and G(K) are acutely regulated in AP

  13. Regulation of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Kv1.5 by the Janus Kinase JAK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Jamshed; Elvira, Bernat; Bissinger, Rosi; Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Lang, Florian

    2015-12-01

    The tyrosine kinase Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) participates in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. The kinase further influences ion channels and transport proteins. The present study explored whether JAK3 contributes to the regulation of the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv1.5, which participates in the regulation of diverse functions including atrial cardiac action potential and tumor cell proliferation. To this end, cRNA encoding Kv1.5 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type JAK3, constitutively active (A568V)JAK3, or inactive (K851A)JAK3. Voltage-gated K(+) channel activity was measured utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp, and Kv1.5 channel protein abundance in the cell membrane was quantified utilizing chemiluminescence of Kv1.5 containing an extracellular hemagglutinin epitope (Kv1.5-HA). As a result, Kv1.5 activity and Kv1.5-HA protein abundance were significantly decreased by wild-type JAK3 and (A568V)JAK3, but not by (K851A)JAK3. Inhibition of Kv1.5 protein insertion into the cell membrane by brefeldin A (5 μM) resulted in a decline of the voltage-gated current, which was similar in the absence and presence of (A568V)JAK3, suggesting that (A568V)JAK3 did not accelerate Kv1.5 protein retrieval from the cell membrane. A 24 h treatment with ouabain (100 µM) significantly decreased the voltage-gated current in oocytes expressing Kv1.5 without or with (A568V)JAK3 and dissipated the difference between oocytes expressing Kv1.5 alone and oocytes expressing Kv1.5 with (A568V)JAK3. In conclusion, JAK3 contributes to the regulation of membrane Kv1.5 protein abundance and activity, an effect sensitive to ouabain and thus possibly involving Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity.

  14. Swelling-activated ion channels: functional regulation in cell-swelling, proliferation and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stutzin, A; Hoffmann, E K

    2006-01-01

    Cell volume regulation is one of the most fundamental homeostatic mechanisms and essential for normal cellular function. At the same time, however, many physiological mechanisms are associated with regulatory changes in cell size meaning that the set point for cell volume regulation is under phys...... as key players in the maintenance of normal steady-state cell volume, with particular emphasis on the intracellular signalling pathways responsible for their regulation during hypotonic stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis....

  15. Regulation of voltage-gated ion channels in excitable cells by the ubiquitin ligases Nedd4 and Nedd4-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, Daria; Schuetz, Friderike; Poronnik, Philip; Adams, David J

    2011-01-01

    The electrical excitability of neurons is mediated primarily by voltage-gated ion channels, particularly voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(v)), K(+) (K(v)) and Cl(-) (ClC) channels. Cells regulate their electrical excitability by controlling not only the activity, but also the number of individual ion channels in the plasma membrane. There exist several mechanisms for regulating levels of voltage-gated ion channels: transcription and translation, retention and export from the endoplasmic reticulum as well as insertion and retrieval from the plasma membrane. Alterations in voltage-gated ion channel activity, composition and distribution can contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, hypertension, neuropathic and inflammatory pain. One mechanism for retrieval is ubiquitination. Here specific ubiquitin ligases bind to membrane proteins to modulate and regulate their cellular fate. In this review, we focus on Nedd4 and Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligases and the mechanisms by which they regulate voltage-gated ion channels and describe a novel paradigm on the mechanisms that underpin aberrant ion channel function in neurological disorders.

  16. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  17. mRNA Expression of Ion Channels in GnRH Neurons: Subtype-Specific Regulation by 17β-Estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Martha A.; Tonsfeldt, Karen J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Burst firing of neurons optimizes neurotransmitter release. GnRH neurons exhibit burst firing activity and T-type calcium channels, which are vital for burst firing activity, are regulated by 17β-estradiol (E2) in GnRH neurons. To further elucidate ion channel expression and E2 regulation during positive and negative feedback on GnRH neurosecretion, we used single cell RT-PCR and real-time qPCR to quantify channel mRNA expression in GnRH neurons. GFP-GnRH neurons expressed numerous ion channels important for burst firing activity. E2-treatment sufficient to induce an LH surge increased mRNA expression of HCN1 channels, which underlie the pacemaker current, the calcium-permeable CaV1.3, CaV2.2, CaV2.3 channels, and TRPC4 channels, which mediate the kisspeptin excitatory response. E2 also decreased mRNA expression of SK3 channels underlying the medium AHP current. Therefore, E2 exerts fundamental changes in ion channel expression in GnRH neurons, to prime them to respond to incoming stimuli with increased excitability at the time of the surge. PMID:23305677

  18. Regulation of neuronal high-voltage activated Ca(V)2 Ca(2+) channels by the small GTPase RhoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Matthieu; Cens, Thierry; Menard, Claudine; Bowerman, Melissa; Bellis, Michel; Brusés, Juan; Raoul, Cedric; Scamps, Frédérique; Charnet, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    High-Voltage-Activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels are known regulators of synapse formation and transmission and play fundamental roles in neuronal pathophysiology. Small GTPases of Rho and RGK families, via their action on both cytoskeleton and Ca(2+) channels are key molecules for these processes. While the effects of RGK GTPases on neuronal HVA Ca(2+) channels have been widely studied, the effects of RhoA on the HVA channels remains however elusive. Using heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we show that RhoA activity reduces Ba(2+) currents through CaV2.1, CaV2.2 and CaV2.3 Ca(2+) channels independently of CaVβ subunit. This inhibition occurs independently of RGKs activity and without modification of biophysical properties and global level of expression of the channel subunit. Instead, we observed a marked decrease in the number of active channels at the plasma membrane. Pharmacological and expression studies suggest that channel expression at the plasma membrane is impaired via a ROCK-sensitive pathway. Expression of constitutively active RhoA in primary culture of spinal motoneurons also drastically reduced HVA Ca(2+) current amplitude. Altogether our data revealed that HVA Ca(2+) channels regulation by RhoA might govern synaptic transmission during development and potentially contribute to pathophysiological processes when axon regeneration and growth cone kinetics are impaired.

  19. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.;

    2010-01-01

    Membrane protein function is regulated by the host lipid bilayer composition. This regulation may depend on specific chemical interactions between proteins and individual molecules in the bilayer, as well as on non-specific interactions between proteins and the bilayer behaving as a physical entity...... with collective physical properties (e.g. thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature or elastic moduli). Studies in physico-chemical model systems have demonstrated that changes in bilayer physical properties can regulate membrane protein function by altering the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation associated...... physical properties. This advance is because of the introduction of new tools for studying lipid bilayer regulation of protein function. The present review provides an introduction to the regulation of membrane protein function by the bilayer physical properties. We further describe the use of gramicidin...

  20. Functional analysis of metabolic channeling and regulation in lignin biosynthesis: a computational approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Lee

    Full Text Available Lignin is a polymer in secondary cell walls of plants that is known to have negative impacts on forage digestibility, pulping efficiency, and sugar release from cellulosic biomass. While targeted modifications of different lignin biosynthetic enzymes have permitted the generation of transgenic plants with desirable traits, such as improved digestibility or reduced recalcitrance to saccharification, some of the engineered plants exhibit monomer compositions that are clearly at odds with the expected outcomes when the biosynthetic pathway is perturbed. In Medicago, such discrepancies were partly reconciled by the recent finding that certain biosynthetic enzymes may be spatially organized into two independent channels for the synthesis of guaiacyl (G and syringyl (S lignin monomers. Nevertheless, the mechanistic details, as well as the biological function of these interactions, remain unclear. To decipher the working principles of this and similar control mechanisms, we propose and employ here a novel computational approach that permits an expedient and exhaustive assessment of hundreds of minimal designs that could arise in vivo. Interestingly, this comparative analysis not only helps distinguish two most parsimonious mechanisms of crosstalk between the two channels by formulating a targeted and readily testable hypothesis, but also suggests that the G lignin-specific channel is more important for proper functioning than the S lignin-specific channel. While the proposed strategy of analysis in this article is tightly focused on lignin synthesis, it is likely to be of similar utility in extracting unbiased information in a variety of situations, where the spatial organization of molecular components is critical for coordinating the flow of cellular information, and where initially various control designs seem equally valid.

  1. The Mechanosensory Ca2+ Channel as a Central Regulator of Prostate Tumor Cell Migration and Invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    hamster ovary (CHO) and sf9 cells enhanced SOC currents (Zitt et al., 1996). However, a subsequent study indicated hTRPC1 expression in sf9 cells induced...Zhu et al. 1995); initial heterologous expression of human TRPC1 in CHO and sf9 cells showed enhanced SOC currents (Zitt et al. 1996). However, a...subsequent study indicated that hTRPC1 expression in sf9 cells induced a constitutively active nonselective cation channel that was not sensitive to

  2. Sulphonic acid derivatives as probes of pore properties of volume-regulated anion channels in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droogmans, G; Maertens, C; Prenen, J; Nilius, B

    1999-09-01

    1. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the effects of 4-sulphonic-calixarenes and some other poly-sulphonic acid agents, such as suramin and basilen blue, on volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) currents in cultured endothelial cells (CPAE cells). 2. The 4-sulphonic-calixarenes induced a fast inhibition at positive potentials but were ineffective at negative potentials. At small positive potentials, 4-sulphonic-calix[4]arene was a more effective inhibitor than 4-sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene, which became more effective at more positive potentials. 3. Also suramin and basilen blue induced a voltage dependent current inhibition, reaching a maximum around +40 mV and declining at more positive potentials. 4. The voltage dependence of inhibition was modelled by assuming that these negatively charged molecules bind to a site inside VRAC that senses a fraction delta of the applied electrical field, ranging beween 0.16 to 0.32. 4-Sulphonic-calix[4]arene, suramin and basilen blue bind and occlude VRAC at moderate potentials, but permeate the channel at more positive potentials. 4-Sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene however do not permeate the channel. From the structural information of the calixarenes, we estimate a lower and upper limit of 11*12 and 17*12 A2 respectively for the cross-sectional area of the pore.

  3. The Ca2+-activated cation channel TRPM4 is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilius, Bernd; Mahieu, Frank; Prenen, Jean; Janssens, Annelies; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Vennekens, Rudi; Voets, Thomas

    2006-02-08

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel, melastatin subfamily (TRPM)4 is a Ca2+-activated monovalent cation channel that depolarizes the plasma membrane and thereby modulates Ca2+ influx through Ca2+-permeable pathways. A typical feature of TRPM4 is its rapid desensitization to intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Here we show that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) counteracts desensitization to [Ca2+]i in inside-out patches and rundown of TRPM4 currents in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments. PIP2 shifted the voltage dependence of TRPM4 activation towards negative potentials and increased the channel's Ca2+ sensitivity 100-fold. Conversely, activation of the phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled M1 muscarinic receptor or pharmacological depletion of cellular PIP2 potently inhibited currents through TRPM4. Neutralization of basic residues in a C-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain accelerated TRPM4 current desensitization and strongly attenuated the effect of PIP2, whereas mutations to the C-terminal TRP box and TRP domain had no effect on the PIP2 sensitivity. Our data demonstrate that PIP2 is a strong positive modulator of TRPM4, and implicate the C-terminal PH domain in PIP2 action. PLC-mediated PIP2 breakdown may constitute a physiologically important brake on TRPM4 activity.

  4. BK Channels Alleviate Lysosomal Storage Diseases by Providing Positive Feedback Regulation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhu; Toro, Ligia; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2015-05-26

    Promoting lysosomal trafficking represents a promising therapeutic approach for lysosome storage diseases. Efficient Ca(2+) mobilization from lysosomes is important for lysosomal trafficking. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes could generate a negative potential in the lumen to disturb subsequent Ca(2+) release in the absence of counter ion flux. Here we report that lysosomes express big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels that form physical and functional coupling with the lysosomal Ca(2+) release channel, TRPML1. Ca(2+) release via TRPML1 causes BK activation, which in turn facilitates further lysosomal Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Importantly, BK overexpression rescues the impaired TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and abnormal lysosomal storage in cells from Niemann-Pick C1 patients. Therefore, we have identified a lysosomal K(+) channel that provides a positive feedback mechanism to facilitate TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Our findings suggest that upregulating BK may be a potential therapeutic strategy for certain lysosomal storage diseases and common neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Density-dependent nerve growth factor regulation of Gs-alpha RNA in pheochromocytoma 12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, G; Aguanno, A; Kumar, R; Benincasa, D; Gubits, R M; Yu, H; Dolan, K P

    1990-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) affects levels of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gs-alpha) in pheochromocytoma 12 cells in a bidirectional, density-dependent manner. Cells grown at high density responded to NGF treatment with increased levels of Gs-alpha mRNA and protein. Conversely, in cells grown in low-density cultures, levels of this mRNA were lowered by NGF treatment. Images PMID:2160599

  6. p.D1690N sodium voltage-gated channel α subunit 5 mutation reduced sodium current density and is associated with Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhipeng; Xie, Qiang; Huang, Yuan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Weihua; Huang, Zhengrong

    2016-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited primary arrhythmia disorder, leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia, but does not exhibit clinical cardiac abnormalities. The sodium voltage-gated channel α subunit 5 (SCN5A) gene, which encodes the α subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5, is the most common pathogenic gene, although ≥22 BrS‑susceptibility genes have previously been identified. In the present study, a novel genetic variant (p.D1690N) localized in the S5‑S6 linker of domain IV of the Nav1.5 channels was identified in a Chinese Han family. Wild‑type (WT) and p.D1690N Nav1.5 channels were transiently over‑expressed in HEK293 cells and analyzed via the whole-cell patch clamp technique. The p.D1690N mutation significantly reduced the peak sodium current density to 23% of WT (at ‑20 mV; P<0.01), shifted steady‑state activation by 7 mV to increasingly positive potentials (P<0.01). Furthermore, prolonging of the recovery from inactivation was observed in the p.D1690N mutant. No significant change was identified in steady‑state inactivation. Thus, the mutant‑induced changes contributed to the loss of function of Nav1.5 channels, which indicates that the p.D1690N variant may have a pathogenic role in BrS.

  7. MiR-101 and miR-144 regulate the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Fatemat; Nuovo, Gerard J; Crawford, Melissa; Boyaka, Prosper N; Kirkby, Stephen; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that plays a critical role in the lung by maintaining fluid homeostasis. Absence or malfunction of CFTR leads to Cystic Fibrosis, a disease characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. We recently reported that air pollutants such as cigarette smoke and cadmium negatively regulate the expression of CFTR by affecting several steps in the biogenesis of CFTR protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently received a great deal of attention as both biomarkers and therapeutics due to their ability to regulate multiple genes. Here, we show that cigarette smoke and cadmium up-regulate the expression of two miRNAs (miR-101 and miR-144) that are predicted to target CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells. When premature miR-101 and miR-144 were transfected in human airway epithelial cells, they directly targeted the CFTR 3'UTR and suppressed the expression of the CFTR protein. Since miR-101 was highly up-regulated by cigarette smoke in vitro, we investigated whether such increase also occurred in vivo. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks demonstrated an up-regulation of miR-101 and suppression of CFTR protein in their lungs. Finally, we show that miR-101 is highly expressed in lung samples from patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when compared to control patients. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic cigarette smoking up-regulates miR-101 and that this miRNA could contribute to suppression of CFTR in the lungs of COPD patients.

  8. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K~+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷强; 花宝光; 郭玉海; 娄成后

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%. However, if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  9. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%.However,if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  10. A Putative Calcium-Permeable Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel, CNGC18, Regulates Polarized Pollen Tube Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A tip-focused Ca2+ gradient is tightly coupled to polarized pollen tube growth, and tip-localized influxes of extracellular Ca2+ are required for this process. However the molecular identity and regulation of the potential Ca2+ channels remains elusive.The present study has implicated CNGC18 (cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 18) in polarized pollen tube growth, because its overexpression induced wider and shorter pollen tubes. Moreover, CNGC18 overexpression induced depolarization of pollen tube growth was suppressed by lower extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]ex). CNGC18-yellow fluorescence protein (YFP)was preferentially localized to the apparent post-Golgi vesicles and the plasma membrane (PM) in the apex of pollen tubes.The PM localization was affected by tip-localized ROP1 signaling. Expression of wild type ROP1 or an active form of ROP1enhanced CNGC18-YFP localization to the apical region of the PM, whereas expression of RopGAP1 (a ROP1 deactivator)blocked the PM localization. These results support a role for PM-localized CNGC18 in the regulation of polarized pollen tube growth through Its potential function in the modulation of calcium influxes.

  11. Continuous allosteric regulation of a viral packaging motor by a sensor that detects the density and conformation of packaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndsen, Zachary T; Keller, Nicholas; Smith, Douglas E

    2015-01-20

    We report evidence for an unconventional type of allosteric regulation of a biomotor. We show that the genome-packaging motor of phage ϕ29 is regulated by a sensor that detects the density and conformation of the DNA packaged inside the viral capsid, and slows the motor by a mechanism distinct from the effect of a direct load force on the motor. Specifically, we show that motor-ATP interactions are regulated by a signal that is propagated allosterically from inside the viral shell to the motor mounted on the outside. This signal continuously regulates the motor speed and pausing in response to changes in either density or conformation of the packaged DNA, and slows the motor before the buildup of large forces resisting DNA confinement. Analysis of motor slipping reveals that the force resisting packaging remains low (<1 pN) until ∼ 70% and then rises sharply to ∼ 23 pN at high filling, which is a several-fold lower value than was previously estimated under the assumption that force alone slows the motor. These findings are consistent with recent studies of the stepping kinetics of the motor. The allosteric regulatory mechanism we report allows double-stranded DNA viruses to achieve rapid, high-density packing of their genomes by limiting the buildup of nonequilibrium load forces on the motor.

  12. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  13. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Chia-Yu Huang

    Full Text Available In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  14. Serum response factor regulates smooth muscle contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinases and L-type calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Young; Park, Chanjae; Ha, Se Eun; Park, Paul J.; Berent, Robyn M.; Jorgensen, Brian G.; Corrigan, Robert D.; Grainger, Nathan; Blair, Peter J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Miano, Joseph M.; Ward, Sean M.; Smith, Terence K.; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2017-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) transcriptionally regulates expression of contractile genes in smooth muscle cells (SMC). Lack or decrease of SRF is directly linked to a phenotypic change of SMC, leading to hypomotility of smooth muscle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, the molecular mechanism behind SRF-induced hypomotility in GI smooth muscle is largely unknown. We describe here how SRF plays a functional role in the regulation of the SMC contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and L-type calcium channel CACNA1C. GI SMC expressed Dmpk and Cacna1c genes into multiple alternative transcriptional isoforms. Deficiency of SRF in SMC of Srf knockout (KO) mice led to reduction of SRF-dependent DMPK, which down-regulated the expression of CACNA1C. Reduction of CACNA1C in KO SMC not only decreased intracellular Ca2+ spikes but also disrupted their coupling between cells resulting in decreased contractility. The role of SRF in the regulation of SMC phenotype and function provides new insight into how SMC lose their contractility leading to hypomotility in pathophysiological conditions within the GI tract. PMID:28152551

  15. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  16. Interactions among forest age, valley and channel morphology, and log jams regulate animal production in mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, D. M.; Venarsky, M. P.; Hall, R. O., Jr.; Herdrich, A.; Livers, B.; Winkelman, D.; Wohl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Forest age and local valley morphometry strongly influence the form and function of mountain streams in Colorado. Streams in valleys with old growth forest (>350 years) have extensive log jam complexes that create multi-thread channel reaches with extensive pool habitat and large depositional areas. Streams in younger unmanaged forests (e.g., 120 years old) and intensively managed forests have much fewer log jams and lower wood loads. These are single-thread streams dominated by riffles and with little depositional habitat. We hypothesized that log jam streams would retain more organic matter and have higher metabolism, leading to greater production of stream macroinvertebrates and trout. Log jam reaches should also have greater emergence of adult aquatic insects, and consequently have higher densities of riparian spiders taking advantage of these prey. Surficial organic matter was 3-fold higher in old-growth streams, and these streams had much higher ecosystem respiration. Insect production (g m2 y-1) was similar among forest types, but fish density was four times higher in old-growth streams with copious log jams. However, at the valley scale, insect production (g m-1 valley-1) and trout density (number m-1 valley-1) was 2-fold and 10-fold higher, respectively, in old growth streams. This finding is because multi-thread reaches created by log jams have much greater stream area and stream length per meter of valley than single-thread channels. The more limited response of macroinvertebrates may be related to fish predation. Trout in old growth streams had similar growth rates and higher fat content than fish in other streams in spite of occurring at higher densities and higher elevation/colder temperatures. This suggests that the positive fish effect observed in old growth streams is related to greater availability of invertebrate prey, which is consistent with our original hypothesis. Preliminary analyses suggest that spider densities do not respond strongly to

  17. Regulation by L channels of Ca(2+)-evoked secretory responses in ouabain-treated chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascual, Ricardo; Colmena, Inés; Ruiz-Pascual, Lucía; Baraibar, Andrés Mateo; Egea, Javier; Gandía, Luis; García, Antonio G

    2016-10-01

    It is known that the sustained depolarisation of adrenal medullary bovine chromaffin cells (BCCs) with high K(+) concentrations produces an initial sharp catecholamine release that subsequently fades off in spite depolarisation persists. Here, we have recreated a sustained depolarisation condition of BCCs by treating them with the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase blocker ouabain; in doing so, we searched experimental conditions that permitted the development of a sustained long-term catecholamine release response that could be relevant during prolonged stress. BCCs were perifused with nominal 0Ca(2+) solution, and secretion responses were elicited by intermittent application of short 2Ca(2+) pulses (Krebs-HEPES containing 2 mM Ca(2+)). These pulses elicited a biphasic secretory pattern with an initial 30-min period with secretory responses of increasing amplitude and a second 30-min period with steady-state, non-inactivating responses. The initial phase was not due to gradual depolarisation neither to gradual increases of the cytosolic calcium transients ([Ca(2+)]c) elicited by 2Ca(2+) pulses in BBCs exposed to ouabain; both parameters increased soon after ouabain addition. Νifedipine blocked these responses, and FPL64176 potentiated them, suggesting that they were triggered by Ca(2+) entry through non-inactivating L-type calcium channels. This was corroborated by nifedipine-evoked blockade of the L-type Ca(2+) channel current and the [Ca(2+)]c transients elicited by 2Ca(2+) pulses. Furthermore, the plasmalemmal Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) blocker SEA0400 caused a mild inhibition followed by a large rebound increase of the steady-state secretory responses. We conclude that these two phases of secretion are mostly contributed by Ca(2+) entry through L calcium channels, with a minor contribution of Ca(2+) entry through the reverse mode of the NCX.

  18. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D’Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A.; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced...

  19. Large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel regulation by protein kinase C in guinea pig urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Kiril L; Smith, Amy C; Parajuli, Shankar P; Malysz, John; Petkov, Georgi V

    2014-03-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are critical regulators of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) excitability and contractility. PKC modulates the contraction of DSM and BK channel activity in non-DSM cells; however, the cellular mechanism regulating the PKC-BK channel interaction in DSM remains unknown. We provide a novel mechanistic insight into BK channel regulation by PKC in DSM. We used patch-clamp electrophysiology, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and functional studies of DSM contractility to elucidate BK channel regulation by PKC at cellular and tissue levels. Voltage-clamp experiments showed that pharmacological activation of PKC with PMA inhibited the spontaneous transient BK currents in native freshly isolated guinea pig DSM cells. Current-clamp recordings revealed that PMA significantly depolarized DSM membrane potential and inhibited the spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations in DSM cells. The PMA inhibitory effects on DSM membrane potential were completely abolished by the selective BK channel inhibitor paxilline. Activation of PKC with PMA did not affect the amplitude of the voltage-step-induced whole cell steady-state BK current or the single BK channel open probability (recorded in cell-attached mode) upon inhibition of all major Ca(2+) sources for BK channel activation with thapsigargin, ryanodine, and nifedipine. PKC activation with PMA elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels in DSM cells and increased spontaneous phasic and nerve-evoked contractions of DSM isolated strips. Our results support the concept that PKC activation leads to a reduction of BK channel activity in DSM via a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, thus increasing DSM contractility.

  20. Entropy generation in a channel resembling gas turbine cooling passage: Effect of rotation number and density ratio on entropy generation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Basha; M Al-Qahtani; B S Yilbas

    2009-06-01

    Flow into a passage resembling a gas turbine blade cooling passage is considered and entropy generation rate in the passage is examined for unique rotation number and density ratios. In the simulations, leading and trailing walls of the passage are assumed to be at constant temperature. A control volume approach is introduced to discretize the governing equations of flow, heat transfer, and entropy generation. Reynolds stress turbulence model is accommodated in the simulation to account for the turbulence. The study is extended to include two rotational speeds and three density ratios. The passage aspect ratio is kept 10:1. It is found that volumetric entropy generation rate attains high values at passage inlet due to attainment of high temperature gradient in this region. Increasing rotation number and density ratio enhances volumetric entropy generation rate in the passage.

  1. Fatty Acid Regulation of Voltage- and Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antollini, Silvia S.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are essential components of the cell, where they play a key role in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and most particularly in cell membranes, where they are central actors in shaping the physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the cellular adaptation to the environment. FFA are continuously being produced and degraded, and a feedback regulatory function has been attributed to their turnover. The massive increase observed under some pathological conditions, especially in brain, has been interpreted as a protective mechanism possibly operative on ion channels, which in some cases is of stimulatory nature and in other cases inhibitory. Here we discuss the correlation between the structure of FFA and their ability to modulate protein function, evaluating the influence of saturation/unsaturation, number of double bonds, and cis vs. trans isomerism. We further focus on the mechanisms of FFA modulation operating on voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel function, contrasting the still conflicting evidence on direct vs. indirect mechanisms of action. PMID:27965583

  2. Fatty Acid Regulation of Voltage- and Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antollini, Silvia S; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are essential components of the cell, where they play a key role in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and most particularly in cell membranes, where they are central actors in shaping the physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the cellular adaptation to the environment. FFA are continuously being produced and degraded, and a feedback regulatory function has been attributed to their turnover. The massive increase observed under some pathological conditions, especially in brain, has been interpreted as a protective mechanism possibly operative on ion channels, which in some cases is of stimulatory nature and in other cases inhibitory. Here we discuss the correlation between the structure of FFA and their ability to modulate protein function, evaluating the influence of saturation/unsaturation, number of double bonds, and cis vs. trans isomerism. We further focus on the mechanisms of FFA modulation operating on voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel function, contrasting the still conflicting evidence on direct vs. indirect mechanisms of action.

  3. Regulation of Guinea Pig Detrusor Smooth Muscle Excitability by 17β-Estradiol: The Role of the Large Conductance Voltage- and Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provence, Aaron; Hristov, Kiril L; Parajuli, Shankar P; Petkov, Georgi V

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapies have been suggested to be beneficial in alleviating symptoms of overactive bladder. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms of estrogen in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) at the cellular level remain unknown. Large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, which are key regulators of UBSM function, are suggested to be non-genomic targets of estrogens. This study provides an electrophysiological investigation into the role of UBSM BK channels as direct targets for 17β-estradiol, the principle estrogen in human circulation. Single BK channel recordings on inside-out excised membrane patches and perforated whole cell patch-clamp were applied in combination with the BK channel selective inhibitor paxilline to elucidate the mechanism of regulation of BK channel activity by 17β-estradiol in freshly-isolated guinea pig UBSM cells. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) significantly increased the amplitude of depolarization-induced whole cell steady-state BK currents and the frequency of spontaneous transient BK currents in freshly-isolated UBSM cells. The increase in whole cell BK currents by 17β-estradiol was eliminated upon blocking BK channels with paxilline. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) significantly increased (~3-fold) the single BK channel open probability, indicating direct 17β-estradiol-BK channel interactions. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) caused a significant hyperpolarization of the membrane potential of UBSM cells, and this hyperpolarization was reversed by blocking the BK channels with paxilline. 17β-Estradiol (100 nM) had no effects on L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel currents recorded under perforated patch-clamp conditions. This study reveals a new regulatory mechanism in the urinary bladder whereby BK channels are directly activated by 17β-estradiol to reduce UBSM cell excitability.

  4. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  5. FKBP52 is involved in the regulation of SOCE channels in the human platelets and MEG 01 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Esther; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A; Redondo, Pedro C

    2013-03-01

    Immunophilins are FK506-binding proteins that have been involved in the regulation of calcium homeostasis, either by modulating Ca(2+) channels located in the plasma membrane or in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RE). We have investigated whether immunophilins would participate in the regulation of stored-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in human platelets and MEG 01. Both cell types were loaded with fura-2 for determining cytosolic calcium concentration changes ([Ca(2+)](c)), or stimulated and fixed to evaluate the protein interaction profile by performing immunoprecipitation and western blotting. We have found that incubation of platelets with FK506 increases Ca(2+) mobilization. Thapsigargin (TG)-evoked, Thr-evoked SOCE and TG-evoked Mn(2+) entry resulted in significant reduction by treatment of platelets with immunophilin antagonists. We confirmed by immunoprecipitation that immunophilins interact with transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) and Orai1 in human platelets. FK506 and rapamycin reduced the association between TRPC1 and Orai1 with FK506 binding protein (52) (FKBP52) in human platelets, and between TRPC1 and the type II IP(3)R, which association is known to be crucial for the maintenance of SOCE in human platelets. FKBP52 role in SOCE activation was confirmed by silencing FKBP52 using SiRNA FKBP52 in MEG 01 as demonstrated by single cell configuration imaging technique. TRPC1 silencing and depletion of cell of TRPC1 and FKBP52 simultaneously, impair activation of SOCE evoked by TG in MEG 01. Finally, in MEG 01 incubated with FK506 we observed a reduction in TRPC1/FKBP52 coupling, and similarly, FKBP52 silencing reduced the association between IP3R type II and TRPC1 during SOCE. All together, these results demonstrate that immunophilins participate in the regulation of SOCE in human platelets.

  6. β-Arrestin-Dependent Dopaminergic Regulation of Calcium Channel Activity in the Axon Initial Segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungchil; Ben-Shalom, Roy; Ahn, Misol; Liptak, Alayna T; van Rijn, Richard M; Whistler, Jennifer L; Bender, Kevin J

    2016-08-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiate a variety of signaling cascades, depending on effector coupling. β-arrestins, which were initially characterized by their ability to "arrest" GPCR signaling by uncoupling receptor and G protein, have recently emerged as important signaling effectors for GPCRs. β-arrestins engage signaling pathways that are distinct from those mediated by G protein. As such, arrestin-dependent signaling can play a unique role in regulating cell function, but whether neuromodulatory GPCRs utilize β-arrestin-dependent signaling to regulate neuronal excitability remains unclear. Here, we find that D3 dopamine receptors (D3R) regulate axon initial segment (AIS) excitability through β-arrestin-dependent signaling, modifying CaV3 voltage dependence to suppress high-frequency action potential generation. This non-canonical D3R signaling thereby gates AIS excitability via pathways distinct from classical GPCR signaling pathways.

  7. Towards optimal multi-channel EMG electrode configurations in muscle force estimation: a high density EMG study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudenmann, D.; Kingma, I.; Stegeman, D.F.; Dieen, J.H. van

    2005-01-01

    Surface EMG is an important tool in biomechanics, kinesiology and neurophysiology. In neurophysiology the concept of high-density EMG (HD-EMG), using two dimensional electrode grids, was developed for the measurement of spatiotemporal activation patterns of the underlying muscle and its motor units

  8. Gpr177, a novel locus for bone-mineral-density and osteoporosis, regulates osteogenesis and chondrogenesis in skeletal development

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jiang, Ming; Hsu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic analysis has recently identified Gpr177 as a susceptibility locus for bone-mineral-density and osteoporosis. Determining the unknown function of this gene is therefore extremely important to further our knowledge base of skeletal development and disease. The protein encoded by Gpr177 exhibits an ability to modulate the trafficking of Wnt similar to the Drosophila Wls/Evi/Srt. Because of a critical role in Wnt regulation, Gpr177 might be required for several key steps of skeletog...

  9. Presynaptic Ca2+-activated K+ channels in glutamatergic hippocampal terminals and their role in spike repolarization and regulation of transmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H; Shao, L R; Chavoshy, S; Gu, N; Trieb, M; Behrens, R; Laake, P; Pongs, O; Knaus, H G; Ottersen, O P; Storm, J F

    2001-12-15

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK, also called Maxi-K or Slo channels) are widespread in the vertebrate nervous system, but their functional roles in synaptic transmission in the mammalian brain are largely unknown. By combining electrophysiology and immunogold cytochemistry, we demonstrate the existence of functional BK channels in presynaptic terminals in the hippocampus and compare their functional roles in somata and terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells. Double-labeling immunogold analysis with BK channel and glutamate receptor antibodies indicated that BK channels are targeted to the presynaptic membrane facing the synaptic cleft in terminals of Schaffer collaterals in stratum radiatum. Whole-cell, intracellular, and field-potential recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells showed that the presynaptic BK channels are activated by calcium influx and can contribute to repolarization of the presynaptic action potential (AP) and negative feedback control of Ca(2+) influx and transmitter release. This was observed in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 40-100 microm), which broadened the presynaptic compound action potential. In contrast, the presynaptic BK channels did not contribute significantly to regulation of action potentials or transmitter release under basal experimental conditions, i.e., without 4-AP, even at high stimulation frequencies. This is unlike the situation in the parent cell bodies (CA3 pyramidal cells), where BK channels contribute strongly to action potential repolarization. These results indicate that the functional role of BK channels depends on their subcellular localization.

  10. Irresponsiveness of two retinoblastoma cases to conservative therapy correlates with up- regulation of hERG1 channels and of the VEGF-A pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Torre Agostino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment strategies for Retinoblastoma (RB, the most common primary intraocular tumor in children, have evolved over the past few decades and chemoreduction is currently the most popular treatment strategy. Despite success, systemic chemotherapeutic treatment has relevant toxicity, especially in the pediatric population. Antiangiogenic therapy has thus been proposed as a valuable alternative for pediatric malignancies, in particolar RB. Indeed, it has been shown that vessel density correlates with both local invasive growth and presence of metastases in RB, suggesting that angiogenesis could play a pivotal role for both local and systemic invasive growth in RB. We present here two cases of sporadic, bilateral RB that did not benefit from the conservative treatment and we provide evidence that the VEGF-A pathway is significantly up-regulated in both RB cases along with an over expression of hERG1 K+ channels. Case presentation Two patients showed a sporadic, bilateral RB, classified at Stage II of the Reese-Elsworth Classification. Neither of them got benefits from conservative treatment, and the two eyes were enucleated. In samples from both RB cases we studied the VEGF-A pathway: VEGF-A showed high levels in the vitreous, the vegf-a, flt-1, kdr, and hif1-α transcripts were over-expressed. Moreover, both the transcripts and proteins of the hERG1 K+ channels turned out to be up-regulated in the two RB cases compared to the non cancerous retinal tissue. Conclusions We provide evidence that the VEGF-A pathway is up-regulated in two particular aggressive cases of bilateral RB, which did not experience any benefit from conservative treatment, showing the overexpression of the vegf-a, flt-1, kdr and hif1-α transcripts and the high secretion of VEGF-A. Moreover we also show for the first time that the herg1 gene transcripts and protein are over expressed in RB, as occurs in several aggressive tumors. These results further stress

  11. Lipid Bilayer – mediated Regulation of Ion Channel Function by Amphiphilic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August

    2008-01-01

    nonspecifi c manner. It has long been suspected that this promiscuous regulation of membrane protein function could be due to changes in the physical properties of the host lipid bilayer, but the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. Given that pharmacological research often involves drug...

  12. 78 FR 20451 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Pelican Island Causeway, Galveston, Channel, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... CFR Code of Federal Regulations DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of... discretionary regulatory actions. In particular, the Act addresses actions that may result in the expenditure by a State, local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or by the private sector of...

  13. The tyrosine kinase p60c-src regulates the fast gate of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H; Machen, T E

    1996-12-01

    The role of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src on the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel was investigated with the cell-attached and excised patch clamp technique in conjunction with current noise analysis of recordings containing multiple channels per patch. Spectra of CFTR-generated current noise contained a low-frequency and a high-frequency Lorentzian noise component. In the cell-attached mode, the high-frequency Lorentzian was significantly dependent on the membrane potential, while the low-frequency Lorentzian was unaffected. Excision of forskolin-stimulated patches into ATP-containing solution significantly reduced the amplitude of the voltage-dependent high-frequency Lorentzian. Addition of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src to excised, active, CFTR-containing membrane patches increased mean currents by 54%, increased the corner frequency of the low-frequency Lorentzian, and recovered the high-frequency Lorentzian and its characteristics. Treatment with lambda-phosphatase inactivated src-induced currents and changes in gating. When active patches were excised under conditions in which patch-associated tyrosine phosphatases were blocked with sodium vanadate, the high-frequency gating remained relatively unchanged. The results suggest that CFTR's open probability and its voltage-dependent fast gate are dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation, and that membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatases are responsible for inactivation of the fast gate after patch excision.

  14. Cooperative regulation by G proteins and Na+ of neuronal GIRK2 K+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Touhara, Kouki K; Weir, Keiko; Bean, Bruce P; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    G protein gated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels open and thereby silence cellular electrical activity when inhibitory G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are stimulated. Here we describe an assay to measure neuronal GIRK2 activity as a function of membrane-anchored G protein concentration. Using this assay we show that four Gβγ subunits bind cooperatively to open GIRK2, and that intracellular Na+ – which enters neurons during action potentials – further amplifies opening mostly by increasing Gβγ affinity. A Na+ amplification function is characterized and used to estimate the concentration of Gβγ subunits that appear in the membrane of mouse dopamine neurons when GABAB receptors are stimulated. We conclude that GIRK2, through its dual responsiveness to Gβγ and Na+, mediates a form of neuronal inhibition that is amplifiable in the setting of excess electrical activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15751.001 PMID:27074662

  15. Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Dendritic Spine Density by PirB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Synapse density on cortical pyramidal neurons is modulated by experience. This process is highest during developmental critical periods, when mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are fully engaged. In mouse visual cortex, the critical period for ocular dominance (OD) plasticity coincides with the developmental pruning of synapses. At this time, mice lacking paired Ig-like receptor B (PirB) have excess numbers of dendritic spines on L5 neurons; these spines persist and are thought to underlie the juvenile-like OD plasticity observed in adulthood. Here we examine whether PirB is required specifically in excitatory neurons to exert its effect on dendritic spine and synapse density during the critical period. In mice with a conditional allele of PirB (PirBfl/fl), PirB was deleted only from L2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons in vivo by timed in utero electroporation of Cre recombinase. Sparse mosaic expression of Cre produced neurons lacking PirB in a sea of wild-type neurons and glia. These neurons had significantly elevated dendritic spine density, as well as increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that they receive a greater number of synaptic inputs relative to Cre– neighbors. The effect of cell-specific PirB deletion on dendritic spine density was not accompanied by changes in dendritic branching complexity or axonal bouton density. Together, results imply a neuron-specific, cell-autonomous action of PirB on synaptic density in L2/3 pyramidal cells of visual cortex. Moreover, they are consistent with the idea that PirB functions normally to corepress spine density and synaptic plasticity, thereby maintaining headroom for cells to encode ongoing experience-dependent structural change throughout life.

  16. Low intensity ultrasound induces apoptosis via MPT channel on mitochondrial membrane: Target for regulating cancer therapy or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yi; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    To discuss how the mitochondrion is involved in low intensity ultrasound induced apoptosis, HepG2 cells were irradiated by low intensity focused ultrasound (ISPTA = 3W/cm2, 1 min) and then cultured from 3-12 h post irradiation in the study. The morphological alteration was examined by light and fluorescent microscopy respectively. Cell viability and apoptosis were examined by trypan blue staining and flow cytometry with double staining of FITC-labelled Annexin-V/PI. Key proteins responded to irradiation were screened out by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and shotgun proteomic methods with Agilent 1100 HPLC-Chip-MS technology. Representative apoptotic morphological characteristics and increased percentage of apoptotic cells were achieved. Six important proteins (4 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated) were selected and analyzed. It revealed low intensity focused ultrasound could induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells and the US-induced apoptosis was mitochondria-dependent and caspases-dependent. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) is related to ultrasound induced apoptosis, but VDAC may be not the main MPT channel. Understanding it could help to assist the cancer therapy by regulating the MPT as the target.

  17. Sexual dimorphism and oestrogen regulation of KCNE3 expression modulates the functional properties of KCNQ1 K channels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alzamora, Rodrigo

    2012-02-01

    The KCNQ1 potassium channel associates with various KCNE ancillary subunits that drastically affect channel gating and pharmacology. Co-assembly with KCNE3 produces a current with nearly instantaneous activation, some time-dependent activation at very positive potentials, a linear current-voltage relationship and a 10-fold higher sensitivity to chromanol 293B. KCNQ1:KCNE3 channels are expressed in colonic crypts and mediate basolateral K(+) recycling required for Cl(-) secretion. We have previously reported the female-specific anti-secretory effects of oestrogen via KCNQ1:KCNE3 channel inhibition in colonic crypts. This study was designed to determine whether sex and oestrogen regulate the expression and function of KCNQ1 and KCNE3 in rat distal colon. Colonic crypts were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats and used for whole-cell patch-clamp and to extract total RNA and protein. Sheets of epithelium were used for short-circuit current recordings. KCNE1 and KCNE3 mRNA and protein abundance were significantly higher in male than female crypts. No expression of KCNE2 was found and no difference was observed in KCNQ1 expression between male and female (at oestrus) colonic crypts. Male crypts showed a 2.2-fold higher level of association of KCNQ1 and KCNE3 compared to female cells. In female colonic crypts, KCNQ1 and KCNE3 protein expression fluctuated throughout the oestrous cycle and 17beta-oestradiol (E2 10 nM) produced a rapid (<15 min) dissociation of KCNQ1 and KCNE3 in female crypts only. Whole-cell K(+) currents showed a linear current-voltage relationship in male crypts, while K(+) currents in colonic crypts isolated from females displayed voltage-dependent outward rectification. Currents in isolated male crypts and epithelial sheets were 10-fold more sensitive to specific KCNQ1 inhibitors, such as chromanol 293B and HMR-1556, than in female. The effect of E2 on K(+) currents mediated by KCNQ1 with or without different beta-subunits was assayed from current

  18. Regulation of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel by Nedd4 family interacting proteins (Ndfips).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yudi; Guo, Jun; Yang, Tonghua; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Shetuan

    2015-11-15

    The cardiac electrical disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS) pre-disposes affected individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. Dysfunction of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) channel (IKr) is a major cause of LQTS. The expression of hERG channels is controlled by anterograde trafficking of newly synthesized channels to and retrograde degradation of existing channels from the plasma membrane. We have previously shown that the E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Nedd4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4-2) targets the PY motif of hERG channels to initiate channel degradation. Although both immature and mature hERG channels contain the PY motif, Nedd4-2 selectively mediates the degradation of mature hERG channels. In the present study, we demonstrate that Nedd4-2 is directed to specific cellular compartments by the Nedd4 family interacting proteins, Nedd4 family-interacting protein 1 (Ndfip1) and Ndfip2. Ndfip1 is primarily localized in the Golgi apparatus where it recruits Nedd4-2 to mediate the degradation of mature hERG proteins during channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Although Ndfip2 directs Nedd4-2 to the Golgi apparatus, it also recruits Nedd4-2 to the multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which may impair MVB function and impede the degradation of mature hERG proteins mediated by Nedd4-2. These findings extend our understanding of hERG channel regulation and provide information which may be useful for the rescue of impaired hERG function in LQTS.

  19. The H-loop in the Second Nucleotide-binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is Required for Efficient Chloride Channel Closing

    OpenAIRE

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R.; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine res...

  20. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR): three-dimensional structure and localization of a channel gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Mark F; O'Ryan, Liam P; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2011-12-09

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located).

  1. The activity of the epithelial sodium channels is regulated by caveolin-1 via a Nedd4-2-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Ha; Campbell, Craig R; Song, Sung-Hee; Day, Margot L; Kumar, Sharad; Cook, David I; Dinudom, Anuwat

    2009-05-08

    It has recently been shown that the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is compartmentalized in caveolin-rich lipid rafts and that pharmacological depletion of membrane cholesterol, which disrupts lipid raft formation, decreases the activity of ENaC. Here we show, for the first time, that a signature protein of caveolae, caveolin-1 (Cav-1), down-regulates the activity and membrane surface expression of ENaC. Physical interaction between ENaC and Cav-1 was also confirmed in a coimmunoprecipitation assay. We found that the effect of Cav-1 on ENaC requires the activity of Nedd4-2, a ubiquitin protein ligase of the Nedd4 family, which is known to induce ubiquitination and internalization of ENaC. The effect of Cav-1 on ENaC requires the proline-rich motifs at the C termini of the beta- and gamma-subunits of ENaC, the binding motifs that mediate interaction with Nedd4-2. Taken together, our data suggest that Cav-1 inhibits the activity of ENaC by decreasing expression of ENaC at the cell membrane via a mechanism that involves the promotion of Nedd4-2-dependent internalization of the channel.

  2. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely r...

  3. Identification of KCa3.1 channel as a novel regulator of Oxidative phosphorylation in a subset of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovalenko, Ilya; Glasauer, Andrea; Schöckel, Laura;

    2016-01-01

    -of-function mutations in p53. Both mutations have severe impacts on the metabolism of tumor cells. Many of these metabolic changes are mediated by transporters or channels that regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between the intracellular compartment and the tumor microenvironment. In the study presented here......, our goal was to identify novel transporters or channels that regulate oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in PDAC in order to characterize novel potential drug targets for the treatment of these cancers. We set up a Seahorse Analyzer XF based siRNA screen and identified previously described as well...... of a small molecule inhibitor confirmed its role in regulating oxygen consumption, ATP production and cellular proliferation. Furthermore, PDAC cell lines sensitive to KCa3.1 inhibition were shown to express the channel protein in the plasma membrane as well as in the mitochondria. These differences...

  4. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  5. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate...... permeability for Cl- ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl- ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl- transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl- lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance...... muscle excitability. Data from ClC-1 expression systems suggest that this ClC-1 activation may arise from loss of regulation by adenosine nucleotides and/or oxidation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge of the physiological factors that control ClC-1 function in active muscle....

  6. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 signaling pathway regulates transient receptor potential cation channel 6 in podocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangrui Ding

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential cation channel 6 (TRPC6 is a nonselective cation channel, and abnormal expression and gain of function of TRPC6 are involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary and nonhereditary forms of renal disease. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases remain poorly understood, recent investigations revealed that many signaling pathways are involved in regulating TRPC6. We aimed to examine the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex (mTOR complex 1 [mTORC1] or mTOR complex 2 [mTORC2] signaling pathways on TRPC6 in podocytes, which are highly terminally differentiated renal epithelial cells that are critically required for the maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. We applied both pharmacological inhibitors of mTOR and specific siRNAs against mTOR components to explore which mTOR signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of TRPC6 in podocytes. The podocytes were exposed to rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, and ku0063794, a dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2. In addition, specific siRNA-mediated knockdown of the mTORC1 component raptor and the mTORC2 component rictor was employed. The TRPC6 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined via real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, fluorescence calcium imaging was performed to evaluate the function of TRPC6 in podocytes. Rapamycin displayed no effect on the TRPC6 mRNA or protein expression levels or TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. However, ku0063794 down-regulated the TRPC6 mRNA and protein levels and suppressed TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. Furthermore, knockdown of raptor did not affect TRPC6 expression or function, whereas rictor knockdown suppressed TRPC6 protein expression and TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. These findings indicate that the mTORC2 signaling pathway regulates TRPC6 in podocytes but that the mTORC1 signaling pathway does not appear

  7. Regulation of Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Cytokines in Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. Sáez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autocrine and paracrine signals coordinate responses of several cell types of the immune system that provide efficient protection against different challenges. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs coordinate activation of this system via homocellular and heterocellular interactions. Cytokines constitute chemical intercellular signals among immune cells and might promote pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. During the last two decades, two membrane pathways for intercellular communication have been demonstrated in cells of the immune system. They are called hemichannels (HCs and gap junction channels (GJCs and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the orchestrated response of immune cells. GJCs and HCs are permeable to ions and small molecules, including signaling molecules. The direct intercellular transfer between contacting cells can be mediated by GJCs, whereas the release to or uptake from the extracellular milieu can be mediated by HCs. GJCs and HCs can be constituted by two protein families: connexins (Cxs or pannexins (Panxs, which are present in almost all APCs, being Cx43 and Panx1 the most ubiquitous members of each protein family. In this review, we focus on the effects of different cytokines on the intercellular communication mediated by HCs and GJCs in APCs and their impact on purinergic signaling.

  8. Stochastic seasonality and nonlinear density-dependent factors regulate population size in an African rodent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leirs, Herwig; Steneth, Nils Chr.; Nichols, James D.

    1997-01-01

    , but clear examples of both processes acting in the same population are rare(7,8). Key-factor analysis (regression of population changes on possible causal factors) and time-series analysis are often used to investigate the presence of density dependence, but such approaches may be biased and provide...

  9. Multiple intracellular signallings involved in regulation of on channels by GH releasing or inhibitory hormones in pituitary somatotropes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Influx of Ca2- via Ca2+ channels is the major step triggering exocytosis of pituitary somatotropes to release growth hormone (GH). Voltage-gated Ca2+ and K+ channels, the primary determinants of the influx of Ca2+ in somatotropes, are regulated by GH-releasing hornone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SRIF) through G protein-coupled signalling systems. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, the changes of the Ca2+ and K+ currents in primary cultured somatotropes were recorded and signalling systems were studied using pharmacological reagents and intracellular dialysis of non-permeable molecules including antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides. GHRH increased both L-and T-types Ca2+ currents and decreased transient (I4) and delayed rectified (Ik) K+ currents. The increase in Ca2+ currents by GHRH was mediated by cAMP/protein kinase A system but the decrease in K+ currents required normal function of protein kinase C system. The GHRH-induced alteration of Ca2+ and K+ currents augments the influx of Ca2+ , leading to an increase in the [ Ca2+ ]i and the GH secretion. In contrary, a significant reduction in Ca2+ currents and increase in K currents were obtained in response to SRIF. The ion channel response to SRIF was demonstrated as a membrane delimited pathway and can be recorded by classic whole-cell configuration, Intracellular dialysis of anti-αi3 antibodies attenuated the increase in K + currents by SRIF whereas anti-αo antibodies blocked the reduction in the Ca2+ current by SRIF. Dialysis of antisense oligonucleotides specific for αo2 sub-units also attenuated the inhibition of SRIF on the Ca2+current. The Gi3 protein mediated the increase in K + currents and the Go2 protein mediated the reduction in the Ca2 +current by SRIF. The SRIF-induced alteration of Ca2 + and K + currents diminished the influx of Ca2+ , leading to a decrease in the [ Ca2+ ]i and the GH secretion. It is therefore concluded that multiple signalling systems are employed in the ion channel

  10. TRPM7 channel regulates PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via PI3K and ERK pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Ling, E-mail: fangling_1984@126.com; Zhan, Shuxiang; Huang, Cheng; Cheng, Xi; Lv, Xiongwen; Si, Hongfang; Li, Jun, E-mail: lj@ahmu.edu.cn

    2013-11-01

    TRPM7, a non-selective cation channel of the TRP channel superfamily, is implicated in diverse physiological and pathological processes including cell proliferation. Recently, TRPM7 has been reported in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Here, we investigated the contribution role of TRPM7 in activated HSC-T6 cell (a rat hepatic stellate cell line) proliferation. TRPM7 mRNA and protein were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot in rat model of liver fibrosis in vivo and PDGF-BB-activated HSC-T6 cells in vitro. Both mRNA and protein of TRPM7 were dramatically increased in CCl{sub 4}-treated rat livers. Stimulation of HSC-T6 cells with PDGF-BB resulted in a time-dependent increase of TRPM7 mRNA and protein. However, PDGF-BB-induced HSC-T6 cell proliferation was inhibited by non-specific TRPM7 blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or synthetic siRNA targeting TRPM7, and this was accompanied by downregulation of cell cycle proteins, cyclin D1, PCNA and CDK4. Blockade of TRPM7 channels also attenuated PDGF-BB induced expression of myofibroblast markers as measured by the induction of α-SMA and Col1α1. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT, associated with cell proliferation, decreased in TRPM7 deficient HSC-T6 cells. These observations suggested that TRPM7 channels contribute to perpetuated fibroblast activation and proliferation of PDGF-BB induced HSC-T6 cells via the activation of ERK and PI3K pathways. Therefore, TRPM7 may constitute a useful target for the treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Upregulation of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in the fibrotic livers from CCl{sub 4}-treated rats. • Increasing expression of TRPM7 mRNA and protein during HSC activation. • Blockade of TRPM7 inhibited the PDGF-BB induced proliferation of HSC-T6 cells. • Blockade of TRPM7 decreased α-SMA and Col1α1 expressions in activated HSC-T6 cells. • TRPM7 up-regulation contributes to the activation of ERK and AKT pathways.

  11. An autism-associated mutation in CaV1.3 channels has opposing effects on voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpitikul, Worawan B; Dick, Ivy E; Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, David T

    2016-06-03

    CaV1.3 channels are a major class of L-type Ca(2+) channels which contribute to the rhythmicity of the heart and brain. In the brain, these channels are vital for excitation-transcription coupling, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal firing. Moreover, disruption of CaV1.3 function has been associated with several neurological disorders. Here, we focus on the de novo missense mutation A760G which has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To explore the role of this mutation in ASD pathogenesis, we examined the effects of A760G on CaV1.3 channel gating and regulation. Introduction of the mutation severely diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) of CaV1.3 channels, an important feedback system required for Ca(2+) homeostasis. This reduction in CDI was observed in two major channel splice variants, though to different extents. Using an allosteric model of channel gating, we found that the underlying mechanism of CDI reduction is likely due to enhanced channel opening within the Ca(2+)-inactivated mode. Remarkably, the A760G mutation also caused an opposite increase in voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), resulting in a multifaceted mechanism underlying ASD. When combined, these regulatory deficits appear to increase the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, thus potentially disrupting neuronal development and synapse formation, ultimately leading to ASD.

  12. Diminished Paracrine Regulation of the Epithelial Na+ Channel by Purinergic Signaling in Mice Lacking Connexin 30*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironova, Elena; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Bugaj, Vladislav; Stockand, James D.

    2011-01-01

    We tested whether ATP release through Connexin 30 (Cx30) is part of a local purinergic regulatory system intrinsic to the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) important for proper control of sodium excretion; if changes in sodium intake influence ATP release via Cx30; and if this allows a normal ENaC response to changes in systemic sodium levels. In addition, we define the consequences of disrupting ATP regulation of ENaC in Cx30−/− mice. Urinary ATP levels in wild-type mice increase with sodium intake, being lower and less dependent on sodium intake in Cx30−/− mice. Loss of inhibitory ATP regulation causes ENaC activity to be greater in Cx30−/− versus wild-type mice, particularly with high sodium intake. This results from compromised ATP release rather than end-organ resistance: ENaC in Cx30−/− mice responds to exogenous ATP. Thus, loss of paracrine ATP feedback regulation of ENaC in Cx30−/− mice disrupts normal responses to changes in sodium intake. Consequently, ENaC is hyperactive in Cx30−/− mice lowering sodium excretion particularly during increases in sodium intake. Clamping mineralocorticoids high in Cx30−/− mice fed a high sodium diet causes a marked decline in renal sodium excretion. This is not the case in wild-type mice, which are capable of undergoing aldosterone-escape. This loss of the ability of ENaC to respond to changes in sodium levels contributes to salt-sensitive hypertension in Cx30−/− mice. PMID:21075848

  13. Diminished paracrine regulation of the epithelial Na+ channel by purinergic signaling in mice lacking connexin 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironova, Elena; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Bugaj, Vladislav; Stockand, James D

    2011-01-14

    We tested whether ATP release through Connexin 30 (Cx30) is part of a local purinergic regulatory system intrinsic to the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) important for proper control of sodium excretion; if changes in sodium intake influence ATP release via Cx30; and if this allows a normal ENaC response to changes in systemic sodium levels. In addition, we define the consequences of disrupting ATP regulation of ENaC in Cx30(-/-) mice. Urinary ATP levels in wild-type mice increase with sodium intake, being lower and less dependent on sodium intake in Cx30(-/-) mice. Loss of inhibitory ATP regulation causes ENaC activity to be greater in Cx30(-/-) versus wild-type mice, particularly with high sodium intake. This results from compromised ATP release rather than end-organ resistance: ENaC in Cx30(-/-) mice responds to exogenous ATP. Thus, loss of paracrine ATP feedback regulation of ENaC in Cx30(-/-) mice disrupts normal responses to changes in sodium intake. Consequently, ENaC is hyperactive in Cx30(-/-) mice lowering sodium excretion particularly during increases in sodium intake. Clamping mineralocorticoids high in Cx30(-/-) mice fed a high sodium diet causes a marked decline in renal sodium excretion. This is not the case in wild-type mice, which are capable of undergoing aldosterone-escape. This loss of the ability of ENaC to respond to changes in sodium levels contributes to salt-sensitive hypertension in Cx30(-/-) mice.

  14. The hypertonic environment differentially regulates wild-type CFTR and TNR-CFTR chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Cheng, Jie; Krasnov, Kristina; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Cutting, Garry R; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Morales, Marcelo M; Guggino, William B

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that the hypertonic environment of the renal medulla regulates the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) and its natural splice variant, TNR-CFTR. To accomplish this, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) stable cell lines expressing TNR-CFTR or CFTR were used. The cells were treated with hypertonic medium made with either NaCl or urea or sucrose (480 mOsm/kg or 560 mOsm/kg) to mimic the tonicity of the renal medulla environment. Western blot data showed that CFTR and TNR-CFTR total cell protein is increased by hypertonic medium, but using the surface biotinylation technique, only CFTR was found to be increased in cell plasma membrane. Confocal microscopy showed TNR-CFTR localization primarily at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. In conclusion, CFTR and TNR-CFTR have different patterns of distribution in MDCK cells and they are modulated by a hypertonic environment, suggesting their physiological importance in renal medulla.

  15. TRPV3 Channel Negatively Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Safeguards the Pluripotency of Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Iek Chi; Chan, Hing Chung; Qi, Zenghua; Ng, Kwun Lam; So, Chun; Tsang, Suk Ying

    2016-02-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have tremendous potential for research and future therapeutic purposes. However, the calcium handling mechanism in ESCs is not fully elucidated. Aims of this study are (1) to investigate if transient receptor potential vanilloid-3 (TRPV3) channels are present in mouse ESCs (mESCs) and their subcellular localization; (2) to investigate the role of TRPV3 in maintaining the characteristics of mESCs. Western blot and immunocytochemistry showed that TRPV3 was present at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of mESCs. Calcium imaging showed that, in the absence of extracellular calcium, TRPV3 activators camphor and 6-tert-butyl-m-cresol increased the cytosolic calcium. However, depleting the ER store in advance of activator addition abolished the calcium increase, suggesting that TRPV3 released calcium from the ER. To dissect the functional role of TRPV3, TRPV3 was activated and mESC proliferation was measured by trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays. The results showed that TRPV3 activation led to a decrease in mESC proliferation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that TRPV3 activation increased the percentage of cells in G2 /M phase; consistently, Western blot also revealed a concomitant increase in the expression of inactive form of cyclin-dependent kinase 1, suggesting that TRPV3 activation arrested mESCs at G2 /M phase. TRPV3 activation did not alter the expression of pluripotency markers Oct-4, Klf4 and c-Myc, suggesting that the pluripotency was preserved. Our study is the first study to show the presence of TRPV3 at ER. Our study also reveals the novel role of TRPV3 in controlling the cell cycle and preserving the pluripotency of ESCs.

  16. Sites of pH regulation of the urea channel of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, D L; Sachs, G

    2001-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) and Streptococcus salivarius (Ss) require intrabacterial urease for acid resistance and express a urea channel, UreI. The presence of UreI was shown to increase urea permeability approximately 300-fold over that of a non-polar ureI deletion mutant. Expression of SsUreI in Xenopus oocytes increased urea uptake pH independently, whereas HpUreI shows an acidic pH dependence, half-maximal at pH 6.0. Mutagenesis of all histidines, aspartates, glutamates and the lysine in the periplasmic domain of HpUreI showed that His-123, His-131, Asp-129, Asp-140, Glu-138 and Lys-132 in the second periplasmic loop (PL2) and His-193 in the C-terminus (Ct) were important for activation of transport. With the exception of a lysine that was shown to substitute for His-193 in HpUreI, these charged amino acids are absent in SsUreI. A chimera in which PL1 of HpUreI was replaced by PL1 of SsUreI retained activity at acidic pH and gained partial activity at neutral pH. Exchange of PL2 inactivated transport, whereas exchange of Ct had no effect. Chimeras, in which either PL1 or PL2 of HpUreI replaced those of SsUreI, retained wild-type transport, but replacement of the Ct or both loops inactivated transport. PL1 appears to be important for restricting transport through HpUreI at neutral pH, whereas protonation of three histidines in PL2 and Ct and the presence of three dicarboxylic amino acids in PL2 appears to be necessary to activate HpUreI at acidic pH.

  17. Association between tetrodotoxin resistant channels and lipid rafts regulates sensory neuron excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pristerà

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. Na(V1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. Na(V1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for Na(V1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated Na(V1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that Na(V1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that Na(V1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC led to the dissociation between rafts and Na(V1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and Na(V1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of Na(V1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between Na(V1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability.

  18. Dual regulation of the native ClC-K2 chloride channel in the distal nephron by voltage and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Laurent; Nissant, Antoine; Edwards, Aurélie; Lourdel, Stéphane; Teulon, Jacques; Paulais, Marc

    2016-09-01

    ClC-K2, a member of the ClC family of Cl(-) channels and transporters, forms the major basolateral Cl(-) conductance in distal nephron epithelial cells and therefore plays a central role in renal Cl(-) absorption. However, its regulation remains largely unknown because of the fact that recombinant ClC-K2 has not yet been studied at the single-channel level. In the present study, we investigate the effects of voltage, pH, Cl(-), and Ca(2+) on native ClC-K2 in the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells from the mouse connecting tubule. The ∼10-pS channel shows a steep voltage dependence such that channel activity increases with membrane depolarization. Intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHo) differentially modulate the voltage dependence curve: alkaline pHi flattens the curve by causing an increase in activity at negative voltages, whereas alkaline pHo shifts the curve toward negative voltages. In addition, pHi, pHo, and extracellular Ca(2+) strongly increase activity, mainly because of an increase in the number of active channels with a comparatively minor effect on channel open probability. Furthermore, voltage alters both the number of active channels and their open probability, whereas intracellular Cl(-) has little influence. We propose that changes in the number of active channels correspond to them entering or leaving an inactivated state, whereas modulation of open probability corresponds to common gating by these channels. We suggest that pH, through the combined effects of pHi and pHo on ClC-K2, might be a key regulator of NaCl absorption and Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange in type B intercalated cells.

  19. Selective regulation of current densities underlies spontaneous changes in the activity of cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrigiano, G; LeMasson, G; Marder, E

    1995-05-01

    We study the electrical activity patterns and the expression of conductances in adult stomatogastric ganglion (STG) neurons as a function of time in primary cell culture. When first plated in culture, these neurons had few active properties. After 1 d in culture they produced small action potentials that rapidly inactivated during maintained depolarization. After 2 d in culture they fired large action potentials tonically when depolarized, and their properties resembled very closely the properties of STG neurons pharmacologically isolated in the ganglion. After 3-4 d in culture, however, their electrical properties changed and they fired in bursts when depolarized. We characterized the currents expressed by these neurons in culture. They included two TTX-sensitive sodium currents, a calcium current, a delayed-rectifier-like current, a calcium-dependent potassium current, and two A-type currents. The changes in firing properties with time in culture were accompanied by an increase in inward and decrease in outward current densities. A single-compartment conductance-based model of an STG neuron was constructed by fitting the currents measured in the biological neurons. When the current densities in the model neuron were matched to those measured for the biological neurons in each activity state, the model neuron closely reproduced each state, indicating that the changes in current densities are sufficient to account for the changes in intrinsic properties. These data indicate that STG neurons isolated in culture change their intrinsic electrical properties by selectively adjusting the magnitudes of their ionic conductances.

  20. Functional and molecular identification of a TASK-1 potassium channel regulating chloride secretion through CFTR channels in the shark rectal gland: implications for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Connor J; Decker, Sarah E; Motley, William W; Peters, Alexander W; Mehr, Ali Poyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Forrest, John N

    2016-12-01

    In the shark rectal gland (SRG), apical chloride secretion through CFTR channels is electrically coupled to a basolateral K(+) conductance whose type and molecular identity are unknown. We performed studies in the perfused SRG with 17 K(+) channel inhibitors to begin this search. Maximal chloride secretion was markedly inhibited by low-perfusate pH, bupivicaine, anandamide, zinc, quinidine, and quinine, consistent with the properties of an acid-sensitive, four-transmembrane, two-pore-domain K(+) channel (4TM-K2P). Using PCR with degenerate primers to this family, we identified a TASK-1 fragment in shark rectal gland, brain, gill, and kidney. Using 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR and genomic walking, we cloned the full-length shark gene (1,282 bp), whose open reading frame encodes a protein of 375 amino acids that was 80% identical to the human TASK-1 protein. We expressed shark and human TASK-1 cRNA in Xenopus oocytes and characterized these channels using two-electrode voltage clamping. Both channels had identical current-voltage relationships (outward rectifying) and a reversal potential of -90 mV. Both were inhibited by quinine, bupivicaine, and acidic pH. The pKa for current inhibition was 7.75 for shark TASK-1 vs. 7.37 for human TASK-1, values similar to the arterial pH for each species. We identified this protein in SRG by Western blot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy and detected the protein in SRG and human airway cells. Shark TASK-1 is the major K(+) channel coupled to chloride secretion in the SRG, is the oldest 4TM 2P family member identified, and is the first TASK-1 channel identified to play a role in setting the driving force for chloride secretion in epithelia. The detection of this potassium channel in mammalian lung tissue has implications for human biology and disease.

  1. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation.

  2. Modeling CaMKII-mediated regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Greenstein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC in the cardiac myocyte is mediated by a number of highly integrated mechanisms of intracellular Ca2+ transport. Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs allow for Ca2+ entry into the myocyte, which then binds to nearby ryanodine receptors (RyRs and triggers Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a process known as Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. The highly coordinated Ca2+-mediated interaction between LCCs and RyRs is further regulated by the cardiac isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII. Because CaMKII targets and modulates the function of many ECC proteins, elucidation of its role in ECC and integrative cellular function is challenging and much insight has been gained through the use of detailed computational models. Multiscale models that can both reconstruct the detailed nature of local signaling events within the cardiac dyad and predict their functional consequences at the level of the whole cell have played an important role in advancing our understanding of CaMKII function in ECC. Here, we review experimentally based models of CaMKII function with a focus on LCC and RyR regulation, and the mechanistic insights that have been gained through their application.

  3. Epigenetic regulation of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jingwen; Zhang, Yanyan; Ye, Fang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Fanxing; Shi, Lijun

    2016-11-24

    Accumulating evidence has shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in hypertension and aging. L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), the dominant channels in vascular myocytes, greatly contribute to arteriole contraction and blood pressure (BP) control. We investigated the dynamic changes and epigenetic regulation of LTCC in the mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats. LTCC function was evaluated by using microvascular rings and whole-cell patch-clamp in the mesenteric arteries of male Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats at established hypertension (3 month old) and an aging stage (16 month old), respectively. The expression of the LTCC α1C subunit was determined in the rat mesenteric microcirculation. The expression of miR-328, which targets α1C mRNA, and the DNA methylation status at the promoter region of the α1C gene (CACNA1C) were also determined. In vitro experiments were performed to assess α1C expression after transfection of the miR-328 mimic into cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The results showed that hypertension superimposed with aging aggravated BP and vascular remodeling. Both LTCC function and expression were significantly increased in hypertensive arteries and downregulated with aging. miR-328 expression was inhibited in hypertension, but increased with aging. There was no significant difference in the mean DNA methylation of CACNA1C among groups, whereas methylation was enhanced in the hypertensive group at specific sites on a CpG island located upstream of the gene promoter. Overexpression of miR-328 inhibited the α1C level of cultured VSMCs within 48 h. The results of the present study indicate that the dysfunction of LTCCs may exert an epigenetic influence at both pre- and post-transcriptional levels during hypertension pathogenesis and aging progression. miR-328 negatively regulated LTCC expression in both aging and hypertension.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 24

  4. A1-adenosine acute withdrawal response and cholecystokinin-8 induced contractures are regulated by Ca(2+)- and ATP-activated K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Maria Grazia; Valeri, Daniela; Tucker, Steven J; Marini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In isolated guinea-pig ileum (GPI), the A1-adenosine acute withdrawal response is under the control of several neuronal signalling systems, including the μ/κ-opioid and the cannabinoid CB1 systems. It is now well established that after the stimulation of the A1-adenosine system, the indirect activation of both μ/κ-opioid and CB1 systems is prevented by the peptide cholecystokinin-8 (CCk-8). In the present study, we have investigated the involvement of the Ca(2+)/ATP-activated K(+) channels in the regulation of both acute A1-withdrawal and CCk-8-induced contractures in the GPI preparation. Interestingly, we found that: (a) the A1-withdrawal contracture is inhibited by voltage dependent Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, Kv, while it is enhanced by the voltage independent Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, SKCa; (b) in the presence of CCk-8, the inhibitory effect of the A1 agonist, CPA, on the peptide induced contracture is significantly enhanced by the voltage independent Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel, SKCa; and (c) the A1-withdrawal contracture precipitated in the presence of CCk-8 is controlled by the ATP-sensitive potassium channels, KATP. Our data suggest, for the first time, that both Ca(2+)- and ATP-activated K(+) channels are involved in the regulation of both A1-withdrawal precipitated and CCk-8 induced contractures.

  5. Regulation of spine density and morphology by IQGAP1 protein domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jausoro

    Full Text Available IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein that regulates spine number. We now show a differential role for IQGAP1 domains in spine morphogenesis, in which a region of the N-terminus that promotes Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and branching stimulates spine head formation while a region that binds to Cdc42 and Rac is required for stalk extension. Conversely, IQGAP1 rescues spine deficiency induced by expression of dominant negative Cdc42 by stimulating formation of stubby spines. Together, our observations place IQGAP1 as a crucial regulator of spine number and shape acting through the N-Wasp Arp2/3 complex, as well as upstream and downstream of Cdc42.

  6. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Adam R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Rachel L. [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Reddy, Jay P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Atkinson, Bradley J. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy Services, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Brewster, Abeena [Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  7. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  8. Differential regulation of human Eag1 channel expression by serum and epidermal growth factor in lung and breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acuña-Macías I

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Isabel Acuña-Macías,1 Eunice Vera,1 Alma Yolanda Vázquez-Sánchez,1 María Eugenia Mendoza-Garrido,2 Javier Camacho1 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Department of Physiology, Biophysics and Neurosciences, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico Abstract: Oncogenic ether à-go-go-1 (Eag1 potassium channels are overexpressed in most primary human solid tumors. Low oxygen and nutrient/growth factor concentrations play critical roles in tumorigenesis. However, the mechanisms by which tumor cells survive and proliferate under growth factor-depleted conditions remain elusive. Here, we investigated whether serum-deprived conditions and epidermal growth factor (EGF regulate Eag1 expression in human lung and breast cancer cells. The human cancer cell lines A549 and MCF-7 (from the lungs and breast, respectively were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and cultured following the manufacturer’s recommendations. Eag1 gene and protein expression were studied by real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Cell proliferation was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was investigated by Western blot. Serum-deprived conditions increased Eag1 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines. This Eag1 upregulation was prevented by EGF and the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in only lung cancer cells; vascular endothelial growth factor did not prevent Eag1 upregulation. Our results suggest that Eag1 may act as a survival and mitogenic factor under low-serum and nutrient conditions and may be a clinical target during the early stages of tumor development. Keywords: lung cancer, serum deprivation, ether à-go-go, potassium channels, EGF, epidermal growth factor, ERK 1/2

  9. The Phospholipid-binding Protein SESTD1 Is a Novel Regulator of the Transient Receptor Potential Channels TRPC4 and TRPC5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, Susanne; Bieberstein, Andrea; Arnould, Isabelle; Ihdene, Orhia; Rütten, Hartmut; Strübing, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    TRPC4 and TRPC5 are two closely related members of the mammalian transient receptor potential cation channel family that have been implicated in important physiological functions, such as growth cone guidance and smooth muscle contraction. To further unravel the role of TRPC4 and TRPC5 in these processes in vivo, detailed information about the molecular composition of native channel complexes and their association with cellular signaling networks is needed. We therefore searched a human aortic cDNA library for novel TRPC4-interacting proteins using a modified yeast two-hybrid assay. This screen identified SESTD1, a previously uncharacterized protein containing a lipid-binding SEC14-like domain as well as spectrin-type cytoskeleton interaction domains. SESTD1 was found to associate with TRPC4 and TRPC5 via the channel's calmodulin- and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding domain. In functional studies, we demonstrate that SESTD1 binds several phospholipid species in vitro and is essential for efficient receptor-mediated activation of TRPC5. Notably, phospholipid binding to SESTD1 was Ca2+-dependent. Because TRPC4 and -5 conduct Ca2+, SESTD1-channel signaling may be bidirectional and also couple TRPC activity to lipid signaling through SESTD1. The modulation of TRPC channel function by specific lipid-binding proteins, such as SESTD1, adds another facet to the complex regulation of these channels complementary to the previously described effects of direct channel-phospholipid interaction. PMID:20164195

  10. Regulation of length and density of Arabidopsis root hairs by ammonium and nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatter, Thomas; Neuhäuser, Benjamin; Stetter, Markus; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Root hairs expand the effective root surface to increase the uptake of nutrients and water from the soil. Here the local effects of the two major nitrogen sources, ammonium and nitrate, on root hairs were investigated using split plates. In three contrasting accessions of A. thaliana, namely Col-0, Tsu-0 and Sha, root hairs were differentially affected by the nitrogen forms and their concentration. Root hairs in Sha were short in the absence of nitrate. In Col-0, hair length was moderately decreased with increasing nitrate or ammonium. In all accessions, the root hair density was insensitive to 1,000-fold changes in the ammonium concentrations, when supplied locally as the exclusive nitrogen form. In contrast, the root hair density generally increased with nitrate as the exclusive local nitrogen source. The nitrate sensitivity was reduced at mM concentrations in a loss-of-function mutant of the nitrate transporter and sensor gene NRT1;1 (NPF6.3). Little differences with respect to ammonium were found in a mutant lacking four high affinity AMT-type ammonium transporters, but interestingly, the response to high nitrate was reduced and may indicate a general defect in nitrogen signaling in that mutant. Genetic diversity and the presence of the nitrogen transceptor NRT1;1 explain heterogeneity in the responses of root hairs to different nitrogen forms in Arabidopsis accessions.

  11. Kinetic modeling of rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including cell density-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Marius; Schmidberger, Anke; Vogelbacher, Markus; Kühnert, Christian; Beuker, Janina; Bernard, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    The production of rhamnolipid biosurfactants by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is under complex control of a quorum sensing-dependent regulatory network. Due to a lack of understanding of the kinetics applicable to the process and relevant interrelations of variables, current processes for rhamnolipid production are based on heuristic approaches. To systematically establish a knowledge-based process for rhamnolipid production, a deeper understanding of the time-course and coupling of process variables is required. By combining reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and experimental data, a process model for rhamnolipid production with P. aeruginosa PAO1 on sunflower oil was developed as a system of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In addition, cell density-based quorum sensing dynamics were included in the model. The model comprises a total of 36 parameters, 14 of which are yield coefficients and 7 of which are substrate affinity and inhibition constants. Of all 36 parameters, 30 were derived from dedicated experimental results, literature, and databases and 6 of them were used as fitting parameters. The model is able to describe data on biomass growth, substrates, and products obtained from a reference batch process and other validation scenarios. The model presented describes the time-course and interrelation of biomass, relevant substrates, and products on a process level while including a kinetic representation of cell density-dependent regulatory mechanisms.

  12. cGMP stimulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels co-expressed with cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II but not type Ibeta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); W.C. Poller; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A. Smolenski; S. Schneider-Rasp; A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); B.J. Scholte (Bob); T. Jarchau; U. Walter

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn order to investigate the involvement of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) type II in cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion, cGMP-dependent activation and phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels was ana

  13. Isotype-specific activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-chloride channels by cGMP-dependent protein kinase II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. French (Pim); J. Bijman (Jan); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); B.J. Scholte (Bob); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); A.C. Nairn; H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractType II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) isolated from pig intestinal brush borders and type I alpha cGK (cGKI) purified from bovine lung were compared for their ability to activate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-Cl- channel in excis

  14. Ion channel regulation of the dynamical instability of the resting membrane potential in saccular hair cells of the green frog (Rana esculenta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, F; Kroese, ABA

    2005-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the ion channel regulation of the resting membrane potential of hair cells with the aim to determine if the resting membrane potential is poised close to instability and thereby a potential cause of the spontaneous afferent spike activity. Methods: The ionic mechanism and the d

  15. Heteromeric Kv7.2/7.3 channels differentially regulate action potential initiation and conduction in neocortical myelinated axons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battefeld, A.; Tran, Baouyen T; Gavrilis, Jason; Cooper, Edward C; Kole, Maarten H P

    2014-01-01

    Rapid energy-efficient signaling along vertebrate axons is achieved through intricate subcellular arrangements of voltage-gated ion channels and myelination. One recently appreciated example is the tight colocalization of K(v)7 potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels in the axon

  16. Heteromeric Kv7.2/7.3 channels differentially regulate action potential initiation and conduction in neocortical myelinated axons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battefeld, A.; Tran, B.T.; Gavrilis, J.; Cooper, E.C.; Kole, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Rapid energy-efficient signaling along vertebrate axons is achieved through intricate subcellular arrangements of voltage-gated ion channels and myelination. One recently appreciated example is the tight colocalization of Kv7 potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium (Nav ) channels in the axonal

  17. Epigenetic regulation of Kcna3-encoding Kv1.3 potassium channel by cereblon contributes to regulation of CD4+ T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ah; Park, Sang-Heon; Jeong, Sang Phil; Han, Min-Hee; Lee, Cho-Rong; Lee, Kwang Min; Kim, Namhee; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Choi, Murim; Ye, Michael; Jung, Guhung; Lee, Won-Woo; Eom, Soo Hyun; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo

    2016-08-02

    The role of cereblon (CRBN) in T cells is not well understood. We generated mice with a deletion in Crbn and found cereblon to be an important antagonist of T-cell activation. In mice lacking CRBN, CD4(+) T cells show increased activation and IL-2 production on T-cell receptor stimulation, ultimately resulting in increased potassium flux and calcium-mediated signaling. CRBN restricts T-cell activation via epigenetic modification of Kcna3, which encodes the Kv1.3 potassium channel required for robust calcium influx in T cells. CRBN binds directly to conserved DNA elements adjacent to Kcna3 via a previously uncharacterized DNA-binding motif. Consequently, in the absence of CRBN, the expression of Kv1.3 is derepressed, resulting in increased Kv1.3 expression, potassium flux, and CD4(+) T-cell hyperactivation. In addition, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in T-cell-specific Crbn-deficient mice was exacerbated by increased T-cell activation via Kv1.3. Thus, CRBN limits CD4(+) T-cell activation via epigenetic regulation of Kv1.3 expression.

  18. Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection on post-transcriptional regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazawa Haruna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontal disease is suggested to increase the risk of atherothrombotic disease by inducing dyslipidemia. Recently, we demonstrated that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, which is known to play a critical role in the regulation of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol levels, is elevated in periodontitis patients. However, the underlying mechanisms of elevation of PCSK9 in periodontitis patients are largely unknown. Here, we explored whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative periodontopathic bacterium, -induced inflammatory response regulates serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels using animal models. Methods We infected C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally with Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative strain of periodontopathic bacteria, and evaluated serum PCSK9 levels and the serum lipid profile. PCSK9 and LDL receptor (LDLR gene and protein expression, as well as liver X receptors (Lxrs, inducible degrader of the LDLR (Idol, and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor (Srebf2 gene expression, were examined in the liver. Results P. gingivalis infection induced a significant elevation of serum PCSK9 levels and a concomitant elevation of total and LDL cholesterol compared with sham-infected mice. The LDL cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with PCSK9 levels. Expression of the Pcsk9, Ldlr, and Srebf2 genes was upregulated in the livers of the P. gingivalis-infected mice compared with the sham-infected mice. Although Pcsk9 gene expression is known to be positively regulated by sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP2 (human homologue of Srebf2, whereas Srebf2 is negatively regulated by cholesterol, the elevated expression of Srebf2 found in the infected mice is thought to be mediated by P. gingivalis infection. Conclusions P. gingivalis infection upregulates PCSK9 production via upregulation of Srebf2, independent of cholesterol levels. Further studies

  19. Alterations in potassium channel gene expression in atria of patients with persistent and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation : Differential regulation of protein and mRNA levels for K+ channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brundel, BJJM; Van Gelder, IC; Henning, RH; Tuinenburg, AE; Wietses, M; Grandjean, JG; Wilde, AAM; Van Gilst, WH; Crijns, HJGM

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Our purpose was to determine whether patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) and patients with paroxysmal AF show alterations in potassium channel expression. BACKGROUND Persistent AF is associated with a sustained shortening of the atrial action potential duration and atrial re

  20. L-type calcium channels may regulate neurite initiation in cultured chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C; Lomme, M; Shugarts, D; Rosack, J; Caracciolo, P; Gisi, T; Nichols, P

    1990-08-01

    The intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, plays an important role in regulating neurite growth in cultured neurons. Insofar as [Ca2+]i is partly a function of Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC), Ca2+ entry through VSCC should influence neurite growth. Vertebrate neurons may possess several types of VSCC. The most frequently described VSCC types are usually designated L, T and N. In most preparations, these VSCC types respond differently to certain pharmacological agents, including Cd2+, Ni2+, the dihydropyridines nifedipine and BAY K8644, and the aminoglycoside antibiotics. We used these agents to study the role of Ca2+ influx in regulating neurite initiation and length in cultures of chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. In chick neurons, nifedipine and Cd2+ (less than 50 microM), which have been reported to inhibit L-type channels, reduced neurite initiation, but not mean neurite length. Ni2+ (less than 100 microM), reported to inhibit T-type channels, had no effect on either initiation or length. Low concentrations of most aminoglycosides (less than 300 microM), reported to inhibit N-type channels, had no effect on neurite initiation, but high concentrations of streptomycin (great than 300 microM), reported to inhibit both L- and N-type channels, reduced neurite initiation. BAY K8644, which enhances current flow through L-type channels, had no effect except at high concentration (50 microM), which inhibited initiation. N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells have been reported to contain L-type and T-type channels, but thus far no channel similar to the N-type has been described. In cultured N1E-115 cells, nifedipine (5 microM), Cd2+ (5 microM), and streptomycin (200 microM) reduced neurite initiation, while nickel (50 microM) and neomycin (100 microM) did not affect initiation. None of these agents altered neurite length. In N1E-115 cells, whole-cell voltage clamp recordings showed that nifedipine and Cd2

  1. Regulation of sodium channel function by bilayer elasticity: the importance of hydrophobic coupling. Effects of Micelle-forming amphiphiles and cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J

    2004-01-01

    Membrane proteins are regulated by the lipid bilayer composition. Specific lipid-protein interactions rarely are involved, which suggests that the regulation is due to changes in some general bilayer property (or properties). The hydrophobic coupling between a membrane-spanning protein...... and the surrounding bilayer means that protein conformational changes may be associated with a reversible, local bilayer deformation. Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies, and the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation contributes to the total energetic cost of the protein conformational change. The energetics...... and kinetics of the protein conformational changes therefore will be regulated by the bilayer elasticity, which is determined by the lipid composition. This hydrophobic coupling mechanism has been studied extensively in gramicidin channels, where the channel-bilayer hydrophobic interactions link...

  2. Roles of store-operated Ca2+ channels in regulating cell cycling and migration of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hui; Li, Gang; Sun, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2015-11-15

    Cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells are important for maintaining cardiac homeostasis and can potentially contribute to myocardial repair. However, cellular physiology of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells is not well understood. The present study investigates the functional store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channels and the potential role in regulating cell cycling and migration using confocal microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blot, coimmunoprecipitation, cell proliferation, and migration assays. We found that SOCE channels mediated Ca(2+) influx, and TRPC1, STIM1, and Orai1 were involved in the formation of SOCE channels in human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. Silencing TRPC1, STIM1, or Orai1 with the corresponding siRNA significantly reduced the Ca(2+) signaling through SOCE channels, decreased cell proliferation and migration, and reduced expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and/or p-Akt. Our results demonstrate the novel information that Ca(2+) signaling through SOCE channels regulates cell cycling and migration via activating cyclin D1, cyclin E, and/or p-Akt in human cardiac c-kit(+) cells.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Mammalian GIRK2 K[superscript +] Channel and Gating Regulation by G Proteins, PIP[subscript 2], and Sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whorton, Matthew R.; MacKinnon, Roderick (Rockefeller)

    2011-11-17

    G protein-gated K{sup +} channels (Kir3.1-Kir3.4) control electrical excitability in many different cells. Among their functions relevant to human physiology and disease, they regulate the heart rate and govern a wide range of neuronal activities. Here, we present the first crystal structures of a G protein-gated K{sup +} channel. By comparing the wild-type structure to that of a constitutively active mutant, we identify a global conformational change through which G proteins could open a G loop gate in the cytoplasmic domain. The structures of both channels in the absence and presence of PIP{sub 2} suggest that G proteins open only the G loop gate in the absence of PIP{sub 2}, but in the presence of PIP{sub 2} the G loop gate and a second inner helix gate become coupled, so that both gates open. We also identify a strategically located Na{sup +} ion-binding site, which would allow intracellular Na{sup +} to modulate GIRK channel activity. These data provide a structural basis for understanding multiligand regulation of GIRK channel gating.

  4. Gαi2- and Gαi3-specific regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Dizayee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two pertussis toxin sensitive G(i proteins, G(i2 and G(i3, are expressed in cardiomyocytes and upregulated in heart failure. It has been proposed that the highly homologous G(i isoforms are functionally distinct. To test for isoform-specific functions of G(i proteins, we examined their role in the regulation of cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC. METHODS: Ventricular tissues and isolated myocytes were obtained from mice with targeted deletion of either Gα(i2 (Gα(i2 (-/- or Gα(i3 (Gα(i3 (-/-. mRNA levels of Gα(i/o isoforms and L-VDCC subunits were quantified by real-time PCR. Gα(i and Ca(vα(1 protein levels as well as protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. L-VDCC function was assessed by whole-cell and single-channel current recordings. RESULTS: In cardiac tissue from Gα(i2 (-/- mice, Gα(i3 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated to 187 ± 21% and 567 ± 59%, respectively. In Gα(i3 (-/- mouse hearts, Gα(i2 mRNA (127 ± 5% and protein (131 ± 10% levels were slightly enhanced. Interestingly, L-VDCC current density in cardiomyocytes from Gα(i2 (-/- mice was lowered (-7.9 ± 0.6 pA/pF, n = 11, p<0.05 compared to wild-type cells (-10.7 ± 0.5 pA/pF, n = 22, whereas it was increased in myocytes from Gα(i3 (-/- mice (-14.3 ± 0.8 pA/pF, n = 14, p<0.05. Steady-state inactivation was shifted to negative potentials, and recovery kinetics slowed in the absence of Gα(i2 (but not of Gα(i3 and following treatment with pertussis toxin in Gα(i3 (-/-. The pore forming Ca(vα(1 protein level was unchanged in all mouse models analyzed, similar to mRNA levels of Ca(vα(1 and Ca(vβ(2 subunits. Interestingly, at the cellular signalling level, phosphorylation assays revealed abolished carbachol-triggered activation of ERK1/2 in mice lacking Gα(i2. CONCLUSION: Our data provide novel evidence for an isoform

  5. CREB regulates spine density of lateral amygdala neurons: implications for memory allocation

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    Derya eSargin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons may compete against one another for integration into a memory trace. Specifically, neurons in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala with relatively higher levels of CREB seem to be preferentially allocated to a fear memory trace, while neurons with relatively decreased CREB function seem to be excluded from a fear memory trace. CREB is a ubiquitous transcription factor that modulates many diverse cellular processes, raising the question as to which of these CREB-mediated processes underlie memory allocation. CREB is implicated in modulating dendritic spine number and morphology. As dendritic spines are intimately involved in memory formation, we investigated whether manipulations of CREB function alter spine number or morphology of neurons at the time of fear conditioning. We used viral vectors to manipulate CREB function in the lateral amygdala principal neurons in mice maintained in their homecages. At the time that fear conditioning normally occurs, we observed that neurons with high levels of CREB had more dendritic spines, while neurons with low CREB function had relatively fewer spines compared to control neurons. These results suggest that the modulation of spine density provides a potential mechanism for preferential allocation of a subset of neurons to the memory trace.

  6. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

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    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  7. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH.

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    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J; Chapleau, Mark W; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M

    2017-03-09

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo-conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox-mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential.

  8. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH

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    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M.

    2017-01-01

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo–conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox–mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate–induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential. PMID:28289711

  9. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2

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    Yunjia Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development.

  10. Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone regulation of the very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) receptor phosphorylation for VHDL uptake.

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    Dong, Du-Juan; Liu, Wen; Cai, Mei-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2013-04-01

    During the metamorphic stage of holometabolous insects, the biosynthetic precursors needed for the synthesis of a large number of adult proteins are acquired from the selective absorption of storage proteins. The very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL), a non-hexameric storage protein, is consumed by the fat body from the hemolymph through VHDL receptor (VHDL-R)-mediated endocytosis. However, the mechanism of the uptake of VHDL by a VHDL-R remains unclear. In this study, a VHDL-R from Helicoverpa armigera was found to be involved in 20E-regulated VHDL uptake through the regulation of steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). The transcripts of VHDL-R were detected mainly in the fat body and integument during the wandering stage. The transcription of VHDL-R was upregulated by 20E through the ecdysteroid receptor (EcRB1) and Ultraspiracle (USP1). In addition, 20E stimulates the phosphorylation of VHDL-R through protein kinase C for ligand binding. VHDL-R knockdown in larvae results the inhibition of development to adulthood. These data imply that 20E regulates VHDL-R on both transcriptional and posttranslational levels for VHDL absorption.

  11. Cav2-type calcium channels encoded by cac regulate AP-independent neurotransmitter release at cholinergic synapses in adult Drosophila brain.

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    Gu, Huaiyu; Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Iniguez, Jorge; Su, Hailing; Hoang, Andy An; Lavian, Monica; Sun, Xicui; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels containing alpha1 subunits encoded by Ca(v)2 family genes are critical in regulating release of neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In Drosophila, cac is the only Ca(v)2-type gene. Cacophony (CAC) channels are localized in motor neuron terminals where they have been shown to mediate evoked, but not AP-independent, release of glutamate at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Cultured embryonic neurons also express CAC channels, but there is no information about the properties of CAC-mediated currents in adult brain nor how these channels regulate transmission in central neural circuits where fast excitatory synaptic transmission is predominantly cholinergic. Here we report that wild-type neurons cultured from late stage pupal brains and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) examined in adult brains, express calcium currents with two components: a slow-inactivating current sensitive to the spider toxin Plectreurys toxin II (PLTXII) and a fast-inactivating PLTXII-resistant component. CAC channels are the major contributors to the slow-inactivating PLTXII-sensitive current based on selective reduction of this component in hypomorphic cac mutants (NT27 and TS3). Another characteristic of cac mutant neurons both in culture and in whole brain recordings is a reduced cholinergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency that is mimicked in wild-type neurons by acute application of PLTXII. These data demonstrate that cac encoded Ca(v)2-type calcium channels regulate action potential (AP)-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses in the adult brain, a function not predicted from studies at the larval NMJ.

  12. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

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    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  13. A cell model study of calcium influx mechanism regulated by calcium-dependent potassium channels in Purkinje cell dendrites.

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    Chono, Koji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Shozo; Suzuki, Hideo; Ito, Etsuro

    2003-10-30

    The present study was designed to elucidate the roles of dendritic voltage-gated K+ channels in Ca2+ influx mechanism of a rat Purkinje cell using a computer simulation program. First, we improved the channel descriptions and the maximum conductance in the Purkinje cell model to mimic both the kinetics of ion channels and the Ca2+ spikes, which had failed in previous studies. Our cell model is, therefore, much more authentic than those in previous studies. Second, synaptic inputs that mimic stimulation of parallel fibers and induce sub-threshold excitability were simultaneously applied to the spiny dendrites. As a result, transient Ca2+ responses were observed in the stimulation points and they decreased with the faster decay rate in the cell model including high-threshold Ca2+-dependent K+ channels than in those excluding these channels. Third, when a single synaptic input was applied into a spiny dendrite, Ca2+-dependent K+ channels suppressed Ca2+ increases at stimulation and recording points. Finally, Ca2+-dependent K+ channels were also found to suppress the time to peak Ca2+ values in the recording points. These results suggest that the opening of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels hyperpolarizes the membrane potentials and deactivates these Ca2+ channels in a negative feedback manner, resulting in local, weak Ca2+ responses in spiny dendrites of Purkinje cells.

  14. The hydrometeorological implications of zoning laws: Can land use regulations of urban density and sprawl improve a city's resilience?

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    Bou-Zeid, E.; Ryu, Y. H.; Smith, J. A.; Newburn, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The intensification of heat waves and of the hydrological cycle due to global climate change pose particularly high risks to urban residents. Cities are already hotter than their surroundings due to the urban heat island effect and are known to result in local intensification of rainfall and flooding due to their coupled impacts on the surface and the lower atmosphere. These interacting local and global changes can adversely affect the health and well being of urban residents, and city administrators are increasing efforts to mitigate and adapt to the potential disruptions though various infrastructure and preparedness programs. However, as cities worldwide continue to expand, a key decision is how to manage that urban sprawl and regulate its spatial features to aid in the mitigation and adaptation effort. This study assesses whether alternative zoning regulations that modify the density and extent of a metropolitan region, but have a minimal impact on total population and demographic growth, have an appreciable impact on its response to extreme weather events, and as such, whether they can be used to increase urban resilience. We consider Baltimore (the city and its surrounding suburbs), which in 1967 adopted one of the first urban growth boundaries (UGBs) in the United States, as our test case. Departing from the urban extent circa 1900, we create alternative land use patterns that, compared to the actual current land use baseline, would have resulted from drastically different policy scenarios and approaches to zoning that the city would have undertaken. We consider various alternatives where the city is smaller and denser, due to stricter regulation, versus larger and less dense than the actual baseline, while maintaining the same total population. Our findings indicate that lower densities have significant benefits: compared to the current landscape and to denser patterns, they reduce both extreme temperatures during heat waves and spatio-temporal rainfall

  15. A conserved threonine in the S1-S2 loop of KV7.2 and K V7.3 channels regulates voltage-dependent activation.

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    Füll, Yvonne; Seebohm, Guiscard; Lerche, Holger; Maljevic, Snezana

    2013-06-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels KV7.2 and KV7.3 (KCNQ2/3 genes) play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability. More than 50 KCNQ2/3 mutations have been identified to cause an inherited form of epilepsy in newborns. For two of those (E119G and S122L) found in the S1-S2 region of KV7.2, we previously showed a decreased channel availability mainly at action potential subthreshold voltages caused by a slight depolarizing shift of the activation curve. Interestingly, recent studies revealed that a threonine residue within the S1-S2 loop, highly conserved among different classes of KV channels, is crucial for both their function and surface expression. To investigate the functional role of the homologous threonine residues in KV7.2 (T114) and KV7.3 (T144) channels, we replaced them with alanine and examined the electrophysiological properties using heterologous expression in CHO cells and whole cell patch clamping. Channels comprising mutant subunits yielded decreased potassium currents with slowed activation and accelerated deactivation kinetics. However, the most striking effect was a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation reaching +30 mV upon co-expression of both mutant subunits. Potential interactions of T114 within the channel were analyzed by creating a 3D homology model of KV7.2 in an open state suggesting that this residue plays a central role in the formation of a stable interface between the S1-S2 and the S5 segment helices. This could be the explanation why substitution of the conserved threonine in KV7.2 and KV7.3 channels destabilizes the open and favors the closed state of these channels.

  16. Voltage-dependent regulation of CaV2.2 channels by Gq-coupled receptor is facilitated by membrane-localized β subunit.

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    Keum, Dongil; Baek, Christina; Kim, Dong-Il; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal through molecular messengers, such as Gβγ, Ca(2+), and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), to modulate N-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV2.2) channels, playing a crucial role in regulating synaptic transmission. However, the cellular pathways through which GqPCRs inhibit CaV2.2 channel current are not completely understood. Here, we report that the location of CaV β subunits is key to determining the voltage dependence of CaV2.2 channel modulation by GqPCRs. Application of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M to tsA-201 cells expressing M1 receptors, together with CaV N-type α1B, α2δ1, and membrane-localized β2a subunits, shifted the current-voltage relationship for CaV2.2 activation 5 mV to the right and slowed current activation. Muscarinic suppression of CaV2.2 activity was relieved by strong depolarizing prepulses. Moreover, when the C terminus of β-adrenergic receptor kinase (which binds Gβγ) was coexpressed with N-type channels, inhibition of CaV2.2 current after M1 receptor activation was markedly reduced and delayed, whereas the delay between PIP2 hydrolysis and inhibition of CaV2.2 current was decreased. When the Gβγ-insensitive CaV2.2 α1C-1B chimera was expressed, voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium current was virtually abolished, suggesting that M1 receptors act through Gβγ to inhibit CaV2.2 channels bearing membrane-localized CaV β2a subunits. Expression of cytosolic β subunits such as β2b and β3, as well as the palmitoylation-negative mutant β2a(C3,4S), reduced the voltage dependence of M1 muscarinic inhibition of CaV2.2 channels, whereas it increased inhibition mediated by PIP2 depletion. Together, our results indicate that, with membrane-localized CaV β subunits, CaV2.2 channels are subject to Gβγ-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition, whereas cytosol-localized β subunits confer more effective PIP2-mediated voltage-independent regulation. Thus, the voltage dependence of

  17. Expulsion of symbiotic algae during feeding by the green hydra--a mechanism for regulating symbiont density?

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    Yelena Fishman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Algal-cnidarian symbiosis is one of the main factors contributing to the success of cnidarians, and is crucial for the maintenance of coral reefs. While loss of the symbionts (such as in coral bleaching may cause the death of the cnidarian host, over-proliferation of the algae may also harm the host. Thus, there is a need for the host to regulate the population density of its symbionts. In the green hydra, Chlorohydra viridissima, the density of symbiotic algae may be controlled through host modulation of the algal cell cycle. Alternatively, Chlorohydra may actively expel their endosymbionts, although this phenomenon has only been observed under experimentally contrived stress conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show, using light and electron microscopy, that Chlorohydra actively expel endosymbiotic algal cells during predatory feeding on Artemia. This expulsion occurs as part of the apocrine mode of secretion from the endodermal digestive cells, but may also occur via an independent exocytotic mechanism. SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, active expulsion of endosymbiotic algae from cnidarians under natural conditions. We suggest this phenomenon may represent a mechanism whereby cnidarians can expel excess symbiotic algae when an alternative form of nutrition is available in the form of prey.

  18. CDPKs CPK6 and CPK3 function in ABA regulation of guard cell S-type anion- and Ca(2+-permeable channels and stomatal closure.

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    Izumi C Mori

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA signal transduction has been proposed to utilize cytosolic Ca(2+ in guard cell ion channel regulation. However, genetic mutants in Ca(2+ sensors that impair guard cell or plant ion channel signaling responses have not been identified, and whether Ca(2+-independent ABA signaling mechanisms suffice for a full response remains unclear. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs have been proposed to contribute to central signal transduction responses in plants. However, no Arabidopsis CDPK gene disruption mutant phenotype has been reported to date, likely due to overlapping redundancies in CDPKs. Two Arabidopsis guard cell-expressed CDPK genes, CPK3 and CPK6, showed gene disruption phenotypes. ABA and Ca(2+ activation of slow-type anion channels and, interestingly, ABA activation of plasma membrane Ca(2+-permeable channels were impaired in independent alleles of single and double cpk3cpk6 mutant guard cells. Furthermore, ABA- and Ca(2+-induced stomatal closing were partially impaired in these cpk3cpk6 mutant alleles. However, rapid-type anion channel current activity was not affected, consistent with the partial stomatal closing response in double mutants via a proposed branched signaling network. Imposed Ca(2+ oscillation experiments revealed that Ca(2+-reactive stomatal closure was reduced in CDPK double mutant plants. However, long-lasting Ca(2+-programmed stomatal closure was not impaired, providing genetic evidence for a functional separation of these two modes of Ca(2+-induced stomatal closing. Our findings show important functions of the CPK6 and CPK3 CDPKs in guard cell ion channel regulation and provide genetic evidence for calcium sensors that transduce stomatal ABA signaling.

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor) opens the defective channel gate of mutant CFTR in a phosphorylation-dependent but ATP-independent manner.

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    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Bear, Christine E

    2012-10-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a channel on the apical membrane of epithelia. Disease-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene can lead to CFTR protein misfolding as in the case of the F508del mutation and/or channel dysfunction. Recently, a small molecule, VX-770 (ivacaftor), has shown efficacy in restoring lung function in patients bearing the G551D mutation, and this has been linked to repair of its channel gating defect. However, these studies did not reveal the mechanism of action of VX-770 in detail. Normally, CFTR channel activity is regulated by phosphorylation, ATP binding, and hydrolysis. Hence, it has been hypothesized that VX-770 modifies one or more of these metabolic events. In this study, we examined VX-770 activity using a reconstitution system for purified CFTR protein, a system that enables control of known regulatory factors. We studied the consequences of VX-770 interaction with CFTR incorporated in planar lipid bilayers and in proteoliposomes, using a novel flux-based assay. We found that purified and phosphorylated CFTR was potentiated in the presence of Mg-ATP, suggesting that VX-770 bound directly to the CFTR protein, rather than associated kinases or phosphatases. Interestingly, we also found that VX-770 enhanced the channel activity of purified and mutant CFTR in the nominal absence of Mg-ATP. These findings suggest that VX-770 can cause CFTR channel opening through a nonconventional ATP-independent mechanism. This work sets the stage for future studies of the structural properties that mediate CFTR gating using VX-770 as a probe.

  20. Emerging role of calcium-activated potassium channel in the regulation of cell viability following potassium ions challenge in HEK293 cells and pharmacological modulation.

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    Domenico Tricarico

    Full Text Available Emerging evidences suggest that Ca(2+activated-K(+-(BK channel is involved in the regulation of cell viability. The changes of the cell viability observed under hyperkalemia (15 mEq/L or hypokalemia (0.55 mEq/L conditions were investigated in HEK293 cells expressing the hslo subunit (hslo-HEK293 in the presence or absence of BK channel modulators. The BK channel openers(10(-11-10(-3M were: acetazolamide(ACTZ, Dichlorphenamide(DCP, methazolamide(MTZ, bendroflumethiazide(BFT, ethoxzolamide(ETX, hydrochlorthiazide(HCT, quercetin(QUERC, resveratrol(RESV and NS1619; and the BK channel blockers(2 x 10(-7M-5 x 10(-3M were: tetraethylammonium(TEA, iberiotoxin(IbTx and charybdotoxin(ChTX. Experiments on cell viability and channel currents were performed using cell counting kit-8 and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Hslo whole-cell current was potentiated by BK channel openers with different potency and efficacy in hslo-HEK293. The efficacy ranking of the openers at -60 mV(Vm was BFT> ACTZ >DCP ≥RESV≥ ETX> NS1619> MTZ≥ QUERC; HCT was not effective. Cell viability after 24 h of incubation under hyperkalemia was enhanced by 82+6% and 33+7% in hslo-HEK293 cells and HEK293 cells, respectively. IbTx, ChTX and TEA enhanced cell viability in hslo-HEK293. BK openers prevented the enhancement of the cell viability induced by hyperkalemia or IbTx in hslo-HEK293 showing an efficacy which was comparable with that observed as BK openers. BK channel modulators failed to affect cell currents and viability under hyperkalemia conditions in the absence of hslo subunit. In contrast, under hypokalemia cell viability was reduced by -22+4% and -23+6% in hslo-HEK293 and HEK293 cells, respectively; the BK channel modulators failed to affect this parameter in these cells. In conclusion, BK channel regulates cell viability under hyperkalemia but not hypokalemia conditions. BFT and ACTZ were the most potent drugs either in activating the BK current and in preventing the

  1. Emerging role of calcium-activated potassium channel in the regulation of cell viability following potassium ions challenge in HEK293 cells and pharmacological modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Domenico; Mele, Antonietta; Calzolaro, Sara; Cannone, Gianluigi; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Latorre, Ramon; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidences suggest that Ca(2+)activated-K(+)-(BK) channel is involved in the regulation of cell viability. The changes of the cell viability observed under hyperkalemia (15 mEq/L) or hypokalemia (0.55 mEq/L) conditions were investigated in HEK293 cells expressing the hslo subunit (hslo-HEK293) in the presence or absence of BK channel modulators. The BK channel openers(10(-11)-10(-3)M) were: acetazolamide(ACTZ), Dichlorphenamide(DCP), methazolamide(MTZ), bendroflumethiazide(BFT), ethoxzolamide(ETX), hydrochlorthiazide(HCT), quercetin(QUERC), resveratrol(RESV) and NS1619; and the BK channel blockers(2 x 10(-7)M-5 x 10(-3)M) were: tetraethylammonium(TEA), iberiotoxin(IbTx) and charybdotoxin(ChTX). Experiments on cell viability and channel currents were performed using cell counting kit-8 and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Hslo whole-cell current was potentiated by BK channel openers with different potency and efficacy in hslo-HEK293. The efficacy ranking of the openers at -60 mV(Vm) was BFT> ACTZ >DCP ≥RESV≥ ETX> NS1619> MTZ≥ QUERC; HCT was not effective. Cell viability after 24 h of incubation under hyperkalemia was enhanced by 82+6% and 33+7% in hslo-HEK293 cells and HEK293 cells, respectively. IbTx, ChTX and TEA enhanced cell viability in hslo-HEK293. BK openers prevented the enhancement of the cell viability induced by hyperkalemia or IbTx in hslo-HEK293 showing an efficacy which was comparable with that observed as BK openers. BK channel