WorldWideScience

Sample records for changing world skip

  1. Changing the World?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Carl; Wright, Christopher; Pullen, Alison

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the political differences between academic activism and the recently emerged research impact agenda. While both claim that academic work can and should engage with and influence the world beyond the academic ‘ivory tower’, their political meaning and practice are radically...... different. Following the distinction made by Jacques Rancière, we argue that research impact performs a policing function which, despite its own rhetoric, is arranged as an attempt to ensure that academic work maintains a neoliberal status quo by actually having no real political impact. Academic activism......, in contrast, serves to politicize scholarly work by democratically disrupting political consensus in the name of equality. Being an academic activist in an era of research impact rests in a twofold movement: that of both acting in the name of equality in an effort (using Marx’s terms) to ‘change the world...

  2. Guidelines for a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell; Brack, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the issues surrounding teachers' use of social networking media and their First Amendment rights. It focuses on the need to develop a school district policy outlining specific guidelines for the use of technology and social networking. It also focuses on the changing world of technology and social networking as well as…

  3. Change the World by Changing Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Wagner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We live in a world of opportunity – the opportunity to use the insight generated through the multiple crises humanity finds itself in to transit into a much more liveable, sustainable and equitable society. A paradigm change seems to be taking place, a movement for change seems to be in the making, but at the same time there is a widespread feeling that things are getting worse instead of better and there is no guarantee that change will lead us into a better future in the next few decades. To effectively guide the direction of change we need to address the root causes of today’s global challenges and take a close look at what drives human society and human beings. In doing so we realize that we are looking at a holographic picture which contains different layers, which are interdependent: Human biology; values and belief systems; the changing narrative underlying the development of human society; economics and governance and the many tools as well as special interests, support and uphold the outdated paradigms. The one element which influences all people nearly every day and is behind just about each and every crisis is the theory and practice of current economics. The article explores the debate on current economics and proposes mechanisms of change.

  4. Hydrology for a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    To support critical decisions related to water quantity, quality, and hazard mitigation, surface water hydrologists and water resources engineers have historically invoked the assumption that hydrologic systems are stationary; variables such as discharge or solute fluxes were assumed to have a mean, a variance, and other statistical properties that did not change over time. Today, the drivers of non-stationarity such as urbanization, groundwater depletion, engineered land-drainage systems, application of nutrients at the land surface, new farming technologies, and changes in greenhouse gas forcing of the global atmosphere have perturbed hydrologic systems enough so that this assumption must be challenged. Understanding of the non-stationarity in hydrologic systems is important for at least two major reasons: (1) Society needs insights on the hydrologic conditions of the future as a basis for planning, operating, and regulating water resources in the future. Water resources engineers cannot depend solely on records of the past to design and operate in the future. However, simply substituting model projections for historic records, without evaluation of the ability of those models to produce realistic projections, is not acceptable. (2) Non-stationarity provides a framework to identify emerging water resource issues and evaluate our society's success in achieving its environmental goals. The study of hydrologic change is our greatest challenge. We must learn how best to blend our knowledge of the past with our projections of the future. In this non-stationary world, observing systems and networks become even more critically important and our models must be tested using historical records to ensure that they produce useful projections of our future. In the words of Ralph Keeling, "The only way to figure out what is happening to our planet is to measure it, and this means tracking the changes decade after decade, and poring over the records." Walter Langbein knew the

  5. Climatic change and world governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousel, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the problems of international agreements about the greenhouse effect gases control. Even if the prejudice covers the whole world, the implementing of pollution regulations generate conflicts of interest. Solidarity, equity and not historical responsibilities have to govern the discussions. This involves to take into account the place of the developing countries. (A.L.B.)

  6. Stability in a changing world -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares, Ingrid; Svenning, J.-C.; van Bodegom, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Are the hyperdiverse local forests of the western Amazon undergoing changes linked to global and local drivers such as climate change, or successional dynamics? We analyzed local climatic records to assess potential climatic changes in Yasuní National Park, Ecuador, and compared two censuses (1995...... dynamics in Yasuní contrast with recent findings from eastern Amazon, where environmental change is driving significant changes in ecosystem dynamics. Our findings suggest that until now, local forests in the northwest Amazon may have escaped pressure from climate change. The stability of this rich palm...

  7. Climate Change and Future World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    of water-borne diseases such as cholera and malaria which, if uncontrolled, could generate epidemics.27 More frequent and more intense extreme 7... Mexico , and the United States. All these trends produced by climate change are likely to increase migration movements to the U.S., and the occurrence

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP001078 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001078 ... Fibroblast 線維芽細胞 Diseased ND35669 ND35669 NDS00076 NDS00076 筋萎縮性側索硬...(SNP, no amino acid change) ... ALS 患者由来 (線維芽細胞) FIG4 27C>T (SNP アミノ酸置換なし) ... human ES-like Research Grade Retrov

  9. Changing world extreme temperature statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, J. M.; Katz, J. I.

    2018-04-01

    We use the Global Historical Climatology Network--daily database to calculate a nonparametric statistic that describes the rate at which all-time daily high and low temperature records have been set in nine geographic regions (continents or major portions of continents) during periods mostly from the mid-20th Century to the present. This statistic was defined in our earlier work on temperature records in the 48 contiguous United States. In contrast to this earlier work, we find that in every region except North America all-time high records were set at a rate significantly (at least $3\\sigma$) higher than in the null hypothesis of a stationary climate. Except in Antarctica, all-time low records were set at a rate significantly lower than in the null hypothesis. In Europe, North Africa and North Asia the rate of setting new all-time highs increased suddenly in the 1990's, suggesting a change in regional climate regime; in most other regions there was a steadier increase.

  10. The World Bank and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.-C.

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is inextricably linked with economic and development policies. This raises the question, to what extent do the commitments to reduce carbon dioxide emissions under the Climate Change Convention affect the practices and policies of the World Bank? After briefly describing the interaction between climate change and economic development, as well as the respective instruments of the Climate Change Treaty and the World Bank, this paper identifies several windows through which the obligations set out by the Climate Change treaty affect the World Bank. These include the Global Environmentally Facility, the Operational Policies adopted by the Executive Directors of the World Bank, specific loan structures and conditions as well as the recent Prototype Carbon Fund. (Author)

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, William H.

    The world is changing,and the atmosphere's composition is changing with it. Human activity is responsible for much of this. Global population growth and migration to urban centers, extensive biomass burning, the spread of fertilizer-intensive agribusiness, globalization of business and industry, rising standards of living in the developing world, and increased energy use fuels atmospheric change. If current practices continue, atmospheric increases are likely for the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide; and for the chemically active gases nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide,and ammonia. Increases in global tropospheric ozone and aerosols are a distinct possibility.

  12. The internet is changing our world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela VÎRJAN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to bring the importance of the internet into discussion, given that it has changed the way we organize the functioning of our social and economical lives, if this change is towards the better or the worse and how we could go about to make use of the internet to improve humanity's social and economical lives at a global level. The appearance and development of the internet has led to fantastically rapid changes to our world, from day to day or even major changes within hours, instantly changing our vision of the world, forcing us to adapt our thinking and beliefs to new tendencies and discoveries of a technical level, of a technological level and of innovation. Those which succeed in adapting to these global changed, from all points of view, it's them who will hold the key to success, and the internet is the gate house to success.

  13. Want to Change the World? Here's How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    About 1,000 students from 50 states and 60 countries attended the second annual Clinton Global Initiative University. The project, an outgrowth of the Clinton Global Initiative for world leaders, challenges participants to take "good intentions and turn them into measurable changes in other people's lives" by submitting detailed…

  14. Changing Instructor's Roles in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Zane L.

    2008-01-01

    Berge's Instructor's Roles Model categorized the instructor's roles as pedagogical, social, managerial, and technical. Developed more than a decade ago, this model described changing roles for instructors as they transitioned from in-person classrooms to teaching online. Today, as virtual worlds emerge and are being used as educational platforms,…

  15. Energy the enabler, in our changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koomanoff, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    Historical industrial and social development made possible by energy technologies throughout the world serves as a paradigm for looking into the future. Energy usage is directly responsible for productivity. World population is increasing rapidly necessitating still more energy. The number of college students (a measure of new ideas and demands) has also increased rapidly. The U.S. has led in energy usage and the resultant growth in transportation and communication but changes are occurring. Urbanization - another effect of energy - shows the majority of high density populations now are in developing countries. Societies are changing from single nation states to interdependent loosely-knit larger socio-economic-environmental areas - Economic Communities. Successful technology must now engage producers, users, governments, as well as communities of interest. Political management systems must recognize these changes to permit the continued development of energy technologies. Looking toward the 21st Century and our continued development in a changing world necessitates recognition of the need for a systems orientation, interdisciplinary approach to find multi-answers to problems. All must participate in the decision making process - looking for solutions (rather than identification of problems) learning together and from each other - and most importantly, managing conflict before it manages us. (orig.)

  16. Ageing populations and changing worlds of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Brian

    2014-08-01

    Population ageing has reshaped the notion of retirement. The changes carry important implications for aspirations to extend working life. Cultural expectations regarding work and retirement must adapt to the reality posed by longer lives. The modern world is characterised by perpetual - and sometime rapid - change. Transformation throughout the second half of the 20th century brought about substantial shifts in the health and longevity of people in societies across the world. Since the beginning of the 21st century, the impacts of population ageing have gathered greater awareness in public consciousness and within the policy arena. Notions of old age, retirement, and later life have been fundamentally transformed, presenting stark challenges alongside novel opportunities for individuals, communities, and governments. Many of the topics of interest with respect to ageing populations are themselves the result of shifts that were unforeseen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 20 Engineering Technologies Which Changed The World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Sik; Shin, Dong Won; Mun, Jung Yang and others

    2004-07-01

    This book deals with 20 engineering technologies which changed the world, these are about a, compass, papermaking, a lens, gunpowder, machine watch, printing technique, vaccine, a suspension bridge, a railroad, a loom, photograph, petroleum, automobile, electricity, wireless communications, synthetic medicine, a jet engine and a rocket, nuclear bombs, ENIAC, and polymerase chain reaction method. Each skill is introduced with history and the detailed reports by other persons.

  18. The Changing Family in a Changing World: America First?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1984-01-01

    The American family has experienced rapid and radical changes since World War II. The effects and possible causes of the increase in the number of single-parent families, entry of mothers into the labor force, and rise in number of families at the poverty level are explored. Implications for changes in policy and practice are discussed. (DF)

  19. Software project management in a changing world

    CERN Document Server

    Ruhe, Günther

    2014-01-01

    By bringing together various current direc­tions, Software Project Management in a Changing World focuses on how people and organizations can make their processes more change-adaptive. The selected chapters closely correspond to the project management knowledge areas introduced by the Project Management Body of Knowledge, including its extension for managing software projects. The contributions are grouped into four parts, preceded by a general introduction. Part I "Fundamentals" provides in-depth insights into fundamental topics including resource allocation, cost estimation and risk manage

  20. Energy policy in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priddle, R.

    1997-01-01

    The outlook of world energy markets was described with a focus on the prospects for oil and gas supply and reserves. Implications of this outlook for energy policy-making were discussed. The three major projections of world primary energy demand were described. According to these projections world primary energy demand will grow steadily. Demand is expected to rise 46 per cent between now and 2010. Fossil-based fuels will account for almost 90 per cent of total primary energy demand in 2010 which is about the same share as today. A structural shift in the shares of different regions in world commercial energy demand is likely to occur, i.e. the OECD share of world energy demand will fall in favour of that of the developing regions. It was also projected that oil will remain the dominant fuel with a share of about 40 per cent in 2010. World gas demand was also projected to grow at an average annual rate of 3 per cent over the outlook period. The rising fossil fuel consumption implies rising greenhouse gas emissions. It was noted that by 2010, without active policy intervention to change the course of energy demand, the world energy-related carbon emissions could be almost 50 per cent greater than 1990 levels. It was suggested that the main role for governments should be to establish a framework to enable competitive energy markets to function efficiently while ensuring that energy security and environmental concerns are addressed. Emergency response measures should be maintained in relation to oil, and the implications of growing dependence on imports of oil and gas from remote and potentially insecure countries should be monitored. The role of government should also include regulation of the environmental consequences of energy supply and use at the local, regional and global level. Government should also regulate the natural monopoly elements of the grid-based industries. There is also a role for government in continuing to encourage research and development

  1. Terrestrial ecosystems in a changing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Global Carbon Project; Pataki, D.E. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth System Science]|[California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Pitelka, L.F. (eds.) [Maryland Univ., Frostburg, MD (United States). Appalachian Lab.

    2007-07-01

    Over 100 authors present 25 contributions on the impacts of global change on terrestrial ecosystems including: * key processes of the earth system such as the CO2 fertilization effect, shifts in disturbances and biome distribution, the saturation of the terrestrial carbon sink, and changes in functional biodiversity, * ecosystem services such the production of wheat, pest control, and carbon storage in croplands, and * sensitive regions in the world threaten by rapid changes in climate and land use such as high latitudes ecosystems, tropical forest in Southeast Asia, and ecosystems dominated by Monsoon climate. The book also explores new research developments on spatial thresholds and nonlinearities, the key role of urban development in global biogeochemical processes, and the integration of natural and social sciences to address complex problems of the human-environment system. (orig.)

  2. The changing world of modern cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom

    2009-01-12

    Change is always ambiguous. There is the enticing prospect of novelty and better times ahead, but at the same time the concern of losing the good of the past. It is with these sentiments that I take over as the Editor-in-Chief from Ira Mellman who for a decade has cleverly and effectively lead the JCB. During this time he directed and oversaw an extensive modernization of the journal and guided it through dramatic changes in the publishing world. Ira lead the journal with unyielding dedication and enthusiasm and we in the cell biology community must thank him profoundly for his service. It is his work, together with the invaluable contribution of the best editorial board and the most dedicated professional editorial staff in the scientific publishing business, that allows me to now take over the stewardship of the JCB with a tremendous sense of excitement and determination to continue and expand the JCB's role as the leading journal in the cell biology community and as a trendsetter in the rapidly changing world of modern cell biology.

  3. Skipping of Chinese characters does not rely on word-based processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nan; Angele, Bernhard; Hua, Huimin; Shen, Wei; Zhou, Junyi; Li, Xingshan

    2018-02-01

    Previous eye-movement studies have indicated that people tend to skip extremely high-frequency words in sentence reading, such as "the" in English and "/de" in Chinese. Two alternative hypotheses have been proposed to explain how this frequent skipping happens in Chinese reading: one assumes that skipping happens when the preview has been fully identified at the word level (word-based skipping); the other assumes that skipping happens whenever the preview character is easy to identify regardless of whether lexical processing has been completed or not (character-based skipping). Using the gaze-contingent display change paradigm, we examined the two hypotheses by substituting the preview of the third character of a four-character Chinese word with the high-frequency Chinese character "/de", which should disrupt the ongoing word-level processing. The character-based skipping hypothesis predicts that this manipulation will enhance the skipping probability of the target character (i.e., the third character of the target word), because the character "/de" has much higher character frequency than the original character. The word-based skipping hypothesis instead predicts a reduction of the skipping probability of the target character because the presence of the character "/de" is lexically infelicitous at word level. The results supported the character-based skipping hypothesis, indicating that in Chinese reading the decision of skipping a character can be made before integrating it into a word.

  4. Forest health in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautasso, Marco; Schlegel, Markus; Holdenrieder, Ottmar

    2015-05-01

    Forest pathology, the science of forest health and tree diseases, is operating in a rapidly developing environment. Most importantly, global trade and climate change are increasing the threat to forest ecosystems posed by new diseases. Various studies relevant to forest pathology in a changing world are accumulating, thus making it necessary to provide an update of recent literature. In this contribution, we summarize research at the interface between forest pathology and landscape ecology, biogeography, global change science and research on tree endophytes. Regional outbreaks of tree diseases are requiring interdisciplinary collaboration, e.g. between forest pathologists and landscape ecologists. When tree pathogens are widely distributed, the factors determining their broad-scale distribution can be studied using a biogeographic approach. Global change, the combination of climate and land use change, increased pollution, trade and urbanization, as well as invasive species, will influence the effects of forest disturbances such as wildfires, droughts, storms, diseases and insect outbreaks, thus affecting the health and resilience of forest ecosystems worldwide. Tree endophytes can contribute to biological control of infectious diseases, enhance tolerance to environmental stress or behave as opportunistic weak pathogens potentially competing with more harmful ones. New molecular techniques are available for studying the complete tree endobiome under the influence of global change stressors from the landscape to the intercontinental level. Given that exotic tree diseases have both ecologic and economic consequences, we call for increased interdisciplinary collaboration in the coming decades between forest pathologists and researchers studying endophytes with tree geneticists, evolutionary and landscape ecologists, biogeographers, conservation biologists and global change scientists and outline interdisciplinary research gaps.

  5. Nuclear power in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power has a future that will only be fully realised if it is shown to be a solution to some of the world's most pressing energy, and associated environmental, problems. This can only be done if nuclear power itself ceases to be perceived as a problem by the public, interest groups, governments and financial institutions. In public relations terms, this means removing the persistent distortions and misconceptions about the nuclear industry. Environmentally, it involves showing that nuclear power is the only alternative energy source which does not contribute to climate change, preserves rare minerals and recycles its raw materials. Governments must be persuaded to see that nuclear power is the only economic answer to the growing energy demand arising from increased industrialisation and population growth. Financiers need convincing that nuclear power is the investment of the future and generators that it is the lowest cost economic and environmental option. The future of nuclear power depends on meeting these challenges. (UK)

  6. Social psychiatry in a rapidly changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. J. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many societies around the world are experiencing a period of unprecedented change in traditional social roles and customs. Globalisation has contributed to materialism and a me-first individualism that heightens awareness of income inequality that itself is one of the most robust markers of unhappiness in society. Ever increasing urbanisation has driven an erosion of large ‘joint’ family arrangements to be replaced by smaller and relatively isolated nuclear families and single parent living. Mass migration has unmasked deep seated fear and prejudice towards the outsider in society. These global changes are fertile ground for the social conditions that have long been known to be risks for mental illness – poverty, poor quality child care, social isolation and the active discrimination and exclusion of the alien, the physically disabled and mentally ill. While there is little we can do to reverse global change, there is much a social psychiatrist can do to mitigate the effect, ensuring his/her voice is added to other calls for reducing discriminatory practice, promoting evidence-based social interventions such as parenting advice and peer support and ensuring that the success of a treatment is measured not just in terms of symptomatic improvement but in whether it results in an outcome that is valued by the patient.

  7. The physician executive in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, L R

    1999-01-01

    Physicians are losing their historic franchise as sole and primary providers of medical care. In addition to eroding moral and scientific authority, physicians are also losing income and status. It is no wonder that physicians are retrenching--confused and angry about the increasing marginalization of their profession and about society's changing expectations. Physicians are caught in a transition zone between the world that was and the one that will soon be. This is destabilizing and causes great anxiety. Rather than being buffeted by changing social and cultural definitions of health care, physicians must become proactively involved in the future of their profession. Physicians can only do this by offering a better mental model of health, medicine, and the community. This cannot be a defensive retreat from engagement. Rather, it must be an imaginative vision, vigorously set forth--a vision that will enlist the support of all constituencies involved in the effort to improve the health and well-being of all members of our society. The physician executive needs to work with physicians to orchestrate this effort to create a new vision of health in the 21st century.

  8. Inferring relevance in a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement learning models of human and animal learning usually concentrate on how we learn the relationship between different stimuli or actions and rewards. However, in real world situations stimuli are ill-defined. On the one hand, our immediate environment is extremely multi-dimensional. On the other hand, in every decision-making scenario only a few aspects of the environment are relevant for obtaining reward, while most are irrelevant. Thus a key question is how do we learn these relevant dimensions, that is, how do we learn what to learn about? We investigated this process of representation learning experimentally, using a task in which one stimulus dimension was relevant for determining reward at each point in time. As in real life situations, in our task the relevant dimension can change without warning, adding ever-present uncertainty engendered by a constantly changing environment. We show that human performance on this task is better described by a suboptimal strategy based on selective attention and serial hypothesis testing rather than a normative strategy based on probabilistic inference. From this, we conjecture that the problem of inferring relevance in general scenarios is too computationally demanding for the brain to solve optimally. As a result the brain utilizes approximations, employing these even in simplified scenarios in which optimal representation learning is tractable, such as the one in our experiment.

  9. Skipped spawning in fishes: More common than you might think

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rideout, Rick M.; Tomkiewicz, Jonna

    2011-01-01

    The traditional view of iteroparity in fishes is one of an annual reproductive cycle that culminates each year in spawning. More recently, a more flexible view of fish reproduction has been adopted, including the potential for mature fish to skip spawning. Here, we review the abundance of recent...... on elemental and isotope signatures. Skipped spawning is most commonly attributed to deficient diet and poor nutritional condition. Advances made in this field of study in recent years include descriptions of hormonal changes that precede and perhaps initiate skipped spawning, the development of life history...

  10. The Changing World of Toys and Toy Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, David

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the changing world of toys and toy play. Children learn about themselves and their world from their play with toys. Over the past half century there has been a remarkable transformation of the toy world of children. Toys have changed in quantity, quality, and level of technology. Mass production has made…

  11. The changing world of climate change: Oregon leads the states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, P.H.; Sadler, S.; Kosloff, L.H.; Trexler, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Following on the heels of recent national and international developments in climate change policy, Oregon's open-quote best-of-batch close-quote proceeding has validated the use of CO 2 offsets as a cost-effective means of advancing climate change mitigation goals. The proceeding was a first in several respects and represents a record commitment of funds to CO 2 mitigation by a private entity. In December 1995, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), issued its Second Assessment Report. The IPCC's conclusion that open-quotes[t]he balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climateclose quotes fundamentally changed the tenor of the policy debate regarding potential threats associated with global climate change. At the Climate Change Convention's Conference of the Parties (COP) in Geneva in July 1996, most countries, including the United States, advocated adopting the IPCC report as the basis for swift policy movement toward binding international emissions targets. The next COP, in December 1997, is scheduled to be the venue for the signing of a treaty protocol incorporating such targets. Binding targets would have major consequences for power plant operators in the US and around the world. Recent developments in the state of Oregon show the kinds of measures that may become commonplace at the state level in addressing climate change mitigation. First, Oregon recently completed the first administrative proceeding in the US aimed at offsetting the greenhouse gas emissions of a new power plant. Second, a legislatively mandated energy facility siting task force recently recommended that Oregon adopt a carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) standard for new power plant construction and drop use of the open-quotes need for powerclose quotes standard. This article reviews these two policy milestones and their implications for climate change mitigation in the United States

  12. Public health in a rapidly changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana I. Andreeva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Several months in 2013 and 2014 have been a hardly predictable time in Ukraine, and the situation is still far from being stable. This made the editorial team of TCPHEE based in Ukraine postpone publishing consecutive issues. However, while the situation still requires practical steps, many aspects including those related to public health require analysis and debate. Thus we invite opinion pieces and studies addressing all different spheres of how public health should function under changing social circumstances. There might be a wide range of such related topics. The most obvious ones are those linked to changing living conditions. Many studies have been undertaken and published with regard to health threats to refugees, people involved in natural or technical disasters (Noji, 2005. Along with environmental health threats, there might be mental health disturbances (World Health Organization, 1992 resulting from long-term strain, losses et cetera. Another important focus is related to changes in health services provision. Crimea, which is a former Ukrainian territory now occupied by the Russian Federation, was among those in Ukraine highly affected with HIV (Dehne, Khodakevich, Hamers, & Schwartlander, 1999. This was responded by several NGOs actively providing harm reduction services to high-risk groups along with methadone substitution therapy to opiate users and antiretroviral medicines to those HIV-infected (Curtis, 2010. However, there are news reports that Russia is going to stop provision of methadone (kommersant.ru, 2014. As opiate substitution programs have been shown an effective approach towards preventing HIV transmission among people who inject drugs (MacArthur et al., 2012, such change in public health policies might affect not only most at risk populations but their partners and population as a whole as well resulting in a rapid spread of HIV. Yet another related topic is that of how health services can be organized at times of

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000576 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000576 ... Normal PB PB ... -- -- ... -- No Nomal human IPS cell line 正常iPS細胞...phem.2014.03.010 Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from primary and secondary myelofibros

  14. Leaders in Computing Changing the digital world

    CERN Document Server

    IT, BCS -The Chartered Institute for; Booch, Grady; Torvalds, Linus; Wozniak, Steve; Cerf, Vint; Spärck Jones, Karen; Berners-Lee, Tim; Wales, Jimmy; Shirley, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This collection of interviews provides a fascinating insight into the thoughts and ideas of influential figures from the world of IT and computing, such as Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Donald Knuth, Linus Torvalds, Jimmy Wales and Steve Wozniak. It gives an excellent overview of important developments in this diverse field over recent years.

  15. World Wind Tools Reveal Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Originally developed under NASA's Learning Technologies program as a tool to engage and inspire students, World Wind software was released under the NASA Open Source Agreement license. Honolulu, Hawaii based Intelesense Technologies is one of the companies currently making use of the technology for environmental, public health, and other monitoring applications for nonprofit organizations and Government agencies. The company saved about $1 million in development costs by using the NASA software.

  16. Valence skipping driven superconductivity and charge Kondo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Hase, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Valence skipping in metallic compounds can give rise to an unconventional superconductivity. •Several elements in the periodic table show valence skipping (or valence missing), for example, Bi forms the compounds in valence states +3 and +5. •The doping of valence skipping elements will induce superconductivity and this will lead to a possibility of high temperature superconductivity. •We consider the Wolf model with negative-U impurities, and show a phase diagram including superconducting phase. •There is a high temperature region near the boundary. -- Abstract: Valence skipping in metallic compounds can give rise to an unconventional superconductivity. Several elements in the periodic table show valence skipping (or valence missing), for example, Bi forms the compounds in valence states +3 and +5. The doping of valence skipping elements will induce superconductivity and this will lead to a possibility of high temperature superconductivity. We consider the Wolf model with negative-U impurities, and show a phase diagram including superconducting phase. The superconducting state is changed into a metallic state with a local singlet as the attractive interaction |U| increases. There is a high temperature region near the boundary

  17. Changing winds. BTM's world market update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, A.

    2006-01-01

    An update of what has happened in the past year in the worldwide wind energy market, and what is expected to happen in the near future, are given. In 2005, the USA was the world's single biggest wind market, installing 2431 MW. Data are also given for some European and Asian states, and Australasia. The increase in the USA was due to the reintroduction of the Production Tax Credit. Vestas maintained its position as world leader in turbine manufacture but its market share decreased from 34% to 27.9%. Data for all top ten manufacturers are given. In 2005, there were increases of up to 30% in the price of turbines due to an increase in cost of raw materials and increased profit margins in a seller's market. The increase in prices has had a marked impact on offshore systems where the economics were already marginal. Summaries of the future prospects of 15 individual countries are given, together with forecasts for 2011-2015

  18. Case Studies on Climate Change and World Heritage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colette, A.

    2007-07-01

    The UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) initiated an assessment of the impacts of climate change on World Heritage in 2005, after the World Heritage Committee noted that 'the impacts of climate change are affecting many and are likely to affect many more World Heritage properties, both natural and cultural in the years to come'. A meeting of experts was convened in March 2006 bringing together over 50 representatives from the States Parties to the World Heritage Convention, various international organizations, non-governmental organizations, the Advisory Bodies to the World Heritage Committee, and academic and scientific experts, to discuss current and future impacts of climate change on World Heritage sites. The outcome of this initiative included a 'Report on Predicting and Managing the Effects of Climate Change on World Heritage', as well as a 'Strategy to Assist States Parties to Implement Appropriate Management Responses' which were endorsed by the World Heritage Committee at its 30th session in July 2006, Vilnius, Lithuania. The outcome of this work has shown that it is timely to develop and implement appropriate management responses to protect World Heritage in the face of climate change. The solutions to global warming are the subject of continuing debate. Some of these measures, beyond the scope of the World Heritage Convention, are discussed under the auspices of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). But although climate change is a global challenge, there are many adaptation and preventive measures that can be taken at the local scale, i.e. at the level of the World Heritage sites. Studies are currently being conducted at several World Heritage sites to monitor climate change impacts and plan appropriate adaptation measures. But the World Heritage network is also a useful tool to share and promote lessons learnt and best practices, as well as to raise awareness regarding climate change impacts

  19. The changing world of biocontainment and biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeggo, M

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, a number of key events have significantly altered our ideas on biosecurity and the role of biocontainment laboratories, such as the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreaks and the anthrax episode of 2001 in the USA. This has resulted in the development of plans to build "high containment" facilities around the world and an array of new regulations at both national and international levels regarding the management of pathogens, the operation of high containment facilities, the use of genetically modified material, and the transportation of such agents and personnel security issues. Considering the cost, however, it is debatable whether every country needs to build its own high containment facility. The Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) provides an example of what might be considered best practice in biocontainment while considering regulations, cost and need.

  20. World Nuclear Association Design Change Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, John Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This presentation treats of design change management in the regulation of nuclear fleets. It covers activities of the WNA/CORDEL/Design Change Management Task Force, including views on the roles of vendors, owner's groups, utility and design authority, WANO and the regulators. The presentation highlights differences of capabilities between large utilities with strong technical staff and smaller utilities that require support and expertise from others. It also notes the current expectation that licensees are solely responsible for the safety of the design and operation of their plants and for maintaining a full understanding and knowledge of the design within licensee's own organization in an internal entity called design authority. It encourages regulators to re-examine this expectation for design changes, arguing that while large utilities maybe be able to deal with design changes, the smaller utilities may be challenged due to their small size and lack of appropriate expertise. It further notes that the original designer must be involved in the management of design changes. In addition, the presentation emphasizes benefits of standardization in design and regulatory expectations internationally, including the benefits of increasing safety and economy. The author provides that the CORDEL Working Group uses international standardization to mean that each vendor's design can be built by a vendor, and ordered by a utility, in every country and be able to meet national regulations without significant changes other than adaptations to meet site requirements. In this discussion, he highlights the aircraft industry as an example and notes the need for internationally agreed mechanisms for design change as well as the need for formal, agreed (internationally) role for the designer to play throughout the fleet lifetime

  1. The understanding of world climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, M.

    2008-01-01

    After having recalled that the problem of global warming in relationship with human activities has been studied since the end of the nineteenth century and since then by different scientific programs, the author describes how the IPCC's or Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's report is produced. He briefly comments how Earth's temperature is determined and the various natural parameters which influence the climate on Earth. He recalls how the IPCC showed the actual influence of human activities, and which changes have actually been observed

  2. Forest pest management in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew M. Liebhold

    2012-01-01

    The scope, context and science guiding forest pest management have evolved and are likely to continue changing into the future. Here, I present six areas of advice to guide practitioners in the implementation of forest pest management. First, human dimensions will continue to play a key role in most pest problems and should always be a primary consideration in...

  3. Soft Approaches for a Changing World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Sørensen, Lene; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2001-01-01

    The education of engineers needs to focus on abilities to facilitate change processes, involving participants actively and be able to view the problem in relation to a dynamic context of different environments. The essence of the future demands of engineers' social and technical qualification is ...

  4. The Changing World of Childhood Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graville, Iris

    2010-01-01

    Theories and practices in early childhood education continually evolve, and the same is true in the health field. Such change is especially apparent in the area of childhood immunizations. Since vaccination to prevent smallpox was first started in the late 1700s, recommendations for which immunizations to give and when to give them have been…

  5. HOW FINTECH INDUSTRY IS CHANGING THE WORLD

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Thi

    2016-01-01

    This thesis researched the innovative edges of the Fintech (financial technology). Fintech has been rapidly penetrating the financial markets by filling in the gaps left by the existing financial institutions and significantly improving the user experience. Firstly, the research briefly described the historical evolution of Fintech. In the subsequent sections, the paper aimed to demonstrate the innovative changes from Fintech in different areas, including the online banking and the payment pr...

  6. Species coexistence in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Fernando; Bastias, Cristina C; Godoy, Oscar; Granda, Elena; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic explanations of diversity maintenance, we discuss how global change drivers can influence species coexistence. We revise the importance of both competition and facilitation for understanding coexistence in different ecosystems, address the influence of phylogenetic relatedness, functional traits, phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variability, and discuss lessons learnt from invasion ecology. While most previous studies have focused their efforts on disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the biological diversity in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, grasslands and coral reefs, we argue that much can be learnt from pauci-specific communities where functional variability within each species, together with demographic and stochastic processes becomes key to understand species interactions and eventually community responses to global change.

  7. Changing the world through shareholder activism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Sandberg

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As one of the more progressive facets of the socially responsibleinvestment (SRI movement, shareholder activism isgenerally recommended or justified on the grounds that itcan create social change. But how effective are differentkinds of activist campaigns likely to be in this regard? Thisarticle outlines the full range of different ways in whichshareholder activism could make a difference by carefullygoing through, first, all the more specific lines of actiontypically included under the shareholder activismumbrella and, second, all of the different ways in which ithas been suggested that these could influence the activitiesof commercial companies. It is argued that – althoughmuch more empirical research is needed in the area – thereare at least theoretical reasons for thinking that it will bedifficult to influence companies through the standardactions of filing or voting on shareholder resolutions.However, some alternative strategies open to activists mayallow them to increase their efficacy. It is specificallyargued that even individual investors could be able to pushfor corporate change through devising a radically selfsacrificialcampaign that manages to get the attention ofpowerful forces outside the corporate sphere.

  8. The collision that changed the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wally Broecker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In connection with the Anthropocene, one might ask how climate is likely to evolve in the absence of man’s intervention and whether humans will be able to purposefully alter this course. In this commentary, I deal with the situation for very long time scales. I make a case that fifty million years ago, the collision between the northward drifting Indian land mass and Asia set the Earth’s climate on a new course. Ever since then, it has cooled. In the absence of some other dramatic disruption in the movement of the plates which make up our planet’s crust, on the time scale of tens of millions of years, this drift would cause the Earth to freeze over as it did during the late Precambrian. Evidence for this change in course comes from records of oxygen and lithium isotopic composition of foraminifer shells. It is reinforced by records of Mg to Ca in halite-hosted fluid inclusions and in marine CaCO3. In addition, the collision appears to have created abrupt changes in the sulfur isotope composition of marine barite and the carbon isotope composition of amber. Not only did this collision create the Himalaya, but more important, it led to a reorganization of the crustal plate motions. Through some combination of the building of mountains and lowering of sea level, these changes generated a mismatch between the supply of CO2 by planetary outgassing and that of calcium by the weathering of silicate rock. The tendency toward an oversupply of calcium has been compensated by a drawdown of the atmosphere’s CO2 content. This drawdown cooled the Earth, slowing down the supply of calcium. Although we are currently inadvertently compensating for this cooling by burning fossil fuels, the impacts of this CO2 on Earth climate will last no more than a tenth of a million years. So, if humans succeed in avoiding extinction, there will likely be a long-term effort to warm the planet.

  9. World Regionalization of Climate Change(1961–2010)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peijun; Shi; Shao; Sun; Daoyi; Gong; Tao; Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Traditional climate classification or regionalization characterizes the mean state of climate condition, which cannot meet the demand of addressing climate change currently. We have developed a climate change classification method, as well as the fundamental principles, an indicator system, and mapping techniques of climate change regionalization. This study used annual mean temperature and total precipitation as climatic indices, and linear trend and variation change as change indices to characterize climate change quantitatively. The study has proposed a scheme for world climate change regionalization based on a half century of climate data(1961–2010). Level-I regionalization divides the world into 12 tendency zones based on the linear trend of climate, level-II regionalization resulted in 28 fluctuation regions based on the variation change of climate. Climate change regionalization provides a scientific basis for countries and regions to develop plans for adapting to climate change, especially for managing climate-related disaster or environmental risks.

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000292 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinsonian neurodegeneration ... SKIP000292 ... Diseased L1-2Mut L1-2Mut ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000300 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 23472874 10.1016/j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinson... SKIP000300 ... Diseased L2-1GC L2-1GC ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060 ...

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000297 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinsonian neurodegeneratio... SKIP000297 ... Diseased L2-1Mut L2-1Mut ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000293 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 23472874 10.1016/j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinson... SKIP000293 ... Diseased L1-1GC2 L1-1GC2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000290 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1016/j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinsonian neurodegene... SKIP000290 ... Diseased L1-1Mut L1-1Mut ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP000299 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 23472874 10.1016/j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinsoni... SKIP000299 ... Diseased L2-3Mut L2-3Mut ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000298 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 23472874 10.1016/j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinsoni... SKIP000298 ... Diseased L2-2Mut L2-2Mut ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP000302 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Information Only ... 23472874 10.1016/j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinso... SKIP000302 ... Diseased L2-3GC L2-3GC ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060 ...

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000815 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000815 ... Diseased ACH-8857-1 ACH-8857-1 ... 軟骨無形成症 Q774 Achondroplasia 10080...0 ... 34 30-39 Male Japanese Japanese Yes No Achondroplasia(GM08857)-specific iPSC.GM08857 is from the father of GM08859. 軟骨無形成症

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP000816 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000816 ... Diseased ACH-8858-6 ACH-8858-6 ... 軟骨無形成症 Q774 Achondroplasia 10080...0 ... 30 30-39 Female Japanese Japanese Yes No Achondroplasia(GM08858)-specific iPSC.GM08858 is from the mother of GM08859. 軟骨無形成

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000235 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000235 ... Diseased HPS0270 HPS0270 ... アトピー性皮膚炎 L209 Atopic dermatitis 603165... ... -- -- ... Yes No iPS cell line derived from Atopic dermatitis patient. Same patient as HPS0271| アトピー性皮膚炎

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000236 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000236 ... Diseased HPS0271 HPS0271 ... アトピー性皮膚炎 L210 Atopic dermatitis 603166... ... -- -- ... Yes No iPS cell line derived from Atopic dermatitis patient. Same patient as HPS0270| アトピー性皮膚炎

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000296 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000296 ... Normal C2 C2 ... -- Female ... -- No Healthy control lin...e for L2-1,2,3Mut. Born in 1931 Healthy control line for L2-1,2,3Mut. Born in 1931 -- -- -- ... -- ... Yes I

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000241 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000241 ... Diseased HPS0183 HPS0183 ... 封入体筋炎 G724 Inclusion body myositis 147...421 ... -- -- ... Yes No intractable disease-specific iPSC derived from Inclution body myositis. 封入体筋炎患者由

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000243 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000243 ... Diseased HPS0174 HPS0174 ... 皮膚筋炎 M339 Dermatopolymyositis 613825 ... ... ... -- -- ... Yes No intractable disease-specific iPSC derived from Dermatomyositis (DM). 皮膚筋炎患者由来iPS細胞株。|

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000245 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000245 ... Diseased HPS0164 HPS0164 ... デュシェンヌ型筋ジストロフィー G710 Duchenne Muscular... Dystrophy 310200 ... -- -- ... Yes No intractable disease-specific iPSC derived from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. デュシェンヌ

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000968 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000968 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21Puro-12 PDB1lox-21Puro-12 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000974 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000974 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21GFP-41 PDB1lox-21GFP-41 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...Jaenisch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000888 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000888 ... T cells T細胞 Normal 24HM 24HM ... 24 20-29 Male Japanese 日本人 -- No iPS cell...s from healthy human T cells ヒト健常人由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Plasmid OCT4,SOX2,KL

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000151 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000151 ... Blastocyst 胚盤胞 Unknown KhES-2 KhES-2 ... -- -- ... -- No Embryonic Stem cell 胚性幹細胞...京都大学再生医科学研究所 ... 16707099 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.04.135 Efficient establishment of human embryonic stem cell l

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000147 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000147 ... Blastocyst 胚盤胞 Unknown KhES-1 KhES-1 ... -- -- ... -- No Embryonic stem cell 胚性幹細胞...nt establishment of human embryonic stem cell lines and long-term maintenance wit

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP001141 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001141 ... cardiac fibroblast 心臓線維芽細胞 Normal ATCC-CYS0105 ATCC-CYS0105 ... ...mary cardiac fibroblasts obtained from a healthy donor. ... 健常人の心臓線維芽細胞由来iPS細胞。 human ES-like Research Grade Se

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000948 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000948 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP14.2 SP14.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ic phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000610 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000610 ... Diseased PDE3F-4 PDE3F-4 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...69371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced plur

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000943 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000943 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP08.2 SP08.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP000957 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000957 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP13.2 SP13.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...cific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000593 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000593 ... Diseased PDB3F-9 PDB3F-9 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ... ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induc

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP000594 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000594 ... Diseased PDB3F-d12 PDB3F-d12 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 1686...he Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000596 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000596 ... Diseased PDB4F-2 PDB4F-2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...f Jaenisch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkins...on's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem ce

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP000960 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000960 ... Diseased PDB1lox-17GFP-55 PDB1lox-17GFP-55 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...Jaenisch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000955 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000955 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP12.3 SP12.3 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ls of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimen

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000598 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000598 ... Diseased PDB4F-4 PDB4F-4 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000763 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000763 ... Diseased PDB2lox-17 PDB2lox-17 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 16...9371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells free of v

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000945 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000945 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP10.1 SP10.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...e neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000604 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000604 ... Diseased PDD4F-1 PDD4F-1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000973 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000973 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21Puro-28 PDB1lox-21Puro-28 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000951 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000951 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP05.1 SP05.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson... of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimenez

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000946 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000946 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP10.2 SP10.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...sease-specific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinso

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000969 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000969 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21Puro-13 PDB1lox-21Puro-13 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000265 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000265 ... Diseased HPS0264 HPS0264 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease ... ... ... 40-49 Male ... Yes No iPS cell line derived from Parkinson disease patient. パーキンソン病患者由来| human ES-like -- Re

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000962 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000962 ... Diseased PDB1lox-17Puro-10 PDB1lox-17Puro-10 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000605 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000605 ... Diseased PDD4F-4 PDD4F-4 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000958 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000958 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP13.4 SP13.4 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ls of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimen

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000971 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000971 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21Puro-20 PDB1lox-21Puro-20 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000967 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000967 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21Puro-5 PDB1lox-21Puro-5 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson... Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP000765 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000765 ... Diseased PDB2lox-22 PDB2lox-22 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 16...9371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells free of v

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000966 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000966 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21GFP-19 PDB1lox-21GFP-19 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...Jaenisch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP000937 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000937 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP01.4 SP01.4 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000608 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000608 ... Diseased PDD4F-9 PDD4F-9 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP000956 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000956 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP12.4 SP12.4 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...cific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000954 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000954 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP06.2 SP06.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson... of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimenez

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000606 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000606 ... Diseased PDD4F-5 PDD4F-5 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000589 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000589 ... Diseased PDA3F-5 PDA3F-5 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkins...on's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells free of viral reprogram

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000595 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000595 ... Diseased PDB4F-1 PDB4F-1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000952 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000952 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP05.2 SP05.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...fic phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000771 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e PARK6 600116 ... -- -- ... Yes No iPS cell line derived from a patient with Parkinson's disease, Familial type, PARK6. 家族性パーキンソン... SKIP000771 ... Diseased PKA13 PKA13 ... 家族性パーキンソン病 G20 familial parkinson's diseas

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000599 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000599 ... Diseased PDB4F-5 PDB4F-5 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000770 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PARK6 600116 ... -- -- ... Yes No iPS cell line derived from a patient with Parkinson's disease, Familial type, PARK6. 家族性パーキンソン... SKIP000770 ... Diseased PKA5 PKA5 ... 家族性パーキンソン病 G20 familial parkinson's disease

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000950 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000950 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP16.3 SP16.3 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000603 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000603 ... Diseased PDD3F-7 PDD3F-7 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced p

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000959 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000959 ... Diseased PDB1lox-17GFP-29 PDB1lox-17GFP-29 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...Jaenisch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000600 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000600 ... Diseased PDC3F-1 PDC3F-1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...titute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000936 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000936 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP01.1 SP01.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...s of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimene

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000972 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000972 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21Puro-26 PDB1lox-21Puro-26 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000590 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000590 ... Diseased PDB3F-1 PDB3F-1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...e ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived in

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP000601 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000601 ... Diseased PDD3F-1 PDD3F-1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced p

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000597 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000597 ... Diseased PDB4F-3 PDB4F-3 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP000949 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000949 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP16.2 SP16.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...s of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimene

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000970 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000970 ... Diseased PDB1lox-21Puro-18 PDB1lox-21Puro-18 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP000542 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000542 ... Diseased PDA3F-1 PDA3F-1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...udolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000964 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000964 ... Diseased PDB1lox-17Puro-31 PDB1lox-17Puro-31 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000942 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000942 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP08.1 SP08.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...s of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimene

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000963 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000963 ... Diseased PDB1lox-17Puro-12 PDB1lox-17Puro-12 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000953 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000953 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP06.1 SP06.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...om human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Da

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000591 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000591 ... Diseased PDB3F-5 PDB3F-5 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...dolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000607 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000607 ... Diseased PDD4F-8 PDD4F-8 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...head Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patie

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000762 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000762 ... Diseased PDB2lox-5 PDB2lox-5 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 1686...71 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells free of vir

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000602 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000602 ... Diseased PDD3F-4 PDD3F-4 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced p

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000592 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000592 ... Diseased PDB3F-8 PDB3F-8 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...ute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000325 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available School ... 23836290 10.1007/s00401-013-1149-y Modeling key pathological features of frontotemporal dementia... SKIP000325 ... Diseased Carrier1 #6 Carrier1 #6 ... 前頭側頭型認知症 G310 FrontoTemporal D

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000327 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cal School ... 23836290 10.1007/s00401-013-1149-y Modeling key pathological features of frontotemporal dementia... SKIP000327 ... Diseased Carrier2 #11 Carrier2 #11 ... 前頭側頭型認知症 G310 FrontoTemporal

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000326 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0.1007/s00401-013-1149-y Modeling key pathological features of frontotemporal dementia... SKIP000326 ... Diseased Carrier2 #1 Carrier2 #1 ... 前頭側頭型認知症 G310 FrontoTemporal D

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000324 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available School ... 23836290 10.1007/s00401-013-1149-y Modeling key pathological features of frontotemporal dementia... SKIP000324 ... Diseased Carrier1 #5 Carrier1 #5 ... 前頭側頭型認知症 G310 FrontoTemporal D

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000382 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000382 ... Diseased HPS0244 HPS0244 ... X連鎖αサラセミア·精神遅滞(ATR-X)症候群 D560 X-Linked alpha-Thalassemia...fic iPS cell line derived from a patient : X-Linked alpha-Thalassemia, Mental Retardation Syndrome (ATR-X sy

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000388 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000388 ... Diseased HPS0207 HPS0207 ... X連鎖アルファ-サラセミア・精神遅滞(ATR-X)症候群 ... Alpha-Thalassemia...l line derived from a patient :Alpha-Thalassemia/Mental Retardation Syndrome, X-Linked; ATRX. ... 疾患特異的iPS細胞株。X

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP001117 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001117 ... Diseased D3-1 D3-1 ... 大うつ病 F33.3 major depression 605210 ... ...-- Male ... Yes No iPS cells derived from fibroblasts of a patient in which a frameshift mutation of disrupted in major depression

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP001118 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001118 ... Diseased D3-2 D3-2 ... 大うつ病 F33.3 major depression 605210 ... ...-- Male ... Yes No iPS cells derived from fibroblasts of a patient in which a frameshift mutation of disrupted in major depression

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP000242 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000242 ... Diseased HPS0178 HPS0178 ... 全身性強皮症 M340 Systemic Scleroderma 18175...), Systematic Sclerosis (SSc)| 全身性強皮症 ... 全身性硬化症 患者由来iPS細胞株。| human ES-like -- Sendai virus Sendai Virus Vector

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000240 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000240 ... Diseased HPS0184 HPS0184 ... 全身性強皮症 M340 Systemic Scleroderma 18175...), Systematic Sclerosis (SSc)| 全身性強皮症、全身性硬化症 患者由来iPS細胞株。| human ES-like -- Sendai virus Sendai Virus Vector

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP000253 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 21490598 10.1038/nature09915 Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripo... SKIP000253 ... Diseased GM23760 GM23760 ... 統合失調症 F20 Schizophrenia 181500 ... ...(SCZD) .episodes of agitatation, delusions of persecutation, fear of assassination, father also affected. 統合失調症

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000855 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000855 ... Diseased HPS0255 HPS0255 ... アルツハイマー病 G309 Alzheimer disease 104300... ... -- -- Japanese Japanese No No Disease specific iPS cell line derived from a patient with Alzheimer disease アルツハイマー

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000856 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000856 ... Diseased HPS0256 HPS0256 ... アルツハイマー病 G309 Alzheimer disease 104300... ... -- -- ... No No Disease specific iPS cell line derived from a patient with Alzheimer disease アルツハイマー

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000854 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000854 ... Diseased HPS0254 HPS0254 ... アルツハイマー病 G309 Alzheimer disease 104300... ... -- -- Japanese Japanese No No Disease specific iPS cell line derived from a patient with Alzheimer disease アルツハイマー

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000733 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000733 ... Diseased GM24666 GM24666 sAD2 sAD2 アルツハイマー病 G309 ALZHEIMER DISEAS...E 104300 ... 83 80-89 Male ... Yes Yes ALZHEIMER DISEASE(Sporadic AD) hiPSC derived from fibroblast アルツハイマー

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000301 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Information Only ... 23472874 10.1016/j.stem.2013.01.008 Genetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinson... SKIP000301 ... Diseased L2-2GC L2-2GC ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson's disease 607060 ...

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000609 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000609 ... Diseased PDE3F-3 PDE3F-3 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 168600 ... ...69371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced plur

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000939 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000939 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP02.2 SP02.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ic phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models of genetic and sporadic Parkinson

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000961 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000961 ... Diseased PDB1lox-17Puro-5 PDB1lox-17Puro-5 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson... Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000965 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000965 ... Diseased PDB1lox-17Puro-33 PDB1lox-17Puro-33 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...ch Rudolf Jaenisch Available The Whitehead Institute The Whitehead Institute ... 19269371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000764 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000764 ... Diseased PDB2lox-21 PDB2lox-21 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson disease 16...9371 10.1016/j.cell.2009.02.013 Parkinson's disease patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells free of v

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000175 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available le Black Black -- No Apparently healthy iPSCs from fetal lung fibroblast cell culture (GM06114) 健常胎児肺線維芽細胞(GM06114)由来iPS細胞... SKIP000175 ... Lung Fibroblast 肺線維芽細胞 Normal GM23392 GM23392 ... 0-9 Ma

  11. The changing pattern of the Western world enrichment industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paleit, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Past and future changes in the long-term enrichment market of the Western world are discussed, mainly from an economic point of view. Major trends and issues are summarized in the following subjects: an abstract economic model of market forms; factors specific to the enrichment market for defining its overall place within the economic model; a description of the changing pattern (market forms) of the Western world enrichment market and its major regional components in the period 1973-95 (one of the last years of the US world-wide monopoly, and one of the last years of contracts concluded in the early 1970s, respectively); a commentary, on the basis of four 'perfect market' criteria, on the main factors influencing these changes; an outlook on the market in the year 2000. (author)

  12. Changing World, Changing Education: Kindergarten--Where to Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyde, Margaret

    This paper discusses the history of early childhood education in Australia, areas of change in contemporary early childhood education, and the philosophical bases of education. The paper also offers suggestions for the future. From 1880 until 1950, Australian children's services consisted of philanthropic enterprises. The period from 1950 to 1970…

  13. New Zealand Freshwater Management: Changing Policy for a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, H. L.; Norton, N.

    2014-12-01

    Fresh water is essential to New Zealand's economic, environmental, cultural and social well-being. In line with global trends, New Zealand's freshwater resources are under pressure from increased abstraction and changes in land-use which contribute contaminants to our freshwater systems. Recent central government policy reform introduces greater national direction and guidance, to bring about a step-change in freshwater management. An existing national policy for freshwater management introduced in 2011 requires regional authorities to produce freshwater management plans containing clear freshwater objectives (measurable statements about the desired environmental state for water bodies) and associated limits to resource use (such as environmental flows and quantity allocation limits, and loads of contaminants to be discharged). These plans must integrate water quantity and quality management, consider climate change, and incorporate tangata whenua (New Zealand māori) roles and interests. In recent (2014) national policy amendments, the regional authorities are also required to implement national 'bottom-line' standards for certain attributes of the system to be managed; undertake accounting for all water takes and all sources of contaminants; and to develop and implement their plans in a collaborative way with communities. This rapid change in national policy has necessitated a new way of working for authorities tasked with implementation; many obstacles lie in their path. The scientific methods required to help set water quantity limits are well established, but water quality methods are less so. Collaborative processes have well documented benefits but also raise many challenges, particularly for the communication of complex and often uncertain scientific information. This paper provides background on the national policy changes and offers some early lessons learned by the regional authorities implementing collaborative freshwater management in New Zealand.

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000282 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000282 ... Diseased HPS0272 HPS0272 ... アトピー性皮膚炎 L209 Atopic dermatitis 603165...atitis. HPS0270 and HPS0271 are derived from the same patient. 疾患特異的iPS細胞株。アトピー性皮膚炎患者由来。HPS0270、HPS0271と同一人由

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP000182 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000182 ... Diseased GM23226 GM23226 ... 1型糖尿病 E10 diabetes (mellitus), juvenil...roblast. Multifactorial Defect 遺伝性若年発症I型糖尿病患者線維芽細胞(GM02416)由来iPS細胞 多因子の異常 human ES-like -- Retrovirus Oct4,

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000920 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000920 ... fibroblast 線維芽細胞 Diseased SLE#100H SLE#100H ... 全身性紅斑性狼瘡 M32.9 System...ic lupus erythematosus 152700 ... -- -- ... No No iPS cell line iPS cell line human ES-like Research Grad...Medicine, Mayo Clinic ... 22142803 10.1186/scrt89 Successful disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP001076 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001076 ... Fibroblast 線維芽細胞 Diseased ND35666 ND35666 ... 筋萎縮性側索硬化症 G122 amyotrop...mutation. Same subject as ND20522 (LCL) ALS 由来 (ND29509線維芽細胞) SOD1 D91A変異 LCL (ND20522)有 human ES-like Resea

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000330 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000330 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 polydactylous human fingers 指 Normal Yub...ovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cellbank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID=3377 ... ...621BMC Yub621BMC JCRB1113 JCRB1113 ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1113 ... bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP000837 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 50-59 Male ... Yes No TPB11(DNAVEC) is iPSC line reprogrammed from a Parkinson disease patient's T-cells, wh... SKIP000837 ... Diseased TPB11 (DNAVEC) TPB11 (DNAVEC) ... 家族性パーキンソン病 ... G20 ... ...ich deleated exon 6 and 7 in parkin gene.DNAVEC: SeV vectors, which were produced by DNAVEC Corp.(Cytotune). パーキンソン

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000941 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000941 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP04.2 SP04.2 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimenez-...0215 Disease-specific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000838 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 50-59 Male ... Yes No TPB27(DNAVEC) is iPSC line reprogrammed from a Parkinson disease patient's T-cells, wh... SKIP000838 ... Diseased TPB27 (DNAVEC) TPB27 (DNAVEC) ... 家族性パーキンソン病 ... G20 ... ...ich deleated exon 6 and 7 in parkin gene.DNAVEC: SeV vectors, which were produced by DNAVEC Corp.(Cytotune). パーキンソン

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000938 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000938 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP02.1 SP02.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimenez-...0215 Disease-specific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000947 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000947 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP14.1 SP14.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Parkinson...of genetic and sporadic Parkinson's disease. Sanchez-Danes A, Richaud-Patin Y, Carballo-Carbajal I, Jimenez-...0215 Disease-specific phenotypes in dopamine neurons from human iPS-based models

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000836 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 50-59 Male ... Yes No TPB8(DNAVEC) is iPSC line reprogrammed from a Parkinson disease patient's T-cells, which... SKIP000836 ... Diseased TPB8 (DNAVEC) TPB8 (DNAVEC) ... 家族性パーキンソン病 ... G20 ... ... deleated exon 6 and 7 in parkin gene.DNAVEC: SeV vectors, which were produced by DNAVEC Corp.(Cytotune). パーキンソン

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000835 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 50-59 Male ... Yes No TPB4(DNAVEC) is iPSC line reprogrammed from a Parkinson disease patient's T-cells, which... SKIP000835 ... Diseased TPB4 (DNAVEC) TPB4 (DNAVEC) ... 家族性パーキンソン病 ... G20 ... ... deleated exon 6 and 7 in parkin gene.DNAVEC: SeV vectors, which were produced by DNAVEC Corp.(Cytotune). パーキンソン

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000176 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available male Black Black -- No Apparently healthy iPSCs from APPARENTLY HEALTHY FETAL lung fibroblast cell culture (GM06112) 健常胎児肺線維芽細胞... SKIP000176 ... Lung Fibroblast 肺線維芽細胞 Normal GM23413 GM23413 ... 0-9 Fe...(GM06112)由来iPS細胞株 human ES-like -- Retrovirus Oct4, Sox2, Klf, c-Myc, retroviral vectors

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP001077 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001077 ... Fibroblast 線維芽細胞 Diseased ND35668 ND35668 ... 筋萎縮性側索硬化症 G122 amyotrop...1 E49K mutation ALS 由来 (ND39026 線維芽細胞) SOD1 E49K 変異 ... human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus Oct4, Sox2, Klf

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000261 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sample_Detail.aspx?Ref=GM23762&PgId=166 ... 21490598 10.1038/nature09915 Modelling schizophrenia using human... SKIP000261 ... Diseased GM23762 GM23762 ... 統合失調症 F20 Schizophrenia 181500 ... ...cally affected with Shizophrenia(SCZD) . 統合失調症患者線維芽細胞(GM02497)由来iPS細胞株。 | human ES-like -- Retrovirus Oct4,

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP001115 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001115 ... Diseased D2-1 D2-1 ... 統合失調症 F209 schizophrenia ... 605210 ... 39 ...30-39 Female ... Yes No iPS cells derived from fibroblasts of a patient in which a frameshift mutation of disrupted in schizophrenia... 1 ( DISC1 ) 統合失調症患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Plasmid OCT4,SOX2,KLF4,c-MYC,

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP001116 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001116 ... Diseased D2-2 D2-2 ... 統合失調症 F209 schizophrenia ... 605210 ... 39 ...30-39 Female ... Yes No iPS cells derived from fibroblasts of a patient in which a frameshift mutation of disrupted in schizophrenia... 1 ( DISC1 ) 統合失調症患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Plasmid OCT4,SOX2,KLF4,c-MYC,

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000260 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available x?Ref=GM23761&PgId=166 ... 21490598 10.1038/nature09915 Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripot... SKIP000260 ... Diseased GM23761 GM23761 ... 統合失調症 F20 Schizophrenia 181500 ... ...h Shizophrenia(SCZD) . | 統合失調症患者線維芽細胞(GM01835)由来iPS細胞株| human ES-like -- Lentivirus Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc,

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000734 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000734 ... Diseased GM24675 GM24675 APPDp2 APPDp2 アルツハイマー病 G309 ALZHEIMER DI... hiPSC derived from fibroblast 家族性アルツハイマー病患者(APP遺伝子重複)維芽細胞由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus OC

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000279 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000279 ... Diseased HPS0192 HPS0192 ... 杉花粉症 J301 Allergic rhinitis (Pollen allergy) 607154 食物アレルギー...cell line derived from a patient: Allergic rhinitis (Pollen allergy). ... 疾患特異的iPS細胞株。杉花粉症 (カニアレルギーも)患者由来。 huma

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000333 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000333 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 polydactylous human fingers 指 Normal Yub...ター研究所 ... Not Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cell... 10F Yub 10F JCRB1116 JCRB1116 ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1116 mesenchymal stem cell finite proliferatio

  15. Changing the world is easy. Changing the Academy is hard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Mia; Tofteng, Ditte Maria Børglum; Brydon-Miller, Mary

    models of higher education. In fact, Action Research is already engaged with notions of utopia (Nielsen & Svensson, 2006) and with creating alternative ways of understanding and enacting teaching and learning with the goal of creating positive social, economic, and political change within the context...... of organizations and communities. What is needed now is a way of bringing these efforts at effecting change within higher education together in order that they might inform, support, and challenge one another and to speak more coherently and forcefully to the larger higher education community. Systemic action...... research provides a strategy for linking existing and emerging action research projects aimed at fundamentally reshaping higher education by creating an international network focused on creating “whole system change” (Burns, 2007, p. 1) in higher education. As Danny Burns describes the process, “effective...

  16. ELT in a changing world innovative approaches to new challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Azra; Saleem, Faiza; Cane, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    A novel ELT resource for language specialists and teachers across the world, this selection of papers is a collection of the most compelling and innovative ideas presented at a seminar hosted by the Centre of English Language, Aga Khan University, Pakistan, in January 2011, entitled 'ELT in a Changing World: Innovative Approaches to New Challenges'.The book is divided into three sections, the first of which is 'Global change and language learning'. This section offers a guided tour of language teaching evolution, highlighting the merits of enhanced language awareness, self-immersive and input/

  17. Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL's Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents

  18. Managing nuclear weapons in a changing world: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The Center for Security and Technology Studies was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support long-range technical studies on issues of importance to US national security. An important goal of the Center is to bring together Laboratory staff and the broader outside community through a program of technical studies, visitors, symposia, seminars, workshops, and publications. With this in mind, the Center and LLNL`s Defense Systems Program sponsored a conference on Managing Nuclear Weapons in a Changing World held on November 17--18,1992. The first day of the meeting focused on nuclear weapons issues in the major geographical areas of the world. On the second day, the conference participants discussed what could be done to manage, control, and account for nuclear weapons in this changing world. Each of the talks and the concluding panel discussion are being indexed as separate documents.

  19. World Health Organization guidelines should not change the CD4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-02

    Mar 2, 2013 ... The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that HIV-positive adults start antiretroviral therapy (ART) at. CD4 counts <350 cells/µl. Several countries have changed their guidelines to recommend ART irrespective of CD4 count or at a threshold of 500 CD4 cells/µl. Consequently, WHO is ...

  20. Travelling through a warming world: climate change and migratory species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, A.; Crick, H.Q.P.; Learmonth, J.A.; Maclean, I.M.D.; Thomas, C.D.; Bairlein, F.; Forchhammer, M.C.; Francis, C.M.; Gill, J.A.; Godley, B.J.; Harwood, J.; Hays, G.C.; Huntley, B.; Hutson, A.M.; Pierce, G.J.; Rehfisch, M.M.; Sims, D.W.; Vieira dos Santos, M.C.; Sparks, T.H.; Stroud, D.; Visser, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Long-distance migrations are among the wonders of the natural world, but this multi-taxon review shows that the characteristics of species that undertake such movements appear to make them particularly vulnerable to detrimental impacts of climate change. Migrants are key components of biological

  1. World Health Organization guidelines should not change the CD4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that HIV-positive adults start antiretroviral therapy (ART) at CD4 counts <350 cells/μl. Several countries have changed their guidelines to recommend ART irrespective of CD4 count or at a threshold of 500 CD4 cells/μl. Consequently, WHO is currently revising its ...

  2. A Small State Maneuvering in the Changing World Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Camilla T. N.

    2016-01-01

    , especially the Danish approach to the BRICs, has developed in recent years, I show how Denmark – a small state – is trying to maneuver in the changing world order through a “creative agency” approach characterized by pragmatic low-profile activism. I develop a neoclassical realist framework and use...

  3. Book Review Lifeblood: How to Change the World, One Dead ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review Lifeblood: How to Change the World, One Dead Mosquito at a Time By Alex Perry (2011). Melissa Raemaekers. Abstract. Pp xiv + 219. R210. Picador Africa, Pan Macmillan, South Africa. 2011. ISBN 978-1-77010-146-3. February 2012, Vol. 102, No. 2 SAMJ. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE ...

  4. Technology and Changing Lifestyles. Teacher's Guide. Preparing for Tomorrow's World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzi, Louis A.

    "Technology and Changing Lifestyles" is one of the "Preparing for Tomorrow's World" (PTW) program modules. PTW is an interdisciplinary, future-oriented program incorporating information from the sciences and social sciences and addressing societal concerns which interface science/technology/society. The program promotes…

  5. Frame Filtering and Skipping for Point Cloud Data Video Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moreno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensors for collecting 3D spatial data from the real world are becoming more important. They are a prime research area topic and have applications in consumer markets, such as medical, entertainment, and robotics. However, a primary concern with collecting this data is the vast amount of information being generated, and thus, needing to be processed before being transmitted. To address the issue, we propose the use of filtering methods and frame skipping. To collect the 3D spatial data, called point clouds, we used the Microsoft Kinect sensor. In addition, we utilized the Point Cloud Library to process and filter the data being generated by the Kinect. Two different computers were used: a client which collects, filters, and transmits the point clouds; and a server that receives and visualizes the point clouds. The client is also checking for similarity in consecutive frames, skipping those that reach a similarity threshold. In order to compare the filtering methods and test the effectiveness of the frame skipping technique, quality of service (QoS metrics such as frame rate and percentage of filter were introduced. These metrics indicate how well a certain combination of filtering method and frame skipping accomplishes the goal of transmitting point clouds from one location to another. We found that the pass through filter in conjunction with frame skipping provides the best relative QoS. However, results also show that there is still too much data for a satisfactory QoS. For a real-time system to provide reasonable end-to-end quality, dynamic compression and progressive transmission need to be utilized.

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000748 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B1345. Ph1 chromosome-positive human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line. Single Ph1 chromosome observed. 白血病... SKIP000748 ... acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line 急性リンパ芽球 ... Diseased PALL-2 PALL...c and molecular analysis of Ph1-chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Miyagi T, Ohyas...-2 JCRB1345 JCRB1345 急性リンパ性白血病 C910 Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia [ALL] 613065 ... -- Male ... Yes No JCR

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000817 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000817 ... Diseased ACHhomo-8859-3 ACHhomo-8859-3 ... 軟骨無形成症 Q774 Achondroplasia... 100800 ... 0-9 Female Japanese Japanese Yes No Achondroplasia(GM08859)-specific iPSC.GM08859 is from... the homozygous child of GM08857 and GM08858. 軟骨無形成症患者(GM08859)繊維芽細胞由来iPS細胞。|GM08859はGM08858の母親とGM08857の父親の子

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000418 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Princess ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-05|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-like R... SKIP000418 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-5 MRC-iPS-5 Princess...e.0013017 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.--DNA methylation dynamics in... human induced pluripotent stem cells over time.--Mesenchymal to embryonic incomp...lete transition of human cells by chimeric OCT4/3 (POU5F1) with physiological co-activator EWS.--Defining hy

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000944 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inson disease 168006 ... 66 60-69 Female ... No No iPS cell line iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Retrov... SKIP000944 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP08.3 SP08.3 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Park...irus SOX2, KLF4 and OCT3/4 Yes Yes MEFs Lines of patient-specific iPS cells were maintained by mechanical di...ssociation of colonies and splitting 1:3 onto feeder cells in hESC medium or by l

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000644 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000644 ... umbilical cord 臍帯(線維芽細胞) Normal HiPS-RIKEN-2D HiPS-RIKEN-2D ... ...bilical cord fibroblast, male) 臍帯由来線維芽細胞(RCB0197 HUC-Fm)iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus ... Oct3... ... Fetus Male Japanese Japanese -- No Human iPS cell line. Parent cell line of RCB0197 HUC-Fm(Normal um...010.00091.x Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shimizu

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000924 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000924 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased CPVT-iPS c5 CPVT-iPS c5 ... カテコラミン... line iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus SOX2, KLF4, OCT3/4 and c-MYC (pMX-based...誘発多形性心室頻拍 I47.2 Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1 604772 ... 46 40-49 Female ... Yes No iPS cell

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000328 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000328 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 polydactylous human fingers 指 Normal Yub... ... Not Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cellbank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID=3375 ... ...621c Yub621c JCRB1111 JCRB1111 ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1111 cartilige-derived messenchymal stem cell.

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000706 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000706 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 placenta 胎盤 Normal PL502 PL502 ... ... ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1125 mesenchymal stem cell. finite prolieferation 胎盤由来間葉系幹細胞(有限増殖) fibroblast-like -...lable National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cellbank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID=3548 ...

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP001095 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from a neonate.(1439 KURABO)| 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(1439 KURABO)由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research ...on, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞... SKIP001095 ... Normal WT-1-#1 WT-1-#1 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Nomal human iPS cell...ling type II collagenopathy skeletal dysplasia by directed conversion and induced pluripotent stem cell

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP000940 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inson disease 168006 ... 46 40-49 Male ... No No iPS cell line iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Retrovir... SKIP000940 ... dermal fibroblast 表皮繊維芽細胞 Diseased SP04.1 SP04.1 ... パーキンソン病 G20 Park...us SOX2, KLF4 and OCT3/4 Yes Yes MEFs Lines of patient-specific iPS cells were maintained by mechanical diss...ociation of colonies and splitting 1:3 onto feeder cells in hESC medium or by lim

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000637 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000637 ... umbilical cord 臍帯(線維芽細胞) Normal HiPS-RIKEN-1B HiPS-RIKEN-1B ... ...umbilical cord fibroblast,Female) 臍帯由来線維芽細胞(RCB0436 HUC-F2)iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus Oc... ... Fetus Female Japanese Japanese -- No Human iPS cell line. Parent cell line of RCB0436 HUC-F2(Normal ...774.2010.00091.x Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shi

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP000639 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000639 ... umbilical cord 臍帯(線維芽細胞) Normal HiPS-RIKEN-1D HiPS-RIKEN-1D ... ... umbilical cord fibroblast,Female) 臍帯由来線維芽細胞(RCB0436 HUC-F2)iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus O... ... Fetus Female Japanese Japanese -- No Human iPS cell line. Parent cell line of ... RCB0436 HUC-F2(Normal...774.2010.00091.x Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shi

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000648 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000648 ... umbilical cord 臍帯(線維芽細胞) Normal HiPS-RIKEN-13B HiPS-RIKEN-13B ... ... cord fibroblast, male) 臍帯由来線維芽細胞(HUC-5)iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4,c-... ... Fetus Male Japanese Japanese -- No Human iPS cell line. Parent cell line of HUC-5(Normal umbilical...blishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shimizu N, Yoshino K, Mi

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP000652 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available both neonatal and maternal cells. 羊膜(母胎・胎児)由来線維芽細胞(HFM-1)由来iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus Oc... SKIP000652 ... amnion 羊膜 Normal HiPS-RIKEN-3D HiPS-RIKEN-3D ... Fetus Male ... -- No Human iPS cel...l line. Parent cell line of HFM-1(amniotic membrane cells).HFM-1 were derived from ...2010.00091.x Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shimizu

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000640 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000640 ... umbilical cord 臍帯(線維芽細胞) Normal HiPS-RIKEN-1E HiPS-RIKEN-1E ... ...umbilical cord fibroblast,Female) 臍帯由来線維芽細胞(RCB0436 HUC-F2)iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus Oc... ... Fetus Female Japanese Japanese -- No Human iPS cell line. Parent cell line of RCB0436 HUC-F2(Normal ...74.2010.00091.x Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shim

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000655 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available both neonatal and maternal cells. 羊膜(母胎・胎児)由来線維芽細胞(HFM-1)由来iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Lentivirus Oc... SKIP000655 ... amnion 羊膜 Normal HiPS-RIKEN-4B HiPS-RIKEN-4B ... Fetus Male ... -- No Human iPS cel...l line. Parent cell line of HFM-1(amniotic membrane cells).HFM-1 were derived from ...4.2010.00091.x Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shimi

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000993 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ISEASE 8, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT; PARK8 607060 ... 78 70-79 Female ... Yes No iPS cells from familial Parkinson... SKIP000993 ... Diseased PARK8-LB16 PARK8-LB16 ... 遺伝性パーキンソン病:PARK8 G20 PARKINSON D...'s disease patient ... 遺伝性パーキンソン病患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Lentivirus Klf4, Sox2, Oct4, c-Myc ... Ye

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000617 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000617 ... Diseased HPS0097 HPS0097 ... 家族性パーキンソン病 PARK2 G20 Parkinson's disea...se, Familial type, PARK2 600116 ... -- -- Japanese Japanese No No Disease specific iPS cell line derived from a patient: Parkins...on's disease, Familial type, PARK2. 疾患特異的iPS細胞株。家族性パーキンソン病 PARK2患者由来。レトロウイルスベクターにより

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000991 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EASE 8, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT; PARK8 607060 ... 66 60-69 Female ... Yes No iPS cells from familial Parkinson's disease patient ... 遺伝性パーキ... SKIP000991 ... Diseased PARK8-LA5 PARK8-LA5 ... 遺伝性パーキンソン病:PARK8 G20 PARKINSON DIS...ンソン病患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Lentivirus Klf4, Sox2, Oct4, c-Myc ... Yes

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000992 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ISEASE 8, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT; PARK8 607060 ... 66 60-69 Female ... Yes No iPS cells from familial Parkinson... SKIP000992 ... Diseased PARK8-LA11 PARK8-LA11 ... 遺伝性パーキンソン病:PARK8 G20 PARKINSON D...'s disease patient ... 遺伝性パーキンソン病患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Lentivirus Klf4, Sox2, Oct4, c-Myc ... Ye

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000994 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ISEASE 8, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT; PARK8 607060 ... 78 70-79 Female ... Yes No iPS cells from familial Parkinson... SKIP000994 ... Diseased PARK8-LB21 PARK8-LB21 ... 遺伝性パーキンソン病:PARK8 G20 PARKINSON D...'s disease patient ... 遺伝性パーキンソン病患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Lentivirus Klf4, Sox2, Oct4, c-Myc ... Ye

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP001097 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from a neonate.(1439 KURABO)| 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(1439 KURABO)由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research ...n, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞... SKIP001097 ... Normal WT-1-#3 WT-1-#3 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Nomal human iPS cell...ing type II collagenopathy skeletal dysplasia by directed conversion and induced pluripotent stem cell

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP000653 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available both neonatal and maternal cells. 羊膜(母胎・胎児)由来線維芽細胞(HFM-1)由来iPS細胞. human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus Oc... SKIP000653 ... amnion 羊膜 Normal HiPS-RIKEN-3E HiPS-RIKEN-3E ... Fetus Male ... -- No Human iPS cel...l line. Parent cell line of HFM-1(amniotic membrane cells).HFM-1 were derived from ...2010.00091.x Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from human neonatal tissues. Fujioka T, Shimizu

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000390 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lections/NIGMS/ipsc_list.aspx?PgId=696 ... 21490598 10.1038/nature09915 Modelling schizophrenia using human ... SKIP000390 ... Diseased GM23764 GM23764 ... 統合失調症 F209 Schizophrenia 181500 ... ...より人工多能性幹細胞 (iPSC) を樹立。23回継代の凍結サンプル。同一人由来のリンパ球GM01490も参照。青年期から神経性無食欲症を発症。鬱<統合失調症。

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000280 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000280 ... Diseased HPS0209 HPS0209 ... 肺性高血圧症 I270 Pulmonary hypertension 178...600 ... -- -- Japanese Japanese Yes No Disease specific iPS cell line derived from a patient: Pulmonary hypertension.... ... 疾患特異的iPS細胞株。肺性高血圧症患者由来。 human ES-like -- Sendai virus SeV18+HS-OCT3/4/TSΔF, SeV18+HS-SOX2/TS

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000865 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000865 ... Diseased HPS0211 HPS0211 ... 肺性高血圧症 I270 Pulmonary hypertension 178...600 ... -- -- Japanese 日本人 Yes No Disease specific iPS cell line derived from a patient : Pulmonary hypertension.... HPS0209 was derived from the same patient. ... 疾患特異的iPS細胞株。肺性高血圧症患者由来。HPS0209と同一人由来。 human ES-like R

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000845 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000845 ... unknown 不明 Diseased Sporadic PD-1 Sporadic PD-1 10005.117.01 10005.117.01 パーキンソン病 G20 Parkin...son Disease 168600 ... 65 60-69 Female ... No No Transgene-free iPS cells from Sporadic Parkinson...lrep.2014.10.023 iPSC-derived dopamine neurons reveal differences between monozygotic twins discordant for Parkinson... Disease patient.Using CytoTune iPS Sendai reprogramming protocol (Life Technologies). 孤発性パーキンソン

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP001068 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE, PARK4 605543 ... 42 40-49 Male ... Yes No Disease specific iPS cell lines derived from patient with Parkinson...rsity Stanford University ... 22110584 10.1371/journal.pone.0026159 SNCA triplication Parkinson... SKIP001068 ... Diseased Trpl17 Trpl17 ... 家族性パーキンソン病 PARK4 G20 Familial PARKINSON ... disease (PARK4) パーキンソン病(PARK4)患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Retrovirus KLF4,SOX2,OCT4,

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000329 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000329 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 polydactylous human fingers 指 Normal Yub... Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cellbank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID=3376 ... ...621b Yub621b JCRB1112 JCRB1112 ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1112 bone-derived mesenchymal stem cell. finit

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP001096 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from a neonate.(1439 KURABO)| 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(1439 KURABO)由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research ...n, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞... SKIP001096 ... Normal WT-1-#2 WT-1-#2 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Nomal human iPS cell...ing type II collagenopathy skeletal dysplasia by directed conversion and induced pluripotent stem cell

  16. Sir David Brewster's changing ideas on the plurality of worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Asúa, Miguel

    2006-06-01

    In the course of his long life the Scottish physicist David Brewster wrote copiously about the plurality of worlds. More Worlds than One (1854), perhaps his strongest statement on the question, was written as an answer to William Whewell's On the Plurality of Worlds (1853), which argued that life was a privilege of the Earth. Brewster's ideas changed drastically along the years in many crucial issues such as the habitability of the Sun and the Moon, the possibility that extraterrestrials could be different from humans, and the occupation of the Earth by intelligent races in the distant past. This paper succinctly surveys Brewster's main lines of thought about the plurality of worlds underlining the significance of his first two articles devoted exclusively to this topic. They were published in 1838 in The Monthly Chronicle, and affirm the habitability of the planets while denying that of the Moon. As is the case with many Victorian scientists, belief in pluralism was for Brewster part and parcel of a complex of ideas and attitudes in which it is hard to distinguish science from religion. I shall argue that a fair number of the shifting opinions and inconsistencies detectable in Brewster's ideas on the plurality of worlds can be attributed to the fact that these were used as pliable apologetic instruments in his scientific writings, many of which are permeated by strong religious concerns.

  17. The next waves: migration theory for a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolberg, A R

    1989-01-01

    In the last quarter of a century, migration theory has undergone fundamental change, moving from the classic "individual relocation" genre initiated by Ravenstein a century ago, to a variety of new approaches which nevertheless share important elements: they tend to be historical, structural, globalist, and critical. Historicization implies a constant modification of theoretical concerns and emphases in the light of changing social realities, and a commitment to a critical approach entails a view of research as 1 element in a broader project concerned with the elucidation of social and political conditions. The article uses elements from 2 major theoretical traditions - a modified world-systems approach and state theory - to project current trends. Global inequality is considered as a structural given. The article then reviews major topics, including the persistence of restrictive immigration policies as barriers to movement, changing patterns of exploitation of foreign labor, liberalization of exit from the socialist world, and the refugee crisis in the developing world. It concludes with a brief consideration of the normative implications of these trends.

  18. Skip segment Hirschsprung disease and Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica R. Gross

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Skip segment Hirschsprung disease describes a segment of ganglionated bowel between two segments of aganglionated bowel. It is a rare phenomenon that is difficult to diagnose. We describe a recent case of skip segment Hirschsprung disease in a neonate with a family history of Waardenburg syndrome and the genetic profile that was identified.

  19. Skip segment Hirschsprung disease and Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Erica R.; Geddes, Gabrielle C.; McCarrier, Julie A.; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Arca, Marjorie J.

    2015-01-01

    Skip segment Hirschsprung disease describes a segment of ganglionated bowel between two segments of aganglionated bowel. It is a rare phenomenon that is difficult to diagnose. We describe a recent case of skip segment Hirschsprung disease in a neonate with a family history of Waardenburg syndrome and the genetic profile that was identified.

  20. Real change in the real world: an achievable goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    This commentary builds on the papers presented at the Vanderbilt Conference by emphasizing the importance of better understanding the process of change-making if real change in the real world is to be achieved. The commentary reviews several frameworks and research findings related to achieving large-scale sustainable change that benefits children and families. It calls for the application of systems thinking as a complement to the more micro-level research that was presented at the Vanderbilt conference. Such an approach would have implications for framing of the issue, for the strategies that are taken to try to achieve change, and for research/evaluation methods for studying complex, dynamic, nonlinear systems.

  1. Nuclear safeguards and security in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badolato, E.V.

    1986-01-01

    Two major crises of 1986 - the Chernobyl nuclear accident and international terrorism have had the effect of making what everyone does even more critically important for U.S. national security and for the security of the world. Chernobyl can be a starting point for efforts to make nuclear power systems safer and more benign. It also poses very basic questions for nuclear arms control activities. A fundamental objective of the Administration's arms control policy is to achieve substantial and equitable reductions in U.S. and Soviet nuclear forces with effective verification. However, Chernobyl served to remind the U.S. once again of the obsessive secretiveness of the Soviet Union and the difficulties of obtaining information on Soviet nuclear weapon activities. All of this points to the importance of developing improved monitoring technologies and obtaining Soviet agreement on on-site inspection. Nuclear safeguards and security developments in response to a changing world are the topic of discussion in this paper

  2. Changes in Scottish suicide rates during the Second World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rob; Stark, Cameron; Humphry, Roger W; Selvaraj, Sivasubramaniam

    2006-06-23

    It is believed that total reported suicide rates tend to decrease during wartime. However, analysis of suicide rates during recent conflicts suggests a more complex picture, with increases in some age groups and changes in method choice. As few age and gender specific analyses of more distant conflicts have been conducted, it is not clear if these findings reflect a change in the epidemiology of suicide in wartime. Therefore, we examined suicide rates in Scotland before, during and after the Second World War to see if similar features were present. Data on deaths in Scotland recorded as suicide during the period 1931-1952, and population estimates for each of these years, were obtained from the General Register Office for Scotland. Using computer spreadsheets, suicide rates by gender, age and method were calculated. Forward stepwise logistic regression was used to assess the effect of gender, war and year on suicide rates using SAS V8.2. The all-age suicide rate among both men and women declined during the period studied. However, when this long-term decline is taken into account, the likelihood of suicide during the Second World War was higher than during both the pre-War and post-War periods. Suicide rates among men aged 15-24 years rose during the Second World War, peaking at 148 per million (41 deaths) during 1942 before declining to 39 per million (10 deaths) by 1945, while the rate among men aged 25-34 years reached 199 per million (43 deaths) during 1943 before falling to 66 per million (23 deaths) by 1946. This was accompanied by an increase in male suicides attributable to firearms and explosives during the War years which decreased following its conclusion. All age male and female suicide rates decreased in Scotland during World War II. However, once the general background decrease in suicide rates over the whole period is accounted for, the likelihood of suicide among the entire Scottish population during the Second World War was elevated. The overall

  3. Optimized Skip-Stop Metro Line Operation Using Smart Card Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peitong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skip-stop operation is a low cost approach to improving the efficiency of metro operation and passenger travel experience. This paper proposes a novel method to optimize the skip-stop scheme for bidirectional metro lines so that the average passenger travel time can be minimized. Different from the conventional “A/B” scheme, the proposed Flexible Skip-Stop Scheme (FSSS can better accommodate spatially and temporally varied passenger demand. A genetic algorithm (GA based approach is then developed to efficiently search for the optimal solution. A case study is conducted based on a real world bidirectional metro line in Shenzhen, China, using the time-dependent passenger demand extracted from smart card data. It is found that the optimized skip-stop operation is able to reduce the average passenger travel time and transit agencies may benefit from this scheme due to energy and operational cost savings. Analyses are made to evaluate the effects of that fact that certain number of passengers fail to board the right train (due to skip operation. Results show that FSSS always outperforms the all-stop scheme even when most passengers of the skipped OD pairs are confused and cannot get on the right train.

  4. It's A Gassy World: Middle School Students Investigate Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, C.

    2016-12-01

    When middle school students are asked about our changing earth system, their responses likely include terms like global warming, climate change, and greenhouse gases. However, many students struggle to understand how it all fits together, and sometimes they hear conflicting information or myths about climate change. This activity allows students to explore the impacts of warming oceans and oceans' absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) through a student planned and carried out investigation that begins with a pre-laboratory engagement and exploration piece, includes a laboratory component, and concludes with an explanation where students analyze their data and interpret their results through the claim-evidence-reasoning framework. It's a Gassy World was developed with three-dimensional instruction in mind to introduce middle school students to the relationship between warming oceans and changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption in the oceans. Students explore disciplinary core ideas in the Earth and Space Sciences discipline of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices. Specifically, students study CO2 as a greenhouse gas and the effect of increased atmospheric CO2 levels on global climate change by planning and carrying out their own investigations. We structured this activity in a 5E format that can take place in four to five days during a climate change unit. After piloting this activity in over 20 formal classrooms and with 5 informal education groups, we have seen how It's a Gassy World helps support inquiry in the classroom and allows students to experience crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices in NGSS. We found that students were engaged and actively learning throughout the activity. Student work and pilot teacher feedback indicated that, through this activity, many students increased their understanding of CO2 as a greenhouse gas and recognized that warmer oceans will

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP001006 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europ...e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Available Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB http://www.clonte... SKIP001006 ... Normal ChiPSC21 ChiPSC21 Y00315 Y00315 ... 26 20-29 Male Europe...ovirus Oct4,SOX2,KLF4,c-Myc ... -- ... Negative ... Yes ... Yes ... Yes G-banding Yes ... Yes ... Takara Bio Europ...an/North African European/North African -- No Cellartis human iPS cell line 21 (ChiPSC21)|Research Gra

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP001004 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europ...e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Available Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB http://www.clonte... SKIP001004 ... Normal ChiPSC12 ChiPSC12 Y00285 Y00285 ... 24 20-29 Male Europe...ovirus Oct4,SOX2,KLF4,c-Myc ... -- ... Negative ... Yes ... Yes ... Yes G-banding Yes ... Yes ... Takara Bio Europ...an/North African European/North African -- No Cellartis human iPS cell line 12 (ChiPSC12)|Research Gra

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP001005 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europ...e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Available Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB http://www.clonte... SKIP001005 ... Normal ChiPSC18 ChiPSC18 Y00305 Y00305 ... 32 30-39 Male Europe...ovirus Oct4,SOX2,KLF4,c-Myc ... -- ... Negative ... Yes ... Yes ... Yes G-banding Yes ... Yes ... Takara Bio Europ...an/North African European/North African -- No Cellartis human iPS cell line 18 (ChiPSC18)|Research Gra

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP001001 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available F4,c-Myc ... -- ... Negative ... Yes ... Yes ... Yes G-banding Yes ... Yes ... Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパ...AB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパ...AB Not Available Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB http://www.clontech.com/JP/Support/Contact_Technical_Support?sitex=10025:22372:US ... takarabio ... SKIP001001 ... Normal P11032 P11032 Y00225 Y00225 ... 38 30-39 Female European/North African Euro...pean/North African -- No Cellartis human iPS cell line P11032|Research Grade(commer

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP001007 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europ...e AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Available Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB http://www.clonte... SKIP001007 ... Normal ChiPSC22 ChiPSC22 Y00325 Y00325 ... 32 30-39 Male Europe...ovirus Oct4,SOX2,KLF4,c-Myc ... -- ... Negative ... Yes ... Yes ... Yes G-banding Yes ... Yes ... Takara Bio Europ...an/North African European/North African -- No Cellartis human iPS cell line 22 (ChiPSC22)|Research Gra

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP001003 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Takara Bio Europe... AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB Available Takara Bio Europe AB. タカラバイオヨーロッパAB http://www.clontech.c... SKIP001003 ... Normal ChiPSC7 ChiPSC7 Y00275 Y00275 ... 20 20-29 Female Europe...us Oct4,SOX2,KLF4,c-Myc ... -- ... Negative ... Yes ... Yes ... Yes G-banding Yes ... Yes ... Takara Bio Europe...an/North African European/North African -- No Cellartis human iPS cell line 7 (ChiPSC7)|Research Grade

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP001165 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001165 ... Normal 246B2 246B2 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP001168 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001168 ... Normal 246B6 246B6 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP001192 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001192 ... blood mononuclear cell 血中単核細胞 Diseased HPS0429 HPS0429 CiRA00142 Ci...d from a patient :Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease . ... シャルコー·マリー·トゥース病患者由来iPS細胞株。 human ES-like Research Grade Pla...ll Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Applicati...on (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Available RIKEN Bi...RA00142 シャルコー・マリー・トゥース病 G600 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 118210 ... -- -- ... Yes No iPS cell line derive

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000444 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available b ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-32|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-like Research ... SKIP000444 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-32 MRC-iPS-32 Bob Bo....pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.--DNA methylation dynamic...s in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue M, Itakura Y, Kuno A, Ogawa T,...ww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP001159 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Human iPS cell lines derived from BJ human foreskin fibroblasts. 新生児包皮から得た線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞... SKIP001159 ... BJ Human Foreskin Fibroblasts 新生児包皮由来の線維芽細胞 Unknown 246G6 246G6 ... ... Shinya 山中 伸弥 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for ...iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information On...ly ... 18035408--22146343 10.1016/j.cell.2007.11.019--10.1038/mt.2011.266 Indu

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP001144 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l line derived from a healthy individual cord blood. ... 健常人の臍帯血由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-...for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and... Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Available RIKEN BioResource Center ... SKIP001144 ... cord blood 臍帯血 Normal HPS0331 HPS0331 610B1 610B1 ... -- Male ... -- No Human iPS cel...理化学研究所 バイオリソースセンター ... http://www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=HPS0331&

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP001156 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Human iPS cell lines derived from BJ human foreskin fibroblasts. 新生児包皮から得た線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞... SKIP001156 ... BJ Human Foreskin Fibroblasts 新生児包皮由来の線維芽細胞 Unknown 246G3 246G3 ... ...amanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Cent...er for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Informa...tion Only ... 18035408--22146343 10.1016/j.cell.2007.11.019--10.1038/mt.2011.2

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000474 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Gideon ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-62|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-like Res... SKIP000474 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-62 MRC-iPS-62 Gideon...459.x--10.1371/journal.pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.--D...NA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue M, Itaku...med/21155951--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP001194 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001194 ... blood mononuclear cell 血中単核細胞 Diseased HPS0508 HPS0508 CiRA00161 Ci... line derived from a patient :Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease . ... シャルコー·マリー·トゥース病患者由来iPS細胞株。 huma...ya 山中 伸弥 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS C...ell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shiny...RA00161 シャルコー・マリー・トゥース病 G600 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 118210 ... -- -- Japanese 日本人 Yes No Disease specific iPS cell

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000494 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eyes Snake eyes ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-83|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-... SKIP000494 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-83 MRC-iPS-83 Snake ....2010.01459.x--10.1371/journal.pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cell...s.--DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue ....gov/pubmed/21155951--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000707 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 胎盤由来間葉系幹細胞 fibroblast-like -- -- ... -- ... When the cultures reached subconfluence, the cell...evelopment 国立成育医療研究センター研究所 ... Not Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cell... SKIP000707 ... placenta 胎盤 Normal PL504 PL504 ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1126 mesenchymal stem cell...s were harvested with 0.25% trypsin and 1mM EDTA and replated with one-quarter of harvested cells ... 5% ... ...bank.nibio.go.jp/~cellbank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID=3549 ...

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP001176 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001176 ... Normal 253F5 253F5 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000498 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y Diggity ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-86|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-like R... SKIP000498 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-86 MRC-iPS-86 Diggit...01459.x--10.1371/journal.pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.-...-DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue M, Ita...ubmed/21155951--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000823 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line, derived from fibloblast(JCRB TIG114). TIG114線維芽細胞由来iPS細胞。エピゾーマルベクターによる樹立、導入細胞には...suke Okita 沖田 圭介 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS ...Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Shinya Yamanaka 山中伸弥... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 http://www.cir... SKIP000823 ... Normal 418C-1 418C-1 ... 36 30-39 Male Japanese Japanese -- No Human iPS cell

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000287 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000287 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 Umbilical cord blood 臍帯血 Normal UCB408E7...ot Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cell...s with transgenic HPV E7. finite proliferation 臍帯血由来間葉系幹細胞 (有限増殖) fibroblast-like -- Retr...-32 UCB408E7-32 JCRB1109 JCRB1109 ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1109 ... Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell...bank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID=3373 ... 15647378 ... Immortalization of human fetal cell

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP001099 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from a neonate.(789013 KURABO)| 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(789013 KURABO)由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Res...ication, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞... SKIP001099 ... Normal WT-2-#32 WT-2-#32 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Nomal human iPS cell... Modeling type II collagenopathy skeletal dysplasia by directed conversion and in...duced pluripotent stem cells. Okada M, Ikegawa S, Morioka M, Yamashita A, Saito A, Sawai H, Murotsuki J, Oha

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000433 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pper Gobstopper ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-21|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-... SKIP000433 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-21 MRC-iPS-21 Gobsto....2010.01459.x--10.1371/journal.pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cell...s.--DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue ....gov/pubmed/21155951--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP001190 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001190 ... blood mononuclear cell 血中単核細胞 Diseased HPS0414 HPS0414 ... 原発性側索硬化症 G...m a patient :Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). ... 原発性側索硬化症由来iPS細胞株。 human ES-like Research Grade Other Oct3/4, ...122 Primary Lateral Sclerosis ... -- -- Japanese 日本人 Yes No Disease specific iPS cell line derived fro...EN BioResource Center 理化学研究所 バイオリソースセンター ... Available RIKEN BioResource Center 理化学研究所 バイオリソースセンター ... http://www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=HPS0414&type=1 ...

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP001169 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001169 ... Normal 246B4 246B4 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP000414 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bba ... Fetus Male ... -- No MRC-iPS-01|MRC5(a 14-week male foetal lung tissue)-derived iPS cells| MRC5(14週男性胎児胚線維芽細胞)由来iPS細胞... SKIP000414 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-1 MRC-iPS-1 Bubba Bu...10.1016/j.yexcr.2009.06.016--10.1371/journal.pone.0013017 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cell...s.--DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cell...s over time.--Mesenchymal to embryonic incomplete transition of human cells by chimeric OCT4/3 (POU5F1) w

  11. Stemcell Information: SKIP000478 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-66|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-like Research ... SKIP000478 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-66 MRC-iPS-66 Tug Tu...-10.1371/journal.pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.--DNA met...hylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue M, Itakura Y, ...155951--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP000457 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s Jimmies ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-45|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-like R... SKIP000457 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-45 MRC-iPS-45 Jimmie...01459.x--10.1371/journal.pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.-...-DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue M, Ita...ubmed/21155951--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP001173 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001173 ... Normal 253F2 253F2 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP000437 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available c ... Fetus Unknown ... -- No MRC-iPS-25|MRC5-derived iPS cells| MRC5由来iPS細胞| human ES-like Research ... SKIP000437 ... fetal lung fibroblast 胎児肺線維芽細胞 Unknown MRC-iPS-25 MRC-iPS-25 Tic Ti...-10.1371/journal.pgen.1002085 Lectin microarray analysis of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.--DNA met...hylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells over time. Toyoda M, Yamazaki-Inoue M, Itakura Y, ...155951--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21637780 -- Some of clones of the same original cells have been used in the papers.

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP001164 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001164 ... Normal 246B1 246B1 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP000824 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line, derived from fibloblast(JCRB TIG107). TIG107線維芽細胞由来iPS細胞。エピゾーマルベクターによる樹立、導入細胞...and ... No ... Keisuke Okita 沖田 圭介 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ...Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Shiny...a Yamanaka 山中伸弥 Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所... SKIP000824 ... Normal 421C-1 421C-1 ... 81 80-89 Female Japanese Japanese -- No Human iPS cell

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP001098 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from a neonate.(789013 KURABO)| 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(789013 KURABO)由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Res...ication, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞... SKIP001098 ... Normal WT-2-#31 WT-2-#31 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Nomal human iPS cell... Modeling type II collagenopathy skeletal dysplasia by directed conversion and in...duced pluripotent stem cells. Okada M, Ikegawa S, Morioka M, Yamashita A, Saito A, Sawai H, Murotsuki J, Oha

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP001166 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001166 ... Normal 246B3 246B3 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP001191 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001191 ... blood mononuclear cell 血中単核細胞 Diseased HPS0426 HPS0426 CiRA00139 Ci... line derived from a patient :Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease . シャルコー·マリー·トゥース病患者由来iPS細胞株。 human...a 山中 伸弥 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Ce...ll Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya...RA00139 シャルコー・マリー・トゥース病 G600 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 118210 ... -- -- Japanese 日本人 Yes No Disease specific iPS cell

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP000708 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000708 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 placenta 胎盤 Normal PL505 PL505 ... ... ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1128 mesenchymal stem cell finite proliferation 胎盤由来間葉系幹細胞(有限増殖) fibroblast-like -- ...opment 国立成育医療研究センター研究所 ... Not Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞...バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cellbank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID=3558 ...

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP001145 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from a healthy individual peripheral blood. ... 健常人の末梢血由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-li... Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Rese...arch and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Available RIKEN BioResource... SKIP001145 ... Normal HPS0360 HPS0360 648A1 648A1 ... 30 30-39 Male ... -- No Human iPS cell... Center 理化学研究所 バイオリソースセンター ... http://www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP001175 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001175 ... Normal 253F4 253F4 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP001167 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plication (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese... iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research and Ap... SKIP001167 ... Normal 246B5 246B5 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibrob

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP001162 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Information Only ... 18035408 10.1016/j.cell... line derived from a healthy individual dermal fibroblasts. 健常人の皮膚線維芽細胞由来のヒトiPS細胞株。 human ES-like Rese...山中 伸弥 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell... SKIP001162 ... Normal 201B3 201B3 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell....2007.11.019 Induction of pluripotent stem cells from ad

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000821 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line, derived from fibloblast(Cell applications Inc. Lot1388). Lot1388線維芽細胞由来iPS細胞。エピゾーマルベクターによる樹立、導入細胞...No ... No ... Keisuke Okita 沖田 圭介 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ...Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Shiny...a Yamanaka 山中伸弥 Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所... SKIP000821 ... Normal 404C-2 404C-2 ... 36 30-39 Female ... -- No Human iPS cell

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP000288 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000288 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 Umbilical cord blood 臍帯血 Normal UCB408E6...d-derived mesenchymal stem cells with transgenic hTERT, HPV E6 and E7. Immortalized ... 臍帯血由来間葉系幹細胞, ... 不死化細胞株 fi...evelopment 国立成育医療研究センター研究所 ... Not Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cell...bank.nibio.go.jp/~cellbank/cgi-bin/search_res_det.cgi?DB_NUM=1&ID...=3374 ... 15647378 ... Immortalization of human fetal cells: the life span of umbilical cord blood-derived cell

  7. Stemcell Information: SKIP000277 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l1 retrotransposition in the neuronal genome in schizophrenia. Bundo M, Toyoshima... SKIP000277 ... Diseased KO-001-25 KO-001-25 ... 統合失調症 F209 Schizophrenia 181500 ... ... |HCV : |その他の感染症 : 梅毒 陰性(梅毒定性RPR(ラテックス比濁法)、梅毒定性TP抗体(ラテックス比濁法)|病歴・治療歴等 : 28歳時、注意力の低下、記憶障害、独語、空笑、幻聴などの精神病症状が亜急性に出現。|        精神科受診し統合失調症

  8. Stemcell Information: SKIP001100 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from a neonate.(789013 KURABO)| 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(789013 KURABO)由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Res...ication, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞... SKIP001100 ... Normal WT-2-#33 WT-2-#33 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Nomal human iPS cell... Modeling type II collagenopathy skeletal dysplasia by directed conversion and in...duced pluripotent stem cells. Okada M, Ikegawa S, Morioka M, Yamashita A, Saito A, Sawai H, Murotsuki J, Oha

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000286 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP000286 ... mesenchymal stem cell 間葉系幹細胞 Umbilical cord blood 臍帯血 Normal UCB408E6...医療研究センター研究所 ... Not Available National Institute of Biomedical Innovation. 独立行政法人医薬基盤研究所JCRB細胞バンク http://cellbank.nibio.go.jp/~cell...s with transgenic HPV E6 and E7. finite proliferation 臍帯血由来間葉系幹細胞(有限増殖) fibroblast-li...E7-31 UCB408E6E7-31 JCRB1108 JCRB1108 ... -- -- ... -- No JCRB1108 ... Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell...378 ... Immortalization of human fetal cells: the life span of umbilical cord blood-derived cells can be prolon

  10. Two speeches that changed the world: from Fulton to Zurich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan John Watson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this extract from his new book Churchill’s Legacy: Two Speeches to Save the World (Watson, 2016, Lord Watson of Richmond draws on his own experience of post war British politics, as a television presenter and media commentator and then as a Liberal Peer and Chairman of the English-Speaking Union, to analyse the significance of Churchill’s Zurich speech of 19 September 1946. He argues that, building on Churchill’s earlier speech at Fulton, Missouri, it helped change the perceptions of the West and alter their response to the emerging Cold War and the future of Europe.

  11. One Health for a changing world: new perspectives from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Andrew A; Scoones, Ian; Wood, James L N

    2017-07-19

    The concept of One Health, which aims to drive improvements in human, animal and ecological health through an holistic approach, has been gaining increasing support and attention in recent years. While this concept has much appeal, there are few examples where it has been successfully put into practice. This Special Issue explores the challenges in African contexts, with papers looking at the complex interactions between ecosystems, diseases and poverty dynamics; at underlying social and political dimensions; at the potentials for integrative modelling; and at the changes in policy and practice required to realise a One Health approach. This introductory paper offers an overview of the 11 papers, coming from diverse disciplinary perspectives, that each explore how a One Health approach can work in a world of social, economic and environmental change. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Changes in the world market in oil and oil refinements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristik, Julija

    1996-01-01

    Since 1980's the world market for crude oil and oil products has faced significant changes that are going to have a grate influence on the supply and consumption of crude oil derivatives in Macedonia. The knowledge of these changes would have a grate contribution in planning the future development of this part of the energetic system of Macedonia. The purpose of this paper (which is a short version of the introductory report for the ZEMAK session with a theme 'Energetic policy and development of energetics in Macedonia') is to present the actual situation on the market for crude oil products, as well as to give the main factors that would have influence on this market in the future. (author). 4 refs., 3 ills

  13. Assessing and managing multiple risks in a changing world ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskilde University (Denmark) hosted a November 2015 workshop, Environmental Risk—Assessing and Managing Multiple Risks in a Changing World. This Focus article presents the consensus recommendations of 30 attendees from 9 countries regarding implementation of a common currency (ecosystem services) for holistic environmental risk assessment and management; improvements to risk assessment and management in a complex, human-modified, and changing world; appropriate development of protection goals in a 2-stage process; dealing with societal issues; risk-management information needs; conducting risk assessment of risk management; and development of adaptive and flexible regulatory systems. The authors encourage both cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to address their 10 recommendations: 1) adopt ecosystem services as a common currency for risk assessment and management; 2) consider cumulative stressors (chemical and nonchemical) and determine which dominate to best manage and restore ecosystem services; 3) fully integrate risk managers and communities of interest into the risk-assessment process; 4) fully integrate risk assessors and communities of interest into the risk-management process; 5) consider socioeconomics and increased transparency in both risk assessment and risk management; 6) recognize the ethical rights of humans and ecosystems to an adequate level of protection; 7) determine relevant reference conditions and the proper ecological c

  14. [World population and development: an important change in perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallin, J

    1984-10-24

    The International Population Conference in Mexico City was much less controversial than the World Population Conference in Bucharest 10 years previously, in part because the message of Bucharest was widely accepted and in part because of changes that occurred in the demographic and economic situations in the succeeding decade. The UN medium population projection for 1985 has been proved quite accurate; it is not as alarming as the high projection but still represents a doubling of world population in less than 40 years. The control of fertility upon which the medium projection was predicated is well underway. The movement from high to low rates of fertility and mortality began in the 18th century in the industrial countries and lasted about 1 1/2 centuries during which the population surplus was dispersed throughout the world, especially in North and South America. The 2nd phase of movement from high to low rates currently underway in the developing countries has produced a far greater population increase. The proportion of the population in the developed areas of Europe, North America, the USSR, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand will decline from about 1/3 of the 2.5 billion world population of 1950 to 1/4 of the 3.7 billion of 1985, to 1/5 of the 4.8 billion of 2000, and probably 1/7 of the 10 billion when world population stabilizes at the end of the next century. The growth rates of developing countries are not homogeneous; the populations of China and India have roughly doubled in the past 35 years while that of Latin America has multiplied by 2 1/2. The population of Africa more than doubled in 35 years and will almost triple by 2025. The number of countries with over 50 million inhabitants, 9 in 1950, will increase from 19 in 1985 to 32 in 2025. The process of urbanization is almost complete in the industrialized countries, with about 75% of the population urban in 1985, but urban populations will continue to grow rapidly in the developing countries as rural

  15. Skip cycle method with a valve-control mechanism for spark ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baykara, Cemal; Akin Kutlar, O.; Dogru, Baris; Arslan, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A normal four-stroke cycle followed by a skip cycle without gas exchange is tested. • The normal and skipped mode results are compared at equal power levels. • The throttle valve is opened wider, thereby resulting in a higher volumetric efficiency. • The pumping work during the gas exchange decreases significantly. • The fuel consumption (BSFC) is reduced by approximately 14–26% under part load conditions. - Abstract: The efficiency decrease of spark ignition (SI) engines under part-load conditions is a considerable issue. Changing the effective stroke volume based on the load level is one of the methods using to improve the part-load efficiency. In this study, a novel alternative engine valve control technique in order to perform a cycle without gas exchange (skip cycle), is examined. The goal of skip cycle strategy is to reduce the effective stroke volume of an engine under part load conditions by skipping several of the four stroke cycles by cutting off the fuel injection and simultaneously deactivating the inlet and exhaust valves. To achieve the same power level in the skip cycle, the cylinder pressure level reaches higher values compared to those in a normal four stroke cycle operation, but inherently not higher than the maximum one at full load of normal cycle. According to the experimental results, the break specific fuel consumption (BSFC) was reduced by 14–26% at a 1–3 bar break mean effective pressure (BMEP) and a 1200–1800 rpm engine speed of skip cycle operation, in comparison to normal engine operation. The significant decrease in the pumping work from the gas exchange is one of the primary factors for an increase in efficiency under part load conditions. As expected, the fuel consumption reduction rate at lower load conditions was higher. These experimental results indicate a promising potential of the skip cycle system for reducing the fuel consumption under part load conditions.

  16. Climate change and the World Bank: opportunity for global governance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer-Christiansen, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    The direct and indirect efforts of the World Bank and its off-spring, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), to become leading international agents of global environmental 'governance' and 'sustainable development' are described and analysed politically with reference to the development of an implementation regime of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The Bank/GEF are seen as engaging in a potentially dangerous experiment of 'global ecological modernisation', or industrial transformation, in 'emerging economies', an experiment legitimised by reference to the catastrophic threat of man-made 'global warming'. This threat is already being translated into political, commercial and bureaucratic benefits accruing to a small global elite. How was this achieved and what are the likely political implications? (author)

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP000219 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l line. ヒトiPS細胞。歯髄細胞由来。 human ES-like -- Plasmid Episomal vector pCXLE, Oct3/4, Sox...Yamanaka 山中伸弥 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Available RIKE... SKIP000219 ... Pulp 歯髄 Normal 454E2 454E2 HPS0077 HPS0077 ... 16 10-19 Female ... -- No Human iPS cel...2, Klf4, L-Myc, Lin28, p53 shRNA ... Yes SNL 76/7 (X-rays:5000R or MMC) 1.5-2.5x10^(6) cells/100mm dish Primate...N BRC 理化学研究所バイオリソースセンター http://www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=HPS0077&type=1 ...

  18. Stemcell Information: SKIP000222 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EN-12A HPS0029 HPS0029 ... -- Male ... -- No Human iPS cell line. ヒトiPS細胞株。臍帯由来線維芽細胞由来。 human ES-like... SKIP000222 ... Umbilical cord(Fibroblast) 臍帯(線維芽細胞) Normal HiPS-RIKEN-12A HiPS-RIK... -- Retrovirus Retroviral vector pMXs, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 ... Yes MEF (X-rays:5000R or MMC) 1-1.5x10^(6) cells/...N BRC 理化学研究所バイオリソースセンター Yukio Nakamura 中村幸夫 Available RIKEN BRC 理化学研究所バイオリソースセンター http://www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=HPS0029&type=1 ...

  19. Stemcell Information: SKIP001103 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001103 ... induced chondrogenic (iChon) cells ダイレクトリプログラミングで作製した軟骨細胞 ... Diseased ...s have elevated ER stress and undergo apoptosis. 軟骨無発症患者線維芽細胞(GM07892)をダイレクトリプログラミングにより軟骨細胞...へと誘導(iChon細胞)。|小胞体ストレスが生じ、過度のアポトーシスが引き起こされていた。 Other Research Grade Retrovirus c-MYC, KLF4... ... Minoru Okada 岡田 稔 Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所... ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 CiRA https:

  20. Stemcell Information: SKIP001101 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001101 ... o induced chondrogenic (iChon) cells ダイレクトリプログラミングで作製した軟骨細胞 ... Normal ...man Dermal Fibroblasts(1439 KURABO). 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(1439 KURABO)をダイレクトリプログラミングにより軟骨細胞へと誘導(iChon細胞) Other Researc... Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Research ...and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 CiRA https://www.cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp/e/index.html ... 25187577 ...WT-1-iChon WT-1-iChon ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Direct iInduction of Chondrogenic(iChon) cells from Hu

  1. Stemcell Information: SKIP000783 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from T cell in Peripheral Blood (TiPS) 正常iPS細胞株(末梢血由来T細胞から樹立(TiPS)) ... human ES-like Resear...5)|8.Feeder Cellの使用: 使用する| 細胞名 : SNL細胞| 使用時の細胞密度 : 1.5 x 10^(6)/10cm dish| 使用前処理方法 : Mitomycin C処理 : 400micr... Total 50ml| Aliquot and store at -20 degree|10.パッセージの際の細胞播種時の細胞密度| Confluentの10c...析 : 未実施|胚葉体形成実験 : 実施 胚葉体形成確認|テラトーマ形成実験 : 未実施|in vitro分化能解析 : 実施 神経への分化確認|マイコプラズマ汚染検査 : 未実施|細胞同定検査(STR多型解析) : 未実施|クローニング : 未実施 ... SKIP000783 ... Normal aTKA9 aTKA9 ... 40 40-49 Male ... -- No Normal iPS cell

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000678 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ns in the ratio 3:1:1:1:1. 胎児肺線維芽細胞由来iPS細胞。|低酸素下でKlf4, c-Myc, Oct4, Sox2とLIN28を3:...1:1:1:1の割合でコードした合成RNAを、線維芽細胞株に20日間毎日添加し、遺伝子を細胞へ導入した。 human ES-like Research Grade Other OCT4 , SOX2 , KLF4 ,... SKIP000678 ... Lung Lung Normal MRC5-RiPS-1.8 MRC5-RiPS-1.8 ... Fetus Male ... -- No hiPS-cell...s derived from human fetal lung fibroblast cells (MRC-5 Line).They were derived using m....1016/j.stem.2010.08.012 Highly efficient reprogramming to pluripotency and directed differentiation of human cell

  3. Stemcell Information: SKIP000221 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available N-2A HPS0009 HPS0009 ... -- Male ... -- No Human iPS cell line. ヒトiPS細胞。臍帯由来線維芽細胞(RCB0197 HUC-Fm)由来。 ... SKIP000221 ... Umbilical cord(Fibroblast) 臍帯(線維芽細胞) Normal HiPS-RIKEN-2A HiPS-RIKE...human ES-like -- Retrovirus Retroviral vector pMXs, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc ... Yes MEF (X-rays:5000R or MMC) 1-1.5x10^(6) cell.../www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=HPS0009&type=1 ... ...学研究所バイオリソースセンター RIKEN BRC 理化学研究所バイオリソースセンター Yukio Nakamura 中村幸夫 Available RIKEN BRC 理化学研究所バイオリソースセンター http:/

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP001102 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001102 ... induced chondrogenic (iChon) cells ダイレクトリプログラミングで作製した軟骨細胞 ... Normal WT...n Dermal Fibroblasts(789013 KURABO). 新生児皮膚繊維芽細胞(789013 KURABO)をダイレクトリプログラミングにより軟骨細胞へと誘導(iChon細胞) Other Resea...n, Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 ... Information Only Center for iPS Cell Researc...h and Application,Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 CiRA https://www.cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp/e/index.html ... 2518757...-2-iChon WT-2-iChon ... 0-9 Male ... -- No Direct iInduction of Chondrogenic(iChon) cells from Huma

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000674 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rous hESC-like colonies in BJ cultures that were mechanically picked at day 18, 20, 21, and 25, respectively. BJ新生児線維芽細胞由来iPS細胞...。|低酸素下でKlf4, c-Myc, Oct4, Sox2とLIN28を3:1:1:1:1の割合でコードした合成RNAを、線維芽細胞株に20日間毎日添加し、遺伝子を細胞へ導入し... SKIP000674 ... foreskin foreskin Normal BJ-RiPS1.1 BJ-RiPS1.1 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No hiPS-cell...cy and directed differentiation of human cells with synthetic modified mRNA.--Som...atic coding mutations in human induced pluripotent stem cells. Warren L, Manos PD, Ahfeldt T, Loh YH, Li H,

  6. Stemcell Information: SKIP001193 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SKIP001193 ... blood mononuclear cell 血中単核細胞 Diseased HPS0507 HPS0507 CiRA00160 Ci...line derived from a patient :Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease . ... シャルコー·マリー·トゥース病患者由来iPS細胞株。 human ES-like Researc... for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Center for iPS Cell Research an...d Application (CiRA), Kyoto University 京都大学iPS細胞研究所 Yamanaka Shinya 山中 伸弥 Availab...RA00160 シャルコー・マリー・トゥース病 G600 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 118210 ... -- -- Japanese 日本人 Yes No iPS cell

  7. Adapting to a changing world: Implications for water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Everyone is aware that the world is changing, and that many of these changes will impact our water resource supplies and how they are used and managed. It's always a challenge to try to predict the future, especially the very uncertain distant future. But one thing is certain, the future environment our descendants will experience will differ from the economic, social, technological and natural conditions we experience today. Some aspects of the changes that are happening may not be under human control, but many are. And to the extent they are, we can influence that future. In this paper I attempt to speculate about a future some 40 to 50 years from now, and how water will need to be managed then. My goal is to motivate some thinking and discussion about how we as water managers can influence and prepare ourselves (or our successors) for that future. It will require collaboration among multiple disciplines to determine how best we as a profession can help society adapt to these changes, and this in turn will require all of us to learn how to work together more effectively than we do now. This theme fits in with the current interest in sustainability, for no matter how it is defined, sustainability makes us think about the long-term future. How do we develop and manage our natural and cultural resources in ways that benefit both us and future generations of people living on this earth? What will their needs and goals be? We don't know and that is the major challenge in deciding what decisions we might make today on their behalf. Here I attempt to identify the challenges and issues water managers could be addressing some 40 to 50 years from now, and what we in each of our disciplines, and together, can begin to do now to address them.

  8. New Nuclear Fuel Disposition Opportunities in a Changed World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    The world's economic, security, environmental, and technological situation has changed significantly in the last several years and these changes bring new opportunities for substantial policy improvements and redirections in the used nuclear fuel management arena. The passage of new energy legislation; the need for more US nuclear energy; growing state, national and international momentum for carbon emission and other air pollutant reductions; post September 11. Homeland Security threat reduction improvements; desires to improve global nuclear security; rapidly emerging needs for clean electricity supplies in developing countries; and the technological advancements in advanced fuel cycle technologies provide a substantial foundation for future enhancements and improvements in current used nuclear fuel management programs. Past progress, lessons learned, and new used fuel/waste management technological innovations coupled with current and future economic, security, and environmental issues can create new approaches that can help the Federal government meet its obligations while simultaneously addressing many of the difficult regional/state issues that have historically hindered progress. This paper will examine and integrate the synergy of these issues to explore options and discuss possible new opportunities in the vitally important area of spent fuel management and the entire back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. (authors)

  9. Breeding to Optimize Agriculture in a Changing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankang Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breeding to Optimize Chinese Agriculture (OPTICHINA was a three-year EU–China project launched in June of 2011. As designed, the project acted as a new strategic model to reinforce systematic cooperation on agricultural research between Europe and China. The OPTICHINA International Conference “Breeding to Optimize Agriculture in a Changing World” was held in Beijing, May 26–29, 2014. The conference included six thematic areas: (1 defining and protecting the yield potential of traits and genes; (2 high-throughput precision phenotyping in the field; (3 molecular technologies in modern breeding; (4 plant ideotype; (5 data analysis, data management, and bioinformatics; and (6 national challenges and opportunities for China. The 10 articles collected in this special issue represent key contributions and topics of this conference. This editorial provides a brief introduction to the OPTICHINA project, followed by the main scientific points of articles published in this special issue. Finally, outcomes from a brainstorming discussion at the end of the conference are summarized, representing the authors' opinions on trends in breeding for a changing world.

  10. WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION – REFORM IT OR CHANGE IT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterian Maria Gabriela

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The failure of Doha Round is a serious step backward for the WTO and the multilateral trading system. Some analysts already discussed in their research about the round as being already closed and they propose the developing of a new program within the organization. WTO still remains a very important institution due to its proven role in encouraging states not to take protectionist measures during the recent economic crisis, but the global trade governance reform must reflect all the changes and realities. The transition is being made toward a more regionalized and preferential global trade and the emergence of strong developing countries shape the whole multilateral trade negotiations. The important growth rates in emerging countries are translated also in strong demand for representation in global trade governance. Objectives: This paper aims to underline the role of multilateralism as form of international cooperation, the link with global economic governance and what concerns academic community in terms of having a reform of it. Prior Work: It has been tried to emphasizing the concepts already developed by known researchers in the field. Approach: The approach is a more theoretic one done in a comparative manner with emphasis on results and future research. The critical method approach is done with qualitative results. Results: The key results are related to pros and cons of reforming the World Trade Organization, as well as presenting the criticisms and proposals for having a second World Trade Organization. Implications: The implications are varied in terms of studying the concepts and addresses researchers in the field, but also lecturers and students. Value: The main added value is the compared approach of the traditional WTO as it derived from General Agreement on Tariff and Trade and the proposal for a new one and its formal relationship with the global economic governance.

  11. The world is changing – our mindsets must change with it

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, D.

    2011-01-01

    The rise in the amount of data we are generating and storing has been meteoric of late. But while the world of data is developing rapidly, the ways that we manage it are not keeping pace. Our paradigms need to change.

  12. A decade of democracy: environmental management in a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Aucamp

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The world’s focus on the environment started in 1972 with the Conference of the United Nations on the Human Environment in Stockholm. This led to the formation of the United Nations’ Environmental Programme (UNEP. The new interest in the role of the humans in the environment only picked up momentum after the publication of the report, Our Common Future by the World Commission on Development and the Environment, led by Harlem Gro Brundtland and the follow-up Conference in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 (The Earth Summit. The main products from this conference were the Earth Charter and the Agenda 21 principles and action plans. Not long after this event South Africa had a change in government in 1994. The new Constitution that was accepted in 1996 is one of the few constitutions that contain pertinent clauses pertaining to the protection of the environment. Environmental legislation such as the new National Environmental Management Act, a National Water Act, a Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, an Air Quality Management Bill has been adapted since 1994. A huge number of non-governmental organisations (NGOs attended the Rio Conference. Some, like Greenpeace (and locally Earthlife Africa, developed pressure groups that pressurised governments to give more attention to the protection of the environment and to improve environmental management. During this period results of scientific research that had a large impact on humankind’s perception of the environment, were published. The discovery of the hole in the ozone layer and of the increase in global warming led to great public interest. This led to conventions and protocols that have been ratified by most countries in the world, for example 189 out of a possible 191 countries ratified the Montreal Protocol for the Protection of the Ozone Layer by June 2004. The private sector responded and today it is the norm to report about the “Triple Bottom-line” (economic, social and

  13. Preparing for Change: Challenges and Opportunities in a Global World

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Sabine

    2009-03-01

    Our world is becoming increasingly global. This may sound like a clich'e, yet it is true nonetheless, and poses unprecedented challenges for graduate education. For the new generation of researchers, teachers and professionals to be successful they must be prepared in more than the content area of their chosen field. They must also acquire proficiency in global awareness, cultural literacy, multicultural teamwork and language facility. These global skill sets form the basis for effective multicultural collaboration and will become increasingly important even for those who do not intend to study or work abroad. Knowledge has become more portable in the internet age; large data bases and reports can be accessed in real time from various locations around the globe; information is exchanged in multifaceted knowledge networks; collaborative research takes place within and outside of the traditional venue of the research university in the private sector, research institutes, and associations; research networks span multiple disciplines as progress invariably occurs at the intersection of previously discrete fields of inquiry. Global collaboration thus is no longer dependent on the physical proximity of collaborators but can take place anywhere any time. This then requires yet another set of skills, namely the ability to adapt to change, exhibit flexibility and transfer skills to a range of contexts and applications. Effective graduate education must address these realities and expose students to learning opportunities that will enable them to acquire these much needed global skills sets.

  14. Place-based collaboration: Leadership for a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hambleton Robin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Placeless power, meaning the exercise of power by decision-makers who are unconcerned about the impact of their decisions on communities living in particular places, has grown significantly in the last thirty years. A consequence is that societies are becoming more unequal. Even in the wealthy global cities modern capitalism is increasing inequality at a formidable rate. In a new book the author provides an international, comparative analysis of the efforts being made by place-based leaders to create inclusive, sustainable cities. This article draws on the evidence presented in the book to suggest that place-based leaders can play a significant role in advancing social justice, promoting care for the environment and bolstering community empowerment. An opening section introduces the idea of place-based power, providing a context for the subsequent discussion. A second section sets out a new way of conceptualising the roles of place-based leaders in any given context, a framework described as the New Civic Leadership. This distinguishes five different realms of civic leadership. The third section provides an example of place-based leadership in action. It outlines the way local leadership has brought about a remarkable transformation of the central area of Melbourne, Australia. A final section presents a comparative discussion of three themes relating to place-based leadership and local collaboration: (i the changing possibilities for place-based leadership in our rapidly globalising world, (ii the need for outward-facing local government leadership given the changing nature of public policy challenges and (iii the role of place-based leadership in bringing about radical public innovation.

  15. Invite your representative to work. Change the world. Here's how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montell, Denise J

    2018-02-15

    Today's political climate can seem hostile to science. Alternative facts, climate change denial, and relabeling of actual news as fake news are discouraging phenomena for sure. But these trends make it more important than ever to engage our politicians. Take heart! There is something you can do. You can show your representatives firsthand the amazing things you do, evidence of the economic engine that your activities generate, and the real people behind the discoveries. I did, and it was fun. We invited our congressman to the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), and he accepted! For 2 hours, we explained and demonstrated efforts to cure blindness using stem cells, the medical implications of the discovery that cells can recover from the brink of death, a mosquito lab striving to eliminate insect-borne disease, and an Alzheimer's disease laboratory. Salud Carbajal peered through a microscope and met real scientists. Before his visit, he did not know what a postdoctoral fellow was, much less what stem cells look like. When he left he knew our names, how much money we bring into his district, and how important National Institutes of Health funding and international mobility are to our enterprise. Although I live in the United States, this approach should also apply to other democratic countries. If each of us converts one representative into a science champion, we can change the world. © 2018 Montell. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Considerations on nonproliferation regime meeting in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past history of worldwide nonproliferation regime, then proposes the future improvements on the regime. Present worldwide nonproliferation regime have been formulated during the cold war era. Therefore, the structure and measures of the regime were heavily influenced by the features of cold war era. Though the cold war was over, still new international order does not seem to be on the horizon, we need to review the present regime and to improve the regime compatible to new world situation. Generally speaking, the nonproliferation regime have gained moderate success so far. We could point out the following features as a kind of success: 1) No increase of overt Nuclear Weapon State (NWS), 2) All five NWSs have finally participated to the NPT, 3) South Africa has destroyed its nuclear weapons and became Non-Nuclear Weapon State (NNWS), 4) Successful conclusions of some regional arrangements, such as Tlatelolco, Ralotonga, and 5) Strengthening of export control on sensitive items. On the other hand, we recognize the following points as the failures of the regime. 6) India, Pakistan and Israel reject to join the NPT, 7) Existence of some violation against NPT regime, i.e. Iraqi case and DPRK case, 8) Insufficient effective measures against brain drain problem, 9) Risk exists for the long term extension of NPT, and 10) Insufficient flexibility to meet changing boundary conditions. We would propose the various measures for strengthening to meet changing boundary conditions, as follows: 11) Measures to be taken along with future civil use of Plutonium, 12) Strengthening and rationalizing international safeguards, 13) Countermeasures for emerging new types of nuclear proliferation, 14) Strengthening nuclear material control in NWS, 15) Measures to be taken for nuclear material from dismantled nuclear weapons, and 16) Nuclear disarmament. (author)

  17. Skip segment Hirschsprung's disease: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Hirschsprung\\'s disease is characterised by the congenital absence of ganglion cells beginning in the distal rectum and extending proximally for varying distances. \\'Zonal aganglionosis\\' is a phenomenon involving a zone of aganglionosis occurring within normally innervated intestine. \\'Skip segment\\' Hirschsprung\\'s disease (SSHD) involves a \\'skip area\\' of normally ganglionated intestine, surrounded proximally and distally by aganglionosis. While Hirschsprung\\'s disease is believed to be the result of incomplete craniocaudal migration of neural crest-derived cells, the occurrence of SSHD has no clear embryological explanation. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of SSHD, reported in the literature between 1954 and 2009, in order to determine the clinical characteristics of this rare entity and its significance. METHODS: The first reported case of SSHD was published in 1954. A systematic review of SSHD cases in the literature, from 1954 to 2009, was carried out using the electronic database \\'Pubmed\\'. Detailed information was recorded regarding the age, gender, presenting symptoms and location of the skip segment in each patient. RESULTS: 24 cases of SSHD have been reported in the literature to date. 18\\/24 (75%) of these cases were males and 6\\/24 (25%) were females. Of these, 22\\/24 (92%) were cases of total colonic aganglionosis (TCA), and 2\\/24 (8%) were rectosigmoid Hirschsprung\\'s disease. Of the 22 TCA cases, 9 (41%) had a skip segment in the transverse colon, 6 (27%) in the ascending colon, 2 (9%) in the caecum and 5 (23%) had multiple skip segments. In both rectosigmoid Hirschsprung\\'s disease cases, the skip segment was in the sigmoid colon. Overall, the length of the skip segment was variable, with the entire transverse colon ganglionated in some cases. CONCLUSION: SSHD occurs predominantly in patients with TCA. The existence of a skip area of normally innervated colon in TCA may influence surgical

  18. The World Religions Paradigm Time for a Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    The teaching of religions has long relied on the World Religions paradigm to guide curricula throughout education, which has led to a widening gap, on the one hand, between what is taught in schools and in universities and, on the other, between research and teaching. While the World Religions paradigm has allowed the inclusion of non-Christian…

  19. Power inverter implementing phase skipping control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Utsav; Amirahmadi, Ahmadreza; Jourdan, Charles; Batarseh, Issa

    2016-10-18

    A power inverter includes a DC/AC inverter having first, second and third phase circuitry coupled to receive power from a power source. A controller is coupled to a driver for each of the first, second and third phase circuitry (control input drivers). The controller includes an associated memory storing a phase skipping control algorithm, wherein the controller is coupled to receive updating information including a power level generated by the power source. The drivers are coupled to control inputs of the first, second and third phase circuitry, where the drivers are configured for receiving phase skipping control signals from the controller and outputting mode selection signals configured to dynamically select an operating mode for the DC/AC inverter from a Normal Control operation and a Phase Skipping Control operation which have different power injection patterns through the first, second and third phase circuitry depending upon the power level.

  20. Changing fertility patterns and policies in the third world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnicoll, G

    1992-01-01

    Different patterns of fertilty transition are apparent in developing countries. Theories of fertility decline are appropriate because demographic analysis has become situation specific rather than general. Pretransition fertility patterns and the onset of decline are provided. Fertility transition patterns are also supplied, including a regional overview for Latin America, east and Southeast Asia, South Asia, West Asia and North Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa. The specialized cases of China, India, Bangladesh, Thailand and Indonesia, and Brazil are also presented. The fertility determinant models of Bongaarts, Davis and Blake, Hobcraft and Little, Ryder, and Henry are used as examples of proximate determinant models. Data collection was possible on a grand scale with contraceptive knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP) surveys and the World Fertility Surveys and Demographic and Health Surveys. Criticism has focused on the scope of these surveys which provide at best proximate determinants and differentiate fertility by standard socioeconomic factors. Data are also obtained on small populations from piecing together records and from quasi-anthropological fieldwork. Historical demography relies on family reconstitution. Longitudinal studies are few in number. The largest and most effective fieldwork station is at Matlab in Bangladesh. Caldwell has provided anthropological methods applicable to fertility study and makes use of teamwork. In Latin America, fertility has fallen by 40% since the 1960s. Bolivia, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Haiti have changed very little. Taiwan and South Korea provide examples of economic growth with equity in East and Southeast Asia. In heterogenous South Asia, decline has been slow and uneven. West Asia and North Africa have high fertility with the exception of Egypt which is in the early stages of transition. The smallest declines are found in sub-Saharan Africa, and are complicated by the AIDS epidemic.

  1. Nuclear power plant life management in a changing business world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    At the end of 1999, there were 348 nuclear power plants connected to the grid in OECD Member countries, representing a total capacity of 296 GWe and generating some 24% of their electricity. One third of these nuclear power plants had been in operation for over 20 years. The demand for electricity throughout OECD countries is increasing steadily but the construction of new nuclear power plants has become increasingly difficult. Many utilities would like to keep existing nuclear power plants operating for as long as they can continue to function safely and economically because. extending the lifetime of nuclear power plants is a substitute to constructing new plants. Therefore, nuclear plant life management (PLIM) has been carried out in many OECD Member countries and has played a very important role in the nuclear generation field. Nuclear power plant owners seek to economically optimise the output from their plants, taking into consideration internal and external influences, as well as equipment reliability and maintenance workload. Nuclear power plant life management and extension is generally an attractive option for utilities supplying electricity because of its low marginal cost and low investment risk. PLIM has become an important issue in the context of changing business circumstances caused by regulatory reform of the electricity market. Specifically, the economic aspect of PLIM has become an important focus in the competitive electricity market. The international workshop on 'Plant Life Management in a Changing Business World' was hosted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) in co-operation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) in Washington, DC, on 26-27 June 2000. Some 50 senior utility executives and policy makers from 12 Member countries, the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the European Commission (EC) attended the meeting. The objective of the workshop was to examine the status of

  2. The relation between breakfast skipping and school performance in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, A.M.; Ouwehand, C.; Dekker, S.J.; Lee, N.C.; de Groot, R.H.M.; Krabbendam, A.C.; Jolles, J.

    2012-01-01

    Breakfast skipping is common in adolescents, but research on the effects of breakfast skipping on school performance is scarce. This current cross-sectional survey study of 605 adolescents aged 11-18 years investigated whether adolescents who habitually skip breakfast have lower end-of-term grades

  3. The Relation between Breakfast Skipping and School Performance in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Ouwehand, Carolijn; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; de Groot, Renate; Krabbendam, Lydia; Jolles, Jelle

    2012-01-01

    Breakfast skipping is common in adolescents, but research on the effects of breakfast skipping on school performance is scarce. This current cross-sectional survey study of 605 adolescents aged 11-18 years investigated whether adolescents who habitually skip breakfast have lower end-of-term grades than adolescents who eat breakfast daily.…

  4. Stemcell Information: SKIP000250 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line derived from Pompe disease patient. Same patient as HPS0175 and HPS0176. ポンペ病患者由来iPS細胞... SKIP000250 ... Diseased HPS0176 HPS0176 ... ポンペ病 E740 Pompe disease 232300 ... -- -- ... No No iPS cell... ... Riken Bio Resource Center 理研BRC cellこのメールアドレスはスパムボットから保護されています。閲覧するにはJavaScriptを有効にする必要があります。 document.getElementById('cloake546a02b79274e6d99187d16a0e57c26').innerHTML = ''; var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addye546a02b79274e6d99187d16a0e57c26 = 'ips' + '@'; addye546a02b79274e6d99187d16a0e57c26 = addye546a02b79274e6d99187d16a0e57c26 + 'brc' + '.' + 'riken' + '.' + 'jp'; var addy_texte546a02b79274e6d99187d16a0e57c26 = 'ips' + '@' + 'brc' + '.' + 'riken' + '.' + 'jp';document.getElementById('cloake546a02b79274e6d99187d16a0e57c26').innerHTML += ''+addy_texte546a02b79274e6d99187d16a0e57c26+''; cellこのメールアドレスはスパムボットから保護されています。閲覧するにはJavaScriptを有効にする必要があります。 document.getElementById('cloak4cb683cb38bb2a5982ddee2e9965027e').innerHTML = ''; var prefix = 'ma' + 'il' + 'to'; var path = 'hr' + 'ef' + '='; var addy4cb683cb38bb2a5982ddee2e9965027e = 'ips' + '@'; addy4cb683cb38bb2a5982ddee2e9965027e = addy4cb683cb38bb2a5982ddee2e9965027e + 'brc' + '.' + 'riken' + '.' + 'jp'; var addy_text4cb683cb38bb2a5982ddee2e9965027e = 'ips' + '@' + 'brc' + '.' + 'riken' + '.' + 'jp';document.getElementById('cloak4cb683cb38bb2a5982ddee2e9965027e').innerHTML += ''+addy_text4cb683cb38bb2a5982ddee2e9965027e+''; Availab...le Riken Bio Resource Center 理研BRC http://www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=HPS0176&type=1&lang=en ...

  5. Climate of an Earth-Like World with Changing Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Having a giant planet like Jupiter next door can really wreak havoc on your orbit! A new study examines what such a bad neighbor might mean for the long-term climate of an Earth-like planet.Influence of a Bad NeighborThe presence of a Jupiter-like giant planet in a nearby orbit can significantly affect how terrestrial planets evolve dynamically, causing elements like the planets orbital eccentricities and axial tilts to change over time. Earth is saved this inconvenience Jupiter isnt close enough to significantly influence us, and our large moon stabilizes our orbit against Jupiters tugs.Top panels: Authors simulationoutcomes for Case1, in which the planets eccentricity varies from 0 to 0.283 over 6500 years. Bottom panels: Outcomes for Case 2, in which the planets eccentricity varies from 0 to 0.066 over 4500 years. The highereccentricities reached in Case 1 causes the climate parameters to vary more widely. Click for a better look! [Way Georgakarakos 2017]Mars, on the other hand, isnt as lucky: its possible that Jupiters gravitational pull causes Marss axial tilt, for instance, to evolve through a range as large as 0 to 60 degrees on timescales of millions of years! Marss orbital eccentricity is similarly thought to vary due to Jupiters influence, and both of these factors play a major role in determining Marss climate.As exoplanet missions discover more planets many of which are Earth-like we must carefully consider which among these are most likely to be capable of sustaining life. If having a nearby neighbor like a Jupiter can tug an Earth-like world into an orbit with varying eccentricity, how does this affect the planets climate? Will the planet remain temperate? Or will it develop a runaway heating or cooling effect as it orbits, rendering it uninhabitable?Oceans and OrbitsTo examine these questions, two scientists have built the first ever 3D global climate model simulations of an Earth-like world using a fully coupled ocean (necessary for understanding

  6. New trends in accident prevention due to the changing world of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeck, R. op de; Heuverswyn, K. van; Lemkowitz, S.; Saari, J.; Sundström-Frisk, C.; Zwetsloot, G.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the world of work can give rise to new risk areas or they can change the way that occupational safety and health needs to be managed. This has implications for workplaces themselves and also for the occupational safety and health system. For this reason the 'changing world of work' has

  7. Thread-Skip: An Undefined Common Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Peter; Allan, William DE

    When a screw-retained implant prosthesis is removed, a click is heard and a slight axial shift is felt, indicating the screw has been fully removed from the retaining thread. This common observation has never been described in the literature. This article describes the click, and it is proposed it be termed thread-skip.

  8. Setting the scene : About planning and a world in change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roo, Gert; Boelens, Luuk; de Roo, Gert; Boelens, Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Today’s world is predominantly urban. Most urban regions are located in delta regions. And delta regions face severe pressures because of their fragile environments, their delicate relationship with existing ecological habitats and coastal zones, which need protection, and the increasing constraints

  9. Complex Problem-Solving in a Changing World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neubert, Jonas; Lans, T.; Mustafic, Maida; Greiff, Samuel; Ederer, Peer

    2017-01-01

    The general aim of today’s vocational and professional education is the preparation of individuals for the world of work. In this chapter, the following issues are explored: (1) current trends in cognitive skill assessment, (2) benefits of relating them to well-established approaches to learning and

  10. The changing world demography of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Hirsch, Niels Christian; Pramming, Stig Krøger

    2003-01-01

    In recent years it has been estimated that the current global prevalence of type 2 diabetes amounts to about 150 million patients. Projections suggest that by the year 2025 the number of prevalent patients in the world will reach approximately 300 million. It is assumed that the increase in the n...

  11. Widespread plant species: natives versus aliens in our changing world

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stohlgren, T. J.; Pyšek, Petr; Kartesz, J.; Nishino, M.; Pauchard, A.; Winter, M.; Pino, J.; Richardson, D. M.; Wilson, J. R. U.; Murray, B. R.; Phillips, M. L.; Ming-yang, L.; Celesti-Grapow, L.; Font, X.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2011), s. 1931-1944 ISSN 1387-3547 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : plant invasions * species distribution * Old and New World Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2011

  12. The EU's Normative Power in Changing World Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian

    2009-01-01

    global order: 1) what is the concept of normative power in world politics?; 2) what is an effective EU toolbox for tackling new challenges?; 3) how does the EU go beyond self-perception and rhetoric?; 4) what is the raison d'etre of the EU?; and 5) how might normative power in EU external policies lead...

  13. Critical Education for Systemic Change: A World-Systems Analysis Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Tom G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper both draws on, and seeks to apply, world-systems analysis to a broad, critical education project that builds mass schooling's potential contribution to the process of world-systemic change. In short, this is done by first setting out the world-systems analysis account of the current state, and period of transition, of the capitalist…

  14. Importance of pollinators in changing landscapes for world crops

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Vaissière, Bernard E; Cane, James H; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Cunningham, Saul A; Kremen, Claire; Tscharntke, Teja

    2006-01-01

    The extent of our reliance on animal pollination for world crop production for human food has not previously been evaluated and the previous estimates for countries or continents have seldom used primary data. In this review, we expand the previous estimates using novel primary data from 200 countries and found that fruit, vegetable or seed production from 87 of the leading global food crops is dependent upon animal pollination, while 28 crops do not rely upon animal pollination. However, glo...

  15. Staying True to Our PBS Roots in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Don

    2018-01-01

    The field of Positive Behavior Support (PBS) has grown and changed significantly in the past 25 years and should be expected to continue that trend for the next 25 years. These changes cannot always be predicted, but they can be managed by considering some current changes to the definition of PBS (Kincaid et al., 2016). This paper discussed how…

  16. Climate change and its effect on world food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.O.

    1974-01-01

    In February of 1972 earth-orbiting artificial satellites revealed the existence of a greatly increased area of the snow and ice cover of the north polar cap as compared to all previous years of space age observations. Some scientists believe that this may have presaged the onset of the dramatic climate anomalies of 1972 that brought far-reaching adversities to the world's peoples. Moreover, there is mounting evidence that the bad climate of 1972 may be the forerunner of a long series of less favorable agricultural crop years that lie ahead for most world societies. Thus widespread food shortages threaten just at the same time that world populations are growing to new highs. Indeed, less favorable climate may be the new global norm. The Earth may have entered a new 'little ice age'. Perhaps this future period will not be so extreme as that around 1700 AD, but it seems likely, at least, to be a cooler period resembling the hemispheric climatic regimes of the period from 1880-1920. (author)

  17. Working for change in the Arab world. Advocacy for reproductive health: Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamand, J

    1996-01-01

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) revealed that within the Arab world there are special difficulties with regard to family planning (FP) and the status of women. There is general social opposition to women's empowerment and employment outside the home, which FP associations have to tackle. At the Cairo ICPD in 1994 the Vatican and Islamic fundamentalists formed a holy alliance against undesirable Western ideas. Eventually most Arab governments became convinced about the need for the program of action. A regional conference was also held in January 1996 on this agenda organized by the IPPF Arab World Region in Cairo to implement the program of action with the participation of 140 representatives. The question of population at the Cairo meeting was linked to economic and social development leading up to the women's conference in Beijing in 1995. At the 1996 implementation meeting the unmet need for reproductive health services was voiced along with the need for solid research in this area. FP has a vital role in social development and in combating poverty. The implementation of IPPF's Vision 2000 strategic plan also contributes to the implementation of the ICPD program of action, which deals with sex education, unsafe abortion, marginalized groups, and women's empowerment. Even Islam has come to support responsible FP for the sake of the well-being of the family. The Grand Mufti of Egypt pronounced his support for FP for health and socioeconomic reasons, for the education of girls, and for equality with men. In Arab countries the outstanding problems are early marriage, female genital mutilation, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and HIV, unwanted pregnancy, unsafe abortion, and ignorance about reproduction. Listening to young people, funding restrictions hampering progress, and an advocacy group of prominent leaders, and the formation of an Arab parliamentarians group on FP were other high points.

  18. Economic conditions of technical changes in world civil air transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna HAWLENA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The world economic environment of the turn of the century produced many new challenges to civil aviation in expectation of a continued growth in the transportation of passengers and cargo. To meet this growing demand, it will be necessary to increase the fleet and to modernise infrastructure – a process hampered by finances and capacity constraints.Such constraints are especially pressing with regard to the acquisition of new types of large aircraft such as the Airbus A380 and the Boeing 787 and 747-8. Future dominance of the market is, however, difficult to predict, as this will be the outcome of a combination of uncertain parameters.

  19. Women in science 50 fearless pioneers who changed the world

    CERN Document Server

    Ignotofsky, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    A charmingly illustrated and educational book, New York Times best seller Women in Science highlights the contributions of fifty notable women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) from the ancient to the modern world. Full of striking, singular art, this fascinating collection also contains infographics about relevant topics such as lab equipment, rates of women currently working in STEM fields, and an illustrated scientific glossary. The trailblazing women profiled include well-known figures like primatologist Jane Goodall, as well as lesser-known pioneers such as Katherine Johnson, the African-American physicist and mathematician who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon.

  20. Implementing land use change models in the developing world

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, Alize

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available recently adapted land use change models (Dyna-Clue and UrbanSIM) that have been successfully adapted to simulate future land use change policies in the various metro's across South-Africa. The presentation will focus on how these technologies together...

  1. Mind games: standing by while the world ignores climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Daniel L.; Berry, Helen L.

    2015-01-01

    The mental health effects of climate change are significant and highly concerning, yet little is known about the magnitude of these effects or how best to manage them. This introduction to the thematic papers in this issue explains why climate change is an increasingly important matter for all health services. PMID:29093843

  2. Importance of pollinators in changing landscapes for world crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Vaissière, Bernard E; Cane, James H; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Cunningham, Saul A; Kremen, Claire; Tscharntke, Teja

    2007-02-07

    The extent of our reliance on animal pollination for world crop production for human food has not previously been evaluated and the previous estimates for countries or continents have seldom used primary data. In this review, we expand the previous estimates using novel primary data from 200 countries and found that fruit, vegetable or seed production from 87 of the leading global food crops is dependent upon animal pollination, while 28 crops do not rely upon animal pollination. However, global production volumes give a contrasting perspective, since 60% of global production comes from crops that do not depend on animal pollination, 35% from crops that depend on pollinators, and 5% are unevaluated. Using all crops traded on the world market and setting aside crops that are solely passively self-pollinated, wind-pollinated or parthenocarpic, we then evaluated the level of dependence on animal-mediated pollination for crops that are directly consumed by humans. We found that pollinators are essential for 13 crops, production is highly pollinator dependent for 30, moderately for 27, slightly for 21, unimportant for 7, and is of unknown significance for the remaining 9. We further evaluated whether local and landscape-wide management for natural pollination services could help to sustain crop diversity and production. Case studies for nine crops on four continents revealed that agricultural intensification jeopardizes wild bee communities and their stabilizing effect on pollination services at the landscape scale.

  3. Perceptions of a Changing World Induce Hope and Promote Peace in Intractable Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J.; Halperin, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. PMID:25713171

  4. Perceptions of a changing world induce hope and promote peace in intractable conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Crisp, Richard J; Halperin, Eran

    2015-04-01

    The importance of hope in promoting conciliatory attitudes has been asserted in the field of conflict resolution. However, little is known about conditions inducing hope, especially in intractable conflicts, where reference to the outgroup may backfire. In the current research, five studies yielded convergent support for the hypothesis that hope for peace stems from a general perception of the world as changing. In Study 1, coders observed associations between belief in a changing world, hope regarding peace, and support for concessions. Study 2 revealed the hypothesized relations using self-reported measures. Studies 3 and 4 established causality by instilling a perception of the world as changing (vs. unchanging) using narrative and drawing manipulations. Study 5 compared the changing world message with a control condition during conflict escalation. Across studies, although the specific context was not referred to, the belief in a changing world increased support for concessions through hope for peace. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  5. Leisure in transformation: Meta-trends changing the world | Edginton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meta-trends often arise from underlying shifts in social, cultural, political, ... discussed the impact of several key meta-trends on leisure, quality of life and community ... changes and shifts; 2) social media, technology and universal connectivity; ...

  6. Adapt or disperse: understanding species persistence in a changing world.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.P.; Kiers, E.T.; Driessen, G.J.J.; van der Heijden, M.G.A.; Kooi, B.W.; Kuenen, F.J.A.; Liefting, M.; Verhoef, H.A.; Ellers, J.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of studies on environmental change focus on the response of single species and neglect fundamental biotic interactions, such as mutualism, competition, predation, and parasitism, which complicate patterns of species persistence. Under global warming, disruption of community interactions

  7. Climate refugia for salmon in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change threatens to create fundamental shifts in in the distributions and abundances of endothermic organisms such as cold-water salmon and trout species (salmonids). Recently published projected declines in salmonid distributions under future climates range from modest t...

  8. Rope skipping increases bone mineral density at calcanei of pubertal girls in Hong Kong: A quasi-experimental investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S Ha

    Full Text Available Bone mineral accrual during puberty is important, especially in girls, because it is related to reduced risks of osteoporosis in adulthood. Previous research has shown that jumping or plyometric exercises may be effective in increasing bone mineral density in adolescents. Rope skipping is a form of activity that involves jumping, thus regular skipping may also increase bone mineral density in pubertal girls. To this end, we conducted a quasi-experimental to examine the effects of rope skipping on girls' bone mineral density and cardiovascular fitness. 176 Hong Kong girls (age = 12.23 ± 1.80 years at baseline were recruited to take part in the study. Bone density at their forearms and calcanei were measured twice over two academic years (mean time between visits was 10.3 months. Using multilevel modeling analyses and adjusting for participants' height and physical activity, we found that girls who participated in weekly rope skipping activities, compared to those who did not, had higher levels of bone density at the calcanei (B = 0.023, p < .01. However, no differences were found for bone density at forearms or participants' cardiovascular fitness. The rates of change of these variables across time were also not significantly different. Results suggest that regular rope skipping may increase girls' bone density at the lower extremities, irrespective of the amount of self-report physical activity. However, further research is required to examine the potential dose-response relation between skipping behaviors and the measured outcomes.

  9. Book Review. Cultural Heritage in a Changing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashika Prajnya Paramita

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Edited by Karol Jan Borowiecki, Neil Forbes, and Antonella Fresa, this collection of essays was developed within the RICHES Project to address the issues surrounding cultural heritage in the era of digital technologies. The 21st century has witnessed rapid developments in digital technologies that have led to major changes in all aspects of society. This book aims to reflect the relationship between cultural heritage and these changes. Written by experts from various background, this book implements an interdisciplinary approach its observations, and provides a comprehensive view of the changes that occur in the society. In various perspectives, the collection show how cultural heritage, mainly in Europe, should be preserved through digital availability and accessibility.

  10. Nutritional physiology of wildlife in a changing world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birnie-Gauvin, Kim; Peiman, Kathryn S.; Raubenheimer, David

    2017-01-01

    composition) and quantity (i.e. food abundance) of dietary items consumed by wildlife have, in many cases, changed. We present representative examples of the extent to which vertebrate foraging behaviour, food availability (quantity and quality) and digestive physiology have been modified due to human...... conservation. Though we find that the changes in the nutritional ecology and physiology of wildlife due to human alterations are typically negative and largely involve impacts on foraging behaviour and food availability, the extent to which these will affect the fitness of organisms and result in evolutionary...

  11. Collaborative Innovation: Creating Opportunities in a Changing World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.A. van de Vrande (Vareska)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractToday’s business environment is characterised by fast and frequent change, which is often difficult to predict. As a consequence, companies need to continuously invest in the development of new business to remain competitive. However, due to the increasing complexity of the environment,

  12. Education and Diplomats: A Changing World Demands Our Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höne, Katharina E.

    2018-01-01

    Diplomacy as it is traditionally understood is changing. Diverse, non-state actors in the social sector have become influential participants in setting global goals and priorities. In education, classroom teachers, administrators, academics, and policymakers play an increasingly important diplomatic role in exchanging knowledge, building consensus…

  13. Big data and positive change in the developing world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, L.; Cowls, J.; Schroeder, R.; Meyer, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the product of a workshop that brought together practitioners, researchers, and data experts to discuss how big data is becoming a resource for positive social change in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We include in our definition of big data sources such as social media

  14. The energy sector changes the face of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludrovsky, P.

    2012-01-01

    Energy systems are becoming more and more complicated every day. The growing number of wind and solar power plants is changing the structure of grids in a fundamental way. However, energy production from fossil fuels still remains of the greatest importance within the energy sector. Old and new energy sources must learn to coexist together. (Authors)

  15. A Paradigm for Learning in a World of Continuous Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Through ongoing rapid-fire changes in the nature of communications, the social, professional, and political landscapes of our time are rapidly transforming. But the prevailing paradigm in most schools and school systems is a relic of the industrial revolution. Schools and school systems must adopt a new paradigm for learning if they are to remain…

  16. Chemical engineering and chemistry : education in a changing world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijenga, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Current trends in science and engineering research are analyzed, together with an inventory of changes in the field of employment and practice in industry. The resulting demands on university education of chemists and chemical engineers have been translated into a more or less continuous updating of

  17. Cruise Ships: Continuity and Change in the World System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Oyogoa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cruise ships present a useful context to study contemporary developments in globalization.  U.S.-owned cruise companies have managed to create the “ideal” context for contemporary corporations: very little government oversight of labor relations, an available pool of very cheap labor dispersed across the globe, lax environmental regulations, high profit margins, and corporate tax rates around 1%.  A typical cruise ship leaving the U.S. contains workers from 75 to 90 nationalities.  Crewmembers performing menial service work are recruited exclusively from “poor countries” in Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Crewmembers typically sign 10-month contracts stipulating 10-14 hour workdays/7 days a week without vacation or sick days. There is a striking correlation between workers’ pay/status and their countries’ position within the world system.  Staff members are usually white Westerners, while crewmembers are exclusively from the global south. On cruises the legacies of imperialism and colonialism are often the basis of workers’ racialization as appropriate servants.

  18. Widespread plant species: natives vs. aliens in our changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Pyšek, Petr; Kartesz, John; Nishino, Misako; Pauchard, Aníbal; Winter, Marten; Pino, Joan; Richardson, David M.; Wilson, John R.U.; Murray, Brad R.; Phillips, Megan L.; Ming-yang, Li; Celesti-Grapow, Laura; Font, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of the level of invasion for a region are traditionally based on relative numbers of native and alien species. However, alien species differ dramatically in the size of their invasive ranges. Here we present the first study to quantify the level of invasion for several regions of the world in terms of the most widely distributed plant species (natives vs. aliens). Aliens accounted for 51.3% of the 120 most widely distributed plant species in North America, 43.3% in New South Wales (Australia), 34.2% in Chile, 29.7% in Argentina, and 22.5% in the Republic of South Africa. However, Europe had only 1% of alien species among the most widespread species of the flora. Across regions, alien species relative to native species were either as well-distributed (10 comparisons) or more widely distributed (5 comparisons). These striking patterns highlight the profound contribution that widespread invasive alien plants make to floristic dominance patterns across different regions. Many of the most widespread species are alien plants, and, in particular, Europe and Asia appear as major contributors to the homogenization of the floras in the Americas. We recommend that spatial extent of invasion should be explicitly incorporated in assessments of invasibility, globalization, and risk assessments.

  19. Widespread plant species: Natives versus aliens in our changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Pysek, P.; Kartesz, J.; Nishino, M.; Pauchard, A.; Winter, M.; Pino, J.; Richardson, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.U.; Murray, B.R.; Phillips, M.L.; Ming-yang, L.; Celesti-Grapow, L.; Font, X.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of the level of invasion for a region are traditionally based on relative numbers of native and alien species. However, alien species differ dramatically in the size of their invasive ranges. Here we present the first study to quantify the level of invasion for several regions of the world in terms of the most widely distributed plant species (natives vs. aliens). Aliens accounted for 51.3% of the 120 most widely distributed plant species in North America, 43.3% in New South Wales (Australia), 34.2% in Chile, 29.7% in Argentina, and 22.5% in the Republic of South Africa. However, Europe had only 1% of alien species among the most widespread species of the flora. Across regions, alien species relative to native species were either as well-distributed (10 comparisons) or more widely distributed (5 comparisons). These striking patterns highlight the profound contribution that widespread invasive alien plants make to floristic dominance patterns across different regions. Many of the most widespread species are alien plants, and, in particular, Europe and Asia appear as major contributors to the homogenization of the floras in the Americas. We recommend that spatial extent of invasion should be explicitly incorporated in assessments of invasibility, globalization, and risk assessments. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Temporal constraints on predation risk assessment in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, Douglas P.; Ramasamy, Ryan A.; McCormick, Mark I.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Siebeck, Ulrike E.; Ferrari, Maud C.O.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat degradation takes various forms and likely represents the most significant threat to our global biodiversity. Recently, we have seen considerable attention paid to increasing global CO 2 emissions which lead to ocean acidification (OA). Other stressors, such as changing levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), also impact biodiversity but have received much less attention in the recent past. Here we examine fundamental questions about temporal aspects of risk assessment by coral reef damselfish and provide critical insights into how OA and UVR influence this assessment. Chemical cues released during a predator attack provide a rich source of information that other prey animals use to mediate their risk of predation and are the basis of the majority of trait-mediated indirect interactions in aquatic communities. However, we have surprisingly limited information about temporal aspects of risk assessment because we lack knowledge about how long chemical cues persist after they are released into the environment. Here, we showed that under ambient CO 2 conditions (∼ 385 μatm), alarm cues of ambon damselfish (Pomacentrus amboinensis) did not degrade within 30 min in the absence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), but were degraded within 15 min when the CO 2 was increased to ∼ 905 μatm. In experiments that used filters to eliminate UVR, we found minimal degradation of alarm cues within 30 min, whereas under ambient UVR conditions, alarm cues were completely degraded within 15 min. Moreover, in the presence of both UVR and elevated CO 2 , alarm cues were broken down within 5 min. Our results highlight that alarm cues degrade surprisingly quickly under natural conditions and that anthropogenic changes have the potential to dramatically change rates of cue degradation in the wild. This has considerable implications for risk assessment and consequently the importance of trait-mediated indirect interactions in coral-reef communities. - Highlights: • We have limited

  1. Temporal constraints on predation risk assessment in a changing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivers, Douglas P., E-mail: doug.chivers@usask.ca [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada); Ramasamy, Ryan A.; McCormick, Mark I.; Watson, Sue-Ann [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville Qld4811 (Australia); School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville Qld4811 (Australia); Siebeck, Ulrike E. [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane Qld4072 (Australia); Ferrari, Maud C.O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, WCVM, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7W 5B4 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    Habitat degradation takes various forms and likely represents the most significant threat to our global biodiversity. Recently, we have seen considerable attention paid to increasing global CO{sub 2} emissions which lead to ocean acidification (OA). Other stressors, such as changing levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), also impact biodiversity but have received much less attention in the recent past. Here we examine fundamental questions about temporal aspects of risk assessment by coral reef damselfish and provide critical insights into how OA and UVR influence this assessment. Chemical cues released during a predator attack provide a rich source of information that other prey animals use to mediate their risk of predation and are the basis of the majority of trait-mediated indirect interactions in aquatic communities. However, we have surprisingly limited information about temporal aspects of risk assessment because we lack knowledge about how long chemical cues persist after they are released into the environment. Here, we showed that under ambient CO{sub 2} conditions (∼ 385 μatm), alarm cues of ambon damselfish (Pomacentrus amboinensis) did not degrade within 30 min in the absence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), but were degraded within 15 min when the CO{sub 2} was increased to ∼ 905 μatm. In experiments that used filters to eliminate UVR, we found minimal degradation of alarm cues within 30 min, whereas under ambient UVR conditions, alarm cues were completely degraded within 15 min. Moreover, in the presence of both UVR and elevated CO{sub 2}, alarm cues were broken down within 5 min. Our results highlight that alarm cues degrade surprisingly quickly under natural conditions and that anthropogenic changes have the potential to dramatically change rates of cue degradation in the wild. This has considerable implications for risk assessment and consequently the importance of trait-mediated indirect interactions in coral-reef communities. - Highlights:

  2. Changes of hierarchical network in local and world stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwary, Enayet Ullah; Lee, Jong Youl; Nobi, Ashadun; Kim, Doo Hwan; Lee, Jae Woo

    2017-10-01

    We consider the cross-correlation coefficients of the daily returns in the local and global stock markets. We generate the minimal spanning tree (MST) using the correlation matrix. We observe that the MSTs change their structure from chain-like networks to star-like networks during periods of market uncertainty. We quantify the measure of the hierarchical network utilizing the value of the hierarchy measured by the hierarchical path. The hierarchy and betweenness centrality characterize the state of the market regarding the impact of crises. During crises, the non-financial company is established as the central node of the MST. However, before the crisis and during stable periods, the financial company is occupying the central node of the MST in the Korean and the U.S. stock markets. The changes in the network structure and the central node are good indicators of an upcoming crisis.

  3. Learning what to see in a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina eSchmack

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual perception is strongly shaped by expectations, but it is poorly understood how such perceptual expectations are learned in our dynamic sensory environment. Here, we applied a Bayesian framework to investigate whether perceptual expectations are continuously updated from different aspects of ongoing experience. In two experiments, human observers performed an associative learning task in which rapidly changing expectations about the appearance of ambiguous stimuli were induced. We found that perception of ambiguous stimuli was biased by both learned associations and previous perceptual outcomes. Computational modelling revealed that perception was best explained by amodel that continuously updated priors from associative learning and perceptual history and combined these priors with the current sensory information in a probabilistic manner. Our findings suggest that the construction of visual perception is a highly dynamic process that incorporates rapidly changing expectations from different sources in a manner consistent with Bayesian learning and inference.

  4. Women's Changing Participation in the Labor Force: A World Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, T. Paul

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes how the composition of the labor force changes with economic development. It considers recent trends in women's labor force participation and the type of jobs held in various sectors as national per capita income increases. The paper notes that women are more likely to work in the family or informal labor market if the labor costs to firms exceed the opportunity costs of female labor to family enterprises. Firms are at a relative disadvantage compared with families in the...

  5. Ozone Climate Penalty and Mortality in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakami, A.; Zhao, S.; Pappin, A.; Mesbah, M.

    2013-12-01

    The expected increase in ozone concentrations with temperature is referred to as the climate penalty factor (CPF). Observed ozone trends have resulted in estimations of regional CPFs in the range of 1-3 ppb/K in the Eastern US, and larger values around the globe. We use the adjoint of a regional model (CMAQ) for attributing changes in ozone mortality and attainment metrics to increased temperature levels at each location in North America during the summer of 2007. Unlike previous forward sensitivity analysis studies, we estimate how changes in temperatures at various locations influence such policy-relevant metrics. Our analysis accounts for separate temperature impact pathways through gas-phase chemistry, moisture abundance, and biogenic emissions. We find that water vapor impact, while mostly negative, is positive and large for temperature changes in urban areas. We also find that increased biogenic emissions plays an important role in the overall temperature influence. Our simulations show a wide range of spatial variability in CPFs between -0.4 and 6.2 ppb/K with largest values in urban areas. We also estimate mortality-based CPFs of up to 4 deaths/K for each grid cell, again with large localization in urban areas. This amounts to an estimated 370 deaths/K for the 3-month period of the simulation. We find that this number is almost equivalent to 5% reduction in anthropogenic NOx emissions for each degree increase in temperature. We show how the CPF will change as the result progressive NOx emission controls from various anthropogenic sectors and sources at different locations. Our findings suggest that urban NOx control can be regarded as an adaptation strategy with regards to ozone air quality. Also, the strong temperature dependence in urban environments suggests that the health and attainment burden of urban heat island may be more substantial than previously thought. Spatial distribution of average adjoint-based CPFs Adjoint-based CPF and Mortality CPF

  6. WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION - REFORM IT OR CHANGE IT?

    OpenAIRE

    Sterian Maria Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The failure of Doha Round is a serious step backward for the WTO and the multilateral trading system. Some analysts already discussed in their research about the round as being already closed and they propose the developing of a new program within the organization. WTO still remains a very important institution due to its proven role in encouraging states not to take protectionist measures during the recent economic crisis, but the global trade governance reform must reflect all the changes a...

  7. WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION – REFORM IT OR CHANGE IT?

    OpenAIRE

    Sterian Maria Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The failure of Doha Round is a serious step backward for the WTO and the multilateral trading system. Some analysts already discussed in their research about the round as being already closed and they propose the developing of a new program within the organization. WTO still remains a very important institution due to its proven role in encouraging states not to take protectionist measures during the recent economic crisis, but the global trade governance reform must reflect all the changes a...

  8. The Seven Brothers. The changing world of petrochemical multinationals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ammelrooij, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since the eighties oil companies do not build their own drilling installations and refineries, but contract out such construction activities to engineering contractors. An overview is given of the market of the so-called Seven Brother (analogue to Seven Sisters for the oil companies) and the changes that are taking place at the moment. The Seven Brothers are Asea Brown Boveri (USA), Fluor Corp (US), Kvaerner ASA (Norway), Foster Wheeler (UK), Jacobs (USA), Morrison Knudsen (USA), and Parsons (UK)

  9. Changing World, Unchanging Accounting? Cost Systems for Hungarian Agricultural Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Zoltán Musinszki

    2011-01-01

    The literature of agricultural cost accounting has defined the definition of cost centres and cost bearers, the contents of the accounts, the procedures and methods for cost accounting and unit cost calculation without any significant changes for decades now. Do the agricultural companies set up and operate their own cost allocation and unit cost calculation systems on procedures made for state owned farms and cooperatives, or do they align their cost system with the challenges of our times? ...

  10. The vital issues process: Strategic planning for a changing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engi, D.; Glicken, J.

    1995-05-01

    The Vital Issues process (VIp) is a strategic planning tool initially developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Office of Foreign Intelligence (OFI)* of the US Department of Energy (DOE). It was further developed and refined through its application to a variety of strategic purposes for a range of public and semipublic organizations. The VIp provides a structured mechanism for assisting organizations in accomplishing specified objectives by identifying and prioritizing a portfolio of strategic issues, programmatic areas, or responses to a specified problem. It employs day-long panel meetings in a specified format to elicit a broad range of perspectives on a particular issue in a nonconfrontational manner and to facilitate the interaction and synthesis of diverse viewpoints on a specific topic. The VIp is unique in its incorporation of two primary approaches in each panel session: a qualitative or transactional segment, which entails the synthesis of the alternatives through negotiations or discussion, and a quantitative or net benefit maximization segment, an analytical approach, which involves prioritization of the alternatives using pairwise comparisons. This combination of facilitated group discussion and quantitative ranking provides input to strategic management decisions in the form of stakeholder-defined and -prioritized items as well as information on potential barriers to the implementation of policies and programs. This is the final volume in the series Identifying Vital Issues: New Intelligence Strategies for a New World, a three-volume set that gives an accounting of the VIp as implemented for OFI. This volume provides an in-depth description of the methodology used in the VIp.

  11. Book review: Gyrfalcons and Ptarmigan in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    The Peregrine Fund has published proceedings of several conferences over the years and has become experts, and this 2 volume set is no exception. The title of the proceedings sounded especially interesting in this era of almost daily accounts in the media about climate change, its causes and its effects on the planet, including its flora and fauna. This 772-page Proceedings is loaded with useful information regarding Gyrfalcons and their prey and should be in the library of all serious raptor bibliophiles. The sponsors are to be commended for supporting the conference and for publishing the proceedings. Proceedings are available at http://www.peregrinefund.org/gyr-conf

  12. "O Brave New World": A Change in the Weather.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Haley

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of "Waterfronts" becomes a powerful poetic metaphor. A point of departure and arrival in understanding arts practises. The ebb and flow between definitions of Nature and Culture. The littoral from which evolutionary transition is made. Referencing The Tempest by William Shakespeare (1564 -1616 some paintings by Turner and the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci (1452 - 1519, this presentation considers how Public Art in the context of urban and social development may start to engage the issue of Climate Change. It will also explore our relationship with water from different perspectives, as a learning process.

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP000806 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available change : every day No 5% Negative ... RIKEN BioResouce Center (RIKEN ... BRC) 理化学...研究所バイオリソースセンター RIKEN BioResouce Center (RIKEN ... BRC) 理化学研究所バイオリソースセンター Available RIKEN BioR...esouce Center (RIKEN ... BRC) 理化学研究所バイオリソースセンター http://www2.brc.riken.jp/lab/cell/detail.cgi?cell_no=HPS0059&type=1 ...

  14. What is Novel About Novel Ecosystems: Managing Change in an Ever-Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truitt, Amy M.; Granek, Elise F.; Duveneck, Matthew J.; Goldsmith, Kaitlin A.; Jordan, Meredith P.; Yazzie, Kimberly C.

    2015-06-01

    Influenced by natural climatic, geological, and evolutionary changes, landscapes and the ecosystems within are continuously changing. In addition to these natural pressures, anthropogenic drivers have increasingly influenced ecosystems. Whether affected by natural or anthropogenic processes, ecosystems, ecological communities, and ecosystem functioning are dynamic and can lead to "novel" or "emerging" ecosystems. Current literature identifies several definitions of these ecosystems but lacks an unambiguous definition and framework for categorizing what constitutes a novel ecosystem and for informing decisions around best management practices. Here we explore the various definitions used for novel ecosystems, present an unambiguous definition, and propose a framework for identifying the most appropriate management option. We identify and discuss three approaches for managing novel ecosystems: managing against, tolerating, and managing for these systems, and we provide real-world examples of each approach. We suggest that this framework will allow managers to make thoughtful decisions about which strategy is most appropriate for each unique situation, to determine whether the strategy is working, and to facilitate decision-making when it is time to modify the management approach.

  15. Allelopathic and Bloom-Forming Picocyanobacteria in a Changing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Śliwińska-Wilczewska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Picocyanobacteria are extremely important organisms in the world’s oceans and freshwater ecosystems. They play an essential role in primary production and their domination in phytoplankton biomass is common in both oligotrophic and eutrophic waters. Their role is expected to become even more relevant with the effect of climate change. However, this group of photoautotrophic organisms still remains insufficiently recognized. Only a few works have focused in detail on the occurrence of massive blooms of picocyanobacteria, their toxicity and allelopathic activity. Filling the gap in our knowledge about the mechanisms involved in the proliferation of these organisms could provide a better understanding of aquatic environments. In this review, we gathered and described recent information about allelopathic activity of picocyanobacteria and occurrence of their massive blooms in many aquatic ecosystems. We also examined the relationships between climate change and representative picocyanobacterial genera from freshwater, brackish and marine ecosystems. This work emphasizes the importance of studying the smallest picoplanktonic fractions of cyanobacteria.

  16. On the world's ice ages and changing environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eronen, M.; Olander, H.

    1990-07-01

    All known ice ages during the earth's history are reviewed. The oldest glaciation occurred around 2.3 billion years ago, followed by a series of large glaciations 950-650, 450-430 and 310-270 million years ago. Continental drift played a major role in these long-term climatic changes. The present Quaternary ice age actually began 17 million years ago, when a large ice mass grew over Antarctica. A detailed account is given of the climatic fluctuations during the Quaternary period (over 2.5 million years). Different stratigraphic records, and the relationship of climatic variations to orbital forcing are discussed. Large environmental changes took place in the course of the climate oscillations. Large ice sheets waxed and waned, global sea-levels fluctuated, forests disappeared from many regions during cold times and advanced during favourable times. The ice masses depressed the earth's crust markedly, and this then rose rapidly when the ice melted. The extent of glacial erosion is also discussed. Finally the postglacial climatic history of the earth is described and the consequences of the possible greenhouse effect are considered.(orig.)

  17. On being a scientist in a rapidly changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, I D

    1996-02-01

    The practice of biological science has changed dramatically since mid-century, reshaped not only by a rapid series of landmark discoveries, but also by governmental directives, institutional policies, and public attitudes. Until 1964, the major influences were the mentor, who provided direction and indoctrination into the culture of science, and in dentistry, the newly established NIDR, which fueled the research engine with an expanding research and training program. The 1965-74 period witnessed the advent of the Institutional Review Board, an increased social involvement of biological scientists, and a recognition of the need for biological and physical safeguards in the conduct of research. The most turbulent years were 1975-89, when there was a confluence of animal rights activism and regulation, growing concerns with scientific fraud and publication malpractice, and the stresses and strains (and opportunities) resulting from the rapid expansion of the academic-industrial complex. The current period is characterized by rapid pace, high volume, and an increased depth and breadth of knowledge-a major change in scale in the conduct of science. It is an exciting time but one in which ethical issues are multiplying. Attention must be paid.

  18. Teacher Education around the World: Changing Policies and Practices. Teacher Quality and School Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling-Hammond, Linda, Ed.; Lieberman, Ann, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers are the most important single element of the education system but what does it take to create high quality teachers in today's world? Around the world, countries are struggling to understand how to change their schools to meet global demands. International comparisons have shown that schools in Finland lead the league tables, but why is…

  19. Landscapes of West Africa: A window on a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotillon, Suzanne E.; Tappan, G. Gray

    2016-01-01

    Our global ecosystem is and has always been complex, dynamic, and in constant flux. Science tells us how natural forces of enormous power have shaped and reshaped Earth’s surface, atmosphere, climate, and biota again and again since the planet’s beginnings about 4.5 billion years ago. For most of the planet’s history those environmental changes were the result of the interaction of natural processes such as geology and climate and were described on the geological time scale in epochs spanning millions of years.When humankind appeared on Earth around 200,000 years ago the influence of human activity on the environment must have been small and localized. The influence of scattered small groups of people on the global ecosystem would have been overwhelmed by the forces of natural systems (Steffen and others, 207). Human population would not grow to 50 million (about 0.7 percent of the Earth’s current population) for another 197,000 years. Population growth accelerated over the centuries that followed until the planet was adding more than that 50 million people every year. Our planet is now home to roughly 7.3 billion people and we are adding 1 million more people roughly every 4.8 days (US Census Bureau, 2011). Before 1950, no one on Earth had lived through a doubling of the human population, but now some people have experienced a tripling in their lifetime (Cohen, 2003).

  20. Forests in a water limited world under climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mátyás, Csaba; Sun, Ge

    2014-01-01

    The debate on ecological and climatic benefits of planted forests at the sensitive dry edge of the closed forest belt (i.e. at the ‘xeric limits’) is still unresolved. Forests sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide, accumulate biomass, control water erosion and dust storms, reduce river sedimentation, and mitigate small floods. However, planting trees in areas previously dominated by grassland or cropland can dramatically alter the energy and water balances at multiple scales. The forest/grassland transition zone is especially vulnerable to projected drastic temperature and precipitation shifts and growing extremes due to its high ecohydrological sensitivity. We investigated some of the relevant aspects of the ecological and climatic role of forests and potential impacts of climate change at the dryland margins of the temperate-continental zone using case studies from China, the United States and SE Europe (Hungary). We found that, contrary to popular expectations, the effects of forest cover on regional climate might be limited and the influence of forestation on water resources might be negative. Planted forests generally reduce stream flow and lower groundwater table level because of higher water use than previous land cover types. Increased evaporation potential due to global warming and/or extreme drought events is likely to reduce areas that are appropriate for tree growth and forest establishment. Ecologically conscious forest management and forestation planning should be adjusted to the local, projected hydrologic and climatic conditions, and should also consider non-forest alternative land uses. (paper)

  1. Conservation of living resources in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teer, James G.

    1996-11-01

    Conservation of living resources is no longer parochial in scope; it is a global challenge. Ecological, social, political, and business interests operate in a network that reaches across seas, continents, and nations. Industries, including the electric utility industry, are diversifying in products and expanding into international markets. They soon discover that, while all nations have common goals for their peoples, conservation and environmental issues in less-developed nations have different dimensions and norms than are encountered in Western, affluent societies. In developing countries, survival is more of an issue than quality of life, and burgeoning human numbers have put tremendous pressures on resources including wildlife and its habitats. Human population, urbanization of society, changes in single-species to ecosystem and landscape levels of management, and protectionists and animal rights philosophies are influences with which conservation of resources and the environment must contend. The human condition and conservation efforts are inextricably linked. Examples to demonstrate this fact are given for Project Tiger in India, the jaguar in Latin America, and the Serengeti ecosystem in Kenya and Tanzania.

  2. Energy Transformations of Soil Organic Matter in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, A. M.; Coucheney, E.; Grice, S. M.; Ritz, K.; Harris, J.

    2011-12-01

    The role of soils in governing the terrestrial carbon balance is acknowledged as being important but remains poorly understood within the context of climate change. Soils exchange energy with their surroundings and are therefore open systems thermodynamically, but little is known how energy transformations of decomposition processes are affected by temperature. Soil organic matter and the soil biomass can be conceptualised as analogous to the 'fuel' and 'biological engine' of the earth, respectively, and are pivotal in driving the belowground carbon cycle. Thermodynamic principles of soil organic matter decomposition were evaluated by means of isothermal microcalorimetry (TAM Air, TA Instruments, Sollentuna Sweden: (i) Mineral forest soils from the Flakaliden long-term nitrogen fertilisation experiment (Sweden) were amended with a range of different substrates representing structurally simple to complex, ecologically pertinent organic matter and heat signatures were determined at temperatures between 5 and 25°C. (ii) Thermodynamic and resource-use efficiencies of the biomass were determined in arable soils which received contrasting long-term management regimes with respect to organic matter and nitrogen since 1956. The work showed that (i) structurally labile components have higher activation energy and temperature dependence than structurally more complex organic components. This is, however, in contrast to the thermodynamic argument which suggests the opposite that reactions metabolising structurally complex, aromatic components have higher temperature dependence than reactions metabolising structurally more labile components. (ii) Microbial communities exposed to long-term stress by heavy metal and low pH were less thermodynamic efficient and showed a decrease in resource-use efficiency in comparison with conventional input regimes. Differences in efficiencies were mirrored in both the phenotypic and functional profiles of the communities. We will present our

  3. See Before You Jump: Full Recognition of Parafoveal Words Precedes Skips During Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Peter C.; Plummer, Patrick; Choi, Wonil

    2013-01-01

    Serial attention models of eye-movement control during reading were evaluated in an eye-tracking experiment that examined how lexical activation combines with visual information in the parafovea to affect word skipping (where a word is not fixated during first-pass reading). Lexical activation was manipulated by repetition priming created through prime-target pairs embedded within a sentence. The boundary technique (Rayner, 1975) was used to determine whether the target word was fully available during parafoveal preview or whether it was available with transposed letters (e.g., Herman changed to Hreman). With full parafoveal preview, the target word was skipped more frequently when it matched the earlier prime word (i.e., was repeated) than when it did not match the earlier prime word (i.e., was new). With transposed-letter (TL) preview, repetition had no effect on skipping rates despite the great similarity of the TL preview string to the target word and substantial evidence that TL strings activate the words from which they are derived (Perea & Lupker, 2003). These results show that lexically-based skipping is based on full recognition of the letter string in parafoveal preview and does not involve using the contextual constraint to compensate for the reduced information available from the parafovea. These results are consistent with models of eye-movement control during reading in which successive words in a text are processed one at a time (serially) and in which word recognition strongly influences eye movements. PMID:22686842

  4. SparseLeap: Efficient Empty Space Skipping for Large-Scale Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Hadwiger, Markus

    2017-08-28

    Recent advances in data acquisition produce volume data of very high resolution and large size, such as terabyte-sized microscopy volumes. These data often contain many fine and intricate structures, which pose huge challenges for volume rendering, and make it particularly important to efficiently skip empty space. This paper addresses two major challenges: (1) The complexity of large volumes containing fine structures often leads to highly fragmented space subdivisions that make empty regions hard to skip efficiently. (2) The classification of space into empty and non-empty regions changes frequently, because the user or the evaluation of an interactive query activate a different set of objects, which makes it unfeasible to pre-compute a well-adapted space subdivision. We describe the novel SparseLeap method for efficient empty space skipping in very large volumes, even around fine structures. The main performance characteristic of SparseLeap is that it moves the major cost of empty space skipping out of the ray-casting stage. We achieve this via a hybrid strategy that balances the computational load between determining empty ray segments in a rasterization (object-order) stage, and sampling non-empty volume data in the ray-casting (image-order) stage. Before ray-casting, we exploit the fast hardware rasterization of GPUs to create a ray segment list for each pixel, which identifies non-empty regions along the ray. The ray-casting stage then leaps over empty space without hierarchy traversal. Ray segment lists are created by rasterizing a set of fine-grained, view-independent bounding boxes. Frame coherence is exploited by re-using the same bounding boxes unless the set of active objects changes. We show that SparseLeap scales better to large, sparse data than standard octree empty space skipping.

  5. SparseLeap: Efficient Empty Space Skipping for Large-Scale Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Hadwiger, Markus; Al-Awami, Ali K.; Beyer, Johanna; Agus, Marco; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in data acquisition produce volume data of very high resolution and large size, such as terabyte-sized microscopy volumes. These data often contain many fine and intricate structures, which pose huge challenges for volume rendering, and make it particularly important to efficiently skip empty space. This paper addresses two major challenges: (1) The complexity of large volumes containing fine structures often leads to highly fragmented space subdivisions that make empty regions hard to skip efficiently. (2) The classification of space into empty and non-empty regions changes frequently, because the user or the evaluation of an interactive query activate a different set of objects, which makes it unfeasible to pre-compute a well-adapted space subdivision. We describe the novel SparseLeap method for efficient empty space skipping in very large volumes, even around fine structures. The main performance characteristic of SparseLeap is that it moves the major cost of empty space skipping out of the ray-casting stage. We achieve this via a hybrid strategy that balances the computational load between determining empty ray segments in a rasterization (object-order) stage, and sampling non-empty volume data in the ray-casting (image-order) stage. Before ray-casting, we exploit the fast hardware rasterization of GPUs to create a ray segment list for each pixel, which identifies non-empty regions along the ray. The ray-casting stage then leaps over empty space without hierarchy traversal. Ray segment lists are created by rasterizing a set of fine-grained, view-independent bounding boxes. Frame coherence is exploited by re-using the same bounding boxes unless the set of active objects changes. We show that SparseLeap scales better to large, sparse data than standard octree empty space skipping.

  6. Slow Onsets, Abrupt Changes, and Fast Reflexes: Learning from Climate Hazards in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Adaptation is higher than ever before on the global agenda. Awareness of risks across the weather-climate continuum has increased pressure for information to support planning under changing rates and emergence of multiple hazards (e.g. drought, heat waves, floods). In recognition of this demand, the global community is developing a Global Framework for Climate Services, implementing the Sendai Framework on disaster risk reduction, and formulating climate-sensitive development and research initiatives aimed at nations and communities. The gap between conceptual feasibility and practical implementation remains immense. One of Gilbert White's many important contributions was in developing a framework for structuring adjustment decisions in the context of longer-term risks. The physical environment at a given stage of technology sets the theoretical range of choice while the practical range of choice is set by culture, capacity and institutions. These factors facilitate or impede efficient and equitable responses, with the latter being key in the underestimation of the complexities of adaptation. This presentation will focus on the scientific research, monitoring and information needed to address challenges in (1) Understanding thresholds in the relationship between physical and social changes, including those in connected systems such as water, food and energy, (2) Designing and diffusion of decision support tools and smart practices, and (3) Understanding the links between capacity-building and implementation, including the need to focus researchers and institutions on improving decision quality (not just meeting "user needs"). The author will engage the audience in a discussion of the drivers of social transitions and transformations, drawing on cases from around the world. Key questions, include "What leads to proactive collaboration and action?"; "How often should we revise our assumptions about the direction and magnitude of changes as events unfold?"; and "What

  7. 26 CFR 26.2653-1 - Taxation of multiple skips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of multiple skips. 26.2653-1 Section 26.2653-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE...-1 Taxation of multiple skips. (a) General rule. If property is held in trust immediately after a GST...

  8. Sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply. Political and legal challenges of the 21th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haertel, Ines

    2014-01-01

    The book on sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply as political challenges in the 21th century includes contributions on the following topics: sustainability and environment, energy and climatic change, agriculture and world food supply.

  9. 26 CFR 26.2662-1 - Generation-skipping transfer tax return requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... at death, the executor of the decedent's estate is liable for the tax imposed on that direct skip by...) Direct skip. In the case of a direct skip, on or before the date on which an estate or gift tax return is... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Generation-skipping transfer tax return...

  10. Forest health in a changing world: Effects of globalization and climate change on forest insect and pathogen impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. D. Ramsfield; Barbara Bentz; M. Faccoli; H. Jactel; E. G. Brockerhoff

    2016-01-01

    Forests and trees throughout the world are increasingly affected by factors related to global change. Expanding international trade has facilitated invasions of numerous insects and pathogens into new regions. Many of these invasions have caused substantial forest damage, economic impacts and losses of ecosystem goods and services provided by trees. Climate...

  11. Skipping Breakfast is Correlated with Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoko; Saito, Isao; Henmi, Ikuyo; Yoshimura, Kana; Maruyama, Kotatsu; Yamauchi, Kanako; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro; Kato, Tadahiro; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Kishida, Taro; Asada, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that the total energy intake of Japanese people has decreased, the percentage of obese people has increased. This suggests that the timing of meals is related to obesity. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between the timing of meals and obesity, based on analyses of physical measurements, serum biochemical markers, nutrient intake, and lifestyle factors in the context of Chrononutrition. We analyzed data derived from 766 residents of Toon City (286 males and 480 females) aged 30 to 79 years who underwent detailed medical examinations between 2011 and 2013. These medical examinations included. (1) physical measurements (waist circumference, blood pressure, etc.); (2) serum biochemical markers (total cholesterol, etc.); (3) a detailed questionnaire concerning lifestyle factors such as family structure and daily habits (22 issues), exercise and eating habits (28 issues), alcohol intake and smoking habits; (4) a food frequency questionnaire based on food groups (FFQg); and (5) a questionnaire concerning the times at which meals and snacks are consumed. The values for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were higher for participants who ate dinner less than three hours before bedtime (3-h group). The Chi-square test showed that there was a significant difference in eating habits, e.g., eating snacks, eating snacks at night, having dinner after 8 p.m., and having dinner after 9 p.m., between the 3-h group. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that skipping breakfast significantly influenced both waist circumference (β = 5.271) and BMI (β = 1.440) and that eating dinner influenced BMI (β = 0.581). Skipping breakfast had a greater influence on both waist circumference and BMI than eating dinner <3-h before going to bed.

  12. Changing knowledge perspective in a changing world: The Adriatic multidisciplinary TDS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Andrea; Carniel, Sandro; Nativi, Stefano; Signell, Richard P.; Benetazzo, Alvise; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Bonaldo, Davide; Minuzzo, Tiziano; Sclavo, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    The use and exploitation of the marine environment in recent years has been increasingly high, therefore calling for the need of a better description, monitoring and understanding of its behavior. However, marine scientists and managers often spend too much time in accessing and reformatting data instead of focusing on discovering new knowledge from the processes observed and data acquired. There is therefore the need to make more efficient our approach to data mining, especially in a world where rapid climate change imposes rapid and quick choices. In this context, it is mandatory to explore ways and possibilities to make large amounts of distributed data usable in an efficient and easy way, an effort that requires standardized data protocols, web services and standards-based tools. Following the US-IOOS approach, which has been adopted in many oceanographic and meteorological sectors, we present a CNR experience in the direction of setting up a national Italian IOOS framework (at the moment confined at the Adriatic Sea environment), using the THREDDS (THematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services) Data Server (TDS). A TDS is a middleware designed to fill the gap between data providers and data users, and provides services allowing data users to find the data sets pertaining to their scientific needs, to access, visualize and use them in an easy way, without the need of downloading files to the local workspace. In order to achieve this results, it is necessary that the data providers make their data available in a standard form that the TDS understands, and with sufficient metadata so that the data can be read and searched for in a standard way. The TDS core is a NetCDF- Java Library implementing a Common Data Model (CDM), as developed by Unidata (http://www.unidata.ucar.edu), allowing the access to "array-based" scientific data. Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant NetCDF files can be read directly with no modification, while non-compliant files can

  13. Globalisation as the Carrier of the Current Changes in the Modern World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Lončar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the development of the globalization process, meaning of the term globalization and influences that globalization has on world economy, politics and human community in general. It makes the point that globalization has negative and positive aspects, but it certainly brings big changes. The developed part of the world uses very well global conditions, in the same time playing the role of the main carrier of the globalization processes. With the development of informatics and communication technology world is becoming much smaller so that connection between two subjects in different parts of the world is made in a few minutes. Creation of economic and politic integrations is also one of the causes and consequences of globalization.

  14. Historical Development of the Changes in Approaches to Nature Conservation in Turkey and in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yeşil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In today’s world, nature conservation and the notion of protected area are of vital importance for the living. Therefore, humankind started to take important steps for conservation of natural areas and preventing deterioration. Nature conservation studies dating back to old times in the world, was put in the agenda in our country after long years. Various protected area status were designated to the areas havin high resources value in our country, and these areas were put under protection by various laws. Some of this conservation status was formed based on the national legislation, and some based on the international conventions. Nowadays, promising actions are taken for sustainable use of biologic diversity and other significant natural resources. In this study; changes and developments in approaches to nature conservation in the world and in our country throughout the history were investigated, and the current situation in Turkey and in the world was revealed.

  15. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  16. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Peter L. [Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Brisbane, 4111 (Australia)

    2010-03-15

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  17. Update History of This Database - SKIP Stemcell Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us SKIP Stemcell Database Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/03/13 SKIP Stemcell Database... English archive site is opened. 2013/03/29 SKIP Stemcell Database ( https://www.skip.med.k...eio.ac.jp/SKIPSearch/top?lang=en ) is opened. About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Databa...se Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - SKIP Stemcell Database | LSDB Archive ...

  18. Theological and ethical dimensions of addressing climate change : reflections from the World Council of Churches (WCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.G. [World Council of Churches, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The World Council of Churches (WCC) has supported regional workshops around the world which focus on examining climate change issues from a theological and ethical perspective. The human responsibility is one dimension of the ethics of climate change and is supplemented by the fact that the problem is caused largely by rich industrialized countries, the consequences of which will be suffered in most part by the poor and politically weak developing nations and by future generations. When the WCC delivered a statement at the Kyoto Climate Conference in December 1997, they integrated these two ethical dimensions and spoke of climate change as an issue of justice. Their point of view was that as individuals and as societies, particularly in the over-developed parts of the world, we must be held responsible for the destructive impact of our actions which are leading to climate change and threatening vulnerable human communities, other species and broader ecosystems. Justice implies that we must be accountable for promises that we make to limit the emissions of greenhouse gases. The WCC has been actively involved in the climate change issue since 1988 through the education of its member churches around the world and through monitoring the inter-governmental negotiations through the UN, as well as through advocacy at national levels. In May 2000, the WCC held an international consultation to examine the issue of emissions trading from a perspective of equity. This paper included 2 appendices: Appendix A entitled Statement by the World Council of Churches to the high level segment of the third session of the Conference of the Parties (COP3) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, and Appendix B entitled The atmosphere as a global commons : responsible caring and equitable sharing.

  19. Climate Change Draws World Attention: The 2007 Nobel Peace Award Goes to Gore and IPCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Beverly Milner; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Nobel Committee awarded their Peace Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization and by the United Nations Environment Program) and to former Vice-President Al Gore, Jr. The committee praised the United Nations panel for creating…

  20. A network of experimental forests and ranges: Providing soil solutions for a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Beth. Adams

    2010-01-01

    The network of experimental forests and ranges of the USDA Forest Service represents significant opportunities to provide soil solutions to critical issues of a changing world. This network of 81 experimental forests and ranges encompasses broad geographic, biological, climatic and physical scales, and includes long-term data sets, and long-term experimental...

  1. Transportation into narrative worlds and the motivation to change health-related behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebbers, Timon; de Wit, J.B.F.; Appel, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Stories are considered to be a potent means to change health-related attitudes, beliefs, and behavior because of recipients’ transportation into the narrative world. Little emphasis, however, has been given to the link between transportation and process variables that are pertinent to health

  2. Societal Changes Affecting Primary School Education after the Second World War in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksuniemi, Merja; Niemisalo, Sari

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate how changes in both foreign and domestic environments after the Second World War affected primary education and teacher training in Finland, the article presents a historical picture of the post-war reality of the school system, based on a review of sources that include laws, decrees, curricula, textbooks and previous research. The…

  3. Adapting to a Changing World--Challenges and Opportunities in Undergraduate Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Adapting to a Changing World" was commissioned by the National Science Foundation to examine the present status of undergraduate physics education, including the state of physics education research, and, most importantly, to develop a series of recommendations for improving physics education that draws from the knowledge we have about…

  4. Full Speed Ahead: Our Leadership Summit Examines the Wildly Changing World of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The face of reading is changing, and it is happening at a much faster rate than most people had imagined. Where is it all going? What factors are driving the most significant developments? And what role do librarians play in this rapidly evolving world? These are some of the key questions that stakeholders--including educators, publishers,…

  5. What Does Global Migration Network Say about Recent Changes in the World System Structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkina, Julia; Korotayev, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate whether the structure of the international migration system has remained stable through the recent turbulent changes in the world system. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology draws on the social network analysis framework--but with some noteworthy limitations stipulated by the specifics of…

  6. 75 FR 50847 - Cotton Program Changes for Upland Cotton, Adjusted World Price, and Active Shipping Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Cotton Program Changes for Upland Cotton, Adjusted World Price, and Active Shipping Orders AGENCY... Assistance Program (EAAP) and clarifying the definition of ``active shipping order.'' DATES: Effective Date... address that matter this rule amends in the payment calculation for semi-processed and reginned motes in 7...

  7. Managing time in a changing world: Timing of avian annual cycle stages under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomotani, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Animals need to time their seasonal activities such as breeding and migration to occur at the right time. They use cues from the environment to predict changes and organise their activities accordingly. What happens, then, when climate change interferes with this ability to make predictions? Climate

  8. The Justice Game: Augustine, Disordered Loves, and the Temptation to Change the World

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Augustine’s thought on justice offers enduring wisdom to today’s undergraduates as they grapple with the difficult questions that arise when they ponder what it means to change the world in the light of the reality of injustice in this world. By juxtaposing Augustine’s theological writings on the nature of justice and power within the earthly and heavenly cities with Augustine’s letters that demonstrate his public engagement with injustice, we learn how Augustine thought about justice and how...

  9. Reality is broken why games make us better and how they can change the world

    CERN Document Server

    McGonigal, Jane

    2011-01-01

    We are living in a world full of games. More than 31 million people in the UK are gamers. The average young person will spend 10,000 hours gaming by the age of twenty-one. The future belongs to those who play games. In this ground-breaking book, visionary game designer Jane McGonigaI challenges conventional thinking and shows that games - far from being simply escapist entertainment - have the potential not only to radically improve our own lives but to change the world.

  10. The treat of global climate change has important implications throughout the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejazi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Energy in general is essential for economic and social development, prosperity, health and security of citizens. of the other hand, world population over the last 10 years has increased by more than 12%, and now it is exactly about 6.4 billion people and it means more demand for energy. Meanwhile, global primary energy consumption has seen an increase of 20%. Energy supply has some sources and unfortunately most of them have impact on life cycle in biosphere. However, the developed countries, that are only 16% in the population in 2000, consume the energy of 80%. This article deals with the threat of global climate change and its implications throughout the world

  11. Global Deliberative Democracy and Climate Change: Insights from World Wide Views on Global Warming in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Riedy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available On 26 September 2009, approximately 4,000 citizens in 38 countries participated in World Wide Views on Global Warming (WWViews. WWViews was an ambitious first attempt to convene a deliberative mini-public at a global scale, giving people from around the world an opportunity to deliberate on international climate policy and to make recommendations to the decision-makers meeting at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen (COP-15 in December 2009. In this paper, we examine the role that deliberative mini-publics can play in facilitating the emergence of a global deliberative system for climate change response. We pursue this intent through a reflective evaluation of the Australian component of the World Wide Views on Global Warming project (WWViews. Our evaluation of WWViews is mixed. The Australian event was delivered with integrity and feedback from Australian participants was almost universally positive. Globally, WWViews demonstrated that it is feasible to convene a global mini-public to deliberate on issues of global relevance, such as climate change. On the other hand, the contribution of WWViews towards the emergence of a global deliberative system for climate change response was limited and it achieved little influence on global climate change policy. We identify lessons for future global mini-publics, including the need to prioritise the quality of deliberation and provide flexibility to respond to cultural and political contexts in different parts of the world. Future global mini-publics may be more influential if they seek to represent discourse diversity in addition to demographic profiles, use designs that maximise the potential for transmission from public to empowered space, run over longer time periods to build momentum for change and experiment with ways of bringing global citizens together in a single process instead of discrete national events.

  12. Transtheoretical Model Based Exercise Counseling Combined with Music Skipping Rope Exercise on Childhood Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Ok Kyung; Sung, Kyung Mi; Lee, Bo Gyeong; Choi, Hee Won; Im, Eun-Ok

    2016-06-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the effects of a transtheoretical model (TTM) based exercise counseling offered with music skipping rope exercise on components of the TTM (stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy), body mass index, glucose, and lipid profile of overweight/obese children in Korea. This study used a nonequivalent pretest and posttest experimental study design. A total of 75 overweight/obese children participated in the study. Eight sessions of exercise counseling combined with music skipping rope exercise for 12 weeks were offered for children in the experimental group, while one session of exercise counseling with music skipping rope exercise for 12 weeks was offered for children in the control group. Outcomes were measured at baseline, and 6 months after the intervention. After the intervention, self-efficacy significantly improved among children in the experimental group (p = .049), while these children maintained their baseline BMI at 6-month follow-up (p > .05). Among children in the control group, BMI significantly increased (p effective in maintaining BMI and improving self-efficacy of overweight/obese children. The TTM-based counseling combined with exercise classes has potential to control weight among overweight/obese children, while involvement of parents and children in the development of the theory-based intervention may generate further benefits regarding health and well-being of overweight/obese children. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. "I will change the world": The Intersection of Social Change and Male College Athletes' Leadership Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Rhema D; Harrison, C Keith; Lawrence, S Malia; Eyanson, Jeff; McArdle, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Historically, men have been characterized as task-oriented leaders who are motivated by desires for autonomy, wealth, and power (17, 33). However, these "masculine" views of leadership might not accurately capture the leadership motivations of Millennial males as the views were developed in previous generations (4). Given the commitment of many Millennials towards socially responsible attitudes and behaviors (18, 25), we utilized a qualitative research design to examine the influence of social change on the leadership motivations of Millennial male intercollegiate athletes. In doing so, we found participants were motivated to lead in order to affect social change within their communities and within society. Our findings indicate a new perspective, one which includes a commitment to social change, is potentially needed when discussing "masculine" views of leadership.

  14. Energy, world should not chose nuclear energy to fight against climatic change. Nuclear and climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, S.

    2007-06-01

    This document proposes an abstract of the conclusions of an expert group, the Oxford Research Group, which criticizes the today boost in favor of the electricity from nuclear energy. They explain that the nuclear energy should not be a solution for the fight against the climatic change. (A.L.B.)

  15. Detecting changes in real-world objects: The relationship between visual long-term memory and change blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Timothy F; Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude; Alvarez, George A

    2009-01-01

    A large body of literature has shown that observers often fail to notice significant changes in visual scenes, even when these changes happen right in front of their eyes. For instance, people often fail to notice if their conversation partner is switched to another person, or if large background objects suddenly disappear.1,2 These 'change blindness' studies have led to the inference that the amount of information we remember about each item in a visual scene may be quite low.1 However, in recent work we have demonstrated that long-term memory is capable of storing a massive number of visual objects with significant detail about each item.3 In the present paper we attempt to reconcile these findings by demonstrating that observers do not experience 'change blindness' with the real world objects used in our previous experiment if they are given sufficient time to encode each item. The results reported here suggest that one of the major causes of change blindness for real-world objects is a lack of encoding time or attention to each object (see also refs. 4 and 5).

  16. Tiny and Hidden but Changing Your World: The Importance of Soil Microbes to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, N.; Neumann, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    When most people think about global climate change they think about massive power plants billowing smoke and expansive glaciers melting to nothingness. What the public often overlooks is how natural processes invisible to the naked eye can be changed by the climate, and the fact that the natural response to those changes can further alter the climate. Scientists call these reactions "feedback cycles", and understanding them is crucial to predicting the true impact of human activities. In our research, we study one particular feedback cycle: the effect of increased plant productivity on methane emissions from wetlands. Globally, wetlands account for about a third of annual emissions of methane, the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. This heat-trapping gas is generated in the soil of wetlands by microscopic organisms that consume, among other things, proteins and sugars released by the roots of plants. As the atmosphere becomes warmer and richer in carbon dioxide, these plants will grow larger and faster, releasing more of this microbe food into the soil. Our current research seeks to understand how that will affect the microbial ecosystem, and through it the emissions of methane gas.

  17. Serious Simulation Role-Playing Games for Transformative Climate Change Education: "World Climate" and "Future Climate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Sterman, J.; Sawin, E.; Jones, A.; Merhi, H.; Hunt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change, its mitigation, and adaption to its impacts are among the greatest challenges of our times. Despite the importance of societal decisions in determining climate change outcomes, flawed mental models about climate change remain widespread, are often deeply entrenched, and present significant barriers to understanding and decision-making around climate change. Here, we describe two simulation role-playing games that combine active, affective, and analytical learning to enable shifts of deeply held conceptions about climate change. The games, World Climate and Future Climate, use a state-of-the-art decision support simulation, C-ROADS (Climate Rapid Overview and Decision Support) to provide users with immediate feedback on the outcomes of their mitigation strategies at the national level, including global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and concentrations, mean temperature changes, sea level rise, and ocean acidification. C-ROADS outcomes are consistent with the atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMS), such as those used by the IPCC, but runs in less than one second on ordinary laptops, providing immediate feedback to participants on the consequences of their proposed policies. Both World Climate and Future Climate role-playing games provide immersive, situated learning experiences that motivate active engagement with climate science and policy. In World Climate, participants play the role of United Nations climate treaty negotiators. Participant emissions reductions proposals are continually assessed through interactive exploration of the best available science through C-ROADS. Future Climate focuses on time delays in the climate and energy systems. Participants play the roles of three generations: today's policymakers, today's youth, and 'just born.' The game unfolds in three rounds 25 simulated years apart. In the first round, only today's policymakers make decisions; In the next round, the young become the policymakers and inherit the

  18. Fish in the desert: behaviour, genes, and persistence in a changing world

    OpenAIRE

    Mossop, Krystina

    2017-01-01

    Organisms inhabit a variable world. Indeed, the spectacular variation exhibited by natural environments has long captured the attention of biologists, and raises a multitude of questions about how individuals and populations persist when their habitats vary or change. In this thesis, I have used an overarching conceptual framework of different scales of variation – both spatial and temporal – to guide three research foci (connectivity, refugia, and conservation) aimed at better understanding ...

  19. Imperial Medicine in a Changing World: The Fourth International Congresses on Tropical Medicine and Malaria, 1948.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The close connections between colonialism and tropical medicine have been widely discussed by historians over the last fifty years. However, few authors consider the relationship between tropical medicine and European and North American imperialism in the immediate post-World War II period. This article examines the Fourth International Congresses on Tropical Medicine and Malaria, held jointly in Washington in 1948. Using the research presented during the conference, it questions to what degree the specialisation had changed in the postwar period. It argues that although some changes are discernable, imperial traditions and relationships remained firmly embedded within the tropical medicine of the congress.

  20. Co-benefits of addressing climate change can motivate action around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Paul G.; Milfont, Taciano L.; Kashima, Yoshihisa; Bilewicz, Michał; Doron, Guy; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B.; Gouveia, Valdiney V.; Guan, Yanjun; Johansson, Lars-Olof; Pasquali, Carlota; Corral-Verdugo, Victor; Aragones, Juan Ignacio; Utsugi, Akira; Demarque, Christophe; Otto, Siegmar; Park, Joonha; Soland, Martin; Steg, Linda; González, Roberto; Lebedeva, Nadezhda; Madsen, Ole Jacob; Wagner, Claire; Akotia, Charity S.; Kurz, Tim; Saiz, José L.; Schultz, P. Wesley; Einarsdóttir, Gró; Saviolidis, Nina M.

    2016-02-01

    Personal and political action on climate change is traditionally thought to be motivated by people accepting its reality and importance. However, convincing the public that climate change is real faces powerful ideological obstacles, and climate change is slipping in public importance in many countries. Here we investigate a different approach, identifying whether potential co-benefits of addressing climate change could motivate pro-environmental behaviour around the world for both those convinced and unconvinced that climate change is real. We describe an integrated framework for assessing beliefs about co-benefits, distinguishing social conditions (for example, economic development, reduced pollution or disease) and community character (for example, benevolence, competence). Data from all inhabited continents (24 countries; 6,196 participants) showed that two co-benefit types, Development (economic and scientific advancement) and Benevolence (a more moral and caring community), motivated public, private and financial actions to address climate change to a similar degree as believing climate change is important. Critically, relationships were similar for both convinced and unconvinced participants, showing that co-benefits can motivate action across ideological divides. These relationships were also independent of perceived climate change importance, and could not be explained by political ideology, age, or gender. Communicating co-benefits could motivate action on climate change where traditional approaches have stalled.

  1. Older Adults’ Current and Potential Uses of Information Technologies in a Changing World: A Theoretical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hall, Amanda K.; Thielke, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Technologies have become a major force in people’s lives. They change how people interact with the environment, even as the environment changes. We propose that technology use in the setting of changing environments is motivated by essential needs and tensions experienced by the individual. We apply three developmental and behavioral theories (Erikson’s stages of psychosocial development, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model) to explain technology-related behaviors among older adults. We consider how technology use has addressed and can address major ecological changes, in three areas: health promotion, natural disasters, and disparities. We propose that considering these theories can help researchers and developers ensure that technologies will help promote a healthier world for older adults. PMID:26215298

  2. Skipping breakfast and associated factors among Brazilian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeyre França de Paula FIUZA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the prevalence and factors associated with breakfast skipping among adolescents. Methods Cross-sectional study, with adolescents aged 10-17 years, evaluated between 2009 and 2011, belonging to a cohort study in the Central-West region of Brazil. Breakfast skipping was considered as not having breakfast every day. Demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors were evaluated through a questionnaire. Anthropometric assessment included measurement of weight and height, which were used to classify weight status using body mass index. Poisson regression was used to assess the association of breakfast skipping with demographic and socioeconomic variables, lifestyle factors, and weight status. Results Among 1,716 Brazilian adolescents evaluated, 36.2% reported not consuming breakfast every day, with the highest prevalence among girls (p=0.03. After adjusting for age and economic class, breakfast skipping was associated with not consuming breakfast with parents and morning shift at school, in both genders, and with obesity only in boys. Lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption, physical activity, diet quality, and smoking were not associated with skipping breakfast. Conclusion The omission of breakfast was observed in more than a third of adolescents, being associated with demographic and lifestyle factors. In the public health perspective, the importance of encouraging the consumption of this meal is highlighted, with actions involving the school environment and the family.

  3. Noah’s Ark or World Wild Web? Cultural Perspectives in Global Scenario Studies and Their Function for Biodiversity Conservation in a Changing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carijn Beumer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Scenarios and their assumptions on biodiversity conservation, using a framework based on the cultural theory (CT perspectives. We explored an adaptation of the CT typology and the significance of some underrepresented worldviews for discussions on conservation in a changing world. The evaluation of the assumptions on biodiversity conservation in the scenario studies and storylines adds to our understanding of the socio-cultural dimensions of biodiversity loss in a changing world. It contributes to an understanding of the worldviews underlying the complex debates on biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. Making such assumptions and world views explicit will help policymakers and conservationists discuss the diversity of conservation strategies in the face of uncertainty.

  4. Human Development report 2007/2008 - Fighting climate change: human solidarity in a divided world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Climate change is the defining human development challenge of the 21. Century. Failure to respond to that challenge will stall and then reverse international efforts to reduce poverty. The poorest countries and most vulnerable citizens will suffer the earliest and most damaging setbacks, even though they have contributed least to the problem. Looking to the future, no country - however wealthy or powerful - will be immune to the impact of global warming. The Human Development Report 2007/2008 shows that climate change is not just a future scenario. Increased exposure to droughts, floods and storms is already destroying opportunity and reinforcing inequality. Meanwhile, there is now overwhelming scientific evidence that the world is moving towards the point at which irreversible ecological catastrophe becomes unavoidable. Business-as-usual climate change points in a clear direction: unprecedented reversal in human development in our lifetime, and acute risks for our children and their grandchildren. There is a window of opportunity for avoiding the most damaging climate change impacts, but that window is closing: the world has less than a decade to change course. Actions taken - or not taken - in the years ahead will have a profound bearing on the future course of human development. The world lacks neither the financial resources nor the technological capabilities to act. What is missing is a sense of urgency, human solidarity and collective interest. As the Human Development Report 2007/2008 argues, climate change poses challenges at many levels. In a divided but ecologically interdependent world, it challenges all people to reflect upon how we manage the environment of the one thing that we share in common: planet Earth. It challenges us to reflect on social justice and human rights across countries and generations. It challenges political leaders and people in rich nations to acknowledge their historic responsibility for the problem, and to initiate deep and

  5. Health risks of climate change in the World Health Organization South-East Asia Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Kathryn J; Ebi, Kristie L

    2017-09-01

    Countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia Region are particularly vulnerable to a changing climate. Changes in extreme weather events, undernutrition and the spread of infectious diseases are projected to increase the number of deaths due to climate change by 2030, indicating the need to strengthen activities for adaptation and mitigation. With support from the WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia and others, countries have started to include climate change as a key consideration in their national public health policies. Further efforts are needed to develop evidence-based responses; garner the necessary support from partner ministries; and access funding for activities related to health and climate change. National action plans for climate change generally identify health as one of their priorities; however, limited information is available on implementation processes, including which ministries and departments would be involved; the time frame; stakeholder responsibilities; and how the projects would be financed. While progress is being made, efforts are needed to increase the capacity of health systems to manage the health risks of climate change in South-East Asia, if population health is to be protected and strengthened while addressing changing weather and climate patterns. Enhancing the resilience of health systems is key to ensuring a sustainable path to improved planetary and population health.

  6. Agile science: creating useful products for behavior change in the real world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekler, Eric B; Klasnja, Predrag; Riley, William T; Buman, Matthew P; Huberty, Jennifer; Rivera, Daniel E; Martin, Cesar A

    2016-06-01

    Evidence-based practice is important for behavioral interventions but there is debate on how best to support real-world behavior change. The purpose of this paper is to define products and a preliminary process for efficiently and adaptively creating and curating a knowledge base for behavior change for real-world implementation. We look to evidence-based practice suggestions and draw parallels to software development. We argue to target three products: (1) the smallest, meaningful, self-contained, and repurposable behavior change modules of an intervention; (2) "computational models" that define the interaction between modules, individuals, and context; and (3) "personalization" algorithms, which are decision rules for intervention adaptation. The "agile science" process includes a generation phase whereby contender operational definitions and constructs of the three products are created and assessed for feasibility and an evaluation phase, whereby effect size estimates/casual inferences are created. The process emphasizes early-and-often sharing. If correct, agile science could enable a more robust knowledge base for behavior change.

  7. Reembedding Lean: The Japanese Cultural and Religious Context of a World Changing Management Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrock, Christian

    2015-01-01

    James Womack, Daniel Jones, and Daniel Roos rhetorically positioned the management concept “lean” for the business world in the early 1990s, claiming that lean would change the world for the better. In this article, I consider the management concept “lean,” its relation to Japanese history, culture......, Jones, and Ross that lean can be studied and implemented without regard to the context, I show how practices and attitudes considered central to lean have a long-standing history in Japan. They can be traced back to the Tokugawa period (1600–1868) and were salient in the trading houses of early modern...... Japan, in turn heavily inspired by Japanese religious thinking. Research in management fashion suggests that early success case discourse leads to disappointment and abandonment of management concepts later in their life course. Hence, I suggest that the claims of context independence ultimately have...

  8. Mathematical modeling for optimizing skip-stop rail transit operation strategy using genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    "With skip-stop rail transit operation, transit agencies can reduce their operating costs and fleet size, : and passengers can experience reduced in-transit travel times without extra track and technological : improvement. However, since skip-stop op...

  9. The Australasian Antarctic Expedition 2013-2014: Practicing 'Citizen-Science' in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Turney, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Government funding is the cornerstone of modern science. But with declining investment in science across most of the Western World, a major challenge for society is where best to place what little resource we have. Which research questions should have the greatest priority? Nowhere are these issues more pressing than in the Antarctic, where bases have and continue to play host to 'big-science', multi-year programmes of research, locking up logistical support and costs. But in a warming world, the areas with the greatest effects of climate change aren't always near government research stations. With this in mind, in 2012 a plan was formed to visit Commonwealth Bay, a remote area off the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, where in 2010, an iceberg the size of Rhode Island, known as B09B, dramatically knocked a 60-mile long tongue of ice off the Mertz Glacier into the Southern Ocean, setting off a cascade of change. Inspired by the expeditions of the past, we advertised berths for sale to take citizen scientists south with us, harnessing their interest, experience and investment. People responded far and wide. We were oversubscribed, and the Australasian Antarctic Expedition 2013-2014 was born. With the Russian-owned MV Akademik Shokalskiy as the expedition vessel, we set out south from the New Zealand port of Bluff in late November 2013. During our journey south and on the ice we undertook a number of scientific firsts for the region actively engaging the volunteer scientists on board in projects ranging from oceanography, biology, ecology, geology and glaciaology. The expedition demostrated how private funding could support targeted programmes of research and communicate it to the wider world. Small-science research can capture the public's imagination and also reap real scientific outputs. Although it is a funding model developed in the Antarctic a hundred years ago, the beauty is it can applied anywhere in the world.

  10. What Change Can The New Developments In Energy Sector Bring Into the World`s Energypolitical and Geopolitical Order?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur TUTULMAZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments bring US to a leading natural gas and oil producer position. The attempts in last 20 years to bring new horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies together have developed a success in shale gas and oil production in US; the production volumes has reached to a position to redefine the market. Last estimations are bringing more information about the shale capacities of the major basins of the world. However, the estimates are based on a wide range of assumptions and consequently their results vary in a large scale. In any case, these developments have crucial economic, political and geopolitical consequences on the energy market, petroleum producer and consumer countries and regions. Despite the wide range of ambiguity of the estimated size of the resources, the estimations show US and North America has one of the biggest potential, already turning technology into the giant production numbers. Some of the estimations allege so big numbers can even mean to a new world order. The asymmetric nature of the potential, can also be said, increases some of the expected impacts too. In this study, basically, we want to supply an initial solid and economical evaluation to this ambiguity. We are trying to shape a frame for the new energy potential and to put it in a place in the current practice of the world. Secondly, in this context, we are underlying here some of the possible economic and geopolitical consequences each of which can constitute a subject of deeper study.

  11. Measuring and tracking the flow of climate change adaptation aid to the developing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Simon D.; Kandlikar, Milind; Webber, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The developed world has pledged to mobilize at least US 100 billion per year of ‘new’ and ‘additional’ funds by 2020 to help the developing world respond to climate change. Tracking this finance is particularly problematic for climate change adaptation, as there is no clear definition of what separates adaptation aid from standard development aid. Here we use a historical database of overseas development assistance projects to test the effect of different accounting assumptions on the delivery of adaptation finance to the developing countries of Oceania, using machine algorithms developed from a manual pilot study. The results show that explicit adaptation finance grew to 3%-4% of all development aid to Oceania by the 2008-2012 period, but that total adaptation finance could be as high as 37% of all aid, depending on potentially politically motivated assumptions about what counts as adaptation. There was also an uneven distribution of adaptation aid between countries facing similar challenges like Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The analysis indicates that data allowing individual projects to be weighted by their climate change relevance is needed. A robust and mandatory metadata system for all aid projects would allow multilateral aid agencies and independent third parties to perform their own analyses using different assumptions and definitions, and serve as a key check on international climate aid promises.

  12. Strategies for addressing climate change: policy perspectives from around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.D.; Sathaye, J.A.; Craig, P.P.

    1992-01-01

    The greenhouse effect is intrinsically global. Accordingly, effective responses require global coordination. While limited policies have been adopted, notably for phasing out chlorofluorocarbons, there is no clear consensus as to what to do about other greenhouse gases. In this paper, we survey attitudes and policy responses among the nations of the world. Public opinion surveys are consistent in showing that considerable sensitivity to environmental issues exists virtually everywhere. On the other hand, there is acute awareness that other issues, especially economic development, can conflict with global climate-change mitigation goals. In such a state of uncertainty there is a strong argument to be made for implementing policies which are good ideas independent of greenhouse-gas considerations. There is also good reason to expand research. What is feasible depends strongly on present and changing attitudes of the citizens of the world, and of their governments. It is thus critical to follow closely the evolution of attitudes. The kind of work summarized in this paper needs to be updated on a continuing basis, and the results made available routinely to the global policy community. We conclude our review with several recommendations for research designed specifically to reduce uncertainty about costs and institutional issues relating to responses to global climate change. (author)

  13. Climate change, coral bleaching and the future of the world's coral reefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegh-Guldberg, O. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Biological Sciences

    1999-07-01

    Sea temperatures in many tropical regions have increased by almost 1{degree}C over the past 100 years, and are currently increasing at about 1-2{degree}C per century. Mass coral bleaching has occurred in association with episodes of elevated sea temperatures over the past 20 years and involves the loss of the zooxanthellae following chronic photoinhibition. Mass bleaching has resulted in significant losses of live coral in many parts of the world. This paper considers the biochemical, physiological and ecological perspectives of coral bleaching. It also uses the outputs of four runs from three models of global climate change which simulate changes in sea temperature and hence how the frequency and intensity of bleaching events will change over the next 100 years. The results suggest that the thermal tolerances of reef-building corals are likely to be exceeded every year within the next few decades. Events as severe as the 1998 event, the worst on record, are likely to become commonplace within 20 years. Most information suggests that the capacity for acclimation by corals has already been exceeded, and that adaptation will be too slow to avert a decline in the quality of the world's reefs.

  14. Modulating Calcium Signals to Boost AON Exon Skipping for DMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT AON-mediated exon skipping is currently advancing as therapy for DMD...9 9. Appendices…………………………………………………………… 9 1 1. INTRODUCTION AON-AON-mediated exon skipping is currently advancing as therapy for DMD...CDMD inter-group meetings, an annual retreat, and hosting and attending seminars. While not a stated objective of this grant, trainee career

  15. Dr. Bertlmann's socks. How quantum physics changes our picture of ther world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malin, S.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum mechanics, which has together with relativity theory revolutionized physics, is for many people always yet a book with seven seals. Too difficult, too strange, too far? Far from the mark. Shimon Malin launches his reader by a pedagogical trick on a knowledge-rich discovery journey. Two fictive astronauts, The intelligent Julie and the lightly stupid Peter discuss with the real author the progress of the book. Thereby they arrive farly beyond pure natural science at the philosophical question, which means the paradigam change in physics for our picture of the world

  16. Wiki management a revolutionary new model for a rapidly changing and collaborative world

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Rod

    2013-01-01

    We now live in a "wiki" world where mass collaboration is not only possible-it's often the best solution. Conventional management thought assumes that command-and-control is the most effective way to organize the efforts of large numbers of people, but rapid change and increasing complexity have rendered that model obsolete. As a result, most managers today lack the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in an age when networks are proving smarter and faster than hierarchies. Designing organizations for mass collaboration demands a new and very different model-wiki management.

  17. Consideration on non-proliferation regime meeting in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents some proposals for improvement of non-proliferation regime including safeguards structures with historical changes of international regime. Current non-proliferation regime was established under the circumstances of Cold War, and it's structure and measures were influenced by the situation of these time. Although, a couple of years have passed from end of Cold War, new world order has not established yet. Therefore, it is expected that the current regime could be improved in accordance with new world order. Generally speaking, it could be welcomed that the current regime has got some successes from two points of views, namely no new nuclear weapon states have emerged and after the establishment of NPT and all nuclear weapon state is joined NPT finally. However, it is the authors' concern that some gray countries, such as India, Pakistan and Israel, have not joined the NPT yet and cases of Iraqi and DPRK have occurred. After reviewing of such new situation, some proposals will be presented in order to strengthen the nonproliferation regime to meet current world conditions

  18. Impacts of climate change on living aquatic resources of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flittner, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Anthropogenic forced warming of the Earth due to the greenhouse effect could have profound impacts on the world's living aquatic resources. An extensive review is provided of literature concerning such impacts, including physical changes in the ocean and coastal zone, biological changes in coastal wetlands and estuaries, effects of temperature rises and changes in ice cover on marine species, physical and biological impacts on inland waters, and impacts on fisheries. The principal effects would be caused by the increases in temperature and sea-level rise, but changes in precipitation would also be important. Suitable habitats would generally shift poleward and inland. Species would likely shift in abundances and distribution, thus affecting fisheries. It is likely that global warming will produce collapses of some fisheries and expansions of others. The likelihood of collapse may be aggravated by inadequate management due to insufficient authority, unwillingness to act, or lack of knowledge. Options available for reducing the impact of these changes are discussed, along with research needed to help prepare for climate change. 111 refs

  19. Major Aspects of Transformations of International Companies in a Changing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Yurievna Konina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic globalization and demographic changes as well rapidly changing technologies are the most important factors of the firm's environment. The rapid development of information technology radically changes the very essence of the creation of new value. The pace of technological change and innovations increases. In the most advanced sectors of global economy the knowledge is a key resource. The world economy has not finally recovered after the crisis of 2008-2009. The global economy his becoming more multicentre and the vector of economic power is shifting to China and India. The main actors and the anchor of today global economy are leading international companies (transnational corporations- TNCs. Several thousands of TNCs together with their value chain dominate the global economy. The economic power allows the largest TNCs significantly push the boundaries of the company. Globalization has changed external networks of TNCs, their corporate governance, corporate ownership as well transfer pricing schemes as well relations between the headquarter and its subsidiaries and affiliates. A remarkable feature of TNCs recent FDI flows is not Greenfield investment but mergers and acquisitions. Key features of TNC activities are defined by industry. A growing number of TNCs are changing their strategic activities, basing on the latest technology trends. The most important aspects of TNCs activities are linked to innovation, financial operations, advanced management technique, increase in intangible assets. Innovation activity of TNCs is shifting to Asia.

  20. Networks of European cities in worlds of global economic and environmental change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Derudder

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Geographers use a variety of economic, social, and demographic data to measure the importance of global cities and the linkages between cities. We analyze the importance and connectedness of European cities using hyperlinks, or the electronic information provided by the Google Search engine. Hyperlinks are Web sites representing information that is produced; they are especially useful in measuring the impact of contemporary crises. We use the phrases economic slowdown and global financial crisis to derive a Global Financial Score (GFS for 16 core, semiperiphery and peripheral European cities and global warming and climate change to derive a Global Environmental Score (GES. London and Paris are in the European core; Rome, Dublin, Madrid and Prague are in the semiperiphery; while Tallinn, Riga, and Belgrade are in the periphery. A strong positive relationship exists between the GES and GFS. We examine the linkages of the 16 cities to the 100 largest world cities and illustrate, with “clockgrams,” the linkages London, Brussels and Athens have with other world cities. We calculated the number of linkages each of the 16 cities had with other world cities to identify Europe’s urban cores, semiperipheries, peripheries, and deep peripheries. New York is in the core of both the economic and environmental maps. Some world cities are in the semiperiphery of one category and periphery of another. Milan, Istanbul, and Delhi are in the deep periphery for the GFS while Toronto and Athens are for the GES. Hyperlinks represent valuable databases to measure the impact of crises and regional and global urban linkages.

  1. Introduction: The provision of animal health services in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, C

    2004-04-01

    In the future, animal health services in developing countries will need to operate in a continuously changing policy, institutional and commercial environment. Firstly, the changing policies and priorities of national policy-makers regarding public and private sector roles, reinforced in Africa by the donors, have reduced funding and support for the large number of tasks that animal health services have traditionally performed, and there is continuing pressure from policy-makers to focus on what the public sector can do best. Secondly, poverty reduction has become one of the main criteria guiding the allocation of official development assistance, which has major implications for the main target clientele of veterinary services. Thirdly, population growth, increasing income and urbanisation are causing a marked increase in demand for livestock products in the developing world. As a result, the entire livestock commodity chain is undergoing major structural changes, which has significant implications for the definition and control of food safety standards. Fourthly, globalisation, and increasing trade and travel have greatly increased the risk of disease transmission between different countries and continents. Veterinary institutions in the developing world need to adapt to these challenges. They will have to be able to focus on the essential public sector roles. At the same time they must deliver those essential services to the poor, and provide the policy framework to ensure that the inevitable structural changes in the commodity chain take place in an equitable and sustainable fashion, with an acceptable level of health risk for the consumer. According to the weight given to these different objectives, changes in the institutional set-up need to be considered. This issue of the Scientific and Technical Review addresses these challenges. It begins by reviewing the basic economic characteristics underlying the provision of animal health services, and then examines

  2. Developing Changes in Our Reading of the World: A Pedagogical Proposal from Participative Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Trovato-Apollaro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research conducted with the group Women of Theater from Alajuelita. The research intended to answer the question of how to develop changes in our reading of the world. The goal of our study was the co-researchers’ raising awareness process leading them, from themselves, and by means of the abovementioned group, to read, interpret and reconstruct the environment in order to yield transformations in their lives and community. Through reflection, the process was investigated on the basis of the pedagogical practices of Augusto Boal´s Theater of Oppressed (Boal, 1980, as they were applied at the theater workshop together with the group of Women of Theather, at the library of the Educative Center Los Pinos in Alajuelita. The main elements of the implemented methodology respond to the Participative Action Research (PAR, where the dialectical participative relationship and the collective discussion make it possible the creation of learning. We used audio recordings as data collection tools, which were later systematized for their analysis. The paradigmatic position assumed was inspired by an approach related to the concept of complexity. This concept proposes a holistic view of reality, life, and, so, of pedagogy. According to such a view, we all are one, and the multiplicity is interconnected with each one of its parts, in continuous entropy. Under this approach, where the world is a system of systems interconnected among themselves, the main finding was to perceive pedagogy as an instrument for humanization, a magical object capable of valuing diversity and transforming our thoughts, life styles and values, and, in consequence, our reading of the world. We considered that such an important finding might help to develop changes in human beings and might inspire us to assume an ecological perspective towards relationships. Such a perspective might give rise to deep transformations in our social, political and

  3. Can singular examples change implicit racial attitudes in the real-world?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie E. Roos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Implicit attitudes about social groups persist independently of explicit beliefs and can influence not only social behavior, but also medical and legal practices. Although examples presented in the laboratory can alter such implicit attitudes, it is unclear whether the same influence is exerted by real-world exemplars. Following the 2008 US election, Plant et al. reported that the Implicit Association Test or IAT revealed a decrease in negative implicit attitudes towards African-Americans. However, a large-scale study also employing the IAT found little evidence for a change in implicit attitudes pre- and post-election. Here we present evidence that the 2008 US election may have facilitated at least a temporary change in implicit racial attitudes in the US. Our results rely on the Affective Lexical Priming Score or ALPS and pre- and post-election measurements for both US and non-US participants. US students who, pre-election, exhibited negative associations with black faces, post-election showed positive associations with black faces. Canadian students pre- and post-election did not show a similar shift. To account for these findings, we posit that the socio-cognitive processes underlying ALPS are different from those underlying the IAT. Acknowledging that we cannot form a causal link between an intervening real-world event and laboratory-measured implicit attitudes, we speculate that our findings may be driven by the fact that the 2008 election campaign included extremely positive media coverage of President Obama and prominently featured his face in association with positive words – similar to the structure of ALPS. Even so, our real-world finding adds to the literature demonstrating the malleability of implicit attitudes and has implications for how we understand the socio-cognitive mechanisms underlying stereotypes.

  4. Men in family planning: changing the world one life at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, J

    1992-01-01

    While women created the family planning (FP) movement, men have also been involved since its inception (albeit in a minor way). Today men must redefine masculinity in order to become more effective as FP providers and clients. While women have carved out newly self-sufficient identities, men have had to search for new identities which appropriately respond to changing gender relations. The Planned Parenthood of Central and Northern Arizona has 12 males on a staff of 130. The male FP providers have an opportunity to redefine gender relations, masculinity, and reproductive responsibility through their interactions with clients, whether the clients are themselves male or female. The male FP providers have a rare opportunity to exhibit a balance between the "fierceness of the warrior patient and the warmth of the parent" in their dealings with clients. Female clients of male FP providers can realize a therapeutic, emotionally-corrective experience. Male clients of male providers can receive insights into women's lives; into healthful living; and into ways to achieve greater access to feelings, emotions, and experiences. The changes at hand in the world demand that traditionally female values such as nurturing and compassion be brought into the traditionally male world of ambition, profit, and power. Male FP providers can contribute to this improvement as they affect one client at a time.

  5. When the world collapses: changed worldview and social reconstruction in a traumatized community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinka Corkalo Biruski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic experience can affect the individual's basic beliefs about the world as a predictable and safe place. One of the cornerstones in recovery from trauma is reestablishment of safety, connectedness, and the shattered schema of a worldview. Objective: This study explored the role of negatively changed worldview in the relationship between war-related traumatization and readiness for social reconstruction of intergroup relations in a post-conflict community measured by three processes: intergroup rapprochement, rebuilding trust, and need for apology. It was hypothesized that more traumatized people are less supportive of social reconstruction and that this relationship is mediated by the changed worldview. Method: The study included a community random sample of 333 adults in the city of Vukovar, Croatia, that was most devastated during the 1991–1995 war. Six instruments were administered: Stressful Events Scale, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Changed Worldview Scale, and three scales measuring the post-conflict social reconstruction processes: Intergroup Rapprochement, Intergroup Trust and Need for Apology. Results: Mediation analyses showed that the worldview change fully mediated between traumatization and all three aspects of social reconstruction. Conclusions: In a population exposed to war traumatization the worldview change mediates post-conflict social recovery of community relations.

  6. Global assessment of technological innovation for climate change adaptation and mitigation in developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenle, Ademola A; Azadi, Hossein; Arbiol, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    Concerns about mitigating and adapting to climate change resulted in renewing the incentive for agricultural research investments and developing further innovation priorities around the world particularly in developing countries. In the near future, development of new agricultural measures and proper diffusion of technologies will greatly influence the ability of farmers in adaptation and mitigation to climate change. Using bibliometric approaches through output of academic journal publications and patent-based data, we assess the impact of research and development (R&D) for new and existing technologies within the context of climate change mitigation and adaptation. We show that many developing countries invest limited resources for R&D in relevant technologies that have great potential for mitigation and adaption in agricultural production. We also discuss constraints including weak infrastructure, limited research capacity, lack of credit facilities and technology transfer that may hinder the application of innovation in tackling the challenges of climate change. A range of policy measures is also suggested to overcome identified constraints and to ensure that potentials of innovation for climate change mitigation and adaptation are realized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Crossroads. Life Changing Stories from the Second World War: A (Transmedia Storytelling Approach to World War II Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licia Calvi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crossroads is the name of the concept that narratively connects several WWII-related cultural institutions in Brabant. We were initially looking for ways to connect 4 otherwise very diverse World War II-related institutions (in fact, 3 museums and a commemoration centre and we found it in this overarching paradigm. Crossroads does not require museums to share their collection items. It offers them instead a tool to build and offer visitors a cohesive experience related to WWII heritage.  This experience is characterized by the specific focus into their WWII stories using storytelling that they can adopt. This paper will highlight the creative process that brought to the development of this concept and will discuss examples of the resulting transmedia narratives.

  8. The Changing Face of War in Textbooks: Depictions of World War II and Vietnam, 1970-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Richard; Mitchell, Lacy

    2014-01-01

    How have U.S. high school textbook depictions of World War II and Vietnam changed since the 1970s? We examined 102 textbooks published from 1970 to 2009 to see how they treated U.S. involvement in World War II and Vietnam. Our content analysis of high school history textbooks finds that U.S. textbooks increasingly focus on the personal experiences…

  9. Integration of World Knowledge and Temporary Information about Changes in an Object's Environmental Location during Different Stages of Sentence Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuqian; Yang, Wei; Ma, Lijun; Li, Jiaxin

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings have shown that information about changes in an object's environmental location in the context of discourse is stored in working memory during sentence comprehension. However, in these studies, changes in the object's location were always consistent with world knowledge (e.g., in "The writer picked up the pen from the floor and moved it to the desk," the floor and the desk are both common locations for a pen). How do people accomplish comprehension when the object-location information in working memory is inconsistent with world knowledge (e.g., a pen being moved from the floor to the bathtub)? In two visual world experiments, with a "look-and-listen" task, we used eye-tracking data to investigate comprehension of sentences that described location changes under different conditions of appropriateness (i.e., the object and its location were typically vs. unusually coexistent, based on world knowledge) and antecedent context (i.e., contextual information that did vs. did not temporarily normalize unusual coexistence between object and location). Results showed that listeners' retrieval of the critical location was affected by both world knowledge and working memory, and the effect of world knowledge was reduced when the antecedent context normalized unusual coexistence of object and location. More importantly, activation of world knowledge and working memory seemed to change during the comprehension process. These results are important because they demonstrate that interference between world knowledge and information in working memory, appears to be activated dynamically during sentence comprehension.

  10. breakfast skipping and academic / social development of pupils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abasiama Akpan

    “Assessment of the effects of skipping breakfast on the children by pupils was the basic ... concludes that since proper feeding is necessary for the child's academic and social development, the ... people feed influence their behaviour in a variety ... J. C. Duruamaku-Dim, Department of Curriculum & Teaching, Faculty of ...

  11. Effect of skipping breakfast on subsequent energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, David A; Pacanowski, Carly R

    2013-07-02

    The objective was to examine the effect of consuming breakfast on subsequent energy intake. Participants who habitually ate breakfast and those who skipped breakfast were recruited for two studies. Using a randomized crossover design, the first study examined the effect of having participants consume either (a) no breakfast, (b) a high carbohydrate breakfast (335 kcals), or (c) a high fiber breakfast (360 kcals) on three occasions and measured ad libitum intake at lunch. The second study again used a randomized crossover design but with a larger, normal carbohydrate breakfast consumed ad libtum. Intake averaged 624 kcals and subsequent food intake was measured throughout the day. Participants ate only foods served from the Cornell Human Metabolic Research Unit where all foods were weighed before and after consumption. In the first study, neither eating breakfast nor the kind of breakfast consumed had an effect on the amount consumed at lunch despite a reduction in hunger ratings. In the second study, intake at lunch as well as hunger ratings were significantly increased after skipping breakfast (by 144 kcal), leaving a net caloric deficit of 408 kcal by the end of the day. These data are consistent with published literature demonstrating that skipping a meal does not result in accurate energy compensation at subsequent meals and suggests that skipping breakfast may be an effective means to reduce daily energy intake in some adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The relation between breakfast skipping and school performance in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Ouwehand, Carolijn; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; De Groot, Renate; Krabbendam, Lydia; Jolles, Jelle

    2012-01-01

    Boschloo, A., Ouwehand, C., Dekker, S., Lee, N., De Groot, R., Krabbendam, L., & Jolles, J. (2012). The relation between breakfast skipping and school performance in adolescents. Mind, Brain, and Education, 6(2), 81-88. doi:10.1111/j.1751-228x.2012.01138.x

  13. Skipping Syntactically Illegal "the" Previews: The Role of Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Matthew J.; Angele, Bernhard; Ahn, Y. Danbi; Rayner, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Readers tend to skip words, particularly when they are short, frequent, or predictable. Angele and Rayner (2013) recently reported that readers are often unable to detect syntactic anomalies in parafoveal vision. In the present study, we manipulated target word predictability to assess whether contextual constraint modulates…

  14. Translational and Regulatory Challenges for Exon Skipping Therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ferlini, Alessandra; Goemans, Nathalie; Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Wells, Dominic J.; Bushby, Katerine; Vroom, Elizabeth; Balabanov, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Several translational challenges are currently impeding the therapeutic development of antisense-mediated exon skipping approaches for rare diseases. Some of these are inherent to developing therapies for rare diseases, such as small patient numbers and limited information on natural history and

  15. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most...

  16. Climate Change: A Future of Less Water and More people - Strategies for a Water Constrained World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahai, D.

    2010-12-01

    Today, the fact that the Earth is warming is indisputable. The evidence of climate change is already all around us, with the occurence of ever more intense weather events, droughts, heat waves, floods and sea level rise. Predictions of greater calamities in the future without swift action must be taken seriously. However, while international summits have focused on means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, these are largely strategies of containment, not of cure. Even if emissions were to cease today, the current effects of climate change would remain with us for millenia. This is clear from the 2007 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The world must not only tackle the causes of global warming; it must adapt to the damage already done. This need is most acute where water supply is concerned. The world already faces daunting chalenges. According to United Nations' reports, even today 1.8 million children under 5 die from water related diseases every year; 900 million people lack access to safe drinking water; and 2.6 billion go without basic sanitation. In the developing world, 90% of sewage is discharged to water bodies without adequate treatment contributing to "dead zones". Population increases will make matters worse (an addition of around 3 billion people by 2050 is expected) and climate change will compound the crisis. It is forecast that, as the Earth warms, deserts will expand and droughts will intensify causing demographic shifts even as the world's population burgeons. We are already seeing different regions react to water shortages. Many countries are pursuing seawater desalination. However, seawater desalination has numerous drawbacks; it remains the most expensive of water treatment options and the most energy intensive. Some societies may have no choice but to turn to the sea; others should look to other alternatives first. Such frontrunners could include: (1) enhanced conservation, utilizing public education programs, price

  17. Climate change and the long-term viability of the World's busiest heavy haul ice road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Donal; Swindles, Graeme; Patterson, Tim; Galloway, Jennifer; Macumber, Andrew; Falck, Hendrik; Crossley, Laura; Chen, Jie; Pisaric, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Climate models project that the northern high latitudes will warm at a rate in excess of the global mean. This will pose severe problems for Arctic and sub-Arctic infrastructure dependent on maintaining low temperatures for structural integrity. This is the case for the economically important Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road (TCWR)—the world's busiest heavy haul ice road, spanning 400 km across mostly frozen lakes within the Northwest Territories of Canada. In this study, future climate scenarios are developed for the region using statistical downscaling methods. In addition, changes in lake ice thickness are projected based on historical relationships between measured ice thickness and air temperatures. These projections are used to infer the theoretical operational dates of the TCWR based on weight limits for trucks on the ice. Results across three climate models driven by four RCPs reveal a considerable warming trend over the coming decades. Projected changes in ice thickness reveal a trend towards thinner lake ice and a reduced time window when lake ice is at sufficient thickness to support trucks on the ice road, driven by increasing future temperatures. Given the uncertainties inherent in climate modelling and the resultant projections, caution should be exercised in interpreting the magnitude of these scenarios. More certain is the direction of change, with a clear trend towards winter warming that will reduce the operation time window of the TCWR. This illustrates the need for planners and policymakers to consider future changes in climate when planning annual haulage along the TCWR.

  18. Europe's Southeastern Gateway: Responding to Rapidly Changing Patterns of World Shipping. The University's Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger E. HAMLIN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available World trade and transportation are changing dramatically. Energy prices and transport sustainability concerns are reinvigorating ocean freighter shipping. An ever-increasing portion of trade is in containers, and container ships are getting larger quickly. Many ports, nations and continents are not keeping up with ship size increases putting them at a trade disadvantage. Major canals and seaways must also upgrade or be rendered obsolete, causing a change in the pattern of world trade. Ports have to do more than expand vessel size limits. Port regions must also invest in infrastructure that improves multi-modal access to the port and augments hand-off of containers to smaller seaway ships, trains and trucks. With heightened security and evolving emphasis on flexible and efficient logistics, ports must become high-tech logistics hubs with improved real-time data about port throughput. Constanţa, Romania provides an example of an attempt to respond to this rapid change. Near the Danube Delta, on the Black Sea, Constanţa offers a potential southeastern gateway to Europe for the Black Sea, the Eastern Mediterranean and beyond. Ships from Asia, entering via the Suez Canal can easily access Constanţa, and thus save more than ten days of shipping time for destinations in southeastern Europe compared to shipping through Rotterdam or Hamburg. But Constanţa needs to make all the improvements mentioned above. Universities have several roles in this endeavor, including identifying and forecasting trends, providing the technical knowledge to develop high-tech logistics hubs, pursing publicprivate partnerships for infrastructure development and offering training.

  19. Breakfast skipping in prepubertal obese children: hormonal, metabolic and cognitive consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeis, C; Fornari, E; Surano, M G; Comencini, E; Corradi, M; Tommasi, M; Fasan, I; Cortese, S

    2012-03-01

    Skipping breakfast influences cognitive performance. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between the variation of hormonal and metabolic postprandial parameters induced by breakfast consumption or fasting and cognitive performance in obese children. Cross-sectional study for repeated measures. Memory and attention assessment tests, hormones and nutrient oxidation were measured before and after consuming breakfast vs fasting in 10 prepubertal obese children. Fasting induced a significant (PContinuous Performance Test II (a global index of inattention) and the Test of Memory and Learning Word Selective Reminding (a test of verbal memory), whereas no changes were found after breakfast. Fasting was associated with a reduction of insulin and an increase in glucagon, with no changes in glucose. The increase in inattention was associated with a reduction of carbohydrate oxidation (ρ=-0.66, Pbreakfast or fasting, whereas Ghrelin was significantly lower. No association between postprandial hormone variation and cognitive performance was found. Attention and visual memory performance in the morning were reduced when the children skipped breakfast. No association was found with hormones or metabolic changes, but we did find an association with a reduction of carbohydrate oxidation. Nevertheless, these preliminary findings need confirmation in larger sample size.

  20. Changes in precipitation-streamflow transformation around the world: interdecadal variability and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saft, M.; Peel, M. C.; Andreassian, V.; Parajka, J.; Coxon, G.; Freer, J. E.; Woods, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate prediction of hydrologic response to potentially changing climatic forcing is a key current challenge in hydrology. Recent studies exploring decadal to multidecadal climate drying in the African Sahel and south-eastern and south-western Australia demonstrated that long dry periods also had an indirect cumulative impact on streamflow via altered catchment biophysical properties. As a result, hydrologic response to persisting change in climatic conditions, i.e. precipitation, cannot be confidently inferred from the hydrologic response to short-term interannual climate fluctuations of similar magnitude. This study aims to characterise interdecadal changes in precipitation-runoff conversion processes globally. The analysis is based on long continuous records from near-natural baseline catchments in North America, Europe, and Australia. We used several complimentary metrics characterising precipitation-runoff relationship to assess how partitioning changed over recent decades. First, we explore the hypothesis that during particularly dry or wet decades the precipitation elasticity of streamflow increases over what can be expected from inter-annual variability. We found this hypothesis holds for both wet and dry periods in some regions, but not everywhere. Interestingly, trend-like behaviour in the precipitation-runoff partitioning, unrelated to precipitation changes, offset the impact of persisting precipitation change in some regions. Therefore, in the second part of this study we explored longer-term trends in precipitation-runoff partitioning, and related them to climate and streamflow changes. We found significant changes in precipitation-runoff relationship around the world, which implies that runoff response to a given precipitation can vary over decades even in near-natural catchments. When significant changes occur, typically less runoff is generated for a given precipitation over time - even when precipitation is increasing. We discuss the consistency

  1. Can the World's Farmers Feed a World of 10 Billion People In Spite of Climate Change? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterling, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    The rapid rise in agricultural productivity due to technological innovation and science-based methods was one of the great human achievements of the 20th century. We now face the prospect of needing to double agricultural output by the latter third of the current century to match the growth of demand for food and fiber—albeit the pace of growth in demand shows signs of slowing in the future. How farmers and the agricultural industry deal with climate change will, in large measure, determine success or failure. The Earth is committed to about the same amount of warming in the future as has been experienced over the past hundred years regardless of future greenhouse gas emissions trajectories; such will require adaptive responses by plants, animals, producers and consumers if society’s goals for global food security are to be met. In this paper, I summarize the state-of-the science of how climate change may affect our global agricultural production system. I review the latest thinking on the combined effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate changes on crop productivity across the globe. Prospects for adaptation in agriculturally important regions are examined. While it appears that global food production will be adequate to meet global food demand in spite of advancing climate change, it is clear that many parts of the tropics and dry sub-tropics will see yield decreases and possible loss of comparative advantage. In those regions, continued large population growth and deleterious climate changes will contribute to declining per capita agricultural production. Increasing numbers of people at risk of hunger are probable there.

  2. Contemporary Trans-regional Cooperation between Europe and Asia in a Changing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beginda Pakpahan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with contemporary trans-regional cooperation between Europe and Asia in a changing world. It examines the emerging economic relationship between the EU and Asia and possible challenges and implications facing both regions. It argues that Europe - Asia economic and commercial ties are likely in the future to result in unbalanced economic development between both these regions; in short, future agreements are likely to disproportionately favour Europe. Therefore, the economic and commercial ties between these two regions should aim to develop the least advanced countries in Asia. The article argues that ASEM can be empowered as a common flexible framework for bilateral and inter-regional trade initiatives between both regions; it can be empowered to manage and monitor these trade initiatives and their social implications for vulnerable ASEM countries. The main objective of this article is to contribute a clearer understanding of the current EU - Asia relationship in the context of ASEM.

  3. Tourism-Induced Livelihood Changes at Mount Sanqingshan World Heritage Site, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming Ming; Wall, Geoffrey; Xu, Kejian

    2016-05-01

    Although tourism has the potential to improve the wellbeing of residents, it may also disrupt livelihood systems, social processes, and cultural traditions. The livelihood changes at three rural villages at Mount Sanqingshan World Heritage Site, China, are assessed to determine the extent to which tourism strategies are contributing to local livelihoods. A sustainable livelihood framework is adopted to guide the analysis. The three villages exhibit different development patterns due to institutional, organizational, and location factors. New strategies involving tourism were constructed and incorporated into the traditional livelihood systems and they resulted in different outcomes for residents of different villages. Village location, including the relationship to the site tourism plan, affected the implications for rural livelihoods. High dependence on tourism as the single livelihood option can reduce sustainability. Practical implications are suggested to enhance livelihood sustainability at such rural heritage tourism sites.

  4. Changes in the economical updated world by means of the diffuse logia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidy Maylén Pérez López

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the organization world many changes have occurred In last years of last centuries and the first ones, due to the advance of Technologies and Communications (TIC and to the need of getting truthful information in less possible time, the markets globalization and the doubts in taking decisions have favored the development of new techniques of artificial Intelligence applied to a numerous of activities accomplished by human beings and to the field of Economics. In present work a compilation of techniques and applications of artificial intelligence to economy's field is made. It is proposed also a procedure to treat the lack of certainty and the subjectivity as main characteristic of related techniques.

  5. World-wide anthropogenic climate changes: facts, uncertainties and open questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenwiese, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    Various human activities are, without a doubt, leading to a steady increase world-wide in the emissions of trace gases which affect the climate into the atmosphere. As a result, the global climate is also forced to change. The evidence from climate models regarding this is uncertain, however, both with respect to the quantitative aspect and the regional aspect, especially concerning climatic elements apart from temperature. It is therefore important to examine the data of climate history for anthropogenic climate signals. It is difficult, though, to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic climate effects. Despite these uncertainties, however, which result in many questions remaining open, estimations of risk and the principle of responsibility lead to immediate, international climate protection measures being demanded. (orig.) [de

  6. Tourism-Induced Livelihood Changes at Mount Sanqingshan World Heritage Site, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming Ming; Wall, Geoffrey; Xu, Kejian

    2016-05-01

    Although tourism has the potential to improve the wellbeing of residents, it may also disrupt livelihood systems, social processes, and cultural traditions. The livelihood changes at three rural villages at Mount Sanqingshan World Heritage Site, China, are assessed to determine the extent to which tourism strategies are contributing to local livelihoods. A sustainable livelihood framework is adopted to guide the analysis. The three villages exhibit different development patterns due to institutional, organizational, and location factors. New strategies involving tourism were constructed and incorporated into the traditional livelihood systems and they resulted in different outcomes for residents of different villages. Village location, including the relationship to the site tourism plan, affected the implications for rural livelihoods. High dependence on tourism as the single livelihood option can reduce sustainability. Practical implications are suggested to enhance livelihood sustainability at such rural heritage tourism sites.

  7. Geothermal Program Review XV: proceedings. Role of Research in the Changing World of Energy Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Geothermal Technologies conducted its annual Program Review XV in Berkeley, March 24-26, 1997. The geothermal community came together for an in-depth review of the federally-sponsored geothermal research and development program. This year`s theme focussed on {open_quotes}The Role of Research in the Changing World of Energy Supply.{close_quotes} This annual conference is designed to promote technology transfer by bringing together DOE-sponsored researchers; utility representatives; geothermal developers; equipment and service suppliers; representatives from local, state, and federal agencies; and others with an interest in geothermal energy. Separate abstracts have been indexed to the database for contributions to this conference.

  8. Knowledge creation for practical solutions appropriate to a changing world of work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne F. Cascio

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Only one, long-term sustainable source of competitive advantage exist: the intellectual capital that resides in the minds of people. The ongoing development of people as strategic assets is essential because of three defining forces of our time: globalisation, the information revolution, and the speed of change. Each of these forces is examined in the article against the backdrop of some important changes in the psychological contract. The challenge is to create knowledge for practical solutions, appropriate to a changing world of work. Opsomming Slegs een, lang termyn, standhoudende bron van mededingendheid bestaan: die intellektuele kapitaal wat in mense weggelê is. Die deurlopende ontwikkeling van mense as strategiese bate is noodsaaklik as gevolg van drie deurslaggewende, teenswoordige kragte: globalisering, die inligtingsrevolusie, en die spoed van verandering. Elk van hierdie kragte word bespreek in die artikel teen die agtergrond van beduidende verskuiwings in die sielkundige kontrak. Die uitdaging is om kennis vir praktiese oplossings te skep wat op ’n veranderende wêreld van werk van toepassing sal wees.

  9. A changing world: Using nuclear techniques to investigate the impact of climate change on polar and mountainous regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear techniques are being used in polar and mountainous regions to study climate change and its impact on the quality of land, water and ecosystems in order to better conserve and manage these resources. Researchers from around the world will be using data from 13 benchmark sites to draw conclusions about the effects of the rapidly changing climate on the Arctic, mountains and the western part of Antarctica, which have alarmed communities, environmentalists, scientists and policy makers. Between July 2015 and July 2016 they will be using isotopic and nuclear techniques, as well as geochemical and biological analytical methods from other scientific disciplines. This will enable them to track soil and water, to monitor the movement of soil and sediment and to assess the effects of melting permafrost on the atmosphere, as well as on the land, water and fragile ecosystems of mountainous and polar regions. The measurements follow numerous on-site tests carried out since November 2014 to perfect the sampling technique.

  10. Assessing and managing multiple risks in a changing world-The Roskilde recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selck, Henriette; Adamsen, Peter B; Backhaus, Thomas; Banta, Gary T; Bruce, Peter K H; Burton, G Allen; Butts, Michael B; Boegh, Eva; Clague, John J; Dinh, Khuong V; Doorn, Neelke; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Hazlerigg, Charles; Hunka, Agnieszka D; Jensen, John; Lin, Yan; Loureiro, Susana; Miraglia, Simona; Munns, Wayne R; Nadim, Farrokh; Palmqvist, Annemette; Rämö, Robert A; Seaby, Lauren P; Syberg, Kristian; Tangaa, Stine R; Thit, Amalie; Windfeld, Ronja; Zalewski, Maciej; Chapman, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Roskilde University (Denmark) hosted a November 2015 workshop, Environmental Risk-Assessing and Managing Multiple Risks in a Changing World. This Focus article presents the consensus recommendations of 30 attendees from 9 countries regarding implementation of a common currency (ecosystem services) for holistic environmental risk assessment and management; improvements to risk assessment and management in a complex, human-modified, and changing world; appropriate development of protection goals in a 2-stage process; dealing with societal issues; risk-management information needs; conducting risk assessment of risk management; and development of adaptive and flexible regulatory systems. The authors encourage both cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to address their 10 recommendations: 1) adopt ecosystem services as a common currency for risk assessment and management; 2) consider cumulative stressors (chemical and nonchemical) and determine which dominate to best manage and restore ecosystem services; 3) fully integrate risk managers and communities of interest into the risk-assessment process; 4) fully integrate risk assessors and communities of interest into the risk-management process; 5) consider socioeconomics and increased transparency in both risk assessment and risk management; 6) recognize the ethical rights of humans and ecosystems to an adequate level of protection; 7) determine relevant reference conditions and the proper ecological context for assessments in human-modified systems; 8) assess risks and benefits to humans and the ecosystem and consider unintended consequences of management actions; 9) avoid excessive conservatism or possible underprotection resulting from sole reliance on binary, numerical benchmarks; and 10) develop adaptive risk-management and regulatory goals based on ranges of uncertainty. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:7-16. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  11. Controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a world experiencing anthropogenic and climatic-induced change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paerl, Hans W., E-mail: hpaerl@email.unc.edu; Hall, Nathan S.; Calandrino, Elizabeth S.

    2011-04-15

    Harmful (toxic, food web altering, hypoxia generating) cyanobacterial algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are proliferating world-wide due to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment, and they represent a serious threat to the use and sustainability of our freshwater resources. Traditionally, phosphorus (P) input reductions have been prescribed to control CyanoHABs, because P limitation is widespread and some CyanoHABs can fix atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) to satisfy their nitrogen (N) requirements. However, eutrophying systems are increasingly plagued with non N{sub 2} fixing CyanoHABs that are N and P co-limited or even N limited. In many of these systems N loads are increasing faster than P loads. Therefore N and P input constraints are likely needed for long-term CyanoHAB control in such systems. Climatic changes, specifically warming, increased vertical stratification, salinization, and intensification of storms and droughts play additional, interactive roles in modulating CyanoHAB frequency, intensity, geographic distribution and duration. In addition to having to consider reductions in N and P inputs, water quality managers are in dire need of effective tools to break the synergy between nutrient loading and hydrologic regimes made more favorable for CyanoHABs by climate change. The more promising of these tools make affected waters less hospitable for CyanoHABs by 1) altering the hydrology to enhance vertical mixing and/or flushing and 2) decreasing nutrient fluxes from organic rich sediments by physically removing the sediments or capping sediments with clay. Effective future CyanoHAB management approaches must incorporate both N and P loading dynamics within the context of altered thermal and hydrologic regimes associated with climate change. - Research Highlights: {yields} Toxic cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs) increasingly threaten global water supplies. {yields} Human (nutrient) and climate (hydrology, temperature) changes synergistically promote CyanoHABs. {yields

  12. Managing forests in a changing world: the need for a systemic approach. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, S.; Buttoud, G.; Ciancio, O.; Corona, P.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study: The paper is a scientific commented discussion with the aim of defining a framework which allows both a comprehensive vision of forest dynamics, as well as an adaptive management approach and policy procedures more suited to a changing and inherently unpredictable world. Main results: We identify the main challenges facing forestry in relation to recent developments in forestry thinking, i.e. the paradox of aiming at sustainability in a changing environment, a shifting perception of the relationship between ecological and social systems, the recognition of forest ecosystems as complex adaptive systems, the need for integrating the social and ecological dimensions of forestry into a single framework, and the growing awareness of the importance of the ethical approach to the forest. We propose the concept of “systemic forestry” as a paradigm for better understanding forest dynamics and for guiding management and public actions at various levels. We compare the systemic approach with different silvicultural and forest management approaches which have been proposed in the last decades. Research highlights: Our analysis shows that a systemic approach to forestry has five main consequences: 1. forestry is viewed as a part of landscape dynamics through a multi-sectoral coordination, 2. the logic of action changes from norm to process, 3. conservation is a dynamic search for resilience, 4. multi-functionality is achieved through a multi-entries approach integrating ecological, social and economic components of sustainability, 5. forestry institutions are reframed to address the issue of changing interactions among actors, 6. a change in the ethical approach to the forest is needed.

  13. Controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a world experiencing anthropogenic and climatic-induced change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paerl, Hans W.; Hall, Nathan S.; Calandrino, Elizabeth S.

    2011-01-01

    Harmful (toxic, food web altering, hypoxia generating) cyanobacterial algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are proliferating world-wide due to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment, and they represent a serious threat to the use and sustainability of our freshwater resources. Traditionally, phosphorus (P) input reductions have been prescribed to control CyanoHABs, because P limitation is widespread and some CyanoHABs can fix atmospheric nitrogen (N 2 ) to satisfy their nitrogen (N) requirements. However, eutrophying systems are increasingly plagued with non N 2 fixing CyanoHABs that are N and P co-limited or even N limited. In many of these systems N loads are increasing faster than P loads. Therefore N and P input constraints are likely needed for long-term CyanoHAB control in such systems. Climatic changes, specifically warming, increased vertical stratification, salinization, and intensification of storms and droughts play additional, interactive roles in modulating CyanoHAB frequency, intensity, geographic distribution and duration. In addition to having to consider reductions in N and P inputs, water quality managers are in dire need of effective tools to break the synergy between nutrient loading and hydrologic regimes made more favorable for CyanoHABs by climate change. The more promising of these tools make affected waters less hospitable for CyanoHABs by 1) altering the hydrology to enhance vertical mixing and/or flushing and 2) decreasing nutrient fluxes from organic rich sediments by physically removing the sediments or capping sediments with clay. Effective future CyanoHAB management approaches must incorporate both N and P loading dynamics within the context of altered thermal and hydrologic regimes associated with climate change. - Research Highlights: → Toxic cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs) increasingly threaten global water supplies. → Human (nutrient) and climate (hydrology, temperature) changes synergistically promote CyanoHABs. → CyanoHAB control

  14. The importance of benthic-pelagic coupling for marine ecosystem functioning in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jennifer R; Kadin, Martina; Nascimento, Francisco J A; Tamelander, Tobias; Törnroos, Anna; Bonaglia, Stefano; Bonsdorff, Erik; Brüchert, Volker; Gårdmark, Anna; Järnström, Marie; Kotta, Jonne; Lindegren, Martin; Nordström, Marie C; Norkko, Alf; Olsson, Jens; Weigel, Benjamin; Žydelis, Ramunas; Blenckner, Thorsten; Niiranen, Susa; Winder, Monika

    2017-06-01

    Benthic-pelagic coupling is manifested as the exchange of energy, mass, or nutrients between benthic and pelagic habitats. It plays a prominent role in aquatic ecosystems, and it is crucial to functions from nutrient cycling to energy transfer in food webs. Coastal and estuarine ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by anthropogenic pressures; however, there are large gaps in our understanding of the responses of inorganic nutrient and organic matter fluxes between benthic habitats and the water column. We illustrate the varied nature of physical and biological benthic-pelagic coupling processes and their potential sensitivity to three anthropogenic pressures - climate change, nutrient loading, and fishing - using the Baltic Sea as a case study and summarize current knowledge on the exchange of inorganic nutrients and organic material between habitats. Traditionally measured benthic-pelagic coupling processes (e.g., nutrient exchange and sedimentation of organic material) are to some extent quantifiable, but the magnitude and variability of biological processes are rarely assessed, preventing quantitative comparisons. Changing oxygen conditions will continue to have widespread effects on the processes that govern inorganic and organic matter exchange among habitats while climate change and nutrient load reductions may have large effects on organic matter sedimentation. Many biological processes (predation, bioturbation) are expected to be sensitive to anthropogenic drivers, but the outcomes for ecosystem function are largely unknown. We emphasize how improved empirical and experimental understanding of benthic-pelagic coupling processes and their variability are necessary to inform models that can quantify the feedbacks among processes and ecosystem responses to a changing world. © 2017 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Managing forests in a changing world: the need for a systemic approach. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocentini, S.; Buttoud, G.; Ciancio, O.; Corona, P.

    2017-11-01

    Aim of study: The paper is a scientific commented discussion with the aim of defining a framework which allows both a comprehensive vision of forest dynamics, as well as an adaptive management approach and policy procedures more suited to a changing and inherently unpredictable world. Main results: We identify the main challenges facing forestry in relation to recent developments in forestry thinking, i.e. the paradox of aiming at sustainability in a changing environment, a shifting perception of the relationship between ecological and social systems, the recognition of forest ecosystems as complex adaptive systems, the need for integrating the social and ecological dimensions of forestry into a single framework, and the growing awareness of the importance of the ethical approach to the forest. We propose the concept of “systemic forestry” as a paradigm for better understanding forest dynamics and for guiding management and public actions at various levels. We compare the systemic approach with different silvicultural and forest management approaches which have been proposed in the last decades. Research highlights: Our analysis shows that a systemic approach to forestry has five main consequences: 1. forestry is viewed as a part of landscape dynamics through a multi-sectoral coordination, 2. the logic of action changes from norm to process, 3. conservation is a dynamic search for resilience, 4. multi-functionality is achieved through a multi-entries approach integrating ecological, social and economic components of sustainability, 5. forestry institutions are reframed to address the issue of changing interactions among actors, 6. a change in the ethical approach to the forest is needed.

  16. Managing forests in a changing world: the need for a systemic approach. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Nocentini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The paper is a scientific commented discussion with the aim of defining a framework which allows both a comprehensive vision of forest dynamics, as well as an adaptive management approach and policy procedures more suited to a changing and inherently unpredictable world. Main results: We identify the main challenges facing forestry in relation to recent developments in forestry thinking, i.e. the paradox of aiming at sustainability in a changing environment, a shifting perception of the relationship between ecological and social systems, the recognition of forest ecosystems as complex adaptive systems, the need for integrating the social and ecological dimensions of forestry into a single framework, and the growing awareness of the importance of the ethical approach to the forest. We propose the concept of “systemic forestry” as a paradigm for better understanding forest dynamics and for guiding management and public actions at various levels. We compare the systemic approach with different silvicultural and forest management approaches which have been proposed in the last decades. Research highlights: Our analysis shows that a systemic approach to forestry has five main consequences: 1. forestry is viewed as a part of landscape dynamics through a multi-sectoral coordination, 2. the logic of action changes from norm to process, 3. conservation is a dynamic search for resilience, 4. multi-functionality is achieved through a multi-entries approach integrating ecological, social and economic components of sustainability, 5. forestry institutions are reframed to address the issue of changing interactions among actors, 6. a change in the ethical approach to the forest is needed.

  17. Sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply. Political and legal challenges of the 21th century; Nachhaltigkeit, Energiewende, Klimawandel, Welternaehrung. Politische und rechtliche Herausforderungen des 21. Jahrhunderts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertel, Ines (ed.)

    2014-07-01

    The book on sustainability, energy policy, climatic change, world food supply as political challenges in the 21th century includes contributions on the following topics: sustainability and environment, energy and climatic change, agriculture and world food supply.

  18. Changing the world with hydrogen and nuclear: From past successes to shaping the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the past history of hydrogen and nuclear energy, while considering how they had been important forever, how they have been used to change the world when they were discovered and understood, and how they will likely shape our future to face specific challenges of the 21. century. Content: 1 - hydrogen and nuclear reactions at the origin of the universe: the universe and supernovae, the sun, the blue planet, the evolution of man; 2 - understanding and first uses of hydrogen: the discovery of hydrogen, hydrogen balloons, airships or dirigibles, the discovery of the electrolysis and the fuel cell, Jules Vernes; 3 - development of nuclear over the 20. century: pioneers of nuclear energy, Fermi reactor, EBR-1; 4 - development of hydrogen over the 20. century, expanding uses of hydrogen over the second half of the 20. century; 5 - four major endeavours gathering hydrogen and nuclear: light water reactors, naval reactors, nuclear rockets, controlled fusion, the PNP-500 project; 6 - stakes in hydrogen and nuclear production in the 21. century: energy challenge for the 21. century, peaking of fossil fuel production, renaissance of nuclear energy, changes in transportation model, hydrogen market, technologies for nuclear hydrogen production, carbon taxes, the path forward: international demonstrations towards industrialisation, a new generation of scientists for our dreams come true

  19. Major changes in the world's nuclear power at the beginning of the new century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrache, Ion

    2002-01-01

    In the last decade of the 20th century the world nuclear power recorded some characteristic trends among which one can mention the following: - Almost total absence of investments in new NPPs in the industrialized countries except Japan and South Korea; - Policy of some governments to decrease the nuclear power sector in their countries up to a complete stop of electricity production in a foreseeable future (as in case of Sweden, Germany, Nederland and Belgium); - Projections indicating a steady decline of nuclear share in the national power production as for instance in USA, Germany, Great Britain, and other industrialized countries; - pressures upon countries late owners of soviet type NPPs in order to shut down completely the RBMK and WWER reactors; - a drastic reduction of the funds afforded for research dedicated to fission reactors of new concept, except Japan and South Korea; - almost negligible effects of the Kyoto protocol upon nuclear power, hopes being directed towards renewable energy sources. After second half of the year 1998 modest signals of future changes in the energy policy occurred. The US government admitted on basis of performance assessments and projections that the important role of nuclear power in US will be extended still for long after the years 2020-2030. Consequently, research concerning the future demand for fission based power began be financed. Gradually the countries of EU and Canada modified also their official position towards the role of nuclear fission in ensuring the electric energy needs of the future. The beginning of the new century was marked by a significant acceleration of changes of opinions in favor of nuclear power. Japan and South Korea stated that at least in the first half of the 21th century the fission NPP's will play a major role. Russia promoted new WWER reactor types of safety standards equivalent or higher than the western ones. Also China and India launched ambitious plans for building new NPPs. These new

  20. A Crisis Framework Applied to Macrosociological Family Changes: Marriage, Divorce, and Occupational Trends Associated with World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman-Blumen, Jean

    1975-01-01

    A typology of crises is developed to be used with critical aspects of the social system to predict both crisis and postcrisis period role changes. The crisis framework is then applied to macro-changes in family structure in response to an archetypal crisis, World War II. Census data generally support the hypotheses. (Author)

  1. The Challenge of Ensuring Persistency of Identifier Systems in the World of Ever-Changing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Car

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of information objects has always been important with library collections with indexes having been created in the most ancient times. Since the digital age, many specialised and generic persistent identifier (PID systems have been used to identify digital objects. Just as many ancient indexes have died over time, so too PID systems have had a lifecycle from inception to active phase to paralysis, and eventually a fall into oblivion. Where the indexes within the Great Library at Alexandria finally succumbed to fire, technology change has been the destroyer of more recent digital indexes. We distil four PID system design principles from observations over the years that we think should be implemented by PID system architects to ensure that their systems survive change. The principles: describe how to ensure identifiers’ system and organisation independence; codify the delivery of essential PID system functions; mandate a separation of PID functions from data delivery mechanisms; and require generation of policies detailing how change is handled. In addition to suggesting specific items for each principle, we propose that a platform-independent model (PIM be established for persistent identifiers – of any sort and with any resolver technology – in order to enable transition between present and future systems and the preservation of the identifiers’ functioning. We detail our PID system—the PID Service—that implements the proposed principles and a data model to some extent and we describe an implementation case study of an organisation’s implementation of PID systems that implement the Pillars further but still not completely. Penultimately, we describe in a Future Work section, an opportunity for the use of both the Pillars and the PIM; that of the World Wide Web Consortium’s Permanent Identifier Community Group who is seeking to “set up and maintain a secure permanent, URL re-direction service for the web”.

  2. Potential applications of skip SMV with thrust engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilin; Savvaris, Al

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the potential applications of Space Maneuver Vehicles (SMV) with skip trajectory. Due to soaring space operations over the past decades, the risk of space debris has considerably increased such as collision risks with space asset, human property on ground and even aviation. Many active debris removal methods have been investigated and in this paper, a debris remediation method is first proposed based on skip SMV. The key point is to perform controlled re-entry. These vehicles are expected to achieve a trans-atmospheric maneuver with thrust engine. If debris is released at altitude below 80 km, debris could be captured by the atmosphere drag force and re-entry interface prediction accuracy is improved. Moreover if the debris is released in a cargo at a much lower altitude, this technique protects high value space asset from break up by the atmosphere and improves landing accuracy. To demonstrate the feasibility of this concept, the present paper presents the simulation results for two specific mission profiles: (1) descent to predetermined altitude; (2) descent to predetermined point (altitude, longitude and latitude). The evolutionary collocation method is adopted for skip trajectory optimization due to its global optimality and high-accuracy. This method is actually a two-step optimization approach based on the heuristic algorithm and the collocation method. The optimal-control problem is transformed into a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) which can be efficiently and accurately solved by the sequential quadratic programming (SQP) procedure. However, such a method is sensitive to initial values. To reduce the sensitivity problem, genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to refine the grids and provide near optimum initial values. By comparing the simulation data from different scenarios, it is found that skip SMV is feasible in active debris removal and the evolutionary collocation method gives a truthful re-entry trajectory that satisfies the

  3. Integration of World Knowledge and Temporary Information about Changes in an Object's Environmental Location during Different Stages of Sentence Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuqian Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings have shown that information about changes in an object's environmental location in the context of discourse is stored in working memory during sentence comprehension. However, in these studies, changes in the object's location were always consistent with world knowledge (e.g., in “The writer picked up the pen from the floor and moved it to the desk,” the floor and the desk are both common locations for a pen. How do people accomplish comprehension when the object-location information in working memory is inconsistent with world knowledge (e.g., a pen being moved from the floor to the bathtub? In two visual world experiments, with a “look-and-listen” task, we used eye-tracking data to investigate comprehension of sentences that described location changes under different conditions of appropriateness (i.e., the object and its location were typically vs. unusually coexistent, based on world knowledge and antecedent context (i.e., contextual information that did vs. did not temporarily normalize unusual coexistence between object and location. Results showed that listeners' retrieval of the critical location was affected by both world knowledge and working memory, and the effect of world knowledge was reduced when the antecedent context normalized unusual coexistence of object and location. More importantly, activation of world knowledge and working memory seemed to change during the comprehension process. These results are important because they demonstrate that interference between world knowledge and information in working memory, appears to be activated dynamically during sentence comprehension.

  4. Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Sustainable Development in a Changing World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Important changes concerning nuclear energy are coming to the fore, such as economic competitiveness compared to other energy resources, requirement for severe measures to mitigate man-made greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, due to the rise of energy demand in Central and Eastern Europe and Asia and to the greater public concern with respect to the nuclear safety, particularly related to spent fuel and radioactive waste disposal. Global safety culture, as well as well focused nuclear research and development programs for safer and more efficient nuclear technology manifest themselves in a stronger and effective way. Information and data on nuclear technology and safety are disseminated to the public in timely, accurate and understandable fashion. Nuclear power is an important contributor to the world's electricity needs. In 1999, it supplied roughly one sixth of global electricity. The largest regional percentage of electricity generated through nuclear power last year was in western Europe (30%). The nuclear power shares in France, Belgium and Sweden were 75%, 58% and 47%, respectively. In North America, the nuclear share was 20% for the USA and 12% for Canada. In Asia, the highest figures were 43% for the Republic of Korea and 36% for Japan. In 1998, twenty-three nations produced uranium of which, the ten biggest producers (Australia, Canada, Kazakhstan, Namibia, Niger, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Ukraine, USA and Uzbekistan) supplied over 90% of the world's output. In 1998, world uranium production provided only about 59% of world reactor requirements. In OECD countries, the 1998 production could only satisfy 39% of the demand. The rest of the requirements were satisfied by secondary sources including civilian and military stockpiles, uranium reprocessing and re-enrichment of depleted uranium. With regard to the nuclear fuel industry, an increase in fuel burnup, higher thermal rates, longer fuel cycle and the use of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX

  5. Kinematic characteristics of motor patterns in rope skipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique da Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Rope skipping seems to be an easy task to be performed. However, careful analysis of this motor skill shows how complex the execution of this task is. The objective of this study was to examine kinematic variables of jump patterns as a function of skipping frequency. Eight male university students performed a sequence of 30 rope jumps using two jump patterns (alternating support of the feet and simultaneous support of the feet at three skipping frequencies (1.5, 1.7,1.9 Hz. Frequencies were determined with a digital metronome and the rope was turned by the student himself. Rope jumping performance was recorded with two digital cameras for 3Danalysis. Passive markers were attached to the rope and to the ankle, knee and hip joints forcollection of the following dependent variables: continuous relative phase, time interval betweenthe loss of contact of the feet with the ground and cross of the rope under the feet of the volunteer,jump height, and rope height. ANOVA showed that for the pattern with alternating support ofthe feet the jump is executed at a lower height. In addition, analysis of the time interval revealeda delay in the withdrawal of the feet for crossing the rope in the case of the jump pattern with simultaneous support of the feet.

  6. Translational and regulatory challenges for exon skipping therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ferlini, Alessandra; Goemans, Nathalie; Pasmooij, Anna M G; Wells, Dominic J; Bushby, Katerine; Vroom, Elizabeth; Balabanov, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Several translational challenges are currently impeding the therapeutic development of antisense-mediated exon skipping approaches for rare diseases. Some of these are inherent to developing therapies for rare diseases, such as small patient numbers and limited information on natural history and interpretation of appropriate clinical outcome measures. Others are inherent to the antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping approach, which employs small modified DNA or RNA molecules to manipulate the splicing process. This is a new approach and only limited information is available on long-term safety and toxicity for most AON chemistries. Furthermore, AONs often act in a mutation-specific manner, in which case multiple AONs have to be developed for a single disease. A workshop focusing on preclinical development, trial design, outcome measures, and different forms of marketing authorization was organized by the regulatory models and biochemical outcome measures working groups of Cooperation of Science and Technology Action: "Networking towards clinical application of antisense-mediated exon skipping for rare diseases." The workshop included participants from patient organizations, academia, and members of staff from the European Medicine Agency and Medicine Evaluation Board (the Netherlands). This statement article contains the key outcomes of this meeting.

  7. A business to change the world – moral responsibility in textbooks for International Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Andersson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an empirical analysis of textbooks for International Economics in upper secondary schools with a focus on moral responsibility for environment and society. The purpose is to analyse the meanings offered to students regarding the scope of taking moral responsibility in relation to the role of a business person. Four different meanings are formulated as a result of the study: one states that a business only can take responsibility inorder to obey laws and respond to consumer demands, a second and third meaning imply that, a business can make demands, to different extents, on subcontractors. A fourth meaning includes that a business (apart from making profit also can be a tool for change. The different meanings are discussed in relation to different functions of education (Biesta 2008, Säfström 2005 and Education for Sustainable Development. The main argument is that a tool forchange-meaning, contributing to a subjectification function of education, ought to have an increased space in education, if we want students who are engaged in sustainability issues regarding the environment and the society also to see a future working within the business world. This is equally important if we want business students to see a future working for sustainable development.

  8. Le imprese internazionali in un mondo in mutamento. (International business in a changing world environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. DUNNING

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Il documento considera alcuni aspetti dell'interfaccia tra le attività internazionali - soprattutto sotto le spoglie della multinazionale - e ai governi dei paesi che ospitano le sue attività . Inoltre , esso tiene conto del mutato scenario economico e politico mondiale. L'autore delinea come, perché e cosa ,  questa interfaccia è stato modellato negligli eventi degli ultimi 25 anni , speculando circa le prospettive per il resto del 20 ° secolo The paper considers some aspects of the interface between international business - primarily in the guise of the multinational enterprise - and the Governments of the countries which are host to its activities. Furthermore, it takes into account the changing world economic and political scenario. The author outlines why, how and in what ways this interface has been shaped by, or has shaped, the events of the past 25 years, before speculating about the prospects for the remainder of the 20th century.JEL: E23

  9. A Change of Heart? British Policies towards Tubercular Refugees during 1959 World Refugee Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Becky

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at Britain's response to the World Refugee Year (1959-60), and in particular the government's decision to allow entry to refugees with tuberculosis and other chronic illnesses. In doing so, it broke the practice established by the 1920 Aliens' Order which had barred entry to immigrants with a range of medical conditions. This article uses the entry of these sick refugees as an opportunity to explore whether government policy represented as much of a shift in attitude and practice as contemporary accounts suggested. It argues for the importance of setting the reception of tubercular and other 'disabled' refugees in 1959-61 in its very particular historical context, showing it was a case less of the government thinking differently about refugees, and more of how, in a post-Suez context, the government felt obliged to take into account international and public opinion. The work builds on and adds to the growing literature surrounding refugees and disease. It also places the episode within the specificity of the post-war changing epidemiological climate; the creation of the National Health Service; and the welfare state more broadly. In looking at the role of refugee organizations in the Year, the article also contributes to debates over the place of voluntary agencies within British society.

  10. Past, Present, and Future of Psychosomatic Movements in an Ever-Changing World: Presidential Address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph

    The American Psychosomatic Society was founded in 1942 and is celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2017. In recognizing the society's anniversary, this article provides a historical perspective on its history, the field of psychosomatic medicine in general, and anticipated future directions. Essay and narrative review of the literature on the historic development of psychosomatic concepts and their impact on medicine over time. Mind-body associations have been described in the medical literature for more than 3500 years. Early concepts of mind-body dualism and attempts to overcome them are found in classical Greek medicine. Psychosomatic thinking can be observed ever since, but only in the 20th century, a "psychosomatic movement" emerged in Europe and North America, aiming at humanizing medicine by introducing a holistic understanding of man into what was considered a widely reductionistic practice of medicine. This movement led to the inauguration of the American Psychosomatic Society during World War II and of national and international societies of psychosomatic medicine and its subspecializations thereafter. Psychosomatic medicine has its roots in the beginnings of medicine. During the past 75 years, it has made substantial contributions to the science and practice of medicine. The field has also changed in response to developments in medicine, technology, and society and is facing new challenges and opportunities that may require further adaptation of its concepts and practice.

  11. Agriculture and natural resources in a changing world - the role of irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, T.; Havlík, P.; Schneider, U. A.; Kindermann, G.; Obersteiner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Fertile land and fresh water constitute two of the most fundamental resources for food production. These resources are affected by environmental, political, economic, and technical developments. Regional impacts may transmit to the world through increased trade. With a global forest and agricultural sector model, we quantify the impacts of increased demand for food due to population growth and economic development on potential land and water use. In particular, we investigate producer adaptation regarding crop and irrigation choice, agricultural market adjustments, and changes in the values of land and water. Against the background of resource sustainability and food security topics, this study integrates the spatial and operational heterogeneity of irrigation management into a global land use model. It represents a first large scale assessment of agricultural water use under explicit consideration of alternative irrigation options in their particular biophysical, economic, and technical context, accounting for international trade, motivation-based farming, and quantified aggregated impacts on land scarcity, water scarcity, and food supply. The inclusion of technical and economic aspects of irrigation choice into an integrated land use modeling framework provides new insights into the interdisciplinary trade-offs between determinants of global land use change. Agricultural responses to population and economic growth include considerable increases in irrigated area and agricultural water use, but reductions in the average water intensity. Different irrigation systems are preferred under different exogenous biophysical and socioeconomic conditions. Negligence of these adaptations would bias the burden of development on land and water scarcity. Without technical progress in agriculture, predicted population and income levels for 2030 would require substantial price adjustments for land, water, and food to equilibrate supply and demand.

  12. Model or Myopia? Exploiting Water Markets to Address Population and Drought Risks in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change, population demands, and evolving land-use represent strong risks to the sustainable development and stability of world-wide urban water supplies. There is a growing consensus that non-structural supply management instruments such as water markets have significant potential to reduce the risks and vulnerabilities in complex urban water systems. This paper asks a common question, what are the tradeoffs for a city using water market supply instruments?. This question emerges quickly in policy and management, but its answer is deceptively difficult to attain using traditional planning tools and management frameworks. This research demonstrates new frameworks that facilitate rapid evaluation of hypotheses on the reliability, resiliency, adaptability, and cost-effectiveness of urban water supply systems. This study considers a broader exploration of the issues of "nonstationarity" and "uncertainty" in urban water planning. As we invest in new information and prediction frameworks for the coupled human-natural systems that define our water, our problem definitions (i.e., objectives, constraints, preferences, and hypotheses) themselves evolve. From a formal mathematical perspective, this means that our management problems are structurally uncertain and nonstationary (i.e., the definition of optimality changes across regions, times, and stakeholders). This uncertainty and nonstationarity in our problem definitions needs to be more explicitly acknowledged in adaptive management and integrated water resources management. This study demonstrates the potential benefits of exploring these issues in the context of a city in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas, USA determining how to use its regional water market to manage population and drought risks.

  13. Non-equilbrium dynamics of ecosystem processes in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Joseph Pignatello

    The relatively mild and stable climate of the last 10,000 years betrays a history of environmental variability and rapid changes. Humans have recently accelerated global environmental change, ushering in the Anthropocene. Meeting accelerating demands for food, energy, and goods and services has accelerated species extinctions, shows of reactive nitrogen and phosphorus, and warming of the atmosphere. I address the over- arching question of how ecosystems will respond to changing and variable environments through several focused studies. Each study examines an ecosystem response to ex- pected environmental changes in the future. To address how the changing environment affects the sizes and turnover rates of slowly and quickly cycling soil carbon pools, I analyzed the responses of grassland soils to simulated species diversity loss, increased deposition of nitrogen and increased atmospheric CO2. I used a soil respiration experiment to fit models of soil carbon pool turnover to respired carbon dioxide. Species diversity, nitrogen deposition and atmospheric CO2 had no effect on the total soil carbon after 8 years of treatments. Although total soil carbon did not change, the rates of cycling in the fast and slow pools changed in response to elevated CO2 and diversity loss treatments. Nitrogen treatments increased the size of the slowly cycling carbon pool. Precipitation variability has increased around most of the world since the industrial revolution. I used plant mesocosms in a greenhouse experiment to manipulate rainfall variability and mycorrhizal associations. I hypothesized that 1) rewetting events re- sult in higher nitrogen uxes from dry soils than moist soils, 2) a repeated pattern of events caused by low-frequency simulated rainfall results in higher nitrogen uxes and 3) the better ability of ectomycorrhizal fungi relative to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to decompose and assimilate organic nitrogen reduces leaching losses of nitrogen caused by both rewetting

  14. Naturally occurring deletions of hunchback binding sites in the even-skipped stripe 3+7 enhancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnar Palsson

    Full Text Available Changes in regulatory DNA contribute to phenotypic differences within and between taxa. Comparative studies show that many transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are conserved between species whereas functional studies reveal that some mutations segregating within species alter TFBS function. Consistently, in this analysis of 13 regulatory elements in Drosophila melanogaster populations, single base and insertion/deletion polymorphism are rare in characterized regulatory elements. Experimentally defined TFBS are nearly devoid of segregating mutations and, as has been shown before, are quite conserved. For instance 8 of 11 Hunchback binding sites in the stripe 3+7 enhancer of even-skipped are conserved between D. melanogaster and Drosophila virilis. Oddly, we found a 72 bp deletion that removes one of these binding sites (Hb8, segregating within D. melanogaster. Furthermore, a 45 bp deletion polymorphism in the spacer between the stripe 3+7 and stripe 2 enhancers, removes another predicted Hunchback site. These two deletions are separated by ∼250 bp, sit on distinct haplotypes, and segregate at appreciable frequency. The Hb8Δ is at 5 to 35% frequency in the new world, but also shows cosmopolitan distribution. There is depletion of sequence variation on the Hb8Δ-carrying haplotype. Quantitative genetic tests indicate that Hb8Δ affects developmental time, but not viability of offspring. The Eve expression pattern differs between inbred lines, but the stripe 3 and 7 boundaries seem unaffected by Hb8Δ. The data reveal segregating variation in regulatory elements, which may reflect evolutionary turnover of characterized TFBS due to drift or co-evolution.

  15. Naturally occurring deletions of hunchback binding sites in the even-skipped stripe 3+7 enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsson, Arnar; Wesolowska, Natalia; Reynisdóttir, Sigrún; Ludwig, Michael Z; Kreitman, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Changes in regulatory DNA contribute to phenotypic differences within and between taxa. Comparative studies show that many transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are conserved between species whereas functional studies reveal that some mutations segregating within species alter TFBS function. Consistently, in this analysis of 13 regulatory elements in Drosophila melanogaster populations, single base and insertion/deletion polymorphism are rare in characterized regulatory elements. Experimentally defined TFBS are nearly devoid of segregating mutations and, as has been shown before, are quite conserved. For instance 8 of 11 Hunchback binding sites in the stripe 3+7 enhancer of even-skipped are conserved between D. melanogaster and Drosophila virilis. Oddly, we found a 72 bp deletion that removes one of these binding sites (Hb8), segregating within D. melanogaster. Furthermore, a 45 bp deletion polymorphism in the spacer between the stripe 3+7 and stripe 2 enhancers, removes another predicted Hunchback site. These two deletions are separated by ∼250 bp, sit on distinct haplotypes, and segregate at appreciable frequency. The Hb8Δ is at 5 to 35% frequency in the new world, but also shows cosmopolitan distribution. There is depletion of sequence variation on the Hb8Δ-carrying haplotype. Quantitative genetic tests indicate that Hb8Δ affects developmental time, but not viability of offspring. The Eve expression pattern differs between inbred lines, but the stripe 3 and 7 boundaries seem unaffected by Hb8Δ. The data reveal segregating variation in regulatory elements, which may reflect evolutionary turnover of characterized TFBS due to drift or co-evolution.

  16. The World Bank: Changing Leadership and Issues for the United States and Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiss, Martin A

    2005-01-01

    .... The focus of the next World Bank President likely will be on many development issues including global humanitarian and reconstruction assistance and debt relief for the poorest countries, among others. Congress has a significant role in shaping U.S. policy at the World Bank through funding arrangements and oversight responsibility. This report will be updated as events warrant.

  17. Social Inequalities in Young Children's Meal Skipping Behaviors: The Generation R Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne I Wijtzes

    Full Text Available Regular meal consumption is considered an important aspect of a healthy diet. While ample evidence shows social inequalities in breakfast skipping among adolescents, little is known about social inequalities in breakfast skipping and skipping of other meals among young school-aged children. Such information is crucial in targeting interventions aimed to promote a healthy diet in children.We examined data from 4704 ethnically diverse children participating in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Information on family socioeconomic position (SEP, ethnic background, and meal skipping behaviors was assessed by parent-reported questionnaire when the child was 6 years old. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations of family SEP (educational level, household income, employment status, family composition and ethnic background with meal skipping behaviors, using high SEP children and native Dutch children as reference groups.Meal skipping prevalence ranged from 3% (dinner to 11% (lunch. The prevalence of meal skipping was higher among low SEP children and ethnic minority children. Maternal educational level was independently associated with breakfast skipping ([low maternal educational level] OR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.24,3.94. Paternal educational level was independently associated with lunch skipping ([low paternal educational level] OR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.06,2.20 and dinner skipping ([mid-high paternal educational level] OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.20,0.76. Household income was independently associated with breakfast skipping ([low income] OR: 2.43, 95% CI: 1.40,4.22 and dinner skipping ([low income] OR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.22,4.91. In general, ethnic minority children were more likely to skip breakfast, lunch, and dinner compared with native Dutch children. Adjustment for family SEP attenuated the associations of ethnic minority background with meal skipping behaviors

  18. Human activities and climate variability drive fast-paced change across the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Abreu, Paulo C.; Carstensen, Jacob; Chauvaud, Laurent; Elmgren, Ragnar; Grall, Jacques; Greening, Holly; Johansson, John O.R.; Kahru, Mati; Sherwood, Edward T.; Xu, Jie; Yin, Kedong

    2016-01-01

    Time series of environmental measurements are essential for detecting, measuring and understanding changes in the Earth system and its biological communities. Observational series have accumulated over the past 2–5 decades from measurements across the world's estuaries, bays, lagoons, inland seas and shelf waters influenced by runoff. We synthesize information contained in these time series to develop a global view of changes occurring in marine systems influenced by connectivity to land. Our review is organized around four themes: (i) human activities as drivers of change; (ii) variability of the climate system as a driver of change; (iii) successes, disappointments and challenges of managing change at the sea-land interface; and (iv) discoveries made from observations over time. Multidecadal time series reveal that many of the world's estuarine–coastal ecosystems are in a continuing state of change, and the pace of change is faster than we could have imagined a decade ago. Some have been transformed into novel ecosystems with habitats, biogeochemistry and biological communities outside the natural range of variability. Change takes many forms including linear and nonlinear trends, abrupt state changes and oscillations. The challenge of managing change is daunting in the coastal zone where diverse human pressures are concentrated and intersect with different responses to climate variability over land and over ocean basins. The pace of change in estuarine–coastal ecosystems will likely accelerate as the human population and economies continue to grow and as global climate change accelerates. Wise stewardship of the resources upon which we depend is critically dependent upon a continuing flow of information from observations to measure, understand and anticipate future changes along the world's coastlines.

  19. «To change the world»: justice or utopia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Douglas Price

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay plays, in an  ironic way, similarly to Jorge Luis Borges’ style, with the idea that the expression to change the world: justice or utopia, which is not found in Quixote, could undoubtedly have been excluded of it, or invented by an anonymous author, a habitual resource in the Middle Ages. It points out that we are in the presence of works that somehow mark the beginning of the concept of “author” and, paradoxically, question it, as Cervantes does deliberately, or as portrayed in the difficulties to establish the verisimilitude of the authorship of the works by the English bard. And this is done  in order to work not only with the coincidence of the dates of their deaths (which grants space for another Borges-like game, but also with their contribution to the formation of the Western cultural universe, which made Bloom exaggerate in the attribution to Shakespeare of “inventing the human”, but to formulate the opposition of two ethics between two emblematic characters, such as Quixote and Lady Macbeth: ethics, which we shall call “of duty”, from which the concept of utopia is built, present in Erasmus Of Rotterdam’s work (of great influence in the Spain of Cervantes and of Thomas Morus; And the ethics that we will call pragmatic, the ethics of Lady Macbeth, who prescribes to her husband the advice of Nicholas Machiavelli. In short, this paper concludes that Cervantes and Shakespeare inaugurated modernity, and the ideas found in their works, which were present in the production of sense of their time, in turn altered it (given the performative effect of literature; And that their remarkable personalities, united by the invisible thread of “madness”, allowed us to see the two faces of the human, as the Sileni of Alcibiades.

  20. Time for a New Agenda: Organizational Development in a Changing world with much Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik B.

    2017-01-01

    organizations neglect to support a disruptive strategy. By demonstrating the existence of another development path, this paper attempts, from a theoretical point of view, to give a new and a more nuanced perspective on organizational development in a disruptive world. This new path is supportive in a disruptive......Abstract – Traditional organizational theory tends to point out that organizational development follows a certain pattern where the structure of the company is said to become ever more bureaucratic. However, in a world where all companies and industries are faced with disruption, bureaucratic...... world. The aim of the paper is to answer the following research question: How can companies manage processes of organizational development and structures to avoid the bureaucracy and potential crises of the traditional approach in a disruptive world? This research question is important because...

  1. How Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Spontaneously Attend to Real-World Scenes: Use of a Change Blindness Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhauser, Michal; Aran, Adi; Grynszpan, Ouriel

    2018-01-01

    Visual attention of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was assessed using a change blindness paradigm. Twenty-five adolescents with ASD aged 12-18 years and 25 matched typically developing (TD) adolescents viewed 36 pairs of digitized real-world images. Each pair of images was displayed in a "flicker paradigm" whereby a…

  2. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World Past Issues / ... stage for further expansion of medical ultrasound into new areas." To ... ultrasound technology: www.youtube.com/watch?v=6n8xZECzEck& feature= ...

  3. Climate change adaptation under uncertainty in the developing world: A case study of sea level rise in Kiribati

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, S. D.; Webber, S.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact in parts of the developing world. At the 2010 meeting of U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in Cancun, industrialized countries agreed in principle to provide US$100 billion per year by 2020 to assist the developing world respond to climate change. This "Green Climate Fund" is a critical step towards addressing the challenge of climate change. However, the policy and discourse on supporting adaptation in the developing world remains highly idealized. For example, the efficacy of "no regrets" adaptation efforts or "mainstreaming" adaptation into decision-making are rarely evaluated in the real world. In this presentation, I will discuss the gap between adaptation theory and practice using a multi-year case study of the cultural, social and scientific obstacles to adapting to sea level rise in the Pacific atoll nation of Kiribati. Our field research reveals how scientific and institutional uncertainty can limit international efforts to fund adaptation and lead to spiraling costs. Scientific uncertainty about hyper-local impacts of sea level rise, though irreducible, can at times limit decision-making about adaptation measures, contrary to the notion that "good" decision-making practices can incorporate scientific uncertainty. Efforts to improve institutional capacity must be done carefully, or they risk inadvertently slowing the implementation of adaptation measures and increasing the likelihood of "mal"-adaptation.

  4. The Changing Face of World Cities. Young Adult Children of Immigrants in Europe and the United States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crul, M.R.J.; Mollenkopf, J.

    2012-01-01

    A seismic population shift is taking place as many formerly racially homogeneous cities in the West attract a diverse influx of newcomers seeking economic and social advancement. In The Changing Face of World Cities, a distinguished group of immigration experts presents the first systematic,

  5. Structural changes in the world energy supply - adaptations up to current and future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuermann, H.J.

    1985-03-11

    In this analysis of world energy markets in which he pays particular attention to mineral oil, and with a background of world economic problems which have not yet been solved, the author presents a piece of modern economic history in which he also highlights the political aspects of the supply of crude oil. The world-wide contraction in oil consumption which followed two price escalations, has been caused, it is held by structural factors and is therefore of a long-term nature. Of course, in the foreseeable future, oil will easily remain the most important energy-carrier. However, it will be of less importance for Western Europe and Japan than for North America, trading states and developing countries. Nevertheless, diversification should be encouraged as quickly as possible. This does include natural gas still but for the long-term also coal and atomic energy. The author pleads for world-wide trade relations based on coal and gas in order to complement the fully integrated world oil markets. Similarly atomic energy should be developed as quickly as possible.

  6. The Fate of the World is in your hands: computer gaming for multi-faceted climate change education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is a multi-faceted (or 'wicked') problem. True climate literacy therefore requires understanding not only the workings of the climate system, but also the current and potential future impacts of climate change and sea level rise on individuals, communities and countries around the world, as noted in the US Global Change Research Program's (2009) Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. The asymmetric nature of climate change impacts, whereby the world's poorest countries have done the least to cause the problem but will suffer disproportionate consequences, has also been widely noted. Education in climate literacy therefore requires an element of ethics in addition to physical and social sciences. As if addressing these multiple aspects of climate change were not challenging enough, polling data has repeatedly shown that many members of the public tend to see climate change as a far away problem affecting people remote from them at a point in the future, but not themselves. This perspective is likely shared by many students. Computer gaming provides a possible solution to the combined problems of, on the one hand, addressing the multi-faceted nature of climate change, and, on the other hand, making the issue real to students. Fate of the World, a game produced by the company Red Redemption, has been used on several occasions in a small (20-30 students) introductory level general education course on global warming at Weber State University. Players are required to balance difficult decisions about energy investment while managing regional political disputes and attempting to maintain minimum levels of development in the world's poorer countries. By providing a realistic "total immersion" experience, the game has the potential to make climate change issues more immediate to players, and presents them with the ethical dilemmas inherent in climate change. This presentation reports on the use of Fate of the World in an educational

  7. O vzniku a činnosti SKIP v letech 1968 - 1970

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burgetová, Jarmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2008), s. 26-28 ISSN 1210-0927 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70830501 Keywords : Association of Library and Information Professionals (SKIP)- foundation in 1968 * Association of Library and Information Professionals (SKIP) - activities in 1968-1970 Subject RIV: AF - Documentation, Librarianship, Information Studies

  8. Deep Temporal Models using Identity Skip-Connections for Speech Emotion Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jaebok; Englebienne, Gwenn; Truong, Khiet P.; Evers, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Deep architectures using identity skip-connections have demonstrated groundbreaking performance in the field of image classification. Recently, empirical studies suggested that identity skip-connections enable ensemble-like behaviour of shallow networks, and that depth is not a solo ingredient for

  9. 26 CFR 26.2611-1 - Generation-skipping transfer defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND GIFT TAXES GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1986 § 26.2611... either a direct skip, a taxable distribution, or a taxable termination. See § 26.2612-1 for the definition of these terms. The determination as to whether an event is a GST is made by reference to the most...

  10. Word skipping: effects of word length, predictability, spelling and reading skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Timothy J; Yates, Mark

    2017-08-31

    Readers eyes often skip over words as they read. Skipping rates are largely determined by word length; short words are skipped more than long words. However, the predictability of a word in context also impacts skipping rates. Rayner, Slattery, Drieghe and Liversedge (2011) reported an effect of predictability on word skipping for even long words (10-13 characters) that extend beyond the word identification span. Recent research suggests that better readers and spellers have an enhanced perceptual span (Veldre & Andrews, 2014). We explored whether reading and spelling skill interact with word length and predictability to impact word skipping rates in a large sample (N=92) of average and poor adult readers. Participants read the items from Rayner et al. (2011) while their eye movements were recorded. Spelling skill (zSpell) was assessed using the dictation and recognition tasks developed by Sally Andrews and colleagues. Reading skill (zRead) was assessed from reading speed (words per minute) and accuracy of three 120 word passages each with 10 comprehension questions. We fit linear mixed models to the target gaze duration data and generalized linear mixed models to the target word skipping data. Target word gaze durations were significantly predicted by zRead while, the skipping likelihoods were significantly predicted by zSpell. Additionally, for gaze durations, zRead significantly interacted with word predictability as better readers relied less on context to support word processing. These effects are discussed in relation to the lexical quality hypothesis and eye movement models of reading.

  11. On the contribution of demographic change to aggregate poverty measures for the developing world

    OpenAIRE

    Ravallion, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Recent literature and new data help determine plausible bounds to some key demographic differences between the poor and non-poor in the developing world. The author estimates that selective mortality-whereby poorer people tend to have higher death rates-accounts for 10-30 percent of the developing world's trend rate of "$1 a day" poverty reduction in the 1990s. However, in a neighborhood of plausible estimates, differential fertility-whereby poorer people tend also to have higher birth rates-...

  12. Eye movements and word skipping during reading: Effects of word length and predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Keith; Slattery, Timothy J.; Drieghe, Denis; Liversedge, Simon P.

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which target words were predictable from prior context was varied: half of the target words were predictable and the other half were unpredictable. In addition, the length of the target word varied: the target words were short (4–6 letters), medium (7–9 letters), or long (10–12 letters). Length and predictability both yielded strong effects on the probability of skipping the target words and on the amount of time readers fixated the target words (when they were not skipped). However, there was no interaction in any of the measures examined for either skipping or fixation time. The results demonstrate that word predictability (due to contextual constraint) and word length have strong and independent influences on word skipping and fixation durations. Furthermore, since the long words extended beyond the word identification span, the data indicate that skipping can occur on the basis of partial information in relation to word identity. PMID:21463086

  13. Changing Acceptable Occupations for Military and Civilian Women: The Effects of Two World Wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calene, Mary L.

    The perception of what are considered acceptable occupations for women has changed considerably over the last century, just as the role of women in American homelife has changed. This thesis researches the changing role of American women and the effects of this changed role on occupations outside the home. The emphasis is on the long-term effects…

  14. Orderly Change in a Stable World: The Antisocial Trait as a Chimera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Gerald R.

    1993-01-01

    Used longitudinal data from Oregon Youth Study to examine quantitative and qualitative change. Used latent growth models to demonstrate changes in form and systematic changes in mean level for subgroup of boys. Factor analyses carried out at three ages showed that, over time, changes in form and addition of new problems were quantifiable and thus…

  15. Driving Technological Surprise: DARPA’s Mission in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    fundamental ways. Our research, innovation, and entrepreneurial capacity is the envy of the world, but others are building universities, labs, and...through deep engagement with companies, universities, and DoD and other labs. Our success hinges on having a healthy U.S. R&D ecosystem . Within

  16. Initiatives for Change in Korean Higher Education: Quest for Excellence of World-Class Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jean S.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of World-Class Universities (WCUs) is noted as a paramount development in the realm of international higher education. The integration of higher education into a more international scheme has enabled for higher education institutions (HEIs) to have a broader impact on the states and their respective citizens. This study examines…

  17. Learning World Culture or Changing It? Human Rights Education and the Police in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how local law enforcers in India respond to NGO efforts to disseminate world culture through human rights education. Law enforcement officers do not merely decouple from human rights discourse by superficially endorsing it. They also go further than infusing rights with local meaning. Officers use the language and logic of…

  18. Adapting to Change in a Master Level Real-World-Projects Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappert, Charles C.; Stix, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Our mission of capstone computing courses for the past ten years has been to offer students experience with the development of real-world information technology projects. This experience has included both the hard and soft skills required for the work they could expect as industrial practitioners. Hard skills entail extending one's knowledge…

  19. Changing eating habits on the home front: Lost lessons from World War II research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, B.

    2002-01-01

    Programs intended to improve nutrition often fall short of expectations. One exception, however, occurred during the rationing years of World War II, when U.S. citizens were encouraged to incorporate protein-rich organ meats into their protein-deficient diets. Unfortunately,, most of tire insights

  20. Attitude and Self-Efficacy Change: English Language Learning in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dongping; Young, Michael F.; Brewer, Robert A.; Wagner, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    This study explored affective factors in learning English as a foreign language in a 3D game-like virtual world, Quest Atlantis (QA). Through the use of communication tools (e.g., chat, bulletin board, telegrams, and email), 3D avatars, and 2D webpage navigation tools in virtual space, nonnative English speakers (NNES) co-solved online…