WorldWideScience

Sample records for changing polarization structures

  1. Polarized Raman spectroscopy unravels the biomolecular structural changes in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Amuthachelvi; Prakasarao, Aruna; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising technique giving a wealth of information about the orientation and symmetry of bond vibrations in addition to the general chemical information from the conventional Raman spectroscopy. In this regard, polarized Raman Spectroscopic technique was employed to study the changes in the orientation of biomolecules in normal and cancerous conditions. This technique was compared to the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique and was found to yield additional information about the orientation of tyrosine, collagen and DNA. The statistically analyzed depolarization ratios by Linear Discriminant Analysis yielded better accuracy than the statistical results of conventional Raman spectroscopy. Thus, this study reveals that polarized Raman spectroscopy has better diagnostic potential than the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique.

  2. Dynamical changes of the polar cap potential structure: an information theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Coco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some features, such as vortex structures often observed through a wide spread of spatial scales, suggest that ionospheric convection is turbulent and complex in nature. Here, applying concepts from information theory and complex system physics, we firstly evaluate a pseudo Shannon entropy, H, associated with the polar cap potential obtained from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN and, then, estimate the degree of disorder and the degree of complexity of ionospheric convection under different Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF conditions. The aforementioned quantities are computed starting from time series of the coefficients of the 4th order spherical harmonics expansion of the polar cap potential for three periods, characterised by: (i steady IMF Bz > 0, (ii steady IMF Bz < 0 and (iii a double rotation from negative to positive and then positive to negative Bz. A neat dynamical topological transition is observed when the IMF Bz turns from negative to positive and vice versa, pointing toward the possible occurrence of an order/disorder phase transition, which is the counterpart of the large scale convection rearrangement and of the increase of the global coherence. This result has been confirmed by applying the same analysis to a larger data base of about twenty days of SuperDARN data, allowing to investigate the role of IMF By too.

  3. The Changing Polar Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, P. G.; Hurley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and LCROSS have provided an avalanche of new data regarding the lunar poles: LCROSS directly detected water vapor and other volatiles in its impact plume; LRO LAMP has detected surface frost using UV ratios; LEND has refined understanding of the distribution of hydrogen; LOLA and LAMP have showed that the spectral properties of permanently shadowed regions (PSR) are anomalous and may be due to unusual surface texture or altered space weathering; Diviner shows both where the coldest portions of the poles exist, and its quantitative results show where temperatures are low enough to preserve water ice at depth, well outside the PSRs. Yet while we are data rich, our understanding of the lunar poles is maddeningly poor. Our poverty of understanding is made even more baffling by the MESSENGER results from Mercury. At Mercury's poles the distribution of volatiles is dictated by temperature: where subsurface temperatures inferred from topography are consistent with long term preservation of water ice, radar anomalies indicating thick ice are present; where surface temperatures are consistent with preservation of surface frost, high reflectance anomalies indicating surface frost are revealed by laser reflectance. The distribution of water ice on Mercury is well understood. In contrast, temperature is only a weak indicator of the presence of volatiles at the lunar poles; there is little ability to predict the location and abundance of hydrogen or water. The difference may in the age of the volatile deposits on the two planets. Turn the clock forward a few billion years on Mercury and the deposits may appear more lunar. Surface lag deposits may have long ago succumbed to impact gardening, as has much of the shallow buried ice. Ice retained could be patchy, and confined to the coldest places that may tend to preserve it more effectively, even when finely comminuted. Lunar polar volatiles, a possible relic of an ancient, Mercury

  4. Real-time study of genomic DNA structural changes upon interaction with small molecules using dual-polarization interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Zhanxia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2009-06-15

    The structural changes of genomic DNA upon interaction with small molecules have been studied in real time using dual-polarization interferometry (DPI). Native or thermally denatured DNA was immobilized on the silicon oxynitride surface via a preadsorbed poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) layer. The mass loading was similar for both types of DNA; however, native DNA formed a looser and thicker layer due to its rigidity, unlike the more flexible denatured DNA, which mixed with PEI to form a denser and thinner layer. Ethidium bromide (EtBr), a classical intercalator, induced the large thickness decrease and density increase of native DNA (double-stranded), but a slight increase in both the thickness and density of denatured DNA (partial single-stranded). Spermine that electrostatically binds DNA induced the increase in layer thickness and decrease in the density of both native and denatured DNA. However, the looser structure of native DNA made it more accessible to spermine, leading to a higher binding amount and larger thickness increase. For native DNA, EtBr induced a slow and less reversible contraction of DNA owing to intercalation, while spermine induced a fast and reversible expansion of DNA owing to electrostatic interaction. DPI offers an effective means for real-time study of DNA structural changes during the interactions.

  5. Optimization of polarization lidar structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramochkin, Alexander I.; Kaul, Bruno V.; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.

    1999-11-01

    The problems of the polarization lidar transceiver optimization are considered. The basic features and the optimization criteria of lidar polarization units are presented and the comparative analysis of polarization units is fulfilled. We have analyzed optical arrangements of the transmitter to form the desired polarization state of sounding radiation. We have also considered various types of lidar receiving systems: (1) one-channel, providing measurement of Stocks parameters at a successive change of position of polarization analyzers in the lidar receiver, and (2) multichannel, where each channel has a lens, an analyzer, and a photodetector. In the latter case measurements of Stocks parameters are carried out simultaneously. The optimization criteria of the polarization lidar considering the atmospheric state are determined with the purpose to decrease the number of polarization devices needed.

  6. Photoluminescence changes of III-Nitride lateral polarity structures after chemical functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Nora G.; Franke, Alexander; Kirste, Ronny; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-12-01

    The photoluminescence changes of a III-Nitride semiconductor with various surface topographies were studied after chemical functionalization. Al x Ga1‑x N with a composition of 70% aluminum was used and the surfaces were functionalized with a fluorophore dye-terminated peptide using a linker molecule. The stability of the wafers in water was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry prior to modifying the material. The leaching data demonstrated that the AlGaN material in highly stable in biological conditions over 7 d. The attachment of the dye to the wafer was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The PL spectrum showed a clear signature of the dye with a pronounced emission peak at approximately 260 nm, indicating a successful attachment to the surface.

  7. Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-25

    of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence G.M...fiCAtson) Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Irodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by...necessary and identify by block number) An in situ structural investigation of the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum

  8. Continuous modulations of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures and scanned line-widths on silicon by polarization changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Pengjun; Xu, Le; Lu, YongFeng

    2013-07-01

    Large-area, uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are of wide potential industry applications. The continuity and processing precision of LIPSS are mainly determined by the scanning intervals of adjacent scanning lines. Therefore, continuous modulations of LIPSS and scanned line-widths within one laser scanning pass are of great significance. This study proposes that by varying the laser (800 nm, 50 fs, 1 kHz) polarization direction, LIPSS and the scanned line-widths on a silicon (111) surface can be continuously modulated with high precision. It shows that the scanned line-width reaches the maximum when the polarization direction is perpendicular to the scanning direction. As an application example, the experiments show large-area, uniform LIPSS can be fabricated by controlling the scanning intervals based on the one-pass scanned line-widths. The simulation shows that the initially formed LIPSS structures induce directional surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) scattering along the laser polarization direction, which strengthens the subsequently anisotropic LIPSS fabrication. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiments, which both support the conclusions of continuous modulations of the LIPSS and scanned line-widths.

  9. Flare processes evolution and polarization changes of fine structures of solar radio emission in the April 11, 2013 event

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, Gennady; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Chengming; Fu, Qijun; Karlicky, Marian; Fomichev, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in the observations of solar radio spectral fine structures in an M6.5 flare on April 11, 2013 were observed simultaneously by several radio instruments at four different observatories: Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers at Huairou (SBRS/Huairou), Ondrejov Radio spectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC/Ondrejov), Badary Broadband Microwave spectropolarimeter (BMS/Irkutsk), and spectrograph/IZMIRAN (Moscow, Troitsk). The fine structures include microwave zebra patterns (ZP), fast pulsations, and fibers. They were observed during the flare brightening located at the tops of a loop arcade. The dynamics of the polarization was associated with the motion of the flare exciter, which was observed in EUV images at 171A and 131A (SDO/AIA). Combining magnetograms observed by the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) with the homologous assumption of EUV flare brightening and ZP bursts, we deduced that the observed ZPs correspond to the ordinary radio...

  10. Changing polar environments : Interdisciplinary challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shepson, Paul B.; Ariya, Parisa A.; Deal, Clara J.; Donaldson, D. James; Douglas, Thomas A.; Loose, Brice; Maksym, Ted; Matrai, Patricia A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Saenz, Benjamin; Stefels, Jacqueline; Steiner, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    In the past few decades, there has been enormous growth in scientific studies of physical, chemical, and biological interactions among reservoirs in polar regions. This has come, in part, as a result of a few significant discoveries: There is dramatic halogen chemistry that occurs on and above the s

  11. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  12. Dynamics of Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Coster, A. J.; Huba, J.; Ridley, A. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Baker, J. B. H.; Wolf, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) flow structures are narrow ionospheric channels of fast (in excess of 100 m/s) westward drift just outside the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora in the dusk-to-midnight local time sector. Other terms for this phenomenon include subauroral Ion Drift (SAID) events and Polarization Jets. SAPS structures represent a striking departure from the commonly-used two-cell convection pattern. They are thought to arise from the displacement of the downward region-2 Birkeland currents on the dusk side equatorward of the low-latitude boundary of the auroral oval during times of changing high-latitude convection. In this paper, we will use several event simulations with the SAMI3-RCM numerical model (a self-consistent ionosphere-inner magnetosphere model) and RCM-GITM (a self-consistent model of the ionosphere-thermosphere-inner magnetosphere) to analyze the relative roles of changes in the IMF Bz component, ionospheric electron density depletions, and thermospheric modifications in controlling the dynamics of SAPS. Simulation results will be compared to multi-instrument ionospheric observations.

  13. Polar ocean ecosystems in a changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetacek, Victor; Nicol, Stephen

    2005-09-01

    Polar organisms have adapted their seasonal cycles to the dynamic interface between ice and water. This interface ranges from the micrometre-sized brine channels within sea ice to the planetary-scale advance and retreat of sea ice. Polar marine ecosystems are particularly sensitive to climate change because small temperature differences can have large effects on the extent and thickness of sea ice. Little is known about the interactions between large, long-lived organisms and their planktonic food supply. Disentangling the effects of human exploitation of upper trophic levels from basin-wide, decade-scale climate cycles to identify long-term, global trends is a daunting challenge facing polar bio-oceanography.

  14. Classifying spaces of degenerating polarized Hodge structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Kazuya

    2009-01-01

    In 1970, Phillip Griffiths envisioned that points at infinity could be added to the classifying space D of polarized Hodge structures. In this book, Kazuya Kato and Sampei Usui realize this dream by creating a logarithmic Hodge theory. They use the logarithmic structures begun by Fontaine-Illusie to revive nilpotent orbits as a logarithmic Hodge structure. The book focuses on two principal topics. First, Kato and Usui construct the fine moduli space of polarized logarithmic Hodge structures with additional structures. Even for a Hermitian symmetric domain D, the present theory is a refinem

  15. Polarization properties of localized structures in VCSELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Ackemann, Thorsten; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-04-01

    Broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) have peculiar polarization properties which are a field of study by itself.1-3 These properties have already been used for localized structure generation, in a simple configuration, where only one polarization component was used.4 Here, we present new experimental and theoretical results on the complex polarization behavior of localized structures generated in an optically-injected broad area VCSEL. A linear stability analysis of the spin-flip VCSEL model is performed for the case of broad area devices, in a restrained and experimentally relevant parameter set. Numerical simulations are performed, in one and two dimensions. They reveal existence of vector localized structures. These structures have a complex polarization state, which is not simply a linear polarization following the one of the optical injection. Experimental results confirm theoretical predictions. Applications of this work can lead to the encoding of small color images in the polarization state of an ensemble of localized structures at the surface of a broad area VCSEL.

  16. The Large Scale Structure: Polarization Aspects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. F. Pizzo

    2011-12-01

    Polarized radio emission is detected at various scales in the Universe. In this document, I will briefly review our knowledge on polarized radio sources in galaxy clusters and at their outskirts, emphasizing the crucial information provided by the polarized signal on the origin and evolution of such sources. Successively, I will focus on Abell 2255, which is known in the literature as the first cluster for which filamentary polarized emission associated with the radio halo has been detected. By using RM synthesis on our multi-wavelength WSRT observations, we studied the 3-dimensional geometry of the cluster, unveiling the nature of the polarized filaments at the borders of the central radio halo. Our analysis points out that these structures are relics lying at large distance from the cluster center.

  17. Vectorial beam propagation simulation of a novel polarization conversion waveguide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daoping; van Brug, Hedser H.; Frankena, Hans J.; van der Tol, Jos J.; Pedersen, Jorgen W.

    1995-02-01

    The vectorial beam propagation method has successfully been applied to a passive polarization converting waveguide structure. A complete polarization conversion has been simulated. The propagating fields are calculated and the power attenuation is evaluated. The influence of structural changes of the device on the polarization conversion is investigated.

  18. Quantitative Assessment of Birefringent Skin Structures in Scattered Light Confocal Imaging Using Radially Polarized Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natallia Eduarda Uzunbajakava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The polarization characteristics of birefringent tissues could be only partially obtained using linearly polarized light in polarization sensitive optical imaging. Here we analyze the change in polarization of backscattered light from birefringent structures versus the orientations of the incident polarizations using linearly, circularly and radially polarized light in a cross-polarized confocal microscope. A spatially variable retardation plate composed of eight sectors of λ/2 wave plates was used to transform linearly polarized light into a radially polarized light. Based on the experimental data obtained from ex-vivo measurements on human scalp hairs and in-vivo measurements on hair and skin, we exemplify that the underestimation of the birefringence content resulting from the orientation related effects associated with the use of linearly polarized light for imaging tissues containing wavy birefringent structures could be minimized by using radially polarized light.

  19. Polarized deuteron structure functions at small x

    CERN Document Server

    Edelmann, J; Weise, W

    1997-01-01

    We investigate shadowing corrections to the polarized deuteron structure functions g_1^d and b_1. In the kinematic domain of current fixed target experiments we observe that shadowing effects in g_1^d are approximately twice as large as for the unpolarized structure function F_2^d. Furthermore, we find that b_1 is surprisingly large at x < 0.1 and receives dominant contributions from coherent double scattering.

  20. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. This architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements.

  1. Polarization sensitive anisotropic structuring of silicon by ultrashort light pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Drevinskas, Rokas, E-mail: rd1c12@orc.soton.ac.uk; Beresna, Martynas; Kazansky, Peter G. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-27

    Imprinting of anisotropic structures on the silicon surface by double pulse femtosecond laser irradiation is demonstrated. The origin of the polarization-induced anisotropy is explained in terms of interaction of linearly polarized second pulse with the wavelength-sized symmetric crater-shaped structure generated by the linearly polarized first pulse. A wavefront sensor is fabricated by imprinting an array of micro-craters. Polarization controlled anisotropy of the structures can be also explored for data storage applications.

  2. Polar ionospheric responses to solar wind IMF changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    Full Text Available Auroral and airglow emissions over Eureka (89° CGM during the 1997-98 winter show striking variations in relation to solar wind IMF changes. The period January 19 to 22, 1998, was chosen for detailed study, as the IMF was particularly strong and variable. During most of the period, Bz was northward and polar arcs were observed. Several overpasses by DMSP satellites during the four day period provided a clear picture of the particle precipitation producing the polar arcs. The spectral character of these events indicated excitation by electrons of average energy 300 to 500 eV. Only occasionally were electrons of average energy up to ~1 keV observed and these appeared transitory from the ground optical data. It is noted that polar arcs appear after sudden changes in IMF By, suggesting IMF control over arc initiation. When By is positive there is arc motion from dawn to dusk, while By is negative the motion is consistently dusk to dawn. F-region (anti-sunward convections were monitored through the period from 630.0 nm emissions. The convection speed was low (100-150 m/s when Bz was northward but increased to 500 m/s after Bz turned southward on January 20.

    Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora - Ionosphere (particle precipitation - Magnetospheric Physics (polar cap phenomena

  3. Polarization changing technique in macrocosm and it's application to radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘健; 毛二可

    2004-01-01

    A new model of air-surveillance radar (named polarization changing in macrocosm radar: PCM radar), which makes use of the polarization changing technique in macrocosm, is presented in this paper. On basis of careful selection of representative 98 states of polarization in macrocosm, PCM radar can not only perform transmitting and receiving polarization matching for various targets, consequently make full use of transmitting and receiving signals of radar, but also improve the capability against active interference and jamming. Experimental test in air defense early-warning radar system demonstrates that it can effectively enhance radar performance.

  4. Bringing Society to a Changing Polar Ocean: Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, O.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic and Antarctic appear to be accelerating and scientists are trying to understand both the patterns and the impacts of change. These changes will have profound impact on humanity and create a need for public education about these critical habitats. We have focused on a two-pronged strategy to increase public awareness as well as enable educators to discuss comfortably the implications of climate change. Our first focus is on entraining public support through the development of science documentaries about the science and people who conduct it. Antarctic Edge is a feature length award-winning documentary about climate change that has been released in May 2015 and has garnered interest in movie theatres and on social media stores (NetFlix, ITunes). This broad outreach is coupled with our group's interest assisting educators formally. The majority of current polar education is focused on direct educator engagement through personal research experiences that have impact on the participating educators' classrooms. Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) proposes to improve educator and student engagement in polar sciences through exposure to scientists and polar data. Through professional development and the creation of data tools, Polar ICE will reduce the logistical costs of bringing polar science to students in grades 6-16. We will provide opportunities to: 1) build capacity of polar scientists in communicating and engaging with diverse audiences; 2) create scalable, in-person and virtual opportunities for educators and students to engage with polar scientists and their research through data visualizations, data activities, educator workshops, webinars, and student research symposia; and 3) evaluate the outcomes of Polar ICE and contribute to our understanding of science education practices. We will use a blended learning approach to promote partnerships and cross-disciplinary sharing. This combined multi-pronged approach

  5. Magnetic Field Structure from Synchrotron Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, R

    2006-01-01

    Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, as observed through their total synchrotron emission, are strongest (up to \\simeq 30\\mu G) in the spiral arms. The degree of radio polarization is low; the field in the arms must be mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to \\simeq 15\\mu G), sometimes forming 'magnetic arms' parallel to the optical arms. The field structure is spiral in almost every galaxy, even in flocculent and bright irregular types which lack spiral arms. The observed large-scale patterns of Faraday rotation in several massive spiral galaxies reveal coherent regular fields, as predicted by dynamo models. However, in most galaxies observed so far no simple patterns of Faraday rotation could be found. Either many dynamo modes are superimposed and cannot be resolved by present-day telescopes, or most of the apparently regular field is in fact anisotropic random, with frequent reversals, due ...

  6. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  7. Organisational Structure & Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Structural change is seen as a way to meet the challenges of the future that face many organisations. While some writers agree that broad-ranging structural change may not always transform an organisation or enhance its performance, others claim that innovation will be a major source of competitive advantage to organisations, particularly when…

  8. Coherence and Polarization of Polarization Speckle Generated by Depolarizers and Their Changes through Complex ABCD Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ning; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lee, Tim K.;

    2015-01-01

    of special depolarizer: the random roughness birefringent screen (RRBS) is introduced to meet this requirement. The statistical properties of the field generated by the depolarizer is investigated and illustrated in terms of the 2x2 beam coherence and polarization matrix (BCPM) with the corresponding degree...... of coherence (DoC). and degree of polarization (DoP) P. The changes of the coherence and polarization when the speckle field propagates through any optical system are analysed within the framework of the complex ABCD-matrix theory....

  9. Polarization converters on double hetero structures containing strained quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalique, U.; van der Tol, J. J. G. M.; Nötzel, R.; Smit, M. K.

    2009-02-01

    The importance of polarization manipulation is increased as optical fiber systems evolve to higher data rates. Photonic integrated circuits should be insensitive to the state of polarization of the light emanating from fibers if they are to be used as detectors, add-drop mutiplexers or cross connects. Either all the integrated components have to be polarization independent or only one polarization direction should be used. For either method, a compact polarization converter is useful. A model is developed for the mode propagation in the waveguide of the slanted side polarization converter based on double hetero structures. The model is extended to include polarization dependent absorption and mismatch. Polarization converters on different double heterostructures (with and without quantum wells) have been designed and are realized by contact optical lithography. The performance of the realized converters is well described with the model.

  10. Change in Business Structure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Provides information on whether a company’s change in business structure affects its Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and its Vendor Information Pages...

  11. Corporate funding and ideological polarization about climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Justin

    2016-01-05

    Drawing on large-scale computational data and methods, this research demonstrates how polarization efforts are influenced by a patterned network of political and financial actors. These dynamics, which have been notoriously difficult to quantify, are illustrated here with a computational analysis of climate change politics in the United States. The comprehensive data include all individual and organizational actors in the climate change countermovement (164 organizations), as well as all written and verbal texts produced by this network between 1993-2013 (40,785 texts, more than 39 million words). Two main findings emerge. First, that organizations with corporate funding were more likely to have written and disseminated texts meant to polarize the climate change issue. Second, and more importantly, that corporate funding influences the actual thematic content of these polarization efforts, and the discursive prevalence of that thematic content over time. These findings provide new, and comprehensive, confirmation of dynamics long thought to be at the root of climate change politics and discourse. Beyond the specifics of climate change, this paper has important implications for understanding ideological polarization more generally, and the increasing role of private funding in determining why certain polarizing themes are created and amplified. Lastly, the paper suggests that future studies build on the novel approach taken here that integrates large-scale textual analysis with social networks.

  12. Holographic liquid crystal polarization grating with Fabry-Perot structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Yamaguchi, Haruki; Noda, Kohei; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    A holographic liquid crystal polarization grating with a Fabry-Perot structure was developed. Because of its resonant structure, the device offers high levels of control of the diffraction properties of incident-polarized light beams, depending on the resonance conditions. The diffracted light beams are emitted in both the reflection and transmission directions, and the device thus works as a multibranch polarization grating with double optical paths, unlike a conventional polarization grating. These device features were experimentally demonstrated and were also explained theoretically.

  13. Uranus’ Hemispheric Asymmetries in Polar Cloud and Circulation Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Heidi B.; Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Pat; de Pater, Imke

    2015-11-01

    We report on the north polar region of Uranus in the post-equinoctial era. Near-IR imaging with Keck 2 using NIRC2 in 2012-2014 revealed numerous small bright features, as well as small dark features, between 50 degrees N and the north pole. Tracking of these features yielded circulation patterns, with the remarkable result that the region from 60 degrees to at least 83 degrees rotates about the northern pole as a solid body, with a drift rate of 4.1 degrees/hour westward relative to the interior (Sromovsky et al. 2015, Icarus 258, 192-223). For the south pole, the same latitude region had dramatically different characteristics, as judged by 1986 Voyager and 2003 Keck observations. The southern region showed no discrete near-IR features; detailed circulation measurements in that region were based solely on low-contrast features in re-analyzed Voyager images (Karkoschka, 2015, Icarus 250, 294-307). They revealed a large gradient in drift rates, with values reaching twice that seen in the corresponding northern region.The north-south asymmetry in circulation and cloud structure/morphology is surprising because the distribution of upper tropospheric methane is relatively symmetric: roughly constant over a region from 30 S to 30 N, and then declining at higher latitudes in both hemispheres. The methane distribution suggests symmetric down-welling motion in both polar regions, which would inhibit formation of condensation clouds there, in contrast to the observed dichotomy. Some asymmetry may be an effect of seasonal forcing, since the north versus south polar measurements were made during different seasons. If so, then major changes can be expected in the north polar region as Uranus proceeds toward its 2030 northern summer solstice. Hubble STIS observations expected in October of 2015 will further examine the vertical distribution and stability of the polar methane abundances. Future high-resolution imaging with Earth-based facilities will be able to track circulation

  14. Differential extinction and the contrasting structure of polar marine faunas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Z Krug

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The low taxonomic diversity of polar marine faunas today reflects both the failure of clades to colonize or diversify in high latitudes and regional extinctions of once-present clades. However, simple models of polar evolution are made difficult by the strikingly different faunal compositions and community structures of the two poles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A comparison of early Cenozoic Arctic and Antarctic bivalve faunas with modern ones, within the framework of a molecular phylogeny, shows that while Arctic losses were randomly distributed across the tree, Antarctic losses were significantly concentrated in more derived families, resulting in communities dominated by basal lineages. Potential mechanisms for the phylogenetic structure to Antarctic extinctions include continental isolation, changes in primary productivity leading to turnover of both predators and prey, and the effect of glaciation on shelf habitats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that phylogenetic consequences of past extinctions can vary substantially among regions and thus shape regional faunal structures, even when due to similar drivers, here global cooling, and provide the first phylogenetic support for the "retrograde" hypothesis of Antarctic faunal evolution.

  15. A Novel Nano-Grating Structure of Polarizing Beam Splitters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; LI Jing; LI Cheng-Fang; ZHANG Fei; SHI Li-Na

    2006-01-01

    @@ A metal wire nanograting is fabricated and used as a polarizing beam splitter that reflects TE polarization and transmits TM polarization. The metal wire nanograting is based on a fully optimized design structure that consists of not only the core nanowire metal grid but also the substrate nanograting. The substrate nanograting is designed to provide better performance for both TM and TE polarizations. We fabricate metal-stripe gratings on a glass substrate using nanoimprint lithography and reactive ion etching process. A detailed investigation of the polarization effect at 1550 nm wavelength is carried out with the theoretical analysis and experimental results.The polarizing beam splitter has uniform performance with wide variations in the incident angle (±25) and has high efficiency for both the reflected and the transmitted beams.

  16. Complex polarization-phase and spatial-frequency selections of laser images of blood-plasma films in diagnostics of changes in their polycrystalline structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.; Angelskii, P. O.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Karachevtsev, A. O.; Sidor, M. I.; Mintser, O. P.; Oleinichenko, B. P.; Bizer, L. I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical formalism of correlation phase analysis of laser images of human blood plasma with spatial-frequency selection of manifestations of mechanisms of linear and circular birefringence of albumin and globulin polycrystalline networks. Comparative results of the measurement of coordinate distributions of the correlation parameter—the modulus of the degree of local correlation of amplitudes—of laser images of blood plasma taken from patients of three groups—healthy patients (donors), rheumatoid-arthritis patients, and breast-cancer patients—are presented. We investigate values and ranges of change of statistical (the first to fourth statistical moments), correlation (excess of autocorrelation functions), and fractal (slopes of approximating curves and dispersion of extrema of logarithmic dependences of power spectra) parameters of coordinate distributions of the degree of local correlation of amplitudes. Objective criteria for diagnostics of occurrence and differentiation of inflammatory and oncological states are determined.

  17. Instabilities and topology changes in planar polarized epithelial sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubensky, David

    2013-03-01

    Epithelia-sheets of cells joined together by specialized junctional structures-are one of the basic building blocks of tissues and organs in animals. In many epithelia, rotational symmetry is broken and cells become polarized in a particular direction in the plane of the sheet. Here, we study the interplay between such planar cell polarity and the shape and packing of individual cells. Using general symmetry arguments and simple phenomenological models, we give a classification of the instabilities that can occur in such a coupled system. In particular, we show that two routes to chiral symmetry breaking are possible, both of which require that cells first become elongated along one axis. We also consider the evolution of the cell packing after an initial instability, including how planar polarity affects T1 topological transitions. We close with possible applications of these results to development in Drosophila and in zebrafish. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1056456

  18. Radio polarization and magnetic field structure in M 101

    CERN Document Server

    Berkhuijsen, E M; Beck, R; Han, J L

    2016-01-01

    We observed total and polarized radio continuum emission from the spiral galaxy M 101 at 6.2 cm and 11.1 cm wavelengths with the Effelsberg telescope. We use these data to study various emission components in M 101 and properties of the magnetic field. Separation of thermal and non-thermal emission shows that the thermal emission is closely correlated with the spiral arms, while the non-thermal emission is more smoothly distributed indicating diffusion of cosmic ray electrons away from their places of origin. The radial distribution of both emissions has a break near R=16 kpc, where it steepens to an exponential scale length of about 5 kpc, which is about 2.5 times smaller than at R<16 kpc. The distribution of the polarized emission has a broad maximum near R=12 kpc and beyond R=16 kpc also decreases with about 5 kpc scalelength. It seems that near R=16 kpc a major change in the structure of M 101 takes place, which also affects the distributions of the strength of the random and ordered magnetic field. Be...

  19. Monitoring Polar Environmental Change Using FORMOSAT-2 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Liu, C.; Chang, L.; Wang, S.; Yan, K.; Wu, F.; Wu, A.

    2007-12-01

    Polar ice loss to the sea currently account for virtually all of the sea-level rise that is not attributable to ocean warming. Huge section of the Ayles Ice Shelf broke off into the Arctic Ocean. Permafrost soil is losing its permanence across the Northern Hemisphere, altering ecosystems and damaging roads and buildings across Alaska, Canada, and Russia. Global warming change the polar environment significantly, especially in recent year. The National Space Organization (NSPO) of Taiwan successfully launched FORMOSAT-2 on 20 May 2004. The orbit is designed to be high-altitude,. Sun-synchronous, and daily-revisit. With high agility in attitude control, FORMOSAT-2 can cover the polar areas up to +/- 90 deg latitude. More than 72 Area of interests in Alaska, Canada, Greenland area and Ice land have imaged periodically in 2006 and 2007. The images have 2m resolution in panchromatic band and 8m in multispectral bands, with size of about 24 x 100 km or large. The ability of FORMOSAT-2 daily revisit has been extended to monitor the change of topography for the glacier and ice shelf daily, weekly and monthly. By using the FORMOSAT-2 stereo pair, we can determine the elevation profile (DEM) across the glacier surface. In this paper, we will present the mapping and topography of Greenland glaciers and ice land including Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier, Greenland, Belcher Glacier, Canada and Ayles ice island. We will demonstrate the DEM extract ability from FORMOSAT-2 polar stereo images( up to 82 deg latitude), and compared with the DEM of the popular SRTM, ASTER which can be acquired to 79 deg latitude. It is expected that FORMOSAT-2 polar images will be continuously collected for years and contribute to the research of global environmental change.

  20. Neurotypic cell attachment and growth on III-nitride lateral polarity structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, L E; Kirste, R; Johnson, C A; Ghashghaei, H T; Collazo, R; Ivanisevic, A

    2016-01-01

    III-nitride materials have recently received increasing levels of attention for their potential to successfully interface with, and sense biochemical interactions in biological systems. Expanding on available sensing schemes (including transistor-based devices,) a III-N lateral polarity structure capable of introducing quasi-phase matching through a periodic polarity grating presents a novel platform for second harmonic generation. This platform constitutes a non-linear optical phenomenon with exquisite sensitivity to the chemical state of a surface or interface. To characterize the response of a biological system to the nanostructured lateral polarity structures, we cultured neurotypic PC12 cells on AlGaN with varying ratios of Al:Ga - 0, 0.4, 0.6, and 1 - and on surfaces of varying pitch to the III-polar vs. N-polar grating - 5, 10, 20 and 50 μm. While some toxicity associated with increasing Al is observed, we documented and quantified trends in cell responses to the local material polarity and nanoscale roughness. The nitrogen-polar material has a significantly higher nanoscale roughness than III-polar regions, and a 80-200 nm step height difference between the III-polar and N-polar materials in the lateral polarity configuration generates adequate changes in topography to influence cell growth, improves cell adhesion and promotes cell migration along the direction of the features. As the designed material configuration is further explored for biochemical sensing, the lateral polarity scheme may provide a route in assessing the non-specific protein adsorption to this varying nano-topography that drives the subsequent cell response.

  1. Origin and structure of polar domains in doped molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirzadeh, E.; Azuri, I.; Qi, Y.; Ehre, D.; Rappe, A. M.; Lahav, M.; Kronik, L.; Lubomirsky, I.

    2016-11-01

    Doping is a primary tool for the modification of the properties of materials. Occlusion of guest molecules in crystals generally reduces their symmetry by the creation of polar domains, which engender polarization and pyroelectricity in the doped crystals. Here we describe a molecular-level determination of the structure of such polar domains, as created by low dopant concentrations (<0.5%). The approach comprises crystal engineering and pyroelectric measurements, together with dispersion-corrected density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics calculations of the doped crystals, using neutron diffraction data of the host at different temperatures. This approach is illustrated using centrosymmetric α-glycine crystals doped with minute amounts of different L-amino acids. The experimentally determined pyroelectric coefficients are explained by the structure and polarization calculations, thus providing strong support for the local and global understanding of how different dopants influence the properties of molecular crystals.

  2. Tailored Optical Polarization in Nano-Structured Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, Bernardo S

    2016-01-01

    A very efficient method for the calculation of the effective optical response of nano-structured composite systems allows the design of metamaterials tailored for specific optical polarization properties. We use our method to design 2D periodic arrays of sub-wavelength dielectric inclusions within nanometric supported metallic thin films which behave as either an almost perfect linearly dichroic system, as a controllable source of circular polarized light, as a system with a large circular dichroism, or as a circular polarizer. All of these systems may be tuned over a wide energy range.

  3. Polarized neutron scattering on geometrically frustrated magnets with Swedenborgite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valldor, Martin [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Koeln (Germany); Sanders, Yvonne; Schweika, Werner [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Diffuse scattering of polarized neutrons on cobaltate polycrystalline samples with Swedenborgite structure, ABaCo{sub 3}BO{sub 7} (A=Y Ca, and B=Co Fe,Al,Zn) was used to study the change in magnetic order depending on chemical composition. The atomic structure contains alternate stacking of kagome and triangular layers of metal ions, all in tetrahedral oxygen coordination. Geometrical frustration of antiferromagnetically coupled spins should suppress long-range order even at low temperatures despite strong spin-spin coupling in the Swedenborgites. The diffuse magnetic scattering in Y{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}BaCo{sub 4}O {sub 7} reveals two dimensional (2D) spin correlations on the Kagome sublattices towards the entropically favoured V3*V3 structure and suggests a decoupling of layers on triangular sites. Co-substitution by Al and Zn yields similar diffuse magnetic scattering, however, spin dilution results in even more disordered spin liquid or spin glass states. With B=Fe or Co, differences in the magnetic scattering evolve, indicating the onset of spin correlations perpendicular to the Kagome layers.

  4. Mars secular obliquity change due to the seasonal polar caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David P.

    1992-01-01

    There is a weak positive feedback mechanism between the astronomy and meteorology of Mars. The mechanism is this: the seasonal waxing and waning polar caps cause small changes in Mars' dynamical flattening. Because the changes in flattening are out of phase with the sun, there is a net annual solar torque on the planet which increases the angle between the equatorial and orbital phanes. On the basis of Viking observations of the present climate and simple atmospheric models of past climates, these seasonal shifts of mass between the atmosphere and polar caps are capable of secularly increasing Mars' obliquity by about 1 or 2 deg since the origin of the solar system. Thus, the climate, driven largely by the axial tilt, reacts back on the planet and slightly enhances the seasons on Mars as time progresses. More sophisticated models will probably not change this result much; therefore this mechanism probably produced only minor changes in Mars' climate. It causes negligible changes in the axial tilt and climate of the earth.

  5. A novel fibrous duct structure discovered in the brain meninges by using polarized light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Min-Ho; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Lim, Jaekwan; Seo, Eunseok; Lim, Jun; Baek, Miok; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-05-01

    We have previously reported the discovery of a novel fibrous structure (NFS) consisting of unidirectionally arranged collagen fibers in the spinal pia mater. Due to its unique structure, it was easily detected using polarized light microscopy. In the current study, we describe the discovery of a similar NFS in the brain meninges of rats by using polarized light microscopy. This NFS is located beneath the superior sagittal sinus. Initially, we systemically analyzed the polarization properties of the NFS. The change in the light intensity of the NFS, with respect to the polarization angle, was eight times greater than that of blood vessels, showing that the collagen fibers are oriented in a particular direction with almost perfect parallelism (0.99). The orientation angle of the polarization ellipse confirmed the orientation of the collagen fibers in the NFS. Histological studies further confirmed that the unidirectionally arranged collagen fibers were responsible for this distinct polarization property. Surprisingly, X-ray microtomography and 3D confocal imaging revealed that the NFS contains within it a duct structure, a putative primo vessel. In conclusion, we report a NFS in the brain meninges, detected by using polarized light microscopy, that provides space for a putative primo vessel, not a blood vessel.

  6. Aggregation of Dodecyl 1-Pyrenylmethyl Ether and Its Application in Structure-Polarity Relations of Aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG,Da-Yong; TIAN,Juan; JI,Guo-Zhen

    2006-01-01

    The aggregation behavior of dodecyl 1-pyrenylmethyl ether was studied in dioxane-water mixture solvents by fluorescence techniques. The labeled pyrenyl group was effective in monitoring the polarity change of its environment during aggregation processes. Based on the structural effects such as chain-length effect, self-coiling effect,and branch-group effect on the polarity of the probe environment, the structure features of aggregates were discussed and have been used to interpret the effect of the structural features on the aggregates formed by three cholesteryl esters and three long chain alkanes.

  7. Linearly Polarized IR Spectroscopy Theory and Applications for Structural Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Tsonko

    2011-01-01

    A technique that is useful in the study of pharmaceutical products and biological molecules, polarization IR spectroscopy has undergone continuous development since it first emerged almost 100 years ago. Capturing the state of the science as it exists today, "Linearly Polarized IR Spectroscopy: Theory and Applications for Structural Analysis" demonstrates how the technique can be properly utilized to obtain important information about the structure and spectral properties of oriented compounds. The book starts with the theoretical basis of linear-dichroic infrared (IR-LD) spectroscop

  8. Polarity Analysis of Texts using Discourse Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerschop, Bas; Goosen, Frank; Hogenboom, Alexander; Frasincar, Flavius; Kaymak, Uzay; Jong, de Franciska

    2011-01-01

    Sentiment analysis has applications in many areas and the exploration of its potential has only just begun. We propose Pathos, a framework which performs document sentiment analysis (partly) based on a document’s discourse structure. We hypothesize that by splitting a text into important and less im

  9. Nuclear Structure Observable with Polarized Target and Polarized Real Photon Beam at Mainz Microtron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudyal, Dilli

    2016-09-01

    The nucleon polarizabilities are fundamental structure observables, like the nucleon mass or charge. While the electric (αE 1) and magnetic (βM 1) scalar polarizabilities of the nucleon have been measured, little effort has been made to extract the spin dependent polarizabilities. These nucleon polarizabilities, γE1E1 ,γM1M1 ,γM1E2 and γE1M2 describe the spin response of a proton to electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole interactions. We plan to extract them using polarized photon beam and polarized target at the MAMI tagged photon facility in Mainz, Germany. This requires precise measurement of the double polarization observable ∑2 z which is sensitive to these polarizabilities. The ∑2 z is measured via a circularly polarized photon beam on a longitudinally polarized butanol target in the resonance region (E = 250 - 310 MeV). Together with constraints from αE 1 and βM 1, the forward spin polarizability (γ0) , and QCD based models, should allow us to extract all four spin polarizabilities. This presentation will be focused on the preliminary experimental results for the measurement of ∑2 z at different energies and angles. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  10. Polarization Control by Using Anisotropic 3D Chiral Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Menglin L N; Sha, Wei E I; Choy, Wallace C H; Itoh, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the mirror symmetry breaking, chiral structures show fantastic electromagnetic (EM) properties involving negative refraction, giant optical activity, and asymmetric transmission. Aligned electric and magnetic dipoles excited in chiral structures contribute to extraordinary properties. However, the chiral structures that exhibit n-fold rotational symmetry show limited tuning capability. In this paper, we proposed a compact, light, and highly tunable anisotropic chiral structure to overcome this limitation and realize a linear-to-circular polarization conversion. The anisotropy is due to simultaneous excitations of two different pairs of aligned electric and magnetic dipoles. The 3D omega-like structure, etched on two sides of one PCB board and connected by metallic vias, achieves 60% of linearto- circular conversion (transmission) efficiency at the operating frequency of 9.2 GHz. The desired 90-degree phase shift between the two orthogonal linear polarization components is not only from the finite-thick...

  11. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  12. Two-mode polarized traveling wave deflecting structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建豪; 顾强; 方文程; 童德春; 赵振堂

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a two-mode polarizable deflecting structure, as a new concept for bunch measure-ment and beam control. With two modes of HEM11 and HEM12 operating in the same structure on horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, the operation status can be switched between the two polarization modes. They can be operated simultaneously with two independent input power sources. With two-mode deflecting structure, the bunch distortion caused by the geometric wake-fields in the accelerating structure can be mea-sured by one structure.

  13. Paleomagnetism as a structural polarity criterion: application to Tunisian diapirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Bernard; Rouvier, Henri; Le Goff, Maxime; Smati, Amor; Hatira, Nouri; Laatar, Essaied; Mansouri, Abdelbaki; Perthuisot, Vincent

    2000-03-01

    In the Upper Aptian-Albian units, close to Triassic displaced bodies of northwestern Tunisia, the primary magnetization acquired during the Cretaceous period of normal magnetic polarity yields an unquestionable structural polarity criterion. The use of this criterion confirms the diapiric origin of these Triassic bodies and aids understanding of the evolution of the diapirs. It also appears to be a useful tool for the analysis of the geometry of overturning. An Eocene halokinesis on the platform south of the Tunisian Channel is also indicated by analysis of magnetic overprint in the Jebel Slata.

  14. CHANG-ES - VIII. Uncovering hidden AGN activity in radio polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Judith A.; Schmidt, Philip; Damas-Segovia, A.; Beck, Rainer; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N.; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Rand, Richard J.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa; Kamieneski, Patrick; Paré, Dylan; Sullivan, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    We report on C-band (5-7 GHz) observations of the galaxy, NGC 2992, from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) sample. This galaxy displays an embedded nuclear double-lobed radio morphology within its spiral disc, as revealed in linearly polarized emission but not in total intensity emission. The radio lobes are kpc-sized, similar to what has been observed in the past for other Seyfert galaxies, and show ordered magnetic fields. NGC 2992 has shown previous evidence for AGN-related activity, but not the linearly polarized radio features that we present here. We draw attention to this galaxy as the first clear example (and prototype) of bipolar radio outflow that is revealed in linearly polarized emission only. Such polarization observations, which are unobscured by dust, provide a new tool for uncovering hidden weak active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity which may otherwise be masked by brighter unpolarized emission within which it is embedded. The radio lobes observed in NGC 2992 are interacting with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) and offer new opportunities to investigate the interactions between nuclear outflows and the ISM in nearby galaxies. We also compare the radio emission with a new CHANDRA X-ray image of this galaxy. A new CHANG-ES image of NGC 3079 is also briefly shown as another example as to how much more obvious radio lobes appear in linear polarization as opposed to total intensity.

  15. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szakál, Alex, E-mail: szakal.alex@wigner.mta.hu; Markó, Márton, E-mail: marko.marton@wigner.mta.hu; Cser, László, E-mail: cser.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  16. Climate change threatens polar bear populations: a stochastic demographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Christine M; Caswell, Hal; Runge, Michael C; Regehr, Eric V; Amstrup, Steve C; Stirling, Ian

    2010-10-01

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice for feeding, breeding, and movement. Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice are forecast to continue because of climate warming. We evaluated the impacts of climate change on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea by means of a demographic analysis, combining deterministic, stochastic, environment-dependent matrix population models with forecasts of future sea ice conditions from IPCC general circulation models (GCMs). The matrix population models classified individuals by age and breeding status; mothers and dependent cubs were treated as units. Parameter estimates were obtained from a capture-recapture study conducted from 2001 to 2006. Candidate statistical models allowed vital rates to vary with time and as functions of a sea ice covariate. Model averaging was used to produce the vital rate estimates, and a parametric bootstrap procedure was used to quantify model selection and parameter estimation uncertainty. Deterministic models projected population growth in years with more extensive ice coverage (2001-2003) and population decline in years with less ice coverage (2004-2005). LTRE (life table response experiment) analysis showed that the reduction in lambda in years with low sea ice was due primarily to reduced adult female survival, and secondarily to reduced breeding. A stochastic model with two environmental states, good and poor sea ice conditions, projected a declining stochastic growth rate, log lambdas, as the frequency of poor ice years increased. The observed frequency of poor ice years since 1979 would imply log lambdas approximately - 0.01, which agrees with available (albeit crude) observations of population size. The stochastic model was linked to a set of 10 GCMs compiled by the IPCC; the models were chosen for their ability to reproduce historical observations of sea ice and were forced with "business as usual" (A1B) greenhouse gas emissions. The resulting stochastic population

  17. Low temperature polarized target for spin structure studies of nucleons at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Pesek, Michael

    In presented thesis we describe concept of Deep Inelastic Scattering of leptons on nucleons in context of nucleon spin structure studies. Both polarized and unpolarized cases are discussed and concept of Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution Functions (TMD PDF) is introduced. The possibility of TMDs measurement using Semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) is described along with related results from COMPASS experiment. The future Drell-Yan programme at COMPASS is briefly mentioned and its importance is presented on the universality test i.e. change of sign of T-odd TMDs when measured in Drell-Yan and SIDIS. The importance of Polarized Target (PT) for spin structure studies is highlighted and principles of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) are given using both Solid effect and spin temperature concept. COMPASS experiment is described in many details with accent given to PT. Finally the thermal equilibrium (TE) calibration procedure is described and carried out for 2010 and 2011 physics runs at COMPASS. The av...

  18. Shear-induced dynamic polarization and mesoscopic structure in suspensions of polar nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2009-01-16

    We investigate the spatiotemporal behavior of sheared suspensions of rodlike particles with permanent dipole moments. Our calculations are based on a self-consistent hydrodynamic model including feedback effects between orientational motion and velocity profile. The competition between shear-induced tumbling motion and the boundary conditions imposed by plates leads to oscillatory alignment structures. These give rise to a spontaneous time-dependent polarization generating, in turn, magnetic fields. This novel shear-induced effect is robust against varying the boundary conditions. The field strengths are of a measurable magnitude for a broad parameter range.

  19. Chiral Huygens metasurfaces for nonlinear structuring of linearly polarized light

    CERN Document Server

    Lesina, A Calà; Ramunno, L

    2016-01-01

    We report on a chiral nanostructure, which we term a "butterfly nanoantenna," that, when used in a metasurface, allows the direct conversion of a linearly polarized beam into a nonlinear optical far-field of arbitrary complexity. The butterfly nanoantenna exhibits field enhancement in its gap for every incident linear polarization, which can be exploited to drive nonlinear optical emitters within the gap, for the structuring of light within a frequency range not accessible by linear plasmonics. As the polarization, phase and amplitude of the field in the gap are highly controlled, nonlinear emitters within the gap behave as an idealized Huygens source. A general framework is thereby proposed wherein the butterfly nanoantennas can be arranged on a surface to produce a highly structured far-field nonlinear optical beam with high purity. A third harmonic Laguerre-Gauss beam carrying an optical orbital angular momentum of 41 is demonstrated as an example, through large-scale simulations on a high-performance comp...

  20. Effects of climatic changes on anisakid nematodes in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokicki, Jerzy

    2009-11-01

    Anisakid nematodes are common in Antarctic, sub-Antarctic, and Arctic areas. Current distributional knowledge of anisakids in the polar regions is reviewed. Climatic variables influence the occurrence and abundance of anisakids, directly influencing their free-living larval stages and also indirectly influencing their predominantly invertebrate (but also vertebrate) hosts. As these parasites can also be pathogenic for humans, the paucity of information available is a source of additional hazard. As fish are a major human dietary component in Arctic and Antarctic areas, and are often eaten without heat processing, a high risk of infection by anisakid larvae might be expected. The present level of knowledge, particularly relating to anisakid larval stages present in fishes, is far from satisfactory. Preliminary molecular studies have revealed the presence of species complexes. Contemporary climate warming is modifying the marine environment and may result in an extension of time during which anisakid eggs can persist and hatch, and of the time period during which newly hatched larvae remain viable. As a result there may be an increase in the extent of anisakid distribution. Continued warming will modify the composition of the parasitic nematode fauna of marine animals, due to changes in feeding habits, as the warming of the sea and any localised reduction in salinity (from freshwater runoff) can be expected to bring about changes in the species composition of pelagic and benthic invertebrates.

  1. Cosmic microwave background: Polarization and temperature anisotropies from symmetric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    1999-06-01

    Perturbations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are generated by primordial inhomogeneities. I consider the case of CMB anisotropies from one single ordered perturbation source, or seed, existing well before decoupling between matter and radiation. Such structures could have been left by high energy symmetries breaking in the early universe. I focus on the cases of spherical and cylindrical symmetry of the seed. I give general analytic expressions for the polarization and temperature linear perturbations, factoring out of the Fourier integral the dependence on the photon propagation direction and on the geometric coordinates describing the seed. I show how the CMB perturbations manifestly reflect the symmetries of their seeds. In particular, polarization is uniquely linked to the shape of the source because of its tensorial nature. CMB anisotropies are obtained with a line of sight integration. They are a function of the position and orientation of the seed along the photons path. This treatment highlights the undulatory properties of the CMB. I show with numerical examples how the polarization and temperature perturbations propagate beyond the size of their seeds, reaching the CMB sound horizon at the time considered. Just like the waves from a pebble thrown in a pond, CMB anisotropy from a seed intersecting the last scattering surface appears as a series of temperature and polarization waves surrounding the seed, extending on the scale of the CMB sound horizon at decoupling, roughly 1 deg in the sky. Each wave is characterized by its own value of the CMB perturbation, with the same mean amplitude of the signal coming from the seed interior; as expected for a linear structure with size L<=H-1 and density contrast δ at decoupling, the temperature anisotropy is δT/T~=δ(L/H-1)2, roughly ten times stronger than the polarization. These waves could allow one to distinguish relics from high energy processes of the early universe from pointlike astrophysical

  2. CHANG-ES VIII: Uncovering Hidden AGN Activity in Radio Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith A; Damas-Segovia, A; Beck, Rainer; English, Jayanne; Heald, George; Henriksen, Richard N; Krause, Marita; Li, Jiang-Tao; Rand, Richard J; Wang, Q Daniel; Wiegert, Theresa; Kamieneski, Patrick; Paré, Dylan; Sullivan, Kendall

    2016-01-01

    We report on C-band (5 - 7 GHz) observations of the galaxy, NGC~2992, from the CHANG-ES sample. This galaxy displays an embedded nuclear double-lobed radio morphology within its spiral disk, as revealed in linearly polarized emission but {\\it not} in total intensity emission. The radio lobes are kpc-sized, similar to what has been observed in the past for other Seyfert galaxies, and show ordered magnetic fields. NGC~2992 has shown previous evidence for AGN-related activity, but not the linearly polarized radio features that we present here. We draw attention to this galaxy as the first clear example (and prototype) of bipolar radio outflow that is revealed in linearly polarized emission only. Such polarization observations, which are unobscured by dust, provide a new tool for uncovering hidden weak AGN activity which may otherwise be masked by brighter unpolarized emission within which it is embedded. The radio lobes observed in NGC~2992 are interacting with the surrounding interstellar medium and offer new o...

  3. PoLAR Voices: Informing Adult Learners about the Science and Story of Climate Change in the Polar Regions Through Audio Podcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinney, A.; Murray, M. S.; Gobroski, K. A.; Topp, R. M.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The resurgence of audio programming with the advent of podcasting in the early 2000s spawned a new medium for communicating advances in science, research, and technology. To capitalize on this informal educational outlet, the Arctic Institute of North America partnered with the International Arctic Research Center, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the UA Museum of the North to develop a podcast series called PoLAR Voices for the Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership. PoLAR Voices is a public education initiative that uses creative storytelling and novel narrative structures to immerse the listener in an auditory depiction of climate change. The programs will feature the science and story of climate change, approaching topics from both the points of view of researchers and Arctic indigenous peoples. This approach will engage the listener in the holistic story of climate change, addressing both scientific and personal perspectives, resulting in a program that is at once educational, entertaining and accessible. Feedback is being collected at each stage of development to ensure the content and format of the program satisfies listener interests and preferences. Once complete, the series will be released on thepolarhub.org and on iTunes. Additionally, blanket distribution of the programs will be accomplished via radio broadcast in urban, rural and remote areas, and in multiple languages to increase distribution and enhance accessibility.

  4. Cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature anisotropies from symmetric structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baccigalupi, C

    1999-01-01

    I explore the undulatory properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) physics. I consider the cases of spherical and cylindrical symmetry of the perturbation source, or seed. Such structures could have been left by high energy symmetries breaking in the early universe. I give suitable analytic expressions for the polarization and temperature linear perturbations from this kind of seeds and I show how to get their appearence on the CMB sky. This treatment highlights the undulatory properties of the CMB. I show with numerical examples how the polarization and temperature perturbations propagate beyond the size of their seeds, reaching the CMB sound horizon at the time considered. Just like the waves from a pebble thrown in a pond, the CMB anisotropy appears as a series of temperature and polarization waves surrounding the seed, extending on the scale of the CMB sound horizon at decoupling, roughly $1^{o}$ in the sky. Each wave is characterized by its own value of the CMB perturbation, with the same mean ...

  5. Polarized actin structural dynamics in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lawrence; Helmke, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) alignment to directional flow or stretch supports anti-inflammatory functions, but mechanisms controlling polarized structural adaptation in response to physical cues remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether factors associated with early actin edge ruffling implicated in cell polarization are prerequisite for stress fiber (SF) reorientation in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch. Time-lapse analysis of EGFP-actin in confluent ECs showed that onset of either cyclic uniaxial or equibiaxial stretch caused a non-directional increase in edge ruffling. Edge activity was concentrated in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis after 60 min, consistent with the direction of SF alignment. Rho-kinase inhibition caused reorientation of both stretch-induced edge ruffling and SF alignment parallel to the stretch axis. Arp2/3 inhibition attenuated stretch-induced cell elongation and disrupted polarized edge dynamics and microtubule organizing center reorientation, but it had no effect on the extent of SF reorientation. Disrupting localization of p21-activated kinase (PAK) did not prevent stretch-induced SF reorientation, suggesting that this Rac effector is not critical in regulating stretch-induced cytoskeletal remodeling. Overall, these results suggest that directional edge ruffling is not a primary mechanism that guides SF reorientation in response to stretch; the two events are coincident but not causal. PMID:25821527

  6. On arc-polarized structures in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. U. Ö. Sonnerup

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model is proposed to account for some of the behavior of arc-polarized magnetic structures seen in the solar wind. To this end, an exact analytical solution is developed that describes infinite plane wave trains of arbitrary amplitude in a plasma governed by ideal Hall MHD. The main focus is on intermediate-mode wave trains, which display double-branched magnetic hodogram signatures similar to those seen in the solar wind. The theoretically derived hodograms have field rotation in the ion-polarized sense at a slightly depressed field magnitude on one branch and an electron-polarized rotation at a slightly enhanced field magnitude on the other branch. The two branches are joined at the two "turning points", at which the normal flow is exactly Alfvénic. The behavior is accounted for in terms of the opposite dispersive properties of ion and electron whistlers. The hodograms derived from the theory are shown to compare favorably with those of one event, observed by the Cluster spacecraft near the ecliptic plane, and one event at high heliographic latitude observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. However, these two observed structures comprise only a single full wave period, approximately from one turning point to the other and then back again. The theory can be used to predict propagation direction (away from, or towards, the sun from magnetic data alone, provided the sign of the magnetic field component along the wave normal can be reliably determined. Under the same condition, it also predicts whether the ion-polarized branch should precede or follow the electron-polarized branch. Both behaviors are seen in the solar wind. The major shortcoming of the theory is that it fails to reproduce the observed saw-tooth like time series for the magnetic field, in which the field rotation is rapid in the ion sense and slow in the electron sense. Instead, the theory gives about the same rotation rates. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are

  7. Polar semiconductor heterojunction structure energy band diagram considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuxun; Wen, Cheng P.; Wang, Maojun; Hao, Yilong

    2016-03-01

    The unique nature of built-in electric field induced positive/negative charge pairs of polar semiconductor heterojunction structure has led to a more realistic device model for hexagonal III-nitride HEMT. In this modeling approach, the distribution of charge carriers is dictated by the electrostatic potential profile instead of Femi statistics. The proposed device model is found suitable to explain peculiar properties of GaN HEMT structures, including: (1) Discrepancy in measured conventional linear transmission line model (LTLM) sheet resistance and contactless sheet resistance of GaN HEMT with thin barrier layer. (2) Below bandgap radiation from forward biased Nickel Schottky barrier diode on GaN HEMT structure. (3) GaN HEMT barrier layer doping has negligible effect on transistor channel sheet charge density.

  8. Modulated nematic structures induced by chirality and steric polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longa, Lech; PajÄ k, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    What kind of one-dimensional modulated nematic structures (ODMNS) can form nonchiral and chiral bent-core and dimeric materials? Here, using the Landau-de Gennes theory of nematics, extended to account for molecular steric polarization, we study a possibility of formation of ODMNS, both in nonchiral and intrinsically chiral liquid crystalline materials. Besides nematic and cholesteric phases, we find four bulk ODMNS for nonchiral materials, two of which, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported so far. These two structures are longitudinal (NLP) and transverse (NTP) periodic waves where the polarization field being periodic in one dimension stays parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the wave vector. The other two phases are the twist-bend nematic phase (NTB) and the splay-bend nematic phase (NSB), but their fine structure appears more complex than that considered so far. The presence of molecular chirality converts nonchiral NTP and NSB into new NTB phases. Surprisingly, the nonchiral NLP phase can stay stable even in the presence of intrinsic chirality.

  9. Structural polarity in the Chara rhizoid: a reevaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Staehelin, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Chara rhizoid is a useful model system to study gravitropism since all phases of gravitropism occur in a single cell. Despite years of study, a complete description of the distinctive ultrastructure of Chara rhizoids is not available. Therefore, in this paper, we reevaluate the ultrastructural features of vertically grown rhizoids, which have a structural polarity consisting of seven distinct zones. We also characterize the apical vesicles and the cell wall in these rhizoids by using antibodies against pectic polysaccharides. These studies demonstrate that the cell wall consists of two pectinaceous domains and that a distinct population of apical vesicles contain methyl esterified pectin.

  10. Electronic structure and improper electric polarization of samarium orthoferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triguk, V. V.; Makoed, I. I.; Ravinski, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    The band structure and distributions of the electron and spin densities of samarium orthoferrite have been calculated within the framework of the first-principles density functional theory in the LSDA + U approximation taking into account the collinear antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments of iron and samarium cations. The possibility of inducing a ferroelectric state at temperatures below the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature of the magnetic sublattice formed by samarium cations has been considered using the results of the group-theoretical analysis. In the high-temperature range, the formation of regions with a spontaneous electric polarization is possible in the presence of additional factors that reduce the symmetry of the crystal.

  11. Circumpolar Genetic Structure and Recent Gene Flow of Polar Bears: A Reanalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René M Malenfant

    Full Text Available Recently, an extensive study of 2,748 polar bears (Ursus maritimus from across their circumpolar range was published in PLOS ONE, which used microsatellites and mitochondrial haplotypes to apparently show altered population structure and a dramatic change in directional gene flow towards the Canadian Archipelago-an area believed to be a future refugium for polar bears as their southernmost habitats decline under climate change. Although this study represents a major international collaborative effort and promised to be a baseline for future genetics work, methodological shortcomings and errors of interpretation undermine some of the study's main conclusions. Here, we present a reanalysis of this data in which we address some of these issues, including: (1 highly unbalanced sample sizes and large amounts of systematically missing data; (2 incorrect calculation of FST and of significance levels; (3 misleading estimates of recent gene flow resulting from non-convergence of the program BayesAss. In contrast to the original findings, in our reanalysis we find six genetic clusters of polar bears worldwide: the Hudson Bay Complex, the Western and Eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Western and Eastern Polar Basin, and-importantly-we reconfirm the presence of a unique and possibly endangered cluster of bears in Norwegian Bay near Canada's expected last sea-ice refugium. Although polar bears' abundance, distribution, and population structure will certainly be negatively affected by ongoing-and increasingly rapid-loss of Arctic sea ice, these genetic data provide no evidence of strong directional gene flow in response to recent climate change.

  12. Large amplitude nonlinear structures in the nighttime polar mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Shimul K.; Bharuthram, Ramashwar; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax; Muralikrishna, Polinaya; Singh, Satyavir

    2016-07-01

    The existence of large amplitude potential structures will be investigated for a plasma composed of negative ions, positive ions, electrons and an additional fourth component of charged (usually positive) nano-sized ions in an attempt to model the plasma composition in the nighttime polar mesosphere (˜80 - 90 km altitude) [1]. The fourth ionic component becomes positively charged if there is a high enough concentration of negative ions which are sufficiently heavy. The positive charge on the fourth component can be explained by the capture of currents, and is not a result of photo-emission and secondary electron emission processes. Consequently, if the negative ions are much lighter, then the fourth ion component will become negatively charged. The charged ion species will be treated as inertial species which are cold or adiabatic, whilst the electrons will be considered to be Boltzmann-distributed (isothermal). Taking into consideration not only the dynamics of the heaviest species (dust-acoustic) but also the lighter ions (ion-acoustic), the theoretical study will use the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism to explore the existence of arbitrary amplitude solitons and double layer potential structures. [1] Observations of positively charged nanoparticles in the nighttime polar mesosphere, M. Rapp, J. Hedin, I. Strelnikova, M. Friederich, J. Gumbel, and F.˜J. Lübken, Geophys. Res. Letters. 32, L23821, doi:10.1029/2005GL024676 (2005).

  13. Refinement of circular-polarization based on multilayer film structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; LEE Kuei-jen; CHOU His-tseng; HUANG Shan-guo; GU Wan-yi

    2009-01-01

    Circular-polarization discrimination appears in many antennas' applications. A compensation approach based on multilayer film structure is proposed to improve the axial ratio of the magnitude of the two perpendicular modes of the lump ports. The goal is to widen the beamwidth of radiation that has an axial ratio less than 3 dB and thus reducing the complexity at the receiver. A transfer matrix method was developed to represent the multilayer film and characterize its performance. Simulation using high frequency structure simulator shows that a crossed dipole, as an example, can achieve a beamwidth of more than at the frequency of 12.45 GHz after compensation. Finally, conclusions and future work about this compensation method are presented.

  14. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal-Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Li-Ming; GU Ben-Yuan; ZHOU Yun-Song

    2007-01-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure ofair-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  15. South Polar Residual Cap Geomorphology and Inferred Environmental Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A.; Pathare, A.

    2003-12-01

    this varies from area to area. These features are smaller in scale than SCF?s and so may have information pertaining to more recent environmental events. We will present results from several avenues of research that we are pursuing: We are investigating the overall mass budget of the SRC. If the mass lost from expanding depressions is not condensed elsewhere on the cap then the SRC will disappear within a few Martian centuries. It seems unlikely to us that we are observing Mars at such a special time in its history. A large range of expansion rates is possible depending on the subsurface albedo profile (3,5). We will attempt to measure the subsurface albedo by examining images of exposed SCF walls. We are also improving our model to more accurately date features and by extension the environmental events that triggered their initiation. Previously we always initiated our modeled depressions from small pre-existing surface features. We are more closely investigating the genesis of SRC features and what environmental changes are required to cause them. We will continue to catalogue new population statistics for different regions in the SRC Each distinct feature population that we can identify may give us information on previous environmental events. Investigations into SRC features have the potential to describe changes in the Martian polar environment over timescales of millennia. It will provide a link from present conditions to longer-term variations in Martian climate, which are perhaps recorded in the layered deposits. [1] Thomas et al., Nature, 404. [2] Malin et al., Science, 294. [3] Byrne and Ingersoll, GRL, 30. [4] Malin and Edgett, JGR, 106. [5] Byrne and Ingersoll, Science, 299.

  16. Effective Pyroelectric Coefficient and Polarization Offset of Compositionally Step-like Graded Ferroelectric Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Hai-Xia; WU Yin-Zhong; LI Zhen-Ya

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the effective pyroelectric coefficient and polarization offset of the compositionally step-like graded multilayer ferroelectric structures have been studied by use of the first-principles approach. It is exhibited that the dielectric gradient has a nontrivial influence on the effective pyroelectric coefficient, but has a little influence on the polarization offset; and the polarization gradient plays an important role in the abnormal hysteresis loop phenomenon of the co.mpositionally step-like graded ferroelectric structures. Moreover, the origin of the polarization offset is explored,which can be attributed to the polarization gradient in the compositionally step-like graded structure.

  17. An Examination of Directional Discontinuities and Magnetic Polarity Changes around Interplanetary Sector Boundaries Using E > 2 keV Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Lin, R. P.

    1995-10-01

    Past studies of interplanetary magnetic sector boundaries have been based on the assumption that one can determine the field polarities by comparing the field directions with those of the nominal Parker spiral angles. Previous investigators have found evidence for decreases of ∣B∣, the magnitude of the magnetic fieldB, and increases of Θ, the angle betweenB and the ecliptic plane, at sector boundaries. Others have argued that the characteristic thickness of sector boundaries exceeds that of tangential discontinuities, making sector boundaries a separate class of structures. We use a simple technique for inferring the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields based on the assumption thatE > 2 keV electrons are always flowing along the magnetic field away from the Sun. Electron data from the UC Berkeley experiment on the ISEE-3 spacecraft are used to examine periods around several apparent sector boundaries in 1978 and 1979. We compare properties of (a) boundaries with field polarity changes and (b) large-angle (ω > 60°) directional discontinuities with no field polarity changes. We find no significant differences between the sector boundaries and the directional discontinuities in terms of associated decreases in ∣B∣ or of values of Θ. These results suggest no significant difference between sector boundaries and directional discontinuities other than the change in field polarities. Within limited statistics we find that about half the polarity changes would not have been identified using a requirement thatω > 90° and that half of theω > 120° discontinuities would have been misidentified as polarity changes.

  18. Biological Polarized-Light Signaling: Environment, Structure, and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-27

    polarized light in such a medium. The model is generalizable to any medium where polarization extinction and absolute attenuation of light can be measured...navigation in a nocturnal rainforest bee, Megalopta genalis. Our part of the work involved quantitating patterns and spectral properties of polarized light in

  19. Changing climate and microbial resources in polar realms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    of a varied compounds with wide ranging applications in many fields. It would be pertinent to examine their role in polar climate and appreciate the products that are already being harnessed from these regions. Then it would be possible to chalk out...

  20. Structural origin of circularly polarized iridescence in jeweled beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crne, Matija; Sharma, Vivek; Park, Jung O.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2010-03-01

    The iridescent metallic green beetle, Chrysina gloriosa, selectively reflects left circularly polarized light. The exoskeleton is decorated by hexagonal cells (˜10 micron) that coexist with pentagons and heptagons. We find that the fraction of hexagons decreases with an increase in curvature. In bright field microscopy, each cell contains a bright yellow core, placed in a greenish cell with yellowish border, but the core disappears in the dark field. Using confocal microscopy, we observe that these cells consist of nearly concentric, nested arcs that lie on surface of a shallow cone. We infer that the patterns are structurally and optically analogous to the focal conic domains formed spontaneously on the free surface of a cholesteric liquid crystal. The microstructure provides the bases for the morphogenesis as well as key insights for emulating the intricate optical response the exoskeleton of scarab beetles.

  1. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. S.Qureshi; SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus Torkar

    2011-01-01

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that ii initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation.%@@ The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric Held peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive).We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model.

  2. Fermionic out-of-plane structure of polarization singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    A new classification of circular polarization C points in three-dimensional polarization ellipse fields is proposed. The classification type depends on the out-of-plane variation of the polarization ellipse axis, in particular, whether the ellipse axes are in the plane of circular polarization one or three times. A minimal set of parameters for this classification are derived, and discussed in the context of the familiar in-plane C point classification into lemon, star, and monstar types. This new geometric classification is related to the M\\"obius index of polarization singularities recently introduced by Freund.

  3. Polar POLICRYPS diffractive structures generate cylindrical vector beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alj, Domenico; Caputo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.caputo@fis.unical.it; Umeton, Cesare [Department of Physics and CNR-NANOTEC University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Paladugu, Sathyanarayana [Soft Matter Lab, Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Volpe, Giovanni [Soft Matter Lab, Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-11-16

    Local shaping of the polarization state of a light beam is appealing for a number of applications. This can be achieved by employing devices containing birefringent materials. In this article, we present one such enables converting a uniformly circularly polarized beam into a cylindrical vector beam (CVB). This device has been fabricated by exploiting the POLICRYPS (POlymer-LIquid CRYstals-Polymer-Slices) photocuring technique. It is a liquid-crystal-based optical diffraction grating featuring polar symmetry of the director alignment. We have characterized the resulting CVB profile and polarization for the cases of left and right circularly polarized incoming beams.

  4. Does subduction polarity changes below the Alps? Inferences from analogue modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luth, S.; Willingshofer, E.; Sokoutis, D.; Cloetingh, S.

    2013-01-01

    The surface expression of a lateral polarity change of continental mantle lithosphere subduction has been studied by using lithosphere-scale physical models. Key parameters investigated were: the degree of lateral coupling between adjacent domains of opposing subduction polarity, the width of the zo

  5. Effect of spontaneous polarization change on current-voltage characteristics of thin ferroelectric films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Yu. V.; Lavrov, P. P.; Vorotilov, K. A.; Sigov, A. S.

    2015-03-01

    The role of a change in the spontaneous polarization charge in the formation of negative differential conductance regions of the current-voltage characteristics of thin ferroelectric films has been determined. It has been shown that the polarization recovery current, which appears due to partial depolarization of a preliminarily polarized film, prevails over the intrinsic leakage current of the ferroelectric film in the coercive field region and corresponds to the Weibull distribution. The influence of polarization recovery current decreases with decreasing voltage sweep rate.

  6. The Polarized Structure Function $g_{2} A Lattice Study Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Göckeler, M; Kürzinger, W; Oelrich, H; Rakow, P; Schierholz, G

    1999-01-01

    A recent lattice calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g_2 is revisited. It has been recognized that the twist-three operator, which gives rise to d_2, mixes non-perturbatively with operators of lower dimensions under renormalization. This changes the results substantially.

  7. Changing state structures: Outside in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasner, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    In explaining the development of institutional structures within states, social science analysis has focused on autochthonous factors and paid less attention to the way in which external factors, especially purposive agent-directed as opposed to more general environmental factors, can influence domestic authority structures. For international relations scholarship, this lacunae is particularly troubling or perhaps, just weird. If the international system is anarchical, then political leaders can pursue any policy option. In some cases, the most attractive option would be conventional state to state interactions, diplomacy, or war. In other instances, however, changing the domestic authority structures of other states might be more appealing. In some cases, domestic authority structures have been influenced through bargaining, and in others through power. Power may reflect either explicit agent-oriented decisions or social processes that reflect the practices, values, and norms of more powerful entities. PMID:22198756

  8. Growth, Employment and Structural Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggarwal, Aradhna

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the decomposition of GSDP growth per capita in Punjab via-a-vis 15 other states in India during 1993–94 and 2011–12 in terms of employment and productivity growth. Specifically, it focuses on the role of employment growth and structural change in employment on economic growth...... but structural shifts have paid off well in terms of diversification of the economy and their contribution to labour productivity especially for manufacturing. Overall employment effect had been negative but this was essentially due to contraction in the labour force; the employment rate effect turned out...

  9. Intensity-dependent change in polarization state of light in normal incidence on an isotropic nonlinear Kerr medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Prakash; Devendra K Singh

    2010-03-01

    It is shown that all optical polarization states of light except plane and circular polarization states undergo an intensity-dependent change in normal incidence of light in an isotropic nonlinear Kerr medium. This effect should be detectable and we propose an experiment for detecting nonlinear susceptibility involved in that part of nonlinear polarization, which depends on the polarization state of light also.

  10. Spatial Structures of Polar Magnetic Field During the Last Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Sun's polar field is closely related to the large scale coronal structure. It is important for coronal modeling and greatly affects the result. However, the polar field is not well observed because the ecliptic lies near the Sun's equator. In this study, we make use of the data from various observatories (MDI/WSO/MWO/Hinode) to study its spatial structures during the last solar cycle. The result is useful to improve the polar field extrapolation schemes.

  11. Structure in the polarized Galactic synchrotron emission, in particular `depolarization canals'

    CERN Document Server

    Haverkorn, M; De Bruyn, A G

    2004-01-01

    The polarized component of the diffuse radio synchrotron emission of our Galaxy shows structure, which is apparently unrelated to the structure in total intensity, on many scales. The structure in the polarized emission can be due to several processes or mechanisms. Some of those are related to the observational setup, such as beam depolarization -- the vector combination and (partial) cancellation of polarization vectors within a synthesized beam --, or the insensitivity of a synthesis telescope to structure on large scales, also known as the 'missing short spacings problem'. Other causes for structure in the polarization maps are intrinsic to the radiative transfer of the emission in the warm ISM, which induces Faraday rotation and depolarization. We use data obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at 5 frequencies near 350 MHz to estimate the importance of the various mechanisms in producing structure in the linearly polarized emission. In the two regions studied here, which are both at posi...

  12. Empiricism, Structuralism and Scientific Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Lucero

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades there was a structural turn in the classic debate between scientific realists and antirealists with empiricist orientation. Two main arguments support the realist conception: the ‘No Miracle Argument’ and the thesis of continuity. The thesis of continuity states that some parts of a theory are retained when a scientific change takes place. In a current famous article, J. Worrall (1989 defends the continuity argument by stating that what is preserved in the succession of two empirically successful theories are the relations among the postulated entities and not the nature of the relata (structural or syntactical realism. Based on this perspective, van Fraassen introduces his position named Empiricist Structuralism, which claims that only the structures of phenomena are retained. This conception tries to explain the success of science and at the same time defend the continuity of structures. I will demonstrate in this paper that the accomplishment of the two mentioned requirements imply a capitulation in favor of realistic intuitions.

  13. The atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells and the green gap problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, C J; Griffiths, J T; Tang, F; Oehler, F; Findlay, S D; Zheng, C; Etheridge, J; Martin, T L; Bagot, P A J; Moody, M P; Sutherland, D; Dawson, P; Schulz, S; Zhang, S; Fu, W Y; Zhu, T; Kappers, M J; Oliver, R A

    2017-02-03

    We have used high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), aberration-corrected quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (Q-STEM), atom probe tomography (APT) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the atomic structure of (0001) polar and (11-20) non-polar InGaN quantum wells (QWs). This paper provides an overview of the results. Polar (0001) InGaN in QWs is a random alloy, with In replacing Ga randomly. The InGaN QWs have atomic height interface steps, resulting in QW width fluctuations. The electrons are localised at the top QW interface by the built-in electric field and the well-width fluctuations, with a localisation energy of typically 20meV. The holes are localised near the bottom QW interface, by indium fluctuations in the random alloy, with a localisation energy of typically 60meV. On the other hand, the non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs contain nanometre-scale indium-rich clusters which we suggest localise the carriers and produce longer wavelength (lower energy) emission than from random alloy non-polar InGaN QWs of the same average composition. The reason for the indium-rich clusters in non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs is not yet clear, but may be connected to the lower QW growth temperature for the (11-20) InGaN QWs compared to the (0001) polar InGaN QWs.

  14. Finite element analysis of the dynamic behavior of radially polarized Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Ramkumar; Cui, Fangsen

    2016-04-01

    In the traditional layered piezoelectric structures, high stress concentrations could cause the structural failure in interlayer surfaces due to repeated strain reversals. To overcome the performance limitations of these structures, the concept of Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) has been introduced to improve the lifetime, integrity, and reliability of these structures. In this paper, the free and forced vibration of radially polarized Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) cylinders under different sets of loading are studied. Material properties such as piezoelectric, elastic and permittivity are assumed to change along its thickness, based on a specific gradation function. Four-parameter power law distribution is used to grade the volume fraction of the constituents comprising of PZT-5A and PZT-5H. Material property is assumed to be temperature dependent for a few numerical studies. The present modeling approach is validated by comparing the free and forced vibration of radially polarized Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) cylinders with those reported in the literature. The effects of material composition, loading and boundary conditions on the dynamic behavior of FGP cylinder are described. Since the modeling of functionally graded piezoelectric systems is challenging, the present study can help in the design and analysis of FGP cylinders.

  15. Effect of the cathodic polarization on structural and morphological proprieties of FTO and ITO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid, C.C. Plá [LabSiN, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Spada, E.R., E-mail: edspada@gmail.com [LabSiN, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Sartorelli, M.L. [LabSiN, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    This paper deals on the influence of the potentiodynamic stress on structural and morphological proprieties of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO, SnO{sub 2}:F) and indium tin oxide (ITO, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Sn) commercial substrates. The potential range is between 0.0 and −2.0 (V/SCE) using an electrolyte with neutral pH. The electrochemical behavior was investigated from cyclic voltammetry technique and chronopotentiometric curves. These electrochemical results were associated to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra and morphology images acquired by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The main results show that structural and morphological properties of FTO substrates after cathodic polarization remain near constant when compared with ITO films. The ITO substrates show morphological changes after treatment and the XRD patterns indicate the formation of a crystalline structure with In metallic characteristic, at neutral pH.

  16. Radiative recombination mechanisms in polar and non-polar InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, T. J.; Ali, M.; Zhu, T.; Pristovsek, M.; Oliver, R. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    We study the photoluminescence internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and recombination dynamics in a pair of polar and non-polar InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) light-emitting diode (LED) structures as a function of excess carrier density and temperature. In the polar LED at 293 K, the variation of radiative and non-radiative lifetimes is well described by a modified ABC type model which accounts for the background carrier concentration in the QWs due to unintentional doping. As the temperature is reduced, the sensitivity of the radiative lifetime to excess carrier density becomes progressively weaker. We attribute this behaviour to the reduced mobility of the localised electrons and holes at low temperatures, resulting in a more monomolecular like radiative process. Thus we propose that in polar QWs, the degree of carrier localisation determines the sensitivity of the radiative lifetime to the excess carrier density. In the non-polar LED, the radiative lifetime is independent of excitation density at room temperature, consistent with a wholly excitonic recombination mechanism. These findings have significance for the interpretation of LED efficiency data within the context of the ABC recombination model.

  17. NHS System Reform: Structural Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ravaghi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Service (NHS was established in 1948 to provide equitable healthcare for all citizens. Over the years the NHS has gone under different reforms and changes. In 2002 the NHS launched one of its biggest changes in structure since its commencement in 1948. The scale of these changes are greater than those established following the white paper “Working for Patients” in 1989 (Conservative Government that indicated the introduction of the internal market (focus on efficiency. This review therefore proposes to give a brief summarize of the structural changes and current structure of the NHS in the England. The NHS plan was published in July 2000 (Labour Government and outlined a 10 year plan of investment in the NHS. This delineates a vision for a service planned around the patients and more responsive to patients’ needs. The Government emphasizes on the empowering of staff at all levels as a way to achieve this vision. "Shifting the Balance of Power" is part of the Government’s plans for implementation of the NHS Plan and has directed to the establishment of new structures. The main feature of change has been giving locally based Primary Care Trusts the role of running the NHS and, with the local authorities, improving health in their areas. The PCTs are receiving 75% of the NHS budget to act as primary services provider, commissioner (service purchaser, network developer and controller. In addition, all former Health Authorities have been abolished and new Strategic Health Authorities (SHA have been created to serve larger areas and with a more strategic role. The SHAs are responsible for developing strategic frameworks for the local health service; performance of the local health service; and building capacity in the local health service. The Department of Health is also refocusing to reflect these changes, including the abolition of its Regional Offices and relegating some of its operational responsibilities to SHAs and

  18. Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009). South is in the middle. North is at both ends. This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called 'Home Plate.' The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

  19. Close correlation between global air temperature change and polar motion during 1962-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei; Zhu, Lin; Gong, He; Shao, Yaping

    2016-10-01

    Polar motion is an important Earth orientation parameter, but our understanding of its relation to global climate change is highly uncertain. In this study, we examine the links between polar motion excitation and annual mean air temperature during the period of 1962-2013 and discuss the possible responsible mechanisms. The regions of positive correlation correspond well with the warming centers. Spectral analysis shows that they have strong signals at similar frequencies. Strong correlations are also found between the polar motion and surface air pressure and vertical integrated zonal wind. This implies that polar motion serves as an important indicator of global climate change, and thus, the feedbacks between the solid Earth and the climate system deserve careful considerations.

  20. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  1. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  2. Linear polarization Yb3+-doped fiber laser with novel innerclad structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Pinon, F.; Alvarez-Chavez, J.A.; Jaramillo-Vigueras, D.; Cruz-May, de la L.; Offerhaus, H.L.

    2008-01-01

    Results on high radiance Yb3+-doped fiber lasers with novel double innerclad structures (double-D clad and four hole) and polarized output at ≈1090 nm are presented. We have demonstrated >40% of the total output power being polarized, making the fiber laser suitable for LIDAR and second-harmonic gen

  3. A geometrical approach to structural change modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Stijepic, Denis

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model for studying the dynamics of economic structures. The model is based on qualitative information regarding structural dynamics, in particular, (a) the information on the geometrical properties of trajectories (and their domains) which are studied in structural change theory and (b) the empirical information from stylized facts of structural change. We show that structural change is path-dependent in this model and use this fact to restrict the number of future structural cha...

  4. Enhancement of hidden structures of early skin fibrosis using polarization degree patterns and Pearson correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Alexander P; Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Boccara, Albert C; Russo, Angelo; Smith, Paul; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2005-01-01

    The skin of athymic nude mice is irradiated with a single dose of x-ray irradiation that initiated fibrosis. Digital photographs of the irradiated mice are taken by illuminating the mouse skin with linearly polarized probe light of 650 nm. The specific pattern of the surface distribution of the degree of polarization enables the detection of initial skin fibrosis structures that were not visually apparent. Data processing of the raw spatial distributions of the degree of polarization based on Fourier filtering of the high-frequency noise improves subjective perception of the revealed structure in the images. In addition, Pearson correlation analysis provides information about skin structural size and directionality.

  5. A waveguide polarizer based on Si-coated Ti:LiNbO3 planar structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hangyou Lin(林航友); Jiping Ning(宁继平); Fan Geng(耿凡)

    2004-01-01

    @@ A novel design of a transverse magnetic(TM)-pass waveguide polarizer based on Si on an X-cut,Y-propagatiou Ti:LiNbO3 planar waveguide is presented.The eigenvalue functions of such structure havebeen obtained by using Wenzel-Kramers-Brillouin(WKB)method with modified Airy functions.Theintervals of the silicon thickness have been found which result in transverse electric(TE)light sufferingstrong attenuation while TM wave propagating with fairly low loss.A planar waveguide polarizer isfabricated and its polarization-dependent measurements lead to the best polarization extinction ratio~34dB and the insertion loss<0.4 dB.

  6. Generation of arbitrary radially polarized array beams by modulating the correlation structure

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Shijun; Li, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a convenient approach for simultaneously manipulating the amplitude and polarization of light beams by means of the modulation of the correlation structure. As an illustration, we constructed a periodic correlation structure that can generate an arbitrary radially polarized array (RPA) beam of a radial or rectangular symmetry array in the focal plane from a radially polarized (RP) beam. The physical realizability conditions for such source and the far-field beam condition are derived. It is illustrated that the beamlet shape and the state of polarization (SOP) can be effectively controlled by the initial correlation structure and the coherence width. Furthermore, by designing the source correlation structure, a tunable OK-shaped RPA beam and an optical cage are demonstrated, which can find widespread applications in non-destructive manipulation of particles and living biological cells. The arbitrariness in the design of correlation structure prompted us to find more convenient approaches for co...

  7. Changes in southern hemispheric polar amplification over the past 5 million years revealed by climate modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoencamp, Jori; Stap, Lennert; Tuenter, Erik; Lourens, Luc; van de Wal, Roderik

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge on polar amplification is important to relate high latitude climate records to global mean temperature changes. Several studies have pointed out that the strength of polar amplification in the Northern Hemisphere varies considerably due to the presence of large ice sheets and more sea ice during colder climate conditions. As a result, the polar amplification in the Northern Hemisphere decreases for warmer climates. In this study, we address the fact that these changes in the Northern Hemisphere also affect the polar amplification in the Southern Hemisphere. We study the Southern and Northern Hemisphere amplification together over the past 5 million years with the CLIMBER-2 intermediate complexity model. Radiation, land ice extent and height, and greenhouse gases are prescribed as forcing. We find that in contrast to the reduction in polar amplification in the Northern Hemisphere, polar amplification in the Southern Hemisphere increases for warmer climates. The amplification decreases in the Northern Hemisphere from 2.7 during glacial conditions to 1.6 for a pre-industrial climate, which is line with other climate simulations. Over the same CO2 range the southern hemispheric polar amplification increases from 1 to 1.6. This is caused by the fact that the atmospheric transport needed to balance the radiation surplus in the equatorial region needs to be compensated by relatively stronger transport of energy in Southern direction while the transport in Northern direction reduces. This reduction in Northern direction is driven by less (land and sea) ice resulting in a smaller meridional gradient in Northern direction and hence a smaller atmospheric transport. As a consequence, the traditional scaled (with LGM temperature) Dome C record needs to be corrected with a maximum of 0.6 degrees half-way glacial and interglacial conditions, if it is to be interpreted as global mean temperature change indicator. While this changes the amplitude, the phasing of

  8. Joint effect of polarization and the propagation path of a light beam on its intrinsic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Sarkew; Kundikova, Nataliya

    2016-08-22

    The well-known effects of the spin-orbit interactions of light are manifestations of the pair's mutual influence of the three types of angular momentum (AM) of light, namely, the spin AM, the extrinsic orbital AM and the intrinsic orbital AM. Here we propose a convenient classification of the effects of the spin-orbit interactions of light and we observe one of the new effects in the frame of this classification, which is determined by the joint influence of two types of the AM on the third type of the AM, namely, the influence of the spin AM and the extrinsic orbital AM on the intrinsic orbital AM. We experimentally studied the propagation of circularly polarized light through an optical fiber coiled into a helix. We have found that the spin AM and the helix parameters affect the spatial structure of the radiation transmitted through the optical fiber. We found out that the structure of the light field rotates when changing the sign of circular polarization. The angle of rotation depends on the parameters of the helix. The results can be used to develop the general theory of spinning particles and can find application in metrology methods and nanooptics devices.

  9. Surface chemistry and electronic structure of nonpolar and polar GaN films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Monu; Krishna, T.C. Shibin; Aggarwal, Neha; Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Surface chemistry and electronic structure of polar and nonpolar GaN is reported. • Influence of polarization on electron affinity of p & np GaN films is investigated. • Correlation between surface morphology and polarity has been deduced. - Abstract: Photoemission and microscopic analysis of nonpolar (a-GaN/r-Sapphire) and polar (c-GaN/c-Sapphire) epitaxial gallium nitride (GaN) films grown via RF-Molecular Beam Epitaxy is reported. The effect of polarization on surface properties like surface states, electronic structure, chemical bonding and morphology has been investigated and correlated. It was observed that polarization lead to shifts in core level (CL) as well as valence band (VB) spectra. Angle dependent X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic analysis revealed higher surface oxide in polar GaN film compared to nonpolar GaN film. On varying the take off angle (TOA) from 0° to 60°, the Ga−O/Ga−N ratio varied from 0.11–0.23 for nonpolar and 0.17–0.36 for polar GaN film. The nonpolar film exhibited N-face polarity while Ga-face polarity was perceived in polar GaN film due to the inherent polarization effect. Polarization charge compensated surface states were observed on the polar GaN film and resulted in downward band bending. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic measurements revealed electron affinity and ionization energy of 3.4 ± 0.1 eV and 6.8 ± 0.1 eV for nonpolar GaN film and 3.8 ± 0.1 eV and 7.2 ± 0.1 eV for polar GaN film respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements divulged smooth morphology with pits on polar GaN film. The nonpolar film on the other hand showed pyramidal structures having facets all over the surface.

  10. Climate change and the increasing impact of polar bears on bird populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke eProp

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is becoming warmer at a high rate, and contractions in the extent of sea ice are currently changing the habitats of marine top-predators dependent on ice. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus depend on sea ice for hunting seals. For these top-predators, longer ice-free seasons are hypothesized to force the bears to hunt for alternative terrestrial food, such as eggs from colonial breeding birds. We analyzed time-series of polar bear observations at four locations on Spitsbergen (Svalbard and one in east Greenland. Summer occurrence of polar bears, measured as the probability of encountering bears and the number of days with bear presence, has increased significantly from the 1970/80s to the present. The shifts in polar bear occurrence coincided with trends for shorter sea ice seasons and less sea ice during the spring in the study area. This resulted in a strong inverse relationship between the probability of bear encounters on land and the length of the sea ice season. Within ten years after their first appearance on land, polar bears had advanced their arrival dates by almost 30 days. Direct observations of nest predation showed that polar bears may severely affect reproductive success of the barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis, common eider (Somateria mollissima and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus. Nest predation was strongest in years when the polar bears arrived well before hatch, with more than 90% of all nests being predated. The results are similar to findings from Canada, and large-scale processes, such as climate and subsequent habitat changes, are pinpointed as the most likely drivers in various parts of the Arctic. We suggest that the increasing, earlier appearance of bears on land in summer reflects behavioral adaptations by a small segment of the population to cope with a reduced hunting range on sea ice. This exemplifies how behavioral adaptations may contribute to the cascading effects of climate change.

  11. Multiple scattering of polarized light in disordered media exhibiting short-range structural correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynck, Kevin; Pierrat, Romain; Carminati, Rémi

    2016-09-01

    We develop a model based on a multiple scattering theory to describe the diffusion of polarized light in disordered media exhibiting short-range structural correlations. Starting from exact expressions of the average field and the field spatial correlation function, we derive a radiative transfer equation for the polarization-resolved specific intensity that is valid for weak disorder and we solve it analytically in the diffusion limit. A decomposition of the specific intensity in terms of polarization eigenmodes reveals how structural correlations, represented via the standard anisotropic scattering parameter g , affect the diffusion of polarized light. More specifically, we find that propagation through each polarization eigenchannel is described by its own transport mean free path that depends on g in a specific and nontrivial way.

  12. Multiple scattering of polarized light in disordered media exhibiting short-range structural correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Vynck, Kevin; Carminati, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model based on a multiple scattering theory to describe the diffusion of polarized light in disordered media exhibiting short-range structural correlations. Starting from exact expressions of the average field and the field spatial correlation function, we derive a radiative transfer equation for the polarization-resolved specific intensity that is valid for weak disorder and we solve it analytically in the diffusion limit. A decomposition of the specific intensity in terms of polarization eigenmodes reveals how structural correlations, represented via the standard anisotropic scattering parameter $g$, affect the diffusion of polarized light. More specifically, we find that propagation through each polarization eigenchannel is described by its own transport mean free path that depends on $g$ in a specific and non-trivial way.

  13. Generation of arbitrary radially polarized array beams by manipulating correlation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shijun; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xianlong; Cai, Yangjian; Li, Zhenhua

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate a convenient approach for simultaneously manipulating the amplitude and polarization of light beams by means of the modulation of the correlation structure. As an illustration, an arbitrary radially polarized array (RPA) beam of a radial or rectangular symmetry array is obtained by focusing a conventional radially polarized beam with specially designed correlation structure. The physical realizability conditions for such source and the far-field beam condition are derived. It is illustrated that the far-field beamlet shape and the state of polarization are strictly controlled by the initial correlation structure and the correlation parameter. Furthermore, by designing the source correlation structure, a tunable OK-shaped RPA beam and an optical cage are demonstrated, which can find widespread applications in micro-nano engineering and non-destructive manipulation of living biological cells.

  14. Changes in aerobic performance, body composition, and physical activity in polar explorers during a year-long stay at the polar station in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejczyk, Marcin; Araźny, Andrzej; Opyrchał, Marta

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in physical activity, aerobic performance, and body composition in polar explorers during a 1-year stay at the polar station. The study group consisted of 10 people, including 8 men and 2 women. Aerobic performance (maximal oxygen uptake), physical activity, body mass, and composition were evaluated for the polar explores of the Polish Polar Station prior to departure, and then during their stay at the station for a period of 1 year. The measurements were performed every 3 months. Compared to the measurements taken before going to the polar station, aerobic performance significantly (p = 0.02) increased in the first 3 months of residing at the polar station and then remained relatively stable for the following duration of the stay. In the first 3 months of the stay, we also observed the highest level of physical activity in participants. In the polar explorers, no significant (p > 0.05) body fatness changes were noted. Nonetheless, lean body mass, body mass, and BMI significantly increased compared to the measurements taken before departure to the polar station. The greatest changes in aerobic performance, physical activity, and body composition were observed during the first 3 months after arrival to the Arctic and then, despite changing biometeorological conditions, they remained stable for the next months of the stay. We recommend the introduction of a physical preparation program before departing to the polar station to improve explorers' physical fitness, so that they can meet the physical challenges they are faced with immediately after arrival to the polar station.

  15. Polarization dependence of the metamagnetic resonance of cut-wire-pair structure by using plasmon hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dung, Nguyen Van; Yoo, Young Joon; Lee, Young Pak [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tung, Nguyen Thanh [KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-07-15

    The influence of lattice constants on the electromagnetic behavior of a cut-wire-pair (CWP) structure has been elucidated. In this report, we performed both simulations and experiments to determine the influence of polarization on the metamagnetic resonance of the CWP structure. The key finding is the result of an investigation on the plasmon hybridization between the two CWs, which showed that the polarization of the incident wave was affected. Good agreement between numerical simulation and measurement is achieved.

  16. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn D Rode

    Full Text Available Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013 when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia, highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions.

  17. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Wilson, Ryan R.; Regehr, Eric V.; St. Martin, Michelle; Douglas, David C.; Olson, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986–1995 and 2008–2013) when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia), highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions. PMID:26580809

  18. Variation of moduli spaces and Donaldson invariants under change of polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsrud, G; Ellingsrud, Geir; G\\"ottsche, Lothar

    1994-01-01

    The paper determines the change of moduli spaces of rank $2$ sheaves on surfaces with $p_g=0$ under change of polarization and the corresponding change of the Donaldson invariants. In this revised version we have made some minor stylistic changes in the previous text. In addition we have added a final chapter of about 20 pages (announced in the previous version), in which the six lowest order terms (three of them non-zero) of the change are computed explicitely using computations in the cohomology of Hilbert schemes of points.

  19. Effects of Si-doping on structural, electrical, and optical properties of polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Shuchang; Wang, Yi; Luan, Huakai; Dai, Qian; Wu, Zili; Zhao, Jianguo; Cui, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and non-polar (11 2 bar 0) -oriented a-plane wurtzite AlGaN epi-layers were successfully grown on polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and semi-polar (1 1 bar 02) -oriented r-plane sapphire substrates, respectively with various Si-doping levels in a low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The morphological, structural, electrical, and optical properties of the polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall effect, and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization results show that Si dopants incorporated into the polar and non-polar AlGaN films induced a relaxation of compressive residual strain and a generation of biaxial tensile strain on the surface in consequence of the dislocation climbing. In particular, it was found that the Si-induced compressive strain relaxation in the non-polar AlGaN samples can be promoted by the structural anisotropy as compared with the polar counterparts. The gradually increased relaxation of compressive residual strain in both polar and non-polar AlGaN samples with increasing Si-doping level was attributed to the Si-induced enhancement in the opportunity for the dislocations to interact and annihilate. This implies that the crystal quality for both polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers can be remarkably improved by Si-doping.

  20. The domain structure and polarization retention properties of PT/PZT/PT ferroelectric thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG LongHai; Yu Jun; ZHAO SuLing; ZHENG ChaoDuan; WANG YunBo; GAO JunXiong

    2007-01-01

    3The Research & Test Center of Materials, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, ChinaThe highly oriented perovskite-phase PT/PZT/PT ferroelectric thin film was prepared by sol-gel method. The domain structures and polarization retention properties were investigated by scanning force microscopy. The amplitude and phase images of piezoresponse show complex various contrasts of dark, bright and gray.The complex variation of contrast in piezoresponse images results from the perplexing orientation of grains and arrangement of domains in the ferroelectric films.The bright and dark areas in phase images correspond to top-to-bottom and bottom-to-top polarization oriented c-domain, respectively. The gray areas are c-domains with the polarization vector deviating from the direction normal to the film plane. The surface potential images of EFM are bright contrast, which is due to positive charges trapped on the film surface after being polarized by positive voltage. And the brighter contrast is obtained from the higher electric field. The time-dependent surface potential images and line potential profiles show that the potential decays with time. And the decay in the region polarized by higher electric field is faster, especially at 15 min. This indicates that the polarization retention is related to the polarized electric field. Better retention properties may be obtained from a proper polarized electric field.

  1. The domain structure and polarization retention properties of PT/PZT/PT ferroelectric thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The highly oriented perovskite-phase PT/PZT/PT ferroelectric thin film was pre- pared by sol-gel method. The domain structures and polarization retention proper- ties were investigated by scanning force microscopy. The amplitude and phase images of piezoresponse show complex various contrasts of dark, bright and gray. The complex variation of contrast in piezoresponse images results from the per- plexing orientation of grains and arrangement of domains in the ferroelectric films. The bright and dark areas in phase images correspond to top-to-bottom and bot- tom-to-top polarization oriented c-domain, respectively. The gray areas are c-domains with the polarization vector deviating from the direction normal to the film plane. The surface potential images of EFM are bright contrast, which is due to positive charges trapped on the film surface after being polarized by positive volt- age. And the brighter contrast is obtained from the higher electric field. The time-dependent surface potential images and line potential profiles show that the potential decays with time. And the decay in the region polarized by higher electric field is faster, especially at 15 min. This indicates that the polarization retention is related to the polarized electric field. Better retention properties may be obtained from a proper polarized electric field.

  2. Vectorial Structure of Non-Paraxial Linearly Polarized Gaussian Beam in Far Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guo-Quan; CHEN Liang; NI Yong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    @@ According to the vectorial structure of non-paraxial electromagnetic beams and the method of stationary phase,the analytical TE and TM terms of non-paraxial linearly polarized Gaussian beam are presented in the far field.The influence of linearly polarized angle on the relative energy flux distributions of the whole beam and its TE and TM terms is studied. The beam spot of the TE term is perpendicular to the direction of linearly polarized angle, while that of the TM term coincides with the direction of linearly polarized angle. The whole beam spot is elliptical, and the long axis is located at the direction of linearly polarized angle. The relative energy flux distribution of the TE term is relatively centralized in the direction perpendicular to the linearly polarized angle.While that of the TM term is relatively centralized in the direction of linearly polarized angle. To obtain the isolated TM and TE terms, a polarizer should be put at the long and the short axis of the whole beam. spot,respectively.

  3. Radio polarization and magnetic field structure in M 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Urbanik, M.; Beck, R.; Han, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We observed total and polarized radio continuum emission from the spiral galaxy M 101 at λλ 6.2 cm and 11.1 cm with the Effelsberg telescope. The angular resolutions are 2.´ 5 (=5.4 kpc) and 4.´ 4 (=9.5 kpc), respectively. We use these data to study various emission components in M 101 and properties of the magnetic field. Separation of thermal and non-thermal emission shows that the thermal emission is closely correlated with the spiral arms, while the non-thermal emission is more smoothly distributed indicating diffusion of cosmic ray electrons away from their places of origin. The radial distribution of both emissions has a break near R = 16 kpc (=7.´ 4), where it steepens to an exponential scale length of L ≃ 5 kpc, which is about 2.5 times smaller than at Rlength of both fields is about 20 kpc, which implies that they decrease to about 0.3 μG at R = 70 kpc, which is the largest optical extent. The equipartition strength of the total field ranges from nearly 10 μG at R< 2 kpc to 4 μG at R = 22-24 kpc. As the random field dominates in M 101 (Bran/Bord ≃ 2.4), wavelength-independent polarization is the main polarization mechanism. We show that energetic events causing H i shells of mean diameter < 625 pc could partly be responsible for this. At radii < 24 kpc, the random magnetic field depends on the star formation rate/area, ΣSFR, with a power-law exponent of b = 0.28 ± 0.02. The ordered magnetic field is generally aligned with the spiral arms with pitch angles that are about 8° larger than those of H i filaments. Based on observations with the 100 m telescope of the MPIfR at Effelsberg.FITS files of the images are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A114

  4. T-shaped polarization beam splitter based on two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlan; Shen, Hongjun; Li, Ting; Liu, Jie; Huang, Xianjian

    2016-12-01

    A T-shaped polarization beam splitter based on two-dimensional photonic crystal is proposed, which is composed of three waveguides: one input and two output. Unpolarized beams incident from the input port will be separated into two different polarization modes and outputted individually by two different coupling structures. Simulation results can be obtained by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In the normalized frequency range of 0.3456 extinction ratio is all 30dB for both modes. The polarization beam splitter attains the requirement we expected by analyzing simulation results.

  5. Asymmetric bistable reflection and polarization switching in a magnetic nonlinear multilayer structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuz, Vladimir R.; Novitsky, Denis V.; Prosvirnin, Sergey L.;

    2014-01-01

    -dimensional photonic crystal) with one of the layers doubled to create a defect where periodicity is violated. Strong enhancement of nonreciprocity is observed at the frequencies of the defect modes, where linearly polarized light incident from one side of the structure undergoes polarization rotation upon reflection....... This bistability is shown to result in abrupt switching between linear polarization of the output reflected light when the input intensity is varied. This switching is confirmed in finite-difference time-domain simulations, and its hysteresis character is established....

  6. Deep Inelastic Scattering of Polarized Electrons by Polarized $^3$He and the Study of the Neutron Spin Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Band, H R; Borel, H; Bosted, P E; Breton, V; Cates, G D; Chupp, T E; Dietrich, F S; Erbacher, R D; Fellbaum, J; Fonvieille, H; Gearhart, R A; Holmes, R; Hughes, E W; Johnson, J R; Kawall, D; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, S E; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marroncle, J; Meyer, W T; Meziani, Z E; Middleton, H; Morgenstern, J; Newbury, N R; Petratos, G G; Prepost, R; Roblin, Y; Rock, S E; Shapiro, G; Smith, T; Souder, P A; Spengos, M; Staley, F; Stuart, L M; Szalata, Z M; Terrien, Y; Thompson, A K; White, J L; Woods, M; Xu, J; Young, C C; Zapalac, G H

    1996-01-01

    The neutron longitudinal and transverse asymmetries $A^n_1$ and $A^n_2$ have been extracted from deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons by a polarized $^3$He target at incident energies of 19.42, 22.66 and 25.51 GeV. The measurement allows for the determination of the neutron spin structure functions $g^n_1 (x,Q^2)$ and $g^n_2(x,Q^2)$ over the range $0.03 < x < 0.6$ at an average $Q^2$ of 2 (GeV$/c)^2$. The data are used for the evaluation of the Ellis-Jaffe and Bjorken sum rules. The neutron spin structure function $g^n_1 (x,Q^2)$ is small and negative within the range of our measurement, yielding an integral ${\\int_{0.03}^{0.6} g_1^n(x) dx}= -0.028 \\pm 0.006 (stat) \\pm 0.006 (syst) $. Assuming Regge behavior at low $x$, we extract $\\Gamma_1^n=\\int^1_0 g^n_1(x)dx = -0.031 \\pm 0.006 (stat)\\pm 0.009 (syst) $. Combined with previous proton integral results from SLAC experiment E143, we find $\\Gamma_1^p - evaluated using $\\alpha_s = 0.32\\pm 0.05$.

  7. Probing space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Ananthanarayan

    2007-11-01

    At the international linear collider large beam polarization of both the electron and positron beams will enhance the signature of physics due to interactions that are beyond the standard model. Here we review our recently obtained results on a general model-independent method of determining for an arbitary one-particle inclusive state the space-time structure of such new physics through the beam polarization dependence and angular distribution of the final state particle.

  8. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pancic, Marina; Hansen, Per Juel; Tammilehto, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1) and different temperatures (1, 5, and 8...... C) to simulate changes from present to plausible future levels. Each of the 12 scenarios was run for 7 days, and a significant interaction between temperature and pH on growth was detected. By combining increased temperature and acidification, the two factors counterbalanced each other...... the strains was larger than the variation observed due to the whole range of changes in either pH or temperature. Climate change may therefore not affect the species as such, but may lead to changes in the population structure of the species, with the strains exhibiting high phenotypic plasticity, in terms...

  9. The research of Polar sea ice and its role in climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As an important part of global climate system, the Polar sea ice is effecting on global climate changes through ocean surface radiation balance, mass balance, energy balance as well as the circulating of sea water temperature and salinity. Sea ice research has a centuries-old history. The many correlative sea ice projects were established through the extensive international cooperation during the period from the primary research of intensity and the bearing capacity of sea ice to the development of sea/ice/air coupled model. Based on these researches, the sea ice variety was combined with the global climate change. All research about sea ice includes: the physical properties and processes of sea ice and its snow cover, the ecosystem of sea ice regions, sea ice and upper snow albedo, mass balance of sea ice regions, sea ice and climate coupled model. The simulation suggests that the both of the area and volume of polar sea ice would be reduced in next century. With the developing of the sea ice research, more scientific issues are mentioned. Such as the interaction between sea ice and the other factors of global climate system, the seasonal and regional distribution of polar sea ice thickness, polar sea ice boundary and area variety trends, the growth and melt as well as their influencing factors, the role of the polynya and the sea/air interactions. We should give the best solutions to all of the issues in future sea ice studying.

  10. Emergent Structures in an Active Polar Fluid : dynamics of shape, scattering and merger

    CERN Document Server

    Husain, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Spatially localised defect structures emerge spontaneously in a hydrodynamic description of an active polar fluid comprising polar 'actin' filaments and 'myosin' motor proteins that (un)bind to filaments and exert active contractile stresses. These emergent defect structures are characterized by distinct textures and can be either static or mobile - we derive effective equations of motion for these 'extended particles' and analyse their shape, kinetics, interactions and scattering. Depending on the impact parameter and propulsion speed, these active defects undergo elastic scattering or merger. Our results are relevant for the dynamics of actomyosin-dense structures at the cell cortex, reconstituted actomyosin complexes and 2D active colloidal gels.

  11. Changing state structures: Outside in

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen D. Krasner

    2011-01-01

    In explaining the development of institutional structures within states, social science analysis has focused on autochthonous factors and paid less attention to the way in which external factors, especially purposive agent-directed as opposed to more general environmental factors, can influence domestic authority structures. For international relations scholarship, this lacunae is particularly troubling or perhaps, just weird. If the international system is anarchical, then political leaders ...

  12. The spin polarized band structure of strained thin films of gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldfried, C.; Dowben, P.A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Vescovo, E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1998-12-31

    The magnetic properties of strained thin films of gadolinium are characterized by a wave vector and thickness dependence of the exchange splitting. The spin-resolved band structure has been mapped by spin polarized photoemission, and provides considerable insight into the relationship between magnetism of local moment systems, and band structure.

  13. Polar alicyclic rings: synthesis and structure of all cis-1,2,3,4-tetrafluorocyclopentane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zeguo; Al-Maharik, Nawaf; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Bühl, Michael; O'Hagan, David

    2016-04-14

    The all-cis isomer of 1,2,3,4-tetrafluorocyclopentane is prepared and characterised by NMR and X-ray crystallography and the experimental structure compared with theory. The structure has a similarly high polarity to all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexanes despite the increased conformational flexibility of a cyclopentane.

  14. Non-invasive assessment of corneal crosslinking changes using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Caneiro, D.; Yamanari, M.; Fukuda, S.; Hoshi, S.; Nagase, S.; Oshika, T.; Yasuno, Y.; Collins, M.

    2013-03-01

    Collagen crosslinking (CXL) has shown promising results in the prevention of the progression of keratoconus and corneal ectasia. However, techniques for in vivo and in situ assessment of the treatment are limited. In this study, ex vivo porcine eyes were treated with a chemical CXL agent (glutaraldehyde), during which polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) recordings were acquired simultaneously to assess the sensitivity of the technique to assess changes in the cornea. The results obtained in this study suggest that PSOCT may be a suitable technique to measure CXL changes in situ and to assess the local changes in the treated region of the cornea.

  15. Identifying Surface Changes on HRSC Images of the Mars South Polar Residual CAP (sprc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS), Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board of the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004), including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007). The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004), spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003) and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004). Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015). HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and

  16. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  17. The change of GRB polarization angles in the magnetic-dominated jet model

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The polarimetric measurement on the prompt phase of GRB 100826A shows that the polarization angle changes $\\sim 90^{\\circ}$ between two adjacent time intervals. This phenomenon can be naturally interpreted in the framework of the magnetic-dominated-jet (MDJ) model. The MDJ model suggests that the bulk Lorentz factor of outflow increases as $\\Gamma\\propto r^{1/3}$ until reaching a saturated value $\\Gamma_{\\rm sat}$. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. A beam of synchrotron photons travel alone the jet direction and then collide with the cold electrons at the front of the jet. After the Compton scattering process, these photons are detected by the observer locating slightly off-axis. If photons are emitted before the bulk Lorentz factor saturates, the change of polarization angle is a natural result of the acceleration of outflow.

  18. Electrically tunable polarization splitting and conversion based on 1DPC structure with anisotropic defect layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi-Ghaleh, Kazem; Kazempour, Behnam; Phirouznia, Arash

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the tunability of wave polarization splitting and conversion in a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) structure containing anisotropic electro-optical material. The 4 × 4 transfer matrix method was used to study the transmission properties of the structure. The incident light was assumed to be perpendicular to the optical axes of the anisotropic defect layer. The results indicate that, in the absence of an applied external electric field, for an incident plane wave with P- or S-polarization, a single P- or S-polarized defect mode, respectively, appears with the photonic band gap. Application of the external electric field create two P-polarized and two S-polarized defect modes of equal intensity. As the applied field increased, the splitting mode increased. The photonic band edges of the induced P(S)-polarized mode decreased (increased) as the field increased. The results of this communication can be useful in the design of tunable mode-selecting optical filters.

  19. Plasmonic structure integrated single-photon detector configurations to improve absorptance and polarization contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Csete, Maria; Szenes, Andras; Szalai, Aniko; Szabo, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Configurations capable of maximizing both absorptance and polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) consisting of p=264 nm and P=792 nm periodic niobium-nitride (NbN) patterns on silica substrate. Global NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-orientation (gamma=90 azimuthal angle) and the highest polarization contrast is attained in S-orientation of all devices. Common nanophotonical origin of absorptance enhancement is collective resonance on nano-cavity-gratings with different profiles, which is promoted by coupling between localized modes in quarter wavelength MIM nano-cavities and laterally synchronized Brewster-Zenneck-type surface waves in integrated SNSPDs possessing a three-quarter-wavelength-scaled periodicity. The spectral sensitivity and dispersion characteristics reveal that device design specific optimal configurations...

  20. Polar organic solvent added to an aqueous solution changes hydrolytic property of lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Wakako; Ue, Akemi; Nagao, Akihiko

    2003-08-01

    For developing further uses of lipase as a biocatalyst, its hydrolytic activity toward some esters was investigated in a miscible solution composed of a buffer and a polar organic solvent. Twenty percent dimethylformamide, 35% dimethylsulfoxide, 15% 1,4-dioxane, 15% dimethoxyethane, and 2% diethoxyethane promoted the hydrolysis by a lipase from Rhizomucor miehei toward some hydrophobic substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl oleate, 4-methylumbelliferyl palmitate, and monoolein. While hydrolysis by this lipase toward the substrates with a relatively weak hydrophobicity (4-metylumbelliferyl heptanoate and 4-methylumbelliferyl nanoate) was suppressed by these solvents. A fluorometric analysis showed that the polar organic solvent in the buffer induced some conformational change around a tryptophan residue of R. miehei lipase. In addition to the influence of the miscible solvent on the solubility of the substrates, the conformational change of the protein induced by the miscible solvent would also affect the reactive properties of the lipase. Adding a polar organic solvent to an aqueous solution will be an efficient method for changing hydrolytic performance of lipases.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of polar MnO ultrathin film grown on Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Asish K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.

    2016-05-01

    Surface electronic structure of ultrathin polar MnO film was studied by Low-energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and Photoemission Spectroscopic (PES) techniques. Epitaxial monolayer to facet formation with increasing film thickness has been observed by LEED. Our LEED result shows p(2x2) surface reconstruction along with facet formation, stabilize the polar MnO(111) surface. The core levels and the valence band electronic structure of MnO films have been studied as a function of film thickness using X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy techniques.

  2. Discontinuous space variant sub-wavelength structures for generating radially polarized light in visible region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyani, Z.; Dmitriev, S.; Lindlein, N.; Leuchs, G.; Rusina, O.; Harder, I.

    2011-08-01

    A discontinuous space variant sub-wavelength dielectric grating is designed and fabricated for generating radially polarized light in visible region (l = 632.8 nm). The design is based on sub-wavelength silicon nitride structures introducing a retardation of p/2 by form birefringence, with space variant orientation of the optical axis. The pattern is divided into concentric ring segments with constant structural parameters, therefore reducing electron-beam writing time significantly. The design avoids the technological challenges encountered in the generation of a continuous space variant grating while maintaining good quality of the resulting polarization mode.

  3. Polarization-Controlled Broad Color Palette Based on an Ultrathin One-Dimensional Resonant Grating Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Ishwor; Shrestha, Vivek Raj; Park, Chul-Soon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Highly efficient polarization-tuned structural color filters, which are based on a one- dimensional resonant aluminum grating that is integrated with a silicon nitride waveguide, are proposed and demonstrated to feature a broad color palette. For such a metallic grating structure, transmissive color filtering is only feasible for the incident transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization due to its high reflection regarding the transverse-electric (TE) case; however, polarization-tuned customized colors can be efficiently achieved by optimizing the structural parameters like the duty ratio of the metallic grating. For the fabricated color filters, the transmission peaks, which are imputed to the resonance between the incident light and the guided modes that are supported by the dielectric waveguide, provided efficiencies as high as 90% and 70% for the TM and TE polarizations, respectively, as intended. Through the tailoring of the polarization, a group of filters with different grating periods were successfully exploited to produce a broad color palette spanning the entire visible band. Lastly, a nanoscale alphabetic pattern featuring a flexible combination of colorations was practically constructed via an arrangement of horizontal and vertical gratings.

  4. Low frequency observations of linearly polarized structures in the interstellar medium near the south Galactic pole

    CERN Document Server

    Lenc, Emil; Sun, X H; Sadler, E M; Willis, A G; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bell, M E; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Callingham, J R; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Deshpande, A A; Dillon, J S; Dwarkanath, K S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; For, B -Q; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Jacobs, D C; Kapinska, A D; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, H -S; Kratzenberg, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Murphy, T; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, S; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, S K; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S J; Trott, C; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    We present deep polarimetric observations at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), covering 625 deg^2 centered on RA=0 h, Dec=-27 deg. The sensitivity available in our deep observations allows an in-band, frequency-dependent analysis of polarized structure for the first time at long wavelengths. Our analysis suggests that the polarized structures are dominated by intrinsic emission but may also have a foreground Faraday screen component. At these wavelengths, the compactness of the MWA baseline distribution provides excellent snapshot sensitivity to large-scale structure. The observations are sensitive to diffuse polarized emission at ~54' resolution with a sensitivity of 5.9 mJy beam^-1 and compact polarized sources at ~2.4' resolution with a sensitivity of 2.3 mJy beam^-1 for a subset (400 deg^2) of this field. The sensitivity allows the effect of ionospheric Faraday rotation to be spatially and temporally measured directly from the diffuse polarized background. Our observations reveal large-sca...

  5. Structural changes concurrent with ferromagnetic transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Sen; Bao Hui-Xin; Zhou Chao; Wang Yu; Ren Xiao-Bing; Song Xiao-Ping; Yoshitaka Matsushita

    2013-01-01

    Ferromagnetic transition has generally been considered to involve only an ordering of magnetic moment with no change in the host crystal structure or symmetry,as evidenced by a wealth of crystal structure data from conventional X-ray diffractometry (XRD).However,the existence of magnetostriction in all known ferromagnetic systems indicates that the magnetic moment is coupled to the crystal lattice; hence there is a possibility that magnetic ordering may cause a change in crystal structure.With the development of high-resolution synchrotron XRD,more and more magnetic transitions have been found to be accompanied by simultaneous structural changes.In this article,we review our recent progress in understanding the structural change at a ferromagnetic transition,including synchrotron XRD evidence of structural changes at the ferromagnetic transition,a phenomenological theory of crystal structure changes accompanying ferromagnetic transitions,new insight into magnetic morphotropic phase boundaries (MPB) and so on.Two intriguing implications of non-centric symmetry in the ferromagnetic phase and the first-order nature of ferromagnetic transition are also discussed here.In short,this review is intended to give a self-consistent and logical account of structural change occurring simultaneously with a ferromagnetic transition,which may provide new insight for developing highly magneto-responsive materials.

  6. Chiral Nematic Structure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions and Films; Polarized Light and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G. Gray

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic liquid crystalline solutions and suspensions form chiral nematic phases that show a rich variety of optical textures in the liquid crystalline state. These ordered structures may be preserved in solid films prepared by evaporation of solvent or suspending medium. Film formation from aqueous suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC was investigated by polarized light microscopy, optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM. An attempt is made to interpret qualitatively the observed textures in terms of the orientation of the cellulose nanocrystals in the suspensions and films, and the changes in orientation caused by the evaporative process. Mass transfer within the evaporating droplet resulted in the formation of raised rings whose magnitude depended on the degree of pinning of the receding contact line. AFM of dry films at short length scales showed a radial orientation of the CNC at the free surface of the film, along with a radial height variation with a period of approximately P/2, ascribed to the anisotropic shrinkage of the chiral nematic structure.

  7. Monitoring changes in VO2max via the Polar FT40 in female collegiate soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Snarr, Ronald L; Williford, Hank N

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if the Polar FT40 could accurately track changes in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) in a group of female soccer players. Predicted VO2max (pVO2max) via the Polar FT40 and observed VO2max (aVO2max) from a maximal exercise test on a treadmill were determined for members of a collegiate soccer team (n = 20) before and following an 8-week endurance training protocol. Predicted (VO2max and aVO2max measures were compared at baseline and within 1 week post-training. Change values (i.e., the difference between pre to post) for each variable were also determined and compared. There was a significant difference in aVO2max (pre = 43.6 ± 2.4 ml · kg · min(-1), post = 46.2 ± 2.4 ml · kg · min(-1), P < 0.001) and pVO2max (pre = 47.3 ± 5.3 ml · kg · min(-1), post = 49.7 ± 6.2 ml · kg · min(-1), P = 0.009) following training. However, predicted values were significantly greater at each time point compared to observed values (P < 0.001 at pre and P = 0.008 at post). Furthermore, there was a weak correlation between the change in aVO2max and the change in pVO2max (r = 0.18, P = 0.45). The Polar FT40 does not appear to be a valid method for predicting changes in individual VO2max following 8 weeks of endurance training in female collegiate soccer players.

  8. Tailoring the crystal structure of individual silicon nanowires by polarized laser annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Haitian; Chen, Chun-Chung; Hung, Wei-Hsuan; Hsu, I-Kai; Theiss, Jesse; Zhou, Chongwu; Cronin, Stephen B

    2011-07-29

    We study the effect of polarized laser annealing on the crystalline structure of individual crystalline-amorphous core-shell silicon nanowires (NWs) using Raman spectroscopy. The crystalline fraction of the annealed spot increases dramatically from 0 to 0.93 with increasing incident laser power. We observe Raman lineshape narrowing and frequency hardening upon laser annealing due to the growth of the crystalline core, which is confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The anti-Stokes:Stokes Raman intensity ratio is used to determine the local heating temperature caused by the intense focused laser, which exhibits a strong polarization dependence in Si NWs. The most efficient annealing occurs when the laser polarization is aligned along the axis of the NWs, which results in an amorphous-crystalline interface less than 0.5 µm in length. This paper demonstrates a new approach to control the crystal structure of NWs on the sub-micron length scale.

  9. Long-living structures of photochromic salicylaldehyde azine: polarity and viscosity effects from nanoseconds to hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółek, Marcin; Burdziński, Gotard; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we report on the effects of solvent viscosity and polarity on the photochromic salicylaldehyde azine (SAA) molecule by examining the steady-state and UV-visible absorption results in the time scale from nanoseconds to hours, in solution and in a polymer film. For the neutral structure, the viscosity strongly affects the lifetime of the photochromic (trans-keto) tautomer by suppressing the second order quenching process, and thus increasing the photochrome lifetimes in highly viscous solvents to 500 μs in polar triacetine, and to 65 μs in non-polar squalane. Trapping SAA in a non-polar polymer film (polyethylene) results in further elongation of the photochromic lifetime (700 μs) by one order of magnitude (with respect to that in squalane), due to the retardation of the intramolecular back-isomerization. Another species, living significantly longer and absorbing more in the UV comparing to the photochrome, was identified as the syn-enol tautomer. The lifetime of this tautomer, created in a competitive mechanism to the photochrome creation, is much longer in non-polar solvents (hundreds of minutes) than in polar ones (tens of minutes), opposite to the trend observed for the photochrome. For the SAA anion, the transient living on the ns-μs time scale can be exclusively assigned to the triplet state, which is not observed for the neutral form at room temperature.

  10. Polarization switching and patterning in self-assembled peptide tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bdikin, Igor; Bystrov, Vladimir; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Gracio, José; Kopyl, Svitlana; Wojtas, Maciej; Mishina, Elena; Sigov, Alexander; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembled peptide nanotubes are unique nanoscale objects that have great potential for a multitude of applications, including biosensors, nanotemplates, tissue engineering, biosurfactants, etc. The discovery of strong piezoactivity and polar properties in aromatic dipeptides [A. Kholkin, N. Amdursky, I. Bdikin, E. Gazit, and G. Rosenman, ACS Nano 4, 610 (2010)] opened up a new perspective for their use as biocompatible nanoactuators, nanomotors, and molecular machines. Another, as yet unexplored functional property is the ability to switch polarization and create artificial polarization patterns useful in various electronic and optical applications. In this work, we demonstrate that diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes are indeed electrically switchable if annealed at a temperature of about 150 °C. The new orthorhombic antipolar structure that appears after annealing allows for the existence of a radial polarization component, which is directly probed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements. Observation of the relatively stable polarization patterns and hysteresis loops via PFM testifies to the local reorientation of molecular dipoles in the radial direction. The experimental results are complemented with rigorous molecular calculations and create a solid background of electric-field induced deformation of aromatic rings and corresponding polarization switching in this emergent material.

  11. A recent change in the optical and γ-ray polarization of the Crab nebula and pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.; Kyne, G.; Gouiffès, C.; Laurent, P.; Hallinan, G.; Redfern, R. M.; Shearer, A.

    2016-03-01

    We report on observations of the polarization of optical and γ-ray photons from the Crab nebula and pulsar system using the Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP), the Hubble Space Telescope, Advanced Camera for Surveys and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite (INTEGRAL). These, when combined with other optical polarization observations, suggest that the polarized optical emission and γ-ray polarization changes in a similar manner. A change in the optical polarization angle has been observed by this work, from 109.5 ± 0.7° in 2005 to 85.3 ± 1.4° in 2012. On the other hand, the γ-ray polarization angle changed from 115 ± 11° in 2003-2007 to 80 ± 12° in 2012-2014. Strong flaring activities have been detected in the Crab nebula over the past few years by the high-energy γ-ray missions Agile and Fermi, and magnetic reconnection processes have been suggested to explain these observations. The change in the polarized optical and γ-ray emission of the Crab nebula/pulsar as observed, for the first time, by GASP and INTEGRAL may indicate that reconnection is possibly at work in the Crab nebula. We also report, for the first time, a non-zero measure of the optical circular polarization from the Crab pulsar+knot system.

  12. Optical Sensing of Polarization States Changes in Meat due to the Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tománek, Pavel; Mikláš, Jan; Abubaker, Hamed Mohamed; Grmela, Lubomír

    2010-11-01

    Food materials or biological materials display large compositional variations, inhomogeneities, and anisotropic structures. The biological tissues consist of cells which dimensions are bigger than a wavelength of visible light, therefore Mie scattering of transmitted and reflected light occurs and different polarization states arise. The meat industry needs reliable meat quality information throughout the production process in order to guarantee high-quality meat products for consumers. The minor importance is still given to the food quality control and inspection during processing operations or storing conditions. The paper presents a quite simple optical method allowing measure the freshness or ageing of products. The principle is to study temporal characteristics of polarization states of forward or backward scattered laser light in the samples in function of meat ageing.

  13. Structure-Dependent Spin Polarization in Polymorphic CdS:Y Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Xiao, Bingxin; Zhao, Rui; Ma, Yanzhang; Zhang, Mingzhe

    2016-03-01

    Searching for the polymorphic semiconductor nanocrystals would provide precise and insightful structure-spin polarization correlations and meaningful guidance for designing and synthesizing high spin-polarized spintronic materials. Herein, the high spin polarization is achieved in polymorphic CdS:Y semiconductor nanocrystals. The high-pressure polymorph of rock-salt CdS:Y nanocrystals has been recovered at ambient conditions synthesized by the wurtzite CdS:Y nanocrystals as starting material under 5.2 GPa and 300 °C conditions. The rock-salt CdS:Y polymorph displays more robust room-temperature ferromagnetism than wurtzite sample, which can reach the ferromagnetic level of conventional semiconductors doped with magnetic transition-metal ions, mainly due to the significantly enhanced spin configuration and defect states. Therefore, crystal structure directly governs the spin configuration, which determines the degree of spin polarization. This work can provide experimental and theoretical methods for designing the high spin-polarized semiconductor nanocrystals, which is important for applications in semiconductor spintronics.

  14. Are Spine--Sheath Polarization Structures in the Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei Associated with Helical Magnetic Fields?

    CERN Document Server

    Gabuzda, Denise C; O'Neill, Eamonn L

    2014-01-01

    One possible origin for polarization structures across jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) with a central "spine" of orthogonal magnetic field and a "sheath" of longitudinal magnetic field along one or both edges of the jet is the presence of a helical jet magnetic field. Simultaneous Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) polarization observations of AGN displaying partial or full spine--sheath polarization structures were obtained at 4.6, 5.0, 7.9, 8.9, 12.9 and 15.4 GHz, in order to search for additional evidence for helical jet magnetic fields, such as transverse Faraday rotation gradients (due to the systematic change in the line-of-sight magnetic-field component across the jet). Results for eight sources displaying monotonic transverse Faraday rotation gradients with significances $\\geq 3\\sigma$ are presented here. Reversals in the directions of the transverse RM gradients with distance from the core or with time are detected in three of these AGNs. These can be interpreted as evidence for a nested helical m...

  15. Optical and microstructural properties of semi-polar (11-22)InGaN/GaN quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, Nicholas P.; Dawson, Philip [Photon Science Institute, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Johnston, Carol F.; Kappers, Menno J.; Hollander, Jonathan L.; McAleese, Clifford; Humphreys, Colin J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we report on a comparison of the optical properties of a series of semi-polar (11-22)InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures with those of a series of polar (0001) control samples. In the semi-polar structures we observe blue-shifts of the quantum well emission, increases of the radiative recombination rates and sharpening of the quantum well excitation spectra; all these changes are compatible with a decrease in the magnitude of the electric field strength with respect to the control samples. However the reduction in the electric field strength does not translate into an improvement in the photoluminescence internal quantum efficiency at room temperature. This failure we attribute to an increased density of non-radiative recombination centres, arising from the larger dislocation density in the (11-22) samples. Using TEM and STEM-HAADF measurements we have also observed gross well width fluctuations in the (11-22) samples which result in broadening of the photoluminescence spectra. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Dynamic Changes of Microglia/Macrophage M1 and M2 Polarization in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Vanessa; Iskandar, Cut Dahlia; Kegler, Kristel; Hansmann, Florian; Elmarabet, Suliman Ahmed; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kalkuhl, Arno; Deschl, Ulrich; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner; Beineke, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Microglia and macrophages play a central role for demyelination in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) virus infection, a commonly used infectious model for chronic-progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to determine the dynamic changes of microglia/macrophage polarization in TME, the spinal cord of Swiss Jim Lambert (SJL) mice was investigated by gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence. Virus persistence and demyelinating leukomyelitis were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and histology. Electron microscopy revealed continuous myelin loss together with abortive myelin repair during the late chronic infection phase indicative of incomplete remyelination. A total of 59 genes out of 151 M1- and M2-related genes were differentially expressed in TME virus-infected mice over the study period. The onset of virus-induced demyelination was associated with a dominating M1 polarization, while mounting M2 polarization of macrophages/microglia together with sustained prominent M1-related gene expression was present during the chronic-progressive phase. Molecular results were confirmed by immunofluorescence, showing an increased spinal cord accumulation of CD16/32(+) M1-, arginase-1(+) M2- and Ym1(+) M2-type cells associated with progressive demyelination. The present study provides a comprehensive database of M1-/M2-related gene expression involved in the initiation and progression of demyelination supporting the hypothesis that perpetuating interaction between virus and macrophages/microglia induces a vicious circle with persistent inflammation and impaired myelin repair in TME.

  17. The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by Δu and Δd of the polarized functions.

  18. Structural Changes in Chinese Food Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Gould, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    The article tests for structural food preference change in urban China using province-level panel data from 2002 to 2010. We employ the Generalized Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System to represent consumer preferences and estimate demand for seven food groups in a dynamic setting. This relaxes many of the restrictions on the demand models used in the literature on structural preference change. Our findings suggest that Chinese food preferences are continuing to evolve.

  19. Structural Organization of Insulin Fibrils Based on Polarized Raman Spectroscopy: Evaluation of Existing Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Valentin; Sawaya, Michael R; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-09-01

    Many different proteins undergo misfolding and self-assemble into amyloid fibrils, resulting in a range of neurodegenerative diseases. The limitations of conventional methods of structural biology for fibril characterization have led to the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy for obtaining quantitative structural information regarding the organization of amyloid fibrils. Herein, we report the orientation of selected chemical groups and secondary structure elements in aligned insulin fibrils, including β-sheets, which possess a high level of orientation in the cross-β core, and α-helices in the disordered portions of the fibrils. Strong orientation of disulfide bonds in amyloid fibrils was also revealed, indicating their association with the fibril core. The determined orientation of chemical groups provides strong constraints for modeling the overall structure of amyloid fibrils, including the core and disordered parts. The developed methodology allows for the validation of structural models proposed in the literature for amyloid fibrils. Specifically, the polarized Raman data obtained herein strongly agreed with two insulin fibril models (Jiménez et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2002, 99, 9196-9201 and Ivanova et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2009, 106, 18990-18995) yet revealed significant qualitative and quantitative differences. This work demonstrates the great potential of polarized Raman spectroscopy for structural characterization of anisotropic biological species.

  20. Polarizing properties and structure of the cuticle of scarab beetles from the Chrysina genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández del Río, Lía; Arwin, Hans; Järrendahl, Kenneth

    2016-07-01

    The optical properties of several scarab beetles have been previously studied but few attempts have been made to compare beetles in the same genus. To determine whether there is any relation between specimens of the same genus, we have studied and classified seven species from the Chrysina genus. The polarization properties were analyzed with Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry and the structural characteristics with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Most of the Chrysina beetles are green colored or have a metallic look (gold or silver). The results show that the green-colored beetles polarize reflected light mainly at off-specular angles. The gold-colored beetles polarize light left-handed near circular at specular reflection. The structure of the exoskeleton is a stack of layers that form a cusplike structure in the green beetles whereas the layers are parallel to the surface in the case of the gold-colored beetles. The beetle C. gloriosa is green with gold-colored stripes along the elytras and exhibits both types of effects. The results indicate that Chrysina beetles can be classified according to these two major polarization properties.

  1. The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Program's Algorithm Change Process (ACP): Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Program Office is the supporting organization for the Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) and JPSS-1 satellites. S-NPP carries the following sensors: VIIRS, CrIS, ATMS, OMPS, and CERES with instruments that ultimately produce over 25 data products that cover the Earths weather, oceans, and atmosphere. A team of scientists and engineers from all over the United States document, monitor and fix errors in operational software code or documentation with the algorithm change process (ACP) to ensure the success of the S-NPP and JPSS 1 missions by maintaining quality and accuracy of the data products the scientific community relies on. This poster will outline the programs algorithm change process (ACP), identify the various users and scientific applications of our operational data products and highlight changes that have been made to the ACP to accommodate operating system upgrades to the JPSS programs Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), so that the program is ready for the transition to the 2017 JPSS-1 satellite mission and beyond.

  2. The effects of polarization changes of stochastic electromagnetic beams on heterodyne detection in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wang; Chengqiang, Li; Tingfeng, Wang; Heyong, Zhang; Jingjiang, Xie; Lisheng, Liu; Jin, Guo

    2016-11-01

    The performance of heterodyne systems is discussed for stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmospheres by introducing a turbulence spectrum of refractive-index fluctuations. Several analytic formulae for the heterodyne detection system are presented by employing the beam coherence polarization matrix of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beam. Based on the Tatarskii spectrum model, some numerical results are given for the variation of heterodyne efficiency with the misalignment angle, detector diameter, turbulence conditions and parameters of the overlapping beams. According to the numerical results, we find that the change in heterodyne efficiency is dependent on the initial polarization of the beams, and that a turbulent atmosphere degrades the heterodyne efficiency significantly for a lager detector diameter. The change in heterodyne efficiency in a turbulent atmosphere is basically the same as that in free space for a relatively short distance z s. However, the change in heterodyne efficiency is different for a sufficiently long distance. For the deterministic received signal and the detector, the performance of the heterodyne detection can be adjusted by controlling the local oscillator signal parameters.

  3. A recent change in the optical and {\\gamma}-ray polarization of the Crab nebula and pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Paul; Gouiffes, Christian; 3,; Laurent, Philipe; Hallinan, Gregg; Redfern, Michael; Shearer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of the polarization of optical and {\\gamma}-ray photons from the Crab nebula and pulsar system using the Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP), the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite (Integral). These, when combined with other optical polarization observations, suggest that the polarized optical emission and {\\gamma}-ray polarization changes in a similar manner. A change in the optical polarization angle has been observed by this work, from 109.5 \\pm 0.7\\deg in 2005 to 85.3 \\pm 1.4 \\deg in 2012. On the other hand, the {\\gamma}-ray polarization angle changed from 115 \\pm 11 \\deg in 2003-2007 to 80 \\pm 12 \\deg in 2012-2014. Strong flaring activities have been detected in the Crab nebula over the past few years by the high energy {\\gamma}-ray missions Agile and Fermi, and magnetic reconnection processes have been suggested to explain these observations. The change in the polarized optical...

  4. Polarized structure function sigma_lt' for kaon electroproduction in the nucleon resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhsha Nasseripour; B. Raue; Daniel Carman; Pawel Ambrozewicz

    2008-02-19

    The first measurements of the polarized structure function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for the reaction $p(\\vec e,e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the nucleon resonance region are reported. Measurements are included from threshold up to $W$=2.05~GeV for central values of $Q^2$ of 0.65 and 1.00~GeV$^2$, and nearly the entire kaon center-of-mass angular range. $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is the imaginary part of the longitudinal-transverse response and is expected to be sensitive to interferences between competing intermediate $s$-channel resonances, as well as resonant and non-resonant processes. The results for $\\sigma_{LT'}$ are comparable in magnitude to previously reported results from CLAS for $\\sigma_{LT}$, the real part of the same response. An intriguing sign change in $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is observed in the high $Q^2$ data at $W\\approx 1.9$~GeV. Comparisons to several existing model predictions are shown.

  5. Structural polarity and dynamics of male germline stem cells in the milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Esther D; Dorn, August

    2004-11-01

    The male germline stem cells (GSCs) of the milkweed bug present an extraordinary structural polarity that is, to our knowledge, unequalled by any other type of stem cells. They consist of a perikaryon and numerous projections arising from the cell pole directed toward the apical cells, the proposed niche of the GSCs. The projections can traverse a considerable distance until their terminals touch the apical cells. From hatching until death, the GSC projections undergo conspicuous changes, the sequence of which has been deduced from observations of all developmental stages. Projection formation starts from lobular cell protrusions showing trabecular ingrowths of the cell membrane. Finger-like projections result from a process of growth and "carving out". The newly formed projections contain mostly only free ribosomes other than a few mitochondria. A stereotyped degradation process commences in the projection terminals: profiles of circular, often concentric, cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum appear and turn into myelin bodies, whereas mitochondria become more numerous. The cytoplasm vesiculates, lysosomal bodies appear, and mitochondria become swollen. At the same time, the projection terminals are segregated by transverse ingrowths of the cell membrane. Finally, autophagic vacuoles and myelin bodies fill the segregated terminals, which then rupture. Simultaneously, new projections seem to sprout from the perikaryon of the GSCs. These dynamics, which are not synchronized among the GSCs, indicate that a novel type of signal exchange and transduction between the stem cells and their niche is involved in the regulation of asymmetric versus symmetric division of GSCs.

  6. Periodic magnetic structures generated by spin–polarized currents in nanostripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, Oleksii M., E-mail: alexey@volkov.ca; Sheka, Denis D. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Mertens, Franz G. [Physics Institute, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2013-11-25

    The influence of a transverse spin–polarized current on long ferromagnetic nanostripes is studied numerically. The magnetization behavior is analyzed for all range of the applied currents, up to the saturation. It is shown that the saturation current is a nonmonotonic function of the stripe width. A number of stable periodic magnetization structures are observed below the saturation. Type of the periodical structure depends on the stripe width. Besides the one–dimensional domain structure, typical for narrow wires, and the two–dimensional vortex–antivortex lattice, typical for wide films, a number of intermediate structures are observed, e.g., cross–tie and diamond state.

  7. Effect of Electric Field and Polarity on Light Emission in Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Structure Thin-Film Electroluminescent Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwaki, Jun-ichi; Kozawaguchi, Haruki; Tsujiyama, Bunjiro

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the emission intensities and spectra with applied electric fields in Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor (MIS) structure thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) devices have been investigated using devices with stacked emitting layer structures, such as ITO/ZnS: Mn/ZnS: Tb/Sm2O3/Al. In MIS-TFEL devices, the emission distribution in the direction of the ZnS film thickness is nonhomogeneous. In particular, the emission intensity in the region near the ZnS-insulator interface increases with increasing applied voltage more than in the other region in the ZnS layer, when electrons exciting emission centers are accelerated from the insulator side. On the other hand, the emission is homogeneous at the opposite polarity. It is found that the emission color for stacked emitting layer MIS-TFEL devices can be modulated by changing the applied voltage.

  8. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedhosseini, E.; Bdikin, I.; Ivanov, M.; Vasileva, D.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  9. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedhosseini, E., E-mail: Seyedhosseini@ua.pt; Ivanov, M. [CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials and Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bdikin, I. [TEMA and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vasileva, D. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, A. [Moscow State Institute of Radioengineering, Electronics and Automation, 119454 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rodriguez, B. J. [Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research and School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Kholkin, A. L. [CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials and Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-21

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  10. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cosyn, W; Higinbotham, D W; Hyde, C; Kuhn, S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Park, K; Sargsian, M; Strikman, M; Weiss, C

    2014-01-01

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < p_R < several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We revie...

  11. Polarization of modified titanium and titanium–zirconium creates nano-structures while hydride formation is modulated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Matthias J.; Walter, Martin S. [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstrasse 15, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bucko, Miroslaw M. [Department of Ceramics and Refractory Materials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pamula, Elzbieta [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Lyngstadaas, S. Petter [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Haugen, Håvard J., E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-10-01

    The majority of titanium based bone-level dental implants available on the market today feature a sand-blasted and acid-etched (SBAE) surface that contains comparably high hydrogen levels. Cathodic polarization of titanium in acidic solutions is known to further increase titanium hydride on the surface. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of cathodic reduction on titanium (Ti) and titanium–zirconium (TiZr) with a SBAE surface in order to investigate the potential of such a process for further improving surfaces for bone anchored dental implants. Samples of both materials were cathodically polarized in acidic solution at different current densities and for different process times. Chemical analysis of the hydrogen levels by SIMS showed that cathodic reduction re-arranged the hydride already present on the surfaces from the etching process but could not significantly increase hydride levels. The hydrogen layer created by the preceding hot acid etching appeared to modulate further hydride creation. Analysis of the surface topography by SEM showed changes to the nano-topography of both materials after polarization. TiZr showed homogeneously distributed nano-spheres as they were already observed for TiZr SBAE at increased size of 80–100 nm on the whole surface. By contrast, polarization of Ti created nano-nodules and nano-spheres of 150–200 nm on the surface. These spheres were interconnected to form flower-like structures along the ridges and peaks of the surface. Moreover the flanks were covered by a rippled structure of isotropically distributed small-diameter (10–20 nm) nano-nodules.

  12. A Change in the Optical Polarization Associated with a Gamma-Ray Flare in the Blazar 3C 279

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.

    2011-08-19

    It is widely accepted that strong and variable radiation detected over all accessible energy bands in a number of active galaxies arises from a relativistic, Doppler-boosted jet pointing close to our line of sight. The size of the emitting zone and the location of this region relative to the central supermassive black hole are, however, poorly known, with estimates ranging from light-hours to a light-year or more. Here we report the coincidence of a gamma ({gamma})-ray flare with a dramatic change of optical polarization angle. This provides evidence for co-spatiality of optical and {gamma}-ray emission regions and indicates a highly ordered jet magnetic field. The results also require a non-axisymmetric structure of the emission zone, implying a curved trajectory for the emitting material within the jet, with the dissipation region located at a considerable distance from the black hole, at about 10{sup 5} gravitational radii.

  13. Tracking Changes in Cardiac Output: Statistical Considerations on the 4-Quadrant Plot and the Polar Plot Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, Bernd; Grothe, Oliver; Wagner, Julia Y

    2015-08-01

    When comparing 2 technologies for measuring hemodynamic parameters with regard to their ability to track changes, 2 graphical tools are omnipresent in the literature: the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot recently proposed by Critchley et al. The polar plot is thought to be the more advanced statistical tool, but care should be taken when it comes to its interpretation. The polar plot excludes possibly important measurements from the data. The polar plot transforms the data nonlinearily, which may prevent it from being seen clearly. In this article, we compare the 4-quadrant and the polar plot in detail and thoroughly describe advantages and limitations of each. We also discuss pitfalls concerning the methods to prepare the researcher for the sound use of both methods. Finally, we briefly revisit the Bland-Altman plot for the use in this context.

  14. A Web-Based Polar Firn Model to Motivate Interest in Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. D.; Lundin, J.; Stevens, C.; Leahy, W.; Waddington, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    How long would you have to dig straight down in Greenland before you reached solid ice? This is one of many questions that could be answered by a typical high school student using our online firn model. Firn is fallen snow that compacts under its own weight and eventually turns into glacial ice. The Herron and Langway (1980) firn model describes this process. An important component of predicting future climate change is researching past climate change. Some details of our past climate are discovered by analyzing polar ice and the firn process. Firn research can also be useful for understanding how changes in ice surface levels reflect changes in the ice mass. We have produced an online version of the Herron and Langway model that provides a simple way for students to learn how polar snow turns into ice. As a user, you can enter some climatic conditions (accumulation rate, temperature, and surface density) into our graphical user interface and press 'Submit'. We take the numbers you enter in your internet browser, send them to the model written in Python that is running on our server, and provide links to your results, all within seconds. The model produces firn depth, density, and age data. The results appear on the webpage in both text and graphical format. We have developed an example lesson plan appropriate for a high-school physics or environmental science class. The online model offers students an opportunity to apply their scientific knowledge in order to understand real-world physical processes. Additionally, students learn about scientific research and the tools scientists use to conduct it. The model can be used as a standalone lesson or as a part of a larger climate-science unit. The online model was created with funding from the Washington NASA Space Grant Consortium and the National Science Foundation's Partnerships for International Research and Education program.

  15. Subsurface Structure in the Martian Polar Layered Deposits: The Deep Space 2 Impact Accelerometry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moersch, J. E.; Lorenz, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    While primarily a technology demonstration mission, the New Millenium Mars Microprobes (also known as Deep Space 2, or simply DS2)will also provide the first in situ science measurements of the martian subsurface. The DS2 impact accelerometry experiment will provide both engineering data about the depth of probe emplacement and science data about the physical nature of the subsurface at the probes' landing sites. Little is known about the detailed physical properties or small-scale vertical structure of the subsurface at the DS2 landing site in the southern martian polar layered deposits. Imaging data from the Viking Orbiters and Mars Global Surveyor reveal alternating bands of light and dark material in this region with thicknesses at least as small as the limit of resolution, about 10 m. The overall composition of these layers is poorly constrained, but generally thought to be a mixture of dust and ice with the layers being caused by variations in the dust/ice ratio, or perhaps by dust deposits of different densities. Low thermal inertias in the region suggest that the top few centimeters of the surface are composed of a mantling of fine-grained dust. However, 3.5-cm radar returns indicate that the maximum depth of this dust is not greater than a few tens of centimeters. Thermal models generally agree that, while the layered deposits do provide a potential near-surface reservoir for ice, the uppermost few centimeters to meters in these regions are likely to be ice-free because of sublimation losses. Finally, while it is generally agreed that the layered deposits are the product of variations in the martian climate, no direct correlation has been made between band sequences and specific climate changes. Our intention is to shed light on some of these questions about the martian polar layered deposits by using the DS2 accelerometry experiment to determine the physical nature of the layered deposits, and to detect the presence of any subsurface layering of dust, ice

  16. The Structure of Galactic Gas at High Latitudes: The Southern Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosachinskii, I. V.; Il'in, G. N.; Prozorov, V. A.

    2004-04-01

    We analyze the angular structure of the 21-cm interstellar neutral hydrogen emission at six and seven declinations in the northern (published previously) and southern polar caps of the Galaxy (Galactic latitudes from -40 deg to -90 deg), respectively, with an extent of 90 deg in right ascension. The RATAN-600 radio telescope has a beam width averaged over these regions of 2.0' x 30'. One-dimensional power spectra for the angular distribution of interstellar neutral hydrogen emission were computed in each 6.3-km/s-wide spectral channel by using the standard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) code and were smoothed over 1 hour in right ascension. The Galactic latitude dependence of the mean parameters for the sky distribution of H I line emission at high latitudes was found to correspond to the distribution of gas in the form of a flat layer only in the northern region, while in the southern cap, the gas distribution is much less regular. In addition, the mean H I radial velocities are negative everywhere (-3.7 +/- 3.0 km/s in the north and -6.0+/-2.4 km/s in the south). The power spectra of the angular fluctuations in the range of angular periods from 10' to 6 deg appear as power laws. However, the spectral indices change greatly over the sky: from -3 to -1.2; on average, as the Galactic latitude increases and the H I column density decreases, the fluctuation spectrum of the interstellar gas emission becomes flatter. In the northern polar region, this behavior is much more pronounced, which probably stems from the fact that the gas column density in the south is generally a factor of 2 or 3 higher than that in the north. Therefore, the spectra are, on average, also steeper in the south, but the dependence on Galactic latitude is weaker. Using simulations, we show that the observed power-law spectrum of the H I emission distribution can be obtained in terms of not only a turbulent, but also a cloud model of interstellar gas if we use our previous spectra of the diameters

  17. Polar and brown bear genomes reveal ancient admixture and demographic footprints of past climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Webb; Schuster, Stephan C.; Welch, Andreanna J.; Ratan, Aakrosh; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C.; Zhao, Fangqing; Kim, Hie Lim; Burhans, Richard C.; Drautz, Daniela I.; Wittekindt, Nicola E.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Peacock, Elizabeth; Farley, Sean; Sage, George K.; Rode, Karyn; Obbard, Martyn E.; Montiel, Rafael; Bachmann, Lutz; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Aars, Jon; Mailund, Thomas; Wiig, Øystein; Talbot, Sandra L.; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Polar bears (PBs) are superbly adapted to the extreme Arctic environment and have become emblematic of the threat to biodiversity from global climate change. Their divergence from the lower-latitude brown bear provides a textbook example of rapid evolution of distinct phenotypes. However, limited mitochondrial and nuclear DNA evidence conflicts in the timing of PB origin as well as placement of the species within versus sister to the brown bear lineage. We gathered extensive genomic sequence data from contemporary polar, brown, and American black bear samples, in addition to a 130,000- to 110,000-y old PB, to examine this problem from a genome-wide perspective. Nuclear DNA markers reflect a species tree consistent with expectation, showing polar and brown bears to be sister species. However, for the enigmatic brown bears native to Alaska's Alexander Archipelago, we estimate that not only their mitochondrial genome, but also 5–10% of their nuclear genome, is most closely related to PBs, indicating ancient admixture between the two species. Explicit admixture analyses are consistent with ancient splits among PBs, brown bears and black bears that were later followed by occasional admixture. We also provide paleodemographic estimates that suggest bear evolution has tracked key climate events, and that PB in particular experienced a prolonged and dramatic decline in its effective population size during the last ca. 500,000 years. We demonstrate that brown bears and PBs have had sufficiently independent evolutionary histories over the last 4–5 million years to leave imprints in the PB nuclear genome that likely are associated with ecological adaptation to the Arctic environment.

  18. Cardiac tissue structure. Electric field interactions in polarizing the heart: 3D computer models and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entcheva, Emilia

    1998-11-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the interactions between the cardiac tissue structure and applied electric fields in producing complex polarization patterns. It is hypothesized that the response of the heart in the conditions of strong electric shocks, as those applied in defibrillation, is dominated by mechanisms involving the cardiac muscle structure perceived as a continuum. Analysis is carried out in three-dimensional models of the heart with detailed fiber architecture. Shock-induced transmembrane potentials are calculated using the bidomain model in its finite element implementation. The major new findings of this study can be summarized as follows: (1) The mechanisms of polarization due to cardiac fiber curvature and fiber rotation are elucidated in three-dimensional ellipsoidal hearts of variable geometry; (2) Results are presented showing that the axis of stimulation and the polarization axis on a whole heart level might differ significantly due to geometric and anisotropic factors; (3) Virtual electrode patterns are demonstrated numerically inside the ventricular wall in internal defibrillation conditions. The role of the tissue-bath interface in shaping the shock-induced polarization is revealed; (4) The generation of 3D phase singularity scrolls by shock-induced intramural virtual electrode patterns is proposed as evidence for a possible new mechanism for the failure to defibrillate. The results of this study emphasize the role of unequal anisotropy in the intra- and extracellular domains, as well as the salient fiber architecture characteristics, such as curvature and transmural rotation, in polarizing the myocardium. Experimental support of the above findings was actively sought and found in recent optical mapping studies using voltage-sensitive dyes. If validated in vivo, these findings would significantly enrich the prevailing concepts about the mechanisms of stimulation and defibrillation of the heart.

  19. Analysis of local structure of Arg10 domain in apo-α- lactalbumin with a polarity-sensitive arginine-specific fluorescent probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe, 3-(4-chloro-6-p-glyoxalphenoxy-1,3,5-triazinylamino)-7- (dimethylamino)-2-methylphenazine, was used to analyze the local structure of apo-α-lactalbumin by detecting the polarity and conformational changes of the arginine residue (Arg10) domain. The polarity of the Arg10 domain in both native and heat-denatured apo-α-lactalbumin was determined, which corresponds to a dielectric constant of 16, and the hydrophobic core near the Arg10 was found to be conservative for heating. Meanwhile, the effect of Ca2+ binding on the conformational changes of the Arg10 domain was studied, revealing that the hydrophobic core near the Arg10 is insensitive to the binding of Ca2+.

  20. Fostering science communication and outreach through video production in Dartmouth's IGERT Polar Environmental Change graduate program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond Wagner, C. R.; McDavid, L. A.; Virginia, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Dartmouth's NSF-supported IGERT Polar Environmental Change graduate program has focused on using video media to foster interdisciplinary thinking and to improve student skills in science communication and public outreach. Researchers, educators, and funding organizations alike recognize the value of video media for making research results more accessible and relevant to diverse audiences and across cultures. We present an affordable equipment set and the basic video training needed as well as available Dartmouth institutional support systems for students to produce outreach videos on climate change and its associated impacts on people. We highlight and discuss the successes and challenges of producing three types of video products created by graduate and undergraduate students affiliated with the Dartmouth IGERT. The video projects created include 1) graduate student profile videos, 2) a series of short student-created educational videos for Greenlandic high school students, and 3) an outreach video about women in science based on the experiences of women students conducting research during the IGERT field seminar at Summit Station and Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. The 'Science in Greenland--It's a Girl Thing' video was featured on The New York Times Dot Earth blog and the Huffington Post Green blog among others and received international recognition. While producing these videos, students 1) identified an audience and created story lines, 2) worked in front of and behind the camera, 3) utilized low-cost digital editing applications, and 4) shared the videos on multiple platforms from social media to live presentations. The three video projects were designed to reach different audiences, and presented unique challenges for content presentation and dissemination. Based on student and faculty assessment, we conclude that the video projects improved student science communication skills and increased public knowledge of polar science and the effects of climate change.

  1. Structure and dynamics of a dizinc metalloprotein: effect of charge transfer and polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong L; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Da W; Xie, Dai Q; Zhang, John Z H

    2011-08-25

    Structures and dynamics of a recently designed dizinc metalloprotein (DFsc) (J. Mol. Biol. 2003, 334, 1101) are studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a dynamically adapted polarized force field derived from fragment quantum calculation for protein in solvent. To properly describe the effect of charge transfer and polarization in the present approach, quantum chemistry calculation of the zinc-binding group is periodically performed (on-the-fly) to update the atomic charges of the zinc-binding group during the MD simulation. Comparison of the present result with those obtained from simulations under standard AMBER force field reveals that charge transfer and polarization are critical to maintaining the correct asymmetric metal coordination in the DFsc. Detailed analysis of the result also shows that dynamic fluctuation of the zinc-binding group facilitates solvent interaction with the zinc ions. In particular, the dynamic fluctuation of the zinc-zinc distance is shown to be an important feature of the catalytic function of the di-ion zinc-binding group. Our study demonstrates that the dynamically adapted polarization approach is computationally practical and can be used to study other metalloprotein systems.

  2. Near-infrared Imaging Polarimetry of GGD 27: Circular Polarization and Magnetic Field Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Hough, James H.; Nagata, Tetsuya; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Saito, Hiro

    2016-06-01

    Near-infrared imaging polarimetry in the J, H, and K s bands was carried out for GGD 27 in the dark cloud Lynds 291. Details of an infrared reflection nebula associated with the optical nebulosity GGD 27 and the infrared nebula GGD 27 IRS are presented. Aperture photometry of 1263 point-like sources, detected in all three bands, was used to classify them based on a color-color diagram, and the linear polarization of several hundred sources was determined, with the latter used to map the magnetic field structure around GGD 27. This field, around GGD 27 IRS, appears to be associated with the extended CO outflow of IRAS 18162-2048 however, there are partly distorted or bent components in the field. The Chandrasekhar-Fermi method gives an estimate of the magnetic field strength as ˜90 μG. A region associated with GGD 27 IRS is discovered to have a circular polarization in the range of ˜2%-11% in the K s band. The circular polarization has an asymmetric positive/negative pattern and extends out to ˜ 120″ or 1.0 pc. The circular and linear polarization patterns are explained as resulting from a combination of dense inner and fainter outer lobes, suggesting episodic outflow.

  3. Plasmonic Structure Integrated Single-Photon Detector Configurations to Improve Absorptance and Polarization Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Csete

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Configurations capable of maximizing both the absorption component of system detection efficiency and the achievable polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs consisting of p = 264 nm and P = 792 nm periodic niobium nitride (NbN patterns on silica substrate. Global effective NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-orientation (γ = 90°/0° azimuthal angle and the highest polarization contrast is attained in S-orientation of all devices. Common nanophotonical origin of absorptance enhancement is collective resonance on nanocavity gratings with different profiles, which is promoted by coupling between localized modes in quarter-wavelength metal-insulator-metal nanocavities and laterally synchronized Brewster-Zenneck-type surface waves in integrated SNSPDs possessing a three-quarter-wavelength-scaled periodicity. The spectral sensitivity and dispersion characteristics reveal that device design specific optimal configurations exist.

  4. Polar Microalgae: New Approaches towards Understanding Adaptations to an Extreme and Changing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Barbara R; Mock, Thomas

    2014-01-28

    Polar Regions are unique and highly prolific ecosystems characterized by extreme environmental gradients. Photosynthetic autotrophs, the base of the food web, have had to adapt physiological mechanisms to maintain growth, reproduction and metabolic activity despite environmental conditions that would shut-down cellular processes in most organisms. High latitudes are characterized by temperatures below the freezing point, complete darkness in winter and continuous light and high UV in the summer. Additionally, sea-ice, an ecological niche exploited by microbes during the long winter seasons when the ocean and land freezes over, is characterized by large salinity fluctuations, limited gas exchange, and highly oxic conditions. The last decade has been an exciting period of insights into the molecular mechanisms behind adaptation of microalgae to the cryosphere facilitated by the advancement of new scientific tools, particularly "omics" techniques. We review recent insights derived from genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics studies. Genes, proteins and pathways identified from these highly adaptable polar microbes have far-reaching biotechnological applications. Furthermore, they may provide insights into life outside this planet, as well as glimpses into the past. High latitude regions also have disproportionately large inputs into global biogeochemical cycles and are the region most sensitive to climate change.

  5. Structural changes and relaxations monitored by luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yang, B; Townsend, P D

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence data have often been used to study imperfections and to characterize lattice distortions because the signals are sensitive to changes of structure and composition. Previous studies have included intentionally added probe ions such as rare earth ions to sense distortions in local crystal fields caused by modified structural environments. An under-exploited extension of this approach was to use luminescence to monitor crystalline phase changes. A current overview of this new and powerful technique shows that continuous scanning of the sample temperatures immediately offered at least three types of signatures for phase transitions. Because of high sensitivity, luminescence signals were equally responsive to structural changes from inclusions and nanoparticles. These coupled to the host material via long-range interactions and modified the host signals. Two frequently observed examples that are normally overlooked are from nanoparticle inclusions of water and CO2. Examples also indicated that phase transitions were detected in more diverse materials such as superconductors and fullerenes. Finally, luminescence studies have shown that in some crystalline examples, high dose ion implantation of surface layers could induce relaxations and/or structural changes of the entire underlying bulk material. This was an unexpected result and therefore such a possibility has not previously been explored. However, the implications for ion implication are significant and could be far more general than the examples mentioned here.

  6. Migraine and structural changes in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Lipton, Richard B; Ashina, Sait

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the association between migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) and 3 types of structural brain abnormalities detected by MRI: white matter abnormalities (WMAs), infarct-like lesions (ILLs), and volumetric changes in gray and white matter (GM, WM) regions....

  7. Structural Change and Employment in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses factors contributing to structural changes in developing countries and concludes that unemployment and underemployment are best countered by generating new productive activities, developing economic linkages, and stimulating an increase in the number of workplaces. Advocates cooperation among developing nations. (JOW)

  8. Advanced Energy Conversion System Using Sinusoidal Voltage Tracking Buck-Boost Converter Cascaded Polarity Changing Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nabil A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an advanced power converter employs a sinusoidal voltage absolute value tracking buck-boost DC-DC converter in the first power processing stage and a polarity changing full-bridge inverter in the second stage. The proposed power conversion system has the capability of delivering sinusoidal output and input current with unity power factor and good output voltage regulation. Consequently, the complete voltage regulator system, which is mainly suitable for new energy generation systems as well as energy storage systems, can be constructed compactly and inexpensively without DC link electrolytic capacitor. Also, the paper presents an auxiliary passive resonant circuit for soft switching operation. Simulation results using PSIM software are presented to verify the operation principles and feasibility of the proposed power conversion system.

  9. The Evolution of Unpolarized and Polarized Structure Functions at small $x$

    CERN Document Server

    Blümlein, Johannes; Vogt, A

    1996-01-01

    A survey is given of recent developments on the resummed small-$x$ evol= ution, in a framework based on the renormalization group equation, of non--singl= et and singlet structure functions in both unpolarized and polarized deep--inela= stic scattering. The available resummed anomalous dimensions are discussed for= all these cases, and the most important analytic and numerical results are compiled. The quantitative effects of these small-$x$ resummations on the evolution of the various parton densities and structure functions are presented, and their present uncertainties are investigated. An applicati= on to QED radiative corrections is given.

  10. Interdisciplinary Graduate Training in Polar Environmental Change: Field-based learning in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia, R. A.; Holm, K.; Whitecloud, S.; Levy, L.; Kelly, M. A.; Feng, X.; Grenoble, L.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the NSF-funded Integrative Graduate Education Research Traineeship (IGERT) program at Dartmouth College is to develop a new cohort of environmental scientists and engineers with an interdisciplinary understanding of polar regions and their importance to global environmental change. The Dartmouth IGERT challenges Ph.D. students to consider the broader dimensions of their research and to collaborate with scientists from other disciplines, educators, and policy makers. IGERT students will focus on research questions that are relevant to the needs of local people experiencing climate change and on understanding the ethical responsibilities and benefits of conducting research in partnership with northern residents and institutions. Seven Ph.D. students from the departments of Earth Sciences, Engineering, and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Dartmouth College make up the first IGERT cohort for the five-year program. The Dartmouth IGERT curriculum will focus on three main components of polar systems responding to recent climate change: the cryosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, and biogeochemical cycles. The integrating experience of the core curriculum is the Greenland Field Seminar that will take place in Kangerlussuaq (terrestrial and aquatic systems), Summit Camp (snow and ice) and Nuuk, Greenland (human dimensions of change). In Nuuk, IGERT students will share their science and develop partnerships with students, educators, and policy makers at the University of Greenland, the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), and other Greenlandic institutions. In summer 2009 the authors conducted preliminary fieldwork near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland to develop aspects of the science curriculum for the 2010 Greenland Field Seminar and to explore research topics for IGERT Fellows (Levy and Whitecloud). Examples of results presented here are designed to develop field-based learning activities. These include soil and vegetation relationships as a function of aspect

  11. Polar polymeric structures as wax dispersant flow improvers for paraffinic distillate fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, I.M.; Khidr, T.T.; Ghuiba, F.M. (Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt))

    1999-01-01

    Three (oxygen-based) and two (nitrogen + oxygen)-based polar polymeric structures were synthesized. The five copolymers were used as wax dispersant flow improver bifunctional additives (WDFI 1-5) for improving the cold flow properties of a paraffinic gas oil through cloud point (CP), cold filter plugging point (CFPP) and pour point (PP) tests. Results showed that the prepared additives exhibited high dispersing potential in terms of filterability improvement ([Delta]CFPP) correlated with the incorporated polar functional groups into their structures. On the contrary, their flowability in terms of ([Delta]PP) as flow improvers was not affected by polarity and appeared to depend primarily on the alkyl matching between copolymer alkyl chain moiety and average carbon number of wax content in the fuel. The prepared additives exhibited good compatibility with both natural wax dispersants and a commercial flow improver. The combined (nitrogen + oxygen)-based additive WDFI 5 has shown higher activity than oxygen-based ones and achieved the optimum effectiveness to the extent of 2, 8 and 15 C as [Delta]CP, [Delta]CFPP and [Delta]PP respectively. (orig.)

  12. Polar polymeric structures as wax dispersant flow improvers for paraffinic distillate fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, I.M.; Khidr, T.T.; Ghuiba, F.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

    1999-11-01

    Three (oxygen-based) and two (nitrogen + oxygen)-based polar polymeric structures were synthesized. The five copolymers were used as wax dispersant flow improver bifunctional additives (WDFI 1-5) for improving the cold flow properties of a paraffinic gas oil through cloud point (CP), cold filter plugging point (CFPP) and pour point (PP) tests. Results showed that the prepared additives exhibited high dispersing potential in terms of filterability improvement ({Delta}CFPP) correlated with the incorporated polar functional groups into their structures. On the contrary, their flowability in terms of ({Delta}PP) as flow improvers was not affected by polarity and appeared to depend primarily on the alkyl matching between copolymer alkyl chain moiety and average carbon number of wax content in the fuel. The prepared additives exhibited good compatibility with both natural wax dispersants and a commercial flow improver. The combined (nitrogen + oxygen)-based additive WDFI 5 has shown higher activity than oxygen-based ones and achieved the optimum effectiveness to the extent of 2, 8 and 15 C as {Delta}CP, {Delta}CFPP and {Delta}PP respectively. (orig.)

  13. Far-field radially polarized focal spot from plasmonic spiral structure combined with central aperture antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei; Ren, Yuan; Lu, Yonghua; Lei, Xinrui; Jiang, Kang; Li, Kuanguo; Wang, Yong; Cui, Chenjing; Wen, Xiaolei; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of a vector micro-beam with an optical antenna has significant potentials for nano-optical technology applications including bio-optics, optical fabrication, and quantum information processing. We have designed and demonstrated a central aperture antenna within an Archimedean spiral that extracts the bonding plasmonic field from a surface to produce a new vector focal spot in far-field. The properties of this vector focal field are revealed by confocal microscopy and theoretical simulations. The pattern, polarization and phase of the focal field are determined by the incident light and by the chirality of the Archimedean spiral. For incident light with right-handed circular polarization, the left-handed spiral (one-order chirality) outputs a micro-radially polarized focal field. Our results reveal the relationship between the near-field and far-field distributions of the plasmonic spiral structure, and the structure has the potential to lead to advances in diverse applications such as plasmonic lenses, near-field angular momentum detection, and optical tweezers. PMID:27009383

  14. Far-field radially polarized focal spot from plasmonic spiral structure combined with central aperture antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei; Ren, Yuan; Lu, Yonghua; Lei, Xinrui; Jiang, Kang; Li, Kuanguo; Wang, Yong; Cui, Chenjing; Wen, Xiaolei; Wang, Pei

    2016-03-01

    Manipulation of a vector micro-beam with an optical antenna has significant potentials for nano-optical technology applications including bio-optics, optical fabrication, and quantum information processing. We have designed and demonstrated a central aperture antenna within an Archimedean spiral that extracts the bonding plasmonic field from a surface to produce a new vector focal spot in far-field. The properties of this vector focal field are revealed by confocal microscopy and theoretical simulations. The pattern, polarization and phase of the focal field are determined by the incident light and by the chirality of the Archimedean spiral. For incident light with right-handed circular polarization, the left-handed spiral (one-order chirality) outputs a micro-radially polarized focal field. Our results reveal the relationship between the near-field and far-field distributions of the plasmonic spiral structure, and the structure has the potential to lead to advances in diverse applications such as plasmonic lenses, near-field angular momentum detection, and optical tweezers.

  15. Space and time aliasing structure is monthly mean polar-orbiting satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lixin; Levy, Gad

    1995-01-01

    Monthly mean wind fields from the European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS1) scatterometer are presented. A banded structure which resembles the satellite subtrack is clearly and consistently apparent in the isotachs as well as the u and v components of the routinely produced fields. The structure also appears in the means of data from other polar-orbiting satellites and instruments. An experiment is designed to trace the cause of the banded structure. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) gridded surface wind analyses are used as a control set. These analyses are also sampled with the ERS1 temporal-spatial samplig pattern to form a simulated scatterometer wind set. Both sets are used to create monthly averages. The banded structures appear in the monthly mean simulated data but do not appear in the control set. It is concluded that the source of the banded structure lies in the spatial and temporal sampling of the polar-orbiting satellite which results in undersampling. The problem involves multiple timescales and space scales, oversampling and under-sampling in space, aliasing in the time and space domains, and preferentially sampled variability. It is shown that commonly used spatial smoothers (or filters), while producing visually pleasing results, also significantly bias the true mean. A three-dimensional spatial-temporal interpolator is designed and used to determine the mean field. It is found to produce satisfactory monthly means from both simulated and real ERS1 data. The implications to climate studies involving polar-orbiting satellite data are discussed.

  16. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  17. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  18. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-03-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  19. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  20. Polarity correspondence in metaphor congruency effects: structural overlap predicts categorization times for bipolar concepts presented in vertical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakens, Daniël

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has shown that words presented on metaphor congruent locations (e.g., positive words UP on the screen and negative words DOWN on the screen) are categorized faster than words presented on metaphor incongruent locations (e.g., positive words DOWN and negative words UP). These findings have been explained in terms of an interference effect: The meaning associated with UP and DOWN vertical space can automatically interfere with the categorization of words with a metaphorically incongruent meaning. The current studies test an alternative explanation for the interaction between the vertical position of abstract concepts and the speed with which these stimuli are categorized. Research on polarity differences (basic asymmetries in the way dimensions are processed) predicts that +polar endpoints of dimensions (e.g., positive, moral, UP) are categorized faster than -polar endpoints of dimensions (e.g., negative, immoral, DOWN). Furthermore, the polarity correspondence principle predicts that stimuli where polarities correspond (e.g., positive words presented UP) provide an additional processing benefit compared to stimuli where polarities do not correspond (e.g., negative words presented UP). A meta-analysis (Study 1) shows that a polarity account provides a better explanation of reaction time patterns in previous studies than an interference explanation. An experiment (Study 2) reveals that controlling for the polarity benefit of +polar words compared to -polar words did not only remove the main effect of word polarity but also the interaction between word meaning and vertical position due to polarity correspondence. These results reveal that metaphor congruency effects should not be interpreted as automatic associations between vertical locations and word meaning but instead are more parsimoniously explained by their structural overlap in polarities.

  1. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrawi, F.; Urban, J.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G.; Weigel, K.; Braesicke, P.; Pitts, M. C.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Murtagh, D.

    2016-01-01

    More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O) increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations). The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000-2014) from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O) observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Performing linear regression analyses we derive from the Envisat/MIPAS (2002-2012) and Aura/MLS (2004-2014) observations predominantly positive changes in the potential temperature range 350 to 1000 K. The linear changes in water vapour derived from Envisat/MIPAS observations are largely insignificant, while those from Aura/MLS are mostly significant. For the temperature neither of the two instruments indicate any significant changes. Given the strong inter-annual variation observed in

  2. Knee structure in double ionization of noble atoms in circularly polarized laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Jingtao

    2017-01-01

    Nonsequential double ionization is characterized by a knee structure in the plot of double-ionization probability versus laser intensity. In circularly polarized (CP) laser fields, this structure has only been observed for Mg atoms. By choosing laser fields according to a scaling law, we exhibit the knee structure in CP laser fields for Ar and He atoms. The collision of the ionized electron with the core enhances the ionization of the second electron and forms the knee structure. The electron recollision is universal in CP laser fields, but the ionization probability in the knee region decreases as the wavelength of the driven field increases. For experimental observations, it is beneficial to use target atoms with small ionization potentials and laser fields with short wavelengths.

  3. Changes to collagen structure during leather processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizeland, Katie H; Edmonds, Richard L; Basil-Jones, Melissa M; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2015-03-11

    As hides and skins are processed to produce leather, chemical and physical changes take place that affect the strength and other physical properties of the material. The structural basis of these changes at the level of the collagen fibrils is not fully understood and forms the basis of this investigation. Synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to quantify fibril orientation and D-spacing through eight stages of processing from fresh green ovine skins to staked dry crust leather. Both the D-spacing and fibril orientation change with processing. The changes in thickness of the leather during processing affect the fibril orientation index (OI) and account for much of the OI differences between process stages. After thickness is accounted for, the main difference in OI is due to the hydration state of the material, with dry materials being less oriented than wet. Similarly significant differences in D-spacing are found at different process stages. These are due also to the moisture content, with dry samples having a smaller D-spacing. This understanding is useful for relating structural changes that occur during different stages of processing to the development of the final physical characteristics of leather.

  4. The structural properties of sustainable, continuous change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsson, Dorthe Døjbak; Klaas, Johann Peter; Carroll, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that the relationship between structure and inertia in changing environments may be more complex than previously held and that the theoretical logics tying inertia with flexibility and efficiency remain incomplete. Using a computational model, this article aims to clarify this...... inertia. These are important insights, because they suggest that with the right design, organizations may be both more flexible and reliable than commonly believed....

  5. Inversion of single-station teleseismic P-wave polarization-data for the velocity structure of Beijing area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Broadband three-component seismic data recorded by Beijingstation (BJI) of CDSN were used to calculate P-wave polarization of teleseismic events. These polarization data were then used in the inversion for the underground structure around the Beijing station, especially for the details of velocity discontinuities. The result shows that a conspicuous low velocity zone exists in the crust on the west of the station, which is in good agreement with previous studies. It proves the theory that polarization data could be applied to inversion for velocity structures, especially for boundaries with large velocity gradient. It also demonstrates the feasibility of velocity structure inversion with polarization data from high-quality broadband data recorded by a single station. Therefore, travel-times and polarization data can be jointly used to study velocity structure. Polarization data are more suitable for delineating the boundary of velocity anomalies. Moreover, if the polarization method is combined with receiver function method to fully exploit their complementarity, it is possible to obtain the lateral velocity variation around the station as well as the detailed vertical variation below the station.

  6. Invited review: climate change impacts in polar regions: lessons from Antarctic moss bank archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royles, Jessica; Griffiths, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Mosses are the dominant plants in polar and boreal regions, areas which are experiencing rapid impacts of regional warming. Long-term monitoring programmes provide some records of the rate of recent climate change, but moss peat banks contain an unrivalled temporal record of past climate change on terrestrial plant Antarctic systems. We summarise the current understanding of climatic proxies and determinants of moss growth for contrasting continental and maritime Antarctic regions, as informed by 13C and 18O signals in organic material. Rates of moss accumulation are more than three times higher in the maritime Antarctic than continental Antarctica with growing season length being a critical determinant of growth rate, and high carbon isotope discrimination values reflecting optimal hydration conditions. Correlation plots of 13C and 18O values show that species (Chorisodontium aciphyllum / Polytrichum strictum) and growth form (hummock / bank) are the major determinants of measured isotope ratios. The interplay between moss growth form, photosynthetic physiology, water status and isotope composition are compared with developments of secondary proxies, such as chlorophyll fluorescence. These approaches provide a framework to consider the potential impact of climate change on terrestrial Antarctic habitats as well as having implications for future studies of temperate, boreal and Arctic peatlands. There are many urgent ecological and environmental problems in the Arctic related to mosses in a changing climate, but the geographical ranges of species and life-forms are difficult to track individually. Our goal was to translate what we have learned from the more simple systems in Antarctica, for application to Arctic habitats.

  7. Impacts of Polar Changes on the UV-induced Mineralization of Terrigenous Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzberger, Barbara; Arey, J Samuel

    2016-07-05

    Local climates in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere are influenced by Arctic Amplification and by interactions of the Antarctic ozone hole with climate change, respectively. Polar changes may affect hydroclimatic conditions in temperate regions, for example, by increasing the length and intensity of precipitation events at Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. Additionally, global warming has led to the thawing of ancient permafrost soils, particularly in Arctic regions, due to Arctic Amplification. Both heavy precipitation events and thawing of permafrost are increasing the net transfer of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) from land to surface waters. In aquatic ecosystems, UV-induced oxidation of terrigenous DOM (tDOM) produces atmospheric CO2 and this process is one of several mechanisms by which natural organic matter in aquatic and soil environments may play an important role in climate feedbacks. The Arctic is particularly affected by these processes: for example, melting of Arctic sea ice allows solar UV radiation to penetrate into the ice-free Arctic Ocean and to cause photochemical reactions that result in bleaching and mineralization of tDOM. Open questions, in addition to those shown in the Graphical Abstract, remain regarding the resulting contributions of tDOM photomineralization to CO2 production and global warming.

  8. The electrochemical impedance of polarized 316L stainless steel: structure-property-adsorption correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettens, Robert T T; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2009-07-01

    Electrochemical (EC) impedance and polarization data were synergistically coupled with AFM micrographs providing insight on the polarized alloy-electrolyte interface. Several regions of oxide topography/ impedance characteristic were apparent on a 316L SS surface. A relatively rough surface with apparent EC reaction products was observed below -500 mV. Smooth surfaces were seen from -500 mV to 200 mV. A transition region which displayed the aggregation of particles on the surface was seen from 200 mV to 600 mV. Above 600 mV these particles disappeared revealing a smooth topography. These topographical observations matched closely with the impedance behavior of the system, particularly the capacitance (C), polarization resistance (R(p)) and current density. The presence of pre-adsorbed Fb had a significant impact on C below approximately -500 mV (increased capacitance). The deviation from ideality of the current response as determined by a KWW empirical dielectric decay function showed significant differences between PBS-immersed and pre-adsorbed Fb cases. Earlier, changes in Fb area coverage, height, and eccentricity were observed between voltages lower and higher than 0 mV. The presence of the flat-band potential around -150 mV as well as high cathodic charge-transfer reactions taking place below -100 mV relate to these observations.

  9. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could result in image blurring. This paper presents a Kalman-filter based method that incorporates a forward projection of the solution based on a model plasma drift velocity field. This is the first time that the plasma motion, rather than just integrations of electron density, has been used in an ionospheric imaging algorithm. The motion is derived from the Weimer model of the electric field. It is shown that this novel approach to the implementation of a Kalman filter provides a detailed view of the polar cap ionosphere under severe storm conditions. A case study is given for the October 2003 Halloween storm where verification is provided by incoherent scatter radars.

  10. PBX/extradenticle is required to re-establish axial structures and polarity during planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blassberg, Robert A; Felix, Daniel A; Tejada-Romero, Belen; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-02-01

    Recent advances in a number of systems suggest many genes involved in orchestrating regeneration are redeployed from similar processes in development, with others being novel to the regeneration process in particular lineages. Of particular importance will be understanding the architecture of regenerative genetic regulatory networks and whether they are conserved across broad phylogenetic distances. Here, we describe the role of the conserved TALE class protein PBX/Extradenticle in planarians, a representative member of the Lophotrocozoa. PBX/Extradenticle proteins play central roles in both embryonic and post-embryonic developmental patterning in both vertebrates and insects, and we demonstrate a broad requirement during planarian regeneration. We observe that Smed-pbx has pleiotropic functions during regeneration, with a primary role in patterning the anterior-posterior (AP) axis and AP polarity. Smed-pbx is required for expression of polarity determinants notum and wnt1 and for correct patterning of the structures polarized along the AP axis, such as the brain, pharynx and gut. Overall, our data suggest that Smed-pbx functions as a central integrator of positional information to drive patterning of regeneration along the body axis.

  11. Planar cell polarity in the inner ear: how do hair cells acquire their oriented structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Julian; Davies, Alex

    2002-11-05

    Sensory hair cells in the ear and lateral line have an asymmetrical hair-bundle structure, essential for their function as directional mechanotransducers. We examine four questions: (1) how does the planar asymmetry of the individual hair cell originate? (2) How are the orientations of neighboring hair cells coordinated? (3) How is the orientation of a group of hair cells controlled in relation to the ear as a whole? (4) How does the initial cell asymmetry lead to creation of the asymmetrical hair bundle? Studies of the development of hairs and bristles in Drosophila, combined with genetic data from vertebrates, suggest that the answer to questions (1) and (2) lies in asymmetries that develop at the cell cortex and at cell-cell junctions, generated by products of a set of primary planar cell polarity genes, including the transmembrane receptor Frizzled. A separate and largely independent mechanism controls asymmmetric allocation of cell fate determinants such as Numb at mitosis, in Drosophila and possibly in the ear also. Little is known about long-range signals that might orient hair cells globally in the ear, but progress has been made in identifying a set of genes responsible for read-out of the primary polarity specification. These genes, in flies and vertebrates, provide a link to assembly of the polarized cytoskeleton; myosin VIIA appears to belong in this group. The mechanism creating the staircase pattern of stereocilium lengths is unknown, but could involve regulation of stereocilium growth by Ca(2+) ions entering via transduction channels.

  12. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pančić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1 and different temperatures (1, 5 and 8 °C to simulate changes from present to plausible future levels. Each of the 12 scenarios was run for 7 days, and a significant interaction between temperature and pH on growth was detected. By combining increased temperature and acidification, the two factors counterbalanced each other, and therefore no effect on the growth rates was found. However, the growth rates increased with elevated temperatures by ∼20–50% depending on the strain. In addition, a general negative effect of increasing acidification on growth was observed. At pH 7.7 and 7.4, the growth response varied considerably among strains. However, a more uniform response was detected at pH 7.1 with most of the strains exhibiting reduced growth rates by 20–37% compared to pH 8.0. It should be emphasized that a significant interaction between temperature and pH was found, meaning that the combination of the two parameters affected growth differently than when considering one at a time. Based on these results, we anticipate that the polar diatom F. cylindrus will be unaffected by changes in temperature and pH within the range expected by the end of the century. In each simulated scenario, the variation in growth rates among the strains was larger than the variation observed due to the whole range of changes in either pH or temperature. Climate change may therefore not affect the species as such, but may lead to changes in the population structure of the species, with the strains exhibiting high phenotypic plasticity, in terms of temperature and pH tolerance towards future conditions, dominating the population.

  13. The role of polar, lamdba (Λ)-shaped building units in noncentrosymmetric inorganic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, Martin D; Gautier, Romain; Yeon, Jeongho; Moore, Donald T; Nino, Juan C; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R

    2012-05-01

    A methodology for the design of polar, inorganic structures is demonstrated here with the packing of lambda (Λ)-shaped basic building units (BBUs). Noncentrosymmetric (NCS) solids with interesting physical properties can be created with BBUs that lack an inversion center and are likely to pack into a polar configuration; previous methods to construct these solids have used NCS octahedra as BBUs. Using this methodology to synthesize NCS solids, one must increase the coordination of the NCS octahedra with maintenance of the noncentrosymmetry of the bulk. The first step in this progression from an NCS octahedron to an inorganic NCS solid is the formation of a bimetallic BBU. This step is exemplified with the compound CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7): this compound, presented here, crystallizes in an NCS structure with ordered, isolated [Cu(H(2)O)(5)](2+) cations and [VOF(4)(H(2)O)](2-) anions into Λ-shaped, bimetallic BBUs to form CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(6)·H(2)O, owing to the Jahn-Teller distortion of Cu(2+). Conversely, the centrosymmetric heterotypes with the same formula MVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7) (M(II) = Co, Ni, and Zn) exhibit ordered, isolated [VOF(4)(H(2)O)](2-) and [M(H(2)O)(6)](2+) ionic species in a hydrogen bond network. CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7) exhibits a net polar moment while the heterotypes do not; this demonstrates that Λ-shaped BBUs give a greater probability for and, in this case, lead to NCS structures.

  14. Three-dimensional thermal structure of the South Polar Vortex of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Garate-Lopez, Itziar; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed thermal infrared images provided by the VIRTIS-M instrument aboard Venus Express (VEX) to obtain high resolution thermal maps of the Venus south polar region between 55 and 85 km altitudes. The maps investigate three different dynamical configurations of the polar vortex including its classical dipolar shape, a regularly oval shape and a transition shape between the different configurations of the vortex. We apply the atmospheric model described by García Muñoz et al. (2013) and a variant of the retrieval algorithm detailed in Grassi et al. (2008) to obtain maps of temperature over the Venus south polar region in the quoted altitude range. These maps are discussed in terms of cloud motions and relative vorticity distribution obtained previously (Garate-Lopez et al. 2013). Temperature maps retrieved at 55 - 63 km show the same structures that are observed in the ~5 µm radiance images. This altitude range coincides with the optimal expected values of the cloud top altitude at polar latitudes and magnitudes derived from the analysis of ~5 µm images are measured at this altitude range. We also study the imprint of the vortex on the thermal field above the cloud level which extends up to 80 km. From the temperature maps, we also study the vertical stability of different atmospheric layers. The cold collar is clearly the most statically stable structure at polar latitudes, while the vortex and subpolar latitudes show lower stability values. Furthermore, the hot filaments present within the vortex at 55-63 km exhibit lower values of static stability than their immediate surroundings.ReferencesGarate-Lopez et al. Nat. Geosci. 6, 254-257 (2013).García Muñoz et al. Planet. Space Sci. 81, 65-73 (2013).Grassi, D. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 113, 1-12 (2008).AcknowledgementsWe thank ESA for supporting Venus Express, ASI, CNES and the other national space agencies supporting VIRTIS on VEX and their principal investigators G. Piccioni and P. Drossart. This work

  15. Structure and physical properties of the polar oxysulfide CaZnOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Timothy; Smura, Catherine F; Clarke, Simon J; Ok, Kang Min; Halasyamani, P Shiv

    2007-04-02

    The synthesis, structure, and electrical properties of the oxysulfide CaZnOS are reported. The white compound has a band gap of 3.7(1) eV and crystallizes in hexagonal space group P6(3)mc (No. 186) with a = 3.75726(3) A, c = 11.4013(1) A, and Z = 2. The noncentrosymmetric structure, which has few analogues, is composed of isotypic puckered hexagonal ZnS and CaO layers arranged so that ZnS3O tetrahedra are all aligned parallel, resulting in a polar structure. The compound shows type 1 non-phase-matchable second harmonic generation, determined using 1064 nm radiation, with an efficiency approximately 100 times that of alpha-SiO2 and a piezoelectric coefficient of 38 pm V-1. Although polar, CaZnOS is not ferroelectric and the pyroelectric coefficient is very small, approximately 0.0 microC m-2 K-1 between room temperature and 100 degrees C.

  16. Polarization memory effect in the photoluminescence of nc-Si-SiOx light-emitting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailovska, Katerina; Indutnyi, Ivan; Shepeliavyi, Petro; Sopinskyy, Mykola

    2016-06-01

    The polarization memory (PM) effect in the photoluminescence (PL) of the porous nc-Si-SiOx light-emitting structures, containing nanoparticles of silicon (nc-Si) in the oxide matrix and passivated in a solution of hydrofluoric acid (HF), has been investigated. The studied nc-Si-SiOx structures were produced by evaporation of Si monoxide (SiO) powder in vacuum and oblique deposition on Si wafer, and then the deposited silicon oxide (SiOx) films were annealed in the vacuum at 975 °C to grow nc-Si. It was found that the PM effect in the PL is observed only after passivation of nanostructures: during etching in HF solution, the initial symmetric nc-Si becomes asymmetric elongated. It was also found that in investigated nanostructures, there is a defined orientational dependence of the PL polarization degree ( ρ) in the sample plane which correlates with the orientation of SiOx nanocolumns, forming the structure of the porous layer. The increase of the ρ values in the long-wavelength spectral range with time of HF treatment can be associated with increasing of the anisotropy of large Si nanoparticles. The PM effect for this spectral interval can be described by the dielectric model. In the short-wavelength spectral range, the dependence of the ρ values agrees qualitatively with the quantum confinement effect.

  17. Polarization memory effect in the photoluminescence of nc-Si-SiOx light-emitting structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailovska, Katerina; Indutnyi, Ivan; Shepeliavyi, Petro; Sopinskyy, Mykola

    2016-12-01

    The polarization memory (PM) effect in the photoluminescence (PL) of the porous nc-Si-SiOx light-emitting structures, containing nanoparticles of silicon (nc-Si) in the oxide matrix and passivated in a solution of hydrofluoric acid (HF), has been investigated. The studied nc-Si-SiOx structures were produced by evaporation of Si monoxide (SiO) powder in vacuum and oblique deposition on Si wafer, and then the deposited silicon oxide (SiOx) films were annealed in the vacuum at 975 °C to grow nc-Si. It was found that the PM effect in the PL is observed only after passivation of nanostructures: during etching in HF solution, the initial symmetric nc-Si becomes asymmetric elongated. It was also found that in investigated nanostructures, there is a defined orientational dependence of the PL polarization degree (ρ) in the sample plane which correlates with the orientation of SiOx nanocolumns, forming the structure of the porous layer. The increase of the ρ values in the long-wavelength spectral range with time of HF treatment can be associated with increasing of the anisotropy of large Si nanoparticles. The PM effect for this spectral interval can be described by the dielectric model. In the short-wavelength spectral range, the dependence of the ρ values agrees qualitatively with the quantum confinement effect.

  18. Determination of the Structure of the Coronal Magnetic Field Using Microwave Polarization Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogod, V. M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory motions and wave processes in active regions requires knowledge of the structure of the magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. We study the magnetic field structure of active regions at coronal heights, as they are determined by means of multiwave observations of polarized radio emission of active regions in the microwave range. Two methods, a stereoscopic method and the analysis of the radio spectrum are used. The method of stereoscopy rotation allows estimating the height of radio sources in a stable active region relative to the photosphere, based on its apparent motion in the image plane recorded over several days of observation. At various times one-dimensional scans at multiple frequencies spanning the 5.98 - 15.95 GHz frequency range from the RATAN-600 instrument are used. The gyroresonance emission mechanism, which is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field strength, is applied to convert the radio source estimated heights at various frequencies, h(f), to information as regards magnetic field vs. height, B(h). Diagrams of longitude - height of some polarized radio sources revealed multiple reversals, suggestive of a spiral magnetic structure. In all cases, the magnetic field strength maintains high values (800 - 1000 G) at the highest altitudes analysed, which reflects a relatively weak divergence in the field of magnetic flux tubes (in the height range 8 - 14 Mm) responsible for the main part of the radio emission of active regions.

  19. Spin-Polarized Electron Injection in Co/Cu/Fe Sandwich Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shou-Guo; CHEN Yan-Xue; WANG Zhi-He; CHEN Qiang; XIE Shi-Jie; MEI Liang-Mo

    2000-01-01

    A material asymmetry Co/Cu/Fe junction structure has been prepared for studying the spin-polarized electron injection at 77K. The sample performance was demonstrated to be analogous to that of a bipolar transistor. The maximal value of the output pulse voltage between Cu and Fe layers could reach the order of severalμV when the bias current between Co and Cu layers was 10μA. The interface roughness, photograph of material, magnetic loop and injection characteristic curves have been measured. Some important points on this topic have been discussed.

  20. Giant kerr nonlinearity, controlled entangled photons and polarization phase gates in coupled quantum-well structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengjie; Huang, Guoxiang

    2011-11-07

    We study linear and nonlinear propagations of probe and signal pulses in a multiple quantum-well structure with a four-level, double Λ-type configuration. We show that slow, mutually matched group velocities and giant Kerr nonlinearity of the probe and the signal pulses may be achieved with nearly vanishing optical absorption. Based on these properties we demonstrate that two-qubit quantum polarization phase gates can be constructed and highly entangled photon pairs may be produced. In addition, we show that coupled slow-light soliton pairs with very low generation power can be realized in the system.

  1. Extracting structural information from the polarization dependence of one- and two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaser, Jennifer E; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-07-25

    We present ways in which pulse sequences and polarizations can be used to extract structural information from one- and two-dimensional vibrational sum frequency generation (2D SFG) spectra. We derive analytic expressions for the polarization dependence of systems containing coupled vibrational modes, and we present simulated spectra to identify the features of different molecular geometries. We discuss several useful polarization combinations for suppressing strong diagonal peaks and emphasizing weaker cross-peaks. We investigate unique capabilities of 2D SFG spectra for obtaining structural information about SFG-inactive modes and for identifying coupled achiral chromophores. This work builds on techniques that have been developed for extracting structural information from 2D IR spectra. This paper discusses how to utilize these concepts in 2D SFG experiments to probe multioscillator systems at interfaces. The sample code for calculating polarization dependence of 1D and 2D SFG spectra is provided in the Supporting Information .

  2. Stability of the β-structure in prion protein: A molecular dynamics study based on polarized force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijun; Lazim, Raudah; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Dawei

    2012-06-01

    Conformational changes of the antiparallel β-sheet in normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) of rat, bovine, and human are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations in both neutral and acidic environment. Using a recently developed simulation method based on an on-the-fly polarized protein-specific charge (PPC) update scheme during the simulation process, we evaluate and compare the cross-species performances of the β-sheet during the early stage transition from the PrPC to its mutant configuration. Through this study, we observe the growth of the β-sheet structure in all species studied with the extent of elongation in β-sheet being different across the three species.

  3. Polarization Induced Changes in LSM Thin Film Electrode Composition Observed by In Operando Raman Spectroscopy and TOF-SIMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, Melissa D.; Traulsen, Marie Lund; Norrman, Kion

    2015-01-01

    Polarization induced changes in LSM electrode composition were investigated by utilizing in operando Raman spectroscopy and post mortem TOF-SIMS depth profiling. Experiments were conducted on cells with 160 nm thick (La0.85Sr0.15)0.9MnO3±δ thin film electrodes in 10% O2 at 700 °C under various...

  4. Reverse Polarity Magnetized Melt Rocks from the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub Structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, Luis; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1994-01-01

    We report paleomagnetic results for core samples of the breccia and andesitic rocks recovered from the Yucatan-6 Petrolcos Mexicanos exploratory well within the Chicxulub structure (about 60 km SSW from its center), northern Yucatan, Mexico. A previous study has shown that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts and an Ar/Ar date of 65.2 +/- 0.4 Ma. Andesitic rocks are characterized by stable single-component magnetizations with a mean inclination of -42.6 deg +/- 2.4 deg. Breccias present a complex paleomagnetic record characterized by multivectorial magnetizations with widely different initial NRM inclinations. However, after alternating field demagnetization, well defined characteristic components with upward inclinations are defined. IRM acquisition experiments, comparison of IRM and NRM coercivity spectra and the single component magnetization of the andesitic rocks indicate the occurrence of iron-rich titanomagnetites of single or pseudo-single domain states as the dominant magnetic carriers. Mean inclinations from the andesitic rocks and most of the breccia samples give a mean inclination of about -40 deg to -45 deg, indicating a reverse polarity for the characteristic magnetization that is consistent with geomagnetic chron 29R, which spans the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The inclination is also consistent with the expected value (and corresponding paleolatitude) for the site estimated from the reference polar wander curve for North America. We suggest that the characteristic magnetizations for the andesitic and breccia rocks are the result of shock heating at the time of formation of the impact structure and that the age, polarity and pateolatitude are consistent with a time at the K/T boundary.

  5. The Fine-Structure of the Net-Circular Polarization in a Sunspot Penumbra

    CERN Document Server

    Tritschler, A; Schlichenmaier, R; Hagenaar, H J

    2007-01-01

    We present novel evidence for a fine structure observed in the net-circular polarization (NCP) of a sunspot penumbra based on spectropolarimetric measurements utilizing the Zeeman sensitive FeI 630.2 nm line. For the first time we detect a filamentary organized fine structure of the NCP on spatial scales that are similar to the inhomogeneities found in the penumbral flow field. We also observe an additional property of the visible NCP, a zero-crossing of the NCP in the outer parts of the center-side penumbra, which has not been recognized before. In order to interprete the observations we solve the radiative transfer equations for polarized light in a model penumbra with embedded magnetic flux tubes. We demonstrate that the observed zero-crossing of the NCP can be explained by an increased magnetic field strength inside magnetic flux tubes in the outer penumbra combined with a decreased magnetic field strength in the background field. Our results strongly support the concept of the uncombed penumbra.

  6. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-05-29

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system.

  7. Study on the layered dusty plasma structures in the summer polar mesopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional hydrodynamic equations are adopted to build a one-dimensional theoretical model to study the effect of gravity wave on layered dusty plasma structures formation and evolution near the polar summer mesospause region associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism gives consideration to the charged ice particle motion by the gravity wave modulation, making a significant contribution to the vertical transport of heavy ice particles and convergence into thin layers. And numerical results show that the pattern of the multi-layer structure depends on the ration of the initial ice particles density distribution to the vertical wavelength of the gravity waves, the ice particle size and the wind velocity caused by gravity wave. Also, the variation of ion density distribution under the influence of gravity wave has also been examined. Finally, the electron density depletions (bite-outs layers has been simulated according to the charge conservation laws, and the results are compared to the ECT02 rocket sounding data, which agree well with the measuring.

  8. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.

    2010-01-18

    Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures and their fast dynamics is scientifically interesting and technologically of highest relevance. The combination of circularly polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at characteristic X-ray absorption edges, with a high resolution soft X-ray microscope utilizing Fresnel zone plate optics allows to study in a unique way the stochastical behavior in the magnetization reversal process of thin films and the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic vortices and domain walls in confined ferromagnetic structures. Future sources of fsec short and high intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of magnetic imaging down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales.

  9. Thermal Expansion Anomaly in TTB Ferroelectrics: The Interplay between Framework Structure and Electric Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun; You, Li; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-15

    Tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) makes up a large family of functional materials with fascinating dielectric, piezoelectric, or ferroelectric properties. Understanding the thermal expansion mechanisms associated with their physical properties is important for their practical applications as well as theoretical investigations. Fortunately, the appearance of anomalous thermal expansion in functional materials offers a chance to capture the physics behind them. Herein, we report an investigation of the thermal expansion anomalies in TTBs that are related to ferroelectric transitions and summarize recent progress in this field. The special role of Pb(2+) cation is elucidated. The interplay between the thermal expansion anomaly, electric polarization, and framework structure provides new insight into the structure-property relationships in functional materials.

  10. Three Dimensional Structure of the Mars North Polar Basal Unit from MARSIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, A.; Orosei, R.; Cartacci, M.; Cicchetti, A.; Mitri, G.; Giuppi, S.; Noschese, R.; Picardi, G.; Plaut, J.

    2012-04-01

    Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) is an orbital subsurface sounder aboard ESA's Mars Express spacecraft . It transmits a low-frequency radar pulse that is capable of penetrating below the surface, and is reflected by subsurface dielectric discontinuities. MARSIS has been used to probe both the south and the north polar caps of Mars, revealing their thickness and structure. We report on the results of a campaign of observations of the north polar ice cap of Mars that took place between May and December 2011 in uniquely favorable conditions and produced data of unprecedented quality. The focus of this work is the so-called Basal Unit, a dark, ice-rich, complexely layered geologic unit lying stratigraphically between the polar layered deposits and the Vastitas Borealis Formation, and extending beneath most of Planum Boreum and Olympia Planitia. The objective of this work is the to study the full three dimensional structure of the Northern Polar Deposit and in particular of the Basal Unit (BU). It was recently found that the BU consists of two markedly different units, called the Rupes Tenuis unit and the Planum Boreum cavi unit. The Rupes Tenuis unit appears to be older, horizontally layered, and lacking erosional contacts. It has been thus interpreted as the result of precipitation and cold-trapping of dust-laden volatiles. The Planum Boreum cavi unit displays cross-bedding, indicating dune accumulation. Bright layers within it are interpreted as being made of ice-cemented dust, while dark layers should consist of weathered basalt fines. It seems likely that, in places, the Planum Boreum cavi unit rests directly on the Vastitas Borealis, without the Rupes Tenuis unit in between. Because the two units in the BU have formed much earlier than the north polar layered deposits, and at some interval from each other, they bear evidence of past climatic conditions that were very different from present, so that they "could potentially be a

  11. Optical and Micro-Structural Characterization of MBE Grown Indium Gallium Nitride Polar Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    El Afandy, Rami

    2011-07-07

    Gallium nitride and related materials have ushered in scientific and technological breakthrough for lighting, mass data storage and high power electronic applications. These III-nitride materials have found their niche in blue light emitting diodes and blue laser diodes. Despite the current development, there are still technological problems that still impede the performance of such devices. Three-dimensional nanostructures are proposed to improve the electrical and thermal properties of III-nitride optical devices. This thesis consolidates the characterization results and unveils the unique physical properties of polar indium gallium nitride quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy technique. In this thesis, a theoretical overview of the physical, structural and optical properties of polar III-nitrides quantum dots will be presented. Particular emphasis will be given to properties that distinguish truncated-pyramidal III-nitride quantum dots from other III-V semiconductor based quantum dots. The optical properties of indium gallium nitride quantum dots are mainly dominated by large polarization fields, as well as quantum confinement effects. Hence, the experimental investigations for such quantum dots require performing bandgap calculations taking into account the internal strain fields, polarization fields and confinement effects. The experiments conducted in this investigation involved the transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction as well as photoluminescence spectroscopy. The analysis of the temperature dependence and excitation power dependence of the PL spectra sheds light on the carrier dynamics within the quantum dots, and its underlying wetting layer. A further analysis shows that indium gallium nitride quantum dots through three-dimensional confinements are able to prevent the electronic carriers from getting thermalized into defects which grants III-nitrides quantum dot based light emitting diodes superior thermally induced optical

  12. Structural changes in dairy business in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Vujčić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Croatia today is in the economy transition process that also includes agriculture aiming to increase production and achieving competitive standard with international and European markets. Currently, domestic cow milk production ensures 80% of annual milk and dairy products requirements with the 20% import. In the period from 1990-1992, during the patriot war, 103000 cows and heifers were destroyed. Since then, Croatia started the gradual process of reorganization of the agricultural private sector including dairy business in order to increase production insensitivity.The agricultural structure of dairy segment is unsatisfactory with only 23.39% of farms holding four or more heifers. Households with 3 cows per farm dominate with average real estate of 0.10-3.0 acres.Changes in milk production (1990-2003 are reflected in the decrease of the number of breeding cattle – index 56.13%, and decrease of milk market producers from 65 000 to 65 151. Never the less, positive trends towards stabilization in milk production (2003 – 642 mil litres and annual milk intake increased from 342 mil litres in 1990 to 472 mil litres in 2003 (index 138.08% can be noticed. Changes in the structure of milk producers show certain positive movements as 23.39% of producers have 53.40% cows and respectively participation in milk production and buy off. Until 2008, with determined development conditions, cow milk production can increase for 42% and from 2703 litres to average of 4000 litres per dairy cow.

  13. Changing Arctic Ecosystems: Updated forecast: Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions required to improve polar bear outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Karen L.; Atwood, Todd C.; Mugel, Douglas N.; Rode, Karyn D.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to the loss of snow and ice, which increases the amount of solar energy absorbed by the region. The most visible consequence has been the rapid decline in sea ice over the last 3 decades-a decline projected to bring long ice-free summers if greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are not significantly reduced. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice over the biologically productive continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean as a platform for hunting seals. In 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the polar bear as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to the threat posed by sea ice loss. The polar bear was the first species to be listed due to forecasted population declines from climate change.

  14. Linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium in the 3C 196 field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, V.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Pandey, V. N.; Mevius, M.; Haverkorn, M.; Brentjens, M. A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Zaroubi, S.; Abdalla, F. B.; Asad, K. M. B.; Bus, S.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Fernandez, E. R.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Iliev, I. T.; Jensen, H.; Kazemi, S.; Mellema, G.; Offringa, A. R.; Patil, A. H.; Vedantham, H. K.; Yatawatta, S.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: This study aims to characterize linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the 3C 196 field, one of the primary fields of the LOFAR-Epoch of Reionization key science project. Methods: We have used the high band antennas (HBA) of LOFAR to image this region and rotation measure (RM) synthesis to unravel the distribution of polarized structures in Faraday depth. Results: The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is 5-15 K in polarized intensity and covers the range from -3 to +8 rad m-2 in Faraday depth. The most interesting morphological feature is a strikingly straight filament at a Faraday depth of +0.5 rad m-2 running from north to south, right through the centre of the field and parallel to the Galactic plane. There is also an interesting system of linear depolarization canals conspicuous in an image showing the peaks of Faraday spectra. We used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. For the first time, we see some common morphology in the RM cubes made at 150 and 350 MHz. There is no indication of diffuse emission in total intensity in the interferometric data, in line with results at higher frequencies and previous LOFAR observations. Based on our results, we determined physical parameters of the ISM and proposed a simple model that may explain the observed distribution of the intervening magneto-ionic medium. Conclusions: The mean line-of-sight magnetic field component, B∥, is determined to be 0.3 ± 0.1 μG and its spatial variation across the 3C 196 field is 0.1 μG. The filamentary structure is probably an ionized filament in the ISM, located somewhere within the Local Bubble. This filamentary structure shows an excess in thermal electron density (neB∥> 6.2 cm-3μG) compared to its surroundings. The RM cubes (FITS files) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  15. Spectral and polarization properties of a ‘cholesteric liquid crystal—phase plate—metal’ structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrov, S. Ya; Pyatnov, M. V.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the localized surface modes in a structure consisting of the cholesteric liquid crystal layer, a phase plate, and a metal layer. These modes are analogous to the optical Tamm states. The nonreciprocal transmission of polarized light propagating in the forward and backward directions is established. It is demonstrated that the transmission spectrum can be controlled by external fields acting on the cholesteric liquid crystal and by varying the plane of polarization of the incident light.

  16. Structural polarity and dynamics of male germline stem cells in an insect (milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, David C; Dorn, August

    2008-01-01

    Knowing the structure opens a door for a better understanding of function because there is no function without structure. Male germline stem cells (GSCs) of the milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) exhibit a very extraordinary structure and a very special relationship with their niche, the apical cells. This structural relationship is strikingly different from that known in the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) -- the most successful model system, which allowed deep insights into the signaling interactions between GSCs and niche. The complex structural polarity of male GSCs in the milkweed bug combined with their astonishing dynamics suggest that cell morphology and dynamics are causally related with the most important regulatory processes that take place between GSCs and niche and ensure maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation of GSCs in accordance with the temporal need of mature sperm. The intricate structure of the GSCs of the milkweed bug (and probably of some other insects, i.e., moths) is only accessible by electron microscopy. But, studying singular sections through the apical complex (i.e., GSCs and apical cells) is not sufficient to obtain a full picture of the GSCs; especially, the segregation of projection terminals is not tangible. Only serial sections and their overlay can establish whether membrane ingrowths merely constrict projections or whether a projection terminal is completely cut off. To sequence the GSC dynamics, it is necessary to include juvenile stages, when the processes start and the GSCs occur in small numbers. The fine structural analysis of segregating projection terminals suggests that these terminals undergo autophagocytosis. Autophagosomes can be labeled by markers. We demonstrated acid phosphatase and thiamine pyrophosphatase (TPPase). Both together are thought to identify autophagosomes. Using the appropriate substrate of the enzymes and cerium chloride, the precipitation of electron-dense cerium phosphate granules

  17. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, A; de la Flor, G; Aroyo, M I; Gospodinov, M; Bismayer, U; Mihailova, B

    2016-11-30

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba(2+), Sr(2+), La(3+), Bi(3+)) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb(5+) or Sn(4+) doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb(2+) have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba(2+)) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr(2+), La(3+)), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb(2+), increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi(3+)) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A

  18. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, A.; de la Flor, G.; Aroyo, M. I.; Gospodinov, M.; Bismayer, U.; Mihailova, B.

    2016-11-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba2+, Sr2+, La3+, Bi3+) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb5+ or Sn4+ doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb2+ have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba2+) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr2+, La3+), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb2+, increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi3+) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A-site Pb2+ cations leads to

  19. Vectorial mapping of noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure of semiconducting FeSe surface with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Xiaole [Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Xianfeng [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L., E-mail: clgao@sjtu.edu.cn; Jia, Jin-Feng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Luo, Weidong, E-mail: wdluo@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China)

    2016-02-08

    Antiferromagnetic semiconductors gain increasing interest due to their possible application in spintronics. Using spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy operating in a vector field, we mapped the noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structure of a semiconducting hexagonal FeSe surface on the atomic scale. The surface possesses an in-plane compensated Néel structure which is further confirmed by first-principles calculations.

  20. Phytoplankton abundance and community structure in the Antarctic polar frontal region during austral summer of 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHRAMIK Patil; RAHUL Mohan; SUHAS Shetye; SAHINA Gazi

    2013-01-01

    The Antarctic polar front region in the Southern Ocean is known to be most productive.We studied the phytoplankton community structure in the Indian sector at this frontal location during late austral summer (February,2009) onboard R/V Akademic Boris Petrov.We used the phytoplankton and microheterotrophs abundance,as also the associated physico-chemical parameters to explain the low phytoplankton abundance in the study region.This study emphasizes the shift of phytoplankton,from large (>10 μm) to small (<10 μm) size.The phytoplankton abundance appears to be controlled by physical parameters and by nutrient concentrations and also by the microheterotrophs (ciliates and dinoflagellates) which exert a strong grazing pressure.This probably reduces small (<10 μm) and large (>10 μm)phytoplankton abundance during the late austral summer.This study highlights the highly productive polar front nevertheless becomes a region of low phytoplankton abundance,due to community shifts towards pico-phytoplankton (<10 μm) during late austral summer.

  1. Morphological, structural and electrical investigations on non-polar a-plane ZnO epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlaeger, Stefan; Eisermann, Sebastian; Hofmann, Michael N.; Roemer, Udo; Pinnisch, Melanie; Laufer, Andreas; Meyer, Bruno K.; von Wenckstern, Holger; Lajn, Alexander; Schmidt, Florian; Grundmann, Marius; Blaesing, Juergen; Krost, Alois

    2010-07-01

    We report on the growth of non-polar a-plane ZnO by CVD on r-plane-sapphire-wafers, a-plane GaN-templates and a-plane ZnO single-crystal substrates. Only the homoepitaxial growth approach leads to a Frank-van-der-Merwe growth mode, as shown by atomic force microscopy. The X-ray-diffraction spectra of the homoepitaxial thin films mirror the excellent crystalline quality of the ZnO substrate. The morphological and the structural quality of the homoepitaxial films is comparable to the best results for the growth on c-plane ZnO-substrates. The impurity incorporation, especially of group III elements, seems to be reduced when growing on the non-polar a-plane surface compared to the c-plane films as demonstrated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Optical properties have been investigated using low temperature photoluminescence measurements. We employed capacitance-voltage measurements ( C- V) to measure the background carrier density and its profile from substrate/film interface throughout the film to the surface. In thermal admittance spectroscopy (TAS) specific traps could be distinguished, and their thermal activation energies and capture cross sections could be determined.

  2. Spin structure of the proton from polarized inclusive deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Ballintijn, M K; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Bird, I G; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gaussiran, T; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gülmez, E; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Layda, T; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nagaitsev, A P; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Parks, D P; Penzo, Aldo L; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Pyrlik, J; Reyhancan, I; Rijllart, A; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Rosado, A; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schüler, K P; Segel, R E; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sever, F; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Teichert, K M; Tessarotto, F; Tlaczala, W; Trentalange, S; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Weinstein, R; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of polarized muons off polarized protons, in the kinematic range $0.003 < x < 0.7$ and $1\\gevtwo < Q^2 < 60\\gevtwo$. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis is used to evolve the measured $\\gpone(x,Q^2)$ to a fixed $Q^2_0$. The first moment of $\\gpone$ at $Q^2_0 = 10\\gevtwo$ is $\\gammap = 0.136\\pm 0.013 \\,(\\mbox{stat.}) \\pm 0.009\\,(\\mbox{syst.})\\pm 0.005\\ (\\mbox{evol.})$. This result is below the prediction of the Ellis--Jaffe sum rule by more than two standard deviations. The singlet axial charge $\\dsigt$ is found to be $0.28 \\pm 0.16$. In the Adler--Bardeen factorization scheme, $\\Delta g \\simeq 2$ is required to bring $\\Delta \\Sigma$ in agreement with the Quark-Parton Model. A combined analysis of all available proton and deuteron data confirms the Bjorken sum rule.

  3. The effects of human umbilical cord perivascular cells on rat hepatocyte structure and functional polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aristizábal, Alejandro; Davies, John Edward

    2013-06-01

    Hepatocyte culture is a useful tool for the study of their biology and the development of bioartificial livers. However, many challenges have to be overcome since hepatocytes rapidly lose their normal phenotype in vitro. We have recently demonstrated that human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) are able to provide support to hepatocytes. In the present study we go further into exploring the effects that HUCPVCs have in the functional polarization, and both the internal and external organization, of hepatocytes. Also, we investigate HUCPVC-hepatocyte crosstalk by tracking both the effects of HUCPVCs on hepatocyte transcription factors and those of hepatocytes on the expression of hepatotrophic factors in HUCPVCs. Our results show that HUCPVCs maintain the functional polarity of hepatocytes ex vivo, as judged by the secretion of fluorescein into bile canaliculi, for at least 40 days. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that hepatocytes in coculture organize in an organoid-like structure embedded in extracellular matrix surrounded by HUCPVCs. In coculture, hepatocytes displayed a higher expression of C/EBPα, implicated in maintenance of the mature hepatocyte phenotype, and HUCPVCs upregulated hepatocyte growth factor and Jagged1 indicating that these genes may play important roles in HUCPVC-hepatocyte interactions.

  4. Infrared polarization images of star-forming regions. I - The ubiquity of bipolar structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, M.; Gatley, Ian; Joyce, R. R.; Ueno, M.; Suto, H.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The inefficiency of the stellar formation process leads rather generally to high residual dust densities, and so to the existence of infrared reflection nebulosity (IRN), in regions of star formation. Polarization images of several star-forming regions with mass outflows (GSS 30, S255, GL 5180, GL 2591, GGD 27, and NGC 7538) presented here: (1) establish the universality of bipolarity and of shell or cavity structure in the IRN consistent with that of CO outflow; (2) identify the source of the mass outflow in each case; (3) show that the opening angle near this central source is large; and (4) demonstrate several instances of multiple shells, probably arising from episodic mass loss. Astrometry of 2.2-micron sources with arcsecond accuracy identifies the illuminating source of each IRN uniquely with a compact H II region or a bright IR source. The polarization images provide strong evidence for large-scale dust toroids around each of these sources. The density and mass of these disks are estimated from the extinction through the disk.

  5. Structural polarization properties of vector Gaussian beam in the far field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Guo-Quan; Ni Yong-Zhou; Chu Xiu-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the vector angular spectrum representation of optical beam and the method of stationary phase, the analytical TE and TM terms of vector Gaussian beam have been presented in the far field. By using the local polarization matrix, the polarization properties of the TE and TM terms in the far field are investigated, and it is found that the degree of their polarization is only determined by the spatial location. When the source is completely polarized, the TE and TM terms are both completely polarized in the far field. When the source is completely unpolarized, the TE and TM terms in the far field are partially polarized. The whole beam is also partially polarized except on the propagating axis. Moreover, the degrees of polarization of TE and TM terms are both larger than that of the whole beam.

  6. Structure and function relationships of proteins based on polar profile: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Proteins in the post-genome era impose diverse research challenges, the main are the understanding of their structure-function mechanism, and the growing need for new pharmaceutical drugs, particularly antibiotics that help clinicians treat the ever- increasing number of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms (MDROs). Although, there is a wide range of mathematical-computational algorithms to satisfy the demand, among them the Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship algorithms that have shown better performance using a characteristic training data of the property searched; their performance has stagnated regardless of the number of metrics they evaluate and their complexity. This article reviews the characteristics of these metrics, and the need to reconsider the mathematical structure that expresses them, directing their design to a more comprehensive algebraic structure. It also shows how the main function of a protein can be determined by measuring the polarity of its linear sequence, with a high level of accuracy, and how such exhaustive metric stands as a "fingerprint" that can be applied to scan the protein regions to obtain new pharmaceutical drugs, and thus to establish how the singularities led to the specialization of the protein groups known today.

  7. Excitation of plasmons in Ag/Fe/W structure by spin-polarized electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarin, Sergey N.; Kostylev, Mikhail; Williams, J. F. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Perth WA 6009 (Australia); Artamonov, Oleg M.; Baraban, Alexander P. [St. Petersburg State University, Faculty of Physics, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Guagliardo, Paul [Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, Perth WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-09-07

    Using Spin-polarized Electron-Energy Loss Spectroscopy (SPEELS), the plasmon excitations were probed in a few atomic layers thick Ag film deposited on an Fe layer or on a single crystal of W(110). The measurements were performed at two specular geometries with either a 25° or 72° angle of incidence. On a clean Fe layer (10 atomic layers thick), Stoner excitation asymmetry was observed, as expected. Deposition of a silver film on top of the Fe layer dramatically changed the asymmetry of the SPEELS spectra. The spin-effect depends on the kinematics of the scattering: angles of incidence and detection. The spin-dependence of the plasmon excitations in the silver film on the W(110) surface and on the ferromagnetic Fe film is suggested to arise from the spin-active Ag/W or Ag/Fe interfaces.

  8. The Meso-Structured Magnetic Atmosphere -- A Stochastic Polarized Radiative Transfer Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, T A

    2007-01-01

    We present a general radiative transfer model appropriate to diagnose the small scale and mostly unresolved magnetic field of the solar photosphere. Present modeling techniques still rely to a large extend on a-priori assumptions about the geometry of the underlying magnetic field. In an effort to obtain a more flexible and unbiased approach we pursue a rigorous statistical description of the underlying atmosphere. Based on a Markov random field model the atmospheric structures are characterized in terms of probability densities and spatial correlations. This approach allows us to derive a stochastic transport equation for polarized light valid in a regime with an arbitrary fluctuating magnetic field on finite scales. One of the key ingredients of the derived stochastic transfer equation is the correlation length which provides an additional degree of freedom to the transport equation and can therefore be used as a diagnostic parameter to estimate the characteristic length scale of the underlying magnetic fie...

  9. Probing the Spin-Polarized Electronic Band Structure in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zefang; Zhao, Liang; Mak, Kin Fai; Shan, Jie

    2017-02-01

    We study the electronic band structure in the K/K' valleys of the Brillouin zone of monolayer WSe2 and MoSe2 by optical reflection and photoluminescence spectroscopy on dual-gated field-effect devices. Our experiment reveals the distinct spin polarization in the conduction bands of these compounds by a systematic study of the doping dependence of the A and B excitonic resonances. Electrons in the highest-energy valence band and the lowest-energy conduction band have antiparallel spins in monolayer WSe2, and parallel spins in monolayer MoSe2. The spin splitting is determined to be hundreds of meV for the valence bands and tens of meV for the conduction bands, which are in good agreement with first principles calculations. These values also suggest that both n- and p-type WSe2 and MoSe2 can be relevant for spin- and valley-based applications

  10. Photoluminescence polarization anisotropy for studying long-range structural ordering within semiconductor multi-atomic alloys and organic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Percino, J. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, col. San Miguel Huyeotlipan, 72050, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Orlova, T. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Vavilova, L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04

    Long-range structural ordering within multi-component semiconductor alloys and organic crystals leads to significant optical anisotropy and, in particular, to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PL emission of ternary and quaternary semiconductor alloys is polarized if there is some amount of the atomic ordering within the crystal structure. We analyze the polarization of the PL emission from the quaternary GaInAsP semiconductor alloy grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) and conclude that it could be caused by low degree atomic ordering within the crystal structure together with the thermal biaxial strain due to difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the layer and the substrate. We also study the state of polarization of the PL from organic crystals in order to identify different features of the crystal PL spectrum.

  11. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Cloud is one of the main processes in the climate system and especially a large feed back agent for Arctic warming amplification (Yoshimori et al., 2014). From this reason, observation of polar cloud has been emphasized and 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in 2013 as one of the basic infrastructure in the GRENE (Green Network of Excellence Program) Arctic Climate Change Research Project. The radar, "FALCON-A", is a FM-CW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar, developed for Arctic use by Chiba University (PI: T. Takano) in 2012, following its prototype, "FALCON-1" which was developed in 2006 (Takano et al., 2010). The specifications of the radar are, central frequency: 94.84 GHz; antenna power: 1 W; observation height: up to 15 km; range resolution: 48 m; beam width: 0.2 degree (15 m at 5 km); Doppler width: 3.2 m/s; time interval: 10 sec, and capable of archiving high sensitivity and high spatial and time resolution. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller parabolic antennas separated 1.4 m from each other used for transmitting and receiving the wave. Polarized Micro-Pulse Lidar (PMPL, Sigma Space MPL-4B-IDS), which is capable to measure the backscatter and depolarization ratio, has also been deployed to Ny-Ålesund in March 2012, and now operated to perform collocated measurements with FALCON-A. Simultaneous measurement data from collocated PMPL and FALCON-A are available for synergetic analyses of cloud microphysics. Cloud mycrophysics, such as effective radius of ice particles and ice water content, are obtained from the analysis based on algorithm, which is modified for ground-based measurements from Okamoto's retrieval algorithm for satellite based cloud profiling radar and lidar (CloudSat and CALIPSO; Okamoto et al., 2010). Results of two years will be shown in the presentation. Calibration is a point to derive radar reflectivity (dBZ) from original intensity data

  12. Novel wideband microwave polarization network using a fully-reconfigurable photonic waveguide interleaver with a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Beeker, Willem; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; Dijk, van Paulus; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel wideband microwave photonic polarization network for dual linear-polarized antennas. The polarization network is based on a waveguide-implemented fully-reconfigurable optical interleaver using a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure. For mic

  13. SOCIAL POLARIZATION AND CONFLICT: A NETWORK APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cárdenas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, polarization is associated with a higher probability of social conflict. This paper, in a microeconomic model based on the theory of social networks, analyses how changes in the network's structure affect the level of some basic parameters associated with the concept of polarization. This study shows that under upward monotonic preferences, longer sets of affiliations for each individual reduce polarization, whereas under downward monotonic preferences, longer sets of the so-called bad affiliations increase polarization. Finally, in the case of a non-monotonic system of preferences, an expansion of the affiliations set will alter the resulting polarization order in different ways depending on the preferences themselves

  14. Self-sustained spin-polarized current oscillations in multiquantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo, Ramon [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Ciencias de la Computacion, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Carretero, Manuel; Bonilla, Luis L [G. Millan Institute, Fluid Dynamics, Nanoscience and Industrial Mathematics, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Platero, Gloria [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, 28049 Cantoblanco (Spain)], E-mail: escobedo@unican.es, E-mail: manuel.carretero@uc3m.es, E-mail: bonilla@ing.uc3m.es, E-mail: gplatero@icmm.csic.es

    2009-01-15

    Nonlinear transport through diluted magnetic semiconductor nanostructures is investigated. We have considered a II-VI multiquantum well nanostructure whose wells are selectively doped with Mn. The response to a dc voltage bias may be either a stationary or an oscillatory current. We have studied the transition from stationary to time-dependent current as a function of the doping density and the number of quantum wells. Analysis and numerical solution of a nonlinear spin transport model shows that the current in a structure without magnetic impurities is stationary, whereas current oscillations may appear if at least one well contains magnetic impurities. For long structures having two wells with magnetic impurities, a detailed analysis of nucleation of charge dipole domains shows that self-sustained current oscillations are caused by repeated triggering of dipole domains at the magnetic wells and motion towards the collector. Depending on the location of the magnetic wells and the voltage, dipole domains may be triggered at both wells or at only one. In the latter case, the well closer to the collector may inhibit domain motion between the first and the second well inside the structure. Our study could allow design of oscillatory spin-polarized current injectors.

  15. Polarization-based perturbations to thermopower and electronic conductivity in highly conductive tungsten bronze structured (Sr,Ba)Nb2O6: Relaxors vs normal ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jonathan A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Mahan, Gerald D.; Randall, Clive A.

    2014-09-01

    Electrical conductivity, thermopower, and lattice strain were investigated in the tetragonal tungsten bronze structured (Srx,Ba1-x)Nb2O6-δ system for 0.7>x>0.4 with large values of δ. These materials show attractive thermoelectric characteristics, especially in single-crystal form. Here, the Sr/Ba ratio was changed in order to vary the material between a normal ferroelectric with long-range polarization to relaxor behavior with short-range order and dynamic polarization. The influence of this on the electrical conduction mechanisms was then investigated. The temperature dependence of both the thermopower and differential activation energy for conduction suggests that the electronic conduction is controlled by an impurity band with a mobility edge separating localized and delocalized states. Conduction is controlled via hopping at low temperatures, and as temperature rises electrons are activated above the mobility edge, resulting in a large increase in electrical conductivity. For relaxor ferroelectric-based compositions, when dynamic short-range order polarization is present in the system, trends in the differential activation energy and thermopower show deviations from this conduction mechanism. The results are consistent with the polarization acting as a source of disorder that affects the location of the mobility edge and, therefore, the activation energy for conduction.

  16. A quantitative measure of electrostatic perturbation in holo and apo enzymes induced by structural changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Biological pathways are subject to subtle manipulations that achieve a wide range of functional variation in differing physiological niches. In many instances, changes in the structure of an enzyme on ligand binding germinate electrostatic perturbations that form the basis of its changed catalytic or transcriptional efficiency. Computational methods that seek to gain insights into the electrostatic changes in enzymes require expertise to setup and computing prowess. In the current work, we present a fast, easy and reliable methodology to compute electrostatic perturbations induced by ligand binding (MEPP. The theoretical foundation of MEPP is the conserved electrostatic potential difference (EPD in cognate pairs of active site residues in proteins with the same functionality. Previously, this invariance has been used to unravel promiscuous serine protease and metallo-β-lactamase scaffolds in alkaline phosphatases. Given that a similarity in EPD is significant, we expect differences in the EPD to be significant too. MEPP identifies residues or domains that undergo significant electrostatic perturbations, and also enumerates residue pairs that undergo significant polarity change. The gain in a certain polarity of a residue with respect to neighboring residues, or the reversal of polarity between two residues might indicate a change in the preferred ligand. The methodology of MEPP has been demonstrated on several enzymes that employ varying mechanisms to perform their roles. For example, we have attributed the change in polarity in residue pairs to be responsible for the loss of metal ion binding in fructose 1,6-bisphosphatases, and corroborated the pre-organized state of the active site of the enzyme with respect to functionally relevant changes in electric fields in ketosteroid isomerases.

  17. Influence of solvent polarity on the structure of drop-cast electroactive tetra(aniline)-surfactant thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Thomas G; Bartenstein, Julia E; Sironi, Beatrice; Mills, Benjamin M; Alexander Bell, O; Emyr Macdonald, J; Arnold, Thomas; Faul, Charl F J; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2016-09-21

    The influence of processing conditions on the thin film microstructure is a fundamental question that must be understood to improve the performance of solution-processed organic electronic materials. Using grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, we have studied the structure of thin films of a tetra(aniline)-surfactant complex prepared by drop-casting from five solvents (hexane, chloroform, tetrahydrofuran, dichloromethane and ethanol), selected to cover a range of polarities. We found that the structure, level of order and degree of orientation relative to the substrate were extremely sensitive to the solvent used. We have attempted to correlate such solvent sensitivity with a variety of solvent physical parameters. Of particular significance is the observation of a sharp structural transition in the thin films cast from more polar solvents; such films presented significantly greater crystallinity as measured by the coherence length and paracrystalline disorder parameter. We attribute this higher structural order to enhanced dissociation of the acid surfactant in the more polar solvents, which in turn promotes complex formation. Furthermore, the more polar solvents provide more effective screening of (i) the attractive ionic interaction between oppositely charged molecules, providing greater opportunity for dynamic reorganisation of the supramolecular aggregates into more perfect structures; and (ii) the repulsive interaction between the positively charged blocks permitting a solvophobic-driven aggregation of the aromatic surfaces during solvent evaporation.

  18. Joint effect of polarization and the propagation path of a light beam on its intrinsic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Abdulkareem, Sarkew

    2016-01-01

    The well-known effects of the spin-orbit interaction of light are manifestations of pair mutual influence of the three types of the angular momentum of light, namely, the spin angular momentum, the extrinsic orbital angular momentum and the intrinsic orbital angular momentum. Here we propose the convenient classification of the effects of the spin-orbit interaction of light and we observe one of the new effects in the frame of this classification, which is determined by the joint influence of two types of the angular momentum on the third type of the angular momentum, namely, the influence of the spin angular momentum and the extrinsic orbital angular momentum on the intrinsic orbital angular momentum. We experimentally studied the propagation of circularly polarized light through an optical fiber coiled into a helix. We have found that the spin angular momentum and the helix parameters affect the spatial structure of the radiation transmitted through the optical fiber. We found out that the structure of the ...

  19. Images of Polar Bears and Penguins, Storms, Deforestation and More - Middle School Students Perceptions of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, S.; Melaas, E. K.; Malmrose, M.; Mullokandov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global change studies aim to foster a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of global change on planet Earth. The study of global change presents a rich domain of inquiry, exploration, and discovery at all grade levels. The main objective of this exploratory study was to assess middle school students' perceptions of global change as part of their participation in the NSF GK12 program called GLACIER (Global Change Initiative - Education and Research) during the academic year 2012-13. The middle schools are located in the Metro Boston area. As part of the program, participating students were asked to draw pictures of their perceptions and ideas on global change. The drawings of 150 children, ages 11 to 13, were qualitatively analyzed. The analysis focused on (a) the type of concepts children chose to convey, (b) the specific context of the global change described (polar bears in floating glaciers), (c) students direct representation of anthropocentric impacts (such as pollution or deforestation), and (d) the match between students concepts and the recent IPCC reports. About 20% of the students focused on the iconic imagery of the melting glaciers and impact on animals such as penguins and polar bears, more than 25% focused on natural disasters (such as storms, sea level changes) while 30% focused on urban problems. These concepts are matched with the recent IPCC report. These results are notable and suggest students in middle schools understand the varied dimensions of global change and the role of human activities in bringing about change. Students' perspectives may help in developing a suitable curriculum using existing science standards to discuss this significant topic in middle school classrooms. In addition, students' drawings illustrate their perception of the coupled human and natural systems.

  20. Inversion of single-station teleseismic P-wave polarization-data for the velocity structure of Beijing area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Futian; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Pavlis, G. L., Booker, J. R., Progressive multiple event location (PMEL), Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 1983, 73: 1753.[2]Dziewonski, A. M., Anderson, D. L., Travel times and station corrections for P-waves at teleseismic distances, J. Geophys. Res., 1983, 88: 3295.[3]Hu Ge, Menke, W., Formal inversion of laterally heterogeneous velocity structure from P-wave polarization data, Geophys. J. Int., 1992. 110: 63.[4]Menke, W., Lerner-Lam, A., Transition from linear to complex polarization in short period compressional waves, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 1991, 81: 611.[5]Hu Ge, Menke, W., Rognvaldsson, S., A demonstration of the joint use of p-wave polarization and travel-time data in tomographic inversion: crustal velocity structure near the south Iceland Lowland network, Geophys. Res. Letters, 1993, 20(13): 1407.[6]Teng, J., Yao, H., Chou, H., Crustal structure in the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan-Zhangjiakou region, Acta Geophysica Sinica(in Chinese), 1979, 22(3): 218.[7]Shao, X., Zhang, J., Chen, X. et al., The results of deep sounding by using converted waves of earthquakes in the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan region, Seismology and Geology(in Chinese), 1980: 2(2): 12.[8]Wei, M., Shi, Z., Yin, X. et al., The basic configuration of crustal structure in North China region and its relation to the earthquakes from gravimetric date, Seismology and Geology(in Chinese), 1980, 2(2): 55.[9]Jin Anshu, Liu Futian, Sun Yongzhi, Three-dimensional P velocity structure of the crust and upper Mantle under Beijing region, Acta Geophysica Sinica(in Chinese), 1980, 23(2): 172.[10]Vidale, J.E., Complex polarization analysis of particle motion, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 1986, 76: 1393.[11]Jurkevics, A., Polarization analysis of three-component array data, Bull, Seismol. Soc. Am., 1988, 78: 1725.[12]Park, J., Vernon, F. L., Lindberg, C.R., Frequency dependent polarization analysis of high-frequency seismograms, J. Geophys. Res., 1987, 92: 12664.[13

  1. Identification of Structural Changes Caused by Weed Infection in Agriculture by Optical and Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, Gizella; Surek, Gyorgy; Fenyes, Diana; Ocsai, Katalin; Linda Toth, Gracia; Akos Gera, David; Hubik, Iren; Simon, Andras; Torok, Cecilia

    2011-03-01

    In most cases the healthy, weed-free cropland has a regular geometric structure determined by sowing technique and plant-to-plant distances. Several plant diseases and weed infections can cause disorders and structural changes in cropland. According to our experience, this type of geometrical changes can be well detected by using polarimetric radar images (RADARSAT2, ALOS PALSAR) with different polarizations (dual, quad) and wavelengths (C, L band).We analyze agricultural damages resulting in structural changes in different croplands. In this paper we propose to complete the methodology of identifying these agricultural damages based on the integrated use of optical and radar satellite images. We focused on the detection of ragweed infection on sunflower lands. According to our results it is possible to develop a methodology based on the quantitative evaluation of polarimetric features which enables us to identify ragweed infected sunflower lands before the beginning of pollen scattering (beginning of August).

  2. Spatiotemporal change of sky polarization during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey: polarization patterns of the eclipsed sky observed by full-sky imaging polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipocz, Brigitta; Hegedüs, Ramón; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-12-01

    Using 180 degrees field-of-view (full-sky) imaging polarimetry, we measured the spatiotemporal change of the polarization of skylight during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey. We present our observations here on the temporal variation of the celestial patterns of the degree p and angle alpha of linear polarization of the eclipsed sky measured in the red (650 nm), green (550 nm), and blue (450 nm) parts of the spectrum. We also report on the temporal and spectral change of the positions of neutral (unpolarized, p = 0) points, and points with local minima or maxima of p of the eclipsed sky. Our results are compared with the observations performed by the same polarimetric technique during the total solar eclipse on 11 August 1999 in Hungary. Practically the same characteristics of celestial polarization were encountered during both eclipses. This shows that the observed polarization phenomena of the eclipsed sky may be general.

  3. Structural renal changes in obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Kerstin; Benz, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Overweight, obesity, and associated diseases represent an emerging problem, not only in Western countries but also in the developing world. They are now characterized as epidemic diseases. Obesity is particularly serious because its incidence in children and adolescents increased dramatically: it is estimated that in the United States every eighth adolescent suffers from obesity, which in the long run may reduce life expectancy in the population. Apart from cardiovascular disease (ie, blood pressure, stroke, and coronary heart disease), kidney diseases also have been shown to be associated with obesity. Epidemiologic studies have indicated that obesity can be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease irrespective of the presence or absence of diabetes, arterial hypertension, and other comorbidities. More evidence is accumulated on the link between chronic kidney disease in obesity and abnormalities in adipokine secretion (hyperleptinemia, lack of adiponectin), activation of the renin-angiotensin system, chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, impaired renal hemodynamics, and diminished nephron number related to body mass. In general, obesity is known to aggravate the course of many primary renal diseases such as glomerulonephritides, but also impairs renal function after kidney transplantation. Microalbuminuria, proteinuria, hyperfiltration, and impaired renal function are associated with obesity. Histologically, secondary focal segmental sclerosis has been shown to be caused particularly by obesity. Of practical purpose for clinical nephrology, loss of body weight either by lifestyle modification or bariatric surgery improves albuminuria and hyperfiltration in obese patients, making renal disease in obesity accessible for prevention programs. This review specifically addresses the pathogenesis and morphology of renal functional and particularly structural changes in obesity and associated renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Horizontal Structure of Dynamical Instability at Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Top Revealed in Polarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; Diner, D. J.; Matheou, G.; Teixeira, J.; Qu, Z.; Emde, C.

    2014-12-01

    Marine stratocumulus (Sc) layers cover vast regions and, due to their high opacities, they play a major role in the Earth's solar radiation budget. They also have remarkably flat upper boundaries due to strong gradients in relative humidity at the top of the boundary layer (BL). However, those very gradients are unstable at scales as small as meters depending on fluctuations of temperature and liquid water content, hence radiative cooling in the thermal IR. The ensuing turbulent mixing of moist and dry air at cloud top due to such small-scale dynamical processes is not benign. It controls the structure of the entire marine BL, hence the Sc life-cycle, hence large-scale subsidence, hence global circulation and, ultimately, climate. This physical connection across many orders of magnitude in scale makes the prognosis and microphysical parameterization of marine Sc particularly challenging for climate modelers. It also makes these clouds high-value targets for remote sensing, both space-based and airborne. Airborne sensors can easily achieve the resolution required to image cloud-top instabilities but natural sunlight is so highly scattered that the finest spatial features are all but erased by the "radiative smoothing" process. However, we will show that JPL's Airborne Multi-angle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager (AirMSPI), which flies on NASA's ER-2 aircraft at 20 km altitude, reveals in near-backscattered polarized light the previously unseen horizontal structure of the marine Sc cloud top physics and dynamics at 10 m resolution across a 10 km swath. It appears as a complex network of meandering filaments. Large-Eddy Simulation modeling of these oceanic clouds with bin microphysics and state-of-the-art polarized 3D radiative transfer have been harnessed to model AirMSPI observations of the first three Stokes vector components in the relevant observational geometry for a 2.5x2.5 km^2 region. Synthetic imagery obtained at JPL's High-Performance Computing facility shows

  5. Fabrication of Proton-Exchange Waveguide Using Stoichiometric LiTaO3 for Guided Wave Electrooptic Modulators with Polarization-Reversed Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Murata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical waveguides were fabricated on z-cut stoichiometric LiTaO3 (SLT by using the proton-exchange method. The surface index change for the extraordinary ray on the SLT substrate resulting from the proton exchange was 0.017, which coincided well with congruent LiTaO3 substrates. The proton exchange coefficient in the SLT was 0.25×10−12 cm2/s. The application of the SLT waveguide to a quasi-velocity-matched travelling-wave electrooptic modulator with periodically polarization-reversed structure is also reported.

  6. Changing Structures; Changing Rules: The Development of the "Internal Market."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, D.; Evans, J.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the 1988 Education Reform Act's effects on providing physical education and sports in British schools, and specifically, implementation of the National Curriculum for Physical Education. The ERA and local school management have not only changed interschool and school-government agency relationships, but have fostered potentially damaging…

  7. Geological connectivity drives microbial community structure and connectivity in polar, terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Belinda C; Bissett, Andrew; Snape, Ian; van Dorst, Josie; Palmer, Anne S; Ji, Mukan; Siciliano, Steven D; Stark, Jonathon S; Winsley, Tristrom; Brown, Mark V

    2016-06-01

    Landscape heterogeneity impacts community assembly in animals and plants, but it is not clear if this ecological concept extends to microbes. To examine this question, we chose to investigate polar soil environments from the Antarctic and Arctic, where microbes often form the major component of biomass. We examined soil environments that ranged in connectivity from relatively well-connected slopes to patchy, fragmented landforms that comprised isolated frost boils. We found landscape connectedness to have a significant correlation with microbial community structure and connectivity, as measured by co-occurrence networks. Soils from within fragmented landforms appeared to exhibit less local environmental heterogeneity, harboured more similar communities, but fewer biological associations than connected landforms. This effect was observed at both poles, despite the geographical distances and ecological differences between them. We suggest that microbial communities inhabiting well-connected landscape elements respond consistently to regional-scale gradients in biotic and edaphic factors. Conversely, the repeated freeze thaw cycles that characterize fragmented landscapes create barriers within the landscape and act to homogenize the soil environment within individual frost boils and consequently the microbial communities. We propose that lower microbial connectivity in the fragmented landforms is a function of smaller patch size and continual disturbances following soil mixing.

  8. Detailed Structure of the Outer Disk Around HD 169142 with Polarized Light in H-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Munetake; Morita, Ayaka; Fukagawa, Misato; Muto, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Hashimoto, Jun; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Grady, Carol A.; Sitko, Michael L.; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; McElwain, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0.''2=r=1.''2, or 29=r=174 AU, is successfully detected. The azimuthally-averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r = 29-52 AU and r = 81.2-145 AU respectively show r-3-dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r = 40-70 AU. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at lambda = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution or with an irregular temperature distribution or with the combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner power-law region (r outer power-law region. Possible origins for these asymmetries include corrugation of the scattering surface in the outer region, and shadowing effect by a puffed up structure in the inner power-law region.

  9. Spatial and temporal variation in size of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) sexual organs and its use in pollution and climate change studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Born, Erik W; Riget, Frank F; Leifsson, Pall S; Bechshøft, Thea Ø; Kirkegaard, Maja

    2007-11-15

    Sexual organs and their development are susceptible to atmospheric transported environmental xenoendocrine pollutants and climate change (food availability). We therefore investigated sexual organs from 55 male and 44 female East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) to obtain information about growth/size and sexual maturity. Then, the genitalia size was compared with those previously reported from Canadian and Svalbard polar bears. Growth models showed that East Greenland male polar bears reached sexual maturity around 7 years of age and females around 4 years of age. When comparing East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears, the size of baculum and uterus were significantly lower in the East Greenland polar bears (ANOVA: all p baculum mean values from Canadian polar bears, a similar baculum pattern was found for East Greenland vs. Canadian polar bears. It is speculated whether this could be a result of the general high variation in polar bear body size, temporal distribution patterns of anthropogenic long-range transported persistent organic pollutants or climate change (decreasing food availability). The present investigation represents conservation and background data for future spatial and temporal assessments of hunting, pollution and climate change scenarios.

  10. Polarized Structure Function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for $p({\\vec e},e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nasseripour, R; Ambrozewicz, P; Carman, D S; Amaryan, M J; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Casey, L; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Credé, V; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Manak, J J; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rubin, P D; Sabati, F; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Sayre, D; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabyan, Yu G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2008-01-01

    The first measurements of the polarized structure function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for the reaction $p(\\vec e,e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the nucleon resonance region are reported. Measurements are included from threshold up to $W$=2.05 GeV for central values of $Q^2$ of 0.65 and 1.00 GeV$^2$, and nearly the entire kaon center-of-mass angular range. $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is the imaginary part of the longitudinal-transverse response and is expected to be sensitive to interferences between competing intermediate s-channel resonances, as well as resonant and non-resonant processes. The results for $\\sigma_{LT'}$ are comparable in magnitude to previously reported results from CLAS for $\\sigma_{LT}$, the real part of the same response. An intriguing sign change in $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is observed in the high $Q^2$ data at $W\\approx 1.9$ GeV. Comparisons to several existing model predictions are shown.

  11. Polars Changing State: Multiwavelength Long Term Photometry and Spectroscopy of QS Tel, V834 Cen, and BL Hyi

    CERN Document Server

    Gerke, J R; Walter, F M; Gerke, Jill R.; Howell, Steve B.; Walter, Frederick M.

    2006-01-01

    Long term optical and near-infrared photometric and blue spectroscopic observations were obtained for QS Tel, V834 Cen, and BL Hyi. The optical light curves of all three polars displayed large magnitude changes during our observations. These same high/low state transitions were also apparent in near-infrared JHK photometry, though with decreased amplitude. The color of the polar with respect to its state was examined and found not to be a good indicator of the instantaneous state. During low to high state transitions, a nearly constant magnitude difference was observed in all three polars. This $\\Delta$m value was found to be consistent with the level expected to occur if accretion onto the white dwarf reached the Eddington luminosity during the high state. The high state Balmer decrement was measured for each star and used to estimate that the temperature of the emission line forming region was ~12,000K with N$_H$ near 12.8 dex. No relationship between the Balmer emission line strength and the white dwarf ma...

  12. Investigation of polarization-selective InGaAs sensor with elliptical two-dimensional holes array structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Fu, Dong; Hu, Xiaobin; Xu, Yun; Song, Guofeng; Wei, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Polarimetric imaging in infrared wavelengths have attracted more and more attention for broad applications in meteorological observations, medicine, remote sensing and many other fields. Metal metamaterial structures are used in nanophotonics in order to localize and enhance the incident electromagnetic field. Here we develop an elliptical gold Two-Dimensional Holes Array (2DHA) in which photons can be manipulated by surface plasmon resonance, and the ellipse introduce the asymmetry to realize a polarization selective function. Strong polarization dependence is observed in the simulated transmission spectra. To further understand the coupling mechanism between gold holes array and InP, the different parameters of the 2DHA are analyzed. It is shown that the polarization axis is perpendicular to the major axis of the ellipse, and the degree of polarization is determined by the aspect ratio of the ellipse. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of the 2DHA shows a linear dependence on the array period, the bandwidth of transmission spectra closely related to duty cycle of the ellipse in each period. This result will establish a basis for the development of innovative polarization selective infrared sensor.

  13. Temperature dependent structural, elastic, and polar properties of ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and trifluoroethylene (TrFE) copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fu-Chang; Dongare, Avinash; Asandei, Alexandru; Alpay, Pamir; Nakhmanson, Serge; University of Connecticut Team

    We use molecular dynamics to calculate the structural, elastic, and polar properties of crystalline ferroelectric β-poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF (-CH2-CF2-)n with randomized trifluoroethylene TrFE (-CHF-CF2-)n as a function of TrFE content (0-50%) in the temperature range of 0-400 K. There is a very good agreement between the experimentally obtained and the computed values of the lattice parameters, thermal expansion coefficients, elastic constants, polarization, and pyroelectric coefficients. A continuous decrease in Young's modulus with increasing TrFE content was observed and attributed to the increased intramolecular and intermolecular repulsive interactions between fluorine atoms. The computed polarization displayed a similar trend, with the room temperature spontaneous polarization decreasing by 44% from 13.8 μC/cm2 (pure PVDF) to 7.7 μC/cm2 [50/50 poly(VDF-co-TrFE)]. Our results show that molecular dynamics can be used as a practical tool to predict the mechanical and polarization-related behavior of ferroelectric poly(VDF-co-TrFE). Such an atomistic model can thus serve as a guide for practical applications of this important multifunctional polymer.

  14. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khosrawi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations. The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000–2014 from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Although in the polar regions no significant trend is found in the lower stratosphere, we found from the observations a correlation between cold winters and enhanced water vapour mixing ratios.

  15. Structural iron in dioctahedral and trioctahedral smectites: a polarized XAS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, N.; Schlegel, M. L.; Bauer, A.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical form of structural Fe in smectites influences many physicochemical properties of these clay minerals. Powder EXAFS data for structural Fe in smectites have been reported; however, the preferred orientation of clay platelets with respect to the X-ray beam may lead to erroneous conclusions on the local chemical environment. Dioctahedral montmorillonite and for the first time trioctahedral hectorite were prepared as textured samples, and the Fe local environment was probed by analysis of the X-ray absorption pre-edge peaks at the magic angle and by polarized EXAFS (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy. Compared to powder measurements, overlapping contributions from shells with distinct orientations can be filtered more easily by P-EXAFS, thus decreasing uncertainties on structural parameters. The pre-edge spectrum of montmorillonite is similar to spectra commonly reported for dioctahedral smectites. In contrast, the pre-edge spectrum of hectorite is notably distinct and hints to either differences in the site symmetry and/or in covalence. In both smectites, Fe is surrounded by a first O shell at a distance consistent with sixfold-coordinated Fe(III), suggesting that Fe(III) is located in the smectite octahedral sheet. This is corroborated by the distances and orientations of neighboring cationic shells, such as in-plane (Mg, Al) and out-of-plane Si shells. For montmorillonite, the results indicate Fe substitution for Al/Mg in the octahedral sheet, and a number of Fe neighbors consistent with random distribution in the octahedral sheet. For hectorite, results indicate a slight tendency for Fe atoms to form pairs in octahedral sheets; however, low numbers of neighboring cations were obtained, presumably a consequence of the presence of vacancies and/or Li in the vicinity of Fe, or of the coexistence of Fe and Mg neighbors with mutually canceling EXAFS waves. Consistent with pre-edge data, the coordination numbers can also indicate some incoherency in Fe-cation interatomic

  16. Polarized Raman study on the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films on different substrates prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Interestingly, the Raman spectra of BiFeO3 films exhibit distinct polarization dependences. The symmetries of the fundamental Raman modes in 50-700 cm-1 were identified based on group theory. The symmetries of the high order Raman modes in 900-1500 cm-1 of BiFeO3 are determined for the first time, which can provide strong clarifications to the symmetry of the fundamental peaks in 400-700 cm-1 in return. Moreover, the lattice structures of BiFeO3 films are identified consequently on the basis of Raman spectroscopy. BiFeO3 films on SrRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate, CaRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate and tin-doped indium oxide substrate are found to be in the rhombohedral structure, while BiFeO3 film on SrRuO3 coated Nb: SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate is in the monoclinic structure. Our results suggest that polarized Raman spectroscopy would be a feasible tool to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films.

  17. Generalized focusing of time-lapse changes with applications to direct current and time-domain induced polarization inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Doetsch, Joseph; Vignoli, Giulio; Auken, Esben

    2015-11-01

    Often in geophysical monitoring experiments time-lapse inversion models vary too smoothly with time, owing to the strong imprint of regularization. Several methods have been proposed for focusing the spatiotemporal changes of the model parameters. In this study, we present two generalizations of the minimum support norm, which favour compact time-lapse changes and can be adapted to the specific problem requirements. Inversion results from synthetic direct current resistivity models that mimic developing plumes show that the focusing scheme significantly improves size, shape and magnitude estimates of the time-lapse changes. Inversions of the synthetic data also illustrate that the focused inversion gives robust results and that the focusing settings are easily chosen. Inversions of full-decay time-domain induced polarization (IP) field data from a CO2 monitoring injection experiment show that the focusing scheme performs well for field data and inversions for all four Cole-Cole polarization parameters. Our tests show that the generalized minimum support norms react in an intuitive and predictable way to the norm settings, implying that they can be used in time-lapse experiments for obtaining reliable and robust results.

  18. Towards a process-based understanding of Holocene polar climate change. Using glacier-fed lake sediments from Arctic Svalbard and Antarctic South Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Earth`s polar regions are undergoing dramatic changes due to ongoing climate change as demonstrated by increasing temperatures, collapsing ice shelves, Arctic sea ice loss and rapid glacier retreat. Driving an accelerating rise in global sea level, this amplified regional response may have devastating global socio-economic consequences in the foreseeable future. Yet the causes and range of polar climate variability remain poorly understood as observational records are short and fragmentary, w...

  19. Relative Energy Dissipation: Sensitive to Structural Changes of Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祖方遒; 郭丽君; 朱震刚; 凤仪

    2002-01-01

    Energy dissipation techniques, widely used in solid physics previously, are proven to be sensitive also to changes in liquid structure. It has been suggested from relative energy dissipation that changes in liquid structure can occur as a function of temperature in some ordinary binary systems such as Pb-Sn, In-Sn and In-Bi. This finding may be helpful to understand liquid structure changing patterns, therefore enriching the phenomenology of liquid state physics. This is significant for engineering practices.

  20. Lunar true polar wander inferred from polar hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, M A; Miller, R S; Keane, J T; Laneuville, M; Paige, D A; Matsuyama, I; Lawrence, D J; Crotts, A; Poston, M J

    2016-03-24

    The earliest dynamic and thermal history of the Moon is not well understood. The hydrogen content of deposits near the lunar poles may yield insight into this history, because these deposits (which are probably composed of water ice) survive only if they remain in permanent shadow. If the orientation of the Moon has changed, then the locations of the shadowed regions will also have changed. The polar hydrogen deposits have been mapped by orbiting neutron spectrometers, and their observed spatial distribution does not match the expected distribution of water ice inferred from present-day lunar temperatures. This finding is in contrast to the distribution of volatiles observed in similar thermal environments at Mercury's poles. Here we show that polar hydrogen preserves evidence that the spin axis of the Moon has shifted: the hydrogen deposits are antipodal and displaced equally from each pole along opposite longitudes. From the direction and magnitude of the inferred reorientation, and from analysis of the moments of inertia of the Moon, we hypothesize that this change in the spin axis, known as true polar wander, was caused by a low-density thermal anomaly beneath the Procellarum region. Radiogenic heating within this region resulted in the bulk of lunar mare volcanism and altered the density structure of the Moon, changing its moments of inertia. This resulted in true polar wander consistent with the observed remnant polar hydrogen. This thermal anomaly still exists and, in part, controls the current orientation of the Moon. The Procellarum region was most geologically active early in lunar history, which implies that polar wander initiated billions of years ago and that a large portion of the measured polar hydrogen is ancient, recording early delivery of water to the inner Solar System. Our hypothesis provides an explanation for the antipodal distribution of lunar polar hydrogen, and connects polar volatiles to the geologic and geophysical evolution of the Moon

  1. Hierarchical super-structure identified by polarized light microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoindentation: Implications for the limits of biological control over the growth mode of abalone sea shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Andreas S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollusc shells are commonly investigated using high-resolution imaging techniques based on cryo-fixation. Less detailed information is available regarding the light-optical properties. Sea shells of Haliotis pulcherina were embedded for polishing in defined orientations in order to investigate the interface between prismatic calcite and nacreous aragonite by standard materialographic methods. A polished thin section of the interface was prepared with a defined thickness of 60 μm for quantitative birefringence analysis using polarized light and LC-PolScope microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images were obtained for comparison. In order to study structural-mechanical relationships, nanoindentation experiments were performed. Results Incident light microscopy revealed a super-structure in semi-transparent regions of the polished cross-section under a defined angle. This super-structure is not visible in transmitted birefringence analysis due to the blurred polarization of small nacre platelets and numerous organic interfaces. The relative orientation and homogeneity of calcite prisms was directly identified, some of them with their optical axes exactly normal to the imaging plane. Co-oriented "prism colonies" were identified by polarized light analyses. The nacreous super-structure was also visualized by secondary electron imaging under defined angles. The domains of the super-structure were interpreted to consist of crystallographically aligned platelet stacks. Nanoindentation experiments showed that mechanical properties changed with the same periodicity as the domain size. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that insights into the growth mechanisms of nacre can be obtained by conventional light-optical methods. For example, we observed super-structures formed by co-oriented nacre platelets as previously identified using X-ray Photo-electron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM [Gilbert et al., Journal of the

  2. The swimming polarity of multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes can change during an isolation process employing magnets: evidence of a relation between swimming polarity and magnetic moment intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Roger Duarte; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel

    2017-02-04

    Magnetotactic microorganisms are characterized by swimming in the direction of an applied magnetic field. In nature, two types of swimming polarity have been observed: north-seeking microorganisms that swim in the same direction as the magnetic field, and south-seeking microorganisms that swim in the opposite direction. The present work studies the reversal in the swimming polarity of the multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis following an isolation process using high magnetic fields from magnets. The proportion of north- and south-seeking organisms was counted as a function of the magnetic field intensity used during the isolation of the organisms from sediment. It was observed that the proportion of north-seeking organisms increased when the magnetic field was increased. The magnetic moment for north- and south-seeking populations was estimated using the U-turn method. The average magnetic moment was higher for north- than south-seeking organisms. The results suggest that the reversal of swimming polarity must occur during the isolation process in the presence of high magnetic fields and magnetic field gradients. It is shown for the first time that the swimming polarity reversal depends on the magnetic moment intensity of multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes, and new studies must be undertaken to understand the role of magnetic moment polarity and oxygen gradients in determination of swimming polarity.

  3. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has the potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarization. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cell containing nanodiamonds immobilized in a hydrogel, polarizing flowing water molecules 4700-fold above thermal polarization in a magnetic field of 0.35 T, in volumes detectable by current NMR scanners.

  4. Interfacial-strain-induced structural and polarization evolutions in epitaxial multiferroic BiFeO3 (001) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haizhong; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Jin, Kui-Juan; Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Yang, Zhenzhong; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Le; He, Xu; Gu, Junxing; Wan, Qian; Wang, Can; Lu, Huibin; Ge, Chen; He, Meng; Yang, Guozhen

    2015-02-04

    Varying the film thickness is a precise route to tune the interfacial strain to manipulate the properties of the multiferroic materials. Here, to explore the effects of the interfacial strain on the properties of the multiferroic BiFeO3 films, we investigated thickness-dependent structural and polarization evolutions of the BiFeO3 films. The epitaxial growth with an atomic stacking sequence of BiO/TiO2 at the interface was confirmed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Combining X-ray diffraction experiments and first-principles calculations, a thickness-dependent structural evolution was observed from a fully strained tetragonality to a partially relaxed one without any structural phase transition or rotated twins. The tetragonality (c/a) of the BiFeO3 films increases as the film thickness decreases, while the polarization is in contrast with this trend, and the size effect including the depolarization field plays a crucial role in this contradiction in thinner films. These findings offer an alternative strategy to manipulate structural and polarization properties by tuning the interfacial strain in epitaxial multiferroic thin films.

  5. Statistical method for detecting structural change in the growth process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Atsushi

    2008-03-01

    Due to competition among individual trees and other exogenous factors that change the growth environment, each tree grows following its own growth trend with some structural changes in growth over time. In the present article, a new method is proposed to detect a structural change in the growth process. We formulate the method as a simple statistical test for signal detection without constructing any specific model for the structural change. To evaluate the p-value of the test, the tube method is developed because the regular distribution theory is insufficient. Using two sets of tree diameter growth data sampled from planted forest stands of Cryptomeria japonica in Japan, we conduct an analysis of identifying the effect of thinning on the growth process as a structural change. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method is useful to identify the structural change caused by thinning. We also provide the properties of the method in terms of the size and power of the test.

  6. Structural change in OECD comparative advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, Steven; Inklaar, Robert; Van Marrewijk, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In the post-war period, the goods composition of trade in Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries has changed considerably. We analyze the evolution of comparative advantage using a detailed trade data set and a new analytical tool: the Harmonic Mass index (HM index),

  7. Social Structure and Resistance to Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillery, George A., Jr.

    The purpose of the research is to extract as many common factors as possible which are associated with resistance to change. Two peoples are selected for study, the Navajo Indians and the Trappist monks, both of which are rural and have an extensive history spanning at least several centuries, but which differ radically otherwise. The 2 major…

  8. Novel wideband microwave polarization network using a fully-reconfigurable photonic waveguide interleaver with a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Beeker, Willem; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; van Dijk, Paulus; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2013-02-11

    We propose and demonstrate a novel wideband microwave photonic polarization network for dual linear-polarized antennas. The polarization network is based on a waveguide-implemented fully-reconfigurable optical interleaver using a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure. For microwave photonic signal processing, this structure is able to serve as a wideband 2 × 2 RF coupler with reconfigurable complex coefficients, and therefore can be used as a polarization network for wideband antennas. Such a device can equip the antennas with not only the polarization rotation capability for linear-polarization signals but also the capability to operate with and tune between two opposite circular polarizations. Operating together with a particular modulation scheme, the device is also able to serve for simultaneous feeding of dual-polarization signals. These photonic-implemented RF functionalities can be applied to wideband antenna systems to perform agile polarization manipulations and tracking operations. An example of such a interleaver has been realized in TriPleX waveguide technology, which was designed with a free spectral range of 20 GHz and a mask footprint of smaller than 1 × 1 cm. Using the realized device, the reconfigurable complex coefficients of the polarization network were demonstrated with a continuous bandwidth from 2 to 8 GHz and an in-band phase ripple of smaller than 5 degree. The waveguide structure of the device allows it to be further integrated with other functional building blocks of a photonic integrated circuit to realize on-chip, complex microwave photonic processors. Of particular interest, it can be included in an optical beamformer for phased array antennas, so that simultaneous wideband beam and polarization trackings can be achieved photonically. To our knowledge, this is the first-time on-chip demonstration of an integrated microwave photonic polarization network for dual linear-polarized antennas.

  9. Particle dynamics and spatial $e^-e^+$ density structures at QED cascading in circularly polarized standing waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bashinov, A V; Kim, A V

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of longitudinal particle drifting in a standing circularly polarized wave at extreme intensities when quantum radiation reaction (RR) effects should be accounted for. To get an insight into the physics of this phenomenon we made a comparative study considering the RR force in the Landau-Lifshitz or quantum-corrected form, including the case of photon emission stochasticity. It is shown that the cases of circular and linear polarization are qualitatively different. Moreover, specific features of particle dynamics have a strong impact on spatial structures of the electron-positron ($e^-e^+$) density created in vacuum through quantum electrodynamic (QED) cascades in counter-propagating laser pulses. 3D PIC modeling accounting for QED effects confirms realization of different pair plasma structures.

  10. Probing the magnetic field structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, Roman; Johnson, Michael D; Doeleman, Sheperd S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic-field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A$^\\ast$ (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically-arrested disks (MAD). We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford-...

  11. Political attitudes in adolescence and emerging adulthood: Developmental changes in mean level, polarization, rank-order stability, and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekker, Roderik; Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim

    2015-06-01

    This three-wave cohort-sequential longitudinal study (N = 1302) examined the development of two core political attitudes, economic egalitarianism and ethnocentrism, among Dutch youths between age 12 and 31. Longitudinal regression analyses revealed a curvilinear mean level development for both attitudes, reflecting an increased disagreement with economic redistribution and multiculturalism around late adolescence. Furthermore, attitudes became decreasingly polarized (i.e., less extreme) and increasingly stable with age. Finally, several effects of attitudes' correlates gradually changed: The effect of educational level on ethnocentrism increased with age, whereas the effect of gender diminished. Regional effects on ethnocentrism developed as youths resided in a new area. No age-related change was found in the effect of parental SES. Overall, these findings support the idea that attitudes mature during the formative phase of adolescence and that this process slows down during emerging adulthood. Furthermore, these results support developmental explanations for the association between attitudes and their correlates.

  12. Structural changes in bunched crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bussmann, M; Schätz, T; Habs, D

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the spatial distribution of bunched crystalline ion beams in the radio frequency quadrupole storage ring PALLAS are presented for different ratios of the longitudinal and the transverse confinement strengths. The length of highly elongated crystalline ion bunches and its dependence on the bunching voltage is compared to predictions for a one-dimensional ion string and three-dimensional space-charge-dominated beams. The length is found to be considerably shorter than that predicted by the models. Furthermore, the scaling of the length with the bunching voltage is shown to differ from the expected inverse cube root scaling. These differences can partially be attributed to the formation of a mixed crystalline structure. Additionally, a concise mapping of the structural transition from a string to a zig-zag configuration as a function of the ratio of the confinement strengths is presented, which in a similar way deviates from the predictions.

  13. Technology, Structural Change and Manufacturing Employment

    OpenAIRE

    Rothwell, R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a revised version of Roy Rothwell's contribution to the IIASA Task Force Meeting on "Innovation and Industrial Strategy" in June 1980. It shows the heavy impact of technical change on employment both from the side of processes and products. Discussing the economic mechanisms of long waves the author mentions "...The fact that Menschs' inventions are rather more spread over time than his bunches of innovations, certainly suggests that other factors play a part in forcing th...

  14. Leading Change: Faculty Development through Structured Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Painter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are relentless calls for innovation in higher education programs in response to media and policy-makers attention to such concerns as instructional quality, relevance to employment, costs, and time-to-degree. At the same time, the individual course remains the primary unit of instruction and there is little evidence of faculty development strategies to assist with changing core instructional practices. We faced that dilemma when we led an innovative doctoral program in educational leadership. Soon after beginning, we implemented a regular meeting of all faculty members teaching and advising in the program to address upcoming events and review student progress. Our retrospective analysis indicates that these meetings evolved as a practical and sustainable framework for faculty development in support of deep change for instructional practices. Here we describe the challenge of faculty development for change and draw lessons learned from our four years of leadership centered on experiential learning and community sense-making. We hope that program leaders who aspire to promote faculty development in conjunction with graduate program implementation will find these lessons useful.

  15. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  16. The Management of Resistance to Change and Polarity in Educational Organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, A. M. C.; Westhuizen, Philip C. van der

    Research has shown that organizations differ on the basis of their willingness to change and the strategies they use to manage change. For this paper, data were gathered through a review of the literature and through nonstandard interviews with persons in two identified organizations who handle grievance procedures. The analysis identifies the…

  17. Structure, function and molecular adaptations of haemoglobins of the polar cartilaginous fish Bathyraja eatonii and Raja hyperborea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Cinzia; De Rosa, M Cristina; Giordano, Daniela; Mosca, Donato; De Pascale, Donatella; Raiola, Luca; Cocca, Ennio; Carratore, Vitale; Giardina, Bruno; Di Prisco, Guido

    2005-07-15

    Cartilaginous fish are very ancient organisms. In the Antarctic sea, the modern chondrichthyan genera are poorly represented, with only three species of sharks and eight species of skates; the paucity of chondrichthyans is probably an ecological consequence of unusual trophic or habitat conditions in the Southern Ocean. In the Arctic, there are 26 species belonging to the class Chondrichthyes. Fish in the two polar regions have been subjected to different regional histories that have influenced the development of diversity: Antarctic marine organisms are highly stenothermal, in response to stable water temperatures, whereas the Arctic communities are exposed to seasonal temperature variations. The structure and function of the oxygen-transport haem protein from the Antarctic skate Bathyraja eatonii and from the Arctic skate Raja hyperborea (both of the subclass Elasmobranchii, order Rajiformes, family Rajidae) is reported in the present paper. These species have a single major haemoglobin (Hb 1; over 80% of the total). The Bohr-proton and the organophosphate-binding sites are absent. Thus the haemoglobins of northern and southern polar skates appear functionally similar, whereas differences were observed with several temperate elasmobranchs. Such evidence suggests that, in temperate and polar habitats, physiological adaptations have evolved along distinct pathways, whereas, in this case, the effect of the differences characterizing the two polar environments is negligible.

  18. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qiong; Jelezko, Fedor; Retzker, Alex; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarisation. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cel...

  19. Interrogation of orbital structure by elliptically polarized intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation and present investigations of the imprint of the orbital angular node in photoelectron momentum distributions of an aligned atomic p-type orbital following ionization by an intense elliptically polarized laser pulse of femtosecond...... duration. We investigate the role of light ellipticity and the alignment angle of the major polarization axis of the external field relative to the probed orbital by studying radial and angular momentum distributions, the latter at a fixed narrow interval of final momenta close to the peak...... of the photoelectron momentum distribution. In general only the angular distributions carry a clear signature of the orbital symmetry. Our study shows that circular polarization gives the most clear imprints of orbital nodes. These findings are insensitive to pulse duration....

  20. A wind-driving disc model for the mm-wavelength polarization structure of HL Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsakos, Titos; Tzeferacos, Petros; Königl, Arieh

    2016-12-01

    The recent advent of spatially resolved mm- and cm-wavelength polarimetry in protostellar accretion discs could help clarify the role of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport in these systems. The best case to date is that of HL Tau, where the inability to produce a good fit to the 1.25-mm data with a combination of vertical and azimuthal magnetic field components was interpreted as implying that centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) are probably not a significant transport mechanism on the ˜102 au scale probed by the observations. Using synthetic polarization maps of heuristic single-field-component discs and of a post-processed simulation of a wind-driving disc, we demonstrate that a much better fit to the data can be obtained if the radial field component, a hallmark of the CDW mechanism, dominates in the polarized emission region. A similar inference was previously made in modelling the far-infrared polarization map of the pc-scale dust ring in the Galactic Centre. To reconcile this interpretation with theoretical models of protostellar discs, which indicate that the wind is launched from a comparatively high elevation above the mid-plane, we propose that most of the polarized emission originates - with a high ( ≳ 10 per cent) intrinsic degree of polarization - in small ( ≲ 0.1 mm) grains that remain suspended above the mid-plane, and that the bulk of the mm-wavelength emission is produced - with low intrinsic polarization - by larger grains that have settled to the mid-plane.

  1. Polar structure of disclination loops in nematic liquid crystals probed by second-harmonic-light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardaev, Shokir A; Williams, J C; Twieg, R J; Jakli, A; Gleeson, J T; Ellman, B; Sprunt, S

    2015-03-01

    Angle-resolved, second-harmonic-light scattering (SHLS) measurements are reported for three different classes of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (NLCs): polar and nonpolar rodlike compounds and a bent-core compound. Results revealing well-defined scattering peaks are interpreted in terms of the electric polarization induced by distortions of the nematic orientational field ("flexopolarity") associated with inversion wall defects, nonsingular disclinations, analogous to Neel walls in ferromagnets, that often exhibit a closed loop morphology in NLCs. Analysis of the SHLS patterns based on this model provides a "proof-of-concept" for a potentially useful method to probe the flexopolar properties of NLCs.

  2. Conformational changes in the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum detected using phosphorescence polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restall, C J; Coke, M; Murray, E K; Chapman, D

    1985-02-28

    The technique of time-averaged phosphorescence has been used to study the interaction of calcium ions and ATP with the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The presence of excess calcium ions was found to cause a 20% decrease in the phosphorescence emission anisotropy. This is interpreted as being due to a conformational change in the protein and is supported by data from time-resolved phosphorescence measurements which also show a lowering of the anisotropy. This change in the decay of the emission anisotropy is associated with only minor changes in the rotational relaxation time of the protein and is again suggestive of a conformational change in the protein. In some cases ATP was also observed to lower the time-averaged phosphorescence anisotropy possibly via an interaction with the low-affinity regulatory site of the protein.

  3. Change in hydrogen bonding structures of a hydrogel with dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naohara, Ryo; Narita, Kentaro; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of structural changes in polymer network and water during dehydration, X-ray diffraction of poly-N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels was measured. The variation process in the individual structures of water and PDMAA were analyzed by decomposition of the diffraction patterns to separate the respective contributions. The results show that the short-range structures of PDMAA expand during dehydration, whereas the network structure as a whole shrinks. The average length of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules increases with the process. The present results provide a direct evidence of the structural changes of water and polymer in the hydrogel during dehydration.

  4. A Structural Equation Model of Conceptual Change in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Sinatra, Gale M.

    2011-01-01

    A model of conceptual change in physics was tested on introductory-level, college physics students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to conceptual change in physics including an approach goal orientation, need for cognition, motivation, and course grade. Conceptual change in physics…

  5. Upgrade and Design of Coastal Structures Exposed to Climate Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Quvang Harck

    This thesis “Upgrade and Design of Coastal Structures Exposed to Climate Changes” evaluates the performance of existing types of structures when exposed to climate changes. This includes also the potential of using cost‐sharing multipurpose structures for protection against the effects of future...

  6. Structure Change of the Insulating Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Mentlik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern power electric drives brought advantages in induction motor control. In the same time appeared problems with high frequency square waveform voltage (pulse stress produced by the voltage converters. Voltage converters produce repetitive pulses with high level of voltage rise fronts (slew rates. Rise fronts attained values of up to tens kilovolts per microsecond and voltage pulse repetition frequency up to some tens of kilohertz. This technology is an advantage for a drive control. Significant is the impact of these voltage waveforms on the motor insulations. Degradation of the main wall insulation can reduce the reliability of the electric motor and whole drive. In this paper is discussed one possible solution. The promising modification in the insulation material structure is presented in the paper.

  7. Planck intermediate results XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.;

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at h...

  8. Sustainable urban structures to challenge climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil CREANGA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Public spaces within the city in all their form of different types - streets, boulevards, squares, plazas, market places, green areas - are the backbone of cities. Over the centuries buildings defined the shape and quality of public spaces, valorising them in various ways. The post-modern development of urban form generated a great number of “urban spaces”, where there is no longer correspondence between architectural forms and social and political messages: shopping malls and theme parks, inner public spaces, strip developments etc. Urban sprawl accompanied by loss of agricultural/rural land and its impact on the environment are serious concerns for most cities over Europe. To strike the right balance between inner city regeneration, under-use of urban land in the old abandoned sites and the ecological benefits that accompany the new private business initiatives in suburban areas, is one of the major challenges confronting cities in Europe. The paper will analyze the complex relations between architecture and public space, in an attempt to understand how traditional urban structures, public and green spaces, squares and streets, could provide orientation for quality-oriented regeneration. Case in point is Bucharest - capital city of Romania - where aggressive intervention in the urban structure during the 1980s disrupted the fabric of the city. The investigation is oriented towards fundamental questions such as: how to secure and preserve sites that serve as initial points in upgrading processes, how to balance private investment criteria and the quality interests of the urban communities. The major aim is to provide a support for decision making in restoring the fundamental role of public urban space in shaping urban form and supporting community life.

  9. Spin-polarized structural, elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of half-metallic ferromagnetism in V-doped ZnSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monir, M. El Amine.; Baltache, H. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et de la Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Faculté des Sciences, Université de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Murtaza, G., E-mail: murtaza@icp.edu.pk [Materials Modeling Lab, Department of Physics, Islamia College University, Peshawar (Pakistan); Khenata, R., E-mail: khenata_rabah@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et de la Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Faculté des Sciences, Université de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Ahmed, Waleed K. [ERU, Faculty of Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Bouhemadou, A. [Laboratory for Developing New Materials and their Characterization, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Omran, S. Bin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Seddik, T. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et de la Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Faculté des Sciences, Université de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria)

    2015-01-15

    Based on first principles spin-polarized density functional theory, the structural, elastic electronic and magnetic properties of Zn{sub 1−x}V{sub x}Se (for x=0.25, 0.50, 0.75) in zinc blende structure have been studied. The investigation was done using the full-potential augmented plane wave method as implemented in WIEN2k code. The exchange-correlation potential was treated with the generalized gradient approximation PBE-GGA for the structural and elastic properties. Moreover, the PBE-GGA+U approximation (where U is the Hubbard correlation terms) is employed to treat the “d” electrons properly. A comparative study between the band structures, electronic structures, total and partial densities of states and local moments calculated within both GGA and GGA+U schemes is presented. The analysis of spin-polarized band structure and density of states shows the half-metallic ferromagnetic character and are also used to determine s(p)-d exchange constants N{sub 0}α (conduction band ) and N{sub 0}β (valence band) due to Se(4p)–V(3d) hybridization. It has been clearly evidence that the magnetic moment of V is reduced from its free space change value of 3 µ{sub B} and the minor atomic magnetic moment on Zn and Se are generated. - Highlights: • Half metallicity origins by doping V in ZnSe. • PBE-GGA+U approximation is employed to treat the “d” electrons properly. • s(p)-d Exchange constants N{sub 0}α (conduction band ) and N{sub 0}β (valence band) are due to Se(4p)-V(3d) hybridization.

  10. The Polar Stratosphere in a Changing Climate (POLSTRACC): Mission overview and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Rapp, Markus; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Engel, Andreas; Bönisch, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The POLSTRACC mission aims at providing new scientific knowledge on the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere under the present load of halogens and state of climate variables. POLSTRACC employs the German High Altitude and LOng Range Research Aircraft (HALO) and is the only HALO mission dedicated to study the UTLS at high latitudes several years after the last intensive Arctic campaigns. The scientific scope of POLSTRACC is broadened by its combination with the SALSA (Seasonality of Air mass transport and origin in the Lowermost Stratosphere using the HALO Aircraft) and GW-LCYCLE (Gravity Wave Life Cycle Experiment, a BMBF/ROMIC project) missions, which address complementary scientific goals sharing the same HALO payload. POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE offer the unique opportunity to study the bottom of the polar vortex and the high-latitude UTLS along with their impact on lower latitudes throughout an entire winter/spring cycle. The payload for the combined POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE campaigns comprises an innovative combination of remote sensing techniques providing 2- and 3-D distributions of temperature and a large number of substances, and precise in-situ instruments measuring T, O3, H2O, tracers of different lifetimes and chemically active species at the aircraft level with high time-resolution. Drop sondes will add information about temperature, humidity and wind in the atmosphere underneath the aircraft. The POLSTRACC consortium includes national (KIT, Forschungszentrum Jülich, DLR, Universities of Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Mainz and Wuppertal; PTB) and international partners (e.g. NASA). The field campaign is divided into three phases for addressing (i) the early polar vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in December 2015 (from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany), (ii) the mid-winter vortex from January to March 2016 (from Kiruna, Sweden), and (iii) the late dissipating vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in March 2016 (from Kiruna and

  11. Modeling the structure and absorption spectra of stilbazolium merocyanine in polar and nonpolar solvents using hybrid QM/MM techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Aidas, Kestutis; Ågren, Hans

    2010-10-28

    We have performed Car-Parrinello mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (CP-QM/MM) calculations for stilbazolium merocyanine (SM) in polar and nonpolar solvents in order to explore the role of solute molecular geometry, solvation shell structure, and different interaction mechanisms on the absorption spectra and its dependence on solvent polarity. On the basis of the average bond length values and group charge distributions, we find that the SM molecule remains in a neutral quinonoid form in chloroform (a nonpolar solvent) while it transforms to a charge-separated benzenoid form in water (a polar solvent). Based on a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical response technique, with different MM descriptions for the water environment, absorption spectra were obtained as averages over configurations derived from the CP-QM/MM simulations. We show that for SM in water the solute polarization plays a major role in predictions of the λ(max) and solvatochromic shift and that once this effect is included the contributions from solvent polarization and intermolecular charge transfer become less important. For SM in chloroform and water solvents, we have also performed absorption spectra calculations using a polarizable continuum model in order to address its relative performance compared to the QM/MM response technique. In the case of SM in water, our study supports the notion that, in order to predict accurate absorption spectra and solvatochromic shifts, it is important to use a discrete description of the solvent when it, as in water, is involved in site-specific interaction with the solute molecule. The technique is thus shown to outperform the more conventional polarizable continuum model in predicting the solvatochromic shift.

  12. The impact of volcanic aerosol on the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex: mechanisms and sensitivity to forcing structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2014-06-01

    imply that reproducing the polar vortex responses to past eruptions, or predicting the response to future eruptions, depends on accurate representation of the space-time structure of the volcanic aerosol forcing.

  13. Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of 5 years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anticorrelation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice!free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7% and 10%, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5% 7%. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Because longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  14. The Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of five years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anti-correlation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7 and 10 percent, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5 to 7 percent. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Since longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  15. Thermally induced structural changes in coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavalas, G.R.; Flagan, R.C.

    1990-01-17

    The effect of particle shape on char burnout is investigated in the limit of shrinking core combustion. As a first step, the particle temperature is assumed to proceed in the shrinking core regime and under conditions of negligible Stefan flow. The problem then reduces to calculating the oxygen concentration field around a non-spherical particle with the oxidation reaction taking place on the external surface. This problem has been addressed by an analytical technique and a numerical technique. An analytical technique known as domain perturbation'' was used to examine the change due to reaction in the shape of a slightly nonspherical, but axisymmetric, particle. It was found that the aspect ratio always increases with conversion, i.e., the particle becomes less spherical. A numerical technique, based on the boundary integral'' method was developed to handle the case of an axisymmetric particle with otherwise arbitrary shape. Numerical results are presented which again show the aspect ratio to increase with conversion. 8 refs.

  16. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in {Sgr}\\,{\\rm{A}}* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  17. Ultra-broad band and dual-band highly efficient polarization conversion based on the three-layered chiral structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai-kai; Xiao, Zhong-yin; Tang, Jing-yao; Liu, De-jun; Wang, Zi-hua

    2016-07-01

    In the paper, a novel three-layered chiral structure is proposed and investigated, which consists of a split-ring resonator sandwiched between two layers of sub-wavelength gratings. This designed structure can achieve simultaneously asymmetric transmission with an extremely broad bandwidth and high amplitude as well as multi-band 90° polarization rotator with very low dispersion. Numerical simulations adopted two kinds of softwares with different algorithms demonstrate that asymmetric parameter can reach a maximum of 0.99 and over than 0.8 from 4.6 to 16.8 GHz, which exhibit magnitude and bandwidth improvement over previous chiral metamaterials in microwave bands (S, C, X and Ku bands). Specifically, the reason of high amplitude is analyzed in detail based on the Fabry-perot like resonance. Subsequently, the highly efficient polarization conversion with very low dispersion between two orthogonal linearly polarized waves is also analyzed by the optical activity and ellipticity. Finally, the electric fields are also investigated and further demonstrate the correctness of the simulated and calculated results.

  18. Employee experience of structural change in two Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roald, J; Edgren, L

    2001-01-01

    Advances in medical and technological procedures, together with changes in demography, demand structural changes in the Nordic health care systems. Few studies have focused on employee perceptions of these structural changes. This study aims to describe employee reactions following a merger between two Norwegian hospitals. A Grounded theory approach has been used in this study. The theoretical model is based on empirical data collected from employees directly affected by the structural change process. Employee resistance was found to be the core category. Three categories were found in relation to this core category; goal uncertainty, organizational culture and individual insecurity. Different perceptions and interpretations of vaguely formulated goals lead to employee resistance. The difference between the organizational cultures in the two hospitals impeded the merger according to the project plan, and very few positive results could be seen. Individual insecurity regarding the future was experienced in connection with the implementation of structural change. The authors propose a strategy to counteract resistance in similar mergers.

  19. Study on Land Use Structure Changes and Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyou; LIU; Chunling; PU; Airong; ZHU; Zhiqiang; WANG

    2013-01-01

    Land structure change not only relates to the coordinated development of regional social economic,but also determines the ecological environment security in certain region. Ili river valley was chose as the study area. The scientific and quantitative assessment of land use struc- ture and spatial pattern is significant to the sustainable development of the Ili river valley area. Based on the detailed investigation date of land use from 2002 to 2008,and social and economic statistics of the Ili river valley in eight counties and one city in 2008,the study area’s land use structure changes were discussed in three aspects from the land use structure,the degree of land use,to the land use efficiency. The changes of land use structure were analyzed by the use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Factors that influence land use structure changes were analyzed. In the end,suggestions were put forward to optimize the management.

  20. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on tool steel by multiple picosecond laser pulses of different polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorčič, Peter; Sedlaček, Marko; Podgornik, Bojan; Reif, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are produced on cold work tool steel by irradiation with a low number of picosecond laser pulses. As expected, the ripples, with a period of about 90% of the laser wavelength, are oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization. Subsequent irradiation with the polarization rotated by 45° or 90° results in a corresponding rotation of the ripples. This is visible already with the first pulse and becomes almost complete - erasing the previous orientation - after as few as three pulses. The phenomenon is not only observed for single-spot irradiation but also for writing long coherent traces. The experimental results strongly defy the role of surface plasmon-polaritons as the predominant key to LIPSS formation.

  1. Measurement of the Polarized Structure Function $\\sigma_{LT^\\prime}$ for Pion Electroproduction in the Roper Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Joo, K; Aznauryan, I G; Burkert, V D; Egiyan, H; Minehart, R C; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Farhi, L; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Frolov, V; Funsten, H; Gaff, S J; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Jüngst, H G; Kelley, J H; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; Maximon, L C; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatie, F; Sabourov, K; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J

    2005-01-01

    The polarized longitudinal-transverse structure function $\\sigma_{LT^\\prime}$ measures the interference between real and imaginary amplitudes in pion electroproduction and can be used to probe the coupling between resonant and non-resonant processes. We report new measurements of $\\sigma_{LT^\\prime}$ in the $N(1440){1/2}^+$ (Roper) resonance region at $Q^2=0.40$ and 0.65 GeV$^2$ for both the $\\pi^0 p$ and $\\pi^+ n$ channels. The experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using longitudinally polarized electrons at a beam energy of 1.515 GeV. Complete angular distributions were obtained and are compared to recent phenomenological models. The $\\sigma_{LT^\\prime}(\\pi^+ n)$ channel shows a large sensitivity to the Roper resonance multipoles $M_{1-}$ and $S_{1-}$ and provides new constraints on models of resonance formation.

  2. Polarization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film in a floating-gate capacitor structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Hui, E-mail: hyuan@gmu.edu, E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu; Li, Haitao; Zhu, Hao [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States); Zhang, Kai; Baumgart, Helmut [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Bonevich, John E. [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Richter, Curt A. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States); Li, Qiliang, E-mail: hyuan@gmu.edu, E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film sandwiched and embedded inside the oxide layer have been fabricated and studied. The capacitors exhibit ferroelectric-like hysteresis which is a result of the robust, reversible polarization of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film while the gate voltage sweeps. The temperature-dependent capacitance measurement indicates that the activation energy is about 0.33 eV for separating the electron and hole pairs in the bulk of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, and driving them to either the top or bottom surface of the thin film. Because of the fast polarization speed, potentially excellent endurance, and the complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatibility, the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} embedded MOS structures are very interesting for memory application.

  3. Excited-state proton coupled charge transfer modulated by molecular structure and media polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-02-01

    Charge and proton transfer reactions in the excited states of organic dyes can be coupled in many different ways. Despite the complementarity of charges, they can occur on different time scales and in different directions of the molecular framework. In certain cases, excited-state equilibrium can be established between the charge-transfer and proton-transfer species. The interplay of these reactions can be modulated and even reversed by variations in dye molecular structures and changes of the surrounding media. With knowledge of the mechanisms of these processes, desired rates and directions can be achieved, and thus the multiple emission spectral features can be harnessed. These features have found versatile applications in a number of cutting-edge technological areas, particularly in fluorescence sensing and imaging.

  4. Molecular dynamics analysis of the effect of electronic polarization on the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of ionic liquids and lithium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesch, Volker; Montes-Campos, Hadrián; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Gallego, Luis Javier; Heuer, Andreas; Schröder, Christian; Varela, Luis M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study on the effect of electronic polarization on the structure and single-particle dynamics of mixtures of the aprotic ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide ([EMIM][TFSI]) doped with a lithium salt with the same anion at 298 K and 1 bar. In particular, we analyze the effect of electron density fluctuations on radial distribution functions, velocity autocorrelation functions, cage correlation functions, mean-squared displacements, and vibrational densities of states, comparing the predictions of the quantum-chemistry-based Atomistic Polarizable Potential for Liquids, Electrolytes, & Polymers (APPLE&P) with those of its nonpolarizable version and those of the standard non-polarizable Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA). We found that the structure of the mixture is scarcely modified by the fluctuations in electron charge of their constituents, but their transport properties are indeed quite drastically changed, with larger mobilities being predicted for the different species in the bulk mixtures with the polarizable force field. Specifically, the mean-squared displacements are larger for the polarizable potentials at identical time intervals and the intermediate subdiffusive plateaus are greatly reduced, so the transition to the diffusive regime takes place much earlier than in the non-polarizable media. Moreover, the correlations of the added cations inside their cages are weakened out earlier and their vibrational densities of states are slightly red-shifted, reflecting the weakening effect of the electronic polarization on the Coulomb coupling in these dense ionic media. The comparison of OPLS-AA with non-polarizable APPLE&P indicates that adding polarization to OPLS-AA is not sufficient to achieve results close to experiments.

  5. Characterization of process-induced damage in Cu/low-k interconnect structure by microscopic infrared spectroscopy with polarized infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Hirofumi; Hashimoto, Hideki; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-09-01

    Microscopic Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra are measured for a Cu/low-k interconnect structure using polarized IR light for different widths of low-k spaces and Cu lines, and for different heights of Cu lines, on Si substrates. Although the widths of the Cu line and the low-k space are 70 nm each, considerably smaller than the wavelength of the IR light, the FT-IR spectra of the low-k film were obtained for the Cu/low-k interconnect structure. A suitable method was established for measuring the process-induced damage in a low-k film that was not detected by the TEM-EELS (Transmission Electron Microscope-Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy) using microscopic IR polarized light. Based on the IR results, it was presumed that the FT-IR spectra mainly reflect the structural changes in the sidewalls of the low-k films for Cu/low-k interconnect structures, and the mechanism of generating process-induced damage involves the generation of Si-OH groups in the low-k film when the Si-CH3 bonds break during the fabrication processes. The Si-OH groups attract moisture and the OH peak intensity increases. It was concluded that the increase in the OH groups in the low-k film is a sensitive indicator of low-k damage. We achieved the characterization of the process-induced damage that was not detected by the TEM-EELS and speculated that the proposed method is applicable to interconnects with line and space widths of 70 nm/70 nm and on shorter scales of leading edge devices. The location of process-induced damage and its mechanism for the Cu/low-k interconnect structure were revealed via the measurement method.

  6. Structural change in the brazilian economy in the 2000s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Messa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the sources of structural change in the Brazilian economy in the 2000s. On that purpose, it uses the input-output structural decomposition analysis and introduces a method to correct the influence of prices on the time behavior of the technical coefficients, making them actually represent changes in the production structure. Results show that most of the growth differential between services and industry in that period was induced by the production structure: more precisely, by a lower intermediate consumption of domestic industrial inputs by the production chain of all economic sectors, concomitant with a higher intermediate consumption of services.

  7. Polar Bears or People? Exploring Ways in Which Teachers Frame Climate Change in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Not only will young adults bear the brunt of the effects of climate change, but they are also the ones who will be required to take action-to mitigate and to adapt. Framing, as both a theory and an analytic method, has been used to understand how language in the media can affect the audience's concern and intention to act. The theory and the…

  8. PF2fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna Bettadapura

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data, and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM maps (albeit at coarser resolution of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF(2 fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF(2 fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF(2 fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF(2 fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF(2 fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF(2 fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search.

  9. Armstrong effect as a tool for structural elucidation of liquid polar dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Yu. A.

    2014-04-01

    The effect that appears when high-voltage electric field is applied to liquid polar dielectrics was described. The effect was suggested to be called the Armstrong effect after the name of the scientist who discovered it. Experimental data on the Armstrong effect in pure water were considered. The possible composition of megaclusters of liquid water was evaluated. The potential applications of the effect were suggested.

  10. Dynamic Changes in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Structure in Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Vega

    2011-01-01

    sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and the sarcolemma where Ca2+ release is activated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the SR is a structurally inert organelle in ventricular myocytes. Our data suggest that rather than being static, the SR undergoes frequent dynamic structural changes. SR boutons expressing functional ryanodine receptors moved throughout the cell, approaching or moving away from the sarcolemma of ventricular myocytes. These changes in SR structure occurred in the absence of changes in [Ca2+] during EC coupling. Microtubules and the molecular motors dynein and kinesin 1(Kif5b were important regulators of SR motility. These findings support a model in which the SR is a motile organelle capable of molecular motor protein-driven structural changes.

  11. Cosmic anisotropies from quasars: from polarization to structural-axis alignments

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrims, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The comparison of the orientations of the optical-polarization vectors of quasars that are separated by billions of light-years has led to the discovery that they are aligned instead of pointing in random directions as expected. This discovery has been confirmed and the significance of the correlations enhanced. We devoted this doctoral thesis to an in-depth analysis of these striking observations that imply Gpc-scale correlations. We developed a new and independent statistical method which is dedicated to the study and the characterization of the distribution of the orientations of vectorial quantities that are perpendicular to the lines of sight of a set of sources spread on the celestial sphere. This allowed us to confirm independently the large-scale polarization-vector alignments and to refine the limits of the alignment regions through an unbiased characterization of the signal. We also provided a detailed analysis of a large sample of polarization measurements made at radio wavelengths in which similar...

  12. A wind-driving disc model for the mm-wavelength polarization structure of HL Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Matsakos, Titos; Königl, Arieh

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of spatially resolved mm- and cm-wavelength polarimetry in protostellar accretion discs could help clarify the role of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport in these systems. The best case to date is that of HL~Tau, where the inability to produce a good fit to the 1.25-mm data with a combination of vertical and azimuthal magnetic field components was interpreted as implying that centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) are probably not a significant transport mechanism on the $\\sim 10^2\\,$au scale probed by the observations. Using synthetic polarization maps of heuristic single-field-component discs and of a post-processed simulation of a wind-driving disc, we demonstrate that a much better fit to the data can be obtained if the radial field component, a hallmark of the CDW mechanism, dominates in the polarized emission region. A similar inference was previously made in modelling the far-infrared polarization map of the pc-scale dust ring in the Galactic centre. To reconcile this interp...

  13. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FROM FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES OF DIFFUSE POLARIZED EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, S. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; McConnell, D. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Haverkorn, M. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9010, 6500-GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Beck, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Wolleben, M. [Square Kilometre Array South Africa, The Park, Pinelands 7405 (South Africa); Stanimirovic, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Dickey, J. M. [Physics Department, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Staveley-Smith, L., E-mail: mao@astro.wisc.edu [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2012-11-01

    We present a study of the magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), carried out using diffuse polarized synchrotron emission data at 1.4 GHz acquired at the Parkes Radio Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The observed diffuse polarized emission is likely to originate above the LMC disk on the near side of the galaxy. Consistent negative rotation measures (RMs) derived from the diffuse emission indicate that the line-of-sight magnetic field in the LMC's near-side halo is directed coherently away from us. In combination with RMs of extragalactic sources that lie behind the galaxy, we show that the LMC's large-scale magnetic field is likely to be of quadrupolar geometry, consistent with the prediction of dynamo theory. On smaller scales, we identify two brightly polarized filaments southeast of the LMC, associated with neutral hydrogen arms. The filaments' magnetic field potentially aligns with the direction toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We suggest that tidal interactions between the SMC and the LMC in the past 10{sup 9} years are likely to have shaped the magnetic field in these filaments.

  14. Slim-structured electro-floating display system based on the polarization-controlled optical path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Cheol; Park, Seong-Jin; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-04-18

    A new slim-type electro-floating display system based on the polarization-controlled optical path is proposed. In the proposed system, the optical path between the input plane and Fresnel lens can be made recursive by repetitive transmission and reflection of the input beam by employing a new polarization-based optical path controller (P-OPC), which is composed of two quaterwave plates, a half mirror and a reflective polarizer. Based on this P-OPC, the absolute optical path between the input plane and Fresnel lens, virtually representing the physical depth of the display system, can be reduced down to one third of its original path, which results in the same rate of decrease in the volume size of the display system. The operational principle of the proposed system is analyzed with the Jones matrix. In addition, to confirm the feasibility of the proposed system, experiments with test prototypes are carried out, and the results are comparatively discussed with those of the conventional system.

  15. Three phase partitioning leads to subtle structural changes in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Gulam Mohmad; Gupta, Munishwar Nath

    2013-09-01

    Three phase partitioning consists of precipitation of proteins due to simultaneous presence of ammonium sulphate and t-butanol. The technique has been successfully used for purification and refolding of proteins. There are however indications that the structures of proteins subjected to three phase partitioning are different from native structure of proteins. Taking several proteins, the present work examines the structural changes in proteins by comparing their thermal stabilities, secondary structure contents, surface hydrophobicities, hydrodynamic radii and solubilities in the presence of ammonium sulphate. The results show that while the nature or extent of structural changes may vary, in all the cases the changes are rather subtle and not drastic in nature. Hence, the technique can be safely used for protein purification and refolding.

  16. Family Structure Changes and Children's Health, Behavior, and Educational Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz

    More and more children do not grow up in traditional nuclear families. Instead they grow up in single parent  households or in families with a step-parent. For example, in 1980, almost 83% of all Danish children in the ages 0 to 17 lived with both of their parents, but this number steadily...... structure changes during childhood. More family structure changes implies worse outcomes and might actually be more important than the number of years a child has spent in a single parent household. The age at which the family structure change occurs also seems to be important at least for some outcomes....... decreased to 73% in 2005. Hence it is important to improve our understanding of the impact of "shocks" in family structure due to parental relationship dissolution on children. International studies mainly suggest a negative relationship between non-nuclear family structure and child outcomes. There are two...

  17. Structural Changes and Global Trends in European Union Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak Mesic

    2009-01-01

    The article aims at researching and presenting structural changes and global trends in distributive trade of European Union, resulted from liberalization of economic activities within the EU. During the last decades, EU trade went through deep transformation and structural changes. Traditional distributive trade has been replaced by organized and concentrated distribution. Even though, there are many developing trends which unify the EU trade, still there are some differences specific for par...

  18. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pancic, Marina; Hansen, Per Juel; Tammilehto, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1) and different temperatures (1, 5, and 8...... C) to simulate changes from present to plausible future levels. Each of the 12 scenarios was run for 7 days, and a significant interaction between temperature and pH on growth was detected. By combining increased temperature and acidification, the two factors counterbalanced each other......, and therefore no effect on the growth rates was found. However, the growth rates increased with elevated temperatures by 20–50% depending on the strain. In addition, a general negative effect of increasing acidification on growth was observed. At pH 7.7 and 7.4, the growth response varied considerably among...

  19. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pančić, M.; Hansen, Peter Juul; Tammilehto, A.;

    2015-01-01

    The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1) and different temperatures (1, 5 and 8 °C......) to simulate changes from present to plausible future levels. Each of the 12 scenarios was run for 7 days, and a significant interaction between temperature and pH on growth was detected. By combining increased temperature and acidification, the two factors counterbalanced each other, and therefore no effect...... on the growth rates was found. However, the growth rates increased with elevated temperatures by ∼20–50% depending on the strain. In addition, a general negative effect of increasing acidification on growth was observed. At pH 7.7 and 7.4, the growth response varied considerably among strains. However, a more...

  20. Effects of nitrogen dopants on the atomic step kinetics and electronic structures of O-polar ZnO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhan, Huahan; Zhou, Yinghui; Wu, Yaping; Chen, Xiaohang; Wang, Huiqiong; Kang, Junyong

    2016-02-21

    Oxygen-polar ZnO films are grown in step flow mode by molecular beam epitaxy. Driven by the step flow anisotropy, the growth leads to the occurrence of specific hexagonal pits in the surface. The specific pits are formed by interlacing steps of the {10̄1̄4} facets, thus quenching the macroscopic dipole moment along the c-axis and satisfying the stabilization principles. Nitrogen (N) doping trials are then performed on the basis of the stable surface. In doping, growth remains in step flow mode but the step flow anisotropy vanishes, resulting in an obvious change of the surface morphology. Besides, a distinct acceptor state appears by in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy analysis. First-principles calculations reveal that N readily substitutes for step-edge Zn and acts as NO2 adsorbed at the step edge. Desorption of the NO2 facilitates the formation of NO-VZn shallow acceptor complexes, which contributes to the appearance of the acceptor state. According to the peculiarities of N dopants on the O-polar surface, vicinal O-polar substrates (e.g., {10̄1̄4} substrate) are promising in ZnO : N due to the easily achieved step flow growth and high density of step edges for N incorporation.

  1. A Comparative Study of Molecular Structure, pKa, Lipophilicity, Solubility, Absorption and Polar Surface Area of Some Antiplatelet Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Remko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical chemistry methods have been used to study the molecular properties of antiplatelet agents (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel, elinogrel, ticagrelor and cangrelor and several thiol-containing active metabolites. The geometries and energies of most stable conformers of these drugs have been computed at the Becke3LYP/6-311++G(d,p level of density functional theory. Computed dissociation constants show that the active metabolites of prodrugs (ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel and drugs elinogrel and cangrelor are completely ionized at pH 7.4. Both ticagrelor and its active metabolite are present at pH = 7.4 in neutral undissociated form. The thienopyridine prodrugs ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel are lipophilic and insoluble in water. Their lipophilicity is very high (about 2.5–3.5 logP values. The polar surface area, with regard to the structurally-heterogeneous character of these antiplatelet drugs, is from very large interval of values of 3–255 Å2. Thienopyridine prodrugs, like ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel, with the lowest polar surface area (PSA values, exhibit the largest absorption. A high value of polar surface area (PSA of cangrelor (255 Å2 results in substantial worsening of the absorption in comparison with thienopyridine drugs.

  2. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: cn.zguoliu@yahoo.com [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Harbin 150040 (China); Engineering Research Center of Forest Bio-preparation, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu, Ruisi; Zhou, Zhen; Zu, Yuangang; Xu, Fengjie [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Harbin 150040 (China); Engineering Research Center of Forest Bio-preparation, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed.

  3. Dynamic Change of Polarity in Primary Cultured Spheroids of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma and Its Role in Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroaki; Kondo, Jumpei; Sato, Yumi; Endo, Hiroko; Nakajima, Aya; Piulats, Jose M; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Itoh, Yu; Mizoguchi, Akira; Ohue, Masayuki; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells possess apical-basal polarity, which governs the exchange of nutrients and waste. Perturbation of cell polarity appears to be a general feature of cancers, although most colorectal cancers are differentiated adenocarcinomas, in which polarity is maintained to some extent. Little is known about the role of dysregulated polarity in cancer. The cancer tissue-originated spheroid method was applied to the preparation and culture of spheroids. Spheroids were cultured in suspension or in type I collagen gel. Polarity was assessed by IHC of apical markers and electron microscopy. Two types of polarity status in spheroids were observed: apical-in, with apical membrane located at cavities inside the spheroids in type I collagen gel; and apical-out, with apical membrane located at the outermost layer of spheroids in suspension. These polarities were highly interchangeable. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin attenuated the polarity switch. In patients, clusters of cancer cells that invaded vessels had both apical-in and apical-out morphologic features, whereas primary and metastatic tumors had apical-in features. In a mouse liver metastasis model, apical-out spheroids injected into the portal vein became apical-in spheroids in the liver within a few days. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin significantly decreased liver metastasis. Polarity switching was observed in spheroids and human cancer. The polarity switch was critical in an experimental liver metastasis model.

  4. $\\Lambda$ polarization in peripheral collisions at moderate relativistic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Y L; Stöcker, H; Wang, D J; Csernai, L P

    2016-01-01

    The polarization of $\\Lambda$ hyperons from relativistic flow vorticity is studied in peripheral heavy ion reactions at FAIR and NICA energies, just above the threshold of the transition to the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Previous calculations at higher energies with larger initial angular momentum, predicted significant $\\Lambda$ polarization based on the classical vorticity term in the polarization, while relativistic modifications decreased the polarization and changed its structure in the momentum space. At the lower energies studied here, we see the same effect namely that the relativistic modifications decrease the polarization arising from the initial shear flow vorticity.

  5. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, L.; Barreiro, R. B.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low (z ≃ 0.3), intermediate (z ≃ 0.6) and high redshift (z ≃ 0.9). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing map), the proposed filter successfully reconstructs a map of the weak ISW signal, finding a perfect correlation with the input signal for the ideal case and around 80 per cent, on average, in the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage. We find that including CMB polarization improves the correlation between input and reconstruction although only at a small level. Nonetheless, given the weakness of the ISW signal, even modest improvements can be of importance. In particular, in realistic situations, in which less information is available from the LSS tracers, the effect of including polarization is larger. For instance, for the case in which the ISW signal is recovered from CMB plus only one survey, and taking into account the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage, the improvement in the correlation coefficient can be as large as 10 per cent.

  6. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelis, M.; Dekimpe, de M.G.; Leeflang, P.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in keymarketingmetrics? New players may just be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisio

  7. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelis, Marcel; Dekimpe, Marnik G.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in key marketing metrics? New players mayjust be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisi

  8. Using Event Structure Analysis to Understand Planned Social Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Stevenson

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors explore the application of Event Structure Analysis in understanding the linkages between events in planned social change. An illustrative example from the Comprehensive Strategy for Serious, Violent and Chronic Juvenile Offenders is used to highlight the key features of Event Structure Analysis.

  9. Studies of the structure and dynamics of the D region of the polar ionosphere during solar flares in April 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, V. D.; Vasil'ev, E. B.; Ogloblina, O. F.; Tereshchenko, V. A.; Chernyakov, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    [1] The results of observations of the polar lower ionosphere by the partial reflection method during moderate solar flares in April 2004 are presented. The structure of the electron concentration profile in the ionospheric D region and the effects of the impact on it of X-ray radiation of the flares both in quiet and disturbed conditions are considered. It is shown that at altitudes below 75 km the electron concentration is proportional to the intensity of X-ray radiation from a solar flare. This manifests the existence of a linear recombination law at these heights.

  10. The structural state of epitaxial GaP films of different polarities grown on misoriented Si(001) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loshkarev, I. D.; Vasilenko, A. P.; Trukhanov, E. M.; Kolesnikov, A. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Esin, M. Yu.; Petrushkov, M. O.

    2017-02-01

    The structure of GaP films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on vicinal Si(1113) substrates has been studied by X-ray diffraction. It is established that the crystalline lattice of a pseudomorphic film rotates about the axis toward increasing deviation from the singular orientation, while the subsequent relaxation leads to rotation in the opposite direction. This is valid for the films of both (001) and (001¯) polarities. Differences between the surface morphologies of relaxed and pseudomorphic GaP films are revealed.

  11. Polarized scattering of light for arbitrary magnetic fields with level-crossings from the combination of hyperfine and fine structure splittings

    CERN Document Server

    Sowmya, K; Sampoorna, M; Stenflo, J O

    2015-01-01

    Interference between magnetic substates of the hyperfine structure states belonging to different fine structure states of the same term influences the polarization for some of the diagnostically important lines of the Sun's spectrum, like the sodium and lithium doublets. The polarization signatures of this combined interference contain information on the properties of the solar magnetic fields. Motivated by this, in the present paper, we study the problem of polarized scattering on a two-term atom with hyperfine structure by accounting for the partial redistribution in the photon frequencies arising due to the Doppler motions of the atoms. We consider the scattering atoms to be under the influence of a magnetic field of arbitrary strength and develop a formalism based on the Kramers--Heisenberg approach to calculate the scattering cross section for this process. We explore the rich polarization effects that arise from various level-crossings in the Paschen--Back regime in a single scattering case using the li...

  12. Structural Changes of Polyethylene Terephthalate Fibers Grafted by Acrylamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施琴芬; 戴礼兴

    2003-01-01

    A group of grafted PET fibers with different graft yield are formed by grafiing acrylamide onto the PET main chains. The structure of grafted fibers are studied by scanning electronic microscope ( SEM ), infra-red spectrophotometer (IR), and differential scanning calorimetry( DSC ). At the same time, the moisture regain, dyeability, strength, and elongation at break of the samples are measured and their relations with structural changes are discussed. Compared with ungrafted fiber, shape of the fiber cross-section, IR characteristic absorption peaks, and melting behavior of the grafted fibers have been changed, causing the fiber dyeability and moisture regain to be increased, and mechanical properties to be changed.

  13. Unambiguous determination of structure parameters for soft matter samples made possible with polarization analysis on JCNS SANS using a 3He spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Babcock, E; Radulescu, A; Pipich, V

    2010-01-01

    Incoherent background can create an intrinsic problem for standard small angle neutron scattering measurements. Biological samples contain hydrogen which is a strong incoherent scatterer thus creating an intrinsic source of background that makes determination of the coherent scattering parameters difficult in special situations. This can especially be true for the Q-range from around 0.1-0.5 \\AA^-1 where improper knowledge of the background level can lead to ambiguity in determination of the samples structure parameters. Polarization analysis is a way of removing this ambiguity by allowing one to distinguish the coherent from incoherent scattering, even when the coherent scattering is only a small fraction of the total scattered intensity. ^3He spin filters are ideal for accomplishing this task because they permit the analysis of large area and large divergence scattered neutron beams without adding to detector background or changing the prorogation of the scattered neutron beam. This rapid note describes the...

  14. Extracellular Matrix components regulate cellular polarity and tissue structure in the developing and mature Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  15. Simulation climate change. A field manipulation study of polar microarthdropod community response to global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, A.D. (British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    Passive cloches were deployed at three altitudinally distinct sites on Signy Island, maritime Antarctica, to investigate the effect of ameliorated thermal environment upon fellfield microarthropod communities. Temperature was monitored at 1.5 m height, at ground surface level, and at 5 cm depth in cloche and control plots. During summer (December-march), cloches elevated monthly mean temperatures by up to 2.46 deg. C at the soil surface and 2.20 deg. C at 5 cm depth. Integrated air temperatures over consecutive 10 d periods were up to 4.65 deg. C warmer in cloches than controls. During winter (April-November), snow cover of the fellfield sites buffered temperature variation and reduced the treatment effect. After eight years of these manipulations, sampling of the upper 50 mm of soil revealed consistently greater microarthropod populations within cloches than in controls (treatment effect: p<0.05). Maximum difference occurred at high altitude where thermal amelioration was greatest (site effect: p<0.05). Cloche populations of the numerically dominant collembolan Cryptopygus antarcticus Willem contained an increased proportion of small (length<750 [mu]m) individuals. No species new to Signy Island were recorded. Relating these microarthropod populations to the ameliorated thermal environment suggests that Antarctic invertebrate communities may respond to global warming, as predicted by global circulation models, with an increase in abundance with little increase in diversity. However, this response could be indirect, the intermediate controlling factor being the percentage cover of the soil surface by vegetation, itself a function of climate change. (au) (49 refs.)

  16. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Takala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes.

  17. Coding genes and molecular structures of the diffusible signalling proteins (pheromones) of the polar ciliate, Euplotes nobilii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Pedrini, Bill; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Wüthrich, Kurt; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2012-12-01

    In protozoan ciliates, diffusible signalling proteins (pheromones) regulate the vegetative growth and mating interactions. Here, the coding genes and the structures of the encoded pheromones were studied in genetically distinct wild-type strains representing interbreeding Antarctic and Arctic populations of the marine ciliate Euplotes nobilii. Determination of seven allelic pheromone-coding DNA sequences revealed that an unusual extension and high structural conservation of the 5' non-coding region are peculiar traits of this gene family, implying that this region is directly involved in the mechanism of pheromone gene expression, possibly through phenomena of intron splicing and/or frame-shifting. For four pheromones, the three-dimensional structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in solution. These structures show that the pheromones represent a protein family which adapts to its polar environment by combining a structurally stable core of a three-helix bundle with extended polypeptide segments that are devoid of regular secondary structures and concomitantly show enhanced structural flexibility.

  18. Three-dimensionally modulated anisotropic structure for diffractive optical elements created by one-step three-beam polarization holographic photoalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Noda, Kohei; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    A diffractive optical element with a three-dimensional liquid crystal (LC) alignment structure for advanced control of polarized beams was fabricated by a highly efficient one-step photoalignment method. This study is of great significance because different two-dimensional continuous and complex alignment patterns can be produced on two alignment films by simultaneously irradiating an empty glass cell composed of two unaligned photocrosslinkable polymer LC films with three-beam polarized interference beam. The polarization azimuth, ellipticity, and rotation direction of the diffracted beams from the resultant LC grating widely varied depending on the two-dimensional diffracted position and the polarization states of the incident beams. These polarization diffraction properties are well explained by theoretical analysis based on Jones calculus.

  19. CALCULATION OF THE FINE STRUCTURE OF OXYGEN-LIKE IONS USING THE POLARIZATION POTENTIAL FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG YONG; WANG RONG; JIANG GANG; ZHU ZHENG-HE

    2001-01-01

    We have calculated the forbidden transition energies and magnetic dipole transition probabilities of 2s22p4(3pl-3P2) and 2s22p4 (3p0-3p1) of oxygen-like isoelectronic sequences (Z=10-32) by a method of polarization potential correction. The transition energies show good agreement with experiment and are much better than the calculations in the literature. These results also illustrate that it is feasible to use the dipole expansion of the polarization potential to deal with some dynamic and non-dynamic effects in the central field approach. The relation of polarizability and cut-off radius with atomic number is discussed. We also give the fitted formula between the polarizability α1 and atomic number Z as c1 =0.73429-9.56644× 10-4Z+7.43016× 10-5Z2 -2.53298×10-6Z3+2.08306× 10-8Z4.

  20. Constructional change, paradigmatic structure and the orientation of usage processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltoft, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a model analysis of the interplay between structure and usage in the semantic change of constructions, with a focus on the role of content structure in the sense of paradigmatically organised semantic structure. The case at hand the development of the Danish indirect object...... construction from the 18th century to the present, a specialisation process parallel to the one described for English by Colleman & De Clerck (2011), though not identical to it. The semantics of constructions is described in terms of linguistic content, as distinct from conceptual structure, and the linguistic...

  1. Macro- and microscopic spectral-polarization characteristics of the structure of normal and abnormally located chordae tendianeae of left ventricular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyk, Yu. Yu.; Prydij, O. G.; Zymnyakov, D. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    The morphological peculiarities of TS mitral valve of the heart of man in normal and abnormal spaced strings of the left ventricle and the study of their structural features depending on the location was studied. There are given the results of comparative statistics, correlation and fractal study population Mueller-matrix images (MMI) of healthy and abnormal (early forms that are not diagnosed by histological methods) BT normal and abnormally located tendon strings left ventricle of the human heart. Abnormalities in the structure of the wings, tendon strings (TS), mastoid muscle (MM) in inconsistencies elements and harmonized operation of all valve complex shown in the features of the polarization manifestations of it laser images.

  2. Study of the in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system using polarized neutron scattering under grazing incidence geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, R., E-mail: ryuji.maruyama@j-parc.jp [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Bigault, T.; Wildes, A.R.; Dewhurst, C.D. [Institut Laue Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Soyama, K. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Courtois, P. [Institut Laue Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2016-05-21

    The in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system with a polycrystalline grain size less than the ferromagnetic exchange length was investigated using polarized neutron off-specular scattering and grazing incidence small angle scattering measurements to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the magnetic properties which are different from the bulk. These complementary measurements with different length scales and the data analysis based on the distorted wave Born approximation revealed the lateral correlation on a length scale of sub- μm due to the fluctuating orientation of the magnetization in the layer. The obtained in-plane magnetic structure is consistent with the random anisotropy model, i.e. competition between the exchange interactions between neighboring spins and the local magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  3. Changes of structure and dipole moment of water with temperature and pressure: a first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongdong; Dai, Jiayu; Yuan, Jianmin

    2011-07-14

    The changes of structure and distribution of dipole moment of water with temperatures up to 2800 K and densities up to 2.2 g/cm(3) are investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics. Along the isochore of 1.0 g/cm(3), the structure of liquid water above 800 K is dramatically different from that at ambient conditions, where the hydrogen-bonds network collapses. Along the isotherm of 1800 K, the transition from the liquid state to an amorphous superionic phase occurs at 2.0 g/cm(3) (32.9 GPa), which is not observed along the isotherm of 2800 K. With increasing temperature, the average dipole moment of water molecules is decreased arising from the weakened polarization by the collapse of the hydrogen-bonds network, while it is contrarily increased with compression due to the strengthening effect upon the polarization of water molecules. Both higher temperature and pressure broaden the distribution of dipole moment of water molecules due to the enhanced intramolecular charge fluctuations.

  4. Polar decomposition of Mueller matrices for 2D-structured surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the Polar Decomposition (PD has been applied to the Mueller matrices (MMs of the light scattered by linear ribs of rectangular profile on a flat substrate. Although photo-lithographic technique produces a silicon surface, metallic character is acquired by sputtering with gold some of the samples. With a dual rotating compensator polarimeter the MMs are obtained by Fourier Transform analysis. The samples have been numerically modeled by using both FDTD and Extinction Theorem (ET and MMs have been computed from the results. The scattering depends strongly on the geometry and composition of the ribs, and this sensitivity is noticed for instance in M11 element. But information offered by PD parameters is shown to be more apprehensible, like the substrate-induced depolarization or the retardance associated to the rib width.

  5. Development and dynamics of cell polarity at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanale, Joseph P; Sun, Thomas Y; Montell, Denise J

    2017-04-01

    Cells exhibit morphological and molecular asymmetries that are broadly categorized as cell polarity. The cell polarity established in early embryos prefigures the macroscopic anatomical asymmetries characteristic of adult animals. For example, eggs and early embryos have polarized distributions of RNAs and proteins that generate global anterior/posterior and dorsal/ventral axes. The molecular programs that polarize embryos are subsequently reused in multiple contexts. Epithelial cells require apical/basal polarity to establish their barrier function. Migrating cells polarize in the direction of movement, creating distinct leading and trailing structures. Asymmetrically dividing stem cells partition different molecules between themselves and their daughter cells. Cell polarity can develop de novo, be maintained through rounds of cell division and be dynamically remodeled. In this Cell Science at a Glance review and poster, we describe molecular asymmetries that underlie cell polarity in several cellular contexts. We highlight multiple developmental systems that first establish cell/developmental polarity, and then maintain it. Our poster showcases repeated use of the Par, Scribble and Crumbs polarity complexes, which drive the development of cell polarity in many cell types and organisms. We then briefly discuss the diverse and dynamic changes in cell polarity that occur during cell migration, asymmetric cell division and in planar polarized tissues.

  6. Structural color change in longhorn beetles Tmesisternus isabellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Dong, B Q; Liu, X H; Zheng, Y M; Zi, J

    2009-08-31

    The elytra of longhorn beetles Tmesisternus isabellae show iridescent golden coloration which stems from long and flat scales imbricated densely on the elytral surface. The scales are able to change coloration from golden in the dry state to red in the wet state with water absorption. Structural characterizations revealed that the iridescent coloration of scales originates from a multilayer in the scale interior. Measurements on both water contact angle and chemical composition indicated that scales are hydrophilic. The change in scale coloration to red in the wet state is due to both the swelling of the multilayer period and water infiltration. The unraveled structural color change and its strategy may not only help us get insight into the biological functionality of structural coloration but also inspire the designs of artificial photonic devices.

  7. Process Analysis in Container Shipping Network Structure Form Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Being aimed at the influence of ship-size and cargo-demand changes on container shipping networks, to reveal the evolution process of container shipping networks structure form, this paper respectively designed the operation models for two major container shipping networks structure forms: Multi-port-calling network and Hub-and-spoke network, to maximizing the investment efficiency. Based on the above models, a comprehensively integrated operation model of container shipping networks is built and the evolution process of container shipping networks structure form with changing of both ship-size and cargo demands is analyzed. Finally, through a case study, results show that the comprehensive integrated operation model is very effective in the analysis of evolution process of container shipping networks structure forms.

  8. Structural Changes and Dairy Chain Efficiency in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Rosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The dairy chain in Italy experienced substantial structural changes during the past years. Since the introduction of milk quotas in 1984, structural changes caused by consistent reduction of dairy farms, growing brand concentration at wholesale level, and diffusion of private labels at retail level may have altered the competitive market conditions, with increasing price asymmetry and inefficiencies in price transmission. We tested this hypothesis using the McCorriston and Sheldon’s successive oligopoly model, and we gave evidences of altered price transmission and consumer’s surplus distribution along the vertical chain in the examined period.

  9. Structural Change, Globalization and Economic Growth in China and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Valli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In their period of rapid economic growth China and India have experienced profound structural transformations. The aim of the paper is to analyze the relation between structural change, the process of globalization and economic growth in the two great Asian countries, using a highly disaggregated dataset for the 1987-2009 period. While China had a longer and more intensive productivity growth than India, the latter had a somewhat more balanced growth. Both countries registered higher within-sectors gains in productivity than between-sectors ones. Our analysis also shows that there exist important feedbacks between structural change, globalization and economic growth over time. When the reallocation of labor is large, it may positively impact on the future rates of economic growth. At the same time, however, it seems that a too rapid economic growth may hinder a smooth reallocation of labor. In both countries, new policies should be designed to favor labor movement across sectors and areas, to reduce the wage-productivity differentials and to integrate the informal sector in formal markets in India, in order to foster structural changes and enhance economic growth. If a too unbalanced economic growth has somewhat limited the extent of structural change, globalization has on the contrary promoted it. High level of export, import and FDI not only has been related to higher rates of economic growth, but also to a deeper reallocation of resources across sectors, modifying the comparative advantage and reorganizing the production.

  10. Monitoring changes in membrane polarity, membrane integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations in Streptococcus pneumoniae using fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Emily A; Marks, Laura R; Roche-Håkansson, Hazeline; Håkansson, Anders P

    2014-02-17

    Membrane depolarization and ion fluxes are events that have been studied extensively in biological systems due to their ability to profoundly impact cellular functions, including energetics and signal transductions. While both fluorescent and electrophysiological methods, including electrode usage and patch-clamping, have been well developed for measuring these events in eukaryotic cells, methodology for measuring similar events in microorganisms have proven more challenging to develop given their small size in combination with the more complex outer surface of bacteria shielding the membrane. During our studies of death-initiation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), we wanted to elucidate the role of membrane events, including changes in polarity, integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations. Searching the literature, we found that very few studies exist. Other investigators had monitored radioisotope uptake or equilibrium to measure ion fluxes and membrane potential and a limited number of studies, mostly in Gram-negative organisms, had seen some success using carbocyanine or oxonol fluorescent dyes to measure membrane potential, or loading bacteria with cell-permeant acetoxymethyl (AM) ester versions of ion-sensitive fluorescent indicator dyes. We therefore established and optimized protocols for measuring membrane potential, rupture, and ion-transport in the Gram-positive organism S. pneumoniae. We developed protocols using the bis-oxonol dye DiBAC4(3) and the cell-impermeant dye propidium iodide to measure membrane depolarization and rupture, respectively, as well as methods to optimally load the pneumococci with the AM esters of the ratiometric dyes Fura-2, PBFI, and BCECF to detect changes in intracellular concentrations of Ca(2+), K(+), and H(+), respectively, using a fluorescence-detection plate reader. These protocols are the first of their kind for the pneumococcus and the majority of these dyes have not been used in any other bacterial

  11. Statistical methods in longitudinal research principles and structuring change

    CERN Document Server

    von Eye, Alexander

    1991-01-01

    These edited volumes present new statistical methods in a way that bridges the gap between theoretical and applied statistics. The volumes cover general problems and issues and more specific topics concerning the structuring of change, the analysis of time series, and the analysis of categorical longitudinal data. The book targets students of development and change in a variety of fields - psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, medicine, psychiatry, economics, behavioural sciences, developmental psychology, ecology, plant physiology, and biometry - with basic training in statistics an

  12. Labor mobility, trade and structural change: the Philippine experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, M I

    1993-01-01

    "This article addresses three questions: (1) Is the high rate of emigration of labor from the Philippines related to the country's trade policy? (2) Why have migration and accompanying remittances not made much of an impact on the growth and structure of the Philippine economy? (3) Would economic growth and structural change eventually curtail labor emigration? The Philippines' history of labor export and its economic development are contrasted with those of Asian NIEs [newly industrialized economies] which have adopted liberal trade regimes."

  13. Analytical model and new structure of the enhancement-mode polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Xiong, Jiayun; Wei, Jie; Wu, Junfeng; Peng, Fu; Deng, Siyu; Zhang, Bo; Luo, Xiaorong

    2016-04-01

    A novel enhancement-mode (E-mode) polarization-junction HEMT with vertical conduction channel (PVC-HEMT) is proposed, and its analytical model for threshold voltage (Vth) is presented. It has two features: one is GaN/AlGaN/GaN double hetero-structure, the other is that source and drain locate at the same side of trench-type MOS gate (T-gate), and the source contacts with the T-gate, which forms vertical conduction channel (VC). The 2-D hole gas (2-DHG) and 2-D electron gas (2-DEG) are formed at the GaN-top/AlGaN and AlGaN/GaN-buffer interface, respectively, forming the polarization-junction. First, the E-mode operation is realized because 2-DHG under the source prevents the electrons injecting from source to 2-DEG, breaking through the conventional E-mode method by depleting 2-DEG under the gate. Second, a uniform electric field (E-field) distribution is achieved due to the assisted depletion effect by polarization-junction. Third, the source reduces the E-field peak at the T-gate side and modulates the E-field distribution. The breakdown voltage (BV) of PVC-HEMT is 705 V and specific ON-resistance (RON,sp) is 1.18 mΩ cm2. Compared with conventional HEMT (C-HEMT), PVC-HEMT has a smaller size due to the special location of the source and T-gate. An analytic threshold voltage model is presented and the analytical results agree well with the simulated results.

  14. A3V5O14 (A = K+, Rb+, or Tl+), new polar oxides with a tetragonal tungsten bronze related structural topology: synthesis, structure, and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jeongho; Kim, Sang-Hwan; Halasyamani, P Shiv

    2010-08-02

    Three polar noncentrosymmetric (NCS) oxide materials, A(3)V(5)O(14) (A = K(+), Rb(+), or Tl(+)), have been synthesized by hydrothermal and conventional solid state techniques. Their crystal structures and functional properties (second-harmonic generation, piezoelectricity, and polarization) have been determined. The iso-structural materials exhibit a layered structural topology that consists of corner-sharing VO(4) tetrahedra and VO(5) square pyramids. The layers stack parallel to the c-axis direction and are separated by the K(+), Rb(+), or Tl(+) cations. Powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements using 1064 nm radiation indicate the materials exhibit moderate SHG efficiencies of approximately 100 x alpha-SiO(2). Additional SHG measurements, that is, particle size versus SHG efficiency, indicate the materials are type-I phase-matchable. Converse piezoelectric measurements for K(3)V(5)O(14), Rb(3)V(5)O(14), and Tl(3)V(5)O(14) revealed d(33) values of 28, 22, and 26 pm/V, respectively. Pyroelectric measurements, that is, temperature-dependent polarization measurements, resulted in pyroelectric coefficients of -2.2, -2.9, and -2.8 microC/m(2) x K at 65 degrees C, for K(3)V(5)O(14), Rb(3)V(5)O(14), and Tl(3)V(5)O(14) respectively. Frequency-dependent polarization measurements confirmed that all of the materials are nonferroelectric, consistent with our first principle density functional theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations. Infrared, UV-vis, thermogravimetric, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements were also performed. Crystal data: K(3)V(5)O(14), trigonal, space group P31m (No. 157), a = 8.6970(16) A, c = 4.9434(19) A, V = 323.81(15), and Z = 1; Rb(3)V(5)O(14), trigonal, space group P31m (No. 157), a = 8.7092(5) A, c = 5.2772(7) A, V = 346.65(5), and Z = 1; Tl(3)V(5)O(14), trigonal, space group P31m (No. 157), a = 8.7397(8) A, c = 5.0846(10) A, V = 336.34(8), and Z = 1.

  15. First-principles investigation of the size-dependent structural stability and electronic properties of O-vacancies at the ZnO polar and non-polar surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun Wong, Kin; Alay-e-Abbas, S. M.; Shaukat, A.; Fang, Yaoguo; Lei, Yong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, all electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals method has been used to investigate the structural and electronic properties of polar (0001) and non-polar (101¯0) surfaces of ZnO in terms of the defect formation energy (DFE), charge density, and electronic band structure with the supercell-slab (SS) models. Our calculations support the size-dependent structural phase transformation of wurzite lattice to graphite-like structure which is a result of the termination of hexagonal ZnO at the (0001) basal plane, when the stacking of ZnO primitive cell along the hexagonal principle c-axis is less than 16 atomic layers of Zn and O atoms. This structural phase transformation has been studied in terms of Coulomb energy, nature of the bond, energy due to macroscopic electric field in the [0001] direction, and the surface to volume ratio for the smaller SS. We show that the size-dependent phase transformation is completely absent for surfaces with a non-basal plane termination, and the resulting structure is less stable. Similarly, elimination of this size-dependent graphite-like structural phase transformation also occurs on the creation of O-vacancy which is investigated in terms of Coulomb attraction at the surface. Furthermore, the DFE at the (101¯0)/(1¯010) and (0001)/(0001¯) surfaces is correlated with the slab-like structures elongation in the hexagonal a- and c-axis. Electronic structure of the neutral O-vacancy at the (0001)/(0001¯) surfaces has been calculated and the effect of charge transfer between the two sides of the polar surfaces (0001)/(0001¯) on the mixing of conduction band through the 4s orbitals of the surface Zn atoms is elaborated. An insulating band structure profile for the non-polar (101¯0)/(1¯010) surfaces and for the smaller polar (0001)/(0001¯) SS without O-vacancy is also discussed. The results in this paper will be useful for the tuning of the structural and electronic properties of the

  16. Bias and population structure in the actuation of sound change

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, James

    2015-01-01

    Why do human languages change at some times, and not others? We address this longstanding question from a computational perspective, focusing on the case of sound change. Sound change arises from the pronunciation variability ubiquitous in every speech community, but most such variability does not lead to change. Hence, an adequate model must allow for stability as well as change. Existing theories of sound change tend to emphasize factors at the level of individual learners promoting one outcome or the other, such as channel bias (which favors change) or inductive bias (which favors stability). Here, we consider how the interaction of these biases can lead to both stability and change in a population setting. We find that population structure itself can act as a source of stability, but that both stability and change are possible only when both types of bias are active, suggesting that it is possible to understand why sound change occurs at some times and not others as the population-level result of the inte...

  17. The structure and maintenance of tropopause polar vortices over the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Steven M.

    2009-12-01

    Tropopause polar vortices (TPVs) are coherent vortices based the tropopause in polar regions, where they are isolated from the wind shear associated with the midlatitude jet stream. Cyclonic TPVs are a common feature of the Arctic, have radii up to 1500 km, and can have lifetimes of over one month. The Arctic is a particularly favorable region for these features due to the isolation from the jet stream, an environment conducive for vortex longevity. Further, TPVs can have an impact on surface weather since they provide more favorable conditions for surface cyclogenesis. The intensification of cyclonic TPVs is examined using an Ertel Potential Vorticity (EPV) framework to test the hypothesis that diabatic effects are able to intensify the vortices due to a dominance of radiative cooling within the vortices that can be seen in high latitudes. This thesis first generalizes the diabatic intensification mechanisms by applying the EPV framework methods to a large sample of cyclones in the Canadian Arctic, and shows that there is a net tendency to create EPV in the vortex, and hence intensify cyclones from radiative processes. While the effects of latent heating are considerable, they are smaller in magnitude. The physical mechanisms leading to these observations are then examined in idealized numerical experiments, where it is shown that longwave radiative cooling is the most important mechanism for intensification. Dry air from the downward intrusion of stratospheric air in the vortex strengthens the vertical gradient of water vapor near the tropopause, and weakens the vertical gradient of water vapor in the lower stratosphere. This results in relatively high radiative cooling near the tropopause, and relatively low radiative cooling in the lower stratosphere with respect to the background environment in the vortex core, enhancing EPV generation in the vortex core. The impact of radiative processes to the climatology of cyclonic TPVs is then examined by comparing a

  18. Theoretical analysis of the crystal structure, band-gap energy, polarization, and piezoelectric properties of ZnO-BeO solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L.; Alpay, S. P.

    2011-07-01

    The electrical properties, the spontaneous polarization, and the piezoelectric response of ZnO can be tailored by alloying ZnO with BeO for applications such as electrodes in flat panel displays and solar cells, blue and ultraviolet (UV) light emitting devices, and highly sensitive UV detectors. We present here the results of a study that employs density-functional theory to analyze the crystal structure, the band structure, spontaneous polarization, and piezoelectric properties of Zn1-xBexO solid solutions. Our findings indicate that Zn1-xBexO alloys may have a different crystal structure than the end components ZnO and BeO that crystallize in the prototypical wurtzite structure (P63mc). It is shown that orthorhombic lattices with Pmn21, Pna21, or P21 structures may have lower formation energies than the wurtzite lattice at a given Be composition. The band-gap energies of Zn1-xBexO in the wurtzite and the orthorhombic structures are nearly identical and the bowing of the band-gap energy increases with increasing Be concentration. The spontaneous polarization of Zn1-xBexO in the orthorhombic lattice is markedly larger compared to the wurtzite structure while the piezoelectric polarization in the wurtzite and orthorhombic structures varies linearly with the Be concentration.

  19. Polarization enhancement and ferroelectric switching enabled by interacting magnetic structures in DyMnO3 thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Chengliang

    2013-12-02

    The mutual controls of ferroelectricity and magnetism are stepping towards practical applications proposed for quite a few promising devices in which multiferroic thin films are involved. Although ferroelectricity stemming from specific spiral spin ordering has been reported in highly distorted bulk perovskite manganites, the existence of magnetically induced ferroelectricity in the corresponding thin films remains an unresolved issue, which unfortunately halts this step. In this work, we report magnetically induced electric polarization and its remarkable response to magnetic field (an enhancement of ?800% upon a field of 2 Tesla at 2 K) in DyMnO3 thin films grown on Nb-SrTiO3 substrates. Accompanying with the large polarization enhancement, the ferroelectric coercivity corresponding to the magnetic chirality switching field is significantly increased. A picture based on coupled multicomponent magnetic structures is proposed to understand these features. Moreover, different magnetic anisotropy related to strain-suppressed GdFeO 3-type distortion and Jahn-Teller effect is identified in the films.

  20. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Bonavera, L; Marcos-Caballero, A; Vielva, P

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low ($z \\simeq 0.3$), intermediate ($z \\simeq 0.6$) and high redshift ($z \\simeq 0.9$). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing ma...

  1. Atomistic mechanisms governing structural stability change of zinc antimony thermoelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaolong [Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710054 (China); Lin, Jianping, E-mail: jaredlin@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China); Qiao, Guanjun [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Zhao, E-mail: zwangzhao@gmail.com [Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710054 (China); State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-01-05

    The structural stability of thermoelectric materials is a subject of growing importance for their energy harvesting applications. Here, we study the microscopic mechanisms governing the structural stability change of zinc antimony at its working temperature, using molecular dynamics combined with experimental measurements of the electrical and thermal conductivity. Our results show that the temperature-dependence of the thermal and electrical transport coefficients is strongly correlated with a structural transition. This is found to be associated with a relaxation process, in which a group of Zn atoms migrates between interstitial sites. This atom migration gradually leads to a stabilizing structural transition of the entire crystal framework, and then results in a more stable crystal structure of β–Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} at high temperature.

  2. Detailed structure of the outer disk around HD 169142 with polarized light in H-band

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, Munetake; Fukagawa, Misato; Muto, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Hashimoto, Jun; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko K; Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Grady, Carol A; Sitko, Michael L; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D; Carson, Joseph C; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; McElwain, Michael W; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-01-01

    Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0.2" <= r <= 1.2", or 29 <= r <= 174 AU, is successfully detected. The azimuthally-averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r=29-52 AU and r=81.2-145 AU respectively show r^{-3}-dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r=40-70 AU. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at \\lambda = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution or with an irregular temperature distribution or with the combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner...

  3. Studies of magnetostriction and spin polarized band structures of rare earth intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Anisotropic magnetostriction measurements of R6Fe23, R = (Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er) were carried out from 77 K to room temperature. Magnetic fields up to 2.1 Tesla were applied. All the compounds exhibited large magnetostrictions at 77 K, the largest effect being obtained for Tb6Fe23. Saturation magnetostriction values for the compounds were also determined for 77 K and room temperature. Results of the temperature dependence of magnetostriction for Er6Fe23 are in good agreement with Callen and Callen's single ion theory. Therefore, the main sources of magnetostriction in this compound is the Er ion. The spin-up and spin-down electronic energy bands, the density of states and the magnetic moments of YCo5, SmCo5, and GdCo5 were calculated by the spin polarized augmented plane wave technique. The calculations obtained show the origin of the moment, provide good estimates of its magnitude and variation, and the reasons for those variations. They also show the important role of partial charge transfer and of d-d electronic coupling. Calculations for LaNi5 and GdNi5 systems are discussed.

  4. Structure and resistance of concentration polar layer on cation exchange membrane-solution interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG Shang-bin; HUANG Ke-long; LI Xiao-gang; WANG Xian

    2006-01-01

    Membrane/solution interface consists of a neutral concentration polar layer(CPL) and a charge layer(CL) under external electrical field, and the neutral CPL can be neglected under high frequency AC electrical field. The relationship of CL thickness e with electrolyte concentration C and fixed ion exchange sites density σ in membrane surface layer can be expressed as e=σ/C.According to this model, the thickness of the CL on Nafion1135 membrane/solution interface(ec) was calculated under different membrane surface charge quantity Q and variable electrolyte concentration C. The membrane/solution interface CL thickness(em) is obviously related with the membrane properties, and decreases dramatically in a higher electrolyte concentration, em values are 76.3nm and 110.3 nm respectively for Nafion1135 and PE01 ion exchange membrane in 0.05 mol/L H2SO4 solution, and em values for both membrane tend to 2 nm in 2 mol/L H2SO4 solution. For Nafion1135 membrane, the comparison of ec and em gives the result that CL thickness em obtained by resistance measurement fits well with the calculated CPL thickness ec while proton in CL transferred to membrane surface is 14.56 × l0-10 mol, which corresponds to the fixed exchange group number in a surface layer with a thickness τ=2 nm for Nafion1135 membrane.

  5. Structural change and agricultural diversification since China’s reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural change is considered the major engine in fostering a country’s growth. In the agricultural sector, diversification is the commonly used development strategy to increase rural sector’s flexibility, and to respond to improving technologies and market conditions. This study examined agricultural development and transformation during China’s socio-economic reforms. In particular, it empirically investigated whether the change of China’s agricultural structure is consistent with structural change theory and observed outcomes from other countries. The degree of agricultural diversification was quantitatively measured at a regional scale using the Herfindahl index. An underdeveloped province in northwest China was studied to provide insights into the interaction among structural change, agricultural diversification, and implemented development policies. Aggregate-level analyses suggest that China’s agricultural transformation pattern is consistent with those of other developing countries. A specific provincial-level analysis shows that environmentally and economically disadvantaged regions are slower to diversify their economy than better endorsed regions.

  6. Effective Organizational Structures and Processes: Addressing Issues of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes organizational structures and processes at the institutional and project levels for the development and support of distance learning initiatives. It addresses environmental and stakeholder issues and explores principles and strategies of effective leadership for change creation and management.

  7. The structural changes in the Mexican coffee sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padron, Benigno Rodriguez; Burger, Kees

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the structural changes which have been present since the economic clauses of the International Coffee Agreements have no longer been in effect. It studies the elements that modified the coffee policy over time. It also investigates the main characteristics of the entire coffee

  8. Extinction Partially Reverts Structural Changes Associated with Remote Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetere, Gisella; Restivo, Leonardo; Novembre, Giovanni; Aceti, Massimiliano; Lumaca, Massimo; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Structural synaptic changes occur in medial prefrontal cortex circuits during remote memory formation. Whether extinction reverts or further reshapes these circuits is, however, unknown. Here we show that the number and the size of spines were enhanced in anterior cingulate (aCC) and infralimbic (ILC) cortices 36 d following contextual fear…

  9. The structural changes in the Mexican coffee sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padron, Benigno Rodriguez; Burger, Kees

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the structural changes which have been present since the economic clauses of the International Coffee Agreements have no longer been in effect. It studies the elements that modified the coffee policy over time. It also investigates the main characteristics of the entire coffee

  10. [Labor law issues in hospitals by structural changes and changes in hospital ownership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Peter

    2003-11-01

    The present article deals with the potential impact of structural changes and changes in hospital control or ownership on the employment contracts of the physicians concerned. While taking the applicable jurisdiction into consideration, the author examines the options of assigning new responsibilities or decreasing compensation opportunities, amending or even terminating employment contracts, outsourcing hospital-related services, or allowing physicians in the future to provide these services at their own risk. Furthermore, the article outlines the change in employer in various "change of control" scenarios such as in the case of hospital privatisation.

  11. Limitations of GIS and remote sensing for considering spatial and temporal change in studies of habitat use by polar bears

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To investigate the feasibility of using satellite-based remote sensing to study habitat use of polar bears {Ursus aritimus), we compared distributions of satellite...

  12. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Aron J. [Department of Chemistry, Lensfield Rd., University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Mori-Sánchez, Paula, E-mail: paula.mori@uam.es [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  13. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  14. Financing reform and structural change in the health services industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C W; Phillips, B U

    1986-08-01

    This paper reviews the major trends in financing reform, emphasizing their impact on those characteristics of the market for health services that economists have viewed as monopolistic, and discusses the implications of structural change for the allied health professions. Hopefully, by understanding the fundamental forces of change and responding to uncertainty with flexibility and imagination, the allied health professions can capitalize on the opportunities afforded by structural change. Overall, these trends should result in the long-term outlook for use of allied health services to increase at an average annual rate of 9% to 10%. Allied health professionals may also witness an increase in independent practice opportunities. Finally, redistribution of jobs will likely occur in favor of outpatient facilities, home health agencies, and nontraditional settings. This in turn will have an impact on allied health education, which will need to adapt to these types of reforms.

  15. Inflatable shape changing colonies assembling versatile smart space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Thomas; Hilbich, Daniel; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    Various plants have the ability to follow the sun with their flowers or leaves during the course of a day via a mechanism known as heliotropism. This mechanism is characterised by the introduction of pressure gradients between neighbouring motor cells in the plant's stem, enabling the stem to bend. By adapting this bio-inspired mechanism to mechanical systems, a new class of smart structures can be created. The developed overall structure is made up of a number of cellular colonies, each consisting of a central pressure source surrounded by multiple cells. After launch, the cellular arrays are deployed in space and are either preassembled or alternatively are attached together during their release or afterwards. A central pressure source is provided by a high-pressure storage unit with an integrated valve, which provides ingress gas flow to the system; the gas is then routed through the system via a sequence of valve operations and cellular actuations, allowing for any desired shape to be achieved within the constraints of the deployed array geometry. This smart structure consists of a three dimensional adaptable cellular array with fluid controlling Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) components enabling the structure to change its global shape. The proposed MEMS components include microvalves, pressure sensors, mechanical interconnect structures, and electrical routing. This paper will also give an overview of the system architecture and shows the feasibility and shape changing capabilities of the proposed design with multibody dynamic simulations. Example applications of this lightweight shape changing structure include concentrators, mirrors, and communications antennas that are able to dynamically change their focal point, as well as substructures for solar sails that are capable of steering through solar winds by altering the sails' subjected area.

  16. The magnetic vortex gyration mediated by spin-polarized current in a confined off-centered nanocontact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Li, Dongfei; Wang, Yaxin; Hua, Zhong

    2017-02-01

    We study the magnetic vortex dynamical behaviors in a confined off-centered nanocontact system through micromagnetic simulations. It is found that the vortex core could be pinned when the nanocontact is shifted to large enough distance from the center of the nanodisk. We also find that the position of nanocontact exerts great influence on the vortex core gyration, including trajectory, eigenfrequency, excitation time, and instantaneous velocity. The simulations show that it is possible to utilize the nanocontact position to change the total effective potential energy of the system so as to realize both the pinning of the vortex core and the controllability of vortex core gyration. The characteristic gyration in this system is advantageous to control the polarity switching and other dynamical behaviors of magnetic vortex.

  17. Polarized scattering with Paschen-Back effect, hyperfine structure, and partial frequency redistribution in magnetized stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Sowmya, K; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2015-01-01

    $F$-state interference significantly modifies the polarization produced by scattering processes in the solar atmosphere. Its signature in the emergent Stokes spectrum in the absence of magnetic fields is depolarization in the line core. In the present paper, we derive the partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrix that includes interference between the upper hyperfine structure states of a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths. The theory is applied to the Na I D$_2$ line that is produced by the transition between the lower $J=1/2$ and upper $J=3/2$ states which split into $F$ states because of the coupling with the nuclear spin $I_s=3/2$. The properties of the PRD matrix for the single-scattering case is explored, in particular, the effects of the magnetic field in the Paschen--Back regime and their usefulness as a tool for the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  18. Polarized Scattering with Paschen-Back Effect, Hyperfine Structure, and Partial Frequency Redistribution in Magnetized Stellar Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Stenflo, J. O.; Sampoorna, M.

    2014-05-01

    F-state interference significantly modifies the polarization produced by scattering processes in the solar atmosphere. Its signature in the emergent Stokes spectrum in the absence of magnetic fields is depolarization in the line core. In the present paper, we derive the partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrix that includes interference between the upper hyperfine structure states of a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths. The theory is applied to the Na I D2 line that is produced by the transition between the lower J = 1/2 and upper J = 3/2 states which split into F states because of the coupling with the nuclear spin Is = 3/2. The properties of the PRD matrix for the single-scattering case is explored, in particular, the effects of the magnetic field in the Paschen-Back regime and their usefulness as a tool for the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  19. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon upon polarization controlled two-color double-pulse irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhm, Sandra; Herzlieb, Marcel; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Krüger, Jörg; Bonse, Jörn

    2015-01-12

    Two-color double-fs-pulse experiments were performed on silicon wafers to study the temporally distributed energy deposition in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). A Mach-Zehnder interferometer generated parallel or cross-polarized double-pulse sequences at 400 and 800 nm wavelength, with inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds between the sub-ablation 50-fs-pulses. Multiple two-color double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample. The resulting LIPSS characteristics (periods, areas) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism is proposed to explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS. These two-color experiments extend previous single-color studies and prove the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition for LIPSS formation.

  20. Quarkonium fine-hyperfine splittings and the Lorentz structure of the confining potential with vacuum-polarization corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N.; Jena, S.N.

    1980-06-01

    Within the framework of the Poggio-Schnitzer flavor-independent static-potential model with long-distance vacuum-polarization correction, we analyze the Lorentz-Dirac structure of the confinement potential with reference to the charmonium hyperfine splittings. In view of the questionable existence and/or doubtful identity of the X(2830) and chi(3455) states, we give preference to the Lorentz-Dirac character of the confinement potential in the form of an approximately equal admixture of scalar and vector components with no anomalous moment. This in turn predicts the /sup 1/S/sub 0/ partners of psi and psi' to be near the 3.0- and 3.6-GeV mass regions, respectively. This also suggests the /sup 1/P/sub 1/ state of charmonium is to be found above the /sup 3/P/sub 0/ state near the mass region of 3.48 GeV.

  1. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  2. Changes in brown coal structure caused by coal-solubilizing microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiers, H.; Koepsel, R.; Weber, A.; Winkelhoefer, M.; Grosse, S. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Energieverfahrenstechnik und Chemieingenieurwesen

    1997-12-31

    The phenomenon of coal solubilization caused by microorganisms has been explained by various mechanisms: extraction of non-covalently bonded polar components of the coal substance by biogenic agents (chelating agents, alkaline substances) and enzyme-catalyzed cleavage of covalent bonds by extracellular enzyme systems. For this it is assumed that bond cleavage occurs on the aliphatic carbon (methylene groups, aliphatic bridges or on ester groups). As the coal has usually been treated with oxidizing agents such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or HNO{sub 3} before bioconversion, there is a possibility that the result of bioconversion is overlaid with the effect of the chemical treatment. We therefore studied the structural changes in the organic coal substance during pre-oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, treatment with MnP and conversion using the fungal strains of Trichoderma and Fusarium oxysporum. (orig.)

  3. Technological Progress, Structural Change and China's Energy Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Junsong; He Canfei

    2009-01-01

    China has witnessed rapid economic development since 1978, and during the time, energy production and consumptiondeveloped at a tremendous speed as well.Energy efficiency which can he measured by energy consumption per unit of GDP, how-ever, experienced continuous decrease.Theoretically, the change of energy efficiency can be attributed to industry structural change and technological change.In order to explain the transformation of Chinese energy efficiency, we adopt logarithmic mean Divisia index techniques to decompose changes in energy intensity in the period of 1994-2005.We find that technological change is the dominant contributor in the decline of energy intensity, but the contribution has declined since 2001.The change in industry structure has decreased the energy intensity before 1998, but raised the intensity after 1998.Decomposed technological effects for all sectors indicate that technological progresses in high energy consuming industries such as raw chemical materials and chemi-cal products, smelting and pressing of ferrous metals, manufacture of non-metallic mineral products and household contribute are the principal drivers of China's declining energy intensity.

  4. Structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji; Katayama, Shin'ichi; Koyano, Mikio; Ito, Nobuaki

    2013-10-01

    The structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment up to 1,400 °C were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The results indicate that the dehydration and condensation of silanol in opal are very important factors in the structural evolution of heat-treated synthetic opal. Synthetic opal releases water molecules and silanols by heat treatment up to 400 °C, where the dehydration of silanol may lead to the condensation of a new Si-O-Si network comprising a four-membered ring structure of SiO4 tetrahedra, even at 400 °C. Above 600 °C, water molecules are lost and the opal surface and internal silanol molecules are completely dehydrated by heat effect, and the medium-temperature range structure of opal may begin to thermally reconstruct to six-membered rings of SiO4 tetrahedra. Above 1,000 °C, the opal structure almost approaches that of silica glass with an average structure of six-membered rings. Above 1,200 °C, the opal changes to low-cristobalite; however, minor evidence of low-tridymite stacking was evident after heat treatment at 1,400 °C.

  5. Inertial particle focusing in microchannels with gradually changing geometrical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liang-Liang; Yan, Qing; Guo, Jing; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Liang; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The influence of gradually changing geometrical structures on the inertial focusing of particles is systematically investigated by numerical simulations and experiments in this paper. The Saffman lift force, often ignored in the straight microchannel, becomes strong in microchannels with gradually changing geometrical structures, affecting the lateral migration of particles in the microchannels. In comparison with microchannels that have straight and gradually constricting structures, microchannels with gradually expanding structures focus all the particles in a much narrower bandwidth due to the combined effect of the Saffman lift force and the inertial lift force at the appropriate flow rates. Additionally, the influence of the different arrangements of gradually expanding structures on the inertial focusing of particles was also studied. Results suggest that to achieve the single-stream inertial focusing of particles, gradually expanding structures should be designed on one side or symmetrically on two sides of the microchannel. This study is of importance for the better design of the microchannels utilized for the efficient separation and manipulation of particle-related applications, such as microflow cytometry.

  6. Anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using double AlN buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-01-01

    We report the anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using a three-step growth method which consisted of a low temperature AlN buffer layer, followed by a high temperature AlN buffer layer and GaN growth. By introducing double AlN buffer layers, we substantially improve the crystal and optical qualities of semi-polar (11-22) GaN, and significantly reduce the density of stacking faults and dislocations. The high resolution x-ray diffraction measurement revealed that the in-plane anisotropic structural characteristics of GaN layer are azimuthal dependent. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the majority of dislocations in the GaN epitaxial layer grown on m-sapphire are the mixed-type and the orientation of GaN layer was rotated 58.4° against the substrate. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the PL intensity and wavelength have polarization dependence along parallel and perpendicular to the [1-100] axis (polarization degrees ~ 0.63). The realization of a high polarization semi-polar GaN would be useful to achieve III-nitride based lighting emission device for displays and backlighting.

  7. North polar region of Mars: Advances in stratigraphy, structure, and erosional modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.L.; Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Skinner, J.A.; Bourke, M.C.; Fortezzo, C.M.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kolb, E.J.; Okubo, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    We have remapped the geology of the north polar plateau on Mars, Planum Boreum, and the surrounding plains of Vastitas Borealis using altimetry and image data along with thematic maps resulting from observations made by the Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. New and revised geographic and geologic terminologies assist with effectively discussing the various features of this region. We identify 7 geologic units making up Planum Boreum and at least 3 for the circumpolar plains, which collectively span the entire Amazonian Period. The Planum Boreum units resolve at least 6 distinct depositional and 5 erosional episodes. The first major stage of activity includes the Early Amazonian (???3 to 1 Ga) deposition (and subsequent erosion) of the thick (locally exceeding 1000 m) and evenly-layered Rupes Tenuis unit (Abrt), which ultimately formed approximately half of the base of Planum Boreum. As previously suggested, this unit may be sourced by materials derived from the nearby Scandia region, and we interpret that it may correlate with the deposits that regionally underlie pedestal craters in the surrounding lowland plains. The second major episode of activity during the Middle to Late Amazonian (??? features. Some present-day dune fields may be hundreds of kilometers removed from possible sources along the margins of Planum Boreum, and dark materials, comprised of sand sheets, extend even farther downwind. These deposits also attest to the lengthy period of erosion following emplacement of the Planum Boreum 1 unit. We find no evidence for extensive glacial flow, topographic relaxation, or basal melting of Planum Boreum materials. However, minor development of normal faults and wrinkle ridges may suggest differential compaction of materials across buried scarps. Timing relations are poorly-defined mostly because resurfacing and other uncertainties prohibit precise determinations of surface impact crater densities

  8. Effect of Population Structure Change on Carbon Emission in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper expanded the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI model through the introduction of urbanization, residents’ consumption, and other factors, and decomposed carbon emission changes in China into carbon emission factor effect, energy intensity effect, consumption inhibitory factor effect, urbanization effect, residents’ consumption effect, and population scale effect, and then explored contribution rates and action mechanisms of the above six factors on change in carbon emissions in China. Then, the effect of population structure change on carbon emission was analyzed by taking 2003–2012 as a sample period, and combining this with the panel data of 30 provinces in China. Results showed that in 2003–2012, total carbon emission increased by 4.2117 billion tons in China. The consumption inhibitory factor effect, urbanization effect, residents’ consumption effect, and population scale effect promoted the increase in carbon emissions, and their contribution ratios were 27.44%, 12.700%, 74.96%, and 5.90%, respectively. However, the influence of carbon emission factor effect (−2.54% and energy intensity effect (−18.46% on carbon emissions were negative. Population urbanization has become the main population factor which affects carbon emission in China. The “Eastern aggregation” phenomenon caused the population scale effect in the eastern area to be significantly higher than in the central and western regions, but the contribution rate of its energy intensity effect (−11.10 million tons was significantly smaller than in the central (−21.61 million tons and western regions (−13.29 million tons, and the carbon emission factor effect in the central area (−3.33 million tons was significantly higher than that in the eastern (−2.00 million tons and western regions (−1.08 million tons. During the sample period, the change in population age structure, population education structure, and population occupation structure

  9. Spin-dependent structure functions in nuclear matter and the polarized EMC effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloët, I C; Bentz, W; Thomas, A W

    2005-07-29

    An excellent description of both spin-independent and spin-dependent quark distributions and structure functions has been obtained with a modified Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, which is free of unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks--hence incorporating an important aspect of confinement. We utilize this model to investigate nuclear medium modifications to structure functions and find that we are readily able to reproduce both nuclear matter saturation and the experimental F2N(A)/F2N ratio, that is, the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) effect. Applying this framework to determine g1p(A), we find that the ratio g1p(A)/g1p differs significantly from unity, with the quenching caused by the nuclear medium being about twice that of the spin-independent case. This represents an exciting result, which, if confirmed experimentally, will reveal much about the quark structure of nuclear matter.

  10. Depletion of phosphatidylglycerol head-group induces changes in oxygen evolution and protein secondary structures of photosystemⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to explore the roles of polar head-group of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) molecules in the functional and structural aspects of photosystemⅡ(PSⅡ) through enzymatic approach. It was shown that the depletion of PG by treatment of phospholipase C (PLC) on PSⅡ particles caused the inhibition of oxygen evolving activity in PSⅡ. This effect also gave rise to changes in the protein secondary structures of PSⅡ, that is, an increase in α-helical conformation which is compensated by the loss of β-strand structures. It revealed that the head-group of PG molecules plays an important structural role in the maintenance of normal structure of PSⅡ proteins, which is required to maintain the appropriate physiological activity of the PSⅡ complex such as the oxygen evolving activity. It is suggested that there most probably exist hydrogen-bonding interactions between PG molecules and PSⅡ proteins.

  11. Optical and micro-structural characterizations of MBE grown indium gallium nitride polar quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami T.

    2011-12-01

    Comparison between indium rich (27%) InGaN/GaN quantum dots (QDs) and their underlying wetting layer (WL) is performed by means of optical and structural characterizations. With increasing temperature, micro-photoluminescence (μPL) study reveals the superior ability of QDs to prevent carrier thermalization to nearby traps compared to the two dimensional WL. Thus, explaining the higher internal quantum efficiency of the QD nanostructure compared to the higher dimensional WL. Structural characterization (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) reveal an increase in the QD indium content over the WL indium content which is due to strain induced drifts. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. On the binding energies of excitons in polar quantum well structures in a weak electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yun-Feng; Liang Xi-Xia; K. K. Bajaj

    2005-01-01

    The binding energies of excitons in quantum well structures subjected to an applied uniform electric field by taking into account the exciton longitudinal optical phonon interaction is calculated. The binding energies and corresponding Stark shifts for Ⅲ-Ⅴ and Ⅱ-Ⅵ compound semiconductor quantum well structures have been numerically computed.The results for GaAs/AlGaAs and ZnCdSe/ZnSe quantum wells are given and discussed. Theoretical results show that the exciton-phonon coupling reduces both the exciton binding energies and the Stark shifts by screening the Coulomb interaction. This effect is observable experimentally and cannot be neglected.

  13. Muscle structural changes in mitochondrial myopathy relate to genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, David B.; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Ørngreen, Mette C.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that morphological changes at the cellular level occur in muscle of patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but changes in muscle structure with fat infiltration and gross variation of muscle fiber size with giant fibers, normally encountered in the muscular dystrophies, have......, similar to those found in the group of muscular dystrophy patients occurred consistently in patients with a high mutation load for single, largescale deletions of mtDNA, but were absent in all patients with the 3243A-->G mtDNA point mutation. Dystrophic changes of muscle architecture were also present...... typically not been associated with mitochondrial disease. We investigated gross and microscopic muscle morphology in thigh muscles by muscle biopsy and MRI in 16 patients with MM, and compared findings with those obtained in muscular dystrophy patients and healthy subjects. Changes of muscle architecture...

  14. Ownership Structure and Earnings Management in periods of Executive Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Rasmus S.

    This paper reports evidence of earnings management associated with non-routine executive changes in a Danish context. It is hypothesised that incoming executives in non-owner-controlled companies decrease earnings by means of discretionary accruals in the financial statements relating to the period...... this is not the case for owner-controlled companies. Also, a test shows a significant difference in earnings management in owner- versus non-owner-controlled companies around executive changes. The study elaborates on the research in the area by including ownership structure. Furthermore, the study is carried out...... of the executive change. A modified, modified Jones model is used to divide income before tax into discretionary and non-discretionary components. The empirical evidence is consistent with the hypothesis. Non-owner-controlled companies significantly decrease earnings around executive changes, while...

  15. Frequency effects and structural change - the Afrikaans preterite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanita Kirsten

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available According to emergent grammar and exemplar theory in cognitive linguistics, the frequency of an item affects its behaviour in terms of structural change. In this article, I illustrate how high frequency items, such as preterital modal auxiliaries and copulas in Afrikaans, resist regularising with the rest of the Afrikaans verbal system. Items with a moderately high frequency can resist change for a time, but succumb to it eventually, such as mog (“might” and wis (“knew”. While the course of change can also be affected by other factors, such as het (“have” and had (“had”, and dink (“think” and gedink/dag/dog (“thought” show, the data in diachronic Afrikaans corpora from 1911 to 2010 confirm that high frequency items resist structural change to a large extent, while low frequency items do not. This links with the cognitive representation of language and language processing, and illustrates how the use of language shapes the structure of language.

  16. Developmental changes in organization of structural brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khundrakpam, Budhachandra S; Reid, Andrew; Brauer, Jens; Carbonell, Felix; Lewis, John; Ameis, Stephanie; Karama, Sherif; Lee, Junki; Chen, Zhang; Das, Samir; Evans, Alan C

    2013-09-01

    Recent findings from developmental neuroimaging studies suggest that the enhancement of cognitive processes during development may be the result of a fine-tuning of the structural and functional organization of brain with maturation. However, the details regarding the developmental trajectory of large-scale structural brain networks are not yet understood. Here, we used graph theory to examine developmental changes in the organization of structural brain networks in 203 normally growing children and adolescents. Structural brain networks were constructed using interregional correlations in cortical thickness for 4 age groups (early childhood: 4.8-8.4 year; late childhood: 8.5-11.3 year; early adolescence: 11.4-14.7 year; late adolescence: 14.8-18.3 year). Late childhood showed prominent changes in topological properties, specifically a significant reduction in local efficiency, modularity, and increased global efficiency, suggesting a shift of topological organization toward a more random configuration. An increase in number and span of distribution of connector hubs was found in this age group. Finally, inter-regional connectivity analysis and graph-theoretic measures indicated early maturation of primary sensorimotor regions and protracted development of higher order association and paralimbic regions. Our finding reveals a time window of plasticity occurring during late childhood which may accommodate crucial changes during puberty and the new developmental tasks that an adolescent faces.

  17. Developmental Changes in Organization of Structural Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khundrakpam, Budhachandra S.; Reid, Andrew; Brauer, Jens; Carbonell, Felix; Lewis, John; Ameis, Stephanie; Karama, Sherif; Lee, Junki; Chen, Zhang; Das, Samir; Evans, Alan C.; Ball, William S.; Byars, Anna Weber; Schapiro, Mark; Bommer, Wendy; Carr, April; German, April; Dunn, Scott; Rivkin, Michael J.; Waber, Deborah; Mulkern, Robert; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Chiverton, Abigail; Davis, Peter; Koo, Julie; Marmor, Jacki; Mrakotsky, Christine; Robertson, Richard; McAnulty, Gloria; Brandt, Michael E.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Kramer, Larry A.; Yang, Grace; McCormack, Cara; Hebert, Kathleen M.; Volero, Hilda; Botteron, Kelly; McKinstry, Robert C.; Warren, William; Nishino, Tomoyuki; Robert Almli, C.; Todd, Richard; Constantino, John; McCracken, James T.; Levitt, Jennifer; Alger, Jeffrey; O'Neil, Joseph; Toga, Arthur; Asarnow, Robert; Fadale, David; Heinichen, Laura; Ireland, Cedric; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Moss, Edward; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Bintliff, Brooke; Bradford, Ruth; Newman, Janice; Evans, Alan C.; Arnaoutelis, Rozalia; Bruce Pike, G.; Louis Collins, D.; Leonard, Gabriel; Paus, Tomas; Zijdenbos, Alex; Das, Samir; Fonov, Vladimir; Fu, Luke; Harlap, Jonathan; Leppert, Ilana; Milovan, Denise; Vins, Dario; Zeffiro, Thomas; Van Meter, John; Lange, Nicholas; Froimowitz, Michael P.; Botteron, Kelly; Robert Almli, C.; Rainey, Cheryl; Henderson, Stan; Nishino, Tomoyuki; Warren, William; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Dubois, Diane; Smith, Karla; Singer, Tish; Wilber, Aaron A.; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Basser, Peter J.; Chang, Lin-Ching; Koay, Chen Guan; Walker, Lindsay; Freund, Lisa; Rumsey, Judith; Baskir, Lauren; Stanford, Laurence; Sirocco, Karen; Gwinn-Hardy, Katrina; Spinella, Giovanna; McCracken, James T.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Levitt, Jennifer; O'Neill, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings from developmental neuroimaging studies suggest that the enhancement of cognitive processes during development may be the result of a fine-tuning of the structural and functional organization of brain with maturation. However, the details regarding the developmental trajectory of large-scale structural brain networks are not yet understood. Here, we used graph theory to examine developmental changes in the organization of structural brain networks in 203 normally growing children and adolescents. Structural brain networks were constructed using interregional correlations in cortical thickness for 4 age groups (early childhood: 4.8–8.4 year; late childhood: 8.5–11.3 year; early adolescence: 11.4–14.7 year; late adolescence: 14.8–18.3 year). Late childhood showed prominent changes in topological properties, specifically a significant reduction in local efficiency, modularity, and increased global efficiency, suggesting a shift of topological organization toward a more random configuration. An increase in number and span of distribution of connector hubs was found in this age group. Finally, inter-regional connectivity analysis and graph-theoretic measures indicated early maturation of primary sensorimotor regions and protracted development of higher order association and paralimbic regions. Our finding reveals a time window of plasticity occurring during late childhood which may accommodate crucial changes during puberty and the new developmental tasks that an adolescent faces. PMID:22784607

  18. Dynamic structures of intact chicken erythrocyte chromatins as studied by 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, H; Nishimoto, S; Kyogoku, Y

    1994-08-01

    The dynamic properties of DNA in intact chicken erythrocyte cells, nuclei, nondigested chromatins, digested soluble chromatins, H1, H5-depleted soluble chromatins and nucleosome cores were investigated by means of single-pulse and 1H-31P cross-polarization NMR. The temperature dependence of the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy was identical for the former three in the presence of 3 mM MgCl2, suggesting that the local higher order structure is identical for these chromatins. The intrinsic phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy of the nucleosome cores was -159 ppm. The chemical shift anisotropy of DNA in the chromatins can be further averaged by the motion of the linker DNA. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame of the proton spins (T1p) of the nondigested chromatins was measured at various locking fields. The result was analyzed on the assumption of the isotropic motion to get a rough value of the correlation time of the motion efficient for the relaxation, which was eventually ascribed to the segmental motion of the linker DNA with restricted amplitude. The 30 nm filament structure induced by NaCl was shown to be dynamically different from that induced by MgCl2. Side-by-side compaction of 30-nm filaments was suggested to be induced in the MgCl2 concentration range higher than 0.3 mM. Biological significance of the dynamic structure was discussed in connection with the results obtained.

  19. The shallow benthic food web structure in the high Arctic does not follow seasonal changes in the surrounding environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędra, Monika; Kuliński, Karol; Walkusz, Wojciech; Legeżyńska, Joanna

    2012-12-01

    Seasonality, quality and quantity of food resources strongly affect fitness and survival of polar fauna. Most research conducted in polar areas has been carried out during the summer, rarely including aspects of seasonality; therefore, there are gaps in our knowledge of the structure of food webs in the Arctic, particularly information is lacking on the possible shifts in winter feeding strategies of organisms. This study is the first to compare potential shifts in benthic food-web structure between winter and summer in a shallow-water Arctic fjord (Kongsfjorden, Svalbard). Winter data were collected in March when conditions are representative of winter and when Arctic shallow benthic fauna is likely to be most affected by absence of fresh food supply as opposed to summer (August). Samples of particulate suspended organic matter (POM), settled organic matter, surface sediment and benthic organisms were taken and analyzed for stable isotopes signatures (δ13C and δ15N). Four relative trophic levels (TL) were distinguished in both winter and summer, and no differences in the structure of benthic food web were found between seasons. Our study shows that the shallow sublittoral benthos depends on primary production, fresh and reworked settled organic matter and, to a certain degree, on terrestrial input. We also demonstrate that shallow water polar benthic fauna is characterized by a high level of omnivory and feeds at multiple trophic levels showing strong resilience to changing seasonal conditions.

  20. Stress reduction correlates with structural changes in the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Britta K; Carmody, James; Evans, Karleyton C; Hoge, Elizabeth A; Dusek, Jeffery A; Morgan, Lucas; Pitman, Roger K; Lazar, Sara W

    2010-03-01

    Stress has significant adverse effects on health and is a risk factor for many illnesses. Neurobiological studies have implicated the amygdala as a brain structure crucial in stress responses. Whereas hyperactive amygdala function is often observed during stress conditions, cross-sectional reports of differences in gray matter structure have been less consistent. We conducted a longitudinal MRI study to investigate the relationship between changes in perceived stress with changes in amygdala gray matter density following a stress-reduction intervention. Stressed but otherwise healthy individuals (N = 26) participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention. Perceived stress was rated on the perceived stress scale (PSS) and anatomical MR images were acquired pre- and post-intervention. PSS change was used as the predictive regressor for changes in gray matter density within the bilateral amygdalae. Following the intervention, participants reported significantly reduced perceived stress. Reductions in perceived stress correlated positively with decreases in right basolateral amygdala gray matter density. Whereas prior studies found gray matter modifications resulting from acquisition of abstract information, motor and language skills, this study demonstrates that neuroplastic changes are associated with improvements in a psychological state variable.

  1. Effect of spin polarization on the structural properties and bond hardness of Fe$_x$B ($x = 1, 2, 3$) compounds first-principles study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AHMED GUEDDOUH; BACHIR BENTRIA; IBN KHALDOUN LEFKAIER; YAHIA BOUROUROU

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, spin and non-spin polarization (SP, NSP) are performed to study structural properties and bond hardness of Fe$_x$B ($x = 1, 2, 3$) compounds using density functional theory (DFT) within generalized gradientapproximation (GGA) to evaluate the effect of spin polarization on these properties. The non-spin-polarization results show that the non-magnetic state (NM) is less stable thermodynamically for Fe$_x$B compounds than spinpolarization by the calculated cohesive energy and formation enthalpy. Spin-polarization calculations show that ferromagnetic state (FM) is stable for FexB structures and carry magnetic moment of 1.12, 1.83 and 2.03 $\\mu$B inFeB, Fe$_2$B and Fe$_3$B, respectively. The calculated lattice parameters, bulk modulus and magnetic moments agree well with experimental and other theoretical results. Significant differences in volume and in bulk modulus werefound between the ferromagnetic and non-magnetic cases, i.e., 6.8, 32.8, respectively.We predict the critical pressure between ferromagnetic and non-magnetic phases. The model for hardness calculation using Mulliken population coupled to semi-empirical hardness theory proved effective in hardness prediction for the metal borides which agree well with the experimental values. These results would help to gain insight into the spin-polarized effect on the structural and bond hardness.

  2. Changes in Mauna Kea Dry Forest Structure 2000-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banko, Paul C.; Brinck, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the structure of the subalpine vegetation of Palila Critical Habitat on the southwestern slope of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawai‘i, were analyzed using 12 metrics of change in māmane (Sophora chrysophylla) and naio (Myoporum sandwicense) trees surveyed on plots in 2000 and 2014. These two dominant species were analyzed separately, and changes in their structure indicated changes in the forest’s health. There was a significant increase in māmane minimum crown height (indicating a higher ungulate “browse line”), canopy area, canopy volume, percentage of trees with ungulate damage, and percentage of dead trees. No significant changes were observed in māmane maximum crown height, proportion of plots with trees, sapling density, proportion of plots with saplings, or the height distribution of trees. The only significant positive change was for māmane tree density. Significantly negative changes were observed for naio minimum crown height, tree height, canopy area, canopy volume, and percentage of dead trees. No significant changes were observed in naio tree density, proportion of plots with trees, proportion of plots with saplings, or percentage of trees with ungulate damage. Significantly positive changes were observed in naio sapling density and the height distribution of trees. There was also a significant increase in the proportion of māmane vs. naio trees in the survey area. The survey methods did not allow us to distinguish among potential factors driving these changes for metrics other than the percentage of trees with ungulate damage. Continued ungulate browsing and prolonged drought are likely the factors contributing most to the observed changes in vegetation, but tree disease or insect infestation of māmane, or naio, and competition from alien grasses and other weeds could also be causing or exacerbating the impacts to the forest. Although māmane tree density has increased since 2000, this study also demonstrates that efforts by managers

  3. CERN's new Career Structure Main Changes in a Nutshell

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    All Staff Members will have received an official notification of their position in the new career path structure, with effect from 1 September 2001. A Weekly Bulletin announcement two weeks ago (Bulletin 33/2001) referred to documents and contacts for individual or general information, notably via the HR Division Web site (see below). The present article summarises the main changes between the MOAS and the MAPS (Merit Advancement and Promotion Scheme). The aim of MAPS is to make the career structure more dynamic, while retaining positive elements of the MOAS scheme, notably an annual interview and performance assessment process. The main changes are: - Career reviews including salary band promotion at several stages in a person's career replace the previous automatic grade-to-grade progression within a career path. - Speeds of advancement can be modulated to a greater extent. - The exceptional advancement zone is re-designed. - Premiums or allowances linked to performance, responsibility, and specific labou...

  4. Structural and magnetic changes on annealing permalloy/copper multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulthorpe, B.D.; Hase, T.P.A. E-mail: t.p.a.hase@dur.ac.uk; Tanner, B.K.; Marrows, C.H.; Hickey, B.J

    2001-05-01

    Thin-film powder diffraction and in situ grazing incidence X-ray scattering have been used to determine the structural changes that occur during annealing of permalloy/copper multilayers. We show that the enhanced stability in the magnetotransport properties of multilayers doped with cobalt at the interfaces correlates with reduced interdiffusion. The development of a long correlation length conformal roughness during annealing is observed.

  5. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  6. Change in fish community structure in the Barents Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Aschan

    Full Text Available Change in oceanographic conditions causes structural alterations in marine fish communities, but this effect may go undetected as most monitoring programs until recently mainly have focused on oceanography and commercial species rather than on whole ecosystems. In this paper, the objective is to describe the spatial and temporal changes in the Barents Sea fish community in the period 1992-2004 while taking into consideration the observed abundance and biodiversity patterns for all 82 observed fish species. We found that the spatial structure of the Barents Sea fish community was determined by abiotic factors such as temperature and depth. The observed species clustered into a deep assemblage, a warm water southern assemblage, both associated with Atlantic water, and a cold water north-eastern assemblage associated with mixed water. The latitude of the cold water NE and warm water S assemblages varied from year to year, but no obvious northward migration was observed over time. In the period 1996-1999 we observed a significant reduction in total fish biomass, abundance, mean fish weight, and a change in community structure including an increase in the pelagic/demersal ratio. This change in community structure is probably due to extremely cold conditions in 1996 impacting on a fish community exposed to historically high fishing rates. After 1999 the fish community variables such as biomass, abundance, mean weight, P/D ratio as well as community composition did not return to levels of the early 90s, although fishing pressure and climatic conditions returned to earlier levels.

  7. Strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2012-04-17

    Density functional theory calculations (DFT) are used to investigate the strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of biaxially strained (parallel to the (001), (110) and (111) planes) and uniaxially strained (along the [001], [110] and [111] directions) germanium (Ge). It is calculated that a moderate uniaxial strain parallel to the [111] direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with a bandgap energy useful for technological applications. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. THE EFFECT OF IRRADIATION ON ENAMEL MICRO-STRUCTURE CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    Harun Gunawan; Sri Angky Soekanto; Safrida Hoesin

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of head and neck carcinoma therapy. The radiation dose ranges from 40 – 70 Gy, depends on the severity and location of the malignancy. Many patients experience an increased dental caries or sensitivity occurrence following radiotherapy. The objective of this study is to analyze the enamel micro-structure changes after irradiation. Nine polished enamel slabs were prepared from impacted 3rd molars. The slabs were flushed in non-ionic distil...

  9. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakravarty

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U and bound (B forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA, secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69% of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered residues in the U form which are observed (ordered in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial.

  10. Structural Change and Economic Development in China and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Valli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The comparison of the periods of rapid economic growth in China since 1978 and India since 1992 markedly show different patterns of development and structural change. However, both countries experienced some advantages of "relative economic backwardness" and some aspects of the "fordist model of growth". China had an anticipated and deeper structural change, spurred mainly by economic reforms and the growth of the internal market in the 1980s, and, since the mid-1990s, by a very rapid penetration of its industrial products in the world market. However, a substantial part of China's exports in medium and high tech sectors are due to joint-ventures with foreign multinationals. India had a more balanced structural change and a slower insertion in the world market, although some sectors, such as software, steel, automotive and pharmaceuticals are recently increasing their share in the world markets. Owing to the huge number of micro-enterprises and the great size of the informal sector, India benefited much less than China from the economies of scale and from the third wave of the "fordist model of growth". Both countries, but in particular China, experienced negative externalities of this recent phase of rapid growth, such as higher inequalities, pollution and urban congestion.

  11. Structural change in molten basalt at deep mantle conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Drewitt, James W E; Konôpková, Zuzana; Dalladay-Simpson, Philip; Morton, Donna M; Rai, Nachiketa; van Westrenen, Wim; Morgenroth, Wolfgang

    2013-11-07

    Silicate liquids play a key part at all stages of deep Earth evolution, ranging from core and crust formation billions of years ago to present-day volcanic activity. Quantitative models of these processes require knowledge of the structural changes and compression mechanisms that take place in liquid silicates at the high pressures and temperatures in the Earth's interior. However, obtaining such knowledge has long been impeded by the challenging nature of the experiments. In recent years, structural and density information for silica glass was obtained at record pressures of up to 100 GPa (ref. 1), a major step towards obtaining data on the molten state. Here we report the structure of molten basalt up to 60 GPa by means of in situ X-ray diffraction. The coordination of silicon increases from four under ambient conditions to six at 35 GPa, similar to what has been reported in silica glass. The compressibility of the melt after the completion of the coordination change is lower than at lower pressure, implying that only a high-order equation of state can accurately describe the density evolution of silicate melts over the pressure range of the whole mantle. The transition pressure coincides with a marked change in the pressure-evolution of nickel partitioning between molten iron and molten silicates, indicating that melt compressibility controls siderophile-element partitioning.

  12. Ion induced changes in the structure of bordered pit membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinkee; Holbrook, N Michele; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2012-01-01

    Ion-mediated changes in xylem hydraulic resistance are hypothesized to result from hydrogel like properties of pectins located in the bordered pit membranes separating adjacent xylem vessels. Although the kinetics of the ion-mediated changes in hydraulic resistance are consistent with the swelling/deswelling behavior of pectins, there is no direct evidence of this activity. In this report we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate structural changes in bordered pit membranes associated with changes in the ionic concentration of the surrounding solution. When submerged in de-ionized water, AFM revealed bordered pit membranes as relatively smooth, soft, and lacking any sharp edges surface, in contrast to pictures from scanning electron microscope (SEM) or AFM performed on air-dry material. Exposure of the bordered pit membranes to 50 mM KCl solution resulted in significant changes in both surface physical properties and elevation features. Specifically, bordered pit membranes became harder and the fiber edges were clearly visible. In addition, the membrane contracted and appeared much rougher due to exposed microfibers. In neither solution was there any evidence of discrete pores through the membrane whose dimensions were altered in response to the ionic composition of the surrounding solution. Instead the variable hydraulic resistance appears to involve changes in the both the permeability and the thickness of the pit membrane.

  13. Ion induced changes in the structure of bordered pit membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkee eLee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Xylem hydraulic resistance varies with ion concentration in sap solution. It is assumed that this variation in resistance results from hydrogel like properties of pectins located in bordered pit membranes separating adjacent vessels. Although kinetics of the resistance change suggests swelling/deswelling behavior of the pectins, there is no direct evidence of this activity. In this report we provide evidence of structural changes in bordered pit membranes responding to variation in ionic concentration of solute around it using atomic force microscopy (AFM. AFM revealed bordered pit membranes as relatively smooth, soft and lacking any sharp edges surface when submerged in de-ionized water, in contrast to pictures from scanning electron microscope (SEM or AFM performed on air dry material. Exposure of the bordered pit membranes to 50 mM KCl solution resulted in significant changes in both surface physical properties with and elevation features as bordered pit membrane became harder, with visible edges of fibers and collapsed, while no change in porosity was observed. Analysis suggests a need for a major shift in our understanding to the physical bases of variable xylem resistance from change in porosity to change in pathway length. Findings support the role of actuating properties of hybrid hydrogel-cellulose materials in water redistribution and embolism resistance.

  14. Community structure changes of macrobenthos in the South Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junlong; XU Fengshan; LIU Ruiyu

    2012-01-01

    The ecological environment in the Yellow Sea has changed greatly from the 1950s to 1990s and this has had significant impact on marine organisms.In this study,data on soft-sediment macrobenthos occurring in depths from 25 m to 81 m in the South Yellow Sea were used to compare changes in community structure.The agglomerative classification (CLUSTER) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) methods were applied.Five communities were recognized by cluster analysis:1.The Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass community dominated by cold water species,which changed slightly in species composition since the 1950s; 2.The mixed community with the coexistence of cold water species and warm water species,as had been reported previously; 3.The polychaete-dominated eurythermal community in which the composition changed considerably as some dominant species disappeared or decreased; 4.The Changjiang (Yangtze) River Estuarine community,with some typical estuarine species; 5.The community affected by the Yellow Sea Warm Current.The greatest change occurred in the coastal area,which indicated that the change may be caused by human activities.Macrobenthos in the central region remained almost unchanged,particularly the cold water species shielded by the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass.The depth,temperature and median grain size of sediments were important factors affecting the distributions of macrobenthos in the South Yellow Sea.

  15. Recent COMPASS results on the polarized structure function $g_{1}^{d}$ of the deuteron

    CERN Document Server

    Quintans, Catarina

    2007-01-01

    The study of the spin dependent structure functions of the deuteron is part of a broad physics program addressed by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN. The longitudinal spin asymmetry $A^{d}_{1}$ is evaluated from data on inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarised muons off a large $^{6}$LiD polarised target. Recent results on $g^{d}_{1}$ both for low and high Q$^{2}$ are presented. The obtained values for the first moment $\\Gamma^{d}_{1}$ and the flavor-singlet axial current $a_{0}$ are also shown.

  16. QED Correction to Asymmetry for Polarized ep Scattering from the Method of Electron Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Igor Akushevich; Nikolai Merenkov

    2004-03-01

    The electron structure function method is applied to calculate model-independent radiative corrections to an asymmetry of electron-proton scattering. The representations for both spin-independent and spin-dependent parts of the cross-section are derived. Master formulae take into account the leading corrections in all orders and the main contribution of the second order next-to-leading ones and have accuracy at the level of one per mille. Numerical calculations illustrate our analytical results for both elastic and deep inelastic events.

  17. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon cross-polarized two-color double-fs-pulse irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhm, S., E-mail: hoehm@mbi-berlin.de.de [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Straße 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krüger, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und–prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Bonse, J., E-mail: joern.bonse@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und–prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LIPSS formation on fused silica is studied upon cross-polarized two-color (400 and 800 nm) double-fs-pulse irradiation. • LIPSS orientation follows the polarization of the first pulse. • LIPSS periods are determined by the wavelength of the first pulse. • LIPSS area is increased for temporally overlapping pulses due to nonlinear absorption. - Abstract: The dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration) is studied by cross-polarized two-color double-fs-pulse experiments. In order to analyze the relevance of temporally distributed energy deposition in the early stage of LIPSS formation, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used for generating multiple double-pulse sequences at two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm). The inter-pulse delay between the individual cross-polarized pulses of each sequence was systematically varied in the sub-ps range and the resulting LIPSS morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the polarization of the first laser pulse arriving to the surface determines the orientation and the periodicity of the LIPSS. These two-color experiments further confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface for LIPSS formation, particularly by the first laser pulse of each sequence. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSS characteristics (period, orientation)

  18. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure: effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, P.

    2015-11-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an "effective" quiet day level (QDC) composed of a "basic" QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (By) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF By-related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m-1). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF Bz (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m-1 during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20 % during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  19. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure. Effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauning, P. [Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an ''effective'' quiet day level (QDC) composed of a ''basic'' QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (B{sub y}) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF B{sub y}-related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m{sup -1}). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF B{sub z} (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m{sup -1} during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20% during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  20. Landscape Structure Changes in Liangshui Nature Reserve, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Jianzhi; Gao Jiarong; Wang Fengyou

    2003-01-01

    This paper systematically studied the landscape dynamic changes in Liangshui Natural Reserve (LNR) in Heilongiang Province, northeast China during three periods (1950s, 1970s and 1990s), by applying landscape space modelMarkov model. The results indicated that the landscape structure in LNR changed and the types of landscape patches increased. The phenomena of increasing and reducing of landscape types happened at the same time and the matrix- natural Pinus koraiensis decreased year by year. The law of transformation of landscape types matches well with the results concluded from statistical data,survey data, and the developing process inherent succession of the forest. By analyzing landscape dynamic changes, some scientific management measures were put forward in this paper.

  1. Detection of Structural Damage Through Changes in Frequency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hong-ping; HE Bo; CHEN Xiao-qiang

    2005-01-01

    Among all the structural vibration characteristics, natural frequencies are relatively simple and accurate to measure, and provide the structural global damage information. In this paper, the feasibility of using only natural frequencies to identify structural damage is exploited by adopting two usual approaches, namely, sensitivity analysis and neural networks. Some aspects of damage detection such as the problem of incomplete modal test data and robustness of detection are considered. A laboratory tested 3-storey frame is used to demonstrate the possibility of frequency-based damage detection techniques. The numerical results show that the damaged element can be correctly localized and the content of damage can be identified with relatively high degree of accuracy by using the changes in frequencies.

  2. Color change of the snapper (Pagrus auratus) and Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) skin and eyes during storage: effect of light polarization and contact with ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Murat O; Stewart, Kelsie; Fletcher, Graham C; Alçiçek, Zayde

    2014-12-01

    Ten gurnard and 10 snapper were stored on ice. One side always contacted the ice; the other side was always exposed to air. At different intervals for up to 12 d, the fish were placed in a light box, and the images of both sides were taken using polarized and nonpolarized illumination. Image analysis resulted in average L*, a*, and b* values of skin, and average L* values of the eyes. The skin L* value of gurnard changed significantly over time while that of snapper was substantially constant. The a* and b* values of both fish decreased over time. The L* values of eyes were significantly lower for polarized images, and significantly lower for the side of fish exposed to air only. This may be a concern in quality evaluation methods such as QIM. The difference of colors between the polarized and nonpolarized images was calculated to quantify the reflection off the surface of fish. For accurate measurement of surface color and eye color, use of polarized light is recommended.

  3. In-Situ Measurements of Changes in Stratospheric Aerosol and the N2O - Aerosol Relationship inside and outside of the Polar Vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, S.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Brock, C. A.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Ferry, G. V.; Barr, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two optical particle counters on the ER-2, together covering a particle size diameter range from 0.1 micrometers to 23 micrometers, were used to measure the aerosol bulk quantities integral number, aerosol surface and volume, as well as detailed size distributions inside and outside of the polar vortex in the lower stratosphere. While AASE I (Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition, (Dec. 1988 - Feb. 1989) was conducted in a period of relative volcanic quiescence, enhancements in aerosol number, surface and volume of factors around 10, 25 and 100 were observed during AASE II (Aug. 1991 - Mar. 1992) due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The changes in these bulk quantities as well as in the size distributions measured both outside and inside the the polar vortex are presented and compared with those obtained in polar stratospheric cloud events (AASE I). Except for a shift towards larger aerosol mixing ratios the general shape of correlograms between the measured N2O and particle mixing ratios remain similar before and after the eruption. Similar correlograms are used to interpret data from vertical profiles inside and outside of the polar vortex.

  4. The Case for Tetrahedral Oxy-subhydride (TOSH Structures in the Exclusion Zones of Anchored Polar Solvents Including Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Oehr

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize a mechanistic model of how negatively-charged exclusion zones (EZs are created. While the growth of EZs is known to be associated with the absorption of ambient photonic energy, the molecular dynamics giving rise to this process need greater elucidation. We believe they arise due to the formation of oxy-subhydride structures (OH−(H2O4 with a tetrahedral (sp3 (OH−(H2O3 core. Five experimental data sets derived by previous researchers were assessed in this regard: (1 water-derived EZ light absorbance at specific infrared wavelengths, (2 EZ negative potential in water and ethanol, (3 maximum EZ light absorbance at 270 nm ultraviolet wavelength, (4 ability of dimethyl sulphoxide but not ether to form an EZ, and (5 transitory nature of melting ice derived EZs. The proposed tetrahedral oxy-subhydride structures (TOSH appear to adequately account for all of the experimental evidence derived from water or other polar solvents.

  5. Local structures of polar wurtzites Zn1-xMgxO studied by raman and 67Zn/25Mg NMR spectroscopies and by total neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proffen, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yiung- Il [UCSB; Cadars, Sylvian [UCSB; Shayib, Ramzy [UCSB; Feigerle, Charles S [UNIV OF TENNESSEE; Chmelka, Bradley F [UCSB; Seshadri, Ram [UCSB

    2008-01-01

    Research in the area of polar semiconductor heterostructures has been growing rapidly, driven in large part by interest in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems. 2DEGs are known to form at heterojunction interfaces that bear polarization gradients. They can display extremely high electron mobilities, especially at low temperatures, owing to spatial confinement of carrier motions. Recent reports of 2DEG behaviors in Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N/GaN and Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO heterostructures have great significance for the development of quantum Hall devices and novel high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). 2DEG structures are usually designed by interfacing a polar semiconductor with its less or more polar alloys in an epitaxial manner. Since the quality of the 2DEG depends critically on interface perfection, as well as the polarization gradient at the heterojunction, understanding compositional and structural details of the parent and alloy semiconductors is an important component in 2DEG design and fabrication. Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO is one of the most promising heterostructure types for studies of 2DEGs, due to the large polarization of ZnO, the relatively small lattice mismatch, and the large conduction band offsets in the Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO heterointerface. Although 2DEG formation in Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O/ZnO heterostructures have been researched for some time, a clear understanding of the alloy structure of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O is currently lacking. Here, we conduct a detailed and more precise study of the local structure of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O alloys using Raman and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in conjunction with neutron diffraction techniques.

  6. Structural change in the petroleum activities; Strukturendringer i petroleumsvirksomheten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    The report is twofold. First it is described a reference situation for the petroleum industry based on qualitative and quantitative parameters. The purpose of this section is to form a basis of a future observation can be assessed. Then referred the views and reviews a wide range of stake holders in the industry has about how the structures in the petroleum industry will evolve in the years ahead. The views and reviews that are reproduced are from players in the petroleum industry itself, represented by 48 companies and organizations, and are not the views or opinions of Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. Participants' attention is mainly focused on how StatoilHydro will affect the industry, but it is also a general perception that there are many other factors that are just as important for how the industry will evolve in the long term. Participants' views will help to identify trends that may affect the player image. The project is not intended to constitute a strategy for or how to accommodate structural changes in the petroleum industry. The report discusses not systematically the structural changes that will be positive or negative for the industry and proposes no measures that will affect them. In Chapter 5, however, rendered what the various players in the interview rounds have proposed measures to counter the various structural changes. Finally touches the report not the significance of structural changes in the industry may have on health, safety and environment (HSE) in activity. The views and reviews from the players were passed in 2008, before the problems in the financial industry gained a considerable extent. Data and forecasts are also prepared during this period. Reviews in the report were accordingly given before one learned about the extent of the economic development and are not revised in the afterwards. Ministry of Petroleum and Energy will in the years ahead have to have a continuous attention to the issues described in this report. It

  7. Spin-polarized electronic structure of the Ni(001) surface and thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Madsen, J.; Andersen, O. K.

    1982-01-01

    of the five-layer film is used to calculate the electronic structure of a 13-layer film. The theoretical work function of 5.4 eV agrees well with the experimental value of 5.2 eV. The calculated spin moments are ordered ferromagnetically in all the films considered, and the moments of the atoms in the surface...... layer are 0.95, 0.69, and 0.65 Bohr magnetons for the one-, three-, and five-layer films, respectively. The moment of an atom in the central layer of the five-layer film is 0.61 Bohr magnetons as compared with the calculated (experimental) bulk value of 0.59±0.01 (0.56) Bohr magnetons. The increase...

  8. Spiral Passive Electromagnetic Sensor (SPES) for composite structural changes in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iervolino, Onorio; Meo, Michele

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of structural health monitoring (SHM) is to provide accurate and responsive detection and monitoring of flaws. This research work reports an investigation of SPES sensors for damage detection, investigating different sensor sizes and how they affect the sensor's signal. A sensor able to monitor structural change that can be remotely interrogated and does not need a power supply is presented in this work. The SPES-sensor presents the great advantage of monitoring conductive and non-conductive structures such as fiberglass-reinforced composites (FRC) and carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). Any phenomena that affect the magnetic field of the SPES can be detected and monitored. A study was conducted to investigate the capability of sensor to give information on structural changes, simulated by the presence of an external mass placed in the proximity of sensor. Effect of different positions of the SPES within the sample, and how to extend the area of inspection using multiple sensors was investigated. The sensor was tested embedded in the samples, simulating the structural change on both sides of the sample. In both configurations the sensor described herein demonstrated a great potential to monitor structural changes.

  9. White matter structure changes as adults learn a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Alexander A; Rudelson, Justin J; Tse, Peter U

    2012-08-01

    Traditional models hold that the plastic reorganization of brain structures occurs mainly during childhood and adolescence, leaving adults with limited means to learn new knowledge and skills. Research within the last decade has begun to overturn this belief, documenting changes in the brain's gray and white matter as healthy adults learn simple motor and cognitive skills [Lövdén, M., Bodammer, N. C., Kühn, S., Kaufmann, J., Schütze, H., Tempelmann, C., et al. Experience-dependent plasticity of white-matter microstructure extends into old age. Neuropsychologia, 48, 3878-3883, 2010; Taubert, M., Draganski, B., Anwander, A., Müller, K., Horstmann, A., Villringer, A., et al. Dynamic properties of human brain structure: Learning-related changes in cortical areas and associated fiber connections. The Journal of Neuroscience, 30, 11670-11677, 2010; Scholz, J., Klein, M. C., Behrens, T. E. J., & Johansen-Berg, H. Training induces changes in white-matter architecture. Nature Neuroscience, 12, 1370-1371, 2009; Draganski, B., Gaser, C., Busch, V., Schuirer, G., Bogdahn, U., & May, A. Changes in grey matter induced by training. Nature, 427, 311-312, 2004]. Although the significance of these changes is not fully understood, they reveal a brain that remains plastic well beyond early developmental periods. Here we investigate the role of adult structural plasticity in the complex, long-term learning process of foreign language acquisition. We collected monthly diffusion tensor imaging scans of 11 English speakers who took a 9-month intensive course in written and spoken Modern Standard Chinese as well as from 16 control participants who did not study a language. We show that white matter reorganizes progressively across multiple sites as adults study a new language. Language learners exhibited progressive changes in white matter tracts associated with traditional left hemisphere language areas and their right hemisphere analogs. Surprisingly, the most significant changes

  10. Structure and chemical reactivity of the polar three-fold surfaces of GaPd: a density-functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajčí, M; Hafner, J

    2013-03-28

    The polar threefold surfaces of the GaPd compound crystallizing in the B20 (FeSi-type) structure (space group P2(1)3) have been investigated using density-functional methods. Because of the lack of inversion symmetry the B20 structure exists in two enantiomorphic forms denoted as A and B. The threefold {111} surfaces have polar character. In both nonequivalent (111) and (111) directions several surface terminations differing in structure and chemical composition are possible. The formation of the threefold surfaces has been studied by simulated cleavage experiments and by calculations of the surface energies. Because of the polar character of the threefold surfaces calculations for stoichiometric slabs permit only the determination of the average energy of the surfaces exposed on both sides of the slab. Calculations for nonstoichiometric slabs performed in the grand canonical ensemble yield differences of the surface energies for the possible terminations as a function of the chemical potential in the reactive atmosphere above the surface and predict a transition between Ga- and Pd-terminated surfaces as a function of the chemical potential. The {100} surfaces are stoichiometric and uniquely defined. The calculated surface energies are identical to the average energies of the {100} surfaces of the pure metals. The {210} surfaces are also stoichiometric, with an energy very close to that of the {100} surfaces. Assuming that for the {111} surfaces the energies of different possible terminations are in a proportion equal to that of the concentration-weighted energies of the {111} surfaces of the pure metals, surface energies for all possible {111} terminations may be calculated. The preferable termination perpendicular to the A direction consists of a bilayer with three Ga atoms in the upper and three Pd atoms in the lower part. The surface energy of this termination further decreases if the Pd triplet is covered by additional Ga atom. Perpendicular to the A direction

  11. Correlation between stoichiometry and surface structure of the polar MgAl2O4(100) surface as a function of annealing temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Nørregaard; Rasmussen, Morten Karstoft; Knudsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between surface structure, stoichiometry and atomic occupancy of the polar MgAl2O4(100) surface has been studied with an interplay of noncontact atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface x-ray diffraction under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The Al/Mg ratio...

  12. Structural changes of starch during baking and staling of rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihhalevski, Anna; Heinmaa, Ivo; Traksmaa, Rainer; Pehk, Tõnis; Mere, Arvo; Paalme, Toomas

    2012-08-29

    Rye sourdough breads go stale more slowly than wheat breads. To understand the peculiarities of bread staling, rye sourdough bread, wheat bread, and a number of starches were studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C CP MAS NMR, (1)H NMR, (31)P NMR), polarized light microscopy, rheological methods, microcalorimetry, and measurement of water activity. The degree of crystallinity of starch in breads decreased with hydration and baking to 3% and increased during 11 days of storage to 21% in rye sourdough bread and to 26% in wheat bread. (13)C NMR spectra show that the chemical structures of rye and wheat amylopectin and amylose contents are very similar; differences were found in the starch phospholipid fraction characterized by (31)P NMR. The (13)C CP MAS NMR spectra demonstrate that starch in rye sourdough breads crystallize in different forms than in wheat bread. It is proposed that different proportions of water incorporation into the crystalline structure of starch during staling and changes in starch fine structure cause the different rates of staling of rye and wheat bread.

  13. The effect of the changing polarity and neutral sheet of the IMF on the cosmic ray diurnal anisotropy at neutron monitor energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Staden, M. L.; Potgieter, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    A drift with a simulated wavy neutral sheet have been used to study the effects of the reversal of the solar magnetic field every 11 years and the changes in the waviness of the heliospheric neutral sheet, corresponding to changes in solar activity, on the diurnal anisotropy at an energy of 20 GeV. The results indicate that the long-term behavior of the diurnal anisotropy, especially the phase shift from one solar minimum period to another, which seems to depend on the polarity of the IMF, has a theoretical explanation in the drift picture of the modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere.

  14. A novel molecular distance edge vector as applied to chemical modeling of quantitative structure-retention relationships: Various gas chromatographic retention behaviors of polychlorinated dibenzo-furans on different polarity-varying stationary phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hong; HUANG Ping; HU Yinyu; YE Nancy; LI Zhiliang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the identical group as a pseudo atom instead of a typical atom, a novel modified molecular distance-edge (MDE) vector μ was developed in our laboratory to characterize chemical structure of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) congeners and/or isomers. Quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRRs) between the new VMDE parameters and gas chromatographic (GC) retention behavior of PCDFs were then generated by multiple linear regression (MLR) method for non-polar, moderately polar, and polar stationary phases. Four excellent models with high correlation coefficients, R=0.984-0.995, were proposed for non-polar columns (DB-5, SE-54, OV-101). For the moderately polar columns (OV-1701), the correlation coefficient of the developed good model is only 0.958. For the polar columns (SP-2300), the QSRR model is poor with R=0.884. Then cross validation with leave-one out of procedure (CV) is performed in high correlation with the non-polar (Rcv=992-0.974) and weakly polar (Rcv=921) columns and in little correlation (Rcv=0.834) with the polar columns. These results show that the new μ vector is suitable for describing the retention behaviors of PCDFs on non-polar and moderately polar stationary phases and not for the various gas chromatographic retention behaviors of PCDFs on the different polarity-varying stationary phases.

  15. Structural and Functional Changes With the Aging Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denic, Aleksandar; Glassock, Richard J; Rule, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Senescence or normal physiologic aging portrays the expected age-related changes in the kidney as compared to a disease that occurs in some but not all individuals. The microanatomical structural changes of the kidney with older age include a decreased number of functional glomeruli from an increased prevalence of nephrosclerosis (arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and tubular atrophy with interstitial fibrosis), and to some extent, compensatory hypertrophy of remaining nephrons. Among the macroanatomical structural changes, older age associates with smaller cortical volume, larger medullary volume until middle age, and larger and more numerous kidney cysts. Among carefully screened healthy kidney donors, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines at a rate of 6.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per decade. There is reason to be concerned that the elderly are being misdiagnosed with CKD. Besides this expected kidney function decline, the lowest risk of mortality is at a GFR of ≥75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for age kidney functional reserve when they do actually develop CKD, and they are at higher risk for acute kidney injury.

  16. Changes in social structure and the role of the peasantry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šljukić Srđan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modernization processes in rural areas not only lead to the separation of peasant (traditional and rural, due to the deagrarization and changes of cultural and political patterns, but also to full integration of agriculture into the social division of labor. As a part of economy, agriculture, in a social sense, ceased to be linked exclusively to rural areas, which enables the distinction between sociology of agriculture and rural sociology. In this paper, the changes in class/strata structure of agriculture that took place during the last two decades in the Serbian society are described and explained. After that, an attempt was made to explain this new structure in the context of a broader structure of Serbian society and its reproduction, taking into the consideration the existing views (Lazić/Cvejić. The author especially emphasises his critical views on some disputable issues. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179053: Promene u društvenoj strukturi i pokretljivosti kao činioci evropskih integracija Republike Srbije, sa posebnim osvrtom na AP Vojvodinu

  17. Total internal reflection without change of polarization using a right-angle prism with half-wavelength-thick optical interference coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, R M A

    2009-02-01

    Monochromatic light, which is polarized in an arbitrary state, is totally internally reflected at angle of incidence phi=45 degrees without change of polarization by a right-angle prism of refractive index n0=1+1/Square root of 2=1.70711 (e.g., N-LAK8 Schott glass at wavelength lambda=706 nm), which is coated with a transparent thin film of refractive index n1=(1+1/2)1/2=1.30656 (e.g., vacuum-deposited fluoride material) and of metric thickness equal to half of the vacuum wavelength of incident light, d=lambda/2. The ambient medium of evanescent refraction is assumed to be vacuum, air, or an inert gas. Wavelength shifts of +/-50 nm, or changes of the internal angle of incidence of +/-1 degrees around 45 degrees, cause phase errors of only a few degrees. The reflected and incident polarization states are nearly identical in the presence of such small phase errors.

  18. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  19. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  20. The structure of the shell and polar plugs of the egg of the whipworm, Trichuris trichiura (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from the Samango monkey (Cercopithecus albogularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, C C; White, B J

    1989-12-01

    The structure of the shell of the egg of Trichuris trichiura was examined using light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results confirmed its three-layered structure and provided evidence that the cores of the polar plugs, which could be seen to be extensions of the shell's middle layer, could be lost en bloc, either mechanically or chemically, and in this way probably provided an exit for the first stage larva at hatching.

  1. Polarity-dependent resistance switching in GeSbTe phase-change thin films: The importance of excess Sb in filament formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Kooi, Bart J.; Oosthoek, Jasper L. M.; van den Dool, Pim; Palasantzas, George; Pauza, Andrew

    2009-12-01

    We show that polarity-dependent resistance switching in GeSbTe thin films depends strongly on Sb composition by comparing current-voltage characteristics in Sb-excess Ge2Sb2+xTe5 and stoichiometric Ge2Sb2Te5 samples. This type of switching in Ge2Sb2+xTe5 films is reversible with both continuous and pulsed dc voltages less than 1.5 V. Low and high resistance states of this switching can be attributed to formation and rupture, respectively, of electrically conductive Sb-bridges between the Ge2Sb2Te5 crystals and electrodes through the resistive amorphous phase. The coexistence of polarity-dependent resistance switching with amorphous-crystalline phase-changes renders great opportunities to expand the applicability of GeSbTe films for data storage applications.

  2. Late Posthemorrhagic Structural and Functional Changes in Pulmonary Circulation Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Andreyeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the major regularities and mechanisms of morphological changes in the rat pulmonary circulation arteries in the late posthemorrhagic period and to compare them with age-related features of the vessels. Materials and methods: experiments to generate graduated hemorrhagic hypotension with the blood pressure being maintained at 40 mm Hg were carried out on young (5—6-month albino male Wistar rats. Throughout hypotension and 60 days after blood loss, the blood was tested to determine low and average molecular-weight substances by spectrophotometry and the pro- and antioxidative systems by chemiluminescence. Pulmonary circulation arteries were morphologically studied in young animals, rats in the late posthemorrhagic period and old (24—25-month rats. Results. Sixty-minute hemorrhagic hypotension leads to the development of endotoxemia and imbalance of the pro- and antioxidative systems, the signs of which are observed in the late periods (2 months after hypotension. At the same time, the posthemorrhagic period is marked by the significant pulmonary circulation arterial morphological changes comparable with their age-related alterations in old rat. This shows up mainly in the reorganization of a connective tissue component in the vascular wall: the elevated levels of individual collagen fibers, their structural changes, elastic medial membrane destruction and deformity. At the same time, there is a change in the morphometric parameters of vessels at all study stages while their lowered flow capacity is only characteristic for intraorgan arteries. Conclusion: The increased activity of free radical oxidation and endotoxemia may be believed to be one of the causes of morphological changes in pulmonary circulation arteries in the late posthemorrhagic period, which is similar to age-related vascular alterations. Key words: hemorrhagic hypotension, pulmonary circulation arteries, free radical oxidation, endotoxemia, remodeling, late

  3. Structure fluctuations and conformational changes in protein binding

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Tuzikov, Alexander V; Vakser, Ilya A

    2011-01-01

    Structure fluctuations and conformational changes accompany all biological processes involving macromolecules. The paper presents a classification of protein residues based on the normalized equilibrium fluctuations of the residue centers of mass in proteins and a statistical analysis of conformation changes in the side-chains upon binding. Normal mode analysis and an elastic network model were applied to a set of protein complexes to calculate the residue fluctuations and develop the residue classification. Comparison with a classification based on normalized B-factors suggests that the B-factors may underestimate protein flexibility in solvent. Our classification shows that protein loops and disordered fragments are enriched with highly fluctuating residues and depleted with weakly fluctuating residues. To calculate the dihedral angles distribution functions, the configuration space was divided into cells by a cubic grid. The effect of protein association on the distribution functions depends on the amino a...

  4. Studies on Structural Changes of Collagen in Silicosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYU-RUI; HUXUN; 等

    1994-01-01

    In order to provide scientific information on the prevention and treatment of silicosis,studies about changes of silicotic collagen in lungs were carried out.In this paper,we present experiments about the structural changes of collagen in silicotic lungs of rats and patients.These included clectron microscopy,circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopy studies of collaeen fibers.The results indicated that fibers of silicotic collagen were shorter in length.smaller in diameter and decreased in α-helix content,The Si-O-R-group and -OH group were found increased and -C-C-backbone shortened.The increase of -Si-O-R-group indicated that silica formed linking bridgen between collagens whih may be the cause of progressive enlargement of nodules.

  5. FPGA realization of Farrow structure for sampling rate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In numerous implementations of modern telecommunications and digital audio systems there is a need for sampling rate change of the system input signal. When the relation between signal input and output sampling frequencies is a fraction of two large integer numbers, Lagrange interpolation based on Farrow structure can be used for the efficient realization of the resample block. This paper highlights efficient realization and estimation of necessary resources for polynomial cubic Lagrange interpolation in the case of the demand for the signal sampling rate change with the factor 160/147 on Field-Programmable Gate Array architecture (FPGA. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-32023 i br. TR-32028

  6. Structure change of 156Yb at high-spin states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Hui; LI Zhong-Yu; WANG Shou-Yu; MENG Jie; LI Zhi-Huan; LI Xiang-Qing; XU Fu-Rong; LIU Hong-Liang; ZHANG Shuang-Quan; ZHOU Shan-Gui; YE Yan-Lin; JIANG Dong-Xing; ZHENG Tao; ZHU Li-Hua; WU Xiao-Guang; LI Guang-Sheng; HE Chuang-Ye; MA Li-Ying; LU Fei; FAN Feng-Ying; HAN Li-Ying; WANG He; XIAO Jun; LI Xue-Qin; CHEN Dong; FANG Xiao; LOU Jian-Lin; LIU Ying; HAO Xin; PAN Bo; LI Li-Hua

    2009-01-01

    High-spin states of 156Yb have been studied via the 144Sm(16O,4n)156Yb fusion-evaporation reaction at beam energy 102 MeV. The positive-parity yrast band and negative-parity cascade have been extended up to higher-spin states, respectively. The characteristics of the negative-parity sequence above the 25- state may related to the excitation from the nucleon in the Z = 64, N = 82 core. The E-GOS curve for the positive-parity yrast sequence in 156Yb indicate that this nucleus may undergo an evolution from quasivibrational to quasirotational structure with increasing angular momentum. The Cranked Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky calculations by means of Total-Routhian-Surface (TRS) methods has been made to understand this structure change.

  7. Structural analysis of lunar subsurface with Chang'E-3 lunar penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jialong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Tang, Zesheng

    2016-01-01

    Geological structure of the subsurface of the Moon provides valuable information on lunar evolution. Recently, Chang'E-3 has utilized lunar penetrating radar (LPR), which is equipped on the lunar rover named as Yutu, to detect the lunar geological structure in Northern Imbrium (44.1260N, 19.5014W) for the first time. As an in situ detector, Chang'E-3 LPR has relative higher horizontal and vertical resolution and less clutter impact compared to spaceborne radars and earth-based radars. In this work, we analyze the LPR data at 500 MHz transmission frequency to obtain the shallow subsurface structure of the landing area of Chang'E-3 in Mare Imbrium. Filter method and amplitude recovery algorithms are utilized to alleviate the adverse effects of environment and system noises and compensate the amplitude losses during signal propagation. Based on the processed radar image, we observe numerous diffraction hyperbolae, which may be caused by discrete reflectors beneath the lunar surface. Hyperbolae fitting method is utilized to reverse the average dielectric constant to certain depth (ε bar). Overall, the estimated ε bar increases with the depth and ε bar could be classified into three categories. Average ε bar of each category is 2.47, 3.40 and 6.16, respectively. Because of the large gap between the values of ε bar of neighboring categories, we speculate a three-layered structure of the shallow surface of LPR exploration region. One possible geological picture of the speculated three-layered structure is presented as follows. The top layer is weathered layer of ejecta blanket with its average thickness and bound on error is 0.95±0.02 m. The second layer is the ejecta blanket of the nearby impact crater, and the corresponding average thickness is about 2.30±0.07 m, which is in good agreement with the two primary models of ejecta blanket thickness as a function of distance from the crater center. The third layer is regarded as a mixture of stones and soil. The

  8. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  9. Forecasting Long Memory Series Subject to Structural Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Papailias, Fotis

    A two-stage forecasting approach for long memory time series is introduced. In the first step we estimate the fractional exponent and, applying the fractional differencing operator, we obtain the underlying weakly dependent series. In the second step, we perform the multi-step ahead forecasts...... for the weakly dependent series and obtain their long memory counterparts by applying the fractional cumulation operator. The methodology applies to stationary and nonstationary cases. Simulations and an application to seven time series provide evidence that the new methodology is more robust to structural...... change and yields good forecasting results....

  10. Modified Testing for Structural Changes in Autoregressive Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao JIN; Zheng TIAN; Yun Feng YANG

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of detecting for structural changes in the autoregressive processes including AR(p) process. In performing a test, we employ the conventional residual CUSUM of squares test (RCUSQ) statistic. The RCUSQ test is based on the subsampiing method introduced by Jach and Kokoszka [J. Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability 25(2004)]. It is shown that under regularity conditions, the asymptotic distribution of the test statistic is the function of a standard Brownian bridge. Simulation results as to AR(1)process and an example of real data analysis axe provided for illustration.

  11. The changes of ADI structure during high temperature annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krzyńska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of structure investigations of ADI during it was annealing at elevated temperature are presented. Ductile iron austempered at temperature 325oC was then isothermally annealed 360 minutes at temperature 400, 450, 500 and 550oC. The structure investigations showed that annealing at these temperatures caused substantial structure changes and thus essential hardness decrease, which is most useful property of ADI from point of view its practical application. Degradation advance of the structure depends mainly on annealing temperature, less on the time of the heat treatment. It was concluded that high temperature annealing caused precipitation of Fe3C type carbides, which morphology and distribution depend on temperature. In case of 400oC annealing the carbides precipitates inside bainitic ferrite lath in specific crystallographic planes and partly at the grain boundaries. The annealing at the temperature 550oC caused disappearing of characteristic for ADI needle or lath – like morphology, which is replaced with equiaxed grains. In this case Fe3C carbides take the form very fine precipitates with spheroidal geometry.

  12. Polarized Scattering of Light for Arbitrary Magnetic Fields with Level-crossings from the Combination of Hyperfine and Fine Structure Splittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M.; Stenflo, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    Interference between magnetic substates of the hyperfine structure states belonging to different fine structure states of the same term influences the polarization for some of the diagnostically important lines of the Sun's spectrum, like the sodium and lithium doublets. The polarization signatures of this combined interference contain information on the properties of the solar magnetic fields. Motivated by this, in the present paper, we study the problem of polarized scattering on a two-term atom with hyperfine structure by accounting for the partial redistribution in the photon frequencies arising due to the Doppler motions of the atoms. We consider the scattering atoms to be under the influence of a magnetic field of arbitrary strength and develop a formalism based on the Kramers-Heisenberg approach to calculate the scattering cross section for this process. We explore the rich polarization effects that arise from various level-crossings in the Paschen-Back regime in a single scattering case using the lithium atomic system as a concrete example that is relevant to the Sun.

  13. POLARIZED SCATTERING OF LIGHT FOR ARBITRARY MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH LEVEL-CROSSINGS FROM THE COMBINATION OF HYPERFINE AND FINE STRUCTURE SPLITTINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru (India); Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: ksowmya@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-01

    Interference between magnetic substates of the hyperfine structure states belonging to different fine structure states of the same term influences the polarization for some of the diagnostically important lines of the Sun's spectrum, like the sodium and lithium doublets. The polarization signatures of this combined interference contain information on the properties of the solar magnetic fields. Motivated by this, in the present paper, we study the problem of polarized scattering on a two-term atom with hyperfine structure by accounting for the partial redistribution in the photon frequencies arising due to the Doppler motions of the atoms. We consider the scattering atoms to be under the influence of a magnetic field of arbitrary strength and develop a formalism based on the Kramers–Heisenberg approach to calculate the scattering cross section for this process. We explore the rich polarization effects that arise from various level-crossings in the Paschen–Back regime in a single scattering case using the lithium atomic system as a concrete example that is relevant to the Sun.

  14. Visualization of Excitonic Structure in the Fenna-Matthews-OlsonPhotosynthetic Complex by Polarization-Dependent Two-DimensionalElectronic Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago; Department of Biology, Department of Chemistry, Washington University; Fleming, Graham; Read, Elizabeth L.; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Engel, Gregory S.; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-05-26

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting proceeds by the collection and highly efficient transfer of energy through a network of pigment-protein complexes. Inter-chromophore electronic couplings and interactions between pigments and the surrounding protein determine energy levels of excitonic states and dictate the mechanism of energy flow. The excitonic structure (orientation of excitonic transition dipoles) of pigment-protein complexes is generally deduced indirectly from x-ray crystallography in combination with predictions of transition energies and couplings in the chromophore site basis. Here, we demonstrate that coarse-grained excitonic structural information in the form of projection angles between transition dipole moments can be obtained from polarization-dependent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of an isotropic sample, particularly when the nonrephasing or free polarization decay signal rather than the photon echo signal is considered. The method provides an experimental link between atomic and electronic structure and accesses dynamical information with femtosecond time resolution. In an investigation of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex from green sulfur bacteria, energy transfer connecting two particular exciton states in the protein is isolated as being the primary contributor to a cross peak in the nonrephasing 2D spectrum at 400 fs under a specific sequence of polarized excitation pulses. The results suggest the possibility of designing experiments using combinations of tailored polarization sequencesto separate and monitor individual relaxation pathways.

  15. Mind-Reading Ability and Structural Connectivity Changes in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabinio, Monia; Rossetto, Federica; Blasi, Valeria; Savazzi, Federica; Castelli, Ilaria; Massaro, Davide; Valle, Annalisa; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Mind-Reading ability through the eyes is an important component of the affective Theory of Mind (ToM), which allows people to infer the other's mental state from the eye gaze. The aim of the present study was to investigate to which extent age-associated structural brain changes impact this ability and to determine if this association is related to executive functions in elderly subjects. For this purpose, Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine both gray matter and white matter (WM) areas associated with aging. The resulting areas have been included in a subsequent correlation analysis to detect the brain regions whose structure was associated with the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes, assessed with the Italian version of the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" (RME) test, in a sample of 36 healthy subjects ranging from 24 to 79 years of age. The analysis resulted in three important findings: (1) the performance to the RME test is relatively stable across the decades 20-70 (despite a slight decrease of this ability with aging) and independent from executive functions; (2) structural brain imaging demonstrated the involvement of a great number of cortical ToM areas for the execution of the RME test: the bilateral precentral gyrus, the bilateral posterior insula, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, which also showed a significant volume decrease with age; (3) an age and task-related decline in WM connectivity on left fronto-temporal portion of the brain. Our results confirm the age-related structural modifications of the brain and show that these changes have an influence on the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes.

  16. Mind-Reading ability and structural connectivity changes in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia eCabinio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Mind-Reading ability through the eyes is an important component of the affective Theory of Mind (ToM, which allows people to infer the other’s mental state from the eye gaze. The aim of the present study was to investigate to which extent age-associated structural brain changes impact this ability and to determine if this association is related to executive functions in elderly subjects. For this purpose, Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine both gray matter and white matter areas associated with aging. The resulting areas have been included in a subsequent correlation analysis to detect the brain regions whose structure was associated with the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes, assessed with the Italian version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME test, in a sample of 36 healthy subjects ranging from 24 to 79 years of age. The analysis resulted in three important findings: 1 the performance to the RME test is relatively stable across the decades 20-70 (despite a slight decrease of this ability with aging and independent from executive functions; 2 structural brain imaging demonstrated the involvement of a great number of cortical ToM areas for the execution of the RME test: the bilateral precentral gyrus, the bilateral posterior insula, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, which also showed a significant volume decrease with age; 3 an age and task-related decline in white matter connectivity on left fronto-temporal portion of the brain. Our results confirm the age-related structural modifications of the brain and show that these changes have an influence on the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes.

  17. Polarized scattering with Paschen-Back effect, hyperfine structure, and partial frequency redistribution in magnetized stellar atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru (India); Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: ksowmya@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-10

    F-state interference significantly modifies the polarization produced by scattering processes in the solar atmosphere. Its signature in the emergent Stokes spectrum in the absence of magnetic fields is depolarization in the line core. In the present paper, we derive the partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrix that includes interference between the upper hyperfine structure states of a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths. The theory is applied to the Na I D{sub 2} line that is produced by the transition between the lower J = 1/2 and upper J = 3/2 states which split into F states because of the coupling with the nuclear spin I{sub s} = 3/2. The properties of the PRD matrix for the single-scattering case is explored, in particular, the effects of the magnetic field in the Paschen-Back regime and their usefulness as a tool for the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  18. Broadband cross-polarization-based heteronuclear dipolar recoupling for structural and dynamic NMR studies of rigid and soft solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharkov, B. B. [Department of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, Stockholm, SE 10044 (Sweden); Chizhik, V. I. [Faculty of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dvinskikh, S. V., E-mail: sergeid@kth.se [Department of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, Stockholm, SE 10044 (Sweden); Laboratory of Biomolecular NMR, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-21

    Dipolar recoupling is an essential part of current solid-state NMR methodology for probing atomic-resolution structure and dynamics in solids and soft matter. Recently described magic-echo amplitude- and phase-modulated cross-polarization heteronuclear recoupling strategy aims at efficient and robust recoupling in the entire range of coupling constants both in rigid and highly dynamic molecules. In the present study, the properties of this recoupling technique are investigated by theoretical analysis, spin-dynamics simulation, and experimentally. The resonance conditions and the efficiency of suppressing the rf field errors are examined and compared to those for other recoupling sequences based on similar principles. The experimental data obtained in a variety of rigid and soft solids illustrate the scope of the method and corroborate the results of analytical and numerical calculations. The technique benefits from the dipolar resolution over a wider range of coupling constants compared to that in other state-of-the-art methods and thus is advantageous in studies of complex solids with a broad range of dynamic processes and molecular mobility degrees.

  19. Numerical simulation of the solvate structures of acetylsalicylic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide containing polar co-solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.; Kumeev, R. S.; Golubev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes of acetylsalicylic acid with polar co-solvents in supercritical carbon dioxide, modified by methanol, ethanol, and acetone of 0.03 mole fraction concentration, are studied by numerical methods of classical molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculations. The structure, energy of formation, and lifetime of hydrogen-bonded complexes are determined, along with their temperature dependences (from 318 to 388 K at constant density of 0.7 g cm-3). It is shown that the hydrogen bonds between acetylsalicylic acid and methanol are most stable at 318 K and are characterized by the highest value of absolute energy. At higher supercritical temperatures, however, the longest lifetime is observed for acetylsalicylic acid-ethanol complexes. These results correlate with the known literature experimental data showing that the maximum solubility of acetylsalicylic acid at density values close to those considered in this work and at temperatures of 318 and 328 K is achieved when using methanol and ethanol as co-solvents, respectively.

  20. Mathematical principle and characteristics of polarization transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The precise definition of polarization transform is proposed from the viewpoint of polarization domain transform for the first time. The mathematical principle,char-acteristics and physical meanings of polarization transform are analyzed. Two typical kinds of polarization transforms which are called unitary matrix polarization transform (UMPT) and diagonal matrix polarization transform (DMPT) are put for-ward. The gain property and the change property of polarization state distance are presented in detail. Thereby,the concept of serial polarization transform is pro-posed. A general polarization transform can be realized by two steps: changing the location of polarization states in polarization domain by UMPT; and expanding or compressing the density of polarization states by DMPT. The result is meaningful to many applications including polarization filtering,detection,enhancement,anti-jamming,discrimination and so on.

  1. Patterns of faunal extinction and paleoclimatic change from mid-Holocene mammoth and polar bear remains, Pribilof Islands, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltre, Douglas W.; Yesner, David R.; Crossen, Kristine J.; Graham, Russell W.; Coltrain, Joan B.

    2008-07-01

    Qagnaxˆ Cave, a lava tube cave on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, has recently produced a mid-Holocene vertebrate faunal assemblage including woolly mammoth, polar bear, caribou, and Arctic fox. Several dates on the mammoth remains converge on 5700 14C yr BP. These dates, ~ 2300 yr younger than mammoth dates previously published from the Pribilof Islands, make these the youngest remains of proboscideans, and of non-extinct Quaternary megafauna, recovered from North America. Persistence of mammoths on the Pribilofs is most parsimoniously explained by the isolation of the Pribilofs and the lack of human presence in pre-Russian contact times, but an additional factor may have been the local existence of high-quality forage in the form of grasses enriched by nutrients derived from local Holocene tephras. This interpretation is reinforced by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values obtained from the mammoth remains. The endpoint of mammoth survival in the Pribilofs is unknown, but maybe coterminous with the arrival of polar bears whose remains in the cave date to the Neoglacial cold period of ~ 4500 to 3500 14C yr BP. The polar bear record corroborates a widespread cooling of the Bering Sea region at that time.

  2. Crystal structure and polarization hysteresis properties of ferroelectric BaTiO3 thin-film capacitors on (Ba,Sr)TiO3-buffered substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Hisashi; Noguchi, Yuji; Kutsuna, Kazutoshi; Matsuo, Hiroki; Kitanaka, Yuuki; Miyayama, Masaru

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BT) thin-film capacitors with a buffer layer of (Ba1- x Sr x )TiO3 (BST) have been fabricated on (001) SrTiO3 (STO) single-crystal substrates by a pulsed laser deposition method, and the crystal structure and polarization hysteresis properties have been investigated. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping shows that the BST buffer effectively reduces the misfit strain relaxation of the BT films on SrRuO3 (SRO) electrodes. The BT capacitor with the SRO electrodes on the BST (x = 0.3) buffer exhibits a well-saturated hysteresis loop with a remanent polarization of 29 µC/cm2. The hysteresis loop displays a shift toward a specific field direction, which is suggested to stem from the flexoelectric coupling between the out-of-plane polarization and the strain gradient adjacent to the bottom interface.

  3. POLYMERIC IONIC CONDUCTORS MODIFIED WITH POLAR GROUPS: PART Ⅱ. STRUCTURE-IONIC CONDUCTION RELATION IN LI-COMPLEX BASED ON MALEIC ANHYDRIDE- COPOLYMERIZED METHACRYLATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Kang; ZHOU Tong; DENG Zhenghua; WAN Guoxiang

    1992-01-01

    Ringlike polar monomer maleic anhydride (MAn) was copolymerized with oligo (oxyethylene)methacrylate (MEOn), and its effect on ion conduction property of the corresponding polymer-salt complexes was studied. As a consequence the introduction of MAn onto polymer chain retards crystallization of the ether pendants considerably, and improves the ion conductivity to a larger degree compared with other polar groups once investigated (σmax,25 ℃ = 8.5 × 10-5 S/cm). The structure-ion conduction relation in the polymer- salt matrix is also analyzed macroscopically through the correspondence between composition-dependences of polymerization conversion and isothermal ion conductivity, and microscopically through the measurements of cross polarized light and electron transmission.

  4. Polarized Structure Function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for $p({\\vec e},e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Raue, Brian; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Carman, Daniel; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anciant, Eric; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asavapibhop, Burin; Asryan, Gegham; Audit, Gerard; Auger, Thierry; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Casey, Liam; Cetina, Catalina; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dragovitsch, Peter; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girard, Pascal; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gothe, Ralf; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hu, Jicun; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, Konstantin; MacCormick, Marion; Manak, Joseph; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Peterson, Gerald; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Sayre, Donald; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Shafi, Aziz; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Simionatto, Sebastio; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Taylor, Shawn; Tedeschi, David; Thoma, Ulrike; Thompson, Richard; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Wang,

    2008-06-01

    The first measurements of the polarized structure function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for the reaction $p(\\vec e,e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the nucleon resonance region are reported. Measurements are included from threshold up to $W$=2.05 GeV for central values of $Q^2$ of 0.65 and 1.00 GeV$^2$, and nearly the entire kaon center-of-mass angular range. $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is the imaginary part of the longitudinal-transverse response and is expected to be sensitive to interferences between competing intermediate s-channel resonances, as well as resonant and non-resonant processes. The results for $\\sigma_{LT'}$ are comparable in magnitude to previously reported results from CLAS for $\\sigma_{LT}$, the real part of the same response. An intriguing sign change in $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is observed in the high $Q^2$ data at $W\\approx 1.9$ GeV. Comparisons to several existing model predictions are shown.

  5. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c < 50 μg ml-1) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c ⩾ 50 μg ml-1) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18 cm-1, indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  6. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-05

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  7. High-Resolution Simulation and Analysis of the Mature Structure of a Polar Low over the Sea of Japan on 21 January 1997

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅刚; 郭敬天; 张美根

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a high-resolution simulation of a remarkable polar low observed over the Sea of Japan on 21 January 1997 by using a 5-km mesh non-hydrostatic model MRI-NHM (Meteorological Research Institute Non-Hydrostatic Model). A 24-hour simulation starting from 0000 UTC 21 January 1997 successfully reproduced the observed features of the polar low such as the wrapping of western part of an initial E W orientation vortex, the spiral-shaped bands, the cloud-free "eye", and the warm core structure at its mature stage. The "eye" of the simulated polar low was relatively dry, and was associated with a strong downdraft. A thermodynamic budget analysis indicates that the "warm core" in the "eye"region was mainly caused by the adiabatic warming associated with the downdraft. The relationship among the condensational diabatic heating, the vertical velocity, the convergence of the moisture flux, and the circulation averaged within a 50 km×50 km square area around the polar low center shows that they form a positive feedback loop, and this loop is not inconsistent with the CISK (Conditional Instability of the Second Kind) mechanism during the developing stage of the polar low.

  8. Planck intermediate results. XXXVIII. $E$- and $B$-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huang, Z; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Serra, P; Soler, J D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    The quest for a $B$-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the $353\\,$GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between $E$-modes and $B$-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder, we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to $2$\\deg\\ (corresponding to $3.5\\,$pc in length for a typical distance of $100\\,$pc). These filaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes $I$, $Q$, $U$, $E$, and $B$...

  9. Structural changes in amber due to uranium mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelcová, Martina; Machovič, Vladimír; Mizera, Jiří; Sýkorová, Ivana; René, Miloš; Borecká, Lenka; Lapčák, Ladislav; Bičáková, Olga; Janeček, Oldřich; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-01

    The presence of uranium, with a bulk mass fraction of about 1.5 wt% and radiolytic alterations are a feature of Cenomanian amber from Křižany, at the northeastern edge of the North Bohemian Cretaceous uranium ore district. Pores and microcracks in the amber were filled with a mineral admixture, mainly in the form of Zr-Y-REE enriched uraninite. As a result of radiolytic alterations due to the presence of uranium, structural changes were observed in the Křižany amber in comparison with a reference amber from Nové Strašecí in central Bohemia; this was of similar age and botanical origin but did not contain elevated levels of uranium. Structural changes involved an increase in aromaticity due to dehydroaromatization of aliphatic cyclic hydrocarbons, loss of oxygen functional groups, an increase in the degree of polymerization, crosslinking of CC bonds, formation of a three-dimensional hydrocarbon network in the bulk organic matrix, and carbonization of the organic matrix around the uraninite infill.

  10. Brain structural complexity and life course cognitive change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Nazahah; Ahearn, Trevor S; Waiter, Gordon D; Murray, Alison D; Whalley, Lawrence J; Staff, Roger T

    2012-07-02

    Fractal measures such as fractal dimension (FD) can quantify the structural complexity of the brain. These have been used in clinical neuroscience to investigate brain development, ageing and in studies of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Here, we examined associations between the FD of white matter and cognitive changes across the life course in the absence of detectable brain disease. The FD was calculated from segmented cerebral white matter MR images in 217 subjects aged about 68years, in whom archived intelligence scores from age 11years were available. Cognitive test scores of fluid and crystallised intelligence were obtained at the time of MR imaging. Significant differences were found (intracranial volume, brain volume, white matter volume and Raven's Progressive Matrices score) between men and women at age 68years and novel associations were found between FD and measures of cognitive change over the life course from age 11 to 68years. Those with greater FD were found to have greater than expected fluid abilities at age 68years than predicted by their childhood intelligence and less cognitive decline from age 11 to 68years. These results are consistent with other reports that FD measures of cortical structural complexity increase across the early life course during maturation of the cerebral cortex and add new data to support an association between FD and cognitive ageing.

  11. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in α-helix conformation and a decrease in β-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in α-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  12. Dielectric Property Change of Ferroelectrics and Electronic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Masaki; Sekine, Rika; Sugihara, Sunao

    1999-09-01

    Electronic structures were investigated in relation to the relative permittivity of ferroelectrics such as the ABO3-type and A- and/or B-substituted materials, using amolecular orbital method. The A-site ions were Ba, Pb, Sr and Ca, andthe B-site ion was Zr. Calculation was performed using theDV-Xα (discrete variational Xα) method and the overlappopulation, which is related to the covalent bonding nature, was discussed together with the effective charge. As a result, the change from ferroelectric to paraelectric was found to be associated with the covalency between the A-site ion and Ti or Zr. Furthermore, the energy for π-bonding between O2p and Ti3d (or Zr4d in AZrO3) shifted toward the lower energy level by substitution of the A site with Ca to give a lower relative permittivity. Then, we studied the effect of quantitative changes of the amount (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) of A-site ions in the (Ba1-x, Srx)TiO3 system on the electronic structures, and suggested that the bonding nature between O and Ti is related to the relative permittivity of the system.

  13. Structural Health Monitoring in Changing Operational Conditions Using Tranmissibility Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Devriendt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article uses frequency domain transmissibility functions for detecting and locating damage in operational conditions. In recent articles numerical and experimental examples were presented and the possibility to use the transmissibility concept for damage detection seemed quite promising. In the work discussed so far, it was assumed that the operational conditions were constant, the structure was excited by a single input in a fixed location. Transmissibility functions, defined as a simple ratio between two measured responses, do depend on the amplitudes or locations of the operational forces. The current techniques fail in the case of changing operational conditions. A suitable operational damage detection method should however be able to detect damage in a very early stage even in the case of changing operational conditions. It will be demonstrated in this paper that, by using only a small frequency band around the resonance frequencies of the structure, the existing methods can still be used in a more robust way. The idea is based on the specific property that the transmissibility functions become independent of the loading condition in the system poles. A numerical and experimental validation will be given.

  14. Demography of an apex predator at the edge of its range: impacts of changing sea ice on polar bears in Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J; Servanty, Sabrina; Regehr, Eric V; Converse, Sarah J; Richardson, Evan; Stirling, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implementation of multistate capture-recapture models. We found that survival of female polar bears was related to the annual timing of sea ice break-up and formation. Using estimated vital rates (e.g., survival and reproduction) in matrix projection models, we calculated the growth rate of the WH subpopulation and projected population responses under different environmental scenarios while accounting for parametric uncertainty, temporal variation, and demographic stochasticity. Our analysis suggested a long-term decline in the number of bears from 1185 (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] = 993-1411) in 1987 to 806 (95% BCI = 653-984) in 2011. In the last 10 yr of the study, the number of bears appeared stable due to temporary stability in sea ice conditions (mean population growth rate for the period 2001-2010 = 1.02, 95% BCI = 0.98-1.06). Looking forward, we estimated long-term growth rates for the WH subpopulation of ~1.02 (95% BCI = 1.00-1.05) and 0.97 (95% BCI = 0.92-1.01) under hypothetical high and low sea ice conditions, respectively. Our findings support previous evidence for a demographic linkage between sea ice conditions and polar bear population dynamics. Furthermore, we present a robust framework for sensitivity analysis with respect to continued climate change (e.g., to inform scenario planning) and for evaluating the combined effects of climate change and management actions on the status of wildlife populations.

  15. Demography of an apex predator at the edge of its range: impacts of changing sea ice on polar bears in Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J.; Servanty, Sabrina; Regehr, Eric V.; Converse, Sarah J.; Richardson, Evan S.; Stirling, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implementation of multistate capture–recapture models. We found that survival of female polar bears was related to the annual timing of sea ice break-up and formation. Using estimated vital rates (e.g., survival and reproduction) in matrix projection models, we calculated the growth rate of the WH subpopulation and projected population responses under different environmental scenarios while accounting for parametric uncertainty, temporal variation, and demographic stochasticity. Our analysis suggested a long-term decline in the number of bears from 1185 (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] = 993–1411) in 1987 to 806 (95% BCI = 653–984) in 2011. In the last 10 yr of the study, the number of bears appeared stable due to temporary stability in sea ice conditions (mean population growth rate for the period 2001–2010 = 1.02, 95% BCI = 0.98–1.06). Looking forward, we estimated long-term growth rates for the WH subpopulation of ~1.02 (95% BCI = 1.00–1.05) and 0.97 (95% BCI = 0.92–1.01) under hypothetical high and low sea ice conditions, respectively. Our findings support previous evidence for a demographic linkage between sea ice conditions and polar bear population dynamics. Furthermore, we present a robust framework for sensitivity analysis with respect to continued climate change (e.g., to inform scenario planning) and for evaluating the combined effects of climate change and management actions on the status of wildlife populations.

  16. Changes in soil bacterial community structure with increasing disturbance frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mincheol; Heo, Eunjung; Kang, Hojeong; Adams, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Little is known of the responsiveness of soil bacterial community structure to disturbance. In this study, we subjected a soil microcosm to physical disturbance, sterilizing 90 % of the soil volume each time, at a range of frequencies. We analysed the bacterial community structure using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Bacterial diversity was found to decline with the increasing disturbance frequencies. Total bacterial abundance was, however, higher at intermediate and high disturbance frequencies, compared to low and no-disturbance treatments. Changing disturbance frequency also led to changes in community composition, with changes in overall species composition and some groups becoming abundant at the expense of others. Some phylogenetic groups were found to be relatively more disturbance-sensitive or tolerant than others. With increasing disturbance frequency, phylogenetic species variability (an index of community composition) itself became more variable from one sample to another, suggesting a greater role of chance in community composition. Compared to the tightly clustered community of the original undisturbed soil, in all the aged disturbed soils the lists of most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in each replicate were very different, suggesting a possible role of stochasticity in resource colonization and exploitation in the aged and disturbed soils. For example, colonization may be affected by whichever localized concentrations of bacterial populations happen to survive the last disturbance and be reincorporated in abundance into each pot. Overall, it appears that the soil bacterial community is very sensitive to physical disturbance, losing diversity, and that certain groups have identifiable 'high disturbance' vs. 'low disturbance' niches.

  17. STRUCTURE AND MORPHOLOGY CHANGES OF HYDROBIOTITES MODIFIED BY CATIONIC SURFACTANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) together with Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the complexes, where the hydrobiotites (Xinjiang) were modified by single-chain surfactants octyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTMA) and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA). XRD patterns showed that the structure of complexes was significantly influenced by the surfactant concentration and the alkyl chain length, because obvious changes took place in the basal spacing. Furthermore, according to the XRD results, several arrangements of surfactant molecules within the hydrobiotite interlayer space were deduced. The FTIR spectrum indicated that the surfactant contents in complexes dramatically increased with the alkyl chain length. The SPM micrographs demonstrated that the surfaces of complexes prepared at lower surfactant concentration were relatively flat compared with that prepared at higher concentration, while those with higher surfactant concentration had much steeper surface due to the alkyl chain length. It was concluded that structure and morphology of surfactant/hydrobiotite complexes depend not only on the surfactant concentration, but also strongly on the surfactant species.