WorldWideScience

Sample records for changing polarization structures

  1. Characterizing the micro structure and kinetics of fast changing samples by simultaneous polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ran; He, Honghui; Zeng, Nan; Ma, Hui

    2015-03-01

    Taking accurate measurements of the state of polarization (SOP) is the key for the success of polarization sensitive techniques which can provide rich information on the microstructure of complex scattering media, such as biological tissues. For static or slow varying samples, SOP measurements can be achieved by time-sequential recoding of different polarization components controlled by rotating polarizers and wave plates or temporal modulation devices such as photoelastic modulators or liquid crystal variable retarders. When the sample is moving or changing its status quickly, polarization components recoded at different time may correspond to different SOPs, which can lead to significant errors in the final results. Simultaneous polarization measurements are necessary for probing such dynamic samples. In this paper, using the simultaneously recorded polarization components, we are able to mimic time sequential polarization schemes and evaluate the errors. The results show that the kinetics of the sample will affect the systematic error and an increase in the statistical errors of the measured degree of polarization (DOP). We change the kinetics of samples with different stirring speed, which is indicated by the characteristic time of the auto-correlation function. It is also demonstrated that the simultaneously recorded polarization components reveals additional information on the orientation of fibrous scatterers as well as their translation and rotation kinetics.

  2. Polarized light scattering as a probe for changes in chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, D.B.

    1993-10-01

    Measurements and calculations of polarized light scattering are applied to chromosomes. Calculations of the Mueller matrix, which completely describes how the polarization state of light is altered upon scattering, are developed for helical structures related to that of chromosomes. Measurements of the Mueller matrix are presented for octopus sperm heads, and dinoflagellates. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made. A working theory of polarized light scattering from helices is developed. The use of the first Born approximation vs the coupled dipole approximation are investigated. A comparison of continuous, calculated in this work, and discrete models is also discussed. By comparing light scattering measurements with theoretical predictions the average orientation of DNA in an octopus sperm head is determined. Calculations are made for the Mueller matrix of DNA plectonemic helices at UV, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Finally evidence is presented that the chromosomes of dinoflagellates are responsible for observed differential scattering of circularly-polarized light. This differential scattering is found to vary in a manner that is possibly correlated to the cell cycle of the dinoflagellates. It is concluded that by properly choosing the wavelength probe polarized light scattering can provide a useful tool to study chromosome structure.

  3. Polarized Raman spectroscopy unravels the biomolecular structural changes in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Amuthachelvi; Prakasarao, Aruna; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising technique giving a wealth of information about the orientation and symmetry of bond vibrations in addition to the general chemical information from the conventional Raman spectroscopy. In this regard, polarized Raman Spectroscopic technique was employed to study the changes in the orientation of biomolecules in normal and cancerous conditions. This technique was compared to the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique and was found to yield additional information about the orientation of tyrosine, collagen and DNA. The statistically analyzed depolarization ratios by Linear Discriminant Analysis yielded better accuracy than the statistical results of conventional Raman spectroscopy. Thus, this study reveals that polarized Raman spectroscopy has better diagnostic potential than the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique.

  4. Dynamical changes of the polar cap potential structure: an information theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Coco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some features, such as vortex structures often observed through a wide spread of spatial scales, suggest that ionospheric convection is turbulent and complex in nature. Here, applying concepts from information theory and complex system physics, we firstly evaluate a pseudo Shannon entropy, H, associated with the polar cap potential obtained from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN and, then, estimate the degree of disorder and the degree of complexity of ionospheric convection under different Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF conditions. The aforementioned quantities are computed starting from time series of the coefficients of the 4th order spherical harmonics expansion of the polar cap potential for three periods, characterised by: (i steady IMF Bz > 0, (ii steady IMF Bz < 0 and (iii a double rotation from negative to positive and then positive to negative Bz. A neat dynamical topological transition is observed when the IMF Bz turns from negative to positive and vice versa, pointing toward the possible occurrence of an order/disorder phase transition, which is the counterpart of the large scale convection rearrangement and of the increase of the global coherence. This result has been confirmed by applying the same analysis to a larger data base of about twenty days of SuperDARN data, allowing to investigate the role of IMF By too.

  5. The Changing Polar Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, P. G.; Hurley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and LCROSS have provided an avalanche of new data regarding the lunar poles: LCROSS directly detected water vapor and other volatiles in its impact plume; LRO LAMP has detected surface frost using UV ratios; LEND has refined understanding of the distribution of hydrogen; LOLA and LAMP have showed that the spectral properties of permanently shadowed regions (PSR) are anomalous and may be due to unusual surface texture or altered space weathering; Diviner shows both where the coldest portions of the poles exist, and its quantitative results show where temperatures are low enough to preserve water ice at depth, well outside the PSRs. Yet while we are data rich, our understanding of the lunar poles is maddeningly poor. Our poverty of understanding is made even more baffling by the MESSENGER results from Mercury. At Mercury's poles the distribution of volatiles is dictated by temperature: where subsurface temperatures inferred from topography are consistent with long term preservation of water ice, radar anomalies indicating thick ice are present; where surface temperatures are consistent with preservation of surface frost, high reflectance anomalies indicating surface frost are revealed by laser reflectance. The distribution of water ice on Mercury is well understood. In contrast, temperature is only a weak indicator of the presence of volatiles at the lunar poles; there is little ability to predict the location and abundance of hydrogen or water. The difference may in the age of the volatile deposits on the two planets. Turn the clock forward a few billion years on Mercury and the deposits may appear more lunar. Surface lag deposits may have long ago succumbed to impact gardening, as has much of the shallow buried ice. Ice retained could be patchy, and confined to the coldest places that may tend to preserve it more effectively, even when finely comminuted. Lunar polar volatiles, a possible relic of an ancient, Mercury

  6. Flare evolution and polarization changes in fine structures of solar radio emission in the 2013 April 11 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Gennady; Sych, Robert; Tan, Bao-Lin; Yan, Yi-Hua; Tan, Cheng-Ming; Fu, Qi-Jun; Karlický, Marian; Fomichev, Valery

    2016-02-01

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in observations is important for understanding of the flare evolution. For the first time, solar radio spectral fine structures in an M6.5 flare that occurred on 2013 April 11 were observed simultaneously by several radio instruments at four different observatories: Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou (SBRS/Huairou), Ondřejov Radio Spectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC/Ondřejov), Badary Broadband Microwave Spectropolarimeter (BMS/Irkutsk), and spectrograph/IZMIRAN (Moscow, Troitsk). The fine structures included microwave zebra patterns (ZPs), fast pulsations and fiber bursts. They were observed during the flare brightening located at the tops of a loop arcade as shown in images taken by the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope onboard NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The flare occurred at 06:58-07:26 UT in solar active region NOAA 11719 located close to the solar disk center. ZPs appeared near high frequency boundaries of the pulsations, and their spectra observed in Huairou and Ondřejov agreed with each other in terms of details. At the beginning of the flare's impulsive phase, a strong narrowband ZP burst occurred with a moderate left-handed circular polarization. Then a series of pulsations and ZPs were observed in almost unpolarized emission. After 07:00 UT a ZP appeared with a moderate right-handed polarization. In the flare decay phase (at about 07:25 UT), ZPs and fiber bursts become strongly right-hand polarized. BMS/Irkutsk spectral observations indicated that the background emission showed a left-handed circular polarization (similar to SBRS/Huairou spectra around 3 GHz). However, the fine structure appeared in the right-handed polarization. The dynamics of the polarization was associated with the motion of the flare exciter, which was observed in EUV images at 171 Å and 131 Å by the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Combining magnetograms observed by

  7. Flare processes evolution and polarization changes of fine structures of solar radio emission in the April 11, 2013 event

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, Gennady; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Chengming; Fu, Qijun; Karlicky, Marian; Fomichev, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in the observations of solar radio spectral fine structures in an M6.5 flare on April 11, 2013 were observed simultaneously by several radio instruments at four different observatories: Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers at Huairou (SBRS/Huairou), Ondrejov Radio spectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC/Ondrejov), Badary Broadband Microwave spectropolarimeter (BMS/Irkutsk), and spectrograph/IZMIRAN (Moscow, Troitsk). The fine structures include microwave zebra patterns (ZP), fast pulsations, and fibers. They were observed during the flare brightening located at the tops of a loop arcade. The dynamics of the polarization was associated with the motion of the flare exciter, which was observed in EUV images at 171A and 131A (SDO/AIA). Combining magnetograms observed by the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) with the homologous assumption of EUV flare brightening and ZP bursts, we deduced that the observed ZPs correspond to the ordinary radio...

  8. Molecular structure and nonequilibrium polarizations: recent experiments on polar gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senftleben-Beenakker experiments are reported on the thermal conductivity and visosity of polyatomic gases. Polar molecules of linear and symmetric top structure have been investigated in a magnetic field. NH3-noble gas mixtures and CH3CN mixtures have been studied. The results indicate the concentration dependence of the various non-equilibrium polarizations for these specific systems. (C.F.)

  9. Polar ices: rapid climatic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent successes of the European GRIP (GReenland Ice core Project) and American GISP 2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) drillings which have reached in 1992 and 1993 the basement rocks of central Greenland (SUMMIT site, 3250 m of altitude) have allow to reconstruct the climate evolution for the last 100,000 years or more. A comparison of climatic informations deduced from these two drillings with records from Vostok (Antarctica) is given in this paper. The δD and δ18O isotopic approach have been used for the reconstruction of climatic series and paleotemperatures in polar regions. Empirical relationships explained by Rayleigh's isotopic models are used as a base for paleotemperature reconstructions from isotopic analyses of ice. A one degree Celsius cooling corresponds to an oxygen 18 decay of 0.67 per thousand and to a 6 per thousand deuterium decay. The GRIP and GISP 2 drillings have demonstrated the exceptional stability of Greenland climate during the last 10.000 years in comparison with strong instabilities encountered during the last 100.000 years and also recorded in North Atlantic marine sediments. The time scales associated with these instabilities are of the order of a few decades for the warming phase. Thanks to Vostok ice-trapped air bubbles analyses, it is now well demonstrated that the strongest instabilities (cooling during the last deglaciation and major glaciation inter stages) are also recorded but less pronounced in Antarctica. GRIP data for the last interglacial stage have been interpreted in terms of climate instabilities but neither GISP 2 results nor Vostok results allow to confirm this interpretation. (J.S.). 29 refs, 3 figs

  10. Long term changes in the polar vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented.

  11. Spin structure of constituent quark and polarized structure of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarized parton distribution inside a constituent quark is calculated. This structure is universal for all hadrons and the polarized structure of any hadron is a convolution of polarized constituent quark distribution in the hadron with the polarized structure function of the constituent quark. This approach gives very good agreement with the experimental data on polarized proton, neutron, and deuteron. However, in order to assemble the components to build the spin the constituent quark we are forced to include a sizeable orbital angular momentum. (author)

  12. The Large Scale Structure: Polarization Aspects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. F. Pizzo

    2011-12-01

    Polarized radio emission is detected at various scales in the Universe. In this document, I will briefly review our knowledge on polarized radio sources in galaxy clusters and at their outskirts, emphasizing the crucial information provided by the polarized signal on the origin and evolution of such sources. Successively, I will focus on Abell 2255, which is known in the literature as the first cluster for which filamentary polarized emission associated with the radio halo has been detected. By using RM synthesis on our multi-wavelength WSRT observations, we studied the 3-dimensional geometry of the cluster, unveiling the nature of the polarized filaments at the borders of the central radio halo. Our analysis points out that these structures are relics lying at large distance from the cluster center.

  13. Imprinted spiral structures as neutron polarizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction from magnetic spiral structures is governed by strong selection rules for the polarization of the outgoing beam. When the sample is entirely of one chirality--for instance a right handed spiral--the neutrons diffracted by some Bragg reflections are fully polarized. While the scattering theory has been formulated long ago, attempts to controllably modify the population of left handed and right handed spiral domains in natural magnetic structures (which for instance occur in some rare earth metals) have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, we have been able to imprint helical magnetic structures in La/Fe multilayers (each layer approximately 30 angstrom thick) simply by rotating the growing sample in a weak external field (30e). A first estimate is given of the efficiency of these multilayers as polarizers of neutron beams

  14. Polarized DIS Structure Functions from Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a parametrization of polarized Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (DIS) structure functions based on Neural Networks. The parametrization provides a bias-free determination of the probability measure in the space of structure functions, which retains information on experimental errors and correlations. As an example we discuss the application of this method to the study of the structure function g1p(x,Q2)

  15. Have Titan's North-Polar Lakes Changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Stephen D.; Hayes, A.; Elachi, C.; Stofan, E.; Paillou, P.; Formico, T.; Mitchell, K.; Casarano, D.; Notarnicola, C.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini's RADAR instrument acquired a SAR swath over Titan's north polar lakes on May 22, 2012 , providing repeat images of a number of the smaller lakes. Previous coverage of these lakes was obtained on various passes in 2006 and 2007. Among the principal objectives of the Cassini mission is to monitor the liquid in the lakes with the approach of northern summer. Evidence of change in the lakes' levels might consist of shoreline changes, changes in radar backscatter (e.g. as penetration increases or dry spots appear), or combinations of these. We have chosen ten lakes and lake complexes for study, ranging from -4 to -100 km largest dimension. Visual comparison of repeat images is complicated by the dissimilar imaging geometry and (in some cases) resolution, and by SAR speckle. There are ambiguous cases that require further study, but at this writing we cannot identify certain changes. Ambiguous cases will be analyzed by using electromagnetic models, which can also take into account different acquisition geometry. Further analysis will be carried out exploiting electromagnetic scattering models and inversion approaches (e.g., Bayesian) to provide estimate of the lake parameters and any related changes. Parts of the research described in this paper were carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund Jr., Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. This architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements. PMID:25346427

  17. Polar ionospheric responses to solar wind IMF changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    Full Text Available Auroral and airglow emissions over Eureka (89° CGM during the 1997-98 winter show striking variations in relation to solar wind IMF changes. The period January 19 to 22, 1998, was chosen for detailed study, as the IMF was particularly strong and variable. During most of the period, Bz was northward and polar arcs were observed. Several overpasses by DMSP satellites during the four day period provided a clear picture of the particle precipitation producing the polar arcs. The spectral character of these events indicated excitation by electrons of average energy 300 to 500 eV. Only occasionally were electrons of average energy up to ~1 keV observed and these appeared transitory from the ground optical data. It is noted that polar arcs appear after sudden changes in IMF By, suggesting IMF control over arc initiation. When By is positive there is arc motion from dawn to dusk, while By is negative the motion is consistently dusk to dawn. F-region (anti-sunward convections were monitored through the period from 630.0 nm emissions. The convection speed was low (100-150 m/s when Bz was northward but increased to 500 m/s after Bz turned southward on January 20.

    Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora - Ionosphere (particle precipitation - Magnetospheric Physics (polar cap phenomena

  18. Bringing Society to a Changing Polar Ocean: Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, O.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic and Antarctic appear to be accelerating and scientists are trying to understand both the patterns and the impacts of change. These changes will have profound impact on humanity and create a need for public education about these critical habitats. We have focused on a two-pronged strategy to increase public awareness as well as enable educators to discuss comfortably the implications of climate change. Our first focus is on entraining public support through the development of science documentaries about the science and people who conduct it. Antarctic Edge is a feature length award-winning documentary about climate change that has been released in May 2015 and has garnered interest in movie theatres and on social media stores (NetFlix, ITunes). This broad outreach is coupled with our group's interest assisting educators formally. The majority of current polar education is focused on direct educator engagement through personal research experiences that have impact on the participating educators' classrooms. Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) proposes to improve educator and student engagement in polar sciences through exposure to scientists and polar data. Through professional development and the creation of data tools, Polar ICE will reduce the logistical costs of bringing polar science to students in grades 6-16. We will provide opportunities to: 1) build capacity of polar scientists in communicating and engaging with diverse audiences; 2) create scalable, in-person and virtual opportunities for educators and students to engage with polar scientists and their research through data visualizations, data activities, educator workshops, webinars, and student research symposia; and 3) evaluate the outcomes of Polar ICE and contribute to our understanding of science education practices. We will use a blended learning approach to promote partnerships and cross-disciplinary sharing. This combined multi-pronged approach

  19. The hybrid outcome of urban change: global city, polarized city?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayat Ismail

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of studies supports the assumption that levels of socio-spatial polarization, segregation, and exclusion are rising in global cities over the past decades as a direct outcome of certain global processes, such as the deindustrialization process, its associated changes in division of labor, and declined redistributive power of the welfare state. However, that assumption – known as the polarization thesis – is criticized based on several contentions, including the oversimplification of the global/local interplay by overlooking the role of local contingent factors that may modify, intensify, or reverse the expected socio-spatial outcome in individual cities. This study aims to capture the hybrid nature of the socio-spatial outcomes of global cities by proving that the complex process of restructuring of cities is a form of structural and chronological hybridity. Through providing a solid empirical ground for investigating the general applicability of the socio-spatial polarization thesis, as well as evaluating the influence of local contexts of cities on the outcomes of urban change. The research offers a theoretical review of the multifaceted restructuring of global cities. Then, the macro trends of global economy are linked to their micro outcomes (segregation patterns within cities, through understanding the implications of cities’ economic functions on local urban policies and housing markets. Finally, the changes in socioeconomic segregation over the past decades are calculated for a large dataset of 66 global cities. The collective result of the analysis shows the downfalls of the generalized hypothesis. While the discussion of individual cities highlights certain contextual particularities, that are contributing to the production of unique socio-spatial configurations in different global cities.

  20. Organisational Structure & Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Structural change is seen as a way to meet the challenges of the future that face many organisations. While some writers agree that broad-ranging structural change may not always transform an organisation or enhance its performance, others claim that innovation will be a major source of competitive advantage to organisations, particularly when…

  1. Study of hadron structure in a deep-inelastic scattering of polarized leptons on polarized nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem is discussed of nucleon structure research in deep inelastic scattering processes of polarized leptons on polarized nucleons. Using a modified Kuti-Weisskopf model theoretical relations are derived for structure functions involved in the deep inelastic differential cross section of leptons on nucleons. (Z.J.)

  2. Coherence and Polarization of Polarization Speckle Generated by Depolarizers and Their Changes through Complex ABCD Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ning; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lee, Tim K.;

    2015-01-01

    Recent research work on speckle patterns indicates a variation of the polarization state during propagation and its nonuniformly spatial distribution. The preliminary step for the investigation of this polarization speckle is the generation of the corresponding field. In this paper, a kind of...... special depolarizer: the random roughness birefringent screen (RRBS) is introduced to meet this requirement. The statistical properties of the field generated by the depolarizer is investigated and illustrated in terms of the 2x2 beam coherence and polarization matrix (BCPM) with the corresponding degree...... of coherence (DoC). and degree of polarization (DoP) P. The changes of the coherence and polarization when the speckle field propagates through any optical system are analysed within the framework of the complex ABCD-matrix theory....

  3. Change in Business Structure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Provides information on whether a company’s change in business structure affects its Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and its Vendor Information Pages...

  4. Alignment of quasar polarizations with large-scale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Hutsemékers, Damien; Pelgrims, Vincent; Sluse, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the optical linear polarization of quasars belonging to Gpc-scale quasar groups at redshift z ~ 1.3. Out of 93 quasars observed, 19 are significantly polarized. We found that quasar polarization vectors are either parallel or perpendicular to the directions of the large-scale structures to which they belong. Statistical tests indicate that the probability that this effect can be attributed to randomly oriented polarization vectors is of the order of 1%. We also found that quasars with polarization perpendicular to the host structure preferentially have large emission line widths while objects with polarization parallel to the host structure preferentially have small emission line widths. Considering that quasar polarization is usually either parallel or perpendicular to the accretion disk axis depending on the inclination with respect to the line of sight, and that broader emission lines originate from quasars seen at higher inclinations, we conclude that quasar spin axes are likely parallel ...

  5. Effects of laser polarization on photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    CERN Document Server

    Buica, Gabriela; 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.053416

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the effects of laser polarization on photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure. We focus on a polarization geometry where the probe and dressing lasers are both linearly polarized, and change the relative polarization angle between them. We find that the total ionization yield and the branching ratio into different ionization channels change as a function of the relative polarization angle, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. We present specific results for the $4p_{1/2}$-$6p_{1/2}$ and $4p_{3/2}$-$6p_{3/2}$ systems of the K atom, and show that the change of the polarization angle leads to the significant modification of photoelectron angular distribution.

  6. Polarization converters on double hetero structures containing strained quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalique, U.; van der Tol, J. J. G. M.; Nötzel, R.; Smit, M. K.

    2009-02-01

    The importance of polarization manipulation is increased as optical fiber systems evolve to higher data rates. Photonic integrated circuits should be insensitive to the state of polarization of the light emanating from fibers if they are to be used as detectors, add-drop mutiplexers or cross connects. Either all the integrated components have to be polarization independent or only one polarization direction should be used. For either method, a compact polarization converter is useful. A model is developed for the mode propagation in the waveguide of the slanted side polarization converter based on double hetero structures. The model is extended to include polarization dependent absorption and mismatch. Polarization converters on different double heterostructures (with and without quantum wells) have been designed and are realized by contact optical lithography. The performance of the realized converters is well described with the model.

  7. High Performance Circularly Polarized Antenna Based on Fractal EBG Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Xiulong; Ammann, Max; Ruvio, Giuseppe; John, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Circularly polarized patch antennas have been widely applied in wireless communication system, global positioning system, etc., because of their low-profile, lightweight, ease of fabrication and low lost [1,2]. To achieve high performance for circularly polarized patch antennas, some new structures were reported in the literature, such as antennas array, stack layer antennas, using periodic structures [3-7], etc. In this paper, a high performance circularly polarized low frequency patch anten...

  8. The hybrid outcome of urban change: global city, polarized city?

    OpenAIRE

    Ayat Ismail

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of studies supports the assumption that levels of socio-spatial polarization, segregation, and exclusion are rising in global cities over the past decades as a direct outcome of certain global processes, such as the deindustrialization process, its associated changes in division of labor, and declined redistributive power of the welfare state. However, that assumption – known as the polarization thesis – is criticized based on several contentions, including the oversimplification...

  9. Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2008-04-01

    The lighting of the underwater environment is constantly changing due to attenuation by water, scattering by suspended particles, as well as the refraction and reflection caused by the surface waves. These factors pose a great challenge for marine animals which communicate through visual signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks and stomatopod crustaceans utilize the polarization properties of light. While the mechanisms behind the polarization vision of these two animal groups are similar, several distinctive types of polarizers (i.e. the structure producing the signal) have been found in these animals. To gain a better knowledge of how these polarizers function, we studied the relationships between fine structures and optical properties of four types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat similar spectral range, around 450- 550 nm, the reflectance properties of the signals and the mechanisms used to produce them have dramatic differences. In cephalopods, stack-plates polarizers produce the polarization patterns found on the arms and around their eyes. In stomatopods, we have found one type of beam-splitting polarizer based on photonic structures and two absorptive polarizer types based on dichroic molecules. These stomatopod polarizers may be found on various appendages, and on the cuticle covering dorsal or lateral sides of the animal. Since the efficiencies of all these polarizer types are somewhat sensitive to the change of illumination and viewing angle, how these animals compensate with different behaviors or fine structural features of the polarizer also varies.

  10. Corporate funding and ideological polarization about climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on large-scale computational data and methods, this research demonstrates how polarization efforts are influenced by a patterned network of political and financial actors. These dynamics, which have been notoriously difficult to quantify, are illustrated here with a computational analysis of climate change politics in the United States. The comprehensive data include all individual and organizational actors in the climate change countermovement (164 organizations), as well as all written and verbal texts produced by this network between 1993-2013 (40,785 texts, more than 39 million words). Two main findings emerge. First, that organizations with corporate funding were more likely to have written and disseminated texts meant to polarize the climate change issue. Second, and more importantly, that corporate funding influences the actual thematic content of these polarization efforts, and the discursive prevalence of that thematic content over time. These findings provide new, and comprehensive, confirmation of dynamics long thought to be at the root of climate change politics and discourse. Beyond the specifics of climate change, this paper has important implications for understanding ideological polarization more generally, and the increasing role of private funding in determining why certain polarizing themes are created and amplified. Lastly, the paper suggests that future studies build on the novel approach taken here that integrates large-scale textual analysis with social networks. PMID:26598653

  11. Polarization beam splitter based on dielectric periodic structure with different EFCs for two polarizations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Zhang; Yurong Jiang; Xia Li; Wei Xue

    2008-01-01

    @@ A dielectric multi-layered structure is studied in this letter. It is found that at some frequency ranges, the equal-frequency contours (EFCs) are almost flat for one polarization but still curve for the other. Based on this property, we propose a novel polarization beam splitter.

  12. Resilience in polar ecosystems: From drivers to impacts and changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölter, Manfred; Müller, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The theory of resilience is increasing in applied ecosystem research and has become a valuable concept for analyzing relationships between natural environments and various stressors, e.g., global warming or direct human impacts. This concept offers opportunities to apply management strategies to different system levels and can provide insights into future ecosystem change. Polar systems are known to be ecologically sensitive to global and local impacts. Records of changes in polar environments, used as alarm signals by governmental and non-governmental institutions, are well documented in various reports. However, it remains difficult to define specific disturbance thresholds, only few methods allow an evaluation of the actual natural state of polar systems, its degree of modification they can accommodate before trophic systems change with severe damages. Some of the main drivers of system changes have been analyzed with respect to possible effects on system changes over different time scales. This paper reviews studies of polar ecosystems and their ability to cope with changes by assessing their resilience in response to human disturbances. Furthermore, we suggest that a customized framework (drivers, pressures, states, impacts, and responses (DPSIR)) should be applied to obtain an improved understanding of the interactions between the state of, and changes in, natural systems.

  13. Uranus’ Hemispheric Asymmetries in Polar Cloud and Circulation Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Heidi B.; Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Pat; de Pater, Imke

    2015-11-01

    We report on the north polar region of Uranus in the post-equinoctial era. Near-IR imaging with Keck 2 using NIRC2 in 2012-2014 revealed numerous small bright features, as well as small dark features, between 50 degrees N and the north pole. Tracking of these features yielded circulation patterns, with the remarkable result that the region from 60 degrees to at least 83 degrees rotates about the northern pole as a solid body, with a drift rate of 4.1 degrees/hour westward relative to the interior (Sromovsky et al. 2015, Icarus 258, 192-223). For the south pole, the same latitude region had dramatically different characteristics, as judged by 1986 Voyager and 2003 Keck observations. The southern region showed no discrete near-IR features; detailed circulation measurements in that region were based solely on low-contrast features in re-analyzed Voyager images (Karkoschka, 2015, Icarus 250, 294-307). They revealed a large gradient in drift rates, with values reaching twice that seen in the corresponding northern region.The north-south asymmetry in circulation and cloud structure/morphology is surprising because the distribution of upper tropospheric methane is relatively symmetric: roughly constant over a region from 30 S to 30 N, and then declining at higher latitudes in both hemispheres. The methane distribution suggests symmetric down-welling motion in both polar regions, which would inhibit formation of condensation clouds there, in contrast to the observed dichotomy. Some asymmetry may be an effect of seasonal forcing, since the north versus south polar measurements were made during different seasons. If so, then major changes can be expected in the north polar region as Uranus proceeds toward its 2030 northern summer solstice. Hubble STIS observations expected in October of 2015 will further examine the vertical distribution and stability of the polar methane abundances. Future high-resolution imaging with Earth-based facilities will be able to track circulation

  14. Monocyte polarization: the relationship of genome-wide changes in H4 acetylation with polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Song, L; Maurer, K; Bagashev, A; Sullivan, K E

    2011-09-01

    The character of monocytes is both molded by and contributes to ongoing immune responses. We hypothesized that monocyte polarization could have durable qualities and these would be mediated partly by changes in the chromatin. We defined genome-wide expression and histone H4 acetylation (H4ac) changes after γ-interferon (IFN), α-IFN and interleukin-4 treatment. To identify genes with altered potential for expression, we stimulated polarized monocytes and identified genes up- or downregulated after polarization and stimulation but not either treatment alone. We also defined durability after an 18-h or 3-day washout. Genes uniquely regulated after the combination of polarization and stimulus were durably altered, with 51% of the effects being durable. This gene set was highly enriched for cytokine-induced alterations in H4ac, with P-values ranging from 10(-24) to 10(-37). Certain regulons defined by patterns of expression were also associated with altered H4ac, with P-values ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-29). Networking software revealed a high density of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase nodes in these clusters. Therefore, some changes in monocyte gene expression were sustained over a 3-day period. These durably altered gene sets were enriched for changes in H4ac and were associated with potential MAP kinase effects. PMID:21451557

  15. A Novel Nano-Grating Structure of Polarizing Beam Splitters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang; LI Jing; LI Cheng-Fang; ZHANG Fei; SHI Li-Na

    2006-01-01

    @@ A metal wire nanograting is fabricated and used as a polarizing beam splitter that reflects TE polarization and transmits TM polarization. The metal wire nanograting is based on a fully optimized design structure that consists of not only the core nanowire metal grid but also the substrate nanograting. The substrate nanograting is designed to provide better performance for both TM and TE polarizations. We fabricate metal-stripe gratings on a glass substrate using nanoimprint lithography and reactive ion etching process. A detailed investigation of the polarization effect at 1550 nm wavelength is carried out with the theoretical analysis and experimental results.The polarizing beam splitter has uniform performance with wide variations in the incident angle (±25) and has high efficiency for both the reflected and the transmitted beams.

  16. Polar marine ecosystems: major threats and future change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, A. [British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Harris, C.M. [Environmental Research and Assessment, Grantchester (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    This review of polar marine ecosystems covers both the Arctic and Antarctic, identifying the major threats and, where possible, predicting their possible state(s) in 2025. Although the two polar regions are similar in their extreme photoperiod, low temperatures, and in being heavily influenced by snow and ice, in almost all other respects they are very different. The Arctic Ocean is a basin surrounded by continental landmasses close to, and influenced by, large populations and industrial activities. In contrast, the Southern Ocean is contiguous with all the other great oceans and surrounds a single land mass; Antarctica is remote from major centres of population and sources of pollution. Marine environments in both Polar Regions have been highly disturbed by fishing activity, but, in terms of pollution, some areas remain among the most pristine in the world. There are, however, both local and global pressures. Over the 2025 time horizon, the greatest concern for the Arctic is probably the ecological implications of climate change, particularly insofar as sea ice extent and duration are likely to be affected. Such changes are not expected to be as pronounced in the Southern Ocean over this time period, and concerns are related more to direct threats from harvesting of marine living resources, and the ability to manage these fisheries sustainably. In both Polar Regions, the capacity of marine ecosystems to withstand the cumulative impact of a number of pressures, including climate change, pollution and overexploitation, acting synergistically is of greatest concern. (author)

  17. Alignment of quasar polarizations with large-scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutsemékers, D.; Braibant, L.; Pelgrims, V.; Sluse, D.

    2014-12-01

    We have measured the optical linear polarization of quasars belonging to Gpc scale quasar groups at redshift z ~ 1.3. Out of 93 quasars observed, 19 are significantly polarized. We found that quasar polarization vectors are either parallel or perpendicular to the directions of the large-scale structures to which they belong. Statistical tests indicate that the probability that this effect can be attributed to randomly oriented polarization vectors is on the order of 1%. We also found that quasars with polarization perpendicular to the host structure preferentially have large emission line widths while objects with polarization parallel to the host structure preferentially have small emission line widths. Considering that quasar polarization is usually either parallel or perpendicular to the accretion disk axis depending on the inclination with respect to the line of sight, and that broader emission lines originate from quasars seen at higher inclinations, we conclude that quasar spin axes are likely parallel to their host large-scale structures. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 092.A-0221.Table 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Polarized and Unpolarized Structure Functions in the Valon Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz

    2006-02-01

    Hadrons are considered as the bound states of their structureful constituents, the Valons. The valon structure is calculated perturbatively in QCD; which is universal and independent of the hosting hadron. This structure is used to calculate Proton and pion structure functions. For the case of polarized structure function, the valon representation, not only gives all the available data on gp,n,d1, but also requires a sizable orbital angular momentum associated with the partonic structure of the valon.

  19. Enhanced polarization of (11–22) semi-polar InGaN nanorod array structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanasiou, M.; Smith, R. M.; Hou, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    By means of a cost effective nanosphere lithography technique, an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure grown on (11–22) semipolar GaN has been fabricated into two dimensional nanorod arrays which form a photonic crystal (PhC) structure. Such a PhC structure demonstrates not only significantly increased emission intensity, but also an enhanced polarization ratio of the emission. This is due to an effective inhibition of the emission in slab modes and then redistribution to the vertical direction, thus minimizing the light scattering processes that lead to randomizing of the optical polarization. The PhC structure is designed based on a standard finite-difference-time-domain simulation, and then optically confirmed by detailed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The results presented pave the way for the fabrication of semipolar InGaN/GaN based emitters with both high efficiency and highly polarized emission.

  20. Radio polarization and magnetic field structure in M 101

    CERN Document Server

    Berkhuijsen, E M; Beck, R; Han, J L

    2016-01-01

    We observed total and polarized radio continuum emission from the spiral galaxy M 101 at 6.2 cm and 11.1 cm wavelengths with the Effelsberg telescope. We use these data to study various emission components in M 101 and properties of the magnetic field. Separation of thermal and non-thermal emission shows that the thermal emission is closely correlated with the spiral arms, while the non-thermal emission is more smoothly distributed indicating diffusion of cosmic ray electrons away from their places of origin. The radial distribution of both emissions has a break near R=16 kpc, where it steepens to an exponential scale length of about 5 kpc, which is about 2.5 times smaller than at R<16 kpc. The distribution of the polarized emission has a broad maximum near R=12 kpc and beyond R=16 kpc also decreases with about 5 kpc scalelength. It seems that near R=16 kpc a major change in the structure of M 101 takes place, which also affects the distributions of the strength of the random and ordered magnetic field. Be...

  1. Milliarcsecond polarization structure of the superluminal quasar 3C 273

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D.H.; Kollgaard, R.I.; Brown, L.F.; Gabuzda, D.C.; Wardle, J.F. C. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A 2 x 10 marcsec-resolution determination is presented for the total intensity and linear polarization structures of the superluminal quasar 3C 273 at 5 GHz. Substantial polarized flux was detected from several superluminal components of the jet, whose fractional polarization increased symmetrically with distance from the core; the most distant component is highly polarized and exhibits a highly ordered magnetic field. Within a few marcsec of the core, the inferred magnetic field orientation varies rapidly with position along the jet. The primarily longitudinal magnetic field orientation is concluded to become established within 20 marcsec of the core. A highly disorganized magnetic field is the most plausible explanation for the low degree of polarization in the innermost regions of the jet. 48 refs.

  2. Milliarcsecond polarization structure of the superluminal quasar 3C 273

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2 x 10 marcsec-resolution determination is presented for the total intensity and linear polarization structures of the superluminal quasar 3C 273 at 5 GHz. Substantial polarized flux was detected from several superluminal components of the jet, whose fractional polarization increased symmetrically with distance from the core; the most distant component is highly polarized and exhibits a highly ordered magnetic field. Within a few marcsec of the core, the inferred magnetic field orientation varies rapidly with position along the jet. The primarily longitudinal magnetic field orientation is concluded to become established within 20 marcsec of the core. A highly disorganized magnetic field is the most plausible explanation for the low degree of polarization in the innermost regions of the jet. 48 refs

  3. Polarization Induced Changes in LSM Thin Film Electrode Composition Observed by In Operando Raman Spectroscopy and TOF-SIMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntyre, Melissa D.; Traulsen, Marie Lund; Norrman, Kion;

    2015-01-01

    electrical polarizations. Raman spectra recorded during polarization showed shifts in spectral intensities that were both reversible and dependent on the applied potential. Spectral changes were assigned to changes in the LSM electronic structure that resulted from changing oxide concentrations in the near......-surface region. Ex situ TOF-SIMS depth profiles were recorded through the LSM electrodes and revealed distinct compositional changes throughout the electrodes. The electrode elements and impurities separated into well-defined layers that were more stratified for stronger applied polarizations. The mechanism...

  4. Polar and chemical domain structures of lead scandium tantalate (PST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local structure of chemical and polar domains and domain walls is determined directly by atomic resolution high-resolution electron microscopy. Thus the Pb, Ta and Sc atomic positions may be located in the images of very thin crystals. Furthermore the Pb cation displacements away from the ideal perovskite A-site have been measured directly for the first time. Local variations in polarization direction may be mapped directly off the images, provided certain electron optical conditions are met. The results are relevant to recent theories of polar-glass behaviour in relaxor-type complex oxide functional ceramics. 17 refs., 9 figs

  5. Tailored Optical Polarization in Nano-Structured Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, Bernardo S

    2016-01-01

    A very efficient method for the calculation of the effective optical response of nano-structured composite systems allows the design of metamaterials tailored for specific optical polarization properties. We use our method to design 2D periodic arrays of sub-wavelength dielectric inclusions within nanometric supported metallic thin films which behave as either an almost perfect linearly dichroic system, as a controllable source of circular polarized light, as a system with a large circular dichroism, or as a circular polarizer. All of these systems may be tuned over a wide energy range.

  6. Quarks and gluons in nucleon polarized structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bourrely, C; Pisanti, O; Santorelli, P; Soffer, J

    1996-01-01

    We study the quark and gluon contributions to the proton and neutron polarized structure functions by considering two different theoretical interpretations. Both approaches are consistent with the world available data from CERN and SLAC. We conclude that, in order to clarify the situation, one should improve the accuracy of the presently running experiments, but one also needs to seriously look into HERA with both electron and proton polarized beams

  7. Aggregation of Dodecyl 1-Pyrenylmethyl Ether and Its Application in Structure-Polarity Relations of Aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG,Da-Yong; TIAN,Juan; JI,Guo-Zhen

    2006-01-01

    The aggregation behavior of dodecyl 1-pyrenylmethyl ether was studied in dioxane-water mixture solvents by fluorescence techniques. The labeled pyrenyl group was effective in monitoring the polarity change of its environment during aggregation processes. Based on the structural effects such as chain-length effect, self-coiling effect,and branch-group effect on the polarity of the probe environment, the structure features of aggregates were discussed and have been used to interpret the effect of the structural features on the aggregates formed by three cholesteryl esters and three long chain alkanes.

  8. Linearly Polarized IR Spectroscopy Theory and Applications for Structural Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Tsonko

    2011-01-01

    A technique that is useful in the study of pharmaceutical products and biological molecules, polarization IR spectroscopy has undergone continuous development since it first emerged almost 100 years ago. Capturing the state of the science as it exists today, "Linearly Polarized IR Spectroscopy: Theory and Applications for Structural Analysis" demonstrates how the technique can be properly utilized to obtain important information about the structure and spectral properties of oriented compounds. The book starts with the theoretical basis of linear-dichroic infrared (IR-LD) spectroscop

  9. A new symmetrical polarization structure near the galactic centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented during a new region of polarized emission, near the galactic centre. The structure of the region has the form of a central component with two jet-like outer lobes. Total intensity maps of the structure, at 4.75 and 10.7 GHz, show that the core and lobes lie symmetrically with respect to the galactic plane. The symmetry of the region suggests the location of a new ''centre of activity'' within the galactic centre region at the position of the polarized core, although total intensity maps do not distinguish this region at all except at low frequencies. (U.K.)

  10. Imaging, object detection, and change detection with a polarized multistatic GPR array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W.

    2015-07-21

    A polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection factoring in the orientation of an object relative to the orientation of transceivers. The polarized detection system may operate on one of several modes of operation based on whether the imaging, object detection, or change detection is performed separately for each transceiver orientation. In combined change mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines changes across polarizations. In combined object mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging and object detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines objects across polarizations and performs change detection on the result. In combined image mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines images across polarizations and performs object detection followed by change detection on the result.

  11. The milliarcsecond polarization structure of six BL Lacertae objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliarcsecond resolution total intensity and linear polarization maps at GHz are presented for the BL Lacertae objects 0235 + 164, 0454 + 844, 1749 + 096, 1823 + 568, and 2200 + 420 (BL Lac). Maps of 1807 + 698 (3C 371), which has in the past been classified either as a BL Lacertae object or an N galaxy, are also presented. Appreciable polarization structure is found in 0454 + 844, 1823 + 568, and BL Lac; in each the polarization position angle in the knots lies within about 10 deg of the structural direction of the VLBI jet, suggesting that plane perpendicular shock waves may be common in these objects. The polarization of 3C 371 is weak, and is quite atypical of BL Lacertae objects. Superluminal motion in 1823 + 568 is suggested. Similar comparison for 0454 + 844 over four epochs confirms proper motion at mu about 0.14 mas/yr. Systematic differences in the VLBI polarization structures of BL Lacertae objects and quasars rule out the possibility that a significant fraction of BL Lacertae objects are gravitationally microlensed quasars. 87 refs

  12. Polarization Control by Using Anisotropic 3D Chiral Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Menglin L N; Sha, Wei E I; Choy, Wallace C H; Itoh, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the mirror symmetry breaking, chiral structures show fantastic electromagnetic (EM) properties involving negative refraction, giant optical activity, and asymmetric transmission. Aligned electric and magnetic dipoles excited in chiral structures contribute to extraordinary properties. However, the chiral structures that exhibit n-fold rotational symmetry show limited tuning capability. In this paper, we proposed a compact, light, and highly tunable anisotropic chiral structure to overcome this limitation and realize a linear-to-circular polarization conversion. The anisotropy is due to simultaneous excitations of two different pairs of aligned electric and magnetic dipoles. The 3D omega-like structure, etched on two sides of one PCB board and connected by metallic vias, achieves 60% of linearto- circular conversion (transmission) efficiency at the operating frequency of 9.2 GHz. The desired 90-degree phase shift between the two orthogonal linear polarization components is not only from the finite-thick...

  13. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  14. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzovsky, E V; Buyanov, Yu I; Koshelev, V I; Nekrasov, E S

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well. PMID:27036799

  15. Chemical changes in the Arctic troposphere at polar sunrise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At polar sunrise, the Arctic troposphere (0 to ∼8 km) is a unique chemical reactor influenced by human activity and the Arctic Ocean. It is surrounded by industrialized continents that in winter contribute gaseous and particulate pollution (Arctic haze). It is underlain by the flat Arctic Ocean from which it is separated by a crack-ridden ice membrane 3 to 4 m thick. Ocean to atmosphere exchange of heat, water vapor and marine biogenic gases influence the composition of the reactor. From 21 September to 21 December to 21 March, the region north of the Arctic circle goes from a completely sunlit situation to a completely dark one and then back to light. At the same time the lower troposphere is stably stratified. This hinders vertical mixing. In this environment, chemical reactions involving sunlight are much slower than further south. Thus, it would not be surprising to find a high abundance of photochemically reactive compounds in the atmosphere at polar sunrise. Between complete dark in February and complete light in April, a number of chemical changes in the lower troposphere are observed. Perhaps the most sensational is the destruction of lower tropospheric ozone accompanied by production of filterable bromine and iodine. The latter are likely of marine origin, although their production may involve anthropogenic compounds. Another change is the shift in the fraction of total sulfur in its end oxidation state (VI) from 50% to 90%. Several gaseous hydrocarbons disappear from the atmosphere at this time. Preliminary observations also indicate a maximum in total non-black carbon on particulate matter. This is consistent with the formation of non-volatile organics from photochemically induced reactions of gas phase organics. Results of the Canadian Polar Sunrise Experiment 1988 are presented

  16. Polarized Structure Functions and the GDH Integral from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Schierholz, G

    2004-01-01

    The Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral $I_{GDH}(Q^2)$, and its relation to polarized nucleon structure functions, is discussed from the lattice perspective. Of particular interest is the variation of $I_{GDH}(Q^2)$ with $Q^2$, and what it may teach us about the origin and magnitude of higher-twist contributions.

  17. What can we learn from polarized structure function data?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarise the perturbative QCD analysis of the structure function data for g1 from longitudinally polarized deep inelastic scattering from proton, deuteron and neutron targets, with particular emphasis on testing sum rules, determining helicity fractions, and extracting the strong coupling from both scaling violations and the Bjorken sum rule

  18. What can we learn from polarized structure function data?

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R D; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ball, Richard D.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano

    1997-01-01

    We summarise the perturbative QCD analysis of the structure function data for g_1 from longitudinally polarized deep inelastic scattering from proton, deuteron and neutron targets, with particular emphasis on testing sum rules, determining helicity fractions, and extracting the strong coupling from both scaling violations and the Bjorken sum rule.

  19. Thermospheric Neutral Density Responses to Changes in IMF Sector Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Y.; Kim, K.; Forbes, J.; Lee, S.

    2008-12-01

    The thermospheric density is important not only for satellite orbital tracking, but also in understanding the thermosphere-ionosphere coupling process as well. Thermospheric density variations are controlled by various sources such as Joule/particle heating, Lorentz force, thermal expansion, upwelling and horizontal wind circulation. These sources are directly or indirectly associated with the direction and/or strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). That is, there is an intimate relationship between IMF variation and thermospheric density variation. In order to examine how thermospheric density variations are influenced on the orientation and/or strength of the IMF, we used total mass density around 400 km, derived from the high- accuracy accelerometer on board the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) spacecraft, in 2003 when the IMF exhibited a well-defined sector polarity change with a ~27-day periodicity; directed toward the Sun (i.e., +Bx and -By) and away the Sun (-Bx and +By). It has been known that the IMF By in GSE coordinates makes a positive or negative IMF Bz offset in GSM coordinate. We discuss whether the thermospheric total mass density from CHAMP changes with the IMF sector polarity.

  20. Measurements of the neutron polarized structure function at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed measurements of unpolarized or spin-averaged nucleon structure functions over the past two decades have led to detailed knowledge of the nucleon's internal momentum distribution. Polarized nucleon structure function measurements, which probe the nucleon's internal spin distribution, started at SLAC in 1976. E-142 has recently measured the neutron polarized structure function g1n(x) over the range 0.03 ≤ x ≤ 0.6 at an average Q2 of 2 GeV2 and found the integral In = ∫01g1n(x)dx=-0.022±0.011. E-143, which took data recently, has measured g1p and g14. Two more experiments (E-154 and E-155) will extend these measurements to lower x and higher Q2

  1. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szakál, Alex, E-mail: szakal.alex@wigner.mta.hu; Markó, Márton, E-mail: marko.marton@wigner.mta.hu; Cser, László, E-mail: cser.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  2. Climate change threatens polar bear populations: A stochastic demographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, C.M.; Caswell, H.; Runge, M.C.; Regehr, E.V.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.

    2010-01-01

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice for feeding, breeding, and movement. Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice are forecast to continue because of climate warming. We evaluated the impacts of climate change on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea by means of a demographic analysis, combining deterministic, stochastic, environment-dependent matrix population models with forecasts of future sea ice conditions from IPCC general circulation models (GCMs). The matrix population models classified individuals by age and breeding status; mothers and dependent cubs were treated as units. Parameter estimates were obtained from a capture-recapture study conducted from 2001 to 2006. Candidate statistical models allowed vital rates to vary with time and as functions of a sea ice covariate. Model averaging was used to produce the vital rate estimates, and a parametric bootstrap procedure was used to quantify model selection and parameter estimation uncertainty. Deterministic models projected population growth in years with more extensive ice coverage (2001-2003) and population decline in years with less ice coverage (2004-2005). LTRE (life table response experiment) analysis showed that the reduction in ?? in years with low sea ice was due primarily to reduced adult female survival, and secondarily to reduced breeding. A stochastic model with two environmental states, good and poor sea ice conditions, projected a declining stochastic growth rate, log ??s, as the frequency of poor ice years increased. The observed frequency of poor ice years since 1979 would imply log ??s ' - 0.01, which agrees with available (albeit crude) observations of population size. The stochastic model was linked to a set of 10 GCMs compiled by the IPCC; the models were chosen for their ability to reproduce historical observations of sea ice and were forced with "business as usual" (A1B) greenhouse gas emissions. The resulting stochastic population projections showed drastic

  3. Low temperature polarized target for spin structure studies of nucleons at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Pesek, Michael

    In presented thesis we describe concept of Deep Inelastic Scattering of leptons on nucleons in context of nucleon spin structure studies. Both polarized and unpolarized cases are discussed and concept of Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution Functions (TMD PDF) is introduced. The possibility of TMDs measurement using Semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) is described along with related results from COMPASS experiment. The future Drell-Yan programme at COMPASS is briefly mentioned and its importance is presented on the universality test i.e. change of sign of T-odd TMDs when measured in Drell-Yan and SIDIS. The importance of Polarized Target (PT) for spin structure studies is highlighted and principles of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) are given using both Solid effect and spin temperature concept. COMPASS experiment is described in many details with accent given to PT. Finally the thermal equilibrium (TE) calibration procedure is described and carried out for 2010 and 2011 physics runs at COMPASS. The av...

  4. Effects of climatic changes on anisakid nematodes in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokicki, Jerzy

    2009-11-01

    Anisakid nematodes are common in Antarctic, sub-Antarctic, and Arctic areas. Current distributional knowledge of anisakids in the polar regions is reviewed. Climatic variables influence the occurrence and abundance of anisakids, directly influencing their free-living larval stages and also indirectly influencing their predominantly invertebrate (but also vertebrate) hosts. As these parasites can also be pathogenic for humans, the paucity of information available is a source of additional hazard. As fish are a major human dietary component in Arctic and Antarctic areas, and are often eaten without heat processing, a high risk of infection by anisakid larvae might be expected. The present level of knowledge, particularly relating to anisakid larval stages present in fishes, is far from satisfactory. Preliminary molecular studies have revealed the presence of species complexes. Contemporary climate warming is modifying the marine environment and may result in an extension of time during which anisakid eggs can persist and hatch, and of the time period during which newly hatched larvae remain viable. As a result there may be an increase in the extent of anisakid distribution. Continued warming will modify the composition of the parasitic nematode fauna of marine animals, due to changes in feeding habits, as the warming of the sea and any localised reduction in salinity (from freshwater runoff) can be expected to bring about changes in the species composition of pelagic and benthic invertebrates.

  5. Polarization Selectivity of Artificial Anisotropic Structures Based on DNA-Like Helices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, 2D and 3D structures of different symmetries can be formed from DNA molecules. The electromagnetic properties of this new natural chiral material can be changed by metalizing DNA. Spatial structures of this type can be used in nanotechnology to prepare metamaterials for the far-UV region. It is shown by the example of an octahedron and a cube composed of DNA-like helices that these structures may exhibit polarization selectivity to electromagnetic radiation. In addition, it is suggested that the effect of the polarization selectivity of DNA-like artificial structures may also occur in the soft X-ray region for all living organisms in nature due to the universal DNA form.

  6. Seasonal and Annual Change in the Martian Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; James, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    The polar caps have a long established dichotomy in visual appearance, relative elevations, and surface composition. Observations using the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) instruments MARCI, CTX and CRISM have shown unique styles of seasonal frost retreat as well as fine scale variations in the composition of various units. With MRO we have observations for three Martian Years (MY) 28, 29 and 30 from November of 2006 to the present. We have observed the seasonal cap recessions in both the north and south using MARCI daily global images and have examined the composition of selected units of the polar layered deposits exposed in summer. Observation over multiple Mars years allows us to compare changes between years as well as longer term evolution of the high albedo deposits at the poles. North Cap Recession and Change: The northern seasonal cap recession was observed in both MY 29 and 30. Past work had noted large scale loss of bright deposits up to Ls 95 and the rugged terrain of the Gemini Scopuli darkens up to ~Ls 100 and then subsequently brightens. The patterns observed in MY 29 and 30 are similar. Significant variability in the early season is noted in both years and the retreating seasonal cap edge is extremely dynamic. Additional retreat of high albedo deposits are noted in MY 30. A new high albedo deposit appears off a reentrant in Olympia Planum in MY 29 and later disappears. In MY30, portions of Olympia Planitia have larger areas of high albedo. In both years sustained bright patches appear along the cap margins and while some are persistent between years, they are also variable over the northern summer. It is still uncertain if these albedo changes represent volatile "refrosting" or the removal of low albedo material to expose higher albedo material underneath and whether or not longer term loss of volatiles is implied. South Cap Recession and Change: The southern seasonal cap recession is fundamentally different than the north, and persistence of

  7. Permutation Tests for Structural Change

    OpenAIRE

    Zeileis, Achim; Hothorn, Torsten

    2006-01-01

    The supLM test for structural change is embedded into a permutation test framework for a simple location model. The resulting conditional permutation distribution is compared to the usual (unconditional) asymptotic distribution, showing that the power of the test can be clearly improved in small samples. Furthermore, generalizations are discussed for binary and multivariate dependent variables as well as model-based permutation testing for structural change. The procedures suggested are illus...

  8. PoLAR Voices: Informing Adult Learners about the Science and Story of Climate Change in the Polar Regions Through Audio Podcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinney, A.; Murray, M. S.; Gobroski, K. A.; Topp, R. M.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The resurgence of audio programming with the advent of podcasting in the early 2000s spawned a new medium for communicating advances in science, research, and technology. To capitalize on this informal educational outlet, the Arctic Institute of North America partnered with the International Arctic Research Center, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the UA Museum of the North to develop a podcast series called PoLAR Voices for the Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership. PoLAR Voices is a public education initiative that uses creative storytelling and novel narrative structures to immerse the listener in an auditory depiction of climate change. The programs will feature the science and story of climate change, approaching topics from both the points of view of researchers and Arctic indigenous peoples. This approach will engage the listener in the holistic story of climate change, addressing both scientific and personal perspectives, resulting in a program that is at once educational, entertaining and accessible. Feedback is being collected at each stage of development to ensure the content and format of the program satisfies listener interests and preferences. Once complete, the series will be released on thepolarhub.org and on iTunes. Additionally, blanket distribution of the programs will be accomplished via radio broadcast in urban, rural and remote areas, and in multiple languages to increase distribution and enhance accessibility.

  9. Assessment of polar climate change using satellite technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.

    1988-02-01

    Results from general circulation models (GCMs) have indicated that a predicted climate warming resulting from an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) will be amplified in the polar regions and that temperature increases in the polar regions will be several times greater than the global average. Some GCMs predict a 4°-5°C average air temperature increase in the Arctic by the middle of the next century. Evidence from the polar regions indicates that a warming in the cryosphere may already be in progress. A 2°-4°C rise in permafrost temperature, measured in northern Alaska, is believed to have occurred during the last 100 years. In addition, many small valley glaciers and ice caps have experienced retreat and appear to have contributed up to 50% to the observed rise (10-15 cm) in sea level during the last century. Other work shows that increased snowfall which can be associated with warmer temperatures has caused thickening of some Alaskan glaciers. Though a decrease in snow and sea ice cover would be a likely consequence of global warming, a sustained decrease in global snow and sea ice extent has not been found from analysis of more than 20 years of image data (1.1-km pixel resolution) from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorological satellites and more than 7 years of scanning multichannel microwave radiometer snow data (30-km pixel resolution) on the Nimbus 7 satellite. Snow and sea ice are sensitive to atmospheric temperature changes because of their large surface to volume ratio. While measurements of snow and sea ice extent, snow depth, and sea ice concentration are possible using visible, near-infrared, or microwave sensors on satellites, it is not feasible to measure the mass balance of the ice sheets with these sensors directly. Estimates by glaciologists show that the Greenland Ice Sheet is in approximate equilibrium and that the Antarctic Ice Sheet has a positive mass balance. Satellite radar altimetry (and in the future

  10. Radiation-induced structural changes. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar was held for discussion on recent progress in experimental investigation of positron and its application to material science. Fundamental characteristics of positronium, measuring method, molecular structure of positronium, and its annihilation and reaction, in liquid phase positronium chemistry are reported. The nonthermal positrons (0.25-2.5 keV) are occurred in KURRI-LINAC, slow positrons are found out by moderating with solid xenon film. Positronium formation in insulating materials are reported. Positron lifetime and insulating rupture strength are measured with epoxy resin and fluororesin changing bridging density, experimental materials temperature, gamma ray dose Free-volume studies on polymer in multiphase systems are evaluated using the method of spin labeling, the molecular dynamics of polymer chains are discussed. The anisotropy diffusion process on structural relaxation of linear polymers are described, introducing the molecular dynamics simulation of polarization and stress relaxation of ferroelectric polymers. (J.P.N.)

  11. Polarized Structure Function of Nucleon and Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh

    2007-06-01

    We have utilized the concept of valon model to calculate the spin structure function of a constituent quark. This structure is universal and arises from perturbative dressing of a valence quark in QCD. With a convolution method the polarized structure functions of proton, neutron, and deuteron are obtained. Our results agree rather well with all available experimental data. It suggests that the sea quark contribution to the spin of nucleon is consistent with zero, in agreement with HERMES data. It also reveals that while the total quark contribution to the spin of a constituent quark, or valon, is almost constant and equal to one, the gluon contribution grows with the increase of Q2, and hence, requiring a sizable negative angular momentum contribution. This component, as well as singlet and non-singlet parts are calculated in the Next-to-Leading order in QCD. We speculate that the gluon contribution to the spin of proton is in the order of 50%. Furthermore, we have determined the polarized valon distribution in a nucleon.

  12. Modulated nematic structures induced by chirality and steric polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longa, Lech; PajÄ k, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    What kind of one-dimensional modulated nematic structures (ODMNS) can form nonchiral and chiral bent-core and dimeric materials? Here, using the Landau-de Gennes theory of nematics, extended to account for molecular steric polarization, we study a possibility of formation of ODMNS, both in nonchiral and intrinsically chiral liquid crystalline materials. Besides nematic and cholesteric phases, we find four bulk ODMNS for nonchiral materials, two of which, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported so far. These two structures are longitudinal (NLP) and transverse (NTP) periodic waves where the polarization field being periodic in one dimension stays parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the wave vector. The other two phases are the twist-bend nematic phase (NTB) and the splay-bend nematic phase (NSB), but their fine structure appears more complex than that considered so far. The presence of molecular chirality converts nonchiral NTP and NSB into new NTB phases. Surprisingly, the nonchiral NLP phase can stay stable even in the presence of intrinsic chirality.

  13. Light switching at low light level based on changes in light polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the polarization spectroscopy of a linearly-polarized optical (probe) field in a multi-Zeeman-sublevel atomic system of the 87Rb D1 line. The polarization spectroscopy signals of the probe light result from the changes in its polarization, which are caused by a left-circularly polarized pumping beam. A theoretical analysis involving multiple Zeeman sublevels is presented and the results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. Based on this phenomenon, we demonstrated a light switch at low light level (∼68 photons per λ2/2π) with a switching efficiency of ∼3%

  14. Light switching at low light level based on changes in light polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Xudong; Li Shujing; Cao Xuemin; Wang Hai [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)], E-mail: wanghai@sxu.edu.cn

    2008-04-28

    We studied the polarization spectroscopy of a linearly-polarized optical (probe) field in a multi-Zeeman-sublevel atomic system of the {sup 87}Rb D1 line. The polarization spectroscopy signals of the probe light result from the changes in its polarization, which are caused by a left-circularly polarized pumping beam. A theoretical analysis involving multiple Zeeman sublevels is presented and the results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. Based on this phenomenon, we demonstrated a light switch at low light level ({approx}68 photons per {lambda}{sup 2}/2{pi}) with a switching efficiency of {approx}3%.

  15. Circumpolar Genetic Structure and Recent Gene Flow of Polar Bears: A Reanalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René M Malenfant

    Full Text Available Recently, an extensive study of 2,748 polar bears (Ursus maritimus from across their circumpolar range was published in PLOS ONE, which used microsatellites and mitochondrial haplotypes to apparently show altered population structure and a dramatic change in directional gene flow towards the Canadian Archipelago-an area believed to be a future refugium for polar bears as their southernmost habitats decline under climate change. Although this study represents a major international collaborative effort and promised to be a baseline for future genetics work, methodological shortcomings and errors of interpretation undermine some of the study's main conclusions. Here, we present a reanalysis of this data in which we address some of these issues, including: (1 highly unbalanced sample sizes and large amounts of systematically missing data; (2 incorrect calculation of FST and of significance levels; (3 misleading estimates of recent gene flow resulting from non-convergence of the program BayesAss. In contrast to the original findings, in our reanalysis we find six genetic clusters of polar bears worldwide: the Hudson Bay Complex, the Western and Eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Western and Eastern Polar Basin, and-importantly-we reconfirm the presence of a unique and possibly endangered cluster of bears in Norwegian Bay near Canada's expected last sea-ice refugium. Although polar bears' abundance, distribution, and population structure will certainly be negatively affected by ongoing-and increasingly rapid-loss of Arctic sea ice, these genetic data provide no evidence of strong directional gene flow in response to recent climate change.

  16. Circumpolar Genetic Structure and Recent Gene Flow of Polar Bears: A Reanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenfant, René M; Davis, Corey S; Cullingham, Catherine I; Coltman, David W

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an extensive study of 2,748 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from across their circumpolar range was published in PLOS ONE, which used microsatellites and mitochondrial haplotypes to apparently show altered population structure and a dramatic change in directional gene flow towards the Canadian Archipelago-an area believed to be a future refugium for polar bears as their southernmost habitats decline under climate change. Although this study represents a major international collaborative effort and promised to be a baseline for future genetics work, methodological shortcomings and errors of interpretation undermine some of the study's main conclusions. Here, we present a reanalysis of this data in which we address some of these issues, including: (1) highly unbalanced sample sizes and large amounts of systematically missing data; (2) incorrect calculation of FST and of significance levels; (3) misleading estimates of recent gene flow resulting from non-convergence of the program BayesAss. In contrast to the original findings, in our reanalysis we find six genetic clusters of polar bears worldwide: the Hudson Bay Complex, the Western and Eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Western and Eastern Polar Basin, and-importantly-we reconfirm the presence of a unique and possibly endangered cluster of bears in Norwegian Bay near Canada's expected last sea-ice refugium. Although polar bears' abundance, distribution, and population structure will certainly be negatively affected by ongoing-and increasingly rapid-loss of Arctic sea ice, these genetic data provide no evidence of strong directional gene flow in response to recent climate change. PMID:26974333

  17. Large amplitude nonlinear structures in the nighttime polar mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Shimul K.; Bharuthram, Ramashwar; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax; Muralikrishna, Polinaya; Singh, Satyavir

    2016-07-01

    The existence of large amplitude potential structures will be investigated for a plasma composed of negative ions, positive ions, electrons and an additional fourth component of charged (usually positive) nano-sized ions in an attempt to model the plasma composition in the nighttime polar mesosphere (˜80 - 90 km altitude) [1]. The fourth ionic component becomes positively charged if there is a high enough concentration of negative ions which are sufficiently heavy. The positive charge on the fourth component can be explained by the capture of currents, and is not a result of photo-emission and secondary electron emission processes. Consequently, if the negative ions are much lighter, then the fourth ion component will become negatively charged. The charged ion species will be treated as inertial species which are cold or adiabatic, whilst the electrons will be considered to be Boltzmann-distributed (isothermal). Taking into consideration not only the dynamics of the heaviest species (dust-acoustic) but also the lighter ions (ion-acoustic), the theoretical study will use the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism to explore the existence of arbitrary amplitude solitons and double layer potential structures. [1] Observations of positively charged nanoparticles in the nighttime polar mesosphere, M. Rapp, J. Hedin, I. Strelnikova, M. Friederich, J. Gumbel, and F.˜J. Lübken, Geophys. Res. Letters. 32, L23821, doi:10.1029/2005GL024676 (2005).

  18. More about arc-polarized structures in the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report results from a Cluster-based study of the properties of 28 arc-polarized magnetic structures (also called rotational discontinuities) in the solar wind. These Alfv'enic events were selected from the database created and analyzed by Knetter (2005) by use of criteria chosen to eliminate ambiguous cases. His studies showed that standard, four-spacecraft timing analysis in most cases lacks sufficient accuracy to identify the small normal magnetic field components expected to accompany such structures, leaving unanswered the question of their existence. Our study aims to break this impasse. By careful application of minimum variance analysis of the magnetic field (MVAB) from each individual spacecraft, we show that, in most cases, a small but significantly non-zero magnetic field component was present in the direction perpendicular to the discontinuity. In the very few cases where this component was found to be large, examination revealed that MVAB had produced an unusual and unexplained orientation of the normal vector. On the whole, MVAB shows that many verifiable rotational discontinuities (Bn ≠ 0) exist in the solar wind and that their eigenvalue ratio (EVR = intermediate/minimum variance) can be extremely large (up to EVR = 400). Each of our events comprises four individual spacecraft crossings. The events include 17 ionpolarized cases and 11 electron-polarized ones. Fifteen of the ion events have widths ranging from 9 to 21 ion inertial lengths, with two outliers at 46 and 54. The electronpolarized events are generally thicker: nine cases fall in the range 20-71 ion inertial lengths, with two outliers at 9 and 13. In agreement with theoretical predictions from a onedimensional, ideal, Hall-MHD description (Sonnerup et al., 2010), the ion-polarized events show a small depression in field magnitude, while the electron-polarized ones tend to show a small enhancement. This effect was also predicted by Wu and Lee (2000). Judging only from the sense of the

  19. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Sonsthagen, Sarah A; Obbard, Martyn E; Boltunov, Andrei; Regehr, Eric V; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Aars, Jon; Atkinson, Stephen N; Sage, George K; Hope, Andrew G; Zeyl, Eve; Bachmann, Lutz; Ehrich, Dorothee; Scribner, Kim T; Amstrup, Steven C; Belikov, Stanislav; Born, Erik W; Derocher, Andrew E; Stirling, Ian; Taylor, Mitchell K; Wiig, Øystein; Paetkau, David; Talbot, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1-3 generations) directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos) uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation connectivity will allow

  20. Implications of the circumpolar genetic structure of polar bears for their conservation in a rapidly warming Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Peacock

    Full Text Available We provide an expansive analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus circumpolar genetic variation during the last two decades of decline in their sea-ice habitat. We sought to evaluate whether their genetic diversity and structure have changed over this period of habitat decline, how their current genetic patterns compare with past patterns, and how genetic demography changed with ancient fluctuations in climate. Characterizing their circumpolar genetic structure using microsatellite data, we defined four clusters that largely correspond to current ecological and oceanographic factors: Eastern Polar Basin, Western Polar Basin, Canadian Archipelago and Southern Canada. We document evidence for recent (ca. last 1-3 generations directional gene flow from Southern Canada and the Eastern Polar Basin towards the Canadian Archipelago, an area hypothesized to be a future refugium for polar bears as climate-induced habitat decline continues. Our data provide empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. The direction of current gene flow differs from earlier patterns of gene flow in the Holocene. From analyses of mitochondrial DNA, the Canadian Archipelago cluster and the Barents Sea subpopulation within the Eastern Polar Basin cluster did not show signals of population expansion, suggesting these areas may have served also as past interglacial refugia. Mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA data from polar and the paraphyletic brown bear (U. arctos uncovered offset signals in timing of population expansion between the two species, that are attributed to differential demographic responses to past climate cycling. Mitogenomic structure of polar bears was shallow and developed recently, in contrast to the multiple clades of brown bears. We found no genetic signatures of recent hybridization between the species in our large, circumpolar sample, suggesting that recently observed hybrids represent localized events. Documenting changes in subpopulation

  1. Polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric, twisted-band structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Jagodnicka, Anna; Wasylczyk, Piotr, E-mail: pwasylcz@fuw.edu.pl [Photonic Nanostructure Facility, Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-23

    We propose a concept for light polarization management: polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric microstructures. Numerical simulations of light propagation show that with an appropriately configured array of twisted bands, such structures may exhibit zero birefringence and at the same time diffract two circular polarizations with different efficiencies. Non-birefringent structures as thin as 3 μm have a significant difference in diffraction efficiency for left- and right-hand circular polarizations. We identify the structural parameters of such twisted-band matrices for optimum performance as circular polarizers.

  2. Polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric, twisted-band structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Jagodnicka, Anna; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    We propose a concept for light polarization management: polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric microstructures. Numerical simulations of light propagation show that with an appropriately configured array of twisted bands, such structures may exhibit zero birefringence and at the same time diffract two circular polarizations with different efficiencies. Non-birefringent structures as thin as 3 μm have a significant difference in diffraction efficiency for left- and right-hand circular polarizations. We identify the structural parameters of such twisted-band matrices for optimum performance as circular polarizers.

  3. Changes of the ash structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Václav; Friedel, Pavel; Janša, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the article is to appraisal of the changes in the structure of the ash due to the addition of compounds capable of the eutectics composition change. For the transformation were used limestone and dolomite dosed in amounts of 2, 5 and 10 wt.% with pellets of spruce wood, willow wood and refused derived fuel. Combustion temperatures of the mixtures were adjusted according to the temperatures reached during the using of fuels in power plants, i.e. 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200 °C.

  4. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. S.Qureshi; SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus Torkar

    2011-01-01

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that ii initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation.%@@ The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric Held peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive).We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model.

  5. Polarization sensitive changes in the human macula associated with normal aging and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNasdale, Dean Allan, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    The human macula occupies a relatively small, but crucial retinal area, as it is the location responsible for our most acute spatial vision and best color discrimination. Localizing important landmarks in the retina is difficult even in normal eyes where morphological inter-individual variability is high. This becomes even more challenging in the presence of sight-threatening pathology. With respect to the human macula, there remains a significant gap in the understanding of normal structure and function. Even less is known about the pathological mechanisms that occur in sight-threatening diseases including age-related macular degeneration. Because relatively little is known about normal aging changes, it is also difficult to differentiate those changes from changes associated with retinal disease. To better understand normal and pathological changes in the macula, imaging techniques using specific optical signatures are required. Structural features in the macula can be distinguished based on their intrinsic properties using specific light/tissue interactions. Because of the high degree of structural regularity in the macula, polarization sensitive imaging is potentially a useful tool for evaluating the morphology and integrity of the cellular architecture for both normal individuals and those affected by disease. In our investigations, we used polarization sensitive imaging to determining normal landmarks that are important clinically and for research investigations. We found that precision and accuracy in localizing the central macula was greatly improved through the use of polarization sensitive imaging. We also found that specific polarization alterations can be used to demonstrate systematic changes as a function of age, disproportionately affecting the central macular region. When evaluating patients with age-related macular degeneration, we found that precision and accuracy of localizing the central macula was also improved, even when significant pathology

  6. Does subduction polarity changes below the Alps? Inferences from analogue modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luth, S.; Willingshofer, E.; Sokoutis, D.; Cloetingh, S.

    2013-01-01

    The surface expression of a lateral polarity change of continental mantle lithosphere subduction has been studied by using lithosphere-scale physical models. Key parameters investigated were: the degree of lateral coupling between adjacent domains of opposing subduction polarity, the width of the zo

  7. Polar POLICRYPS diffractive structures generate cylindrical vector beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local shaping of the polarization state of a light beam is appealing for a number of applications. This can be achieved by employing devices containing birefringent materials. In this article, we present one such enables converting a uniformly circularly polarized beam into a cylindrical vector beam (CVB). This device has been fabricated by exploiting the POLICRYPS (POlymer-LIquid CRYstals-Polymer-Slices) photocuring technique. It is a liquid-crystal-based optical diffraction grating featuring polar symmetry of the director alignment. We have characterized the resulting CVB profile and polarization for the cases of left and right circularly polarized incoming beams

  8. Polar POLICRYPS Diffractive Structures Generate Cylindrical Vector Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Alj, Domenico; Volpe, Giovanni; Caputo, Roberto; Umeton, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Local shaping of the polarization state of a light beam is appealing for a number of applications. This can be achieved by employing devices containing birefringent materials. In this article, we present one such device that permits one to convert a uniformly circularly polarized beam into a cylindrical vector beam (CVB). This device has been fabricated by exploiting the POLICRYPS photocuring technique. It is a liquid-crystal-based optical diffraction grating featuring polar symmetry of the director alignment. We have characterized the resulting CVB profile and polarization for the cases of left and right circularly polarized incoming beams.

  9. Polar POLICRYPS diffractive structures generate cylindrical vector beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alj, Domenico; Caputo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.caputo@fis.unical.it; Umeton, Cesare [Department of Physics and CNR-NANOTEC University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende (CS) (Italy); Paladugu, Sathyanarayana [Soft Matter Lab, Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Volpe, Giovanni [Soft Matter Lab, Department of Physics, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2015-11-16

    Local shaping of the polarization state of a light beam is appealing for a number of applications. This can be achieved by employing devices containing birefringent materials. In this article, we present one such enables converting a uniformly circularly polarized beam into a cylindrical vector beam (CVB). This device has been fabricated by exploiting the POLICRYPS (POlymer-LIquid CRYstals-Polymer-Slices) photocuring technique. It is a liquid-crystal-based optical diffraction grating featuring polar symmetry of the director alignment. We have characterized the resulting CVB profile and polarization for the cases of left and right circularly polarized incoming beams.

  10. Changing Facets of Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covello, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Section I. Exotic nuclear structure. Radioactive beams at TRIUMF / A. C. Shotter. Status of RI-beam factory project at RIKEN / H. Ueno. Population of neutron unbound states via two-proton knockout reactions / N. Frank ... [et al.]. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using ISOL facilities at CERN and Jyväskylä / J. Äystö. Shell structure evolution far from stability: recent results from GANIL / F. Azaiez. Magnetic moment meaurements: pushing the limits / N. Benczer-Koller. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors of excited states with large multi-detector arrays: an application to neutron rich nuclei produced in spontaneous fission / A. V. Ramayya ... [et al.]. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: identification of the 10+ isomer in [symbol]Ni / C. Fahlander ... [et al.]. Exploring the evolution of the shell structure by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Angelis. Studies on the exotic structure of [symbol]Al by measurements of [symbol] and P[symbol] / D. Q. Fang ... [et al.]. Extended cluster model for light and medium nuclei / M. Tomaselli ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei with radioactive beams - present status and future perspectives at FAIR / P. Egelhof. The SPES direct target project at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro / G. Prete ... [et al.] -- Section II. Nuclear structure and nuclear forces. Modern aspects of nuclear structure theory / J. Wambach. Correlations in nuclei: a review / R. Schiavilla. Correlated nucleons in k- and r-space / I. Sick. Roles of all-order core polarizations and Brown-Rho scaling in nucleon effective interactions / T. T. S. Kuo ... [et al.]. Ab initio and ab exitu no core shell model / J. P. Vary ... [et al.]. Ab-initio coupled cluster theory for open quantum systems / G. Hagen ... [et al.]. Symplectic no-core shell model / J. P. Draayer ... [et al.]. Role of deformed symplectic configurations in ab initio no-core shell model results / T. Dytrych ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure

  11. Empiricism, Structuralism and Scientific Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Lucero

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades there was a structural turn in the classic debate between scientific realists and antirealists with empiricist orientation. Two main arguments support the realist conception: the ‘No Miracle Argument’ and the thesis of continuity. The thesis of continuity states that some parts of a theory are retained when a scientific change takes place. In a current famous article, J. Worrall (1989 defends the continuity argument by stating that what is preserved in the succession of two empirically successful theories are the relations among the postulated entities and not the nature of the relata (structural or syntactical realism. Based on this perspective, van Fraassen introduces his position named Empiricist Structuralism, which claims that only the structures of phenomena are retained. This conception tries to explain the success of science and at the same time defend the continuity of structures. I will demonstrate in this paper that the accomplishment of the two mentioned requirements imply a capitulation in favor of realistic intuitions.

  12. Polarized structure of nucleon in the valon representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Firooz; Taghavi-Shahri, Fatemeh

    2007-07-01

    We have utilized the concept of valon model to calculate the spin structure functions of proton, neutron, and deuteron. The valon structure itself is universal and arises from the perturbative dressing of the valence quark in QCD. Our results agree rather well with all of the relevant experimental data on g1p,n,d and gA/gV, and suggests that the sea quark contribution to the spin of proton is consistent with zero. It also reveals that while the total quark contribution to the spin of a valon, ΔΣvalon, is almost constant at Q2 >= 1 the gluon contribution grows with the increase of Q2 and hence requiring a sizable negative orbital angular momentum component Lz. This component along with the singlet and non-singlet parts are calculated in the Next-to-Leading order in QCD . We speculate that gluon contribution to the spin content of the proton is about 60% for all Q2 values. Finally, we show that the size of gluon polarization and hence, Lz, is sensitive to the initial scale Q02.

  13. Polarized structure of nucleon in the valon representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have utilized the concept of valon model to calculate the spin structure functions of proton, neutron, and deuteron. The valon structure itself is universal and arises from the perturbative dressing of the valence quark in QCD. Our results agree rather well with all of the relevant experimental data on g1p,n,d and gA/gV, and suggests that the sea quark contribution to the spin of proton is consistent with zero. It also reveals that while the total quark contribution to the spin of a valon, ΔΣvalon, is almost constant at Q2 ≥ 1 the gluon contribution grows with the increase of Q2 and hence requiring a sizable negative orbital angular momentum component Lz. This component along with the singlet and non-singlet parts are calculated in the Next-to-Leading order in QCD . We speculate that gluon contribution to the spin content of the proton is about 60% for all Q2 values. Finally, we show that the size of gluon polarization and hence, Lz, is sensitive to the initial scale Q02

  14. Polarization-maintaining amplifier based on 3C fiber structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokidani, Jun; Ito, Rumi; Sakurai, Tsutomu; Shin, Sumida; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2015-03-01

    Chirally-Coupled-Core (3C) fiber structure can preserve a single mode quality and even a linear polarization for a large core size. A principal advantage of fiber laser is its compatibility with monolithic integration and robust system. But so far, devices such as a combiner using the 3C fibers have not been reported. Here we report the first demonstration of such monolithic amplifier structure which contains an active fiber and a combiner based on 3C fibers. A single-stage amplifier is seeded by an EO Q-switched micro-laser and pumped by two high power fiber pigtailed 976-nm laser diodes via an in-house fabricated (2 + 1) × 1 pump signal combiner. The active fiber is based on a 3-m-long, 3C Yb-doped fiber (33 μm/250 μm core/cladding diameter with 0.06/0.46 NA). The amplifier demonstrates scaling up to 30W average power and 150 kW peak power in 0.3mJ, 2ns pulses. The beam profiles and beam qualities were characterized as its output power was varied up to 30W. The beam profile was maintained at a high beam quality of around M2=1.2. The spectral properties of the 3C fiber were also characterized as its output peak power was varied.

  15. NHS System Reform: Structural Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ravaghi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Service (NHS was established in 1948 to provide equitable healthcare for all citizens. Over the years the NHS has gone under different reforms and changes. In 2002 the NHS launched one of its biggest changes in structure since its commencement in 1948. The scale of these changes are greater than those established following the white paper “Working for Patients” in 1989 (Conservative Government that indicated the introduction of the internal market (focus on efficiency. This review therefore proposes to give a brief summarize of the structural changes and current structure of the NHS in the England. The NHS plan was published in July 2000 (Labour Government and outlined a 10 year plan of investment in the NHS. This delineates a vision for a service planned around the patients and more responsive to patients’ needs. The Government emphasizes on the empowering of staff at all levels as a way to achieve this vision. "Shifting the Balance of Power" is part of the Government’s plans for implementation of the NHS Plan and has directed to the establishment of new structures. The main feature of change has been giving locally based Primary Care Trusts the role of running the NHS and, with the local authorities, improving health in their areas. The PCTs are receiving 75% of the NHS budget to act as primary services provider, commissioner (service purchaser, network developer and controller. In addition, all former Health Authorities have been abolished and new Strategic Health Authorities (SHA have been created to serve larger areas and with a more strategic role. The SHAs are responsible for developing strategic frameworks for the local health service; performance of the local health service; and building capacity in the local health service. The Department of Health is also refocusing to reflect these changes, including the abolition of its Regional Offices and relegating some of its operational responsibilities to SHAs and

  16. Tensor-polarized structure functions: Tensor structure of deuteron in 2020's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, S.

    2014-10-01

    We explain spin structure for a spin-one hadron, in which there are new structure functions, in addition to the ones (F1, F2, g1, g2) which exist for the spin-1/2 nucleon, associated with its tensor structure. The new structure functions are b1, b2, b3, and b4 in deep inelastic scattering of a charged-lepton from a spin-one hadron such as the deuteron. Among them, twist- two functions are related by the Callan-Gross type relation b2 = 2xb1 in the Bjorken scaling limit. First, these new structure functions are introduced, and useful formulae are derived for projection operators of b1-4 from a hadron tensor Wμν. Second, a sum rule is explained for b1, and possible tensor-polarized distributions are discussed by using HERMES data in order to propose future experimental measurements and to compare them with theoretical models. A proposal was approved to measure b1 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), so that much progress is expected for b1 in the near future. Third, formalisms of polarized proton-deuteron Drell-Yan processes are explained for probing especially tensor- polarized antiquark distributions, which were suggested by the HERMES data. The studies of the tensor-polarized structure functions will open a new era in 2020's for tensor-structure studies in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom, which are very different from ordinary descriptions in terms of nucleons and mesons.

  17. Tensor-polarized structure functions: Tensor structure of deuteron in 2020's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explain spin structure for a spin-one hadron, in which there are new structure functions, in addition to the ones (F1, F2, g1, g2) which exist for the spin-1/2 nucleon, associated with its tensor structure. The new structure functions are b1, b2, b3, and b4 in deep inelastic scattering of a charged-lepton from a spin-one hadron such as the deuteron. Among them, twist- two functions are related by the Callan-Gross type relation b2 = 2xb1 in the Bjorken scaling limit. First, these new structure functions are introduced, and useful formulae are derived for projection operators of b1-4 from a hadron tensor Wμν. Second, a sum rule is explained for b1, and possible tensor-polarized distributions are discussed by using HERMES data in order to propose future experimental measurements and to compare them with theoretical models. A proposal was approved to measure b1 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), so that much progress is expected for b1 in the near future. Third, formalisms of polarized proton-deuteron Drell-Yan processes are explained for probing especially tensor- polarized antiquark distributions, which were suggested by the HERMES data. The studies of the tensor-polarized structure functions will open a new era in 2020's for tensor-structure studies in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom, which are very different from ordinary descriptions in terms of nucleons and mesons

  18. Intensity-dependent change in polarization state of light in normal incidence on an isotropic nonlinear Kerr medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Prakash; Devendra K Singh

    2010-03-01

    It is shown that all optical polarization states of light except plane and circular polarization states undergo an intensity-dependent change in normal incidence of light in an isotropic nonlinear Kerr medium. This effect should be detectable and we propose an experiment for detecting nonlinear susceptibility involved in that part of nonlinear polarization, which depends on the polarization state of light also.

  19. Growth, Employment and Structural Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggarwal, Aradhna

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the decomposition of GSDP growth per capita in Punjab via-a-vis 15 other states in India during 1993–94 and 2011–12 in terms of employment and productivity growth. Specifically, it focuses on the role of employment growth and structural change in employment on economic growth. It...... reviews the theoretical rationale, presents the growth patterns in GSDP and employment, and estimates the employment-productivity components of GSDP growth per capita using the Shapley decomposition analysis. The results show that Punjab has slipped in terms of GSDP per capita over this period but...... structural shifts have paid off well in terms of diversification of the economy and their contribution to labour productivity especially for manufacturing. Overall employment effect had been negative but this was essentially due to contraction in the labour force; the employment rate effect turned out to be...

  20. Control of Fibrinogen Assembly by Changing a Polarity of Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jaseung; Liu, Ying; Snow, Sara; Rambhia, Pooja; Koga, Tadanori; Rafailovich, Miriam; Galanakis, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Thrombogenesis causes various problems associated with an interruption in the blood flow (e.g., myocardial and cerebral infarction), and a hindrance to use of blood-contact vascular biomaterials (e.g., hemodialysis and cardiopulmonary bypass) with long-term patency since undesired adsorption of blood components occurs on vessels or biomaterials, such as surface-induced thrombosis. we showed that this clotting procedure can be occurred on hydrophobic polymeric surfaces without thrombin cleavage. However, the fibrinogen fibers were not formed on the polar surface such as spun-cast polymer film with pyridine and phenol groups. We also found that αC domains play an important role in initiation of polymerization on surface. Therefore, molecular association was inhibited on the polar surfaces due to confinement of αC chains on the surfaces. These findings were directly applied to stent surface modification. The commercial stent consist of Co-Cr alloy forms undesired fiber formation. However, PS-r-PVPh (13% phenol) coated stent surfaces completely prevent fiber formation.

  1. Two-Element PIFA Array Structure for Polarization Diversity in UMTS Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hamouz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to strongly modify the radiated fields of a UMTS handset by using a phased two-element PIFA array. The structure is composed of a 100x40 mm2 metallic ground plane acting as the Printed Circuit Board (PCB of the mobile phone. Two UMTS PIFAs are located at the top edge of this PCB. They are fed by a double Quasi-Lumped Coupler able to provide a 360 phase difference between its two outputs. By properly choosing the DC bias of the double QuasiLumped Coupler, we can set a specific phase difference between the two PIFAs. In this way the two-element array is able to radiate different electromagnetic fields. Simulated and measured radiation patterns in the two main planes of the chassis are presented for different phase differences. It is especially revealed that the novel twoantenna structure is able to radiate vertically-polarized electric fields in the azimuthal plane of the phone and horizontally-polarized electric fields in the same plane when changing the phase shift between the antennas from 0 to 180. Potential applications are polarization-diversity techniques and Specific Absorption Rate reduction for handsets.

  2. Spin polarization of two-dimensional electronic gas decoupled from structural asymmetry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczyrak, B.; Szary, M.; Jurczyszyn, L.; Radny, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown, using density functional theory, that a 2D electron gas induced in a monolayer of Pb or Tl adatoms on the Si (111 )-1 ×1 surface is insensitive to the structural asymmetry of the system and its spin polarization is governed by the interaction between the adlayer and the substrate. It is demonstrated that this interaction changes the in-plane inversion symmetry of the charge distribution within the monolayer and can either suppress [Pb/Si(111)] or enhance [Tl/Si(111)] the adatom intra-atomic spin-orbit effect on a Rashba-Bychkov-type spin splitting.

  3. Vertebrate records in polar sediments: Biological responses to past climate change and human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. G.; Emslie, S. D.; Huang, T.; Blais, J. M.; Xie, Z. Q.; Liu, X. D.; Yin, X. B.; Wang, Y. H.; Huang, W.; Hodgson, D. A.; Smol, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Biological responses to climate and environmental changes in remote polar regions are of increasing interest in global change research. Terrestrial and marine polar ecosystems have suffered from impacts of both rapid climate change and intense human activities, and large fluctuations in the population sizes of seabirds, seals, and Antarctic krill have been observed in the past decades. To understand the mechanisms driving these regime shifts in polar ecosystems, it is important to first distinguish the influences of natural forcing from anthropogenic activities. Therefore, investigations of past changes of polar ecosystems prior to human contact are relevant for placing recent human-induced changes within a long-term historical context. Here we focus our review on the fossil, sub-fossil, archaeological, and biogeochemical remains of marine vertebrates in polar sediments. These remains include well-preserved tissues such as bones, hairs and feathers, and biogeochemical markers and other proxy indicators, including deposits of guano and excrement, which can accumulate in lake and terrestrial sediments over thousands of years. Analyses of these remains have provided insight into both natural and anthropogenic impacts on marine vertebrates over millennia and have helped identify the causal agents for these impacts. Furthermore, land-based seabirds and marine mammals have been shown to play an important role as bio-vectors in polar environments as they transport significant amounts of nutrients and anthropogenic contaminants between ocean and terrestrial ecosystems.

  4. Atomic and electronic structure of polar Fe2O3(0001)/MgO(111) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, K.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, M.; Weinert, M.

    2012-07-01

    We present a first-principles investigation of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of ultrathin Fe2O3(0001) films on a polar MgO(111) substrate. The results imply that the heterointerface is atomically abrupt with oxidelike stacking for film thicknesses between ˜1.5 and 8.5 Å. The Fe-Fe bilayer (nominal separation of 0.59 Å in Fe2O3) at the interface collapses into an “Fe2” monolayer. Both electronic polarization and structural relaxations effectively screen the dipole field of the polar interface system. The structural relaxations—consisting of interpenetration, separation, and merger of Fe and oxygen planes—are particularly drastic in the three- and four-bilayers-thick films, giving rise to barrierless movement of oxygen towards the surface and the formation of an “Fe2|FeO3” layer structure not seen in hematite. Comparisons to calculations of unsupported polar Fe2O3(0001) slabs demonstrate that these unusual changes in stacking sequence and electronic structure are associated with the polar nature of this oxide heterointerface.

  5. Parametric characterization of the spatial structure of partially coherent and partially polarized beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Herrero, R.; Piquero, G.; Mejías, P. M.

    2004-03-01

    On the basis of the second-order intensity moments formalism, the relationship between the spatial structure and the overall polarization characteristics of partially polarized Gaussian Schell-model beams of a certain kind has been investigated. More specifically, attention has been focused on a type of source that cannot be distinguished from ordinary Gaussian Schell-model fields when polarization measurements are disregarded. For this class of beams several general properties have been obtained that enable us to link the beam coherence polarization matrix and the beam quality parameter with certain polarization degrees recently introduced in the literature.

  6. Grain size disposed structural, optical and polarization tuning in ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Para, Touseef Ahmad; Reshi, Hilal Ahmad; Pillai, Shreeja; Shelke, Vilas

    2016-08-01

    Structural, optical and polarization properties were investigated in different batches of ZnO synthesized by sol-gel method at varying sintering temperature. The structural visualization and charge scattering density analysis on the basis of X-ray diffraction data indicate polarized nature of sample. The structure- and polarization-related parameters were determined from Raman and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy data. Urbach energies and band gap were calculated using UV-visible spectroscopy. We observed increase in polarization, decrease in optical activity and band gap with increasing grain size without any increase in defects. Distortion in ZnO tetrahedra resulted in nonlinear optical behaviour above band edges. The results show direct correlation between grain size, band gap, optical behaviour and polarization. Low band gap and high polarization in ZnO can be employed for the production of opto-electronic devices.

  7. The Polar Stratosphere in a Changing Climate (POLSTRACC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Rapp, Markus; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Engel, Andreas; Boenisch, Harald

    2015-04-01

    The POLSTRACC mission aims at providing new scientific knowledge on the Arctic lowermost stratosphere (LMS) and upper troposphere under the present load of halogens and state of climate variables. POLSTRACC is the only HALO (High Altitude and LOng Range Research Aircraft, German Research Community) mission dedicated to study the UTLS at high latitudes several years after the last intensive Arctic campaigns. The scientific scope of POLSTRACC will be broadened by its combination with the SALSA (Seasonality of Air mass transport and origin in the Lowermost Stratosphere using the HALO Aircraft) and GW-LCYCLE (Gravity Wave Life Cycle Experiment, a BMBF/ROMIC project) missions, which address complementary scientific goals sharing the same HALO payload. POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE will offer the unique opportunity to study the bottom of the polar vortex and the high-latitude UTLS along with their impact on lower latitudes throughout an entire winter/spring cycle. The POLSTRACC consortium includes national (KIT, Forschungszentrum Jülich, DLR, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Universities of Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Mainz and Wuppertal) and international partners (e.g. NASA). The payload for the combined POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE campaigns comprises an innovative combination of remote sensing techniques providing 2- and 3-D distributions of temperature and a large number of substances, and precise in-situ instruments measuring T, O3, H2O, tracers of different lifetimes and chemically active species at the aircraft level with high time-resolution. Drop sondes will add information about temperature, humidity and wind in the atmosphere underneath the aircraft. The field campaign will be divided into three phases for addressing (i) the early polar vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in December 2015 (from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany), (ii) the mid-winter vortex from January to March 2016 (from Kiruna, Sweden), and (iii) the late dissipating vortex and its wide

  8. Finite element analysis of the dynamic behavior of radially polarized Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Ramkumar; Cui, Fangsen

    2016-04-01

    In the traditional layered piezoelectric structures, high stress concentrations could cause the structural failure in interlayer surfaces due to repeated strain reversals. To overcome the performance limitations of these structures, the concept of Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs) has been introduced to improve the lifetime, integrity, and reliability of these structures. In this paper, the free and forced vibration of radially polarized Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) cylinders under different sets of loading are studied. Material properties such as piezoelectric, elastic and permittivity are assumed to change along its thickness, based on a specific gradation function. Four-parameter power law distribution is used to grade the volume fraction of the constituents comprising of PZT-5A and PZT-5H. Material property is assumed to be temperature dependent for a few numerical studies. The present modeling approach is validated by comparing the free and forced vibration of radially polarized Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) cylinders with those reported in the literature. The effects of material composition, loading and boundary conditions on the dynamic behavior of FGP cylinder are described. Since the modeling of functionally graded piezoelectric systems is challenging, the present study can help in the design and analysis of FGP cylinders.

  9. Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Polar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009). South is in the middle. North is at both ends. This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top. The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called 'Home Plate.' The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

  10. CARS polarized microscopy of three-dimensional director structures in liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kachynski, A V; Prasad, P N; Smalyukh, I I

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional vibrational imaging of director structures in liquid crystals using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) polarized microscopy. Spatial mapping of the structures is based on sensitivity of a polarized CARS signal to orientation of anisotropic molecules in liquid crystals. As an example, we study structures in a smectic material and demonstrate that single-scan CARS and two-photon fluorescence images of molecular orientation patterns are consistent with each other and with the structure model.

  11. Anisotropic structures of some microorganisms studied by polarization microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2014), s. 363-368. ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Polarization microscopy * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  12. Parametric characterization of the spatial structure of non-uniformly polarized laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías, P. M.; Martínez-Herrero, R.; Piquero, G.; Movilla, J. M.

    We present an approach for describing the spatial structure of partially polarized light fields. Unlike the treatments usually encountered in the literature, in which the polarization state is represented by position-dependent functions, the formalism shown here characterizes the polarization by means of a family of measurable overall parameters averaged over the transverse spatial region where the beam intensity reaches significant values. Generalized degrees of polarization are introduced to evaluate the uniformity of the spatial distribution of the polarization state of the beam-like field. The possibility of improvement and optimization of the quality of a polarized laser beam (understood as the general usefulness of such field for collimation and focussing) is analyzed by employing first-order optical systems. Finally, attention is briefly devoted to non-paraxial electromagnetic vector beams, whose parametric description of their polarization properties constitutes, at present, a challenge for theoreticians.

  13. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  14. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  15. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases

  16. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases

  17. Clarification on polarity of bipolar electric field solitary structures in space plasmas with satellite observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that if initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation. (authors)

  18. Clarification on Polarity of Bipolar Electric Field Solitary Structures in Space Plasmas with Satellite Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bipolar electric field solitary (EFS) structures observed frequently in space plasmas by satellites have two different polarities, first positive electric field peak then negative (i.e., positive/negative) and first negative then positive peak (i.e., negative/positive). We provide the physical explanation on the polarity of observed bipolar EFS structures with an electrostatic ion fluid model. The results show that if initial electric field E0 > 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be positive/negative; and if E0 < 0, the polarity of the bipolar EFS structure will be negative/positive. However, for a fixed polarity of the EFS, either positive/negative or negative/positive, if the satellite is located at the positive side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be positive/negative, if the satellite is located at the negative side of the EFS, the observed polarity should be negative/positive. Therefore, we provide a method to clarify the natural polarity of the EFS with observed polarity by satellites. Our results are significant to understand the physical process in space plasma with the satellite observation. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  19. Structural study of magnesium phtalocyanin and tetraphenylporphyrin - polar molecule complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the structural study of biological magnesium compounds we examined the interaction of magnesium tetraphenyl porphyrin and phtalocyanin (TPPMg and PcMg) with nitrogenated polar molecules (pyridine and quinoline) as follows: - the infrared spectra of TPPMg and PcMg without external ligands were interpreted in the 4000 to 150 cm-1 region. By comparison with the IR spectra of TPPH2, PcH2, PcZn and PcFe II, and especially using the isotopic substitution 24Mg/26Mg; the absorption bands corresponding to the intramolecular magnesium-nitrogen vibrations were revealed. - the IR spectra of TPPMg, PcMg, PcFeII and PcZn complexes with pyridine and quinoline were interpreted next. The absorption bands of the intermolecular metal-nitrogen vibrations were identified. - these complexes were then studied quantitatively in the solid state by thermogravimetry: TPPMg pyridine was examined in benzene solution by absorption spectrometry in the visible and in carbon sulphide solution by infrared spectrometry. The equilibrium constants were determined for these systems at various temperatures and their thermodynamic constants (ΔH0 and ΔS0) of formation evaluated. From studies it was concluded that the stoichiometry of the complexes with pyridine (or quinoline) is 1:1 or 1:2 (one tetrapyrolic magnesium molecule for 1 or 2 pyridines); in the 1:1 complex the pyridine nitrogen interacts strongly and directly with the porphyrin magnesium (electron donor-acceptor system); the same applies to the second by weak interactions between the π systems of pyridine and of the tetrapyrolic ring, the tetrapyrolic molecule and pyridine planes probably being parallel. The model accounts for the fact that in these systems there is only one isosbestic point, whereas two are expected and observed for a 1:2 complex of the iron porphyrin-pyridine type. (author)

  20. MARKET INTEGRATION: CASE STUDIES OF STRUCTURAL CHANGE

    OpenAIRE

    Franken, Jason R.V.; Parcell, Joseph L.

    2003-01-01

    The grain/oilseed industry is undergoing considerable structural change in the form of mergers and the addition of new processing facilities to add value beyond commodity grade. The rapid structural changes in this industry call into question the relevance of previous research conducted in these areas. Focusing on two structural change events in northeast Missouri as case studies provides an incisive glimpse at the larger impact of structural change on the grain/oilseed industry. This study a...

  1. Phase space structures and ionization dynamics of hydrogen atom in elliptically polarized microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Shchekinova, Elena; Chandre, Cristel; Uzer, Turgay

    2006-01-01

    International audience The multiphoton ionization of hydrogen atoms in a strong elliptically polarized microwave field exhibits complex features that are not observed for ionization in circular and linear polarized fields. Experimental data reveal high sensitivity of ionization dynamics to the small changes of the field polarization. The multidimensional nature of the problem makes widely used diagnostics of dynamics, such as Poincaré surfaces of section, impractical. We analyze the phase ...

  2. Probing Membrane Protein Structure Using Water Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of ...

  3. Plasmonic structure integrated single-photon detector configurations to improve absorptance and polarization contrast

    OpenAIRE

    Mária Csete; Gábor Szekeres; András Szenes; Anikó Szalai; Gábor Szabó

    2014-01-01

    Configurations capable of maximizing both the absorption component of system detection efficiency and the achievable polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) consisting of p = 264 nm and P = 792 nm periodic niobium nitride (NbN) patterns on silica substrate. Global effective NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-...

  4. Metal-Multilayer-Dielectric Structure for Enhancement of s- and p-Polarized Evanescent Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchenko, Svitlana G; Lymarenko, Ruslan A; Taranenko, Victor B

    2016-12-01

    We propose a structure based on combination of multilayer stack of dielectric films and thin metal layer for excitation and enhancement of both s- and p-polarized evanescent waves. It is shown that two different mechanisms of evanescent wave excitation may occur at the same angle of light beam incidence on the structure. Application for evanescent wave polarization holographic recording with the help of this structure is discussed. PMID:26831680

  5. Novel polar dielectrics with the tetragonal tungsten bronze structure

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei ROTARU

    2013-01-01

    There is great interest in the development of new polar dielectric ceramics and multiferroic materials with new and improved properties. A family of tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) relaxors of composition Ba₆M³⁺Nb₉O₃₀ (M³⁺ = Ga³⁺, Sc³⁺ and In³⁺, and also their solid solutions) were studied in an attempt to understand their dielectric properties to enable design of novel polar TTB materials. A combination of electrical measurements (dielectric and impedance spectroscopy) and powder diffr...

  6. Vacuum polarization in hydrogen-like relativistic atom: superfine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One studies contribution of vacuum polarization into superfine splitting of hydrogen-like atom principal state. One presents the general expressions for a single-potential and for bi-potential contributions of vacuum polarization into superfine splitting of hydrogen-like principal state. The expression for correction to energy was derived in the form of Zα parameter explicit function. The final expression derived in terms of the generalized hypergeometrical functions and their derivatives represents the function of particle mass ratio both at the orbit and in a vacuum loop and, thus, is true both for ordinary and for muon atoms. Paper presents, as well, various asymptotics for muon atoms

  7. Generation of arbitrary radially polarized array beams by modulating the correlation structure

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Shijun; Li, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a convenient approach for simultaneously manipulating the amplitude and polarization of light beams by means of the modulation of the correlation structure. As an illustration, we constructed a periodic correlation structure that can generate an arbitrary radially polarized array (RPA) beam of a radial or rectangular symmetry array in the focal plane from a radially polarized (RP) beam. The physical realizability conditions for such source and the far-field beam condition are derived. It is illustrated that the beamlet shape and the state of polarization (SOP) can be effectively controlled by the initial correlation structure and the coherence width. Furthermore, by designing the source correlation structure, a tunable OK-shaped RPA beam and an optical cage are demonstrated, which can find widespread applications in non-destructive manipulation of particles and living biological cells. The arbitrariness in the design of correlation structure prompted us to find more convenient approaches for co...

  8. Climate change and the increasing impact of polar bears on bird populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke eProp

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is becoming warmer at a high rate, and contractions in the extent of sea ice are currently changing the habitats of marine top-predators dependent on ice. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus depend on sea ice for hunting seals. For these top-predators, longer ice-free seasons are hypothesized to force the bears to hunt for alternative terrestrial food, such as eggs from colonial breeding birds. We analyzed time-series of polar bear observations at four locations on Spitsbergen (Svalbard and one in east Greenland. Summer occurrence of polar bears, measured as the probability of encountering bears and the number of days with bear presence, has increased significantly from the 1970/80s to the present. The shifts in polar bear occurrence coincided with trends for shorter sea ice seasons and less sea ice during the spring in the study area. This resulted in a strong inverse relationship between the probability of bear encounters on land and the length of the sea ice season. Within ten years after their first appearance on land, polar bears had advanced their arrival dates by almost 30 days. Direct observations of nest predation showed that polar bears may severely affect reproductive success of the barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis, common eider (Somateria mollissima and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus. Nest predation was strongest in years when the polar bears arrived well before hatch, with more than 90% of all nests being predated. The results are similar to findings from Canada, and large-scale processes, such as climate and subsequent habitat changes, are pinpointed as the most likely drivers in various parts of the Arctic. We suggest that the increasing, earlier appearance of bears on land in summer reflects behavioral adaptations by a small segment of the population to cope with a reduced hunting range on sea ice. This exemplifies how behavioral adaptations may contribute to the cascading effects of climate change.

  9. Extracting structural features of rat sciatic nerve using polarization-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. Shahidul; Oliveira, Michael C.; Wang, Yan; Henry, Francis P.; Randolph, Mark A.; Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-05-01

    We present spectral domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SD PS-OCT) imaging of peripheral nerves. Structural and polarization-sensitive OCT imaging of uninjured rat sciatic nerves was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. OCT and its functional extension, PS-OCT, were used to image sciatic nerve structure with clear delineation of the nerve boundaries to muscle and adipose tissues. A long-known optical effect, bands of Fontana, was also observed. Postprocessing analysis of these images provided significant quantitative information, such as epineurium thickness, estimates of extinction coefficient and birefringence of nerve and muscle tissue, frequency of bands of Fontana at different stretch levels of nerve, and change in average birefringence of nerve under stretched condition. We demonstrate that PS-OCT combined with regular-intensity OCT (compared with OCT alone) allows for a clearer determination of the inner and outer boundaries of the epineurium and distinction of nerve and muscle based on their birefringence pattern. PS-OCT measurements on normal nerves show that the technique is promising for studies on peripheral nerve injury.

  10. Landward and eastward shift of Alaskan polar bear denning associated with recent sea ice changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, A.S.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the northern Alaska region den in coastal areas and on offshore drifting ice. We evaluated changes in the distribution of polar bear maternal dens between 1985 and 2005, using satellite telemetry. We determined the distribution of maternal dens occupied by 89 satellite collared female polar bears between 137°W and 167°W longitude. The proportion of dens on pack ice declined from 62% in 1985–1994 to 37% in 1998–2004 (P = 0.044) and among pack ice dens fewer occurred in the western Beaufort Sea after 1998. We evaluated whether hunting, attraction to bowhead whale remains, or changes in sea ice could explain changes in den distribution. We concluded that denning distribution changed in response to reductions in stable old ice, increases in unconsolidated ice, and lengthening of the melt season. In consort, these changes have likely reduced the availability and quality of pack ice denning habitat. Further declines in sea ice availability are predicted. Therefore, we expect the proportion of polar bears denning in coastal areas will continue to increase, until such time as the autumn ice retreats far enough from shore that it precludes offshore pregnant females from reaching the Alaska coast in advance of denning.

  11. Surface chemistry and electronic structure of nonpolar and polar GaN films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Monu; Krishna, T.C. Shibin; Aggarwal, Neha; Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Surface chemistry and electronic structure of polar and nonpolar GaN is reported. • Influence of polarization on electron affinity of p & np GaN films is investigated. • Correlation between surface morphology and polarity has been deduced. - Abstract: Photoemission and microscopic analysis of nonpolar (a-GaN/r-Sapphire) and polar (c-GaN/c-Sapphire) epitaxial gallium nitride (GaN) films grown via RF-Molecular Beam Epitaxy is reported. The effect of polarization on surface properties like surface states, electronic structure, chemical bonding and morphology has been investigated and correlated. It was observed that polarization lead to shifts in core level (CL) as well as valence band (VB) spectra. Angle dependent X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic analysis revealed higher surface oxide in polar GaN film compared to nonpolar GaN film. On varying the take off angle (TOA) from 0° to 60°, the Ga−O/Ga−N ratio varied from 0.11–0.23 for nonpolar and 0.17–0.36 for polar GaN film. The nonpolar film exhibited N-face polarity while Ga-face polarity was perceived in polar GaN film due to the inherent polarization effect. Polarization charge compensated surface states were observed on the polar GaN film and resulted in downward band bending. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic measurements revealed electron affinity and ionization energy of 3.4 ± 0.1 eV and 6.8 ± 0.1 eV for nonpolar GaN film and 3.8 ± 0.1 eV and 7.2 ± 0.1 eV for polar GaN film respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements divulged smooth morphology with pits on polar GaN film. The nonpolar film on the other hand showed pyramidal structures having facets all over the surface.

  12. Cassini Returns to Saturn's Poles: Seasonal Change in the Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, G. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Sinclair, J. A.; Hesman, B. E.; Hurley, J.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    High inclination orbits during Cassini's solstice mission (2012) are providing us with our first observations of Saturn's high latitudes since the prime mission (2007). Since that time, the northern spring pole has emerged into sunlight and the southern autumn pole has disappeared into winter darkness, allowing us to study the seasonal changes occurring within the polar vortices in response to these dramatic insolation changes. Observations from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer] have revealed (i) the continued presence of small, cyclonic polar hotspots at both spring and autumn poles; and (ii) the emergence of an infrared-bright polar vortex at the north pole, consistent with the historical record of Saturn observations from the 1980s (previous northern spring).

  13. Behaviour of the spontaneous polarisation field in polar and nonpolar GaInN/GaN quantum well structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spontaneous and piezoelectric fields in wurtzite GaN-based quantum well structures induce the quantum confined Stark effect(QCSE). The QCSE causes a decrease in the effective bandgap and a reduction of the oscillator strength in the polar c-direction. Unlike in case of the polar direction, the electric fields and the QCSE vanishes in the nonpolar directions, like m-plane. We use GaInN quantum wells as a sensitive probe for the magnitude and changes of the spontaneous field. By using cathodoluminescence in an UHV environment we were able to investigate field induced effects in the polar direction and the absence of these effects in a nonpolar direction. The complex dynamics are observed as a shift of spectral position and a intensity variation. Various samples grown on polar and nonpolar substrates were investigated. By variation of the sample structure like cap thickness and doping level we study the different time dependent behaviour in screening and descreening of the spontaneous field at different electron beam penetration depth. In this contribution we present measurements on nonpolar heterostructures which clearly shows no electric field induced effects, like emission energy and intensity shifts. Compared to the strong effects on polar samples, these measurements prove the absence of the spontaneous field in nonpolar directions.

  14. Multiple scattering of polarized light in disordered media exhibiting short-range structural correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Vynck, Kevin; Carminati, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model based on a multiple scattering theory to describe the diffusion of polarized light in disordered media exhibiting short-range structural correlations. Starting from exact expressions of the average field and the field spatial correlation function, we derive a radiative transfer equation for the polarization-resolved specific intensity that is valid for weak disorder and we solve it analytically in the diffusion limit. A decomposition of the specific intensity in terms of polarization eigenmodes reveals how structural correlations, represented via the standard anisotropic scattering parameter $g$, affect the diffusion of polarized light. More specifically, we find that propagation through each polarization eigenchannel is described by its own transport mean free path that depends on $g$ in a specific and non-trivial way.

  15. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    OpenAIRE

    Kotaro Makino; Yuta Saito; Paul Fons; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Takashi Nakano; Junji Tominaga; Muneaki Hase

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is para...

  16. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn D Rode

    Full Text Available Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013 when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia, highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions.

  17. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D; Wilson, Ryan R; Regehr, Eric V; St Martin, Michelle; Douglas, David C; Olson, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013) when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia), highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions. PMID:26580809

  18. Extracting structural features of rat sciatic nerve using polarization-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, M. S.; de Oliveira, M. C.; Wang, Y.; Henry, F.P.; Randolph, M.A.; Park, B. H.; Boer

    2012-01-01

    We present spectral domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SD PS-OCT) imaging of peripheral nerves. Structural and polarization-sensitive OCT imaging of uninjured rat sciatic nerves was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. OCT and its functional extension, PS-OCT, were used to image sciatic nerve structure with clear delineation of the nerve boundaries to muscle and adipose tissues. A long-known optical effect, bands of Fontana, was also observed. Postprocessi...

  19. Polarization dependence of the metamagnetic resonance of cut-wire-pair structure by using plasmon hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dung, Nguyen Van; Yoo, Young Joon; Lee, Young Pak [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tung, Nguyen Thanh [KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-07-15

    The influence of lattice constants on the electromagnetic behavior of a cut-wire-pair (CWP) structure has been elucidated. In this report, we performed both simulations and experiments to determine the influence of polarization on the metamagnetic resonance of the CWP structure. The key finding is the result of an investigation on the plasmon hybridization between the two CWs, which showed that the polarization of the incident wave was affected. Good agreement between numerical simulation and measurement is achieved.

  20. Chromospheric and Coronal Structure of Polar Plumes. 1; Magnetic Structure and Radiative Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Maxwell J.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Walker, Arthur B. C.; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA), a rocket-borne solar observatory, was successfully launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on May 13, 1991 at 19:05 UT. The telescope systems onboard the MSSTA obtained several full disk solar images in narrow bandpasses centered around strong soft X-ray, EUV, and FUV emission lines. Each telescope was designed to be sensitive to the coronal plasmas at a particular temperature, for seven temperatures ranging from 20,000 K to 4,000,000 K. We report here on the images obtained during the initial flight of the MSSTA, and on the chromospheric and coronal structure of polar plumes observed over both poles of the Sun. We have also co-aligned the MSSTA images with Kitt Peak magnetograms taken on the same day. We are able to positively identify the magnetic structures underlying the polar plumes we analyze as unipolar. We discuss the plume observations and present a radiative energy balance model derived from them.

  1. Innovation, Productivity Growth, and Structural Change

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is concerned with three broad topics: first, changes in the conditions for productivity growth during the last decade; second, industrial innovation as a factor of productivity growth; and third, productivity as a factor of structural change.

  2. Climate change and the increasing impact of polar bears on bird populations

    OpenAIRE

    Prop, Jouke; Aars, Jon; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Hanssen, Sveinn A; Bech, Claus; Bourgeon, Sophie; de Fouw, Jimmy; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Lang, Johannes; Noreen, Elin; Oudman, Thomas; Sittler, Benoit; Stempniewicz, Lech; Tombre, Ingunn; Wolters, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic is becoming warmer at a high rate, and contractions in the extent of sea ice are currently changing the habitats of marine top-predators dependent on ice. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) depend on sea ice for hunting seals. For these top-predators, longer ice-free seasons are hypothesized to force the bears to hunt for alternative terrestrial food, such as eggs from colonial breeding birds. We analyzed time-series of polar bear observations at four locations on Spitsbergen (Svalbard)...

  3. Polarized Quarks, Gluons and Sea in Nucleon Structure Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Bourrely, C.; Buccella, F.; Pisanti, O.; Santorelli, P.; Soffer, J.

    1998-01-01

    We perform a NLO analysis of polarized deep inelastic scattering data to test two different solutions to the so called spin crisis: one of them based on the axial gluon anomaly and consistent with the Bjorken sum rule and another one, where the defects in the spin sum rules and in the Gottfried sum rule are related. In this case a defect is also expected for the Bjorken sum rule. The first solution is slightly favoured by the SLAC E154 results, but both options seem to be consistent with the ...

  4. Polarized Quarks, Gluons and Sea in Nucleon Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bourrely, C; Pisanti, O; Santorelli, P; Soffer, J

    1998-01-01

    We perform a NLO analysis of polarized deep inelastic scattering data to test two different solutions to the so called spin crisis: one of them based on the axial gluon anomaly and consistent with the Bjorken sum rule and another one, where the defects in the spin sum rules and in the Gottfried sum rule are related. In this case a defect is also expected for the Bjorken sum rule. The first solution is slightly favoured by the SLAC E154 results, but both options seem to be consistent with the CERN SMC data.

  5. Quarks and Gluons in Nucleon Polarized Structure Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Bourrely, C.; Buccella, F.; Pisanti, O.; Santorelli, P.; Soffer, J.

    1996-01-01

    We study the available data in polarized e-p deep inelastic scattering to test two different solutions to the so called spin crisis: one of them based on the axial gluon anomaly and consistent with the Bjorken sum rule and another one, where the defects in the spin sum rules and in the Gottfried sum rule are related. In this case a defect is also expected for the Bjorken sum rule. Experimental data, especially the very recent SLAC E154, favour the first solution and demand a gluon polarizatio...

  6. Polarized Quarks, Gluons and Sea in Nucleon Structure Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrely, C.; Buccella, F.; Pisanti, O.; Santorelli, P.; Soffer, J.

    1998-06-01

    We perform a NLO analysis of polarized deep inelastic scattering data to test two different solutions to the so-called spin crisis, one of them based on the axial gluon anomaly and consistent with the Bjorken sum rule, and another in which the defects in the spin sum rules and in the Gottfried sum rule are related. In this case a defect is also expected for the Bjorken sum rule. The first solution is slightly favoured by the SLAC E154 results, but both options seem to be consistent with the CERN SMC data.

  7. Effects of Si-doping on structural, electrical, and optical properties of polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Shuchang; Wang, Yi; Luan, Huakai; Dai, Qian; Wu, Zili; Zhao, Jianguo; Cui, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and non-polar (11 2 bar 0) -oriented a-plane wurtzite AlGaN epi-layers were successfully grown on polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and semi-polar (1 1 bar 02) -oriented r-plane sapphire substrates, respectively with various Si-doping levels in a low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The morphological, structural, electrical, and optical properties of the polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall effect, and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization results show that Si dopants incorporated into the polar and non-polar AlGaN films induced a relaxation of compressive residual strain and a generation of biaxial tensile strain on the surface in consequence of the dislocation climbing. In particular, it was found that the Si-induced compressive strain relaxation in the non-polar AlGaN samples can be promoted by the structural anisotropy as compared with the polar counterparts. The gradually increased relaxation of compressive residual strain in both polar and non-polar AlGaN samples with increasing Si-doping level was attributed to the Si-induced enhancement in the opportunity for the dislocations to interact and annihilate. This implies that the crystal quality for both polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers can be remarkably improved by Si-doping.

  8. Simulated In Situ Measurements and Structural Analysis of Reconnection-Driven Solar Polar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Merrill A.; Uritsky, Vadim M.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Solar polar jets are observed to originate in regions within the open field of solar coronal holes. These so called “anemone” regions are associated with an embedded dipole topology, consisting of a fan-separatrix and a spine line emanating from a null point occurring at the top of the dome shaped fan surface (Antiochos 1998). In this study, we analyze simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) that take into account gravity, solar wind, and spherical geometry to generate polar jets by reconnection between a twisted embedded bipole and the surrounding open field (Karpen et al. 2015). These new simulations confirm and extend previous Cartesian studies of polar jets based on this mechanism (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010, 2015). Focusing on the plasma density, velocity, and magnetic field, we interpolate the adaptively gridded simulation data onto a regular grid, and analyze the signatures that the jet produces as it propagates outward from the solar surface. The trans-Alfvénic nature of the jet front is confirmed by temporally differencing the plasma mass density and comparing the result with the local Alfvén speed. We perform a preliminary analysis of the magnetized plasma turbulence, and examine how the turbulence affects the overall structure of the jet. We also conduct simulated spacecraft fly-throughs of the jet, illustrating the signatures that spacecraft such as Solar Probe Plus may encounter in situ as the jet propagates into the heliosphere. These fly-throughs are performed in several different velocity regimes to better model the changing velocity of Solar Probe Plus relative to the Sun and its jets over the course of the mission.This research was supported by NASA grant NNG11PL10A 670.036 to CUA/IACS (M.A.R. and V.M.U.) and the Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology (J.T.K. and C.R.D.) program.

  9. Unusual polar filament structure in two microsporidia from water reservoirs with radionuclide and organic pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two species of microsporidia with the unusual polar filament structure were found in Cricotopus silvestris and Microtendipes pedellus larvae which were collected near the zone of influence of the Chernobyl atomic power station (Ukraine) and from a high polluted pond in the Mazurian region of Poland. The first microsporidium had separate unikaryotic spores and was assigned to the family Unikaryonidae Sprague. The diameter of the middle coil of the triple-coiled polar filament of this microsporidium was larger than its two other coils. The observed polar filament was thus neither of isofilar nor of the classical anisofilar type. The second polysporoblastic microsporidium has unikaryotic spores and an uncoiled polar filament and was placed in the family Thelohaniidae Hazard and Oldacre. The rare single macrospores of this microsporidium have a double set of the polar filament complex. The relationship between ultrastructural features of microsporidian spores and water pollution is discussed. (author)

  10. Magnetic field structures of solar active regions obtained by polarization mapping observation at 32 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar radio polarization mapping observation was made at 32 GHz with an angular resolution of 3.' 6 on February 2 and 4, 1981. The polarization map represents the distribution of the difference between right-handed (R) and left-handed (L) circular polarization components on the sun (R-L). The polarization maps of two days showed that four active regions on the sun had clear bipolar structures, which were consistent with those observed on the magnetograms. The peak value of the circular polarization degree in the active regions lay between 0.4 % and 2.5 %, which suggests that the longitudinal magnetic field strength at the chromospheric level was between 20 G and 140 G. (author)

  11. Structural changes, roles and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statnett is facing great challenges in a Nordic and European integrated power market, with increasingly mighty commercial players. In a competing market there are conflicts between the socio-economic targets for Statkraft's activities and the commercial interests of Statnet's customers and other players in the power market. In the light of development, the connection lines between the customers and Statnett should be changed. Another problem is the legal competence problem that arises when the Oil and Energy Department (OED) works out the general policy at the same time as it owns Statkraft and Statnett and is the appellate body for the development decisions taken by the NVE (the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate). When comprehensive changes in Statkraft's company organisation and ownership are considered, special attention must be paid to the competence problem and to the risk of the commercial producers increasing their impact on how Statnett manages its role as a systems operator

  12. Structural Change and Macrodynamic Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo, Ricardo Azevedo; Teixeira, Joanilio Rodolpho

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we intend to study some mechanisms that block a rapid diffusion of technological progress from advanced to underdeveloped countries. In order to accomplish this task we focus on two approaches that challenge the view that technological gaps between rich and poor nations are diminishing. The first is the structural economic dynamic approach and the second is the evolutionary view. Both of them reveal that the elimination of the technological gaps between rich and poor nations is ...

  13. Structural stability and change in geographical space

    OpenAIRE

    T Puu

    1981-01-01

    Structural stability and structural change in a continuous two-dimensional model of a space economy are considered, and it is suggested that structural stability of flows or parametric families of flows is a reasonable assumption and secures the robustness of the models constructed. Within the format of continuous flows it is possible to characterize globally the structurally stable flows, by use of the generic theory of differential equations, and to characterize locally, the structural chan...

  14. Vectorial Structure of Non-Paraxial Linearly Polarized Gaussian Beam in Far Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guo-Quan; CHEN Liang; NI Yong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    @@ According to the vectorial structure of non-paraxial electromagnetic beams and the method of stationary phase,the analytical TE and TM terms of non-paraxial linearly polarized Gaussian beam are presented in the far field.The influence of linearly polarized angle on the relative energy flux distributions of the whole beam and its TE and TM terms is studied. The beam spot of the TE term is perpendicular to the direction of linearly polarized angle, while that of the TM term coincides with the direction of linearly polarized angle. The whole beam spot is elliptical, and the long axis is located at the direction of linearly polarized angle. The relative energy flux distribution of the TE term is relatively centralized in the direction perpendicular to the linearly polarized angle.While that of the TM term is relatively centralized in the direction of linearly polarized angle. To obtain the isolated TM and TE terms, a polarizer should be put at the long and the short axis of the whole beam. spot,respectively.

  15. The research of Polar sea ice and its role in climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As an important part of global climate system, the Polar sea ice is effecting on global climate changes through ocean surface radiation balance, mass balance, energy balance as well as the circulating of sea water temperature and salinity. Sea ice research has a centuries-old history. The many correlative sea ice projects were established through the extensive international cooperation during the period from the primary research of intensity and the bearing capacity of sea ice to the development of sea/ice/air coupled model. Based on these researches, the sea ice variety was combined with the global climate change. All research about sea ice includes: the physical properties and processes of sea ice and its snow cover, the ecosystem of sea ice regions, sea ice and upper snow albedo, mass balance of sea ice regions, sea ice and climate coupled model. The simulation suggests that the both of the area and volume of polar sea ice would be reduced in next century. With the developing of the sea ice research, more scientific issues are mentioned. Such as the interaction between sea ice and the other factors of global climate system, the seasonal and regional distribution of polar sea ice thickness, polar sea ice boundary and area variety trends, the growth and melt as well as their influencing factors, the role of the polynya and the sea/air interactions. We should give the best solutions to all of the issues in future sea ice studying.

  16. Neutral hydrogen structures trace dust polarization angle: Implications for the interstellar medium and CMB foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S E; Peek, J E G; Putman, M E; Babler, B L

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI) survey, we show that linear structure in Galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) correlates with the magnetic field orientation implied by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission. The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. At high Galactic latitudes, where the Planck data are noise-dominated, the HI data provide an independent constraint on the Galactic magnetic field orientation, and hence the local dust polarization angle. We detect strong cross-correlations between template maps constructed from estimates of dust intensity combined with either HI-derived angles, starlight polarization angles, or Planck 353 GHz angles. The HI data thus provide a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination.

  17. Identifying polar bear resource selection patterns to inform offshore development in a dynamic and changing Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ryan R.; Horne, Jon S.; Rode, Karyn D.; Regehr, Eric V.; Durner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although sea ice loss is the primary threat to polar bears (Ursus maritimus), little can be done to mitigate its effects without global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Other factors, however, could exacerbate the impacts of sea ice loss on polar bears, such as exposure to increased industrial activity. The Arctic Ocean has enormous oil and gas potential, and its development is expected to increase in the coming decades. Estimates of polar bear resource selection will inform managers how bears use areas slated for oil development and to help guide conservation planning. We estimated temporally-varying resource selection patterns for non-denning adult female polar bears in the Chukchi Sea population (2008–2012) at two scales (i.e., home range and weekly steps) to identify factors predictive of polar bear use throughout the year, before any offshore development. From the best models at each scale, we estimated scale-integrated resource selection functions to predict polar bear space use across the population's range and determined when bears were most likely to use the region where offshore oil and gas development in the United States is slated to occur. Polar bears exhibited significant intra-annual variation in selection patterns at both scales but the strength and annual patterns of selection differed between scales for most variables. Bears were most likely to use the offshore oil and gas planning area during ice retreat and growth with the highest predicted use occurring in the southern portion of the planning area. The average proportion of predicted high-value habitat in the planning area was >15% of the total high-value habitat for the population during sea ice retreat and growth and reached a high of 50% during November 2010. Our results provide a baseline on which to judge future changes to non-denning adult female polar bear resource selection in the Chukchi Sea and help guide offshore development in the region. Lastly, our study provides a

  18. Organizational structural changes in Danish local Government

    OpenAIRE

    Sehested, Karina

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, profound structural changes in the organization of local government have taken place in Denmark: Changes in the political structure (with the consolidation of political committees), in the administration (with the consolidation of departments and internal decentralization), and at the level of institutions (with decentralization from the administrative unit to the institutions). At the center of the changes are despecialization and decentralization. The longterm goal is to improve...

  19. A unified theory of structural change

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Papageorgiou; Fidel Pérez Sebastián; María Dolores Guilló Fuentes

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses dynamic general equilibrium and computational methods, inspired by the multi-sector growth model structure in Stephen Turnovsky’s previous and more recent work, to develop a theory that unifies two of the traditional explanations of structural change: sector-biased technical change and non-homothetic preferences. More specifically, we build a multisector overlapping generations growth model with endogenous technical-change and non-homothetic preferences based on an expanding-v...

  20. Multivariate methods for monitoring structural change

    OpenAIRE

    Jan J.J. Groen; KAPETANIOS, George; Price, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Detection of structural change is a critical empirical activity, but continuous 'monitoring' of series, for structural changes in real time, raises well-known econometric issues that have been explored in a single series context. If multiple series co-break then it is possible that simultaneous examination of a set of series helps identify changes with higher probability or more rapidly than when series are examined on a case-by-case basis. Some asymptotic theory is developed for maximum and ...

  1. Structural Change in Europe During the Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Havlik, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This note examines the extent and patterns of structural changes that have occurred in European economies during the recent crisis using some stylised facts on changing output and employment struc-tures at detailed sectoral level. Focusing mainly on the new EU member states, we compare the perform-ance of various European countries by looking at the differentiated impact of the recent crisis on struc-tural shifts in their economy. We start with stylised facts related to output and employment ...

  2. Polarization and resistivity measurements of post-crystallization changes in amorphous Fe-B-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of grain growth and compositional changes on the electrochemical behavior and the resistivity of amorphous iron-boron-silicon (Fe77.5B15Si7.5) alloys after crystallization were studied. Deterioration of the protective passive film was observed, along with increased annealing. Potentiodynamic polarization provided excellent information about microstructural and chemical changes. It was concluded that electrochemical measurements could be used in conjunction with resistivity measurements in direct studies of grain growth and chemical changes occurring in different phases of the devitrified alloy

  3. Calculation of the QED correction to the recoil proton polarization by the electron structure function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recoil proton polarization for the quasielastic electron-proton scattering is represented as a contraction of the electron structure and the hard part of the polarization dependent contribution into cross-section. The calculation of the hard part with first order radiative correction is performed. The obtained representation includes the leading radiative corrections in all orders of perturbation theory and the main part of the second order next-to-leading ones

  4. Probing space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Ananthanarayan

    2007-11-01

    At the international linear collider large beam polarization of both the electron and positron beams will enhance the signature of physics due to interactions that are beyond the standard model. Here we review our recently obtained results on a general model-independent method of determining for an arbitary one-particle inclusive state the space-time structure of such new physics through the beam polarization dependence and angular distribution of the final state particle.

  5. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C. N.; P. S. J. Spencer

    2007-01-01

    The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approache...

  6. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, P. S. J.; Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, U.K.; Mitchell, C. N.; Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, UK

    2007-01-01

    The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could ...

  7. Identifying Surface Changes on HRSC Images of the Mars South Polar Residual CAP (sprc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS), Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board of the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004), including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007). The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004), spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003) and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004). Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015). HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and

  8. Emergent Structures in an Active Polar Fluid : dynamics of shape, scattering and merger

    CERN Document Server

    Husain, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Spatially localised defect structures emerge spontaneously in a hydrodynamic description of an active polar fluid comprising polar 'actin' filaments and 'myosin' motor proteins that (un)bind to filaments and exert active contractile stresses. These emergent defect structures are characterized by distinct textures and can be either static or mobile - we derive effective equations of motion for these 'extended particles' and analyse their shape, kinetics, interactions and scattering. Depending on the impact parameter and propulsion speed, these active defects undergo elastic scattering or merger. Our results are relevant for the dynamics of actomyosin-dense structures at the cell cortex, reconstituted actomyosin complexes and 2D active colloidal gels.

  9. CAN STRUCTURAL CHANGE EXPLAIN CHANGES IN RETURNS TO TECHNICAL ANALYSIS?

    OpenAIRE

    Kidd, Willis V.; Brorsen, B. Wade

    2002-01-01

    Returns to managed futures funds and Commodity Trading Advisors (CTAs) have decreased dramatically during the last several years. Since these funds overwhelmingly use technical analysis, this research examines futures prices to determine if there is evidence of a structural change in futures price movements that could explain the reduction in fund returns. Bootstrap tests are used to test significance of a change in statistics related to daily returns, close-to-open changes, breakaway gaps, a...

  10. The change of GRB polarization angles in the magnetic-dominated jet model

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The polarimetric measurement on the prompt phase of GRB 100826A shows that the polarization angle changes $\\sim 90^{\\circ}$ between two adjacent time intervals. This phenomenon can be naturally interpreted in the framework of the magnetic-dominated-jet (MDJ) model. The MDJ model suggests that the bulk Lorentz factor of outflow increases as $\\Gamma\\propto r^{1/3}$ until reaching a saturated value $\\Gamma_{\\rm sat}$. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. A beam of synchrotron photons travel alone the jet direction and then collide with the cold electrons at the front of the jet. After the Compton scattering process, these photons are detected by the observer locating slightly off-axis. If photons are emitted before the bulk Lorentz factor saturates, the change of polarization angle is a natural result of the acceleration of outflow.

  11. The magnetic structure of Co(NCNH)2 as determined by (spin-polarized) neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic structure of Co(NCNH)2 has been studied by neutron diffraction data below 10 K using the SPODI and DNS instruments at FRM II, Munich. There is an intensity change in the (1 1 0) and (0 2 0) reflections around 4 K, to be attributed to the onset of a magnetic ordering of the Co2+ spins. Four different spin orientations have been evaluated on the basis of Rietveld refinements, comprising antiferromagnetic as well as ferromagnetic ordering along all three crystallographic axes. Both residual values and supplementary susceptibility measurements evidence that only a ferromagnetic ordering with all Co2+ spins parallel to the c axis is a suitable description of the low-temperature magnetic ground state of Co(NCNH)2. The deviation of the magnetic moment derived by the Rietveld refinement from the expectancy value may be explained either by an incomplete saturation of the moment at temperatures slightly below the Curie temperature or by a small Jahn–Teller distortion. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic ground state of Co(NCNH)2 has been clarified by (spin-polarized) neutron diffraction data at low temperatures. Intensity changes below 4 K arise due to the onset of ferromagnetic ordering of the Co2+ spins parallel to the c axis, corroborated by various (magnetic) Rietveld refinements. - Highlights: • Powderous Co(NCNH)2 has been subjected to (spin-polarized) neutron diffraction. • Magnetic susceptibility data of Co(NCNH)2 have been collected. • Below 4 K, the magnetic moments align ferromagnetically with all Co2+ spins parallel to the c axis. • The magnetic susceptibility data yield an effective magnetic moment of 4.68 and a Weiss constant of −13(2) K. • The ferromagnetic Rietveld refinement leads to a magnetic moment of 2.6 which is close to the expectancy value of 3

  12. Nuclear-polarization effect to the hyperfine structure in heavy multicharged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Nefiodov, A. V.; Plunien, G.; Soff, G.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the correction to the hyperfine structure of heavy multicharged ions, which is connected with the nuclear-polarization effect caused by the unpaired bound electron. Numerical calculations are performed for hydrogenlike ions taking into account the dominant collective nuclear excitations. The correction defines the ultimate limit of precision in accurate theoretical predictions of the hyperfine-structure splittings.

  13. Changes in water structure after laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly sensitive method for the control of water structure changes after laser irradiation has been used, based on a non equilibrium physical model - evaporation of several water drops: some irradiated by laser beam and others of nonirradiated water. The drops lay on a hydrophobic plate at constant temperature and relative humidity. The method of so called 'states spectrum' during the research has been used. The latter, in fact, is the distribution function of the wetting angle θ of water drops, taken as a value, which varies randomly in time. Water structure is characterized by its states spectrum. A possible mechanism of the influence of laser beam on the structure and properties of water has been discussed. It is based on the supposition that the changes in water structure, caused by the laser rays, change the hydration layer around the macromolecules and other biological structures and therefore change their functioning. (author)

  14. Beam quality changes of radially and azimuthally polarized fields propagating through quartic phase plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Herrero, R.; Piquero, G.; Mejías, P. M.

    2008-02-01

    In terms of the so-called irradiance moments of a light field, the beam quality change, Δ Q, of radially and azimuthally polarized beams caused by propagation through a quartic phase plate (as occurs, for example, in strongly pumped laser rods used in high-power solid-state lasers) is studied. Analytical expressions for Δ Q are given, and a comparison between the scalar and vectorial regimes is also shown. The results are applied to several cases of interest.

  15. Intraoperative change in P-wave polarity, an accidental finding: Anaesthesiologist’s dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Swati Chhabra; Singhal, S K

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmias are commonly observed in the intraoperative period. These could arise due to varied reasons and are treated accordingly. However certain situations are encountered where arrhythmias are transient and do not cause any haemodynamic instability. We report a case of 61 year old female posted for an orthopaedic procedure where intraoperative changing p wave polarity was noticed on monitor. Since, the patient was asymptomatic and haemodynamically stable, we decided to proceed with a spi...

  16. Post-equinox dynamics and polar cloud structure on Uranus

    CERN Document Server

    Sromovsky, Lawrence; Hammel, Heidi; de Pater, Imke; Rages, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Post equinox imaging of Uranus by HST, Keck, and Gemini telescopes has enabled new measurements of winds over previously sampled latitudes as well as measurements at high northern latitudes that have recently come into better view. These new observations also used techniques to greatly improve signal to noise ratios, making possible the detection and tracking of more subtle cloud features. The 250 m/s prograde jet peaking near 60 N was confirmed and more accurately characterized. Several long-lived cloud features have also been tracked. The winds pole-ward of 60 N are consistent with solid body rotation at a westward (prograde) rate of 4.3 deg/h with respect to Uranus' interior. When combined with 2007 and other recent measurements, it is clear that a small but well-resolved asymmetry exists in the zonal profile at middle latitudes, peaking at 35 deg, where southern winds are 20 m/s more westward than corresponding northern winds. High S/N Keck II imaging of the north polar region of Uranus reveals a transiti...

  17. Radio polarization and magnetic field structure in M 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Urbanik, M.; Beck, R.; Han, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We observed total and polarized radio continuum emission from the spiral galaxy M 101 at λλ 6.2 cm and 11.1 cm with the Effelsberg telescope. The angular resolutions are 2.´ 5 (=5.4 kpc) and 4.´ 4 (=9.5 kpc), respectively. We use these data to study various emission components in M 101 and properties of the magnetic field. Separation of thermal and non-thermal emission shows that the thermal emission is closely correlated with the spiral arms, while the non-thermal emission is more smoothly distributed indicating diffusion of cosmic ray electrons away from their places of origin. The radial distribution of both emissions has a break near R = 16 kpc (=7.´ 4), where it steepens to an exponential scale length of L ≃ 5 kpc, which is about 2.5 times smaller than at Ranonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A114

  18. Radio polarization and magnetic field structure in M 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Urbanik, M.; Beck, R.; Han, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We observed total and polarized radio continuum emission from the spiral galaxy M 101 at λλ 6.2 cm and 11.1 cm with the Effelsberg telescope. The angular resolutions are 2.´ 5 (=5.4 kpc) and 4.´ 4 (=9.5 kpc), respectively. We use these data to study various emission components in M 101 and properties of the magnetic field. Separation of thermal and non-thermal emission shows that the thermal emission is closely correlated with the spiral arms, while the non-thermal emission is more smoothly distributed indicating diffusion of cosmic ray electrons away from their places of origin. The radial distribution of both emissions has a break near R = 16 kpc (=7.´ 4), where it steepens to an exponential scale length of L ≃ 5 kpc, which is about 2.5 times smaller than at Rlaw exponent of b = 0.28 ± 0.02. The ordered magnetic field is generally aligned with the spiral arms with pitch angles that are about 8° larger than those of H i filaments. Based on observations with the 100 m telescope of the MPIfR at Effelsberg.FITS files of the images are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A114

  19. Factor Endowment, Structural Change, and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Che, Natasha Xingyuan

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims (1) to test the endowment-based structural change theory proposed by recent studies such as Acemoglu & Guerrieri (2008) and Ju, Lin & Wang (2009); and (2) to explore the linkage between structural coherence and economic growth. By structural coherence, I refer to the degree that a country’s industrial structure optimally reflects its factor endowment fundamentals. Using data from 27 industries across 15 countries, I examine whether higher capital endowment is associated w...

  20. Phase-space structures and ionization dynamics of the hydrogen atom in elliptically polarized microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchekinova, E.; Chandre, C.; Uzer, T.

    2006-10-01

    The multiphoton ionization of hydrogen atoms in a strong elliptically polarized microwave field exhibits complex features that are not observed for ionization in circular and linear polarized fields. Experimental data reveal high sensitivity of ionization dynamics to the small changes of the field polarization. The multidimensional nature of the problem makes widely used diagnostics of dynamics, such as Poincaré surfaces of section, impractical. We analyze the phase-space dynamics using the finite time stability analysis rendered by the fast Lyapunov indicators technique. The concept of zero-velocity surface is used to initialize the calculations and visualize the dynamics. Our analysis provides stability maps calculated for the initial energy at the maximum and below the saddle of the zero-velocity surface. We estimate qualitatively the dependence of ionization thresholds on the parameters of the applied field, such as polarization and scaled amplitude.

  1. The optical polarization signatures of fragmented equatorial dusty structures in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F

    2015-01-01

    If the existence of an obscuring circumnuclear region around the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been observationally proven, its geometry remains highly uncertain. The morphology usually adopted for this region is a toroidal structure, but other alternatives, such as flared disks, can be a good representative of equatorial outflows. Those two geometries usually provide very similar spectroscopic signatures, even when they are modeled under the assumption of fragmentation. In this lecture note, we show that the resulting polarization signatures of the two models, either a torus or a flared disk, are quite different from each other. We use a radiative transfer code that computes the 2000 - 8000 angstrom polarization of the two morphologies in a clumpy environment, and show that varying the sizes of a toroidal region has deep impacts onto the resulting polarization, while the polarization of flared disks is independent of the outer radius. Clumpy flared disks also produce higher polarizati...

  2. Plasmonic structure integrated single-photon detector configurations to improve absorptance and polarization contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Csete, Maria; Szenes, Andras; Szalai, Aniko; Szabo, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Configurations capable of maximizing both absorptance and polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) consisting of p=264 nm and P=792 nm periodic niobium-nitride (NbN) patterns on silica substrate. Global NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-orientation (gamma=90 azimuthal angle) and the highest polarization contrast is attained in S-orientation of all devices. Common nanophotonical origin of absorptance enhancement is collective resonance on nano-cavity-gratings with different profiles, which is promoted by coupling between localized modes in quarter wavelength MIM nano-cavities and laterally synchronized Brewster-Zenneck-type surface waves in integrated SNSPDs possessing a three-quarter-wavelength-scaled periodicity. The spectral sensitivity and dispersion characteristics reveal that device design specific optimal configurations...

  3. Review of Tourism and change in polar regions: climate, environment and experience and Cruise tourism in polar regions: promoting environmental and social sustainability?

    OpenAIRE

    P.J. Capelotti

    2011-01-01

    These two edited volumes, which cover much of the same ground, both begin from a common premise: polar tourism, as its been experienced by wealthy travellers for over a century, has a very definite shelf life. With the acceleration of global climate change, the Arctic and Antarctic are being changed, changed rapidly, perhaps permanently and, if one pays attention to the news, seemingly by the day. When combined with popular documentaries and feature films like An inconvenient truth, March of ...

  4. Structural Changes in Chinese Food Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Hovhannisyan, Vardges; Gould, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    The article tests for structural food preference change in urban China using province-level panel data from 2002 to 2010. We employ the Generalized Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System to represent consumer preferences and estimate demand for seven food groups in a dynamic setting. This relaxes many of the restrictions on the demand models used in the literature on structural preference change. Our findings suggest that Chinese food preferences are continuing to evolve.

  5. Study of neutron spin structure functions at low Q2 with polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently completed experiment E94-010 at Jefferson Lab studies the neutron spin structure functions at low momentum transfer (Q2) values. Using a polarized 3 He target and polarized electron beam, we have measured the asymmetries and cross sections for 3He(e,e') from the elastic to the deep inelastic region. The covered Q2 ranges from 0.03 to 1.1 GeV2. From the data, the Q2 evolution of the spin structure functions for 3He and neutron, and of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule has been studied, and the preliminary results are presented

  6. Effects of Heme Electronic Structure and Distal Polar Interaction on Functional and Vibrational Properties of Myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yuki; Nishimura, Ryu; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Shibata, Tomokazu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ogura, Takashi; Matsuo, Takashi; Hirota, Shun; Neya, Saburo; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-02-15

    We analyzed the oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) binding properties, autoxidation reaction rate, and FeO2 and FeCO vibrational frequencies of the H64Q mutant of sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) reconstituted with chemically modified heme cofactors possessing a variety of heme Fe electron densities (ρFe), and the results were compared with those for the previously studied native [Shibata, T. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010 , 132 , 6091 - 6098 ], and H64L [Nishimura, R. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2014 , 53 , 1091 - 1099 ], and L29F [Nishimura, R. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2014 , 53 , 9156 - 9165 ] mutants in order to elucidate the effect of changes in the heme electronic structure and distal polar interaction contributing to stabilization of the Fe-bound ligand on the functional and vibrational properties of the protein. The study revealed that, as in the cases of the previously studied native protein [Shibata, T. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2012 , 51 , 11955 - 11960 ], the O2 affinity and autoxidation reaction rate of the H64Q mutant decreased with a decrease in ρFe, as expected from the effect of a change in ρFe on the resonance between the Fe(2+)-O2 bond and Fe(3+)-O2(-)-like species in the O2 form, while the CO affinity of the protein is independent of a change in ρFe. We also found that the well-known inverse correlation between the frequencies of Fe-bound CO (νCO) and Fe-C (νFeC) stretching [Li, X.-Y.; Spiro, T. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1988 , 110 , 6024 - 6033 ] is affected differently by changes in ρFe and the distal polar interaction, indicating that the effects of the two electronic perturbations due to the chemical modification of a heme cofactor and the replacement of nearby amino acid residues on the resonance between the two alternative canonical forms of the FeCO fragment in the protein are slightly different from each other. These findings provide a new insight for deeper understanding of the functional regulation of the protein. PMID:26814981

  7. Chiral Nematic Structure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions and Films; Polarized Light and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G. Gray

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic liquid crystalline solutions and suspensions form chiral nematic phases that show a rich variety of optical textures in the liquid crystalline state. These ordered structures may be preserved in solid films prepared by evaporation of solvent or suspending medium. Film formation from aqueous suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC was investigated by polarized light microscopy, optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM. An attempt is made to interpret qualitatively the observed textures in terms of the orientation of the cellulose nanocrystals in the suspensions and films, and the changes in orientation caused by the evaporative process. Mass transfer within the evaporating droplet resulted in the formation of raised rings whose magnitude depended on the degree of pinning of the receding contact line. AFM of dry films at short length scales showed a radial orientation of the CNC at the free surface of the film, along with a radial height variation with a period of approximately P/2, ascribed to the anisotropic shrinkage of the chiral nematic structure.

  8. Low frequency observations of linearly polarized structures in the interstellar medium near the south Galactic pole

    CERN Document Server

    Lenc, Emil; Sun, X H; Sadler, E M; Willis, A G; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bell, M E; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Callingham, J R; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Deshpande, A A; Dillon, J S; Dwarkanath, K S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; For, B -Q; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Jacobs, D C; Kapinska, A D; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, H -S; Kratzenberg, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Murphy, T; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, S; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, S K; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S J; Trott, C; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B; Zheng, Q

    2016-01-01

    We present deep polarimetric observations at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), covering 625 deg^2 centered on RA=0 h, Dec=-27 deg. The sensitivity available in our deep observations allows an in-band, frequency-dependent analysis of polarized structure for the first time at long wavelengths. Our analysis suggests that the polarized structures are dominated by intrinsic emission but may also have a foreground Faraday screen component. At these wavelengths, the compactness of the MWA baseline distribution provides excellent snapshot sensitivity to large-scale structure. The observations are sensitive to diffuse polarized emission at ~54' resolution with a sensitivity of 5.9 mJy beam^-1 and compact polarized sources at ~2.4' resolution with a sensitivity of 2.3 mJy beam^-1 for a subset (400 deg^2) of this field. The sensitivity allows the effect of ionospheric Faraday rotation to be spatially and temporally measured directly from the diffuse polarized background. Our observations reveal large-sca...

  9. The structural properties of sustainable, continuous change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsson, Dorthe Døjbak; Klaas, Johann Peter; Carroll, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that the relationship between structure and inertia in changing environments may be more complex than previously held and that the theoretical logics tying inertia with flexibility and efficiency remain incomplete. Using a computational model, this article aims to clarify this...... relationship by exploring what structural properties enable continuous change in inertia-generating organizations and what their performance consequences are in dynamic environments. The article has three main findings: First, employing managers who anticipate change is not enough to generate continuous change......; it is also necessary to raise both the rate of responsiveness and desired performance. Second, continuous change increases average organizational performance and reduces its variation. Third, organizations’ capacity for continuous change is counterintuitively limited by the organizations’ capacity to...

  10. Structures and Processes of Planned Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Currently, two parallel structures can be found in public school systems: the conventional bureaucratic apparatus and a more loosely structured network of collaborative enterprises. The nature of collaborative leadership and followership in settings of planned change is examined, particularly interactions among key actors (teachers,…

  11. Diapause is associated with a change in the polarity of secretion of insulin-like peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Yohei; Honda, Yoko; Honda, Shuji; Iwasaki, Takashi; Qadota, Hiroshi; Benian, Guy M; Kawano, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signalling (IIS) pathway plays an important role in the regulation of larval diapause, the long-lived growth arrest state called dauer arrest, in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this nematode, 40 insulin-like peptides (ILPs) have been identified as putative ligands of the IIS pathway; however, it remains unknown how ILPs modulate larval diapause. Here we show that the secretory polarity of INS-35 and INS-7, which suppress larval diapause, is changed in the intestinal epithelial cells at larval diapause. These ILPs are secreted from the intestine into the body cavity during larval stages. In contrast, they are secreted into the intestinal lumen and degraded during dauer arrest, only to be secreted into the body cavity again when the worms return to developmental growth. The process that determines the secretory polarity of INS-35 and INS-7, thus, has an important role in the modulation of larval diapause. PMID:26838180

  12. Change in the magnetic moment of a ferromagnetic nanoparticle under polarized current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhushner, M. A.; Gatin, A. K.; Grishin, M. V.; Shub, B. R.; Kim, V. P.; Khomutov, G. B.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetization reversal of a ferromagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle with a volume of the order of several thousands of cubic nanometers under the influence of spin-polarized current has been investigated on a high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope, where one of the electrodes is a magnetized iron wire needle and the second electrode is a ferromagnetic nanoparticle on a graphite substrate. The measured threshold current of magnetization reversal, i.e., the lowest value of the current corresponding to the magnetization reversal, is found to be I thresh ≈ 9 nA. A change in the magnetization of a nanoparticle is revealed using the giant magnetoresistance effect, i.e., the dependence of the weak polarized current ( I < I thresh) on the relative orientation of the magnetizations of the electrodes.

  13. 2,4,6-Trimethylpyridinium perchlorate: Polar properties and correlations with molecular structure of organic-inorganic hybrid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaś, M.; Gaģor, A.; Czupiński, O.; Pietraszko, A.; Jakubas, R.

    2009-11-01

    [(CH3)3C5H2NH][ClO4] has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray (at 344, 245, 180 and 115 K), calorimetric, dilatometric, dielectric and pyroelectric measurements. At room temperature the crystal structure is polar, space group Pmn21. It consists of discrete disordered [ClO4]- anions and ordered trimethylpyridinium cations giving the 3D network of hydrogen bonds. The compound reveals a rich polymorphism in the solid state. It undergoes four solid-solid phase transitions: from phases I to II at 356/327 K (heating/cooling), II→III at 346/326, III→IV at 226 K and IV→V at 182/170 K. [(CH3)3C5H2NH][ClO4] reveals a strong pyroelectric response over a wide temperature region (phases III, IV and V) with the spontaneous polarization changes ( ΔPs) of the order of 1.5-8×10-3 C/m2. The spontaneous polarization is irreversible over all the polar phases, however, the magnitude of the ΔPs in the vicinity of the phase transitions is characteristic of compounds with the ferroelectric order. The molecular mechanism of the successive phases transitions in the studied crystal is proposed.

  14. A recent change in the optical and γ-ray polarization of the Crab nebula and pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.; Kyne, G.; Gouiffès, C.; Laurent, P.; Hallinan, G.; Redfern, R. M.; Shearer, A.

    2016-03-01

    We report on observations of the polarization of optical and γ-ray photons from the Crab nebula and pulsar system using the Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP), the Hubble Space Telescope, Advanced Camera for Surveys and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite (INTEGRAL). These, when combined with other optical polarization observations, suggest that the polarized optical emission and γ-ray polarization changes in a similar manner. A change in the optical polarization angle has been observed by this work, from 109.5 ± 0.7° in 2005 to 85.3 ± 1.4° in 2012. On the other hand, the γ-ray polarization angle changed from 115 ± 11° in 2003-2007 to 80 ± 12° in 2012-2014. Strong flaring activities have been detected in the Crab nebula over the past few years by the high-energy γ-ray missions Agile and Fermi, and magnetic reconnection processes have been suggested to explain these observations. The change in the polarized optical and γ-ray emission of the Crab nebula/pulsar as observed, for the first time, by GASP and INTEGRAL may indicate that reconnection is possibly at work in the Crab nebula. We also report, for the first time, a non-zero measure of the optical circular polarization from the Crab pulsar+knot system.

  15. Effect of the change in statocyte polarity on calcium distribution: results from PolCa space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legue, Valerie; Pereda, Veronica; Gerard, Joelle; Eche, Brigitte; Gasset, Gilbert; Chaput, Didier

    Plants are the ability to sense and to re-orient their growth in response to gravity. In roots, specialized sensory cells (called statocytes) perceive signal gravity and are the only cells that exhibit structural polarity with respect to gravity providing interactions with starch-containing plastids (amyloplasts) and the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Upon root reorientation, a displacement of amyloplasts is observed and is accompanied with a change in direct amyloplast-ER direct interaction in root cap cells. Even if amyloplasts are widely considered as gravity sensor, there is no clear evidence that a change in amyloplasts-ER interactions could lead to a transduction gravity signal. Previous space experiments clearly showed that amyloplasts inter-action with ER are not necessary to lead to a root re-orientation, suggesting that amyloplasts displacement mediate transduction events through cytoskeleton reorganisation and calcium-dependant pathways. The objective of the space experiment called PolCa is to dissect the effect of change in amyloplasts-ER interactions on calcium dependant pathways. Space conditions provide a unique opportunity to provide a change of structural polarity in statocytes without a gravistimulation. PolCa experiment has been conducted using Brassica napus seedlings, which submitted four different conditions: continuously on 1 g centrifuge or continuously in micrograv-ity conditions. Some seedlings germinated on centrifuge have been transferred during 10 min in microgravity conditions, leading to a loss of amyloplast-ER interactions through amyloplasts displacement. Others seedlings germinated in microgravity conditions have been transferred on centrifuge during 10 min. In this situation, we observed a return of amyloplasts-ER interactions. We analysed the localisation of free calcium after chemical fixation and calcium precipitation using potassium pyroantimonate in these four situations. The observation of calcium precipita-tions with

  16. Changes in Polarization Position Angle across the Eclipse in the Double Pulsar System

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, R; Burgay, M; Camilo, F; Kramer, M; Melrose, D B; Stairs, I H

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the changes in polarization position angle in radiation from pulsar A around the eclipse in the Double Pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B at the 20 cm and 50 cm wavelengths using the Parkes 64-m telescope. The changes are ~2\\sigma\\ during and shortly after the eclipse at 20 cm but less significant at 50 cm. We show that the changes in position angle during the eclipse can be modelled by differential synchrotron absorption in the eclipse regions. Position angle changes after the eclipse are interpreted as Faraday rotation in the magnetotail of pulsar B. Implied charge densities are consistent with the Goldreich-Julian density, suggesting that the particle energies in the magnetotail are mildly relativistic.

  17. The optical polarization signatures of fragmented equatorial dusty structures in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Stalevski, M.

    2015-12-01

    If the existence of an obscuring circumnuclear region around the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been observationally proven, its geometry remains highly uncertain. The morphology usually adopted for this region is a toroidal structure, but other alternatives, such as flared disks, can be a good representative of equatorial outflows. Those two geometries usually provide very similar spectroscopic signatures, even when they are modeled under the assumption of fragmentation. In this lecture note, we show that the resulting polarization signatures of the two models, either a torus or a flared disk, are quite different from each other. We use a radiative transfer code that computes the 2000 -- 8000 Å polarization of the two morphologies in a clumpy environment, and show that varying the sizes of a toroidal region has deep impacts onto the resulting polarization, while the polarization of flared disks is independent of the outer radius. Clumpy flared disks also produce higher polarization degrees (˜ 10 % at best) together with highly variable polarization position angles.

  18. Polarization switching and patterning in self-assembled peptide tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bdikin, Igor; Bystrov, Vladimir; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Gracio, José; Kopyl, Svitlana; Wojtas, Maciej; Mishina, Elena; Sigov, Alexander; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembled peptide nanotubes are unique nanoscale objects that have great potential for a multitude of applications, including biosensors, nanotemplates, tissue engineering, biosurfactants, etc. The discovery of strong piezoactivity and polar properties in aromatic dipeptides [A. Kholkin, N. Amdursky, I. Bdikin, E. Gazit, and G. Rosenman, ACS Nano 4, 610 (2010)] opened up a new perspective for their use as biocompatible nanoactuators, nanomotors, and molecular machines. Another, as yet unexplored functional property is the ability to switch polarization and create artificial polarization patterns useful in various electronic and optical applications. In this work, we demonstrate that diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes are indeed electrically switchable if annealed at a temperature of about 150 °C. The new orthorhombic antipolar structure that appears after annealing allows for the existence of a radial polarization component, which is directly probed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements. Observation of the relatively stable polarization patterns and hysteresis loops via PFM testifies to the local reorientation of molecular dipoles in the radial direction. The experimental results are complemented with rigorous molecular calculations and create a solid background of electric-field induced deformation of aromatic rings and corresponding polarization switching in this emergent material.

  19. Structural Anisotropy in Polar Fluids Subjected to Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A heuristic model based on dielectric continuum theory for the long-range solvation free energy of a dipolar system possessing periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) is presented. The predictions of the model are compared to simulation results for Stockmayer fluids simulated using three different cell geometries. The boundary effects induced by the PBCs are shown to lead to anisotropies in the apparent dielectric constant and the long-range solvation free energy of as much as 50%. However, the sum of all of the anisotropic energy contributions yields a value that is very close to the isotropic one derived from dielectric continuum theory, leading to a total system energy close to the dielectric value. It is finally shown that the leading-order contribution to the energetic and structural anisotropy is significantly smaller in the noncubic simulation cell geometries compared to when using a cubic simulation cell. PMID:22303290

  20. Structure-Dependent Spin Polarization in Polymorphic CdS:Y Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Xiao, Bingxin; Zhao, Rui; Ma, Yanzhang; Zhang, Mingzhe

    2016-03-16

    Searching for the polymorphic semiconductor nanocrystals would provide precise and insightful structure-spin polarization correlations and meaningful guidance for designing and synthesizing high spin-polarized spintronic materials. Herein, the high spin polarization is achieved in polymorphic CdS:Y semiconductor nanocrystals. The high-pressure polymorph of rock-salt CdS:Y nanocrystals has been recovered at ambient conditions synthesized by the wurtzite CdS:Y nanocrystals as starting material under 5.2 GPa and 300 °C conditions. The rock-salt CdS:Y polymorph displays more robust room-temperature ferromagnetism than wurtzite sample, which can reach the ferromagnetic level of conventional semiconductors doped with magnetic transition-metal ions, mainly due to the significantly enhanced spin configuration and defect states. Therefore, crystal structure directly governs the spin configuration, which determines the degree of spin polarization. This work can provide experimental and theoretical methods for designing the high spin-polarized semiconductor nanocrystals, which is important for applications in semiconductor spintronics. PMID:26905093

  1. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.; MacKenzie, E.

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authrs examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B(sub z). A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations.

  2. The Structure & Linear Polarization of the Kiloparsec-Scale Jet of the Quasar 3C\\,345

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, David H; Marchenko, Valerie V

    2012-01-01

    Deep Very Large Array imaging of the quasar 3C\\,345 at 4.86 and 8.44 GHz has been used to study the structure and linear polarization of its radio jet on scales ranging from 2 to 30 kpc. There is a 7--8 Jy unresolved core with spectral index $\\alpha \\simeq -0.24$ ($I_\

  3. Does One Need the Anomaly to Describe the Polarized Structure Functions?

    OpenAIRE

    Buccella, F.; Pisanti, O.; Santorelli, P.; Soffer, J.

    1995-01-01

    The SLAC data on the p, d and n polarized structure functions are fairly well reproduced with and without the contribution of the anomaly. The results are compared with a previous study based mainly on SMC data. The implications on the solution of the spin-crisis are discussed.

  4. Does one need the anomaly to describe the polarized structure functions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buccella, F. [Naples Univ. `Federico II` (Italy). Dip. di Scienze Fisiche; Pisanti, O.; Santorelli, P. [Naples Univ. `Federico II` (Italy). Dip. di Scienze Fisiche]|[INFN, Naples (Italy); Soffer, J. [CNRS, Marseille (France). Centre de Physique Theorique

    1996-02-01

    The SLAC data on the p, d and n polarized structure functions are fairly well reproduced with and without the contribution of the anomaly. The results are compared with a previous study based mainly on SMC data. The implications on the solution of the spin crisis are discussed.

  5. Does one need the anomaly to describe the polarized structure functions?

    CERN Document Server

    Buccella, F; Santorelli, P; Soffer, J

    1995-01-01

    The SLAC data on the p, d and n polarized structure functions are fairly well reproduced with and without the contribution of the anomaly. The results are compared with a previous study based mainly on SMC data. The implications on the solution of the spin-crisis are discussed.

  6. Does one need the anomaly to describe the polarized structure functions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLAC data on the p, d and n polarized structure functions are fairly well reproduced with and without the contribution of the anomaly. The results are compared with a previous study based mainly on SMC data. The implications on the solution of the spin crisis are discussed

  7. Does one need the anomaly to describe the polarized structure functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccella, F.; Pisanti, O.; Santorelli, P.; Soffer, J.

    1996-02-01

    The SLAC data on the p, d and n polarized structure functions are fairly well reproduced with and without the contribution of the anomaly. The results are compared with a previous study based mainly on SMC data. The implications on the solution of the spin-crisis are discussed.

  8. Diagnostic efficiency of Mueller-matrix polarization reconstruction system of the phase structure of liver tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotna, Natalia I.; Pavlov, Sergii V.; Radchenko, Kostiantyn O.; Stasenko, Vladyslav A.; Wójcik, Waldemar; Kussambayeva, Nazym

    2015-12-01

    The application field of using the Mueller-matrix polarizing reconstruction system of phase structure of biological layer for optical-anisotropic parameters differentiation of histological sections of healthy and rat's liver with hepatitis were investigated. Comparison of system informativity with known systems on indexes of sensitivity, specificity and balanced accuracy were performed.

  9. Polarization and piezoelectricity in polymer films with artificial void structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuanlan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xia, Zhongfu; Qiu, Xunlin; Wirges, Werner; Gerhard, Reimund; Zeng, Changchun; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2011-10-01

    Laminated polymer-film systems with well-defined void structures were prepared from fluoroethylenepropylene (FEP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) layers. First the PTFE films were patterned and then fusion-bonded with the FEP films. The laminates were subjected to either corona or contact charging in order to obtain the desired piezoelectricity. The build-up of the "macro-dipoles" in the laminated films was studied by recording the electric hysteresis loops. The resulting electro-mechanical properties were investigated by means of dielectric resonance spectroscopy (DRS) and direct measurements of the stress-strain relationship. Moreover, the thermal stability of the piezoelectric d 33 coefficient was investigated at elevated temperatures and via thermally stimulated discharge (TSD) current measurements in short circuit. For 150 μm thick laminated films, consisting of one 25 μm thick PTFE layer, two 12.5 μm thick FEP layers, and a void of 100 μm height, the critical voltage necessary for the build-up of the "macro-dipoles" in the inner voids was approximately 1400 V, which agrees with the value calculated from the Paschen Law. A quasi-static piezoelectric d 33 coefficient up to 300 pC/N was observed after corona charging. The mechanical properties of the film systems are highly anisotropic. At room temperature, the Young's moduli of the laminated film system are around 0.37 MPa in the thickness direction and 274 MPa in the lateral direction, respectively. Using these values, the theoretical shape anisotropy ratio of the void was calculated, which agrees well with experimental observation. Compared with films that do not exhibit structural regularity, the laminates showed improved thermal stability of the d 33 coefficients. The thermal stability of d 33 can be further improved by pre-aging. E.g., the reduction of the d 33 value in the sample pre-aged at 150°C for 5 h was less than 5% after annealing for 30 h at a temperature of 90°C.

  10. Optical and microstructural properties of semi-polar (11-22)InGaN/GaN quantum well structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report on a comparison of the optical properties of a series of semi-polar (11-22)InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures with those of a series of polar (0001) control samples. In the semi-polar structures we observe blue-shifts of the quantum well emission, increases of the radiative recombination rates and sharpening of the quantum well excitation spectra; all these changes are compatible with a decrease in the magnitude of the electric field strength with respect to the control samples. However the reduction in the electric field strength does not translate into an improvement in the photoluminescence internal quantum efficiency at room temperature. This failure we attribute to an increased density of non-radiative recombination centres, arising from the larger dislocation density in the (11-22) samples. Using TEM and STEM-HAADF measurements we have also observed gross well width fluctuations in the (11-22) samples which result in broadening of the photoluminescence spectra. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Optical and microstructural properties of semi-polar (11-22)InGaN/GaN quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, Nicholas P.; Dawson, Philip [Photon Science Institute, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Johnston, Carol F.; Kappers, Menno J.; Hollander, Jonathan L.; McAleese, Clifford; Humphreys, Colin J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we report on a comparison of the optical properties of a series of semi-polar (11-22)InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures with those of a series of polar (0001) control samples. In the semi-polar structures we observe blue-shifts of the quantum well emission, increases of the radiative recombination rates and sharpening of the quantum well excitation spectra; all these changes are compatible with a decrease in the magnitude of the electric field strength with respect to the control samples. However the reduction in the electric field strength does not translate into an improvement in the photoluminescence internal quantum efficiency at room temperature. This failure we attribute to an increased density of non-radiative recombination centres, arising from the larger dislocation density in the (11-22) samples. Using TEM and STEM-HAADF measurements we have also observed gross well width fluctuations in the (11-22) samples which result in broadening of the photoluminescence spectra. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. What is happening in the International Polar Year? Latest news about the climate changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Polar (IPY) Year 2007-2008 is a large scientific programme focused on the Arctic and the Antarctic. Scientists from over 60 nations participates. The IPY have two primary objectives: to improve weather forecasts especially regarding extreme weather and to improve climatic models for better understanding of possible instabilities, especially regarding ocean currents. The presentation includes data on natural climate change, temperature anomaly, the ice in the Arctic Ocean and Northern and Southern Hemisphere sea ice area, current in Southern and Northern hemisphere sea ice area and variations of the surface temperature ice arctic regions antarctic regions. The presentation was held at the MNT-Forum, 29. January 2008

  13. Macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations of plasma density structures in the polar cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, S. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States); Basu, S. [National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (United States); Sojka, J.J. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-15

    The seasonal and UT variation of mesoscale structures (10 km - 100 m) in the central polar cap has been obtained from an analysis of 250-MHz intensity scintillation observations made at Thule, Greenland. It has been established earlier that mesoscale structures causing scintillations of satellite signals may develop at the edges of macroscale structures (several hundred km) such as discrete polar cap plasma density enhancements or patches through the gradient drift instability process. As such, the authors examined the seasonal and UT variation of polar cap patches simulated by using the USU Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) under conditions of southward B{sub z}. A fairly remarkable similarity is found between the scintillation observations and the model predictions of patch occurrence. For instance, both the patch and scintillation occurrences are minimized during the winter solstice (northern hemisphere) between 0800-1200 UT while also having their largest seasonal intensity between 2000-2400 UT. Little UT dependence of patches and scintillations is seen at equinox with high intensity being observed throughout the day, while during local summer the intensity of macroscale patches and mesoscale irregularities are found to be a minimum at all UT. These results indicate that macroscale features in the polar cap are routinely associated with plasma instabilities giving rise to smaller scale structures and that the specific patch formation mechanism assumed in the simulation is consistent with the observations. This ability to bridge between macroscale modeling and mesoscale observations provides a natural framework for the modeling of mesoscale structures themselves. This mesoscale modeling, in turn, can be utilized in a variety of radar and communication systems applications in the polar region. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  14. A recent change in the optical and {\\gamma}-ray polarization of the Crab nebula and pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Paul; Gouiffes, Christian; 3,; Laurent, Philipe; Hallinan, Gregg; Redfern, Michael; Shearer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of the polarization of optical and {\\gamma}-ray photons from the Crab nebula and pulsar system using the Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP), the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite (Integral). These, when combined with other optical polarization observations, suggest that the polarized optical emission and {\\gamma}-ray polarization changes in a similar manner. A change in the optical polarization angle has been observed by this work, from 109.5 \\pm 0.7\\deg in 2005 to 85.3 \\pm 1.4 \\deg in 2012. On the other hand, the {\\gamma}-ray polarization angle changed from 115 \\pm 11 \\deg in 2003-2007 to 80 \\pm 12 \\deg in 2012-2014. Strong flaring activities have been detected in the Crab nebula over the past few years by the high energy {\\gamma}-ray missions Agile and Fermi, and magnetic reconnection processes have been suggested to explain these observations. The change in the polarized optical...

  15. Coulomb interaction effects on the electronic structure of radial polarized excitons in nanorings

    OpenAIRE

    Barticevic, Z.; Pacheco, M.; Simonin, J.; Proetto, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structure of radially polarized excitons in structured nanorings is analyzed, with emphasis in the ground-state properties and their dependence under applied magnetic fields perpendicular to the ring plane. The electron-hole Coulomb attraction has been treated rigorously, through numerical diagonalization of the full exciton Hamiltonian in the non-interacting electron-hole pairs basis. Depending on the relative weight of the kinetic energy and Coulomb contributions, the ground-...

  16. Structural Changes in Serbian Industry during Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nikolić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Transition is a complex process whereby a country in transition is stimulating structural changes wishing to achieve economic growth and improved social wellbeing. In this paper the authors aim to show that during transition in Serbia there such changes in the structure of manufacturing industry occurred, which resulted with only modest ​​growth that in fact was slower than in other transitional countries. By the means of theoretical and empirical approach – deductive methods, statistical and mathematical evaluation the authors have come to conclusion that structural changes did not improve industry branches like the hi-tech industry that contribute the most to PPP generation. At the same time, some low productive industries have gained on importance, therefore keeping the standard on the low levels without possibility to rapidly converge towards EU average, which was set as an ultimate goal of transition in Serbia.

  17. The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by Δu and Δd of the polarized functions.

  18. Probing the Inner Structure of Polar Broad Absorption-Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kajal

    2008-10-01

    We have discovered a sample of polar broad absorption-line quasars (BALQSOs). We know their inclination angles with reasonable certainty. Thus, these are the ideal objects to probe their inner structure through the X-ray studies. However, to date, we do not have a reasonably good signal-to-noise ratio X-ray spectrum of any of these objects. Here, we propose deep XMM-Newton observations of four polar BALQSOs to study the physical processes responsible for the X-ray emission, distribution of BAL clouds, wind driven mechanism, jet entrainment, etc. Finally, all these results will be used to constrain our time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations.

  19. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c–axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c–axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics. PMID:26805401

  20. Anisotropic lattice response induced by a linearly-polarized femtosecond optical pulse excitation in interfacial phase change memory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kotaro; Saito, Yuta; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Nakano, Takashi; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Optical excitation of matter with linearly-polarized femtosecond pulses creates a transient non-equilibrium lattice displacement along a certain direction. Here, the pump and probe pulse polarization dependence of the photo-induced ultrafast lattice dynamics in (GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)4 interfacial phase change memory material is investigated under obliquely incident conditions. Drastic pump polarization dependence of the coherent phonon amplitude is observed when the probe polarization angle is parallel to the c-axis of the sample, while the pump polarization dependence is negligible when the probe polarization angle is perpendicular to the c-axis. The enhancement of phonon oscillation amplitude due to pump polarization rotation for a specific probe polarization angle is only found in the early time stage (≤2 ps). These results indicate that the origin of the pump and probe polarization dependence is dominantly attributable to the anisotropically-formed photo-excited carriers which cause the directional lattice dynamics.

  1. Estimating Structural Change in Linear Simultaneous Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Weihong; Zhang Yang

    2004-01-01

    Tests and estimation for changes in the coefficients of linear regression models, particularly the analysis of covariance and the Chow tests, are well known to econometricians and are widely used. This paper demonstrates that analogous estimation can also be constructed in simultaneous equation models when equations are estimated by common estimator like OLS, 2SLS and LIML. In the present paper, we discuss the problem of estimating structural changes in equations from a simultaneous structura...

  2. Structural change and industrial policy in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Atiyas, İzak; Atiyas, Izak; Bakış, Ozan; Bakis, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evidence on structural change in Turkey and provides an overview of the evolution of industrial policy in the last three decades. We show that Turkey has experienced substantial growth in labor productivity in the last decade and that this has been associated with substantial change in the composition of value added and employment both in the overall economy and within the manufacturing industry. Using sectoral national accounts data we decompose aggregate productivity g...

  3. Determination of mask induced polarization effects on AltPSM mask structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollein, Ingo; Teuber, Silvio; Bubke, Karsten

    2005-06-01

    In the process of discussion of possible mask-types for the 5x nm node (half-pitch) and below, the alternating phase-shifting mask (AltPSM) is a potential candidate to be screened. The current scenario suggests using 193 nm immersion lithography with NA values of up to 1.2 and above. New optical effects from oblique incident angles, mask-induced polarization of the transmitted light and birefringence from the substrate need to be taken into account when the optical performance of a mask is evaluated. This paper addresses mask induced polarization effects from dense lines-and-space structures on a real mask. Measurements of the polarization dependent diffraction efficiencies have been performed on AltPSM masks. Experimental results show good agreement with simulations. A comparison with Binary Masks is made.

  4. Temperature dependences of the electric polarization and wave number of incommensurate structures in multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the electric polarization and wave number of incommensurate modulations, proportional to each other, increase according to the Landau law in spin multiferroic cycloids near the Néel temperature. In this case, the constant magnetization component (including the one for a conical spiral) is oriented perpendicular to the spin incommensurability wave vector. A similar temperature behavior should manifest itself for spin helicoids, the axes of which are oriented parallel to the polarization vector but their spin rotation planes are oriented perpendicular to the antiferromagnetic order plane. When the directions of axes of the magnetization helicoid and polarization vector coincide, the latter is quadratic with respect to magnetization and linearly depends on temperature, whereas the incommensurate-modulation wave number barely depends on temperature. Structural distortions of unit cells for multiferroics of different types determine their axial behavior.

  5. Circular grating waveguide structures for intracavity generation of azimuthal polarization in a thin-disk laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpel, Martin; Haefner, Matthias; Schoder, Thomas; Pruss, Christof; Voss, Andreas; Osten, Wolfgang; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Graf, Thomas

    2012-05-15

    We report on the generation of beams with azimuthal polarization using resonant grating waveguide structures (GWSs) inside an Yb:YAG thin-disk laser (TDL) oscillator. Two different GWS concepts were used to select the polarization of the emitted beam. The first uses the resonant reflection principle, and the second is based on the leaky-mode approach already reported in our previous work. Up to 93 W and 103 W of output power were extracted from a TDL with an optical efficiency, η(oo), of 36.2% and 40.1% using the first and the second approaches, respectively. In both cases, a pure azimuthal polarization and a beam quality factor, M2, of about 2.2 were measured. The design, fabrication, and different experimental results, as well as the laser performances for both GWSs, are discussed in the present Letter. PMID:22627563

  6. Fostering Creativity through Collaboration: Polar Learning and Responding Climate Change Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Brunacini, J.; Hernandez, T.; Bachrach, E.

    2014-12-01

    What is the best way to foster creative collaborative interdisciplinary research, education and outreach? In the past, proposal solicitations were open-ended, leaving it to the community to assemble relevant expertise and institutions. In several recent solicitations, the National Science Foundation has required inclusion of specific expertise. For example, the Climate Change Education Partnership solicitation stated, "Each CCEP is required to include substantial involvement of representatives from each of the following communities: climate scientists; experts in the learning sciences; and, practitioners from within formal or informal education venues. This combined expertise is intended to foster innovative, trans-disciplinary advances in climate change education … Additional types of expertise are allowed, but these three required areas must form the core partnership." An Interdisciplinary Collaboration Survey of the Polar Learning and Responding: PoLAR CCEP (http://thepolarhub.org/) implemented by Goodman Research Group, the project's evaluators, assessed the PoLAR Partnership to determine if the collaboration is effective and to understand how the experience affects the partners themselves. The data showed that the NSF goal of fostering innovative teams is being met: "It has brought me into contact with new people, ideas, and approaches that are on the cutting edge and that can be applied not only to this project …" Expertise is distributed within and across the partners with most working in three to four of the required areas (climate science, learning science, formal and/or informal education), and they seek advice from partners across the four areas. Partners experience both personal and professional benefits, including increased satisfaction with their own current work and research, and they anticipate continued work with this group of colleagues on this, as well as future projects. This analysis of partnership development and implementation advances

  7. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias

  8. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedhosseini, E., E-mail: Seyedhosseini@ua.pt; Ivanov, M. [CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials and Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bdikin, I. [TEMA and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Vasileva, D. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, A. [Moscow State Institute of Radioengineering, Electronics and Automation, 119454 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rodriguez, B. J. [Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research and School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Kholkin, A. L. [CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials and Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-21

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  9. A Change in the Optical Polarization Associated with a Gamma-Ray Flare in the Blazar 3C 279

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.

    2011-08-19

    It is widely accepted that strong and variable radiation detected over all accessible energy bands in a number of active galaxies arises from a relativistic, Doppler-boosted jet pointing close to our line of sight. The size of the emitting zone and the location of this region relative to the central supermassive black hole are, however, poorly known, with estimates ranging from light-hours to a light-year or more. Here we report the coincidence of a gamma ({gamma})-ray flare with a dramatic change of optical polarization angle. This provides evidence for co-spatiality of optical and {gamma}-ray emission regions and indicates a highly ordered jet magnetic field. The results also require a non-axisymmetric structure of the emission zone, implying a curved trajectory for the emitting material within the jet, with the dissipation region located at a considerable distance from the black hole, at about 10{sup 5} gravitational radii.

  10. Influence of optical polarization on the improvement of light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement in light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) emitting at ∼270 nm is shown to be influenced by optical polarization. Three UVLEDs with different reflective scattering structures are investigated and compared to standard UVLEDs without scattering structures. The optical polarization and therefore the direction of light propagation within the various UVLEDs are altered by changes in the quantum well (QW) thickness. The improvement in light extraction efficiency of the UVLEDs with reflective scattering structures increases, compared to the UVLEDs without scattering structures, as the fraction of emitted light propagating parallel to the QW plane increases. Additionally, the light extraction efficiency increases as the average distance to the reflective scattering structures decreases

  11. An experimental study of growth and phase change of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, John; Teets, Edward

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the progress made on understanding phase changes related to solutions which may comprise Polar Stratospheric Clouds. In particular, it is concerned with techniques for investigating specific classes of metastability and phase change which may be important not only in Polar Stratospheric Clouds but in all atmospheric aerosols in general. While the lower level atmospheric aerosol consists of mixtures of (NH4)(SO4)2, NH4HSO4, NaCl among others, there is evidence that aerosol at PSC levels is composed of acid aerosol, either injected from volcanic events (such as Pinatubo) or having diffused upward from the lower atmosphere. In particular, sulfuric acid and nitric acid are known to occur at PSC levels, and are suspected of catalyzing ozone destruction reactions by adsorption on surfaces of crystallized particles. The present study has centered on two approaches: (1) the extent of supercooling (with respect to ice) and supersaturation (with respect to hydrate) and the nature of crystal growth in acid solutions of specific molality; and (2) the nature of growth from the vapor of HNO3 - H2O crystals both on a substrate and on a pre-existing aerosol.

  12. Neutron spin structure with polarized deuterons and spectator proton tagging at EIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cosyn, W; Higinbotham, D W; Hyde, C; Kuhn, S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Park, K; Sargsian, M; Strikman, M; Weiss, C

    2014-01-01

    The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of neutron structure with polarized deuteron beams and detection of forward-moving spectator protons over a wide range of recoil momenta (0 < p_R < several 100 MeV in the nucleus rest frame). The free neutron structure functions could be obtained by extrapolating the measured recoil momentum distributions to the on-shell point. The method eliminates nuclear modifications and can be applied to polarized scattering, as well as to semi-inclusive and exclusive final states. We revie...

  13. Polarization of modified titanium and titanium–zirconium creates nano-structures while hydride formation is modulated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Matthias J.; Walter, Martin S. [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstrasse 15, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bucko, Miroslaw M. [Department of Ceramics and Refractory Materials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pamula, Elzbieta [Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Lyngstadaas, S. Petter [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Haugen, Håvard J., E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-10-01

    The majority of titanium based bone-level dental implants available on the market today feature a sand-blasted and acid-etched (SBAE) surface that contains comparably high hydrogen levels. Cathodic polarization of titanium in acidic solutions is known to further increase titanium hydride on the surface. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of cathodic reduction on titanium (Ti) and titanium–zirconium (TiZr) with a SBAE surface in order to investigate the potential of such a process for further improving surfaces for bone anchored dental implants. Samples of both materials were cathodically polarized in acidic solution at different current densities and for different process times. Chemical analysis of the hydrogen levels by SIMS showed that cathodic reduction re-arranged the hydride already present on the surfaces from the etching process but could not significantly increase hydride levels. The hydrogen layer created by the preceding hot acid etching appeared to modulate further hydride creation. Analysis of the surface topography by SEM showed changes to the nano-topography of both materials after polarization. TiZr showed homogeneously distributed nano-spheres as they were already observed for TiZr SBAE at increased size of 80–100 nm on the whole surface. By contrast, polarization of Ti created nano-nodules and nano-spheres of 150–200 nm on the surface. These spheres were interconnected to form flower-like structures along the ridges and peaks of the surface. Moreover the flanks were covered by a rippled structure of isotropically distributed small-diameter (10–20 nm) nano-nodules.

  14. 2,4,6-Trimethylpyridinium perchlorate: Polar properties and correlations with molecular structure of organic-inorganic hybrid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [(CH3)3C5H2NH][ClO4] has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray (at 344, 245, 180 and 115 K), calorimetric, dilatometric, dielectric and pyroelectric measurements. At room temperature the crystal structure is polar, space group Pmn21. It consists of discrete disordered [ClO4]- anions and ordered trimethylpyridinium cations giving the 3D network of hydrogen bonds. The compound reveals a rich polymorphism in the solid state. It undergoes four solid-solid phase transitions: from phases I to II at 356/327 K (heating/cooling), II→III at 346/326, III→IV at 226 K and IV→V at 182/170 K. [(CH3)3C5H2NH][ClO4] reveals a strong pyroelectric response over a wide temperature region (phases III, IV and V) with the spontaneous polarization changes (ΔPs) of the order of 1.5-8x10-3C/m2. The spontaneous polarization is irreversible over all the polar phases, however, the magnitude of the ΔPs in the vicinity of the phase transitions is characteristic of compounds with the ferroelectric order. The molecular mechanism of the successive phases transitions in the studied crystal is proposed. - A novel organic-inorganic hybrid material, simple ionic salt: 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium perchlorate, [(CH3)3C5H2NH][ClO4] has been synthesized. In this paper we report singlecrystal X-ray, powder X-ray, calorimetric, dilatometric, dielectric and pyroelectric studies of this compound over a wide temperature range. A possible mechanism of the structural phase transitions in [(CH3)3C5H2NH][ClO4] is discussed with particular attention focused on unusually strong pyroelectric properties.

  15. Polarization of modified titanium and titanium–zirconium creates nano-structures while hydride formation is modulated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of titanium based bone-level dental implants available on the market today feature a sand-blasted and acid-etched (SBAE) surface that contains comparably high hydrogen levels. Cathodic polarization of titanium in acidic solutions is known to further increase titanium hydride on the surface. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of cathodic reduction on titanium (Ti) and titanium–zirconium (TiZr) with a SBAE surface in order to investigate the potential of such a process for further improving surfaces for bone anchored dental implants. Samples of both materials were cathodically polarized in acidic solution at different current densities and for different process times. Chemical analysis of the hydrogen levels by SIMS showed that cathodic reduction re-arranged the hydride already present on the surfaces from the etching process but could not significantly increase hydride levels. The hydrogen layer created by the preceding hot acid etching appeared to modulate further hydride creation. Analysis of the surface topography by SEM showed changes to the nano-topography of both materials after polarization. TiZr showed homogeneously distributed nano-spheres as they were already observed for TiZr SBAE at increased size of 80–100 nm on the whole surface. By contrast, polarization of Ti created nano-nodules and nano-spheres of 150–200 nm on the surface. These spheres were interconnected to form flower-like structures along the ridges and peaks of the surface. Moreover the flanks were covered by a rippled structure of isotropically distributed small-diameter (10–20 nm) nano-nodules.

  16. Single-molecule fluorescence polarization study of conformational change in archaeal group II chaperonin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Iizuka

    Full Text Available Group II chaperonins found in archaea and in eukaryotic cytosol mediate protein folding without a GroES-like cofactor. The function of the cofactor is substituted by the helical protrusion at the tip of the apical domain, which forms a built-in lid on the central cavity. Although many studies on the change in lid conformation coupled to the binding and hydrolysis of nucleotides have been conducted, the molecular mechanism of lid closure remains poorly understood. Here, we performed a single-molecule polarization modulation to probe the rotation of the helical protrusion of a chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeum, Thermococcus sp. strain KS-1. We detected approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion immediately after photorelease of ATP. The result suggests that the conformational change from the open lid to the closed lid state is responsible for the approximately 35° rotation of the helical protrusion.

  17. Migraine and structural changes in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Lipton, Richard B; Ashina, Sait;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the association between migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) and 3 types of structural brain abnormalities detected by MRI: white matter abnormalities (WMAs), infarct-like lesions (ILLs), and volumetric changes in gray and white matter (GM, WM) regions....

  18. Entrepreneurship, structural change, and economic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noseleit, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The ability to adjust to structural change is vital to economic development, and entries can be active participants in this process. While the importance of factor reallocations for growth is widely discussed, the role of entrepreneurs in managing these reallocations is currently not well understood

  19. Atomic structure of defects in GaN:Mg grown with Ga polarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron microscope phase images, produced by direct reconstruction of the scattered electron wave from a focal series of high-resolution images, were used to determine the nature of defects formed in GaN:Mg crystals. We studied bulk crystals grown from dilute solutions of atomic nitrogen in liquid gallium at high pressure and thin films grown by the MOCVD method. All the crystals were grown with Ga-polarity. In both types of samples the majority of defects were three dimensional Mg-rich hexagonal pyramids with bases on the (0001) plane and six walls on {11(und 2)3} planes seen in cross-section as triangulars. Some other defects appear in cross-section as trapezoidal (rectangular) defects as a result of presence of truncated pyramids. Both type of defects have hollow centers. They are decorated by Mg on all six side walls and a base. The GaN which grows inside on the defect walls shows polarity inversion. It is shown that change of polarity starts from the defect tip and propagates to the base, and that the stacking sequence changes from ab in the matrix to bc inside the defect. Exchange of the Ga sublattice with the N sublattice within the defect leads to 0.6 ± 0.2(angstrom) displacement between Ga sublattices outside and inside the defects. It is proposed that lateral overgrowth of the cavities formed within the defect takes place to restore matrix polarity on the defect base

  20. Structural analysis of polarizing indels: an emerging consensus on the root of the tree of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourne Philip E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The root of the tree of life has been a holy grail ever since Darwin first used the tree as a metaphor for evolution. New methods seek to narrow down the location of the root by excluding it from branches of the tree of life. This is done by finding traits that must be derived, and excluding the root from the taxa those traits cover. However the two most comprehensive attempts at this strategy, performed by Cavalier-Smith and Lake et al., have excluded each other's rootings. Results The indel polarizations of Lake et al. rely on high quality alignments between paralogs that diverged before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA. Therefore, sequence alignment artifacts may skew their conclusions. We have reviewed their data using protein structure information where available. Several of the conclusions are quite different when viewed in the light of structure which is conserved over longer evolutionary time scales than sequence. We argue there is no polarization that excludes the root from all Gram-negatives, and that polarizations robustly exclude the root from the Archaea. Conclusion We conclude that there is no contradiction between the polarization datasets. The combination of these datasets excludes the root from every possible position except near the Chloroflexi. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Greg Fournier (nominated by J. Peter Gogarten, Purificación López-García, and Eugene Koonin.

  1. Changes in the state of polarization of apertured stochastic electromagnetic modified Bessel-Gauss beams in free-space propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, C.; Pan, L.; Lü, B.

    2010-04-01

    By using the generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral, the analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density matrix, spectral degree of polarization, orientation angle and degree of ellipticity of polarization ellipse of apertured stochastic electromagnetic modified Bessel-Gauss beams (MBGBs) through a paraxial optical ABCD system are derived, and used to study the changes in the state of polarization of apertured stochastic electromagnetic MBGBs propagating in free space. The invariance of the on-axis state of polarization of unapertured stochastic electromagnetic MBGBs propagating through paraxial optical ABCD systems is illustrated analytically and numerically. For apertured stochastic electromagnetic MBGBs, the on-axis spectral degree of polarization, orientation angle and degree of ellipticity of polarization ellipse increase with increasing propagation distance, and approach asymptotic values when the propagation distance is large enough. There is a uniform distribution region of the state of polarization around the center of the beams whose range decreases with increasing truncation parameter. In addition, the state of polarization of apertured stochastic electromagnetic MBGBs upon propagation can be modulated by controlling the truncation parameter.

  2. Polar and brown bear genomes reveal ancient admixture and demographic footprints of past climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Webb; Schuster, Stephan C.; Welch, Andreanna J.; Ratan, Aakrosh; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C.; Zhao, Fangqing; Kim, Hie Lim; Burhans, Richard C.; Drautz, Daniela I.; Wittekindt, Nicola E.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Peacock, Elizabeth; Farley, Sean; Sage, George K.; Rode, Karyn; Obbard, Martyn E.; Montiel, Rafael; Bachmann, Lutz; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Aars, Jon; Mailund, Thomas; Wiig, Øystein; Talbot, Sandra L.; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Polar bears (PBs) are superbly adapted to the extreme Arctic environment and have become emblematic of the threat to biodiversity from global climate change. Their divergence from the lower-latitude brown bear provides a textbook example of rapid evolution of distinct phenotypes. However, limited mitochondrial and nuclear DNA evidence conflicts in the timing of PB origin as well as placement of the species within versus sister to the brown bear lineage. We gathered extensive genomic sequence data from contemporary polar, brown, and American black bear samples, in addition to a 130,000- to 110,000-y old PB, to examine this problem from a genome-wide perspective. Nuclear DNA markers reflect a species tree consistent with expectation, showing polar and brown bears to be sister species. However, for the enigmatic brown bears native to Alaska's Alexander Archipelago, we estimate that not only their mitochondrial genome, but also 5–10% of their nuclear genome, is most closely related to PBs, indicating ancient admixture between the two species. Explicit admixture analyses are consistent with ancient splits among PBs, brown bears and black bears that were later followed by occasional admixture. We also provide paleodemographic estimates that suggest bear evolution has tracked key climate events, and that PB in particular experienced a prolonged and dramatic decline in its effective population size during the last ca. 500,000 years. We demonstrate that brown bears and PBs have had sufficiently independent evolutionary histories over the last 4–5 million years to leave imprints in the PB nuclear genome that likely are associated with ecological adaptation to the Arctic environment.

  3. Fostering science communication and outreach through video production in Dartmouth's IGERT Polar Environmental Change graduate program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond Wagner, C. R.; McDavid, L. A.; Virginia, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Dartmouth's NSF-supported IGERT Polar Environmental Change graduate program has focused on using video media to foster interdisciplinary thinking and to improve student skills in science communication and public outreach. Researchers, educators, and funding organizations alike recognize the value of video media for making research results more accessible and relevant to diverse audiences and across cultures. We present an affordable equipment set and the basic video training needed as well as available Dartmouth institutional support systems for students to produce outreach videos on climate change and its associated impacts on people. We highlight and discuss the successes and challenges of producing three types of video products created by graduate and undergraduate students affiliated with the Dartmouth IGERT. The video projects created include 1) graduate student profile videos, 2) a series of short student-created educational videos for Greenlandic high school students, and 3) an outreach video about women in science based on the experiences of women students conducting research during the IGERT field seminar at Summit Station and Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. The 'Science in Greenland--It's a Girl Thing' video was featured on The New York Times Dot Earth blog and the Huffington Post Green blog among others and received international recognition. While producing these videos, students 1) identified an audience and created story lines, 2) worked in front of and behind the camera, 3) utilized low-cost digital editing applications, and 4) shared the videos on multiple platforms from social media to live presentations. The three video projects were designed to reach different audiences, and presented unique challenges for content presentation and dissemination. Based on student and faculty assessment, we conclude that the video projects improved student science communication skills and increased public knowledge of polar science and the effects of climate change.

  4. Intensity and qualitative characteristics of structural changes in transition economies

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kadeřábková; Martin Srholec

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents alternative analytical approaches to evaluation of structural changes in selected transition economies (Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, Slovenia). The analysis starts from the comparison of intensity of structural changes, as an introductory (quantitative) concept measuring structural adjustment capacity. Besides the intensity of structural changes, the need for developing adequate tools evaluating the qualitative aspects of structural changes has been stressed. ...

  5. Security Authentication using Phase-Encoded Nanoparticle Structures and Polarized Light

    OpenAIRE

    Carnicer González, Arturo; Hassanfiroozi, Amir; Latorre-Carmona, Pedro; Huang, Yi-Pai; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Phase encoded nano structures such as Quick Response (QR) codes made of metallic nanoparticles are suggested to be used in security and authentication applications. We present a polarimetric optical method able to authenticate random phase encoded QR codes. The system is illuminated using polarized light and the QR code is encoded using a phase-only random mask. Using classification algorithms it is possible to validate the QR code from the examination of the polarimetric signature of the spe...

  6. Lipase in aqueous-polar organic solvents: Activity, structure, and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal, Md Zahid; Yedavalli, Poornima; Deshmukh, Mandar V; Rao, Nalam Madhusudhana

    2013-01-01

    Studying alterations in biophysical and biochemical behavior of enzymes in the presence of organic solvents and the underlying cause(s) has important implications in biotechnology. We investigated the effects of aqueous solutions of polar organic solvents on ester hydrolytic activity, structure and stability of a lipase. Relative activity of the lipase monotonically decreased with increasing concentration of acetone, acetonitrile, and DMF but increased at lower concentrations (upto ∼20% v/v) ...

  7. Extensive photometry of the intermediate polar MU Cam: detection of a spin period change

    CERN Document Server

    Kozhevnikov, V P

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate polars with known rates of spin period changes are not numerous because such tasks require measurements performed for a long time. To measure a spin period change, MU Cam is a good candidate because it has a spin oscillation with a large amplitude enabling measurements with high precision. Fortunately, in the past the spin period of MU Cam was measured with high precision. To measure the spin period anew, in 2014-2015 we performed extensive photometric observations of MU Cam, spanning a total duration of 208 h within 46 nights. We found that the spin, sideband and orbital periods are equal to 1187.16245+/-0.00047 s, 1276.3424+/-0.0022 s and 4.71942+/-0.00016 h, respectively. Comparing the measured spin period with the spin period of MU Cam in the past, we detected the spin period change with dP/dt=-(2.17+/-0.10) X 10^(-10). This rate of the spin period change was not stable and varied in a time scale of years. During four nights in 2014 April-May MU Cam was fainter than usual by 0.8 mag, and the ...

  8. A structure for quasars under the scope of polarization - I. The UV/optical polarization dichotomy of type-1 and type-2 AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present ultraviolet/optical spectropolarimetric modelling of the phenomenologically based structure for quasars proposed by Elvis (2000). In this first paper of a series, we explore the continuum polarization emerging from radiatively accelerated and bent winds that were vertically launched from the accretion disc in an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We simulate the radiative transfer occurring in Thomson scattering and dust extinction media over a range of morphological parameters and optical depths of the wind. We demonstrate that the wind geometry proposed by Elvis with a phenomenologically derived bending angle of θ = 60° still underestimates the observed optical polarization percentage of type-1 and type-2 AGN and does not yet reproduce the expected dichotomy of the polarization position angle. To recover the observed polarization properties, a smaller bending angle and some amount of dust shielding in the equatorial region should be considered. A two-phase outflow is found to generate both the observed polarization dichotomy and acceptable levels of polarization degree if the wind has a bending angle θ = 45°, and the conical shells have a half-opening angle of 3° < δθ < 10°. The absorbing dust column at the wind base should be in the range 1 < τdust ≤ 4 (τ being integrated over 2000-8000 Å). Straightforward observational tests from spectropolarimetry and from determining the number density of different AGN types can be performed to further constrain the wind geometry.

  9. The Effects of Instrumental Elliptical Polarization on Stellar Point Spread Function Fine Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Joseph C.; Kern, Brian D.; Breckinridge, James B.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    We present procedures and preliminary results from a study on the effects of instrumental polarization on the fine structure of the stellar point spread function (PSF). These effects are important to understand because the the aberration caused by instrumental polarization on an otherwise diffraction-limited will likely have have severe consequences for extreme high contrast imaging systems such as NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission and the proposed NASA Eclipse mission. The report here, describing our efforts to examine these effects, includes two parts: 1) a numerical analysis of the effect of metallic reflection, with some polarization-specific retardation, on a spherical wavefront; 2) an experimental approach for observing this effect, along with some preliminary laboratory results. While the experimental phase of this study requires more fine-tuning to produce meaningful results, the numerical analysis indicates that the inclusion of polarization-specific phase effects (retardation) results in a point spread function (PSF) aberration more severe than the amplitude (reflectivity) effects previously recorded in the literature.

  10. Polarization-independent visible wavelength filter incorporating a symmetric metal-dielectric resonant structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Hyun; Yoon, Yeo-Taek; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2012-10-01

    A nanophotonic polarization-independent visible wavelength filter is presented, incorporating a symmetric metal-dielectric resonant structure on quartz substrate, where a sub-wavelength grating, made up of a two-dimensional array of Al square sheets, is integrated with a Si(3)N(4) slab waveguide via an oxide layer. Incident light is orthogonally diffracted by the symmetric grating towards two directions of the grating groove, and then resonantly coupled to both transverse electric and transverse magnetic guided modes associated with the underlying waveguide, irrespective of light polarization. Polarization independent bandpass filtering was thus achieved around specific wavelengths, determined by the grating pitch and the effective index of the waveguide. Three devices, operating in the blue, green and red spectral bands, were built through design and analysis drawing upon the finite-difference time-domain method. The devices, DEV I, II, and III, were constructed with grating pitches of 285, 355 and 395 nm, respectively, while the core was 100 nm thick. They were inspected to function as an efficient bandpass filter, centered at 460, 560 and 610 nm, with bandwidths of about 13, 14 and 17 nm, respectively; the peak transmission efficiencies were consistently over 85%. Furthermore, the transfer characteristics, insensitive to light polarization, were satisfactorily confirmed for normal incidence. PMID:23188342

  11. Plasmonic Structure Integrated Single-Photon Detector Configurations to Improve Absorptance and Polarization Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Csete

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Configurations capable of maximizing both the absorption component of system detection efficiency and the achievable polarization contrast were determined for 1550 nm polarized light illumination of different plasmonic structure integrated superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs consisting of p = 264 nm and P = 792 nm periodic niobium nitride (NbN patterns on silica substrate. Global effective NbN absorptance maxima appear in case of p/s-polarized light illumination in S/P-orientation (γ = 90°/0° azimuthal angle and the highest polarization contrast is attained in S-orientation of all devices. Common nanophotonical origin of absorptance enhancement is collective resonance on nanocavity gratings with different profiles, which is promoted by coupling between localized modes in quarter-wavelength metal-insulator-metal nanocavities and laterally synchronized Brewster-Zenneck-type surface waves in integrated SNSPDs possessing a three-quarter-wavelength-scaled periodicity. The spectral sensitivity and dispersion characteristics reveal that device design specific optimal configurations exist.

  12. Radiation-induced structural changes, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar is aimed at understanding both the physical and chemical aspects of the structural changes of materials induced by photons or ionizing radiation. The seminar was held on December 19th, 1991 and from February 13 to 14th, 1992 in this institute. The most active areas of the material science, in addition to the previous subjects, such as organic superconductors, silicon-based polymers, and fullerenes were included in this seminar. (J.P.N.)

  13. Neural coding of image structure and contrast polarity of Cartesian, hyperbolic, and polar gratings in the primary and secondary visual cortex of the tree shrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, Jordan; De Luna, Paolo; Rainer, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    We comprehensively characterize spiking and visual evoked potential (VEP) activity in tree shrew V1 and V2 using Cartesian, hyperbolic, and polar gratings. Neural selectivity to structure of Cartesian gratings was higher than other grating classes in both visual areas. From V1 to V2, structure selectivity of spiking activity increased, whereas corresponding VEP values tended to decrease, suggesting that single-neuron coding of Cartesian grating attributes improved while the cortical columnar organization of these neurons became less precise from V1 to V2. We observed that neurons in V2 generally exhibited similar selectivity for polar and Cartesian gratings, suggesting that structure of polar-like stimuli might be encoded as early as in V2. This hypothesis is supported by the preference shift from V1 to V2 toward polar gratings of higher spatial frequency, consistent with the notion that V2 neurons encode visual scene borders and contours. Neural sensitivity to modulations of polarity of hyperbolic gratings was highest among all grating classes and closely related to the visual receptive field (RF) organization of ON- and OFF-dominated subregions. We show that spatial RF reconstructions depend strongly on grating class, suggesting that intracortical contributions to RF structure are strongest for Cartesian and polar gratings. Hyperbolic gratings tend to recruit least cortical elaboration such that the RF maps are similar to those generated by sparse noise, which most closely approximate feedforward inputs. Our findings complement previous literature in primates, rodents, and carnivores and highlight novel aspects of shape representation and coding occurring in mammalian early visual cortex. PMID:26843607

  14. Correlating Interfacial Structure and Magnetism in Thin-Film Oxide Heterostructures Using Transmission Electron Microscopy and Polarized Neutron Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Steven Richard

    Oxide thin-films have attracted considerable attention for a new generation of spintronics devices, where both electron charge and spin are used to transport information. However, a poor understanding of the local features that mediate magnetization and coupling in these materials has greatly limited their deployment into new information and communication technologies. This thesis describes direct, local measurements of structure-property relationships in ferrous thin-films and La1--xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) / Pb(ZrxTi1--x)O3 (PZT) thin-film heterostructures using spatially-resolved characterization techniques. In the first part of this thesis we explore the properties of ferrous spintronic thin-films. These films serve as a model system to establish a suite of interfacial characterization techniques for subsequent studies. We then study the static behavior of LSMO / PZT devices with polarization set by the underlying substrate. Using transmission electron microscopy and geometric phase analysis we reveal the presence of significant local strain gradients in these films for the first time. Electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping of the LSMO / PZT interface reveals Mn valence changes induced by charge-transfer screening. Bulk magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectometry indicate that these chemical and strain changes are associated with a graded magnetization across the LSMO layer. Density functional theory calculations are presented, which show that strain and charge-transfer screening act locally to suppress magnetization in the LSMO by changing the Mn orbital polarization. In the second half of this thesis, we explore asymmetric screening effects on magnetization LSMO / PZT composites. We find that the local ferroelectric polarization can vary widely and that this may be responsible for reduced charge-transfer effects, as well as magnetic phase gradients at interfaces. From this information and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we construct a map of the magnetic

  15. Interdisciplinary Graduate Training in Polar Environmental Change: Field-based learning in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia, R. A.; Holm, K.; Whitecloud, S.; Levy, L.; Kelly, M. A.; Feng, X.; Grenoble, L.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the NSF-funded Integrative Graduate Education Research Traineeship (IGERT) program at Dartmouth College is to develop a new cohort of environmental scientists and engineers with an interdisciplinary understanding of polar regions and their importance to global environmental change. The Dartmouth IGERT challenges Ph.D. students to consider the broader dimensions of their research and to collaborate with scientists from other disciplines, educators, and policy makers. IGERT students will focus on research questions that are relevant to the needs of local people experiencing climate change and on understanding the ethical responsibilities and benefits of conducting research in partnership with northern residents and institutions. Seven Ph.D. students from the departments of Earth Sciences, Engineering, and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Dartmouth College make up the first IGERT cohort for the five-year program. The Dartmouth IGERT curriculum will focus on three main components of polar systems responding to recent climate change: the cryosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, and biogeochemical cycles. The integrating experience of the core curriculum is the Greenland Field Seminar that will take place in Kangerlussuaq (terrestrial and aquatic systems), Summit Camp (snow and ice) and Nuuk, Greenland (human dimensions of change). In Nuuk, IGERT students will share their science and develop partnerships with students, educators, and policy makers at the University of Greenland, the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), and other Greenlandic institutions. In summer 2009 the authors conducted preliminary fieldwork near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland to develop aspects of the science curriculum for the 2010 Greenland Field Seminar and to explore research topics for IGERT Fellows (Levy and Whitecloud). Examples of results presented here are designed to develop field-based learning activities. These include soil and vegetation relationships as a function of aspect

  16. Cross-Polarization Optical Coherence Tomography in Evaluation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubarkova Е.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP OCT technique allows for tissue structure imaging by registration of backscattered radiation in initial and orthogonal polarizations and further comparison of the obtained images. Spatial structure of collagen fibers gives rise not only to backscattering of probing radiation, but also to evolution of its polarization state during propagation through the tissue (depolarization. Collagen fibers of the fibrous cap play a key role in determining the stability of atherosclerotic plaques. Inflammation observed in atherosclerosis is the principal mechanism of collagen fibers disorganization, therefore, the assessment of the depolarizing properties of the fibrous cap can characterize an atherosclerotic plaque as being “vulnerable” to rupture. The aim of the study was to evaluate CP OCT efficiency to determine the condition of collagen fibers of an atherosclerotic plaque fibrous cap, which characterize its “vulnerability”. Materials and Methods. 54 post mortem samples of intact human aorta and aorta with atherosclerotic plaques at different stages were studied. The study involved 150 CP OCT-images in which the value of OCT signal in orthogonal polarization was used to evaluate the ratio of organized and disorganized by inflammation collagen fibers within the fibrous cap. For histological imaging comparison we used hematoxylin-eosine and picrosirius red staining with evaluation in polarized light. Numerical analysis of CP OCT-images was used as a complementary tool for visual assessment. Results. We showed CP OCT to have significant advantages over the traditional OCT in the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque. In orthogonal CP OCT-image one can differentiate the main structural components of a plaque: a fibrous cap and a lipid core. The thickness of the fibrous cap in the orthogonal polarization image correlates with the thickness of the fibrous cap measured from histological preparations

  17. Polarity and structure peculiarities of trialkylphosphine oxides, sulfides, selenides and tellurides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the quantum-chemical calculations structural characteristics of trialkylphosphine oxides, sulfates, selenides and tellurides (Alk3P=X; X O, S, Se, Te) are obtained, which are in good agreement with literature X-ray structural analysis and gas-phase electron diffraction data. The P=X bonds polarity is determined in the framework of vector-additive scheme on the base of experimental data on components dipole moments and using different base series of molecules geometry parameters. It is shown that increasing of bond moment P=X in the X = O, S, Se, Te series takes place through dipole length increasing

  18. An ultrathin twist-structure polarization transformer based on fish-scale metallic wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin; Li, Hongqiang; Fan, Yuancheng; Wei, Zeyong; Wu, Chao; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xing; Li, Fang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2011-04-01

    This study theoretically and experimentally investigates the transmission properties of a metamaterial slab comprised of two layers of metallic fish-scale structure arrays and a sandwiched dielectric layer. Calculations show that the asymmetric transmission can be tuned by varying the slab thickness, due to near-field interlayer coupling. The spatial evolution of the electric field indicates that the twist structure functions as a perfect polarization transformer at certain frequencies. Measured transmission spectra are in good agreement with calculated results when material dissipation is considered.

  19. Outlook for activity and structural change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of energy-using activities is continuing to increase throughout the world, but the rates of likely growth differ among regions. Over the next 20 years, manufacturing production is expected to grow at a rapid pace in parts of the developing world, and moderately in the OECD countries. In the Former East Bloc, it seems likely to stagnate or decline for much of the 1990s, but could then grow at a moderate pace if the transition to a market economy is successfully managed. Domestic passenger travel seems likely to increase everywhere, and growth in international travel will be especially strong. Freight transport activity is difficult to evaluate in the aggregate, since the composition of goods changes over time, but increase is expected in all regions, especially in the developing countries. Structural change within sectors will have significant impacts on energy use. In manufacturing, faster growth in light industry will lead to lower energy intensity in the OECD countries and especially in the Former East Bloc. The outlook in the LDCs suggests somewhat higher growth in energy-intensive industries, but this trend will vary among countries. In passenger travel, structural change is pointing toward higher energy intensity in most of the world as the role of automobiles and air travel continues to grow. Increase in the use of trucks is pushing in a similar direction in freight transport. In the residential sector, structural change will have only a moderate impact in the OECD countries, where per capita levels of home services are already high, but will push energy use significantly upward in the LDCs, and to a lesser extent, in the Former East Bloc. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Coulomb-interaction effects on the electronic structure of radially polarized excitons in nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barticevic, Z.; Pacheco, M.; Simonin, J.; Proetto, C. R.

    2006-04-01

    The electronic structure of radially polarized excitons in structured nanorings is analyzed, with emphasis in the ground-state properties and their dependence under applied magnetic fields perpendicular to the ring plane. The electron-hole Coulomb attraction has been treated rigorously, through numerical diagonalization of the full exciton Hamiltonian in the noninteracting electron-hole pairs basis. Depending on the relative weight of the kinetic energy and Coulomb contributions, the ground-state of polarized excitons has “extended” or “localized” features. In the first case, corresponding to small rings dominated by the kinetic energy, the ground-state shows Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations due to the individual orbits of the building particles of the exciton. In the localized regime, corresponding to large rings dominated by the Coulomb interaction, the only remaining AB oscillations are due to the magnetic flux trapped between the electron and hole orbits. This dependence of the exciton, a neutral excitation, on the flux difference confirms this feature as a signature of Coulomb dominated polarized excitons. Analytical approximations are provided in both regimes, which accurately reproduce the numerical results.

  1. Far-field radially polarized focal spot from plasmonic spiral structure combined with central aperture antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei; Ren, Yuan; Lu, Yonghua; Lei, Xinrui; Jiang, Kang; Li, Kuanguo; Wang, Yong; Cui, Chenjing; Wen, Xiaolei; Wang, Pei

    2016-03-01

    Manipulation of a vector micro-beam with an optical antenna has significant potentials for nano-optical technology applications including bio-optics, optical fabrication, and quantum information processing. We have designed and demonstrated a central aperture antenna within an Archimedean spiral that extracts the bonding plasmonic field from a surface to produce a new vector focal spot in far-field. The properties of this vector focal field are revealed by confocal microscopy and theoretical simulations. The pattern, polarization and phase of the focal field are determined by the incident light and by the chirality of the Archimedean spiral. For incident light with right-handed circular polarization, the left-handed spiral (one-order chirality) outputs a micro-radially polarized focal field. Our results reveal the relationship between the near-field and far-field distributions of the plasmonic spiral structure, and the structure has the potential to lead to advances in diverse applications such as plasmonic lenses, near-field angular momentum detection, and optical tweezers.

  2. Linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium in the 3C196 field

    CERN Document Server

    Jelić, V; Pandey, V N; Mevius, M; Haverkorn, M; Brentjens, M A; Koopmans, L V E; Zaroubi, S; Abdalla, F B; Asad, K M B; Bus, S; Chapman, E; Ciardi, B; Fernandez, E R; Ghosh, A; Harker, G; Iliev, I T; Jensen, H; Kazemi, S; Mellema, G; Offringa, A R; Patil, A H; Vedantham, H K; Yatawatta, S

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to characterise linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the 3C196 field, one of the primary fields of the LOFAR-Epoch of Reionization key science project. We have used the high band antennas (HBA) of LOFAR to image this region and RM-synthesis to unravel the distribution of polarized structures in Faraday depth. The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is $5-15~{\\rm K}$ in polarized intensity and covers the range from -3 to +8 ${\\rm rad~m^{-2}}$ in Faraday depth. The most interesting morphological feature is a strikingly straight filament at a Faraday depth of $+0.5~{\\rm rad~m^{-2}}$ running from north to south, right through the centre of the field and parallel to the Galactic plane. There is also an interesting system of linear depolarization canals conspicuous in an image showing the peaks of Faraday spectra. We have used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. For the first tim...

  3. The electronic structure of spintronic materials as seen by spin-polarized angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Introduction of spin-dependent effects in modern angle-resolved photoemission from the point of view of potential applications in spintronics. •Review on modern spin-polarimeters, including the historical development of the field. •Several examples to illustrate the application of spin-polarized photoemission to ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic sample systems. -- Abstract: The key quantity in spintronic devices is the spin polarization of the current flowing through the various device components, which in turn is closely determined by the components’ electronic structure. Modern spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) can map the details of the spin-polarized electronic structure in many novel material systems – both magnetic and nonmagnetic. In order to separate close-lying electronic states, however, an improvement in energy and angular resolution as well as information depth is still mandatory. We review several types of modern photoemission spectrometers capable of spin analysis and discuss the application of the technique for several physical systems including ferromagnetic thin films and topological insulators

  4. Polarizing properties and structural characteristics of the cuticle of the scarab Beetle Chrysina gloriosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scarab beetle Chrysina gloriosa is green with gold-colored stripes along its elytras. The properties of light reflected on these areas are investigated using Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry. Both areas reflect light with high degree of left-handed polarization but this effect occurs for specular reflection for the gold-colored areas and for off-specular angles for the green areas. The colors and polarization phenomena originate from reflection of light in the cuticle and a structural analysis is presented to facilitate understanding of the different behaviors of these two areas. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the cross section of beetle cuticles show a multilayered structure. On the gold-colored areas the layers are parallel to the surface whereas on the green-colored areas they form cusp-like structures. Optical microscopy images show a rather flat surface in the gold-colored areas compared to the green-colored areas which display a net of polygonal cells with star-shaped cavities in the center. Each of the polygons corresponds to one of the cusps observed in the SEM images. Atomic force microscopy images of the star-shaped cavities are also provided. The roughness of the surface and the cusp-like structure of the green-colored areas are considered to cause scattering on this area. - Highlights: • Chrysina gloriosa reflects light with high degree of left-handed polarization. • Gold-colored areas are good specular reflectors whereas green-colored areas scatter light. • The cusp-like structure in the green areas is responsible for the scattering

  5. Polarizing properties and structural characteristics of the cuticle of the scarab Beetle Chrysina gloriosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández del Río, Lía, E-mail: liafe@ifm.liu.se; Arwin, Hans; Järrendahl, Kenneth

    2014-11-28

    The scarab beetle Chrysina gloriosa is green with gold-colored stripes along its elytras. The properties of light reflected on these areas are investigated using Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry. Both areas reflect light with high degree of left-handed polarization but this effect occurs for specular reflection for the gold-colored areas and for off-specular angles for the green areas. The colors and polarization phenomena originate from reflection of light in the cuticle and a structural analysis is presented to facilitate understanding of the different behaviors of these two areas. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the cross section of beetle cuticles show a multilayered structure. On the gold-colored areas the layers are parallel to the surface whereas on the green-colored areas they form cusp-like structures. Optical microscopy images show a rather flat surface in the gold-colored areas compared to the green-colored areas which display a net of polygonal cells with star-shaped cavities in the center. Each of the polygons corresponds to one of the cusps observed in the SEM images. Atomic force microscopy images of the star-shaped cavities are also provided. The roughness of the surface and the cusp-like structure of the green-colored areas are considered to cause scattering on this area. - Highlights: • Chrysina gloriosa reflects light with high degree of left-handed polarization. • Gold-colored areas are good specular reflectors whereas green-colored areas scatter light. • The cusp-like structure in the green areas is responsible for the scattering.

  6. Polarization of Bi2Te3 thin film in a floating-gate capacitor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with Bi2Te3 thin film sandwiched and embedded inside the oxide layer have been fabricated and studied. The capacitors exhibit ferroelectric-like hysteresis which is a result of the robust, reversible polarization of the Bi2Te3 thin film while the gate voltage sweeps. The temperature-dependent capacitance measurement indicates that the activation energy is about 0.33 eV for separating the electron and hole pairs in the bulk of Bi2Te3, and driving them to either the top or bottom surface of the thin film. Because of the fast polarization speed, potentially excellent endurance, and the complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatibility, the Bi2Te3 embedded MOS structures are very interesting for memory application

  7. Experimental results on polarized structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, L.

    1994-08-01

    A summary is given of experimental results on spin structure functions of the proton g{sub 1}{sup p}(x,Q{sup 2}), deuteron g{sub 1}{sup d}(x,Q{sup 2}), and neutron g{sub 1}{sup n}(x,Q{sup 2}) as measured in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from a polarized target. All results are consistent with the Bjorken sum rule predictions at the Q{sup 2} of each experiment. The data do not support the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule prediction for the proton which implies that the hencity carried by the strange quark may be nonzero and that the net quark helicity is smaller than expected from simple quark models.

  8. Structure-Function Study of Tertiary Amines as Switchable Polarity Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron D. Wilson; Frederick F. Stewart

    2014-02-01

    A series of tertiary amines have been screened for their function as switchable polarity solvents (SPS). The relative ratios of tertiary amine and carbonate species as well as maximum possible concentration were determined through quantitative 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The viscosities of the polar SPS solutions were measured and ranged from near water in dilute systems through to gel formation at high concentrations. The van't Hoff indices for SPS solutions were measured through freezing point depression studies as a proxy for osmotic pressures. A new form of SPS with an amine : carbonate ratio significantly greater than unity has been identified. Tertiary amines that function as SPS at ambient pressures appear to be limited to molecules with fewer than 12 carbons. The N,N-dimethyl-n-alkylamine structure has been identified as important to the function of an SPS.

  9. Influence of polarization to the dielectric properties of polymers and piezocomposites with a nonequilibrium structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this work the frequency temperature dependence of tgδ and ε of the polarized PE, PP films and piezocomposites on the basis of PE/ZTP-19, PP/ZTP-19 (40:60 vol.%), obtained at different crystallization regimes, have been investigated. It has been shown that, at crystallization velocity of 1800-2000 degree/min, the obtained samples has a nonequilibrium structure and frequency of ω =(4†4.3). 104 Hs on tgδ (ω) dependence of the samples piezocomposites observed a losses of the dielectric maximum, which has a relaxation nature. It is established that, in PE, PP polarized films takes place the capture of stabilized charge carriers on traps, under influence of the intrinsic field, which in results observes the decrease of the tgδ and ε

  10. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  11. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-03-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  12. Polarization dependent diffraction anomalous fine structure of rutile TiO2 001 and 111 reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy and polarization dependent Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS) also known as Anisotropic Anomalous Scattering (AAS) can be employed in addition to X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) to study electronic transitions from core states to unoccupied states. Here, we present results from resonant X-ray diffraction experiments on TiO2 rutile, space group (136) P42/mnm. For this model structure, site symmetry information was extracted from determination of the structure factor tensor by refining elements of Ti atomic scattering factor tensors. Influences of oxygen vacancies on the anomalous scattering contributions have been studied on a series of rutile wafers of different oxygen concentration. Samples investigated were 10 x 10 x 1 mm3 single crystal wafers and experiments were carried out at DESY/HASYLAB beamlines C and E2 using a Si(111) double crystal monochromator in the vicinity of the Ti-K absorption edge. Considered reflections include the 'forbidden' 001 and allowed 111 reflection.

  13. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pančić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1 and different temperatures (1, 5 and 8 °C to simulate changes from present to plausible future levels. Each of the 12 scenarios was run for 7 days, and a significant interaction between temperature and pH on growth was detected. By combining increased temperature and acidification, the two factors counterbalanced each other, and therefore no effect on the growth rates was found. However, the growth rates increased with elevated temperatures by ∼20–50% depending on the strain. In addition, a general negative effect of increasing acidification on growth was observed. At pH 7.7 and 7.4, the growth response varied considerably among strains. However, a more uniform response was detected at pH 7.1 with most of the strains exhibiting reduced growth rates by 20–37% compared to pH 8.0. It should be emphasized that a significant interaction between temperature and pH was found, meaning that the combination of the two parameters affected growth differently than when considering one at a time. Based on these results, we anticipate that the polar diatom F. cylindrus will be unaffected by changes in temperature and pH within the range expected by the end of the century. In each simulated scenario, the variation in growth rates among the strains was larger than the variation observed due to the whole range of changes in either pH or temperature. Climate change may therefore not affect the species as such, but may lead to changes in the population structure of the species, with the strains exhibiting high phenotypic plasticity, in terms of temperature and pH tolerance towards future conditions, dominating the population.

  14. A novel microwave cancellation circuit for measuring nonlinear dielectric changes of polar solution under microwave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao-Ran; Huang, Ka-Ma

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an experimental set-up based on a novel microstrip cancellation circuit is presented for investigating the effects of external microwave fields on the dielectric properties of polar solution. The circuit consists of a 3 dB Wilkinson power combiner, a conventional 20 dB backward coupler, and a specially designed 20 dB single-sectioned forward coupler. Besides, in order to realize a uniform electric field in the tested solution, a nicked microstrip ring is designed in the circuit. An improvement of measurement sensitivity in the proposed circuit was obtained when compared to the conventional transmission lines method. We exploit interference cancellation processes to suppress the probing signal at the output port under the principle that two identical amplitude signals with 180° phase difference will completely cancel each other. The measurements are carried out at the frequency of 2.45 GHz, and the temperature effects caused by microwave heating are excluded by the flowing fluid. Experimental results show that the dielectric properties of DMSO-methanol/ethanol mixtures change at the electric field intensity of 105 V m  -  1 and present a distinctly nonlinear dielectric change with the electric fields. The study of the microwave-material interaction has expanded our insights into the high-power microwave’s industry application.

  15. Impacts of Polar Changes on the UV-induced Mineralization of Terrigenous Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzberger, Barbara; Arey, J Samuel

    2016-07-01

    Local climates in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere are influenced by Arctic Amplification and by interactions of the Antarctic ozone hole with climate change, respectively. Polar changes may affect hydroclimatic conditions in temperate regions, for example, by increasing the length and intensity of precipitation events at Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. Additionally, global warming has led to the thawing of ancient permafrost soils, particularly in Arctic regions, due to Arctic Amplification. Both heavy precipitation events and thawing of permafrost are increasing the net transfer of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) from land to surface waters. In aquatic ecosystems, UV-induced oxidation of terrigenous DOM (tDOM) produces atmospheric CO2 and this process is one of several mechanisms by which natural organic matter in aquatic and soil environments may play an important role in climate feedbacks. The Arctic is particularly affected by these processes: for example, melting of Arctic sea ice allows solar UV radiation to penetrate into the ice-free Arctic Ocean and to cause photochemical reactions that result in bleaching and mineralization of tDOM. Open questions, in addition to those shown in the Graphical Abstract, remain regarding the resulting contributions of tDOM photomineralization to CO2 production and global warming. PMID:27110903

  16. Past climate changes derived from isotope measurements in polar ice cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of stable and radioactive isotopes in polar ice cores provide a wealth of information on the climate conditions of the past. Stable isotopes (δ18O, δD) reflect mainly the temperature, whereas δ18O of oxygen in air bubbles reveals predominantly the global ice volume and the biospheric activity. Cosmic ray produced radioisotopes (cosmogenic nuclides) such as 10Be and 36Cl record information on the solar variability and possibly also on the solar irradiance. If the flux of a cosmogenic nuclide into the ice is known the accumulation rate can be derived from the measured concentration. The comparison of 10Be from ice with 14C from tree rings allows deciding whether observed 14C variations are caused by production or system effects. Finally, isotope measurements are very useful for establishing and improving time scales. The 10Be/36Cl ratio changes with an apparent half-life of 376,000 years and is therefore well suited to date old ice. Significant abrupt changes in the records of 10Be, 36Cl from ice and of δ18O from atmospheric oxygen representing global signals can be used to synchronize ice and sediment cores. (author)

  17. Polarity-manipulation based on nanoscale structural transformation on strained 2D MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain induced nanoscale structural transformation is demonstrated in this paper to have the ability of triggering polarity flipping in a wide bandgap system of MgxZn1−xO/MgO/Al2O3. Relaxation dynamics of semiconductor components under large compressive pressures up to 13.7 GPa were studied by a combination of theoretical analysis and experimental characterizations including in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The gigantic force between MgZnO and ultrathin-MgO/Al2O3 delayed the structural transformation of MgZnO from six-fold cubic to four-fold wurtzite into the second monolayer, and consequently flipped the polarity of the film deposited on relaxed MgO. Additionally, dislocation-induced strain relaxation was suggested to happen around 1 nm thick cubic MgO grown on Al2O3, instead of the previous well-accepted concept that wurtzite structures can be inherited from the oxygen sub-lattice of sapphire substrates below the critical thickness. Finally, the structural transformation method employing an ultrathin-MgO interfacial layer was demonstrated to be a suitable technique for accommodating the large lattice mismatch comparing with the dislocation-relaxation mechanism achieving a UV photodetector with four orders of rejection ratio of the UV-to-visible photoresponse. (paper)

  18. Photoinduced structural changes to protein kinase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The importance of porphyrins in organisms is underscored by the ubiquitous biological and biochemical functions that are mediated by these compounds and by their potential biomedical and biotechnological applications. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is the precursor to heme and has biomedical applications such as its use as a photosensitizer in phototherapy and photodetection of cancer. Among other applications, our group has demonstrated that low-irradiance exposure to laser irradiation of PPIX, Fe-PPIX, or meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) non-covalently docked to a protein causes conformational changes in the polypeptide. Such approach can have remarkable consequences in the study of protein structure/function relationship and can be used to prompt non-native protein properties. Therefore we have investigated protein kinase A (PKA), a more relevant protein model towards the photo-treatment of cancer. PKA's enzymatic functions are regulated by the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate for intracellular signal transduction involved in, among other things, stimulation of transcription, tumorigenesis in Carney complex and migration of breast carcinoma cells. Since phosphorylation is a necessary step in some cancers and inflammatory diseases, inhibiting the protein kinase, and therefore phosphorylation, may serve to treat these diseases. Changes in absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime indicate: 1) both TSPP and PPIX non-covalently bind to PKA where they maintain photoreactivity; 2) absorptive photoproduct formation occurs only when PKA is bound to TSPP and irradiated; and 3) PKA undergoes secondary structural changes after irradiation with either porphyrin bound. These photoinduced changes could affect the protein's enzymatic and signaling capabilities.

  19. Spin-polarization-induced structural selectivity in $Pd_{3}X$ and $Pt_{3}X$ (X=3d) compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Z W; Zunger, A

    1995-01-01

    Spin-polarization is known to lead to important {\\it magnetic} and {\\it optical} effects in open-shell atoms and elemental solids, but has rarely been implicated in controlling {\\it structural} selectivity in compounds and alloys. Here we show that spin-polarized electronic structure calculations are crucial for predicting the correct $T=0$ crystal structures for Pd$_3X$ and Pt$_3X$ compounds. Spin-polarization leads to (i) stabilization of the $L1_2$ structure over the $DO_{22}$ structure in Pt$_3$Cr, Pd$_3$Cr, and Pd$_3$Mn, (ii) to the stabilization of the $DO_{22}$ structure over the $L1_2$ structure in Pd$_3$Co and to (iii) ordering (rather than phase-separation) in Pt$_3$Co and Pd$_3$Cr. The results are analyzed in terms of first-principles local spin density calculations.

  20. Inversion of single-station teleseismic P-wave polarization-data for the velocity structure of Beijing area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Broadband three-component seismic data recorded by Beijingstation (BJI) of CDSN were used to calculate P-wave polarization of teleseismic events. These polarization data were then used in the inversion for the underground structure around the Beijing station, especially for the details of velocity discontinuities. The result shows that a conspicuous low velocity zone exists in the crust on the west of the station, which is in good agreement with previous studies. It proves the theory that polarization data could be applied to inversion for velocity structures, especially for boundaries with large velocity gradient. It also demonstrates the feasibility of velocity structure inversion with polarization data from high-quality broadband data recorded by a single station. Therefore, travel-times and polarization data can be jointly used to study velocity structure. Polarization data are more suitable for delineating the boundary of velocity anomalies. Moreover, if the polarization method is combined with receiver function method to fully exploit their complementarity, it is possible to obtain the lateral velocity variation around the station as well as the detailed vertical variation below the station.

  1. Polarization-balanced design of heterostructures: Application to AlN/GaN double-barrier structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kristian; Andersson, Thorvald G.; Hyldgaard, Per

    2011-12-01

    Inversion and depletion regions generally form at the interfaces between doped leads (cladding layers) and the active region of polar heterostructures like AlN/GaN and other nitride compounds. The band bending in the depletion region sets up a barrier that may seriously impede perpendicular electronic transport. This may ruin the performance of devices such as quantum-cascade lasers and resonant-tunneling diodes. Here we introduce the concepts of polarization balance and polarization-balanced designs: A structure is polarization balanced when the applied bias match the voltage drop arising from spontaneous and piezeolectric fields. Devices designed to operate at this bias have polarization-balanced designs. These concepts offer a systematic approach to avoid the formation of depletion regions. As a test case, we consider the design of AlN/GaN double-barrier structures with Alx˜Ga1-x˜N leads. To guide our efforts, we derive a simple relation between the intrinsic voltage drop arising from polar effects, average alloy composition of the active region, and the alloy concentration of the leads. Polarization-balanced designs secure good filling of the ground state for unbiased structures, while for biased structures with efficient emptying of the active region they remove the depletion barriers.

  2. PBX/extradenticle is required to re-establish axial structures and polarity during planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blassberg, Robert A; Felix, Daniel A; Tejada-Romero, Belen; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-02-01

    Recent advances in a number of systems suggest many genes involved in orchestrating regeneration are redeployed from similar processes in development, with others being novel to the regeneration process in particular lineages. Of particular importance will be understanding the architecture of regenerative genetic regulatory networks and whether they are conserved across broad phylogenetic distances. Here, we describe the role of the conserved TALE class protein PBX/Extradenticle in planarians, a representative member of the Lophotrocozoa. PBX/Extradenticle proteins play central roles in both embryonic and post-embryonic developmental patterning in both vertebrates and insects, and we demonstrate a broad requirement during planarian regeneration. We observe that Smed-pbx has pleiotropic functions during regeneration, with a primary role in patterning the anterior-posterior (AP) axis and AP polarity. Smed-pbx is required for expression of polarity determinants notum and wnt1 and for correct patterning of the structures polarized along the AP axis, such as the brain, pharynx and gut. Overall, our data suggest that Smed-pbx functions as a central integrator of positional information to drive patterning of regeneration along the body axis. PMID:23318635

  3. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could result in image blurring. This paper presents a Kalman-filter based method that incorporates a forward projection of the solution based on a model plasma drift velocity field. This is the first time that the plasma motion, rather than just integrations of electron density, has been used in an ionospheric imaging algorithm. The motion is derived from the Weimer model of the electric field. It is shown that this novel approach to the implementation of a Kalman filter provides a detailed view of the polar cap ionosphere under severe storm conditions. A case study is given for the October 2003 Halloween storm where verification is provided by incoherent scatter radars.

  4. Structural changes in dairy business in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Vujčić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Croatia today is in the economy transition process that also includes agriculture aiming to increase production and achieving competitive standard with international and European markets. Currently, domestic cow milk production ensures 80% of annual milk and dairy products requirements with the 20% import. In the period from 1990-1992, during the patriot war, 103000 cows and heifers were destroyed. Since then, Croatia started the gradual process of reorganization of the agricultural private sector including dairy business in order to increase production insensitivity.The agricultural structure of dairy segment is unsatisfactory with only 23.39% of farms holding four or more heifers. Households with 3 cows per farm dominate with average real estate of 0.10-3.0 acres.Changes in milk production (1990-2003 are reflected in the decrease of the number of breeding cattle – index 56.13%, and decrease of milk market producers from 65 000 to 65 151. Never the less, positive trends towards stabilization in milk production (2003 – 642 mil litres and annual milk intake increased from 342 mil litres in 1990 to 472 mil litres in 2003 (index 138.08% can be noticed. Changes in the structure of milk producers show certain positive movements as 23.39% of producers have 53.40% cows and respectively participation in milk production and buy off. Until 2008, with determined development conditions, cow milk production can increase for 42% and from 2703 litres to average of 4000 litres per dairy cow.

  5. The role of polar, lamdba (Λ)-shaped building units in noncentrosymmetric inorganic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, Martin D; Gautier, Romain; Yeon, Jeongho; Moore, Donald T; Nino, Juan C; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R

    2012-05-01

    A methodology for the design of polar, inorganic structures is demonstrated here with the packing of lambda (Λ)-shaped basic building units (BBUs). Noncentrosymmetric (NCS) solids with interesting physical properties can be created with BBUs that lack an inversion center and are likely to pack into a polar configuration; previous methods to construct these solids have used NCS octahedra as BBUs. Using this methodology to synthesize NCS solids, one must increase the coordination of the NCS octahedra with maintenance of the noncentrosymmetry of the bulk. The first step in this progression from an NCS octahedron to an inorganic NCS solid is the formation of a bimetallic BBU. This step is exemplified with the compound CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7): this compound, presented here, crystallizes in an NCS structure with ordered, isolated [Cu(H(2)O)(5)](2+) cations and [VOF(4)(H(2)O)](2-) anions into Λ-shaped, bimetallic BBUs to form CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(6)·H(2)O, owing to the Jahn-Teller distortion of Cu(2+). Conversely, the centrosymmetric heterotypes with the same formula MVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7) (M(II) = Co, Ni, and Zn) exhibit ordered, isolated [VOF(4)(H(2)O)](2-) and [M(H(2)O)(6)](2+) ionic species in a hydrogen bond network. CuVOF(4)(H(2)O)(7) exhibits a net polar moment while the heterotypes do not; this demonstrates that Λ-shaped BBUs give a greater probability for and, in this case, lead to NCS structures. PMID:22335338

  6. Three-dimensional thermal structure of the South Polar Vortex of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Garate-Lopez, Itziar; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed thermal infrared images provided by the VIRTIS-M instrument aboard Venus Express (VEX) to obtain high resolution thermal maps of the Venus south polar region between 55 and 85 km altitudes. The maps investigate three different dynamical configurations of the polar vortex including its classical dipolar shape, a regularly oval shape and a transition shape between the different configurations of the vortex. We apply the atmospheric model described by García Muñoz et al. (2013) and a variant of the retrieval algorithm detailed in Grassi et al. (2008) to obtain maps of temperature over the Venus south polar region in the quoted altitude range. These maps are discussed in terms of cloud motions and relative vorticity distribution obtained previously (Garate-Lopez et al. 2013). Temperature maps retrieved at 55 - 63 km show the same structures that are observed in the ~5 µm radiance images. This altitude range coincides with the optimal expected values of the cloud top altitude at polar latitudes and magnitudes derived from the analysis of ~5 µm images are measured at this altitude range. We also study the imprint of the vortex on the thermal field above the cloud level which extends up to 80 km. From the temperature maps, we also study the vertical stability of different atmospheric layers. The cold collar is clearly the most statically stable structure at polar latitudes, while the vortex and subpolar latitudes show lower stability values. Furthermore, the hot filaments present within the vortex at 55-63 km exhibit lower values of static stability than their immediate surroundings.ReferencesGarate-Lopez et al. Nat. Geosci. 6, 254-257 (2013).García Muñoz et al. Planet. Space Sci. 81, 65-73 (2013).Grassi, D. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 113, 1-12 (2008).AcknowledgementsWe thank ESA for supporting Venus Express, ASI, CNES and the other national space agencies supporting VIRTIS on VEX and their principal investigators G. Piccioni and P. Drossart. This work

  7. A Compact Wideband Dual-Polarized Antenna with Harmonic Suppression Using Nonuniform Defected Ground Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Damaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wideband dual-polarized coplanar waveguide (CPW fed antenna integrating a wide stop-band filter is presented. The designed filter is based on a nonuniform defected ground structure (DGS in order to obtain a wide stop-band and a compact size. This filter is used to reject harmonics and spurious radiation arising from the RF front end. The complete structure (antenna and filter has been optimized to have a compact size of 0.6×0.6λ02 (λ0 being the free-space wavelength at the lowest operating frequency. The realized antenna operates in the frequency range between 2.7 GHz and 5.9 GHz (bandwidth of about 74%. The isolation between feeding ports is more than 18 dB. The complete structure has a wide stop-band characteristic (103% for harmonic rejection. The simulated numerical results have been confirmed with measurements.

  8. The Vast Polar Structure of the Milky Way and Filamentary Accretion of Sub-Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlowski, Marcel S

    2012-01-01

    The Milky Way (MW) is surrounded by numerous satellite objects: dwarf galaxies, globular clusters and streams of disrupted systems. Together, these form a vast polar structure (VPOS), a thin plane spreading to Galactocentric distances as large as 250 kpc. The orbital directions of satellite galaxies and the preferred alignment of streams with the VPOS demonstrate that the objects orbit within the structure. This strong phase-space correlation is at odds with the expectations from simulations of structure formation based on the cold dark matter cosmology (LCDM). The accretion of sub-halos along filaments has been suggested as the origin of the anisotropic distribution. We have tested this scenario using the results of high-resolution cosmological simulations and found it unable to account for the large degree of correlation of the MW satellite orbits. It is therefore advisable to search for alternative explanations. The formation of tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) in the debris expelled from interacting galaxies i...

  9. Polarization memory effect in the photoluminescence of nc-Si-SiOx light-emitting structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailovska, Katerina; Indutnyi, Ivan; Shepeliavyi, Petro; Sopinskyy, Mykola

    2016-12-01

    The polarization memory (PM) effect in the photoluminescence (PL) of the porous nc-Si-SiOx light-emitting structures, containing nanoparticles of silicon (nc-Si) in the oxide matrix and passivated in a solution of hydrofluoric acid (HF), has been investigated. The studied nc-Si-SiOx structures were produced by evaporation of Si monoxide (SiO) powder in vacuum and oblique deposition on Si wafer, and then the deposited silicon oxide (SiOx) films were annealed in the vacuum at 975 °C to grow nc-Si. It was found that the PM effect in the PL is observed only after passivation of nanostructures: during etching in HF solution, the initial symmetric nc-Si becomes asymmetric elongated. It was also found that in investigated nanostructures, there is a defined orientational dependence of the PL polarization degree (ρ) in the sample plane which correlates with the orientation of SiOx nanocolumns, forming the structure of the porous layer. The increase of the ρ values in the long-wavelength spectral range with time of HF treatment can be associated with increasing of the anisotropy of large Si nanoparticles. The PM effect for this spectral interval can be described by the dielectric model. In the short-wavelength spectral range, the dependence of the ρ values agrees qualitatively with the quantum confinement effect. PMID:27255897

  10. Determination of the Structure of the Coronal Magnetic Field Using Microwave Polarization Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogod, V. M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory motions and wave processes in active regions requires knowledge of the structure of the magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. We study the magnetic field structure of active regions at coronal heights, as they are determined by means of multiwave observations of polarized radio emission of active regions in the microwave range. Two methods, a stereoscopic method and the analysis of the radio spectrum are used. The method of stereoscopy rotation allows estimating the height of radio sources in a stable active region relative to the photosphere, based on its apparent motion in the image plane recorded over several days of observation. At various times one-dimensional scans at multiple frequencies spanning the 5.98 - 15.95 GHz frequency range from the RATAN-600 instrument are used. The gyroresonance emission mechanism, which is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field strength, is applied to convert the radio source estimated heights at various frequencies, h(f), to information as regards magnetic field vs. height, B(h). Diagrams of longitude - height of some polarized radio sources revealed multiple reversals, suggestive of a spiral magnetic structure. In all cases, the magnetic field strength maintains high values (800 - 1000 G) at the highest altitudes analysed, which reflects a relatively weak divergence in the field of magnetic flux tubes (in the height range 8 - 14 Mm) responsible for the main part of the radio emission of active regions.

  11. Spin-polarized electronic structure of the Ni(001) surface and thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, O.; Madsen, J.; Andersen, O.K.

    1982-01-01

    Spin-polarized energy bands, charge and spin densities have been calculated self-consistently for one, three, and five atomic (001) layers of fcc Ni using the linear augmented plane-wave method and the von Barth—Hedin approximation for exchange and correlation. The self-consistent potential of the five-layer film is used to calculate the electronic structure of a 13-layer film. The theoretical work function of 5.4 eV agrees well with the experimental value of 5.2 eV. The calculated spin momen...

  12. Structural Integrity Analysis of CEA Change Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Control Element Assembly Change Platform (CEA CP) is similar to a gantry crane. The CEA CP for Shin-Kori units 3 and 4 (SKN 3 and 4) consists of a bridge, which spans the reactor cavity pool and a gantry superstructure mounted on the bridge. The structure is approximately 8.8 m wide, 4.9 m long and 10.6 m high. The gantry superstructure supports one ton capacity hoist trolley and the bridge supports the In Core Instrumentation (ICI) retrieval cart which moves along the bridge. This paper presents the dynamic and structural analysis of CEA CP which is greater than that of the previous nuclear power plants to verify the structural integrity under the application of the earthquake spectrum. The analysis have been performed using the three orthogonal SSE response spectrum for SKN 3 and 4 which shows much higher acceleration value than OPR- 1000 Plants. In addition, the analyses are performed by 3-dimensional finite element analysis using ANSYS software

  13. GLOB(MET)SAT: French proposals for monitoring global change and weather from the polar orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durpaire, Jean-Pierre; Ratier, A.; Dagras, C.

    1991-08-01

    A new concept for a polar orbiting satellite dedicated to global change research and its extension to fulfill the meteorological operational mission in the morning orbit is studied by CNES and MATRA, with the support of EUMETSAT and a group of European scientists. Two options were investigated during the feasibility study called GLOB(MET)SAT, the first one, GLOBSAT, restricted to an IGBP-dedicated mission, and the second one, GLOBMETSAT, combining this research mission and the operational met-mission specified by EUMETSAT. The mission objectives, the associated requirements, and the instruments accommodated are presented and discussed, as well as the main results of the phase A study for the space segment. The system configurations, characteristics, performances and the development plan are described. Both options prove feasible and compatible with a target launch date in the 1996-97 timeframe and preserve a significant growth potential. The use of the MK-2 platform developed for the SPOT-4 program and of other recurrent hardware elements appears a significant cost-saving, schedule-securing and reliability factor in both options. In the same line, the GLOBMETSAT system combining the environment and meteorological missions is of mutual benefit for both missions, in terms of reliability, cost sharing and use of platform resources, while keeping each mission independent and unaffected by the other.

  14. Tensor-polarized structure functions: Tensor structure of deuteron in 2020's

    OpenAIRE

    Kumano, S

    2014-01-01

    We explain spin structure for a spin-one hadron, in which there are new structure functions, in addition to the ones ($F_1$, $F_2$, $g_1$, $g_2$) which exist for the spin-1/2 nucleon, associated with its tensor structure. The new structure functions are $b_1$, $b_2$, $b_3$, and $b_4$ in deep inelastic scattering of a charged-lepton from a spin-one hadron such as the deuteron. Among them, twist-two functions are related by the Callan-Gross type relation $b_2 = 2 x b_1$ in the Bjorken scaling l...

  15. Reverse Polarity Magnetized Melt Rocks from the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub Structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, Luis; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1994-01-01

    We report paleomagnetic results for core samples of the breccia and andesitic rocks recovered from the Yucatan-6 Petrolcos Mexicanos exploratory well within the Chicxulub structure (about 60 km SSW from its center), northern Yucatan, Mexico. A previous study has shown that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts and an Ar/Ar date of 65.2 +/- 0.4 Ma. Andesitic rocks are characterized by stable single-component magnetizations with a mean inclination of -42.6 deg +/- 2.4 deg. Breccias present a complex paleomagnetic record characterized by multivectorial magnetizations with widely different initial NRM inclinations. However, after alternating field demagnetization, well defined characteristic components with upward inclinations are defined. IRM acquisition experiments, comparison of IRM and NRM coercivity spectra and the single component magnetization of the andesitic rocks indicate the occurrence of iron-rich titanomagnetites of single or pseudo-single domain states as the dominant magnetic carriers. Mean inclinations from the andesitic rocks and most of the breccia samples give a mean inclination of about -40 deg to -45 deg, indicating a reverse polarity for the characteristic magnetization that is consistent with geomagnetic chron 29R, which spans the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The inclination is also consistent with the expected value (and corresponding paleolatitude) for the site estimated from the reference polar wander curve for North America. We suggest that the characteristic magnetizations for the andesitic and breccia rocks are the result of shock heating at the time of formation of the impact structure and that the age, polarity and pateolatitude are consistent with a time at the K/T boundary.

  16. Cathodic polarization curves of the oxygen reduction reaction on various structural materials of boiling water reactors in high temperature-high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodic polarization curves of the O2 reduction reaction were measured by using electrodes made from typical structural materials of boiling water reactors (BWRs) to evaluate the effects of kind of material on the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) calculation. To estimate ECPs at any region in the BWRs on the basis of the BWR environmental conditions, anodic and cathodic polarization curves should be obtained in advance under relevant conditions. The concentration of oxidants such as O2 and H2O2 in coolant changes depending on the region in which they exist. As well, reduction reaction rates might differ depending on the kind of materials. In this work, the cathodic polarization curves of type 316L stainless steel (316L SS) and Alloy 182 were measured in high purity water at 553 K with different O2 concentrations and compared with those of type 304 SS (304 SS). The results showed that the cathodic polarization curves differed depending on the kind of materials at the activation-controlled region. But, the difference in the ECP vs. O2 concentration relationship was small when the ECPs were calculated by using both anodic and cathodic polarization curves measured on the objective material. (author)

  17. Saturn's North Polar Vortex Revealed by Cassini/VIMS: Zonal Wind Structure and Constraints on Cloud Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Momary, T. W.; Fletcher, L. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Roos-Serote, M.; Showman, A. P.; Brown, R. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2008-09-01

    We present the first high-spatial resolution, near-nadir imagery and movies of Saturn's north polar region that reveal the wind structure of a north polar vortex. Obtained by Cassini/VIMS on June 15, 2008 from high over Saturn's polar region (sub-spacecraft latitude of 65 degrees N. lat) at an altitude of 0.42 million km during the long polar night, these 210-per-pixel images of the polar region north of 73 degrees N. latitude show several concentric cloud rings and hundreds of individual cloud features in silhouette against the 5-micron background thermal glow of Saturn's deep atmosphere. In contrast to the clear eye of the south polar vortex, the north polar vortex sports a central cloud feature about 650-km in diameter. Zonal winds reach a maximum of 150 m/s near 88 degrees N. latitude (planetocentric) - comparable to the south polar vortex maximum of 190 m/s near 88 degrees S. latitude - and fall off nearly monotonically to 10 m/s near 80 degrees N. latitude. At slightly greater distance from the pole, inside the north polar hexagon in the 75-77 degree N. latitude region, zonal winds increase dramatically to 130 m/s, as silhouetted clouds are seen speeding aroud the "race track” of the hexagonal feature. VIMS 5-micron thermal observations over a 1.6-year period from October 29, 2006 to June 15, 2008 are consistent with the polar hexagon structure itself remaining fixed in the Voyager-era radio rotation rate (Desch and Kaiser, Geophys. Res. Lett, 8, 253-256, 1981) to within an accuracy of 3 seconds per rotational period. This agrees with the stationary nature of the wave in this rotation system found by Godfrey (Icarus 76, 335-356, 1988), but is inconsistent with rotation rates found during the current Cassini era.

  18. Tensor-polarized structure functions: Tensor structure of deuteron in 2020's

    CERN Document Server

    Kumano, S

    2014-01-01

    We explain spin structure for a spin-one hadron, in which there are new structure functions, in addition to the ones ($F_1$, $F_2$, $g_1$, $g_2$) which exist for the spin-1/2 nucleon, associated with its tensor structure. The new structure functions are $b_1$, $b_2$, $b_3$, and $b_4$ in deep inelastic scattering of a charged-lepton from a spin-one hadron such as the deuteron. Among them, twist-two functions are related by the Callan-Gross type relation $b_2 = 2 x b_1$ in the Bjorken scaling limit. First, these new structure functions are introduced, and useful formulae are derived for projection operators of $b_{1-4}$ from a hadron tensor $W_{\\mu\

  19. On the structure and evolution of a polar crown prominence/filament system

    CERN Document Server

    Panesar, N K; Schmit, D J; Tiwari, S K

    2014-01-01

    Polar crown prominences are made of chromospheric plasma partially circling the Suns poles between 60 and 70 degree latitude. We aim to diagnose the 3D dynamics of a polar crown prominence using high cadence EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA at 304 and 171A and the Ahead spacecraft of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A)/EUVI at 195A. Using time series across specific structures we compare flows across the disk in 195A with the prominence dynamics seen on the limb. The densest prominence material forms vertical columns which are separated by many tens of Mm and connected by dynamic bridges of plasma that are clearly visible in 304/171A two-color images. We also observe intermittent but repetitious flows with velocity 15 km/s in the prominence that appear to be associated with EUV bright points on the solar disk. The boundary between the prominence and the overlying cavity appears as a sharp edge. We discuss the structure of the coronal cavity seen both above and around...

  20. Structures in the protoplanetary disk of HD142527 seen in polarized scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Avenhaus, Henning; Schmid, Hans Martin; Meyer, Michael R; Garufi, Antonio; Wolf, Sebastian; Dominik, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    We present H- and Ks-band polarized differential images (PDI) of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD142527, revealing its optically thick outer disk and the nearly empty gap. The very small inner working angle (~0.1") and high resolution achievable with an 8m-class telescope, together with a careful polarimetric calibration strategy, allow us to achieve images that surpass the quality of previous scattered light images. Previously known substructures are resolved more clearly and new structures are seen. Specifically, we are able to resolve 1) half a dozen spiral structures in the disk, including previously known outer-disk spirals as well as new spiral arms and arcs close to the inner rim of the disk; 2) peculiar holes in the polarized surface brightness at position angles of ~0{\\deg} and ~160{\\deg}; 3) the inner rim on the eastern side of the disk; 4) the gap between the outer and inner disk, ranging from the inner working angle of 0.1" out to between 0.7 and 1.0", which is nearly devoid of dust. We then use a Markov-...

  1. Structure and dynamics of the Earth's polar ionosphere: recent results inferred from incoherent scatter sounders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For 20 years, a large part of ionospheric research has been devoted to high latitudes and in particular to the range 60-70 deg. where an oval of auroras permanently encircles each pole. The auroral light emissions are accompanied by the production of ionization, electric currents and fields. Indeed, the auroral latitudes play a dominant role in the ionospheric electrodynamics because electric fields and currents reach thus at their largest intensities. Observations from low-altitude satellites and from ground-based facilities have contributed to the analysis and modelling of the structure and dynamics of the auroral ionosphere. The results illustrated here are inferred from observations of the European Japanese incoherent scatter radars (EISCAT) based in North Scandinavia. Recently, the field of view of the EISCAT facilities has been extended toward the pole with two radars built in 1996 and 2000 at Spitzbergen (78 deg. N): the EISCAT Svalbard radars. Other ground-based instruments (magnetometers, photometers, etc) have also been deployed at the same location. At first sight, the ionization production in the polar ionosphere is expected to be weak because of the reduced solar illumination. The first observations reveal, in contrast, the presence of intense and variable structures, which are still under investigation. To develop our understanding of these events, we discuss the theoretical results given by the particle penetration from solar origin, and of its effects into the dayside polar ionosphere

  2. Study on the layered dusty plasma structures in the summer polar mesopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional hydrodynamic equations are adopted to build a one-dimensional theoretical model to study the effect of gravity wave on layered dusty plasma structures formation and evolution near the polar summer mesospause region associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism gives consideration to the charged ice particle motion by the gravity wave modulation, making a significant contribution to the vertical transport of heavy ice particles and convergence into thin layers. And numerical results show that the pattern of the multi-layer structure depends on the ration of the initial ice particles density distribution to the vertical wavelength of the gravity waves, the ice particle size and the wind velocity caused by gravity wave. Also, the variation of ion density distribution under the influence of gravity wave has also been examined. Finally, the electron density depletions (bite-outs layers has been simulated according to the charge conservation laws, and the results are compared to the ECT02 rocket sounding data, which agree well with the measuring.

  3. Investigations of the supramolecular structure of individual diphenylalanine nano- and microtubes by polarized Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekprasert, Banyat; Korolkov, Vladimir; Falamas, Alexandra; Chis, Vasile; Roberts, Clive J; Tendler, Saul J B; Notingher, Ioan

    2012-07-01

    Polarized Raman microspectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to obtain quantitative information regarding the molecular structure of individual diphenylalanine (FF) nano- and microtubes. The frequencies of the Raman spectral bands corresponding to the amide I (1690 cm(-1)) and amide III (1249 cm(-1)) indicated that the FF-molecules interact by hydrogen bonding at the N-H and not at the C═O sites. The calculated mean orientation angles of the principal axes of the Raman tensors (PARTs) obtained from the polarized Raman spectral measurements were 41 ± 4° for the amide I and 59 ± 5° for amide III. On the basis of the orientation of the PART for the amide I mode, it was found that the C═O bond is oriented at an angle of 8 ± 4° to the tube axis. These values did not vary significantly with the diameter of the tubes (range 400-1700 nm) and were in agreement with the molecular structure proposed previously for larger crystalline specimens. PMID:22662867

  4. CHANGES IN STRUCTURE OF ROMANIA'S INTERNATIONAL TRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA IRINA RABONTU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of structural changes in Romanian trade is somewhat interesting if you look at it from the perspective of mutations that occurred in the categories of goods and services subject to international trade. After the Revolution of 1989, the Romanian economy has gone through dramatic changes that had determinate a total reconfiguration of foreign trade. At the same time, the economic instability has had further repercussions on the Romanian economy manifested through higher prices, reduced wages or earnings, reduced employment and rising unemployment, increasing interest rates on loans due to the devaluation of the national currency, increase value-added tax, consumption reduction etc. We proposed in this paper an analyze for a significant period of time evolution of international trade in goods and services of Romania in order to establish the main categories of goods traded but Romania's main trading partners, too. In order to achieve the central goal of this paper we will use statistical data found in the databases provided by the WTO, Eurostat and the National Statistical Institutes and statistical methods to support our initiative.

  5. Multiband one-way polarization conversion in complementary split-ring resonator based structures by combining chirality and tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryannikov, Andriy E; Beruete, Miguel; Mutlu, Mehmet; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2015-05-18

    Multiband one-way polarization conversion and strong asymmetry in transmission inspired by it are demonstrated in ultrathin sandwiched structures that comprise two twisted aperture-type arrays of complementary split-ring resonators (CSRRs), metallic mesh, and dielectric layers. The basic features of the resulting mechanism originate from the common effect of chirality and tunneling. The emphasis is put on the (nearly) perfect polarization conversion of linear incident polarization into the orthogonal one and related diodelike asymmetric transmission within multiple narrow bands. Desired polarization conversion can be obtained at several resonances for one of the two opposite incidence directions, whereas transmission is fully blocked for the other one. The resonances, at which the (nearly) perfect conversion takes place, are expected to be inherited from similar structures with parallel, i.e., not rotated CSRR arrays that do not enable chirality and, thus, polarization conversion. It is found that the basic transmission and polarization conversion features and, thus, the dominant physics are rather general, enabling efficient engineering of such structures. The lowest-frequency resonance can be obtained in structures made of conventional materials with total thickness less than λ/50 and up to ten such resonances can correspond to thickness less than λ/20. PMID:26074599

  6. Changing Arctic Ecosystems: Updated forecast: Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions required to improve polar bear outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Karen L.; Atwood, Todd C.; Mugel, Douglas N.; Rode, Karyn D.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to the loss of snow and ice, which increases the amount of solar energy absorbed by the region. The most visible consequence has been the rapid decline in sea ice over the last 3 decades-a decline projected to bring long ice-free summers if greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are not significantly reduced. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice over the biologically productive continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean as a platform for hunting seals. In 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the polar bear as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to the threat posed by sea ice loss. The polar bear was the first species to be listed due to forecasted population declines from climate change.

  7. Special Features of Polarization-Induced Relaxation in Structurally Disordered Finely Dispersed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbachenko, L. A.; Tanaev, A. B.; Bezrukova, Ya. V.; Ezhova, L. I.; Baryshnikov, D. S.; Marchuk, S. D.; Berezovskii, P. P.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric characteristics of finely dispersed hydrated natural coal from the Krasnoyarsk Strip Mine are measured in wide ranges of external measuring electric field frequencies, environmental temperatures, and humidities. The frequency, temperature, and concentration dispersions of the dielectric permittivity are revealed for the examined structures. An analysis of the results obtained demonstrates that a cluster layer of the polar aqueous matrix characterized by rigid fixing of water molecules is formed at the interphase boundaries of the examined system. It is demonstrated that this layer plays the role of the potential barrier that complicates transitions for both free water molecules and surface active dispersed coals oriented by the electric field. This layer can increase the electric strength of the examined disordered finely dispersed structures.

  8. On Polarization and Mobility: A look at polarization in the wage-career profile in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Ambra Poggi; Jacques Silber

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to combine the analysis of wage (income) polarization with that of wage (income) mobility. Using the polarization index PG recently proposed by Deutsch et al. (2007) it shows that, when taking the identity of the individuals into account (working with panel data), a distinction can be made between a change over time in polarization that is the consequence of "structural mobility" (change over time in the overall, between and within groups inequality) and a change in polari...

  9. Temporal changes in methane stable isotopes in polar ice cores: big picture and implications for ecosystem changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Seth, Barbara; Beck, Jonas; Fischer, Hubertus

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas after water vapour and carbon dioxide (CO2). Since the industrial revolution the mixing ratio of CH4 in the atmosphere rose to ~1800 ppb, a value never reached within the last 800 000 years. Nowadays, CH4 contributes ~20% to the total radiative forcing from all of the long-lived greenhouse gases. This CH4 increase can only be assessed in relation to natural methane changes in the past. Firn air and air enclosures in polar ice cores represent the only direct paleoatmospheric archive. The latter show that atmospheric CH4 concentrations changed in concert with northern hemisphere temperature during both glacial/interglacial transitions as well as rapid climate changes (Dansgaard-Oeschger events), however, the sources of the methane concentration changes are still a matter of debate. Stable isotopes of methane (δ13CH4 and δD(CH4)) may help to distinguish differences in the magnitude of source type emissions (e.g. Bock et al. 2010). However, recently we could show that it is difficult to interpret the atmospheric loading of methane by relative source mix changes alone (Möller et al. 2013). In fact it appears, that the carbon isotopic signature (δ13CH4) of e.g. tropical wetlands undergoes drastic shifts connected to climate, CO2, sea level or potentially other unknown processes. Here we present the big picture derived from the EDML (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica, Dronning Maud Land) and Vostok ice cores (Möller et al. 2013) and additional new dual isotope data from 4 ice cores from both poles that cover three interglacials: the Holocene, MIS 5 and MIS 11. The contribution sheds light on our current understanding of methane biogeochemistry and discusses open questions. References: Bock, M., J. Schmitt, L. Möller, R. Spahni, T. Blunier, H. Fischer (2010). 'Hydrogen Isotopes Preclude Marine Hydrate CH4 Emissions at the Onset of Dansgaard-Oeschger Events', Science, 328, 1686-1689 Möller, L., T

  10. Optical and Micro-Structural Characterization of MBE Grown Indium Gallium Nitride Polar Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    El Afandy, Rami

    2011-07-07

    Gallium nitride and related materials have ushered in scientific and technological breakthrough for lighting, mass data storage and high power electronic applications. These III-nitride materials have found their niche in blue light emitting diodes and blue laser diodes. Despite the current development, there are still technological problems that still impede the performance of such devices. Three-dimensional nanostructures are proposed to improve the electrical and thermal properties of III-nitride optical devices. This thesis consolidates the characterization results and unveils the unique physical properties of polar indium gallium nitride quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy technique. In this thesis, a theoretical overview of the physical, structural and optical properties of polar III-nitrides quantum dots will be presented. Particular emphasis will be given to properties that distinguish truncated-pyramidal III-nitride quantum dots from other III-V semiconductor based quantum dots. The optical properties of indium gallium nitride quantum dots are mainly dominated by large polarization fields, as well as quantum confinement effects. Hence, the experimental investigations for such quantum dots require performing bandgap calculations taking into account the internal strain fields, polarization fields and confinement effects. The experiments conducted in this investigation involved the transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction as well as photoluminescence spectroscopy. The analysis of the temperature dependence and excitation power dependence of the PL spectra sheds light on the carrier dynamics within the quantum dots, and its underlying wetting layer. A further analysis shows that indium gallium nitride quantum dots through three-dimensional confinements are able to prevent the electronic carriers from getting thermalized into defects which grants III-nitrides quantum dot based light emitting diodes superior thermally induced optical

  11. Polarization changes at Lyot depolarizer output for different types of input beams

    OpenAIRE

    Piquero Sanz, Gemma María; González de Sande, Juan Carlos; Teijeiro, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Lyot depolarizers are optical devices made of birefringent materials used for producing unpolarized beams from totally polarized incident light. The depolarization is produced for polychromatic input beams due to the different phase introduced by the Lyot depolarizer for each wavelength. The effect of this device on other types of incident fields is investigated. In particular two cases are analyzed: (i) monochromatic and nonuniformly polarized incident beams and (ii) incident light synthesiz...

  12. Design of Compact EBG Structure and effect on Circularly Polarized Triangular Patch with Stub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehalata Chokat,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of electromagnetic band gap (EBG structure using slot ring and its effect oncircularly polarized triangular patch antenna performance. The EBG structure has been designed on dielectricsubstrate εr=4.3 and thickness h=1.53mm. The EBG structure acts as resonator which attenuates the surfacewave propagation in a specific frequency range. A new single slot ring EBG structure is proposed whichexhibits surface wave attenuation better than 20 dB in the frequency range from 2.75 GHz to 3.2 GHz. Anantenna with center frequency of 2.8 GHz is designed with and without EBG. The peak gain and radiation efficiency of this antenna are mproved significantly when antenna is above EBG in comparison to ntenna without EBG. The simulated adiation patterns of the antenna xhibit reduction in backward adiation when antenna above EBG plane n comparison to radiation pattern without EBG. Keywords- ctromagnetic band gap (EBG, periodic structures, fractal geometry, platting through hole (PTH, microstrip antenna, and surface wave suppression.

  13. Quasistatic electric field structures and field-aligned currents in the polar cusp region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, K. S.; Moen, J. I.; Pedersen, A.

    2010-10-01

    Cluster data have been examined for quasi-stationary electric field structures and field-aligned currents (FACs) in the vicinity of the dayside cusp region. We have related the measurements to the Region 1/Region 2 (R1/R2) current system and the cusp current system. It has been theoretically proposed that the dayside R1 current may be located on open field lines, and experimental evidence has been shown for R1 currents partially on open field lines. We document that R1 currents may flow entirely on open field lines. The electric field structures are found to occur at plasma density gradients in the cusp. They are associated with strong FACs with current directions that are consistent with the cusp currents. This indicates that the electric field structures are closely coupled to the cusp current system. The electric equipotential structures linking the perpendicular electric fields seen at Cluster altitudes to field-aligned electric fields at lower altitudes fall into one of two categories: S shape or U shape. Both types are found at both the equatorward edge of the cusp ion dispersion and at the equatorward edge of injection events within the cusp. Previous studies in the nightside auroral region attributed the S-shaped potential structures to the boundary transition between the low-density polar cap and the high-density plasma sheet, concluding that the shape of the electric potential structure depends on whether the plasma populations on each side of the structure can support intense currents. This explanation is not applicable for the S-shaped structures observed in the dayside cusp region.

  14. Vectorial mapping of noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure of semiconducting FeSe surface with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiferromagnetic semiconductors gain increasing interest due to their possible application in spintronics. Using spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy operating in a vector field, we mapped the noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structure of a semiconducting hexagonal FeSe surface on the atomic scale. The surface possesses an in-plane compensated Néel structure which is further confirmed by first-principles calculations

  15. Vectorial mapping of noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure of semiconducting FeSe surface with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Xiaole [Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Xianfeng [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L., E-mail: clgao@sjtu.edu.cn; Jia, Jin-Feng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Luo, Weidong, E-mail: wdluo@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China)

    2016-02-08

    Antiferromagnetic semiconductors gain increasing interest due to their possible application in spintronics. Using spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy operating in a vector field, we mapped the noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structure of a semiconducting hexagonal FeSe surface on the atomic scale. The surface possesses an in-plane compensated Néel structure which is further confirmed by first-principles calculations.

  16. The local anesthetic tetracaine destabilizes membrane structure by interaction with polar headgroups of phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimooka, T; Shibata, A; Terada, H

    1992-03-01

    The effect of the local anesthetic tetracaine at less than 10 mM on the water permeability of the phospholipid membrane was examined using liposomes composed of various molar ratios of negatively charged cardiolipin to electrically neutral phosphatidylcholine by monitoring their osmotic shrinkage in hypertonic glucose solution at 30 degrees C. The concentration of tetracaine causing the maximum velocity of shrinkage of liposomes increased with increase in the molar ratio of cardiolipin. Tetracaine increased the zeta-potential of the negatively charged liposomal membrane toward the positive side due to the binding of its cationic form to the negatively charged polar headgroups in the membrane. The maximum velocity of water permeation induced by osmotic shock was observed at essentially the same tetracaine concentration giving a zeta-potential of the liposomal membrane of 0 mV. These concentrations were not affected by change in the sort of acyl-chain of phospholipids in the liposomes when their negative charges were the same. These results suggests that the membrane integrity is governed mainly by the electrical charge of phospholipid polar headgroups when phospholipid bilayers are in the highly fluid state, and that positively charged tetracaine molecules neutralize the negative surface charge, lowering the barrier for water permeation through phospholipid bilayers. PMID:1547263

  17. Transport of Spin-Polarized Electrons through an NEM-SET Structure with Ferromagnetic Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Jiang, K.

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the spin-polarized electron transport in a magnetic nanoelectromechanical single-electron-transistor (NEM-SET), with an oscillating quantum dot (QD) coupled to two ferromagnetic electrodes. The interplay between the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom is considered by using the quantum master equation method within Wigner phase-space. We present a concrete picture for the transition of the QD oscillations from the tunneling state to the shuttling one by analysis of the electron occupation, the effective potential and amplitude probability distribution. It is found that the development of dynamic shuttle instability is dependent on the relative orientation of two leads' magnetizations, which arises a pronounced spin valve effect. For an asymmetric NEM-SET structure, besides the spin valve effect, we unexpectedly find that the shuttle instability is additionally dependent on the the bias-voltage polarities, exhibiting a sizable current rectifica tion. The coexistence of two effects makes it possible to control the spin valve effect electrically or control the rectification magnetically.

  18. Spin structure of the proton from polarized inclusive deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Ballintijn, M K; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Bird, I G; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gaussiran, T; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gülmez, E; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Layda, T; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nagaitsev, A P; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Parks, D P; Penzo, Aldo L; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Pyrlik, J; Reyhancan, I; Rijllart, A; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Rosado, A; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schüler, K P; Segel, R E; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sever, F; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Teichert, K M; Tessarotto, F; Tlaczala, W; Trentalange, S; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Weinstein, R; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the spin-dependent structure function $g_1^{\\rm p}$ in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of polarized muons off polarized protons, in the kinematic range $0.003 < x < 0.7$ and $1\\gevtwo < Q^2 < 60\\gevtwo$. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis is used to evolve the measured $\\gpone(x,Q^2)$ to a fixed $Q^2_0$. The first moment of $\\gpone$ at $Q^2_0 = 10\\gevtwo$ is $\\gammap = 0.136\\pm 0.013 \\,(\\mbox{stat.}) \\pm 0.009\\,(\\mbox{syst.})\\pm 0.005\\ (\\mbox{evol.})$. This result is below the prediction of the Ellis--Jaffe sum rule by more than two standard deviations. The singlet axial charge $\\dsigt$ is found to be $0.28 \\pm 0.16$. In the Adler--Bardeen factorization scheme, $\\Delta g \\simeq 2$ is required to bring $\\Delta \\Sigma$ in agreement with the Quark-Parton Model. A combined analysis of all available proton and deuteron data confirms the Bjorken sum rule.

  19. Phytoplankton abundance and community structure in the Antarctic polar frontal region during austral summer of 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHRAMIK Patil; RAHUL Mohan; SUHAS Shetye; SAHINA Gazi

    2013-01-01

    The Antarctic polar front region in the Southern Ocean is known to be most productive.We studied the phytoplankton community structure in the Indian sector at this frontal location during late austral summer (February,2009) onboard R/V Akademic Boris Petrov.We used the phytoplankton and microheterotrophs abundance,as also the associated physico-chemical parameters to explain the low phytoplankton abundance in the study region.This study emphasizes the shift of phytoplankton,from large (>10 μm) to small (<10 μm) size.The phytoplankton abundance appears to be controlled by physical parameters and by nutrient concentrations and also by the microheterotrophs (ciliates and dinoflagellates) which exert a strong grazing pressure.This probably reduces small (<10 μm) and large (>10 μm)phytoplankton abundance during the late austral summer.This study highlights the highly productive polar front nevertheless becomes a region of low phytoplankton abundance,due to community shifts towards pico-phytoplankton (<10 μm) during late austral summer.

  20. Polarized electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of information on proton structure, its internal spin structure, has recently become available from a new type of experiment, polarized electroproduction. The scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons was measured by longitudinally polarized protons. The quantity measured was the asymmetry A, the normalized difference between the differential scattering cross sections for the antiparallel and parallel spin configurations. Data have been obtained for elastic, deep inelastic, and reasonance region scattering. Polarized electrons were obtained by the photoionization of polarized Li atomic beam with pulsed UV light. The important characteristics of the polarized electron beam are the intensity of 109 e-/1.5 μs pulse at repetition rate of 120 pps, and polarization of 0.85 +- 0.08. A number of data on deep inelastic scattering, preliminary asymmetry in the resonance region and others are described and illustrated in several graphs. There are several implications in these data; 1) test of Bjorken sum rule, 2) scaling, and 3) models of proton structure, which are mentioned hereinafter. The Bjorken sum rule predicts equality in the scaling limit between an integral over ω of the product of spin-averaged nucleon structure function W2 and spin dependent function A, and the ratio of axial vector to vector weak coupling constants of beta decay. Data on the asymmetries in deep inelastic and resonance region scattering will make possible the evaluation of a famous old problem -- the effect of proton polarizability on the hyperfine structure interval in hydrogen. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. Magnetic Structure and Dynamics of the Erupting Solar Polar Crown Prominence on 2012 March 12

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yingna; McCauley, Patrick I; Ji, Haisheng; Reeves, Katharine K; DeLuca, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation of the polar crown prominence that erupted on 2012 March 12. This prominence is observed at the southeast limb by SDO/AIA (end-on view) and displays a quasi vertical-thread structure. Bright U-shape/horn-like structure is observed surrounding the upper portion of the prominence at 171 angstrom before the eruption and becomes more prominent during the eruption. The disk view of STEREO-B shows that this long prominence is composed of a series of vertical threads and displays a half loop-like structure during the eruption. We focus on the magnetic support of the prominence vertical threads by studying the structure and dynamics of the prominence before and during the eruption using observations from SDO and STEREO-B. We also construct a series of magnetic field models (sheared arcade model, twisted flux rope model, and unstable model with hyperbolic flux tube (HFT)). Various observational characteristics appear to be in favor of the twisted flux rope model. We find that the flux rope ...

  2. Deuteron electromagnetic structure functions and polarization properties in soft-wall AdS/QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Schmidt, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We apply a soft-wall AdS/QCD approach to the description of deuteron structure functions and tensor polarized properties. Present work is a completion of our previous study on electromagnetic form factors. By the appropriate choice of two couplings in the effective action we are able to reproduce both the form factors and structure functions in full consistency with model-independent constraints set by perturbative QCD. Our framework is based on a five-dimensional action in AdS space formulated in terms of vector fields dual to the deuteron and the electromagnetic fields. The AdS fields depend on four Minkowski and one holographic coordinate $z$. The scale dependence of the form factors and structure functions is consistent with quark counting rules implying the $1/Q^{10}$ behavior of the charge form factor $G_C(Q^2)$, structure functions $A(Q^2)$ and $B(Q^2)$, and the $1/Q^{12}$ behavior of the magnetic $G_M(Q^2)$ and quadrupole $G_Q(Q^2)$ form factors.

  3. Structural polarization properties of vector Gaussian beam in the far field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Guo-Quan; Ni Yong-Zhou; Chu Xiu-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the vector angular spectrum representation of optical beam and the method of stationary phase, the analytical TE and TM terms of vector Gaussian beam have been presented in the far field. By using the local polarization matrix, the polarization properties of the TE and TM terms in the far field are investigated, and it is found that the degree of their polarization is only determined by the spatial location. When the source is completely polarized, the TE and TM terms are both completely polarized in the far field. When the source is completely unpolarized, the TE and TM terms in the far field are partially polarized. The whole beam is also partially polarized except on the propagating axis. Moreover, the degrees of polarization of TE and TM terms are both larger than that of the whole beam.

  4. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Cloud is one of the main processes in the climate system and especially a large feed back agent for Arctic warming amplification (Yoshimori et al., 2014). From this reason, observation of polar cloud has been emphasized and 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in 2013 as one of the basic infrastructure in the GRENE (Green Network of Excellence Program) Arctic Climate Change Research Project. The radar, "FALCON-A", is a FM-CW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar, developed for Arctic use by Chiba University (PI: T. Takano) in 2012, following its prototype, "FALCON-1" which was developed in 2006 (Takano et al., 2010). The specifications of the radar are, central frequency: 94.84 GHz; antenna power: 1 W; observation height: up to 15 km; range resolution: 48 m; beam width: 0.2 degree (15 m at 5 km); Doppler width: 3.2 m/s; time interval: 10 sec, and capable of archiving high sensitivity and high spatial and time resolution. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller parabolic antennas separated 1.4 m from each other used for transmitting and receiving the wave. Polarized Micro-Pulse Lidar (PMPL, Sigma Space MPL-4B-IDS), which is capable to measure the backscatter and depolarization ratio, has also been deployed to Ny-Ålesund in March 2012, and now operated to perform collocated measurements with FALCON-A. Simultaneous measurement data from collocated PMPL and FALCON-A are available for synergetic analyses of cloud microphysics. Cloud mycrophysics, such as effective radius of ice particles and ice water content, are obtained from the analysis based on algorithm, which is modified for ground-based measurements from Okamoto's retrieval algorithm for satellite based cloud profiling radar and lidar (CloudSat and CALIPSO; Okamoto et al., 2010). Results of two years will be shown in the presentation. Calibration is a point to derive radar reflectivity (dBZ) from original intensity data

  5. Probing b-quark charged-current chiral structure via polarized-Λb semileptonic decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Λb semileptonic decay to Λce anti νe ist studied within the heavy quark effective theory, where Λb is moving and polarized along the direction of its motion. Normalized energy distributions of e and Λc are both calculated for V±A interactions by taking the OMIKRON ( anti Λ/mc) ( anti Λ triple bond mΛc-mc) corrections and electron pt cut effects into account. It is shown that the form factor (Isgur-Wise function) effects are significant: The shapes of the distribution curves are thereby considerably changed in comparison with those calculated within the quark model. In case of the electron energy spectrums, the difference between the V±A interactions are enhanced, while that in the Λc energy spectrums decreases. On the other hand, the OMIKRON ( anti Λ/mc) corrections are found to be negligible in both spectrums. (orig.)

  6. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  7. Dynamical correlation effects on structure factor of spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a theoretical study on static density structure factor S(q) of a spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas over a wide range of electron number density rs. The electron correlations are treated within the dynamical version of the self-consistent mean-field theory of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander, the so-called qSTLS approach. The calculated S(q) exhibits almost perfect agreement with the quantum Monte Carlo simulation data at rs=1. However, the extent of agreement somewhat diminishes with increasing rs, particularly for q around 2kF. Seen in conjunction with the success of qSTLS theory in dealing with correlations in the unpolarized phase, our study suggests that the otherwise celebrated qSTLS theory is not that good in treating the like-spin correlations

  8. Polarity determination of epitaxial structures of CdTe on GaAs by channeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S. (CSIRO Div. of Applied Physics, Lucas Heights Research Labs., Menai, NSW (Australia)); Kwietniak, M.S.; Pain, G.N. (Telecom Australia Research Labs., Clayton, Victoria (Australia)); Rossouw, C.J. (CSIRO Div. of Materials Science and Tech., Clayton, Victoria (Australia))

    1990-01-01

    RBS spectra analysis near the (111) planar channeling direction is used for polarity determination of MOCVD-grown epitaxial layers of (111) and (100) CdTe on sapphire and GaAs substrates. Extensive multiple twinning limits the application of RBS channeling analysis for polarity determination. Comparison is made with polarity determination by X-ray diffraction and two electron diffraction techniques. (orig.).

  9. Twist phase-induced polarization changes in electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Korotkova, O.

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam with twist phase (i.e., twisted EGSM beam) is introduced as an extension of its scalar version based on the unified theory of coherence and polarization. We show how analytical paraxial propagation formulae of isotropic and anisotropic EGSM beams passing through a general astigmatic ABCD optical system can be modified in the presence of the twist phase. Numerical examples demonstrate that the twist phase affects the spectral density, the state of coherence, and the degree of polarization of EGSM beams on propagation.

  10. Electric-field-induced structural changes in water confined between two graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Fernández, Mario; Peeters, F. M.; Neek-Amal, M.

    2016-07-01

    An external electric field changes the physical properties of polar liquids due to the reorientation of their permanent dipoles. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we predict that an in-plane electric field applied parallel to the channel polarizes water molecules which are confined between two graphene layers, resulting in distinct ferroelectricity and electrical hysteresis. We found that electric fields alter the in-plane order of the hydrogen bonds: Reversing the electric field does not restore the system to the nonpolar initial state, instead a residual dipole moment remains in the system. The square-rhombic structure of 2D ice is transformed into two rhombic-rhombic structures. Our study provides insights into the ferroelectric state of water when confined in nanochannels and shows how this can be tuned by an electric field.

  11. Self-sustained spin-polarized current oscillations in multiquantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo, Ramon [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada y Ciencias de la Computacion, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Carretero, Manuel; Bonilla, Luis L [G. Millan Institute, Fluid Dynamics, Nanoscience and Industrial Mathematics, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Platero, Gloria [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, 28049 Cantoblanco (Spain)], E-mail: escobedo@unican.es, E-mail: manuel.carretero@uc3m.es, E-mail: bonilla@ing.uc3m.es, E-mail: gplatero@icmm.csic.es

    2009-01-15

    Nonlinear transport through diluted magnetic semiconductor nanostructures is investigated. We have considered a II-VI multiquantum well nanostructure whose wells are selectively doped with Mn. The response to a dc voltage bias may be either a stationary or an oscillatory current. We have studied the transition from stationary to time-dependent current as a function of the doping density and the number of quantum wells. Analysis and numerical solution of a nonlinear spin transport model shows that the current in a structure without magnetic impurities is stationary, whereas current oscillations may appear if at least one well contains magnetic impurities. For long structures having two wells with magnetic impurities, a detailed analysis of nucleation of charge dipole domains shows that self-sustained current oscillations are caused by repeated triggering of dipole domains at the magnetic wells and motion towards the collector. Depending on the location of the magnetic wells and the voltage, dipole domains may be triggered at both wells or at only one. In the latter case, the well closer to the collector may inhibit domain motion between the first and the second well inside the structure. Our study could allow design of oscillatory spin-polarized current injectors.

  12. Magneto-crystalline cluster structure of the lithium-titanium ferrite studied by polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic structure of the Li-Ti-Zn ferrite when is annealed and slowly cooled down exhibits presence of magnetic clusters which arise due to the thermal diffusion of the Li, Fe and Ti ions. The same materials annealed over 1300 K and cooled down fast no clusters. The polycrystalline sample of chemical formula Li0.673Zn00.3Mn0.05Ti0.695Fe1.282O4 was studied by the polarized neutron diffraction and low-angle scattering method. The cation distributions are determined for the sample with and without cluster structure. The mean clusters diameter and their magnetic moment are evaluated as D=(6.6±0.1) nm and Mc=(880±120) BM, respectively. Basing on the neutron diffraction reflections (220) and (400) the magnetization process is studied for both samples. Analysis of the cluster structure magnetization was carried out using a modified Langevin function containing the magnetic intercluster interaction. The value of the cluster magnetic moment determined in this way by the fitting procedure is equal Mc=(800±10) BM. author. 8 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  13. SOCIAL POLARIZATION AND CONFLICT: A NETWORK APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cárdenas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, polarization is associated with a higher probability of social conflict. This paper, in a microeconomic model based on the theory of social networks, analyses how changes in the network's structure affect the level of some basic parameters associated with the concept of polarization. This study shows that under upward monotonic preferences, longer sets of affiliations for each individual reduce polarization, whereas under downward monotonic preferences, longer sets of the so-called bad affiliations increase polarization. Finally, in the case of a non-monotonic system of preferences, an expansion of the affiliations set will alter the resulting polarization order in different ways depending on the preferences themselves

  14. Images of Polar Bears and Penguins, Storms, Deforestation and More - Middle School Students Perceptions of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, S.; Melaas, E. K.; Malmrose, M.; Mullokandov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global change studies aim to foster a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of global change on planet Earth. The study of global change presents a rich domain of inquiry, exploration, and discovery at all grade levels. The main objective of this exploratory study was to assess middle school students' perceptions of global change as part of their participation in the NSF GK12 program called GLACIER (Global Change Initiative - Education and Research) during the academic year 2012-13. The middle schools are located in the Metro Boston area. As part of the program, participating students were asked to draw pictures of their perceptions and ideas on global change. The drawings of 150 children, ages 11 to 13, were qualitatively analyzed. The analysis focused on (a) the type of concepts children chose to convey, (b) the specific context of the global change described (polar bears in floating glaciers), (c) students direct representation of anthropocentric impacts (such as pollution or deforestation), and (d) the match between students concepts and the recent IPCC reports. About 20% of the students focused on the iconic imagery of the melting glaciers and impact on animals such as penguins and polar bears, more than 25% focused on natural disasters (such as storms, sea level changes) while 30% focused on urban problems. These concepts are matched with the recent IPCC report. These results are notable and suggest students in middle schools understand the varied dimensions of global change and the role of human activities in bringing about change. Students' perspectives may help in developing a suitable curriculum using existing science standards to discuss this significant topic in middle school classrooms. In addition, students' drawings illustrate their perception of the coupled human and natural systems.

  15. Azimuthal Structure of the Sand Erg that Encircles the North Polar Water-Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, L. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Eke, V. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.; Pathare, A.

    2011-12-01

    The sand erg that completely encircles the perennial water-ice cap that covers the Martian north geographic pole displays considerable azimuthal structure as seen in visible and near-IR images. Much of this structure is associated with the terminations of the many steep troughs that cut spiral the approximately 3 km thick polar ice cap. Other contributions come from the katabatic winds that spill over steep-sided edges of the cap, such as what bounds the largest set of dunes that comprise Olympia Undae. During the spring and summer months when these winds initiate from the higher altitudes that contain sublimating CO2 ice, which is very cold and dry, heat adiabatically when they compress as they lose altitude. These winds should then remove H2O moisture from the uppermost layer of the sand dunes that are directly in their path. Two likely locations where this desiccation may occur preferentially is at the termination of Chasma Boreale and the ice cap at Olympia Undae. We will search for this effect by sharpening the spatial structure of the epithermal neutron counting rates measured at northern high latitudes using the Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer (MONS). The epithermal range of neutron energies is nearly uniquely sensitive to the hydrogen content of surface soils, which should likely be in the form of H2O/OH molecules/radicals. We therefore convert epithermal counting rates in terms of Water-Equivalent-Hydrogen, WEH. However, MONS counting-rate data have a FWHM of ~550 km., which is sufficiently broad to prevent a close association of WEH variability with images of geological features. In this study, we reduce spurious features in the instrument smeared neutron counting rates through deconvolution. We choose the PIXON numerical deconvolution technique for this purpose. This technique uses a statistical approach (Pina 2001, Eke 2001), which is capable of removing spurious features in the data in the presence of noise. We have previously carried out a detailed

  16. Electronic structures and the spin polarization of Heusler alloy Co2FeAl surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Yankai; Zhang, Delin; Jiang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structures of the Heusler alloy Co2FeAl surface are studied theoretically via first-principles calculations. The space localization of the surface states is the key effect on the electronic structures of the Co2FeAl surface. At the surface, the lattice parameter shrinks to minimize the total energy, and the minority spin gap disappears and shows a metallic band gap character. However, with the depth increasing, the lattice parameter equals to that of bulk phase, and there shows an energy gap opening at the Fermi level in the minority spin states. As a result, the spin polarization at the surface is lower than that of the bulk Co2FeAl, while it is close to that of bulk phase beneath the surface. According to the calculations, it is clear that the half-metallic property fading of the Co2FeAl films is caused by the surface states. Therefore, it is important to minimize the lattice mismatch at the interface of Co2FeAl in order to obtain a high tunneling magnetoresistance.

  17. Joint effect of polarization and the propagation path of a light beam on its intrinsic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Abdulkareem, Sarkew

    2016-01-01

    The well-known effects of the spin-orbit interaction of light are manifestations of pair mutual influence of the three types of the angular momentum of light, namely, the spin angular momentum, the extrinsic orbital angular momentum and the intrinsic orbital angular momentum. Here we propose the convenient classification of the effects of the spin-orbit interaction of light and we observe one of the new effects in the frame of this classification, which is determined by the joint influence of two types of the angular momentum on the third type of the angular momentum, namely, the influence of the spin angular momentum and the extrinsic orbital angular momentum on the intrinsic orbital angular momentum. We experimentally studied the propagation of circularly polarized light through an optical fiber coiled into a helix. We have found that the spin angular momentum and the helix parameters affect the spatial structure of the radiation transmitted through the optical fiber. We found out that the structure of the ...

  18. Ruthenium nanoparticles in ionic liquids: structural and stability effects of polar solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Gorka; Podgoršek, Ajda; Campbell, Paul S; Santini, Catherine C; Pádua, Agílio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno; Turmine, Mireille

    2011-08-14

    Ionic liquids are a stabilizing medium for the in situ synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles. Herein we show that the addition of molecular polar solutes to the ionic liquid, even in low concentrations, eliminates the role of the ionic liquid 3D structure in controlling the size of ruthenium nanoparticles, and can induce their aggregation. We have performed the synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles by decomposition of [Ru(COD)(COT)] in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C(1)C(4)Im][NTf(2)], under H(2) in the presence of varying amounts of water or 1-octylamine. For water added during the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles, a decrease of the solubility in the ionic liquid was observed, showed by nanoparticles located at the interface between aqueous and ionic phases. When 1-octylamine is present during the synthesis, stable nanoparticles of a constant size are obtained. When 1-octylamine is added after the synthesis, aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles is observed. In order to explain these phenomena, we have explored the molecular interactions between the different species using (13)C-NMR and DOSY (Diffusional Order Spectroscopy) experiments, mixing calorimetry, surface tension measurements and molecular simulations. We conclude that the behaviour of the ruthenium nanoparticles in [C(1)C(4)Im][NTf(2)] in the presence of 1-octylamine depends on the interaction between the ligand and the nanoparticles in terms of the energetics but also of the structural arrangement of the amine at the nanoparticle's surface. PMID:21603700

  19. Valley-dependent band structure and valley polarization in periodically modulated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei-Tao

    2016-08-01

    The valley-dependent energy band and transport property of graphene under a periodic magnetic-strained field are studied, where the time-reversal symmetry is broken and the valley degeneracy is lifted. The considered superlattice is composed of two different barriers, providing more degrees of freedom for engineering the electronic structure. The electrons near the K and K' valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices. It is found that the energy bands for both valleys are symmetric with respect to ky=-(AM+ξ AS) /4 under the symmetric superlattices. More finite-energy Dirac points, more prominent collimation behavior, and new crossing points are found for K' valley. The degenerate miniband near the K valley splits into two subminibands and produces a new band gap under the asymmetric superlattices. The velocity for the K' valley is greatly renormalized compared with the K valley, and so we can achieve a finite velocity for the K valley while the velocity for the K' valley is zero. Especially, the miniband and band gap could be manipulated independently, leading to an increase of the conductance. The characteristics of the band structure are reflected in the transmission spectra. The Dirac points and the crossing points appear as pronounced peaks in transmission. A remarkable valley polarization is obtained which is robust to the disorder and can be controlled by the strain, the period, and the voltage.

  20. Inversion of single-station teleseismic P-wave polarization-data for the velocity structure of Beijing area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Futian; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Pavlis, G. L., Booker, J. R., Progressive multiple event location (PMEL), Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 1983, 73: 1753.[2]Dziewonski, A. M., Anderson, D. L., Travel times and station corrections for P-waves at teleseismic distances, J. Geophys. Res., 1983, 88: 3295.[3]Hu Ge, Menke, W., Formal inversion of laterally heterogeneous velocity structure from P-wave polarization data, Geophys. J. Int., 1992. 110: 63.[4]Menke, W., Lerner-Lam, A., Transition from linear to complex polarization in short period compressional waves, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 1991, 81: 611.[5]Hu Ge, Menke, W., Rognvaldsson, S., A demonstration of the joint use of p-wave polarization and travel-time data in tomographic inversion: crustal velocity structure near the south Iceland Lowland network, Geophys. Res. Letters, 1993, 20(13): 1407.[6]Teng, J., Yao, H., Chou, H., Crustal structure in the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan-Zhangjiakou region, Acta Geophysica Sinica(in Chinese), 1979, 22(3): 218.[7]Shao, X., Zhang, J., Chen, X. et al., The results of deep sounding by using converted waves of earthquakes in the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan region, Seismology and Geology(in Chinese), 1980: 2(2): 12.[8]Wei, M., Shi, Z., Yin, X. et al., The basic configuration of crustal structure in North China region and its relation to the earthquakes from gravimetric date, Seismology and Geology(in Chinese), 1980, 2(2): 55.[9]Jin Anshu, Liu Futian, Sun Yongzhi, Three-dimensional P velocity structure of the crust and upper Mantle under Beijing region, Acta Geophysica Sinica(in Chinese), 1980, 23(2): 172.[10]Vidale, J.E., Complex polarization analysis of particle motion, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 1986, 76: 1393.[11]Jurkevics, A., Polarization analysis of three-component array data, Bull, Seismol. Soc. Am., 1988, 78: 1725.[12]Park, J., Vernon, F. L., Lindberg, C.R., Frequency dependent polarization analysis of high-frequency seismograms, J. Geophys. Res., 1987, 92: 12664.[13

  1. Relative Energy Dissipation: Sensitive to Structural Changes of Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祖方遒; 郭丽君; 朱震刚; 凤仪

    2002-01-01

    Energy dissipation techniques, widely used in solid physics previously, are proven to be sensitive also to changes in liquid structure. It has been suggested from relative energy dissipation that changes in liquid structure can occur as a function of temperature in some ordinary binary systems such as Pb-Sn, In-Sn and In-Bi. This finding may be helpful to understand liquid structure changing patterns, therefore enriching the phenomenology of liquid state physics. This is significant for engineering practices.

  2. Structural changes in the lengthened rabbit muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Pap, Károly; Berki, Sándor; Shisha, Tamás; Kiss, Sándor; Szőke, György

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in muscle tissue after limb lengthening in skeletally mature and immature rabbits and assessed the most vulnerable level of striated muscle. Twenty-three male domestic white rabbits, divided into six groups, were operated on and different lengthening protocols were used in the mature and immature rabbits. The histopathological changes were analysed by a semi-quantitative method according to the scoring system of Lee et al. (Acta Orthop Scand 64(6)...

  3. The Concept of Disease: Structure and Change

    OpenAIRE

    Thagard, P.

    1996-01-01

    By contrasting Hippocratic and nineteenth century theories of disease, this paper describes important conceptual changes that have taken place in the history of medicine. Disease concepts are presented as causal networks that represent the relations among the symptoms, causes, and treatment of a disease. The transition to the germ theory of disease produced dramatic conceptual changes as the result of a radically new view of disease causation. An analogy between disease and fermentation was i...

  4. Horizontal Structure of Dynamical Instability at Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Top Revealed in Polarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; Diner, D. J.; Matheou, G.; Teixeira, J.; Qu, Z.; Emde, C.

    2014-12-01

    Marine stratocumulus (Sc) layers cover vast regions and, due to their high opacities, they play a major role in the Earth's solar radiation budget. They also have remarkably flat upper boundaries due to strong gradients in relative humidity at the top of the boundary layer (BL). However, those very gradients are unstable at scales as small as meters depending on fluctuations of temperature and liquid water content, hence radiative cooling in the thermal IR. The ensuing turbulent mixing of moist and dry air at cloud top due to such small-scale dynamical processes is not benign. It controls the structure of the entire marine BL, hence the Sc life-cycle, hence large-scale subsidence, hence global circulation and, ultimately, climate. This physical connection across many orders of magnitude in scale makes the prognosis and microphysical parameterization of marine Sc particularly challenging for climate modelers. It also makes these clouds high-value targets for remote sensing, both space-based and airborne. Airborne sensors can easily achieve the resolution required to image cloud-top instabilities but natural sunlight is so highly scattered that the finest spatial features are all but erased by the "radiative smoothing" process. However, we will show that JPL's Airborne Multi-angle Spectro-Polarimetric Imager (AirMSPI), which flies on NASA's ER-2 aircraft at 20 km altitude, reveals in near-backscattered polarized light the previously unseen horizontal structure of the marine Sc cloud top physics and dynamics at 10 m resolution across a 10 km swath. It appears as a complex network of meandering filaments. Large-Eddy Simulation modeling of these oceanic clouds with bin microphysics and state-of-the-art polarized 3D radiative transfer have been harnessed to model AirMSPI observations of the first three Stokes vector components in the relevant observational geometry for a 2.5x2.5 km^2 region. Synthetic imagery obtained at JPL's High-Performance Computing facility shows

  5. Polarized Structure Function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for $p({\\vec e},e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nasseripour, R; Ambrozewicz, P; Carman, D S; Amaryan, M J; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Casey, L; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Credé, V; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Manak, J J; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rubin, P D; Sabati, F; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Sayre, D; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabyan, Yu G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2008-01-01

    The first measurements of the polarized structure function $\\sigma_{LT'}$ for the reaction $p(\\vec e,e'K^+)\\Lambda$ in the nucleon resonance region are reported. Measurements are included from threshold up to $W$=2.05 GeV for central values of $Q^2$ of 0.65 and 1.00 GeV$^2$, and nearly the entire kaon center-of-mass angular range. $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is the imaginary part of the longitudinal-transverse response and is expected to be sensitive to interferences between competing intermediate s-channel resonances, as well as resonant and non-resonant processes. The results for $\\sigma_{LT'}$ are comparable in magnitude to previously reported results from CLAS for $\\sigma_{LT}$, the real part of the same response. An intriguing sign change in $\\sigma_{LT'}$ is observed in the high $Q^2$ data at $W\\approx 1.9$ GeV. Comparisons to several existing model predictions are shown.

  6. Carrier-envelope-phase effects and V-like structure in nonsequential double ionization by elliptical polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingbin; Yu, Benhai; Tang, Qingbin; Hua, Duanyang; Tong, Aihong; Jiang, Chenghuan; Shen, Naifeng; Li, Yongchao; Ge, Guixian; Wan, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    The nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of atom is revisited by elliptically polarized few-cycle laser pulse with the classical ensemble method. We focus on the events that both electrons emit into the same direction along the long and short axis of the laser polarization plane, and how do the correlated electron momentum spectra of these two events depends on the carrier-envelope-phase (CEP). We first exhibit that the double-ionization probability has a negligible dependence on CEP. Back analysis shows that the ionization dynamics of the second electron are strongly depend on the CEP, which is significantly responsible for the CEP-dependent correlated electron momentum spectra. Besides, the correlated electron momentum spectrum along the long axis of the laser polarization plane reproduces the so-called V-like structure (also called the figurelike structure) observed in experiments [A. Staudte, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 263002 (2007); A. Rudenko, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 263003 (2007)]. We sort the V-like shape into two regions and find that the different regions exhibit significantly different dynamics behaviors. Simultaneously, we demonstrate that the electron pairs emitted into the same direction along the short axis of the laser polarization plane is a result of the nuclear-electron attraction, and both the nuclear-electron attraction and e-e repulsion significantly contribute to the V-like structure.

  7. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khosrawi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations. The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000–2014 from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Although in the polar regions no significant trend is found in the lower stratosphere, we found from the observations a correlation between cold winters and enhanced water vapour mixing ratios.

  8. The Effect of Changes in Polar Sea Ice on Emissions of Marine Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, P.; Gabric, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud radiative effects remain a major weakness in our understanding of the climate system and consequently in developing accurate climate projections. This is mainly true for Arctic low-level clouds in their key role of regulating surface energy fluxes which affect the freezing and melting of sea ice. The radiative properties of clouds are strongly dependent on the number concentration of airborne water-soluble particles, known as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In the Arctic, the aerosol-cloud-radiation relationship is more complex than elsewhere and the clouds constitute a warming factor for climate, rather than cooling, most of the year. This is due to the semi-permanent ice cover, which raises the albedo of the surface, and the clean Arctic air, which decreases the albedo of the clouds. There has been much discussion on the relative magnitude of the biogenic source of polar CCN: Primary organic marine aerosols and/or sulfate-containing aerosols, derived from marine emissions. Regional field measurements and pan- (Ant)Arctic model simulations don't necessarily agree. Arctic CCN are formed primarily by aggregates of marine organic material and may grow in mass by condensation. Southern Ocean aerosols may be dominated by sulfate particles and organic particles at lower and higher Antarctic latitudes, respectively. The interaction of polar marine microorganisms, seasonality, sea ice cover, presence or absence of sea spray, and atmospheric heterogeneous processes combine to control natural aerosol concentrations and mass, thus modulating the sensitivity of cloud properties, including their reflectivity and the resulting regional radiation budget. We discuss Arctic and Antarctic field and satellite observations and establish a strong and fundamental link between the biology at the ocean/sea ice interface, clouds and climate over polar regions.

  9. Versatile film formation and phase transfer of gold nanoparticles by changing the polarity of the media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalawade, Pradnya; Mukherjee, Tulsi [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kapoor, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhirk@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2012-10-15

    A simple method to prepare gold particles of different sizes and polydispersities is presented. The diameter of the gold particles ranges from 5 to 50 nm. All systems were prepared in either ethylene glycol or mixtures of ethylene glycol:water without adding any external reducing agent in the presence of sodium docecyl sulfate as a stabilzer and afterward transferred into chloroform or accumulated at interface in the form of film. The absence of water in ethylene glycol is a prerequisite for successful 3-dimensional self-assembly film at the interface. The free standing film was very stable and could be easily transferred on solid support. The probability of the film formation at the interface decreased with the increase in the content of water in the mixture. It was observed that as the polarity of the media increases after a certain extent, Au particles neither get transferred nor accumulated at interface and remained in the form of emulsion. However, addition of NaOH leads to the transfer process. In some cases, the phase transfer has a yield of about 100%. After drying, the particles can be re-dispersed in different nonpolar solvents. The dispersed particles were stable for at least 45 days. Characterization of the particles before and after transfer was performed by using UV/Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transfer depends on the polarity of the media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transfer can be induced by NaOH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film formation at the interface decreases as the polarity of the media increases.

  10. Versatile film formation and phase transfer of gold nanoparticles by changing the polarity of the media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method to prepare gold particles of different sizes and polydispersities is presented. The diameter of the gold particles ranges from 5 to 50 nm. All systems were prepared in either ethylene glycol or mixtures of ethylene glycol:water without adding any external reducing agent in the presence of sodium docecyl sulfate as a stabilzer and afterward transferred into chloroform or accumulated at interface in the form of film. The absence of water in ethylene glycol is a prerequisite for successful 3-dimensional self-assembly film at the interface. The free standing film was very stable and could be easily transferred on solid support. The probability of the film formation at the interface decreased with the increase in the content of water in the mixture. It was observed that as the polarity of the media increases after a certain extent, Au particles neither get transferred nor accumulated at interface and remained in the form of emulsion. However, addition of NaOH leads to the transfer process. In some cases, the phase transfer has a yield of about 100%. After drying, the particles can be re-dispersed in different nonpolar solvents. The dispersed particles were stable for at least 45 days. Characterization of the particles before and after transfer was performed by using UV/Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Highlights: ► Phase transfer depends on the polarity of the media. ► Phase transfer can be induced by NaOH. ► Film formation at the interface decreases as the polarity of the media increases.

  11. Glycomimetics Targeting Glycosyltransferases: Synthetic, Computational and Structural Studies of Less-Polar Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardello, Mattia; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Lacetera, Alessandra; Delso, Ignacio; Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; Tejero, Tomás; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Merino, Pedro

    2016-05-17

    The Leloir donors are nucleotide sugars essential for a variety of glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in the transfer of a carbohydrate to an acceptor substrate, typically a protein or an oligosaccharide. A series of less-polar nucleotide sugar analogues derived from uridine have been prepared by replacing one phosphate unit with an alkyl chain. The methodology is based on the radical hydrophosphonylation of alkenes, which allows coupling of allyl glycosyl compounds with a phosphate unit suitable for conjugation to uridine. Two of these compounds, the GalNAc and galactose derivatives, were further tested on a model GT, such as GalNAc-T2 (an important GT widely distributed in human tissues), to probe that both compounds bound in the medium-high micromolar range. The crystal structure of GalNAc-T2 with the galactose derivative traps the enzyme in an inactive form; this suggests that compounds only containing the β-phosphate could be efficient ligands for the enzyme. Computational studies with GalNAc-T2 corroborate these findings and provide further insights into the mechanism of the catalytic cycle of this family of enzymes. PMID:27071848

  12. Polarization dependent soft x-ray spectro-microscopy of local spin structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Maccallum; Agostino, Christopher; Im, Mi-Young; Montoya, Sergio; Fullerton, Eric; Fischer, Peter

    Quantitative information about element-specific contributions to local magnetic spin and orbital moments is readily available by XMCD spectroscopy and images of magnetic domain patterns with a few tens of nanometer spatial resolution. We show that the x-ray spectroscopic analysis of x-ray microscopy images provides quantitative information about local spin structures. We have investigated two prototypical multilayered PMA film systems prepared by sputtering, specifically (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm)x30 and (Fe 0.7nm/Gd 0.4nm)x100 systems. A spectroscopic sequence of full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy (MTXM) images covering about 8mm field-of-views with a spatial resolution of about 20nm were recorded across the Co and Fe L edges, resp. To modulate the magnetic contrast, two sets of images were obtained with left and right circular polarization. Standard XMCD spectroscopy analysis procedures were applied to retrieve the local spectroscopic behavior. We observe a decrease of the L3/L2 ratio when approaching the domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration along the vertical profile of a domain, which we will discuss in view of both systems' magnetic anisotropies. U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231.

  13. Epitaxy of polar semiconductor Co3O4 (110): Growth, structure, and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (110) plane of Co3O4 spinel exhibits significantly higher rates of carbon monoxide conversion due to the presence of active Co3+ species at the surface. However, experimental studies of Co3O4 (110) surfaces and interfaces have been limited by the difficulties in growing high-quality films. We report thin (10–250 Å) Co3O4 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the polar (110) direction on MgAl2O4 substrates. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy measurements attest to the high quality of the as-grown films. Furthermore, we investigate the electronic structure of this material by core level and valence band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and first-principles density functional theory calculations. Ellipsometry reveals a direct band gap of 0.75 eV and other interband transitions at higher energies. A valence band offset of 3.2 eV is measured for the Co3O4/MgAl2O4 heterostructure. Magnetic measurements show the signature of antiferromagnetic ordering at 49 K. FTIR ellipsometry finds three infrared-active phonons between 300 and 700 cm−1.

  14. Geological connectivity drives microbial community structure and connectivity in polar, terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Belinda C; Bissett, Andrew; Snape, Ian; van Dorst, Josie; Palmer, Anne S; Ji, Mukan; Siciliano, Steven D; Stark, Jonathon S; Winsley, Tristrom; Brown, Mark V

    2016-06-01

    Landscape heterogeneity impacts community assembly in animals and plants, but it is not clear if this ecological concept extends to microbes. To examine this question, we chose to investigate polar soil environments from the Antarctic and Arctic, where microbes often form the major component of biomass. We examined soil environments that ranged in connectivity from relatively well-connected slopes to patchy, fragmented landforms that comprised isolated frost boils. We found landscape connectedness to have a significant correlation with microbial community structure and connectivity, as measured by co-occurrence networks. Soils from within fragmented landforms appeared to exhibit less local environmental heterogeneity, harboured more similar communities, but fewer biological associations than connected landforms. This effect was observed at both poles, despite the geographical distances and ecological differences between them. We suggest that microbial communities inhabiting well-connected landscape elements respond consistently to regional-scale gradients in biotic and edaphic factors. Conversely, the repeated freeze thaw cycles that characterize fragmented landscapes create barriers within the landscape and act to homogenize the soil environment within individual frost boils and consequently the microbial communities. We propose that lower microbial connectivity in the fragmented landforms is a function of smaller patch size and continual disturbances following soil mixing. PMID:26310523

  15. Tracheal instillation of urban PM2.5 suspension promotes acute cardiac polarization changes in rats

    OpenAIRE

    L.F. Maatz; G.J.A. Wood; D.H.R.F. Rivero; Saldiva, P H N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which PM2.5 increases cardiovascular mortality are not fully identified. Autonomic alterations are the current main hypotheses. Our objective was to determine if PM2.5 induces acute cardiac polarization alterations in healthy Wistar rats. PM2.5 samples were collected on polycarbonate filters. Solutions containing 10, 20, and 50 µg PM2.5 were administered by tracheal instillation. P wave duration decreased significantly at 20 µg (0.99 ± 0.06, 0.95 ± 0.06, and 0.96 &...

  16. The analysis of space-time structure in QCD vacuum II: Dynamics of polarization and absolute X-distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We propose a method to compute the polarization for a multi-dimensional random distribution. → We apply the method to the eigenemodes of the Dirac operator in pure glue QCD. → We compute the chiral polarization for these modes and study its scale dependence. → We find that in a finite volume there is a scale where the polarization tendency changes. → We study the continuum limit of this chiral polarization scale. - Abstract: We propose a framework for quantitative evaluation of dynamical tendency for polarization in an arbitrary random variable that can be decomposed into a pair of orthogonal subspaces. The method uses measures based on comparisons of given dynamics to its counterpart with statistically independent components. The formalism of previously considered X-distributions is used to express the aforementioned comparisons, in effect putting the former approach on solid footing. Our analysis leads to the definition of a suitable correlation coefficient with clear statistical meaning. We apply the method to the dynamics induced by pure-glue lattice QCD in local left-right components of overlap Dirac eigenmodes. It is found that, in finite physical volume, there exists a non-zero physical scale in the spectrum of eigenvalues such that eigenmodes at smaller (fixed) eigenvalues exhibit convex X-distribution (positive correlation), while at larger eigenvalues the distribution is concave (negative correlation). This chiral polarization scale thus separates a regime where dynamics enhances chirality relative to statistical independence from a regime where it suppresses it, and gives an objective definition to the notion of 'low' and 'high' Dirac eigenmode. We propose to investigate whether the polarization scale remains non-zero in the infinite volume limit, in which case it would represent a new kind of low energy scale in QCD.

  17. Structures of chiral smectic-C mesophases revealed by polarization-analyzed resonant x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report polarization-analyzed, resonant x-ray diffraction at the sulfur K edge performed upon free-standing liquid-crystal films. Our studies of the thiobenzoate liquid-crystal enantiomer 10OTBBB1M7 yield the polarization states of resonant satellite peaks arising from characteristic superlattices in the chiral smectic-C (SmC*) variant phases, including the antiferroelectric SmCA*, ferrielectric SmCFI1* and SmCFI2*, as well as SmCα*. The observed polarizations agree with the clock model of chiral smectic-C variants, and rule out other proposals made to date for these structures. Data from the 10OTBBB1M7 racemate also support the clock model. Our resonant diffraction results from a thiophene liquid-crystal compound reveal the same superlattice periodicities seen in corresponding antiferroelectric and ferrielectric phases of 10OTBBB1M7. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  18. Towards a process-based understanding of Holocene polar climate change. Using glacier-fed lake sediments from Arctic Svalbard and Antarctic South Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Bilt, Willem van der

    2016-01-01

    Earth`s polar regions are undergoing dramatic changes due to ongoing climate change as demonstrated by increasing temperatures, collapsing ice shelves, Arctic sea ice loss and rapid glacier retreat. Driving an accelerating rise in global sea level, this amplified regional response may have devastating global socio-economic consequences in the foreseeable future. Yet the causes and range of polar climate variability remain poorly understood as observational records are short and fragmentary, w...

  19. Family Structure, Intergenerational Mobility, and the Reproduction of Poverty: Evidence for Increasing Polarization?

    OpenAIRE

    Musick, Kelly; Mare, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    A substantial body of research demonstrates links between poverty and family structure from one generation to the next, but leaves open key questions about the implications of these associations for aggregate-level change. To what extent does intergenerational inheritance affect trends in poverty and single parenthood over time? This paper examines how patterns of intergenerational inheritance play out in the population over the long run, using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys and ...

  20. Population and Employment Densities: Structure and Change

    OpenAIRE

    Small, Kenneth A.; Song, Shunfeng

    1994-01-01

    We examine spatial patterns and their changes during the 1970s for the Los Angeles region, by estimating monocentric and polycentric density functions for employment and population. Downtown Los Angeles is clearly identified as the statistical monocentric center of the region, and it is the most consistently strong center in the polycentric patterns. Polycentric models fit statistically better than monocentric models, and there was some shift in employment distribution toward a more polycentr...

  1. Impact of climate change on building structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš

    Bari : EDIPUGLIA, 2010 - (Lefebre, R.; Sabbioni, C.), s. 139-153 ISBN 978-88-7228-601-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2067 Grant ostatní: evropská komise(XE) 6th FP EC CHEF -044251 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : climate change impact * weathering * vulnerability of buildings Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  2. STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN THE TOURIST INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Galdini, Rossana

    2005-01-01

    The paper analyzes the role and the significance of tourism, as one particular set of industries that are of great significance in contemporary western societies, namely consumer services and especially tourist- related services. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of tourism on host communities, the changing role of tourism in the European economy, the relationship between tourism and environment, and its place in urban regeneration. Tourism is one of the most significant social force...

  3. Leading Change: Faculty Development through Structured Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Painter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are relentless calls for innovation in higher education programs in response to media and policy-makers attention to such concerns as instructional quality, relevance to employment, costs, and time-to-degree. At the same time, the individual course remains the primary unit of instruction and there is little evidence of faculty development strategies to assist with changing core instructional practices. We faced that dilemma when we led an innovative doctoral program in educational leadership. Soon after beginning, we implemented a regular meeting of all faculty members teaching and advising in the program to address upcoming events and review student progress. Our retrospective analysis indicates that these meetings evolved as a practical and sustainable framework for faculty development in support of deep change for instructional practices. Here we describe the challenge of faculty development for change and draw lessons learned from our four years of leadership centered on experiential learning and community sense-making. We hope that program leaders who aspire to promote faculty development in conjunction with graduate program implementation will find these lessons useful.

  4. Structural changes in bunched crystalline ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the spatial distribution of bunched crystalline ion beams in the radio frequency quadrupole storage ring PALLAS are presented for different ratios of the longitudinal and the transverse confinement strengths. The length of highly elongated crystalline ion bunches and its dependence on the bunching voltage is compared to predictions for a one-dimensional ion string and three-dimensional space-charge-dominated beams. The length is found to be considerably shorter than that predicted by the models. Furthermore, the scaling of the length with the bunching voltage is shown to differ from the expected inverse cube root scaling. These differences can partially be attributed to the formation of a mixed crystalline structure. Additionally, a concise mapping of the structural transition from a string to a zig-zag configuration as a function of the ratio of the confinement strengths is presented, which in a similar way deviates from the predictions

  5. Structural changes in bunched crystalline ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bussmann, M; Schätz, T; Habs, D

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the spatial distribution of bunched crystalline ion beams in the radio frequency quadrupole storage ring PALLAS are presented for different ratios of the longitudinal and the transverse confinement strengths. The length of highly elongated crystalline ion bunches and its dependence on the bunching voltage is compared to predictions for a one-dimensional ion string and three-dimensional space-charge-dominated beams. The length is found to be considerably shorter than that predicted by the models. Furthermore, the scaling of the length with the bunching voltage is shown to differ from the expected inverse cube root scaling. These differences can partially be attributed to the formation of a mixed crystalline structure. Additionally, a concise mapping of the structural transition from a string to a zig-zag configuration as a function of the ratio of the confinement strengths is presented, which in a similar way deviates from the predictions.

  6. The vast polar structure of the Milky Way attains new members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlowski, Marcel S. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: marcel.pawlowski@case.edu [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen-und Kernphysik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-07-20

    The satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) align with and preferentially orbit in a vast polar structure (VPOS), which also contains globular clusters (GCs) and stellar and gaseous streams. Similar alignments have been discovered around several other host galaxies. We test whether recently discovered objects in the MW halo, the satellite galaxy/GC transition object named PSO J174.0675-10.8774 or Crater and three stellar streams, are part of the VPOS. Crater is situated close to the VPOS. Incorporating the new object in the VPOS-plane fit slightly improves the alignment of the plane with other features such as the Magellanic stream and the average orbital plane of the satellites co-orbiting in the VPOS. We predict Crater's proper motion by assuming that it, too, orbits in the VPOS. One of the three streams aligns well with the VPOS. Surprisingly, it appears to lie in the exact same orbital plane as the Palomar 5 stream and shares its distance, suggesting a direct connection between the two. The stream also crosses close to the Fornax dwarf galaxy and is oriented approximately along the galaxy's direction of motion. The two other streams cannot align closely with the VPOS because they were discovered in the direction of M31/M33, which is outside of the satellite structure. The VPOS thus attains two new members. This further emphasizes that the highly anisotropic and correlated distribution of satellite objects requires an explanation beyond the suggestion that the MW satellite system is an extreme statistical outlier of a ΛCDM sub-halo system.

  7. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  8. Learning Structural Changes of Gaussian Graphical Models in Controlled Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bai

    2012-01-01

    Graphical models are widely used in scienti fic and engineering research to represent conditional independence structures between random variables. In many controlled experiments, environmental changes or external stimuli can often alter the conditional dependence between the random variables, and potentially produce significant structural changes in the corresponding graphical models. Therefore, it is of great importance to be able to detect such structural changes from data, so as to gain novel insights into where and how the structural changes take place and help the system adapt to the new environment. Here we report an effective learning strategy to extract structural changes in Gaussian graphical model using l1-regularization based convex optimization. We discuss the properties of the problem formulation and introduce an efficient implementation by the block coordinate descent algorithm. We demonstrate the principle of the approach on a numerical simulation experiment, and we then apply the algorithm to...

  9. Polarized Raman study on the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films on different substrates prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Interestingly, the Raman spectra of BiFeO3 films exhibit distinct polarization dependences. The symmetries of the fundamental Raman modes in 50-700 cm-1 were identified based on group theory. The symmetries of the high order Raman modes in 900-1500 cm-1 of BiFeO3 are determined for the first time, which can provide strong clarifications to the symmetry of the fundamental peaks in 400-700 cm-1 in return. Moreover, the lattice structures of BiFeO3 films are identified consequently on the basis of Raman spectroscopy. BiFeO3 films on SrRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate, CaRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate and tin-doped indium oxide substrate are found to be in the rhombohedral structure, while BiFeO3 film on SrRuO3 coated Nb: SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate is in the monoclinic structure. Our results suggest that polarized Raman spectroscopy would be a feasible tool to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films.

  10. Comparative analysis of the structure of sterically stabilized ferrofluids on polar carriers by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, M V; Aksenov, V L; Balasoiu, M; Garamus, V M; Schreyer, A; Török, Gy; Rosta, L; Bica, D; Vékás, L

    2006-03-01

    Results of experiments on small-angle neutron scattering from ferrofluids on polar carriers (pentanol, water, methyl-ethyl-ketone), with double-layer sterical stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles, are reported. Several types of spatial structural organization are observed. The structure of highly stable pentanol-based samples is similar to that of stable ferrofluids based on organic non-polar carriers (e.g., benzene) with mono-layer covered magnetic nanoparticles. At the same time, the effect of the interparticle interaction on the scattering is stronger in polar ferrofluids because of the structural difference in the surfactant shell. The structure of the studied methyl-ethyl-ketone- and water-based ferrofluids essentially different from the previous case. The formation of large (>100 nm in size) elongated or fractal aggregates, respectively, is detected even in the absence of external magnetic field, which corresponds to weaker stability of these types of ferrofluids. The structure of the fractal aggregates in water-based ferrofluids does not depend on the particle concentration, but it is sensitive to temperature. A temperature increase results in a decrease in their fractal dimension reflecting destruction of the aggregates. In addition, in water-based ferrofluids these aggregates consist of small (radius approximately 10 nm) and temperature-stable primary aggregates. PMID:16102775

  11. The Evolving Risk of Climate Change and National Security: People not Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titley, D.

    2014-12-01

    This talk will provide a general overview of climate change and discuss why this is a national security issue. Climate change is about people, about water, and about change itself. Understanding the rate of climate change, relative to the abilities of both humans and ecosystems to adapt is critical. I will briefly describe the multiple, independent lines of evidence that the climate is changing, and that the primary cause of this change is a change in atmospheric composition caused by the burning of fossil fuels. I will cover the history of climate change as seen within the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Navy, how this challenge is being addressed from budgetary, policy, and political angles, and what are the greatest challenges to national security that arise from climate change and in particular, the associated changes in the Arctic. I will conclude with an assessment of future challenges and opportunities regarding climate change, from science, policy, and political perspectives, and why we know enough to take significant action now, even if we don't know every detail about the future. In addition, this talk will address how to effectively talk about climate change through the use of analogies, plain, non-jargon English, and even a little humor.

  12. 偏光片知识讲座第四讲偏光片的结构和制造%A Course of Polarizer Knowledge Part Four The Structure and Manufacture of Polarizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志新

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarize the polarizer knowledge in detailed, include about of the invention and application of polarizer, the basic of polarization optics, the principle of polarizing devices, the structure and manufacture of polarizer, the properties and examination of polarizer, and the technology development and market state of polarizer. It have a common direct sense for new recruits in polarizer industry and a refer value for polarizer research workers.%全文详细综述偏光片的发明和应用、偏振光学基础、偏振元件原理、偏光片的结构、制造、性能、检测、实验、技术发展、产业现状、市场前景等系列知识,文章对于从事偏光片生产和应用工作的新成员具有入门指导意义,对于偏光片研究者也具有一定的参考价值。

  13. Systemically induced changes in skeletal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of systemic designs leading the radiographically detectable bone and joint changes is legion. Some disorders (notably the arthridites), while qualifying as diseases with protean systemic manifestations are discussed elsewhere in this book. Other disorders (e.g., achondroplasia), while not representing diseases per se, are included in this chapter for the sake of completeness and due to their relative frequency and their interesting radiographic characteristics. The author focuses on a number of selected conditions, some commonly seen and some relatively infrequently encountered. They are classified into he following categories: endocrinologic; metabolic; hematologic and reticuloendothelial; and dysplastic

  14. Polarization structure of 12 gamma-ray quasars at 5 and 15 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetukhnovskaya, Yu. N.; Gabuzda, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The results of dual-frequency polarization observations of 12 gamma-ray quasars are presented (as a continuation of a study of six blazars carried out earlier). The observations were obtained with the American Very Long Baseline Array. The distributions of intensity and polarization were obtained at 5 and 15 GHz. The degrees of polarization in the cores and jets of the 18 gamma-ray quasars do not stand out from those of other quasars. The brightness temperatures of the core components do not strongly exceed 1012 K.

  15. Globalisation, Structural Change and Labour Productivity Growth in BRICS Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Mallick, Jagannath

    2015-01-01

    Globalisation, has intensified the demand preference for quality labour, that embodies more knowledge and competency/skill to maximise the production in one hand, and it has also changed the life style and consumption behavior of the society on the other. As a consequence, this has led to significant changes in the composition and structure of the economy, and also, the reallocation of labour. The study examines the reallocation effect (or structural change) and the direct effect of globaliza...

  16. Changes in graphite porous structure under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor graphite porous structure is investigated using methods of mercury porosimetry, X-ray low-angle scattering and X-ray analysis. Change of porous structure under the effect of neutron fluence up to 1.3x1022 neutr/cm2 at the temperature of 360-1100 K is described. It is shown that long-term neutron irradiation causes irreversible changes in reactor graphite porous structure at its different levels

  17. Hierarchical super-structure identified by polarized light microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoindentation: Implications for the limits of biological control over the growth mode of abalone sea shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Andreas S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollusc shells are commonly investigated using high-resolution imaging techniques based on cryo-fixation. Less detailed information is available regarding the light-optical properties. Sea shells of Haliotis pulcherina were embedded for polishing in defined orientations in order to investigate the interface between prismatic calcite and nacreous aragonite by standard materialographic methods. A polished thin section of the interface was prepared with a defined thickness of 60 μm for quantitative birefringence analysis using polarized light and LC-PolScope microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images were obtained for comparison. In order to study structural-mechanical relationships, nanoindentation experiments were performed. Results Incident light microscopy revealed a super-structure in semi-transparent regions of the polished cross-section under a defined angle. This super-structure is not visible in transmitted birefringence analysis due to the blurred polarization of small nacre platelets and numerous organic interfaces. The relative orientation and homogeneity of calcite prisms was directly identified, some of them with their optical axes exactly normal to the imaging plane. Co-oriented "prism colonies" were identified by polarized light analyses. The nacreous super-structure was also visualized by secondary electron imaging under defined angles. The domains of the super-structure were interpreted to consist of crystallographically aligned platelet stacks. Nanoindentation experiments showed that mechanical properties changed with the same periodicity as the domain size. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that insights into the growth mechanisms of nacre can be obtained by conventional light-optical methods. For example, we observed super-structures formed by co-oriented nacre platelets as previously identified using X-ray Photo-electron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM [Gilbert et al., Journal of the

  18. Polar layered deposits on Mars: Inner structure and relation to the climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, M.; Head, J.

    Martian polar layered deposits (PLD) have long been thought to contain a record of the past climate. Roles of deposition, ablation and flow in PLD are a subject of discussion and controversy. Understanding of these roles is critical for reading the climate record. We show that simple mechanism including latitude-dependent deposition and ablation, albedo feedback and role of slopes explains many essential features of the PLD. We consider the present-day PLD is a result of a history of H2O ice deposition and sublimation during some recent period of the geological history. The deposition - ablation balance is a function of latitude. Typically, net deposition occurs in the polar area inside some boundary latitude of zero balance, and net ablation occurs outside. This dividing latitude shifts back and forth due to climate change caused by (1) the change of the spin/orbit parameters ("astronomical forcing"), (2) availability of the water vapor source at lower latitudes (tropical mountain glaciers, high-latitude icy mantles, the opposite polar cap, groundwater discharge events), (3) internal climate instabilities. The outermost position of the ablation/deposition boundary was well outside the present margins of the PLD; in the opposite extremes, the area of the positive balance disappeared, and the whole polar cap underwent ablation. Through time such oscillations produced a dome-shaped stack of deposits with a possible thin layer of deposits outside the dome and with a number of unconformities inside. These unconformities will have an east-west oriented strike and a very shallow dip. There is a positive feedback between the deposition/ablation balance and albedo: high albedo favors deposition, and fresh deposits have high albedo. With this feedback, when the climate system goes through oscillations, the boundary latitude between positive and negative balance will stay for some periods of time at its outermost and innermost positions. This will result in steps in the

  19. A Structural Equation Model of Conceptual Change in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Sinatra, Gale M.

    2011-01-01

    A model of conceptual change in physics was tested on introductory-level, college physics students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among variables linked to conceptual change in physics including an approach goal orientation, need for cognition, motivation, and course grade. Conceptual change in physics…

  20. Radiation change of structural isotropic graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of three kinds of isotropic graphite properties by different density and grain size were irradiated to the neutron fluence (1.7 - 2.8) x 1026 m-2 (E > 0.18 MeV) at 360 - 400 Deg C at the BOR-60 reactor. Changing sizes, specific electric resistance, temperature coefficient of linear expansion, Young modulus were investigated following irradiation. It is established that the increase of density in the 1.67 - 1.76 g/cm3 range causes growth of maximum rate and deep of the volume shrinkage of the isotropic fine graphite. Equation approximating temperature dependence of the critical neutron fluence in the 380 - 780 Deg C range is suggested for the investigated graphite samples

  1. Lunar true polar wander inferred from polar hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, M A; Miller, R S; Keane, J T; Laneuville, M; Paige, D A; Matsuyama, I; Lawrence, D J; Crotts, A; Poston, M J

    2016-03-24

    The earliest dynamic and thermal history of the Moon is not well understood. The hydrogen content of deposits near the lunar poles may yield insight into this history, because these deposits (which are probably composed of water ice) survive only if they remain in permanent shadow. If the orientation of the Moon has changed, then the locations of the shadowed regions will also have changed. The polar hydrogen deposits have been mapped by orbiting neutron spectrometers, and their observed spatial distribution does not match the expected distribution of water ice inferred from present-day lunar temperatures. This finding is in contrast to the distribution of volatiles observed in similar thermal environments at Mercury's poles. Here we show that polar hydrogen preserves evidence that the spin axis of the Moon has shifted: the hydrogen deposits are antipodal and displaced equally from each pole along opposite longitudes. From the direction and magnitude of the inferred reorientation, and from analysis of the moments of inertia of the Moon, we hypothesize that this change in the spin axis, known as true polar wander, was caused by a low-density thermal anomaly beneath the Procellarum region. Radiogenic heating within this region resulted in the bulk of lunar mare volcanism and altered the density structure of the Moon, changing its moments of inertia. This resulted in true polar wander consistent with the observed remnant polar hydrogen. This thermal anomaly still exists and, in part, controls the current orientation of the Moon. The Procellarum region was most geologically active early in lunar history, which implies that polar wander initiated billions of years ago and that a large portion of the measured polar hydrogen is ancient, recording early delivery of water to the inner Solar System. Our hypothesis provides an explanation for the antipodal distribution of lunar polar hydrogen, and connects polar volatiles to the geologic and geophysical evolution of the Moon

  2. Changing the mindset[Lightweight composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, M.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in the use of composite technology are some of the more closely watched in the industry. In the industry all agree that to go deeper systems must get lighter, one way being examined is the replacement of heavy steel systems with lightweight composite structures.Composites offer high strength-to-weight ratio, fatigue, and corrosion-resistance, design flexibility, thermal insulation and stiffness over steel systems. Although generally more expensive on a direct component to component comparison, results in overall lower system cost, especially in the deepwater. Conoco-Phillips are one of the industry's leading advocates of composite technology advancement and this article reports on the discussions the author had with a senior research fellow of the company. Details of the research that has been carried out and how far these developments have reached are covered here.

  3. Structure Change of the Insulating Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Mentlik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern power electric drives brought advantages in induction motor control. In the same time appeared problems with high frequency square waveform voltage (pulse stress produced by the voltage converters. Voltage converters produce repetitive pulses with high level of voltage rise fronts (slew rates. Rise fronts attained values of up to tens kilovolts per microsecond and voltage pulse repetition frequency up to some tens of kilohertz. This technology is an advantage for a drive control. Significant is the impact of these voltage waveforms on the motor insulations. Degradation of the main wall insulation can reduce the reliability of the electric motor and whole drive. In this paper is discussed one possible solution. The promising modification in the insulation material structure is presented in the paper.

  4. Changes of methane and nitrous oxide in the atmosphere: New constraints from stable isotope analyses in polar firn and ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Methane and nitrous oxide are two greenhouse gases playing a major role in atmospheric chemistry; methane largely affects the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere whereas nitrous oxide participates in many atmospherical chemical reactions in the stratosphere. A sharp increase in the mixing ratios of both gases has been observed since the beginning of the pre-industrial era, implying an increase of anthropogenic sources. Although these gases are important in global climate changes, their budget remains poorly known. The evolution of their isotopic composition in the atmosphere brings additional constraints as it represents the final signature of their budgets and reflects changes in the relative contribution of sources and sinks. We have measured isotopic composition of methane and nitrous oxide coming from polar firn air and enclosed in ice core bubbles. This is leading to mid term evolution of these gases (the last 200 years). A continuous flow technique is used at the Laboratory of Glaciology and Geophysics of Environment in Grenoble, France, to measure δ13CH4, whereas a similar technique is used at Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, In Heidelberg, Germany, to measure δ15N2O, 1δ15N2O, 2δ15N2O and δN218O. Samples from both Antarctica (Berkner Island) and Greenland (North GRIP) were used. We will present these results and their tentative interpretation based on a diffusion model of gas isotopes in polar firn. (author)

  5. Changes of methane and nitrous oxide in the atmosphere: New constraints from stable isotope analyses in polar firn and ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Methane and nitrous oxide are two greenhouse gases playing a major role in atmospheric chemistry; methane largely affects the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere whereas nitrous oxide participates in many atmospherical chemical reactions in the stratosphere. A sharp increase in the mixing ratios of both gases has been observed since the beginning of the preindustrial era, implying an increase of anthropogenic sources. Although these gases are important in global climate changes, their budget remains poorly known. The evolution of their isotopic composition in the atmosphere brings additional constraints as it represents the final signature of their budgets and reflects changes in the relative contribution of sources and sinks. We have measured isotopic composition of methane and nitrous oxide coming from polar firn air and enclosed in ice core bubbles. This is leading to mid term evolution of these gases (the last 200 years). A continuous flow technique is used at the Laboratory of Glaciology and Geophysics of Environment in Grenoble, France, to measure d13CH4, whereas a similar technique is used at Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, In Heidelberg, Germany, to measure d15N2O, 1d15N2O, 2d15N2O and dN218O. Samples from both Antarctica (Berkner Island) and Greenland (North GRIP) were used. We will present these results and their tentative interpretation based on a diffusion model of gas isotopes in polar firn. (author)

  6. Polarization structure of six gamma-ray quasars at 5 and 15 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetukhnovskaya, Yu. N.; Gabuzda, D. C.; Yakimov, V. E.

    2011-05-01

    The results of 5 and 15 GHz polarization observations of the six blazars 1222+216, 1406-076, 1606+106, 1611+343, 17415-038, and 2022-077 obtained on the American Very Long Baseline Array are presented. The degrees of polarization in the cores and jets of these six gamma-ray quasars do not differ from those for other blazars.

  7. Global change effects on the long-term feeding ecology and contaminant exposures of East Greenland polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Melissa A; Iverson, Sara J; Fisk, Aaron T; Sonne, Christian; Rigét, Frank F; Letcher, Robert J; Arts, Michael T; Born, Erik W; Rosing-Asvid, Aqqalu; Dietz, Rune

    2013-08-01

    Rapid climate changes are occurring in the Arctic, with substantial repercussions for arctic ecosystems. It is challenging to assess ecosystem changes in remote polar environments, but one successful approach has entailed monitoring the diets of upper trophic level consumers. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) and fatty acid carbon isotope (δ(13) C-FA) patterns were used to assess diets of East Greenland (EG) polar bears (Ursus maritimus) (n = 310) over the past three decades. QFASA-generated diet estimates indicated that, on average, EG bears mainly consumed arctic ringed seals (47.5 ± 2.1%), migratory subarctic harp (30.6 ± 1.5%) and hooded (16.7 ± 1.3%) seals and rarely, if ever, consumed bearded seals, narwhals or walruses. Ringed seal consumption declined by 14%/decade over 28 years (90.1 ± 2.5% in 1984 to 33.9 ± 11.1% in 2011). Hooded seal consumption increased by 9.5%/decade (0.0 ± 0.0% in 1984 to 25.9 ± 9.1% in 2011). This increase may include harp seal, since hooded and harp seal FA signatures were not as well differentiated relative to other prey species. Declining δ(13) C-FA ratios supported shifts from more nearshore/benthic/ice-associated prey to more offshore/pelagic/open-water-associated prey, consistent with diet estimates. Increased hooded seal and decreased ringed seal consumption occurred during years when the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) was lower. Thus, periods with warmer temperatures and less sea ice were associated with more subarctic and less arctic seal species consumption. These changes in the relative abundance, accessibility, or distribution of arctic and subarctic marine mammals may have health consequences for EG polar bears. For example, the diet change resulted in consistently slower temporal declines in adipose levels of legacy persistent organic pollutants, as the subarctic seals have higher contaminant burdens than arctic seals. Overall, considerable changes are occurring in the EG

  8. Interfacial-strain-induced structural and polarization evolutions in epitaxial multiferroic BiFeO3 (001) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haizhong; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Jin, Kui-Juan; Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Yang, Zhenzhong; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Le; He, Xu; Gu, Junxing; Wan, Qian; Wang, Can; Lu, Huibin; Ge, Chen; He, Meng; Yang, Guozhen

    2015-02-01

    Varying the film thickness is a precise route to tune the interfacial strain to manipulate the properties of the multiferroic materials. Here, to explore the effects of the interfacial strain on the properties of the multiferroic BiFeO3 films, we investigated thickness-dependent structural and polarization evolutions of the BiFeO3 films. The epitaxial growth with an atomic stacking sequence of BiO/TiO2 at the interface was confirmed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Combining X-ray diffraction experiments and first-principles calculations, a thickness-dependent structural evolution was observed from a fully strained tetragonality to a partially relaxed one without any structural phase transition or rotated twins. The tetragonality (c/a) of the BiFeO3 films increases as the film thickness decreases, while the polarization is in contrast with this trend, and the size effect including the depolarization field plays a crucial role in this contradiction in thinner films. These findings offer an alternative strategy to manipulate structural and polarization properties by tuning the interfacial strain in epitaxial multiferroic thin films. PMID:25580936

  9. Political attitudes in adolescence and emerging adulthood: Developmental changes in mean level, polarization, rank-order stability, and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekker, Roderik; Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim

    2015-06-01

    This three-wave cohort-sequential longitudinal study (N = 1302) examined the development of two core political attitudes, economic egalitarianism and ethnocentrism, among Dutch youths between age 12 and 31. Longitudinal regression analyses revealed a curvilinear mean level development for both attitudes, reflecting an increased disagreement with economic redistribution and multiculturalism around late adolescence. Furthermore, attitudes became decreasingly polarized (i.e., less extreme) and increasingly stable with age. Finally, several effects of attitudes' correlates gradually changed: The effect of educational level on ethnocentrism increased with age, whereas the effect of gender diminished. Regional effects on ethnocentrism developed as youths resided in a new area. No age-related change was found in the effect of parental SES. Overall, these findings support the idea that attitudes mature during the formative phase of adolescence and that this process slows down during emerging adulthood. Furthermore, these results support developmental explanations for the association between attitudes and their correlates. PMID:25880889

  10. Study on Land Use Structure Changes and Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyou; LIU; Chunling; PU; Airong; ZHU; Zhiqiang; WANG

    2013-01-01

    Land structure change not only relates to the coordinated development of regional social economic,but also determines the ecological environment security in certain region. Ili river valley was chose as the study area. The scientific and quantitative assessment of land use struc- ture and spatial pattern is significant to the sustainable development of the Ili river valley area. Based on the detailed investigation date of land use from 2002 to 2008,and social and economic statistics of the Ili river valley in eight counties and one city in 2008,the study area’s land use structure changes were discussed in three aspects from the land use structure,the degree of land use,to the land use efficiency. The changes of land use structure were analyzed by the use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Factors that influence land use structure changes were analyzed. In the end,suggestions were put forward to optimize the management.

  11. Upgrade and Design of Coastal Structures Exposed to Climate Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Quvang Harck

    This thesis "Upgrade and Design of Coastal Structures Exposed to Climate Changes" evaluates the performance of existing types of structures when exposed to climate changes. This includes also the potential of using cost‐sharing multipurpose structures for protection against the effects of future...... climate changes. The thesis consists of three parts. The first part evaluates the performance of existing design formulae for estimation of wave actions on structures, especially in shallow water since these structures are most vulnerable to the rising sea water levels caused by climate changes. Existing......‐Rayleigh distributed wave heights. Additionally, an extension of existing formulae for estimation of wave overtopping flow parameters on sea dikes is performed to include the effects of oblique and short‐crested waves. The general outcome of the first part of the thesis are tools for design of selected types of...

  12. The Management of Resistance to Change and Polarity in Educational Organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, A. M. C.; Westhuizen, Philip C. van der

    Research has shown that organizations differ on the basis of their willingness to change and the strategies they use to manage change. For this paper, data were gathered through a review of the literature and through nonstandard interviews with persons in two identified organizations who handle grievance procedures. The analysis identifies the…

  13. Probing the magnetic field structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, Roman; Johnson, Michael D; Doeleman, Sheperd S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic-field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A$^\\ast$ (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically-arrested disks (MAD). We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford-...

  14. EXPLORING MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE IN STAR-FORMING CORES WITH POLARIZATION OF THERMAL DUST EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The configuration and evolution of the magnetic field in star-forming cores are investigated in order to directly compare simulations and observations. We prepare four different initial clouds having different magnetic field strengths and rotation rates, in which magnetic field lines are aligned/misaligned with the rotation axis. First, we calculate the evolution of such clouds from the prestellar stage until long after protostar formation. Then, we calculate the polarization of thermal dust emission expected from the simulation data. We create polarization maps with arbitrary viewing angles and compare them with observations. Using this procedure, we confirmed that the polarization distribution projected on the celestial plane strongly depends on the viewing angle of the cloud. Thus, by comparing the observations with the polarization map predicted by the simulations, we can roughly determine the angle between the direction of the global magnetic field and the line of sight. The configuration of the polarization vectors also depends on the viewing angle. We find that an hourglass configuration of magnetic field lines is not always realized in a collapsing cloud when the global magnetic field is misaligned with the cloud rotation axis. Depending on the viewing angle, an S-shaped configuration of the magnetic field (or the polarization vectors) appears early in the protostellar accretion phase. This indicates that not only the magnetic field but also the cloud rotation affects the dynamical evolution of such a cloud. In addition, by comparing the simulated polarization with actual observations, we can estimate properties of the host cloud such as the evolutionary stage, magnetic field strength, and rotation rate.

  15. Effect of structure of polar head of phospholipids on their fragmentation during γ-irradiation of model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of phospholipids with different structures of the polar head (phosphatidyl propandiol, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol, and cardiolipin) to sustain radiation-induced fragmentation was studied. It was shown by thin-layer chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy that all test lipids entering the composition of model membranes subjected to γ-irradiation suffered fragmentation yielding phosphatidic acid. The radiation-chemical yield of phosphatidic acid increased in this phospholipid series on passing from phosphatidyl propanediol to cardiolipin

  16. In a more polarized era more and more citizens are structuring their beliefs along ideological lines, just as politicians do

    OpenAIRE

    Jewitt, Caitlin E.; Goren, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    While politics in the US has long been split along the left-right, liberal-conservative spectrum, most academics have assumed that these divisions had historically not percolated through to how most Americans see themselves. In new research which draws on election data, Caitlin E. Jewitt and Paul N. Goren find that people are now more able to structure their beliefs along the left-right dimension than they were in 1980. As debates between political elites have become more polar...

  17. Site susceptibility tensors and magnetic structure of U3Al2Si3: a polarized neutron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear and magnetic structures of U3Al2Si3 have been investigated by means of polarized and unpolarized neutron diffraction for single crystals. Measurements were made in the temperature range from 7 to 250 K and in external magnetic fields up to 6 T parallel to [100], [1-bar10] and [001]. Above the magnetic ordering temperature (TC=36 K) the crystals have the fully ordered U3Ga2Ge3 structure (space group I4/m). Below 35 K both polarized and unpolarized neutron measurements show that the magnetic moments on the U3 atoms, which occupy general positions in the space group, order in the ab-plane in a non-collinear arrangement with a net ferromagnetic component. The moments of the U1 and U2 atoms are found to be small. A polarized neutron study of the magnetization induced by applied fields above TC shows marked anisotropy and makes it likely that it is this strong local anisotropy of the U3 ions which leads to the non-collinearity of the magnetic structure. (author)

  18. Investigation of the electronic structure of CuPc on Cu(100) interfaces using ARUPS with polarized light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiessner, Michael; Haeming, Marc; Forster, Frank; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik II, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Nanoanalytik, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The understanding of the electronic structure at metal-organic interfaces is crucial for electronic devices since it determines the charge transport through metal-organic contacts. Particularly if chemical interaction occurs, as it is the case between most aromatic organic molecules and metals, the hybridization of molecule and metal wave functions effects both the energy position and the symmetry of the involved orbitals. Consequently, the dipole matrix element, i.e. the intensity of a photoemission signal, will be influenced. This phenomenon can thus be utilized as a sensitive probe for the interfacial interaction and the character of the involved molecular and metal states. We report on an investigation of the adsorption of ultra-thin Cu-phthalocyanine films on Cu(100) surfaces by means of angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with polarized light. By using a monochromatized HeI{sub {alpha}} source with a high degree of polarization and with variable polarization direction we observe polarization-dependent intensities for signals from the substrate, from the adsorbate molecules, and from interface states which are generated due to the chemisorption. The evaluation of these variations in intensity shows that the applied method is a usefull tool for understanding the interaction mechanisms.

  19. Impact of the structural changes on the nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation author deals with impact of the structural changes (privatization of the Slovenske Elektrarne, a.s.) and new Atomic law (541/2004 Coll. Laws) on the nuclear safety in the Slovak Republic.

  20. Individual effects of seasonal changes, visitor density, and concurrent bear behavior on stereotypical behaviors in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Krista R; Harrison, Michelle L; Size, Daniele D; MacDonald, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    Stereotypical behaviors in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) can be detrimental to their welfare. These behaviors can be reduced through enrichment programs but are often not completely eliminated, so identifying potential triggers is important. The present study investigated the influences of seasonal changes, visitor density, and concurrent bear activity on stereotypical behaviors exhibited by 3 captive polar bears at the Toronto Zoo. All bears exhibited these behaviors; however, individual differences were found in duration and form. The male exhibited less stereotypical behavior during spring, and the females exhibited less stereotypical behavior during winter. An increase in visitor density was associated with more stereotypical behavior in 1 female but less stereotypical behavior in the other 2 bears. All bears engaged in more stereotypical behaviors when the other bears were inactive, and 1 female engaged in more stereotypical behaviors when the other bears were out of sight. Further, when conspecifics were active, all bears engaged in less stereotypical behaviors. Given the variability among individual bears, future enrichment programs must be tailored to the needs of individuals to maximize efficacy. PMID:24933263

  1. Interrogation of orbital structure by elliptically polarized intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation and present investigations of the imprint of the orbital angular node in photoelectron momentum distributions of an aligned atomic p-type orbital following ionization by an intense elliptically polarized laser pulse of femtosecond...... duration. We investigate the role of light ellipticity and the alignment angle of the major polarization axis of the external field relative to the probed orbital by studying radial and angular momentum distributions, the latter at a fixed narrow interval of final momenta close to the peak of the...... photoelectron momentum distribution. In general only the angular distributions carry a clear signature of the orbital symmetry. Our study shows that circular polarization gives the most clear imprints of orbital nodes. These findings are insensitive to pulse duration....

  2. Resonance-inclined optical nuclear spin polarization of liquids in diamond structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qiong; Jelezko, Fedor; Retzker, Alex; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of molecules in a solution at room temperature has potential to revolutionize nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The prevalent methods for achieving DNP in solutions are typically most effective in the regime of small interaction correlation times between the electron and nuclear spins, limiting the size of accessible molecules. To solve this limitation, we design a mechanism for DNP in the liquid phase that is applicable for large interaction correlation times. Importantly, while this mechanism makes use of a resonance condition similar to solid-state DNP, the polarization transfer is robust to a relatively large detuning from the resonance due to molecular motion. We combine this scheme with optically polarized nitrogen vacancy (NV) center spins in nanodiamonds to design a setup that employs optical pumping and is therefore not limited by room temperature electron thermal polarisation. We illustrate numerically the effectiveness of the model in a flow cel...

  3. Detection of changes in the structure of a system according to changes of its flicker noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of computer simulations of a chaotic motion of elementary particles in the systems with chaotic or ordered structure are presented. The conclusion about the possibility to use the flicker noise of a system for the qualitative estimation of its inner structure and changes in the structure is made

  4. The Polar Stratosphere in a Changing Climate (POLSTRACC): Mission overview and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Rapp, Markus; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Engel, Andreas; Bönisch, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The POLSTRACC mission aims at providing new scientific knowledge on the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere under the present load of halogens and state of climate variables. POLSTRACC employs the German High Altitude and LOng Range Research Aircraft (HALO) and is the only HALO mission dedicated to study the UTLS at high latitudes several years after the last intensive Arctic campaigns. The scientific scope of POLSTRACC is broadened by its combination with the SALSA (Seasonality of Air mass transport and origin in the Lowermost Stratosphere using the HALO Aircraft) and GW-LCYCLE (Gravity Wave Life Cycle Experiment, a BMBF/ROMIC project) missions, which address complementary scientific goals sharing the same HALO payload. POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE offer the unique opportunity to study the bottom of the polar vortex and the high-latitude UTLS along with their impact on lower latitudes throughout an entire winter/spring cycle. The payload for the combined POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE campaigns comprises an innovative combination of remote sensing techniques providing 2- and 3-D distributions of temperature and a large number of substances, and precise in-situ instruments measuring T, O3, H2O, tracers of different lifetimes and chemically active species at the aircraft level with high time-resolution. Drop sondes will add information about temperature, humidity and wind in the atmosphere underneath the aircraft. The POLSTRACC consortium includes national (KIT, Forschungszentrum Jülich, DLR, Universities of Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Mainz and Wuppertal; PTB) and international partners (e.g. NASA). The field campaign is divided into three phases for addressing (i) the early polar vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in December 2015 (from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany), (ii) the mid-winter vortex from January to March 2016 (from Kiruna, Sweden), and (iii) the late dissipating vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in March 2016 (from Kiruna and

  5. Empirical analysis of structural change in Credit Default Swap volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to study the structural change in Credit Default Swap volatility. We use statistical properties and a network approach to better understand the behavior of CDS volatility. We hypothesize that structural change occurs in CDS index during a financial crisis and it requires subperiod analysis, rather than full period analysis, to investigate properly. Our results show that the probability of large volatility is related to the structure of volatility but it is more significantly related to the size of volatility. Both the memory property and the size of volatility are confirmed to have dependence on the structure of volatility. The linked degree of CDS volatilities is highly related to the probability of large volatility and its predictability, regardless of structural change in volatility. Another interesting result is that the CDS volatility of a country is more related to the behavior of other volatilities, not the geographical location

  6. Stress reduction correlates with structural changes in the amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Hölzel, Britta K.; Carmody, James; Evans, Karleyton C.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Dusek, Jeffery A; Morgan, Lucas; Pitman, Roger K.; Lazar, Sara W.

    2009-01-01

    Stress has significant adverse effects on health and is a risk factor for many illnesses. Neurobiological studies have implicated the amygdala as a brain structure crucial in stress responses. Whereas hyperactive amygdala function is often observed during stress conditions, cross-sectional reports of differences in gray matter structure have been less consistent. We conducted a longitudinal MRI study to investigate the relationship between changes in perceived stress with changes in amygdala ...

  7. Structural Changes and Global Trends in European Union Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak Mesic

    2009-01-01

    The article aims at researching and presenting structural changes and global trends in distributive trade of European Union, resulted from liberalization of economic activities within the EU. During the last decades, EU trade went through deep transformation and structural changes. Traditional distributive trade has been replaced by organized and concentrated distribution. Even though, there are many developing trends which unify the EU trade, still there are some differences specific for par...

  8. Moving out of Agriculture: Structural Change in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Brian McCaig; Nina Pavcnik

    2013-01-01

    We examine the role of structural change in the economic development of Vietnam from 1990 to 2008. Structural change accounted for a third of the growth in aggregate labor productivity during this period, which averaged 5.1 percent per annum. We discuss the role of reforms in agriculture, enterprises, and international integration in this process. In addition to the drastic move of employment away from agriculture toward services and manufacturing, we also document the movement of workers awa...

  9. Spin-polarized structural, elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of half-metallic ferromagnetism in V-doped ZnSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monir, M. El Amine.; Baltache, H. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et de la Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Faculté des Sciences, Université de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Murtaza, G., E-mail: murtaza@icp.edu.pk [Materials Modeling Lab, Department of Physics, Islamia College University, Peshawar (Pakistan); Khenata, R., E-mail: khenata_rabah@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et de la Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Faculté des Sciences, Université de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Ahmed, Waleed K. [ERU, Faculty of Engineering, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Bouhemadou, A. [Laboratory for Developing New Materials and their Characterization, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Omran, S. Bin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Seddik, T. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et de la Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Faculté des Sciences, Université de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria)

    2015-01-15

    Based on first principles spin-polarized density functional theory, the structural, elastic electronic and magnetic properties of Zn{sub 1−x}V{sub x}Se (for x=0.25, 0.50, 0.75) in zinc blende structure have been studied. The investigation was done using the full-potential augmented plane wave method as implemented in WIEN2k code. The exchange-correlation potential was treated with the generalized gradient approximation PBE-GGA for the structural and elastic properties. Moreover, the PBE-GGA+U approximation (where U is the Hubbard correlation terms) is employed to treat the “d” electrons properly. A comparative study between the band structures, electronic structures, total and partial densities of states and local moments calculated within both GGA and GGA+U schemes is presented. The analysis of spin-polarized band structure and density of states shows the half-metallic ferromagnetic character and are also used to determine s(p)-d exchange constants N{sub 0}α (conduction band ) and N{sub 0}β (valence band) due to Se(4p)–V(3d) hybridization. It has been clearly evidence that the magnetic moment of V is reduced from its free space change value of 3 µ{sub B} and the minor atomic magnetic moment on Zn and Se are generated. - Highlights: • Half metallicity origins by doping V in ZnSe. • PBE-GGA+U approximation is employed to treat the “d” electrons properly. • s(p)-d Exchange constants N{sub 0}α (conduction band ) and N{sub 0}β (valence band) are due to Se(4p)-V(3d) hybridization.

  10. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed

  11. Planck intermediate results XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.;

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at h...

  12. Strong enhancement of nano-sized circularly polarized light using an aperture antenna with V-groove structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongfu; Ikeda, Soushi; Nakagawa, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Ishibashi, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    We present a new type of aperture antenna with V-groove structures that are made of Au to enhance strong circularly polarized light (CPL). Simulations using the finite element method revealed that strong CPL was enhanced within the aperture with a diameter of 10 nm. The intensity of the electric field was enhanced and was 22,700 times greater than that of the incident light. The channel plasmon polaritons generated in the V-groove structures were responsible for the strong enhancement. The influence of the angle and length of the V-groove on the enhancement of the CPL was investigated. PMID:25831317

  13. Multi-decadal changes in tundra environments and ecosystems: Synthesis of the International Polar Year-Back to the Future Project (IPY-BTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callaghan, Terry V.; Tweedie, Craig E.; Åkerman, Jonas;

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the responses of tundra systems to global change has global implications. Most tundra regions lack sustained environmental monitoring and one of the only ways to document multi-decadal change is to resample historic research sites. The International Polar Year (IPY) provided a uniqu...

  14. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelis, Marcel; Dekimpe, Marnik G.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in key marketing metrics? New players mayjust be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisi

  15. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornelis, M.; Dekimpe, de M.G.; Leeflang, P.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in keymarketingmetrics? New players may just be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisio

  16. Radiation induced structural changes in an epoxide resin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural changes which occur on irradiation of an aromatic amine cured epoxide resin have been examined using UV and IR spectroscopy. The production of stable diphenyl ethylene and carbonyl groups, diphenyl cations and phenyl, phenoxyl and diphenyl radicals have been identified. Modifications to the resin system by the use of additives produces changes in the relative proportions of the species produced. (author)

  17. Optical system for study of temporal dynamics of a change in the complex degree of polarization in liquor laser images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovitch, D. T.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a description of the principles defining period of death by polarimetric study temporal dynamics of changes in optical anisotropy of the cerebrospinal fluid of the human body. The optical model of polycrystalline networks of human body liquor is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order), correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of absolute value and phase of complex degree of mutual polarization in the points of laser images of liquor and temporal dynamics of optical anisotropy of human body liquor. The diagnostic criteria of death coming prescription are determined.

  18. Simultaneous calorimetric and polarization microscopy investigations of light induced changes over phase transitions in a liquid crystal-napthopyran mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, S.; Mercuri, F.; Marinelli, M.; Pizzoferrato, R.; Zammit, U.; Kosa, T.; Sukhomlinova, L.; Taheri, B.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the specific heat and the thermal conductivity in a 4-(n-octyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC)-photochromic molecules mixture, before, during, and after the photo-activation of the dispersed photochromic molecules, over both the smectic A-nematic and the nematic-isotropic phase transitions. The evaluation of the specific heat has enabled the determination of the changes of the phase transition characteristics induced by the photochromic molecules photoisomerization, while that of the thermal conductivity could be used to monitor the modifications induced in the average LC molecular orientation. The polarization microscopy imaging of the sample texture constituted a valuable support for the interpretation of the obtained thermal conductivity results.

  19. The impact of volcanic aerosol on the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex: mechanisms and sensitivity to forcing structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2014-06-01

    imply that reproducing the polar vortex responses to past eruptions, or predicting the response to future eruptions, depends on accurate representation of the space-time structure of the volcanic aerosol forcing.

  20. Tracheal instillation of urban PM2.5 suspension promotes acute cardiac polarization changes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Maatz

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which PM2.5 increases cardiovascular mortality are not fully identified. Autonomic alterations are the current main hypotheses. Our objective was to determine if PM2.5 induces acute cardiac polarization alterations in healthy Wistar rats. PM2.5 samples were collected on polycarbonate filters. Solutions containing 10, 20, and 50 µg PM2.5 were administered by tracheal instillation. P wave duration decreased significantly at 20 µg (0.99 ± 0.06, 0.95 ± 0.06, and 0.96 ± 0.07; P < 0.001, and 50 µg (0.98 ± 0.06, 0.98 ± 0.07, and 0.96 ± 0.08; 60, 90 and 120 min, respectively compared to blank filter solution (P < 0.001. PR interval duration decreased significantly at 20 µg (0.99 ± 0.06, 0.98 ± 0.07, and 0.97 ± 0.08 and 50 µg (0.99 ± 0.05, 0.97 ± 0.0, and 0.95 ± 0.05; 60, 90, and 120 min, respectively compared to blank filter and 10 µg (P < 0.001. QRS interval duration decreased at 20 and 50 µg in relation to blank filter solution and 10 µg (P < 0.001. QT interval duration decreased significantly (P < 0.001 with time in animals receiving 20 µg (0.94 ± 0.12, 0.88 ± 0.14, and 0.88 ± 0.11 and 50 µg (1.00 ± 0.13; 0.97 ± 0.11 and 0.98 ± 0.16; 60, 90 and 120 min, respectively compared to blank filter solution and 10 µg (P < 0.001. PM2.5 induced reduced cardiac conduction time, within a short period, indicating that depolarization occurs more rapidly across ventricular tissue.

  1. The vacuum-polarization contribution to the hyperfine structure splitting of hydrogen-like atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculation of the vacuum-polarization contribution to the hyperfine splitting for hydrogen-like atoms is presented. The extended nuclear charge distribution is taken into account. For the experimentally interesting case 209Bi82+ we predict a Δλ = -1.6 nm shift for the transition wave length of the ground state hyperfine splitting. (orig.)

  2. Fractal structure of hadrons in processes with polarized protons at SPD NICA (Proposal for experiment)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tokarev, M. V.; Zborovský, Imrich; Aparin, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 48-58. ISSN 1547-4771 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : asymmetry * high energy * polarization * proton-proton collisions * Self-similarity Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  3. The Structure and Linear Polarization of the Kiloparsec-scale Jet of the Quasar 3C 345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David H.; Wardle, John F. C.; Marchenko, Valerie V.

    2013-02-01

    Deep Very Large Array imaging of the quasar 3C 345 at 4.86 and 8.44 GHz has been used to study the structure and linear polarization of its radio jet on scales ranging from 2 to 30 kpc. There is a 7-8 Jy unresolved core with spectral index α ~= -0.24 (I νvpropνα). The jet (typical intensity 15 mJy beam-1) consists of a 2.''5 straight section containing two knots, and two additional non-co-linear knots at the end. The jet's total projected length is about 27 kpc. The spectral index of the jet varies over -1.1 ~ 0.5. Despite the indication of jet precession in the total intensity structure, the polarization images suggest instead a jet re-directed at least twice by collisions with the external medium. Surprisingly, the electric vector position angles in the main body of the jet are neither longitudinal nor transverse, but make an angle of about 55° with the jet axis in the middle while along the edges the vectors are transverse, suggesting a helical magnetic field. There is no significant Faraday rotation in the source, so that is not the cause of the twist. The fractional polarization in the jet averages 25% and is higher at the edges. In a companion paper, Roberts & Wardle show that differential Doppler boosting in a diverging relativistic velocity field can explain the electric vector pattern in the jet.

  4. Structural changes in plasma membrane under influence of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects ionizing radiation on membranes was studied. Changes arising in the oligosaccharide layer of the surface of the cell membrane, in the protein and lipid phases of membranes under the influence of radiation, as well as possible schemes of formation of structural changes in the membrane are discussed. Molecular bases of structural membrane changes induced by radiation, and determination of their role in development of cell pathology were investigated. The influence of the state of irradiated cell membranes on their radiosensitivity are also studied

  5. Polar Climate Change from Recent Observations and in Global Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Recent papers on the thinning and shrinking sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean have suggested that these changes can be explained by both natural climate oscillations and large-scale trends. The changes in patterns of ice motion are consistent with the dynamic response of sea ice to changing pressure patterns indicated by the Arctic Oscillation, which seem to transport thicker sea ice out of the Arctic Ocean. Anomalously warm air temperatures and ocean temperatures also appear to have contributed to less sea ice growth, resulting in thinner ice. Both warmer air and ocean temperatures are consistent with the warmer phase of the Arctic Oscillation. Global climate model simulations that include complex dynamic and thermodynamic ice models also show that anthropogenic global warming trends since the 1980's have also contributed to the present-day thinning and shrinking sea ice cover. However, the models also show the large natural variability in the ice cover that must be overcome before the anthropogenic trends can be reliably measured. Estimates of the number of additional ice observing stations that will be required to measure the secular trend will be presented.

  6. Assessing the Impact of Climate Change on Land-Water-Ecosystem Quality in Polar and Mountainous Regions: A New Interregional Project (INT5153)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INT5153 project aims to improve the understanding of the impact of climate change on fragile polar and mountainous ecosystems on both a local and global scale for their better management and conservation. Seven core and five related benchmark sites have been selected from different global regions for specific assessments of the impact of climate change with the following expected outcomes and outputs: Outcomes: • Improved understanding of the impact of climate change on the cryosphere in polar and mountainous ecosystems and its effects on landwater- ecosystem quality at both local and global scales. • Recommendations for improvement of regional policies for soil and agricultural water management, conservation, and environmental protection in polar and mountainous regions. Outputs: • Specific strategies to minimize the adverse effects of, and adapt to, reduced seasonal snow and glacier covered areas on land-water-ecosystem quality in polar and mountain regions across the world. • Enhanced interregional network of laboratories and institutions competent in the assessment of climate change impacts on the cryosphere and land-water-ecosystem quality, using isotopic and nuclear techniques. • Increased number of young scientists trained in the use of isotope and nuclear techniques to assess the impact of climate change on the cryosphere and land-water-ecosystem quality in polar and mountainous ecosystems. • Platform/database with global access for continuing work and monitoring of impact of climate change on fragile polar and mountainous ecosystems at local and global scales, as well as for communicating findings to policy makers and communities. • Improved understanding of the effects of climate change disseminated through appropriate publications, policy briefs, and through a dedicated internet platform. • Methodologies and protocols for investigations in specific ecosystems and conservation/adaptation measures for agriculture areas

  7. Polarization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film in a floating-gate capacitor structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Hui, E-mail: hyuan@gmu.edu, E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu; Li, Haitao; Zhu, Hao [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States); Zhang, Kai; Baumgart, Helmut [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Bonevich, John E. [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Richter, Curt A. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States); Li, Qiliang, E-mail: hyuan@gmu.edu, E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film sandwiched and embedded inside the oxide layer have been fabricated and studied. The capacitors exhibit ferroelectric-like hysteresis which is a result of the robust, reversible polarization of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film while the gate voltage sweeps. The temperature-dependent capacitance measurement indicates that the activation energy is about 0.33 eV for separating the electron and hole pairs in the bulk of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, and driving them to either the top or bottom surface of the thin film. Because of the fast polarization speed, potentially excellent endurance, and the complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatibility, the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} embedded MOS structures are very interesting for memory application.

  8. Structures and Correlations in Ideally Aligned Polar Gay-Berne Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study an ideally oriented system of Gay-Berne particles with embedded longitudinal dipole moments. While keeping the translational degrees of freedom of the molecules unrestricted we assume that their dipoles can be oriented either parallel or antiparallel to the positive z axis of the laboratory frame. At high temperatures, this frustrated Gay-Berne mesogen exhibits an ideally oriented nematic phase, which is the reference state of the system. In the limit of vanishing dipole moment nematic, smectic-A and smectic B phases are stable. Interestingly, by changing the magnitude and location of the molecular dipole in the nematic reference state we found dipole-induced smectic A, smectic B and tetragonal crystal phases, in addition to crystalline structures with smectic Ad and A2-like dipolar organization. Various singlet, pair and triplet distribution functions were evaluated to elucidate short and long range organization in these phases. In particular, the importance of triplet correlations for a proper understanding of the structures and their local, dipolar organization is demonstrated. (author)

  9. The intra-hour variable quasar J1819+3845: 13-year evolution, jet polarization structure, and interstellar scattering screen properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, A. G.; Macquart, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    We examine the long-term evolution of the intra-hour variable quasar, J1819+3845, whose variations have been attributed to interstellar scintillation by extremely local turbulent plasma, located only 1-3 pc from Earth. The variations in this source ceased some time in the period between June 2006 and February 2007. The evolution of the source spectrum and the long-term lightcurve, and the persistent compactness of the source VLBI structure indicate that the cessation of rapid variability was associated with the passage of the scattering material out of the line of sight to the quasar. We present an extensive analysis of the linear polarization variations and their relation to total intensity variations. The proper motion of polarized features in the quasar jet is found to be subluminal. Systematic time delays between Stokes I, Q, and U, in combination with the structure of the source obtained from 8.4 GHz VLBI data confirm the estimate of the screen distance: 1-2 pc, making the screen one of the nearest objects to the solar system. We determine the physical properties of this scattering material. The electron density in the scattering region is extremely high with respect to the warm ionized ISM, with an estimated density of ne ~ 97 l01/3 ΔL 100-1/2 cm -3, where l0 is the outer scale of the turbulence in AU and ΔL = 100 ΔL100 AU is the depth of the scattering region. If this plasma is in pressure balance with the local magnetic field, one expects a ~2 rad m-2 rotation measure (RM) change associated with the passage of this material past the quasar. To that end, we examine the RMs of sources and the diffuse polarized emission in the surrounding region. We place a limit of 10 rad m-2 on the RM change based upon 21 cm polarization observations. The variability of sources near J1819+3845 is examined to deduce limits on the transverse extent of the screen, and we find that no other sources exhibit variations on comparable timescales and that the screen must therefore

  10. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pancic, Marina; Hansen, Per Juel; Tammilehto, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1) and different temperatures (1, 5, and 8...... C) to simulate changes from present to plausible future levels. Each of the 12 scenarios was run for 7 days, and a significant interaction between temperature and pH on growth was detected. By combining increased temperature and acidification, the two factors counterbalanced each other, and...... therefore no effect on the growth rates was found. However, the growth rates increased with elevated temperatures by 20–50% depending on the strain. In addition, a general negative effect of increasing acidification on growth was observed. At pH 7.7 and 7.4, the growth response varied considerably among...

  11. Interpreting shadows: Arms control and defense planning in a rapidly changing multi-polar world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.R.

    1999-06-01

    The focus of arms control is changing. It now deals with issues affecting all nations and not just the super powers. A new framework for approaching non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and arms control could focus on a two-fold policy initiative. The first policy would be a new strategic `triad` built around conventional capability including rapidly deployable forces, regional ballistic missile defense, and long-range precision-strike capability. The second policy would employ an information strategy using the current diplomatic initiatives that appear to be the most productive, or unilateral and multilateral export controls, military assistance in the form of infrastructure, and confidence building measures. Continued success in arms control requires abandoning Cold War policies. Emerging policies will need to appreciate different world views. Good intelligence will be a key factor in the success of any policy orientation and its implementation. The focus needs to change from arms control involving the superpowers to arms control involving everyone.

  12. Investigation of Changing in Antioxidants Structure under Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the important characteristics of polymeric products is oxidation stability especially in thermal condition. In pervious works, effect of antioxidant type on oxidative thermal stability of polyethylene is investigated. Result of pervious works shows that with irradiation, OIT is reduced in samples containing phenolic antioxidant. In the percent work authors intent to clarify reasons of this phenomenon. On the basis of OIT results, in pure polyethylene samples OIT is increased silently with irradiation that may be due to cross linking. But in samples containing phenolic antioxidant OIT shows remarkable decrease after irradiation that maybe due to structural changing of antioxidant after irradiation. For investigation of this phenomena, first; four formulation were prepared with increasing of 1phr, Irganox 1010, irganox B225, Irgafos168, chimassorb 944 to polyethylene by internal mixer, after that; fore mentioned antioxidants were irradiated at 150 kGy. All samples were exposed OIT test results show that phenolic antioxidant didn't, show initial performance because of structural changing and couldn't perform like un irradiated phenolic antioxidant, but other types of antioxidant, like 168 ,944 didn't show structural changing and OIT value didn't show remarkable change compared to before. This structural changing is also evident from appearance; in such a way that phenolic antioxidant showed remarkable coloring with irradiation which was characterized with making solutions and then using UV device. Results show remarkable change of absorbance for phenolic antioxidants

  13. Low x Behaviour of the Isovector Nucleon Polarized Structure Function and the Bjorken Sum Rule

    CERN Document Server

    Buccella, F; Santorelli, P

    1997-01-01

    The combination g_1^p(x) - g_1^n(x) is derived from SLAC data on polarized proton and deuteron targets, evaluated at Q^2 = 10 GeV^2, and compared with the results of SMC experiment. The agreement is satisfactory except for the points at the three lowest x, which have an important role in the SMC evaluation of the l.h.s. of the Bjorken sum rule.

  14. Low x Behavior of the Isovector Nucleon Polarized Structure Function and the Bjorken Sum Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccella, Franco; Pisanti, Ofelia; Santorelli, Pietro

    The combination gp1(x)-gn_1(x) is derived from SLAC data on polarized proton and deuteron targets, evaluated at Q2=10 GeV2, and compared with the results of SMC experiment. The agreement is satisfactory except for the points at the three lowest x, which have an important role in the SMC evaluation on the L.H.S. of the Bjorken sum rule.

  15. Spin-polarized transport in manganite-based magnetic nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant magnetoresistance (G M R) and tunnel magnetoresistance are spin polarized transport phenomena which are observed in magnetic multilayers.They consist in a large variation of the electrical resistivity of the system depending on whether the magnetizations of the magnetic layers are aligned parallel or anti-parallel to each other. In order to be able to align the magnetic layers by means of an external magnetic field, they must not be strongly ferromagnetically coupled.The extrinsic magnetoresistance effects in magnetic multilayers, either G M R in the case of a metallic spacer, or T M R in the case of an insulating spacer, are observed at low magnetic fields, which makes these phenomena interesting for technological applications.We studied the possibility of using the ferromagnetic manganite La0,75Sr0,25MnO3 (L S M O) in magneto resistive devices, with different materials as a spacer layer.As the main result of this work, we report G M R and T M R measurements in L S M O/LaNiO3/L S M O and L S M O/CaMnO3/L S M O tri layers, respectively, observed for the first time in these systems.This work included the deposition of films and multilayers by sputtering, the structural characterization of the samples and the study of their magnetic and electric transport properties.Our main interest was the study of G M R in L S M O/LaNiO3/L S M O tri layers.It was necessary to firstly characterize the magnetic coupling of L S M O layers through the L N O spacer. After that, we performed electric transport measurements with the current in the plane of the samples.We measured a G M R contribution of ∼ 0,55 % at T = 83 K.We designed a procedure for patterning the samples by e-beam lithography for electric transport measurements with the current perpendicular to the plane. We also performed the study of L S M O/CaMnO3/L S M O tri layers with an insulating spacer.We studied the magnetic coupling, as in the previous case.Then we fabricated a tunnel junction for measuring electric

  16. Sensitivity of chiral 3-methylcyclopentanone structure, electric moment and thermodynamic parameters to medium polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Basheer, Watheq; Al Azar, Said

    2015-03-01

    R -(+) -3-methylcyclopentanone (R3MCP) is a chiral ketone which can exist in as many as five conformers with two dominant conformers at room temperature; equatorial-methyl and axial-methyl. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations of the optimized geometries of R-(+) -3-methylcyclopentanone (R3MCP) individual dominant conformers were performed in 10 common solvents of wide polarity range, under the framework of polarizable continuum model (PCM). DFT correlation function type B3LYP using a powerful basis set (aug-cc-pVDZ) yielded different linear correlation between solvent polarity and R3MCP equatorial and axial conformers Gibbs free and zero-point energies, entropies, vibrational modes frequencies, in addition to heat capacity resulting from translational, electronic, rotational and vibrational motion. Furthermore, DFT calculations of the R3MCP equatorial and axial conformers electric dipole and quadrupole moments components in 3D were also carried out and found to have a linear correlation with solvent polarity and cavitation energy. An observed trend for the standard Gibbs energies for the rotational equilibrium of R3MCP to be strongly-solvent dependent will be presented.

  17. A wind-driving disc model for the mm-wavelength polarization structure of HL Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Matsakos, Titos; Königl, Arieh

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of spatially resolved mm- and cm-wavelength polarimetry in protostellar accretion discs could help clarify the role of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport in these systems. The best case to date is that of HL~Tau, where the inability to produce a good fit to the 1.25-mm data with a combination of vertical and azimuthal magnetic field components was interpreted as implying that centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) are probably not a significant transport mechanism on the $\\sim 10^2\\,$au scale probed by the observations. Using synthetic polarization maps of heuristic single-field-component discs and of a post-processed simulation of a wind-driving disc, we demonstrate that a much better fit to the data can be obtained if the radial field component, a hallmark of the CDW mechanism, dominates in the polarized emission region. A similar inference was previously made in modelling the far-infrared polarization map of the pc-scale dust ring in the Galactic centre. To reconcile this interp...

  18. A new polarized target for structure studies on biomolecules at GKSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Small-Angle Neutron Scattering instrument (SANS-1) which has been designed for the fields of molecular biology and polymer research has been put into operation in the new experimental hall for neutron scattering at the research reactor FRG-1 equipped with a Cold Neutron Source and a beryllium reflector at the GKSS Research Center. SANS-1 has been equipped with a polarized target station for the measurement of polarized neutron scatterings, which is mainly dedicated to the use of nuclear spin contrast variation method. The nuclear spins of protons and deuterons in most polymers and biological macromolecules can be almost aligned by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) with respect to an external magnetic field of 2.5 tesla at temperatures below 1 K in the presence of paramagnetic centers via 4 mm microwave irradiation, where one of them can be depolarized selectively by irradiation of their proper nuclear resonance frequency. First experiments using SANS-1 have been carried out with apoferritin and deuterated large subunit of E.coli ribosomes. (author)

  19. Cosmic anisotropies from quasars: from polarization to structural-axis alignments

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrims, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The comparison of the orientations of the optical-polarization vectors of quasars that are separated by billions of light-years has led to the discovery that they are aligned instead of pointing in random directions as expected. This discovery has been confirmed and the significance of the correlations enhanced. We devoted this doctoral thesis to an in-depth analysis of these striking observations that imply Gpc-scale correlations. We developed a new and independent statistical method which is dedicated to the study and the characterization of the distribution of the orientations of vectorial quantities that are perpendicular to the lines of sight of a set of sources spread on the celestial sphere. This allowed us to confirm independently the large-scale polarization-vector alignments and to refine the limits of the alignment regions through an unbiased characterization of the signal. We also provided a detailed analysis of a large sample of polarization measurements made at radio wavelengths in which similar...

  20. Slim-structured electro-floating display system based on the polarization-controlled optical path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Cheol; Park, Seong-Jin; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-04-18

    A new slim-type electro-floating display system based on the polarization-controlled optical path is proposed. In the proposed system, the optical path between the input plane and Fresnel lens can be made recursive by repetitive transmission and reflection of the input beam by employing a new polarization-based optical path controller (P-OPC), which is composed of two quaterwave plates, a half mirror and a reflective polarizer. Based on this P-OPC, the absolute optical path between the input plane and Fresnel lens, virtually representing the physical depth of the display system, can be reduced down to one third of its original path, which results in the same rate of decrease in the volume size of the display system. The operational principle of the proposed system is analyzed with the Jones matrix. In addition, to confirm the feasibility of the proposed system, experiments with test prototypes are carried out, and the results are comparatively discussed with those of the conventional system. PMID:27137306

  1. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FROM FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES OF DIFFUSE POLARIZED EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), carried out using diffuse polarized synchrotron emission data at 1.4 GHz acquired at the Parkes Radio Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The observed diffuse polarized emission is likely to originate above the LMC disk on the near side of the galaxy. Consistent negative rotation measures (RMs) derived from the diffuse emission indicate that the line-of-sight magnetic field in the LMC's near-side halo is directed coherently away from us. In combination with RMs of extragalactic sources that lie behind the galaxy, we show that the LMC's large-scale magnetic field is likely to be of quadrupolar geometry, consistent with the prediction of dynamo theory. On smaller scales, we identify two brightly polarized filaments southeast of the LMC, associated with neutral hydrogen arms. The filaments' magnetic field potentially aligns with the direction toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We suggest that tidal interactions between the SMC and the LMC in the past 109 years are likely to have shaped the magnetic field in these filaments.

  2. Polarized Sources, Targets and Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciullo, Guiseppe; Contalbrigo, Marco; Lenisa, P.

    2011-01-01

    Remarks on the history of workshops on "spin tools" / E. Steffens -- Polarized proton beams in RHIC / A. Zelenski -- The COSY/Julich polarized H[symbol] and D[symbol] ion source / O. Felden -- The new source of polarized ions for the JINR accelerator complex / V. V. Fimushkin -- Resonance effects in nuclear dichroism - an inexpensive source of tensor-polarized deuterons / H. Seyfarth -- Polarized electrons and positrons at the MESA accelerator / K. Aulenbacher -- Status report of the Darmstadt polarized electron injector / Y. Poltoratska -- The Mott polarimeter at MAMI / V. Tioukine -- Proton polarimetry at the relativistic heavy ion collider / Y. Makdisi -- Polarisation and polarimetry at HERA / B. Sobloher -- Polarisation measurement at the ILC with a Compton polarimeter / C. Bartels -- Time evolution of ground motion-dependent depolarisation at linear colliders / A. Hartin -- Electron beam polarimetry at low energies and its applications / R. Barday -- Polarized solid targets: recent progress and future prospects / C. D. Keith -- HD gas distillation and analysis for HD frozen spin targets / A. D'Angelo -- Electron spin resonance study of hydrogen and alkyl free radicals trapped in solid hydrogen aimed for dynamic nuclear polarization of solid HD / T. Kumada -- Change of ultrafast nuclear-spin polarization upon photoionization by a short laser pulse / T. Nakajima -- Radiation damage and recovery in polarized [symbol]NH[symbol] ammonia targets at Jefferson lab / J. D. Maxwell.Polarized solid proton target in low magnetic field and at high temperature / T. Uesaka -- Pulse structure dependence of the proton spin polarization rate / T. Kawahara -- Proton NMR in the large COMPASS [symbol]NH[symbol] target / J. Koivuniemi -- DNP with TEMPO and trityl radicals in deuterated polystyrene / L. Wang -- The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources / L. Rinolfi -- Status of high intensity polarized electron gun at MIT-Bates / E. Tsentalovich -- Target section for spin

  3. Effects of nitrogen dopants on the atomic step kinetics and electronic structures of O-polar ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhan, Huahan; Zhou, Yinghui; Wu, Yaping; Chen, Xiaohang; Wang, Huiqiong; Kang, Junyong

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen-polar ZnO films are grown in step flow mode by molecular beam epitaxy. Driven by the step flow anisotropy, the growth leads to the occurrence of specific hexagonal pits in the surface. The specific pits are formed by interlacing steps of the {101&cmb.macr;4&cmb.macr;} facets, thus quenching the macroscopic dipole moment along the c-axis and satisfying the stabilization principles. Nitrogen (N) doping trials are then performed on the basis of the stable surface. In doping, growth remains in step flow mode but the step flow anisotropy vanishes, resulting in an obvious change of the surface morphology. Besides, a distinct acceptor state appears by in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy analysis. First-principles calculations reveal that N readily substitutes for step-edge Zn and acts as NO2 adsorbed at the step edge. Desorption of the NO2 facilitates the formation of NO-VZn shallow acceptor complexes, which contributes to the appearance of the acceptor state. According to the peculiarities of N dopants on the O-polar surface, vicinal O-polar substrates (e.g., {101&cmb.macr;4&cmb.macr;} substrate) are promising in ZnO : N due to the easily achieved step flow growth and high density of step edges for N incorporation.

  4. Formation-Polarity-Dependent Improved Resistive Switching Memory Performance Using IrOx/GdOx/WOx/W Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Debanjan; Maikap, Siddheswar; Tien, Ta Chang; Lee, Heng Yuan; Chen, Wei-Su; Chen, Frederick T.; Kao, Ming-Jer; Tsai, Ming-Jinn

    2012-04-01

    The formation-polarity-dependent improved resistive switching memory performance using a new IrOx/GdOx/WOx/W structure has been investigated. The memory device has been observed by both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The thicknesses of the GdOx and WOx layers are observed to be approximately 15 and 5.5 nm, respectively. All layers are also analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The resistive switching mechanism is filament formation/rupture in the high-κ GdOx layer, which is controlled by the oxygen ion migration in bilayer GdOx/WOx films under negative and positive formation polarities. Excellent uniformity of SET/RESET voltages, low/high resistance states, and switching cycles have been observed under positive formation polarity owing to the charge trapping/detrapping in the high-κ GdOx switching layer. The memory device shows a long endurance of >104 times, and extrapolated 10-year data retention at 85 °C. This device shows great potential for future nonvolatile memory (NVM) applications.

  5. A Comparative Study of Molecular Structure, pKa, Lipophilicity, Solubility, Absorption and Polar Surface Area of Some Antiplatelet Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Remko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical chemistry methods have been used to study the molecular properties of antiplatelet agents (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel, elinogrel, ticagrelor and cangrelor and several thiol-containing active metabolites. The geometries and energies of most stable conformers of these drugs have been computed at the Becke3LYP/6-311++G(d,p level of density functional theory. Computed dissociation constants show that the active metabolites of prodrugs (ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel and drugs elinogrel and cangrelor are completely ionized at pH 7.4. Both ticagrelor and its active metabolite are present at pH = 7.4 in neutral undissociated form. The thienopyridine prodrugs ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel are lipophilic and insoluble in water. Their lipophilicity is very high (about 2.5–3.5 logP values. The polar surface area, with regard to the structurally-heterogeneous character of these antiplatelet drugs, is from very large interval of values of 3–255 Å2. Thienopyridine prodrugs, like ticlopidine, clopidogrel and prasugrel, with the lowest polar surface area (PSA values, exhibit the largest absorption. A high value of polar surface area (PSA of cangrelor (255 Å2 results in substantial worsening of the absorption in comparison with thienopyridine drugs.

  6. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnaninchi, P O; Yang, Y; Maffulli, G; El Haj, A; Maffulli, N [Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB (United Kingdom); Bonesi, M; Meglinski, I [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Phelan, C, E-mail: pierre.bagnaninchi@ed.ac.u [Department of Pathology, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-07

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  7. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  8. Shoreline change due to coastal structures of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of shoreline change at the coastal area near power plant were analyzed. For a nuclear power plant located in the east coast of Korean peninsula, remote-sensing data, i.e.airborne images and satellite images are acquired and shoreline data were extracted. Recession and davance of shoreline due to coastal structures of powder plant and land reclamation was showed. 1-line numerical shoreline change model was established for simulating the response of shoreline to construction of coastal structures. The model uses curvilinear coordinates that follow the shoreline and is capable of handling the formation of tombolos as well as the growth of salients in the vicinity of coastal structures. The model predicted significant erosion of beach in case breakwaters were extended. Offshore breakwaters were suggested as a countermeasure to shoreline change

  9. Directed technical change and energy intensity dynamics: Structural change vs. energy efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Christian; Kempa, Karol

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses a theoretical model with Directed Technical Change to analyse the observed heterogeneous energy intensity developments. Based on the empirical evidence on the underlying drivers of energy intensity developments, we decompose changes in aggregate energy intensity into structural changes in the economy (Sector Effect) and within-sector energy efficiency improvements (Efficiency Effect). We analyse how energy price growth and the relative productivity of both sectors affect the d...

  10. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, L.; Barreiro, R. B.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low (z ≃ 0.3), intermediate (z ≃ 0.6) and high redshift (z ≃ 0.9). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing map), the proposed filter successfully reconstructs a map of the weak ISW signal, finding a perfect correlation with the input signal for the ideal case and around 80 per cent, on average, in the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage. We find that including CMB polarization improves the correlation between input and reconstruction although only at a small level. Nonetheless, given the weakness of the ISW signal, even modest improvements can be of importance. In particular, in realistic situations, in which less information is available from the LSS tracers, the effect of including polarization is larger. For instance, for the case in which the ISW signal is recovered from CMB plus only one survey, and taking into account the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage, the improvement in the correlation coefficient can be as large as 10 per cent.

  11. The measurement of g1n polarized structure of the neutron by the E154 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the precision measurement of the neutron polarized structure g1n performed by the E154 collaboration at the Standford Linear Accelerator Center, USA, in autumn 1995, using a 48.3 GeV polarized electron beam scattered off a polarized Helium 3 target. The scattered electrons were detected using two spectrometer arms, covering the deep inelastic scattering range: 0.0134 2 2 2 at an average value of Q2 = 5 GeV2. Two electromagnetic calorimeters have been designed by the LPC in Clermont-Ferrand and the SphN-CEA in Saclay to measure the scattered electron energy and to eject the contaminating hadron background using, a cellular automaton and a neural network, widely described in this thesis. The analysis performed in Clermont-Ferrand and presented in this document led us to the integral on the measurement region of g1n equaling: - 0.34 ± 0.003STAT ± 0.004SYST ± 0.001EVOL at Q2 = 5 GeV2, where our data have been evolved to Q2 = 5 GeV2 using the next-to-leading order DGLAP evolution equations and a world parametrization of the polarized parton distributions. The Ellis and Jaffe sum rule is clearly violated. Using different low x extrapolations, our integral is compatible with the Bjorken sum rule. The quark contribution to the nucleon spin is ΔΣ = 29 ± 6 % in the M S-bar scheme and ΔΣ = 37 ± 7% in the AB scheme, at Q2 = 5 GeV2. The gluon contribution seems to be positive and within the range: 0 < ΔG < 2. (author)

  12. The structural change of Cu-Sn melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the high-temperature viscometer and magnetic susceptibility measurement device designed by our group,the viscosity and the magnetic susceptibility of the Cu65Sn35 melt were measured during the cooling process.An anomalous change can be found in the curves of viscosity and magnetic susceptibility at a certain temperature.The structure of the melt was studied by the high-temperature X-ray diffractometer.The anomalous change also can be found in the pair distribution function,correlation radius,and coordination number at the approximate tem-perature,which shows the microstructural change of the Cu65Sn35 melt.From the results,it was confirmed that the Cu6Sn5 compound occurs in the melt,which leads to the structural change of the melt.

  13. The structural change of Cu-Sn melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU JiXin; SUN JianJun; ZHAN ChengWei; TIAN XueLei; CHEN XiChen

    2007-01-01

    With the high-temperature viscometer and magnetic susceptibility measurement device designed by our group, the viscosity and the magnetic susceptibility of the Cu65Sn35 melt were measured during the cooling process. An anomalous change can be found in the curves of viscosity and magnetic susceptibility at a certain temperature. The structure of the melt was studied by the high-temperature X-ray diffractometer. The anomalous change also can be found in the pair distribution function, correlation radius, and coordination number at the approximate temperature, which shows the microstructural change of the Cu65Sn35 melt. From the results, it was confirmed that the Cu6Sn5 compound occurs in the melt, which leads to the structural change of the melt.

  14. Using elaborative interrogation to induce characteristics of polar and nonpolar solvents from animations of their molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ems-Wilson, Janice

    This study concerned (a) how general chemistry students learn to classify solvent polarity from animated molecules, (b) whether peer interaction increases the number of correct classifications, and (c) whether language, academic ability, logical thinking ability, or prior knowledge interact with rate of learning or posttest performance. Two types of interaction were compared, group discussion and elaborative interrogation. The study rested on three assumptions: (a) animated molecules are appropriate for learning the concept of solvent polarity, (b) question stems and a guided interrogation enhance learning of a visual concept, (c) general chemistry students can induce the concept of solvent polarity from animated molecules when no guiding cues, either visual or verbal, are given. After a review of molecular geometry and bonding theories, students were presented with four trials of ten animated molecular structures. Ten three-to-five minute discussions were distributed among the four trials. Prior to the trials the experimental group received a 45-minute training session on elaborative interrogation; the topic was what happens on the molecular level when a carbonated beverage is opened. The control group received a 45-minute expository lecture on the same carbonated beverage topic. Participants were given a four-part posttest immediately following the trials. Results of the study suggest that most students tend to classify the solvent polarity of animated molecules based on certain structural features using a prototype or feature-frequency categorization strategy. Elaborative interrogation did not show a significant effect on the rate of learning or on the performance of learners on posttest measures of recall and comprehension. The experimental group noted a significantly greater number and range of types of features, and offered higher quality generalizations and explanations of their polarity classification procedure. Finally, the results implied that learning

  15. Family Structure Changes and Children's Health, Behavior, and Educational Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz

    More and more children do not grow up in traditional nuclear families. Instead they grow up in single parent households or in families with a step-parent. Hence it is important to improve our understanding of the impact of "shocks" in family structure due to parental relationship dissolution on...... children. In this study I empirically test whether children are traumatized both in the short and the long run by shocks in the family structure during childhood. I focus on educational, behavioral, and health outcomes. A population sample of Danish children born in January to May 1983, 1984, and 1985 is...... used for the analysis. The empirical cross-sectional analysis indicates a negative relation between the number of family structure changes and children.s educational outcomes. Children experiencing many family structure changes also seem to have worse health outcomes....

  16. Family Structure Changes and Children's Health, Behavior, and Educational Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz

    More and more children do not grow up in traditional nuclear families. Instead they grow up in single parent households or in families with a step-parent. Hence it is important to improve our understanding of the impact of 'shocks' in family structure due to parental relationship dissolution on...... children. In this study I empirically test whether children are traumatized by shocks in the family structure during childhood. I focus on both educational, behavioral, and health outcomes. A population sample of Danish children born in January to May 1983, 1984, and 1985 is used for the analysis. The...... empirical cross-sectional analysis indicates a negative relation between the number of family structure changes and children's educational outcomes. Children experiencing many family structure changes also seem to have worse health outcomes....

  17. Structural Change and the Kaldor Facts of Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Foellmi, Reto; Zweimüller, Josef

    2002-01-01

    The model presented in this paper reconciles two of the most important features of the long-run growth process: the massive changes in the structure of production and employment; and the Kaldor facts of economic growth. Structural change occurs because Engel-curves are non-linear. Each new good goes through Engel's consumption cycle, i.e. starts out as a luxury with a high income elasticity and ends up as a necessity with a low income elasticity. The coexistence of stagnating and expanding in...

  18. Structural Change and the Dynamics of Real Exchange Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaodong Zhu; Juanyi Xu; Yong Wang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we first examine empirically the Balassa-Samuelson effect in the presence of structural change. Using cross-country data on per capita income, price level and employment shares by sector, we find that a country’s tradable sector’s share of employment is a more significant predictor of the country’s price level than its per capita income, suggesting that the widely used empirical Balassa-Samuelson model is often mis-specified and biased in the face of structural change. We...

  19. Structural Changes and Dairy Chain Efficiency in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Rosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The dairy chain in Italy experienced substantial structural changes during the past years. Since the introduction of milk quotas in 1984, structural changes caused by consistent reduction of dairy farms, growing brand concentration at wholesale level, and diffusion of private labels at retail level may have altered the competitive market conditions, with increasing price asymmetry and inefficiencies in price transmission. We tested this hypothesis using the McCorriston and Sheldon’s successive oligopoly model, and we gave evidences of altered price transmission and consumer’s surplus distribution along the vertical chain in the examined period.

  20. Structural Change, Globalization and Economic Growth in China and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Valli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In their period of rapid economic growth China and India have experienced profound structural transformations. The aim of the paper is to analyze the relation between structural change, the process of globalization and economic growth in the two great Asian countries, using a highly disaggregated dataset for the 1987-2009 period. While China had a longer and more intensive productivity growth than India, the latter had a somewhat more balanced growth. Both countries registered higher within-sectors gains in productivity than between-sectors ones. Our analysis also shows that there exist important feedbacks between structural change, globalization and economic growth over time. When the reallocation of labor is large, it may positively impact on the future rates of economic growth. At the same time, however, it seems that a too rapid economic growth may hinder a smooth reallocation of labor. In both countries, new policies should be designed to favor labor movement across sectors and areas, to reduce the wage-productivity differentials and to integrate the informal sector in formal markets in India, in order to foster structural changes and enhance economic growth. If a too unbalanced economic growth has somewhat limited the extent of structural change, globalization has on the contrary promoted it. High level of export, import and FDI not only has been related to higher rates of economic growth, but also to a deeper reallocation of resources across sectors, modifying the comparative advantage and reorganizing the production.

  1. Statistical methods in longitudinal research principles and structuring change

    CERN Document Server

    von Eye, Alexander

    1991-01-01

    These edited volumes present new statistical methods in a way that bridges the gap between theoretical and applied statistics. The volumes cover general problems and issues and more specific topics concerning the structuring of change, the analysis of time series, and the analysis of categorical longitudinal data. The book targets students of development and change in a variety of fields - psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, medicine, psychiatry, economics, behavioural sciences, developmental psychology, ecology, plant physiology, and biometry - with basic training in statistics an

  2. Technological and Structural Change in the European Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Panapoulou, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The world banking industry is undergoing a large-scale transformation. Banking systems and financial markets, both domestic and international, have been undergoing a series of profound changes. One of the main driving forces of these worldwide changes is the introduction of innovations in new information technologies. Against these trends, industrial structure in the banking industry and banking regulation have sometimes encouraged these trends and sometimes adapted to them. The aim of this p...

  3. An analysis of structure change of food demand in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guanqing

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of consumer demand is playing an important role in applied econometrics. Chinese food demand has fundamentally changed as the result of growing income and urbanization ever since the economic reform in 1978. Although food demand of the western countries has been widely studied in the literature, the study of demand in the developing countries like China has been much ignored. In this study, we aim at analyzing structure changes of food demands in China. We intend to estimate Ch...

  4. Structural change in developing countries: Has it decreased gender inequality?

    OpenAIRE

    Rendall, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of female labor market outcomes from 1987 to 2008 by assessing the role of changing labor demand requirements in four developing countries: Brazil, Mexico, India and Thailand. The results highlight the importance of structural change in reducing gender disparities by decreasing the labor demand for physical attributes. The results show that India, the country with the greatest physical labor requirements, exhibits the largest labor market gender inequality. I...

  5. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics?

    OpenAIRE

    Kornelis, M.; Dekimpe, de, M.G.; Leeflang, P.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in keymarketingmetrics? New players may just be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisions. Similarly, the addition of a new marketing channel could permanently shift shopping preferences, or could just create a short-lived migration from existing channels. The steady-state impact of ...

  6. Structural decomposition analysis on energy intensity changes at regional level

    OpenAIRE

    Hua Liao; Ce Wang; Zhi-Shuang Zhu; Xiao-Wei Ma

    2012-01-01

    As China's energy intensity fluctuated in recent years, it is necessary to examine whether this fluctuations happened at a regional level. This paper conducts a decomposition model by using the structural decomposition analysis (SDA) method at a regional level. Then this model is employed to empirically analyze the changes of Beijing's energy intensity. The conclusions are as follows: during 2002-2010, except petroleum, the energy intensity decreased and the changes were mostly attributed to ...

  7. Structural change in developing countries: has it decreased gender inequality?

    OpenAIRE

    Rendall, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of female labor market outcomes from 1987 to 2008 by assessing the role of changing labor demand requirements in four developing countries: Brazil, Mexico, India and Thailand. The results highlight the importance of structural change in reducing gender disparities by decreasing the labor demand for physical attributes. The results show that India, the country with the greatest physical labor requirements, exhibits the largest labor market gender inequality. I...

  8. Does competitive entry structurally change key marketing metrics.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does competitive entry create a structural change in key marketing metrics? New players may just be a temporal nuisance to incumbents, but could also fundamentally change the latter's performance evolution, or induce them to permanently alter their spending levels and/or pricing decisions. Similarly, the addition of a new marketing channel could permanently shift shopping preferences, or could just create a short-lived migration from existing channels. The steady-state impact o...

  9. Electronic structure, morphology and emission polarization of enhanced symmetry InAs quantum-dot-like structures grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maryński, A.; Sĕk, G.; Musiał, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wrocław University of Technology, Wybrzeże Wyspiańskiego 27, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Gilfert, C.; Reithmaier, J. P. [Technische Physik, Institute of Nanostructure Technology and Analytics, CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Capua, A.; Karni, O.; Gready, D.; Eisenstein, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Atiya, G.; Kaplan, W. D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Kölling, S. [Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems, Center for Nanoelectronic Technologies, Königsbrücker Straße 180, D-01099 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-09-07

    The optical and structural properties of a new kind of InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dot (QD)-like objects grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. These nanostructures were found to have significantly more symmetrical shapes compared to the commonly obtained dash-like geometries typical of this material system. The enhanced symmetry has been achieved due to the use of an As{sub 2} source and the consequent shorter migration length of the indium atoms. Structural studies based on a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) provided detailed information on both the structure and composition distribution within an individual nanostructure. However, it was not possible to determine the lateral aspect ratio from STEM or APT. To verify the in-plane geometry, electronic structure calculations, including the energy levels and transition oscillator strength for the QDs have been performed using an eight-band k·p model and realistic system parameters. The results of calculations were compared to measured polarization-resolved photoluminescence data. On the basis of measured degree of linear polarization of the surface emission, the in-plane shape of the QDs has been assessed proving a substantial increase in lateral symmetry. This results in quantum-dot rather than quantum-dash like properties, consistent with expectations based on the growth conditions and the structural data.

  10. Changes in corporate governance structures in Polish privatised companies

    OpenAIRE

    Kozarzewski, P.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents early results of the survey of 84 Polish privatised industrial companies, sampled from a list of the 500 biggest firms. Three aspects of corporate governance were analysed: ownership structure, management of the companies, and supervision structures. An attempt was made to assess the influence of corporate governance characterisics on companies' performance. The main conclusion of the paper is that privatisation of the largest enterprises resulted in deep changes to their c...

  11. Unambiguous determination of structure parameters for soft matter samples made possible with polarization analysis on JCNS SANS using a 3He spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Babcock, E; Radulescu, A; Pipich, V

    2010-01-01

    Incoherent background can create an intrinsic problem for standard small angle neutron scattering measurements. Biological samples contain hydrogen which is a strong incoherent scatterer thus creating an intrinsic source of background that makes determination of the coherent scattering parameters difficult in special situations. This can especially be true for the Q-range from around 0.1-0.5 \\AA^-1 where improper knowledge of the background level can lead to ambiguity in determination of the samples structure parameters. Polarization analysis is a way of removing this ambiguity by allowing one to distinguish the coherent from incoherent scattering, even when the coherent scattering is only a small fraction of the total scattered intensity. ^3He spin filters are ideal for accomplishing this task because they permit the analysis of large area and large divergence scattered neutron beams without adding to detector background or changing the prorogation of the scattered neutron beam. This rapid note describes the...

  12. Spin-polarized electronic structure of the Ni(001) surface and thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Madsen, J.; Andersen, O. K.

    1982-01-01

    of the five-layer film is used to calculate the electronic structure of a 13-layer film. The theoretical work function of 5.4 eV agrees well with the experimental value of 5.2 eV. The calculated spin moments are ordered ferromagnetically in all the films considered, and the moments of the atoms in the surface...... layer are 0.95, 0.69, and 0.65 Bohr magnetons for the one-, three-, and five-layer films, respectively. The moment of an atom in the central layer of the five-layer film is 0.61 Bohr magnetons as compared with the calculated (experimental) bulk value of 0.59±0.01 (0.56) Bohr magnetons. The increase...... of the magnetic moment at the surface is mainly of d(x2-y2) character. The calculated 4s contribution to the hyperfine field changes sign and becomes positive in the outermost layer. Near k=0, between the Fermi level and the d-band edge (which lies 0.3 eV below the Fermi level), we find no majority-spin surface...

  13. Polarized scattering of light for arbitrary magnetic fields with level-crossings from the combination of hyperfine and fine structure splittings

    CERN Document Server

    Sowmya, K; Sampoorna, M; Stenflo, J O

    2015-01-01

    Interference between magnetic substates of the hyperfine structure states belonging to different fine structure states of the same term influences the polarization for some of the diagnostically important lines of the Sun's spectrum, like the sodium and lithium doublets. The polarization signatures of this combined interference contain information on the properties of the solar magnetic fields. Motivated by this, in the present paper, we study the problem of polarized scattering on a two-term atom with hyperfine structure by accounting for the partial redistribution in the photon frequencies arising due to the Doppler motions of the atoms. We consider the scattering atoms to be under the influence of a magnetic field of arbitrary strength and develop a formalism based on the Kramers--Heisenberg approach to calculate the scattering cross section for this process. We explore the rich polarization effects that arise from various level-crossings in the Paschen--Back regime in a single scattering case using the li...

  14. Modeling environmental changes from measures of spatial environmental structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Ciobanu, Mircea; Nicolae, Doina N.; Talianu, Camelia

    2004-10-01

    Change is intrinsic to ecosystems, but is also the essence of instability and the outgrowth of situations that lack sustainability. It must also be recognized that change can be associated with either restoration or degradation. Compressed multiband image data provides increased flexibility and practicality for systematic change detection on a regional basis. Combining such capability with conceptual extensions of spatial pattern analysis represents a methodology for systematically monitoring spatial structure of spectral change across landscapes in order to profile characteristic broad scale regimes of change and to indicate trends in those regimes. Sustainability and ecosystem health are watchwords of contemporary ecosystem management. To solve urgent needs in application of remote sensing data, environmental change must be detected based on monitoring spatial and temporal regimes across landscapes. Environmental landscape level indices are used to examine land cover transitions. Based on classified TM images for North-Western Black Sea, Constantza urban area, Romania, conditional probability matrices of land cover transition are compared to measures of landscape structure. Based on proper algorithms for structural composition modeling were defined landscape elements being estimated the probabilistic behavior of pixels. This approach suggests a means of linking the probabilistic behavior of the fine scale dynamics to the pattern observed at larger spatial scales.

  15. Bias and population structure in the actuation of sound change

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, James

    2015-01-01

    Why do human languages change at some times, and not others? We address this longstanding question from a computational perspective, focusing on the case of sound change. Sound change arises from the pronunciation variability ubiquitous in every speech community, but most such variability does not lead to change. Hence, an adequate model must allow for stability as well as change. Existing theories of sound change tend to emphasize factors at the level of individual learners promoting one outcome or the other, such as channel bias (which favors change) or inductive bias (which favors stability). Here, we consider how the interaction of these biases can lead to both stability and change in a population setting. We find that population structure itself can act as a source of stability, but that both stability and change are possible only when both types of bias are active, suggesting that it is possible to understand why sound change occurs at some times and not others as the population-level result of the inte...

  16. Structural Changes in Rice Bran Protein upon Different Extrusion Temperatures: A Raman Spectroscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linyi Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is critically evaluated to establish the limits to which it may be used to detect changes in protein conformation upon extrusion. Rice bran protein (RBP extruded with different temperatures (100, 120, 140, and 160°C, labeled as ERBP- was considered. DSC showed that extrusion at 100°C increased TD of RBP but decreased its ΔH, while, after extrusion treatment at 120°C, RBP completely denatured. A progressive increase in unordered structure and a general decrease in α-helix structure and β-sheet structure of extruded RBP were observed from Raman study. Meanwhile the content of unordered structure increased up to 140°C and then decreased at 160°C, while the trend of α-helix and β-sheet content was opposite, which was contributed to the composite effect of formation of some more protein aggregation and protein denaturation. Extrusion generally induced a significant decrease in Trp band near 760 cm−1 but an increase at 160°C. No significant difference was observed in Tyr doublet ratios between controlled RBP samples and extruded RBP below 160°C, whereas Tyr doublet ratios of extruded RBP decreased at 160°C. Intensity of the band assigned to CHn bending decreased progressively and then increased as extrusion temperature increased, indicating changes in microenvironment and polarity.

  17. Investigating the relationship between changes in collagen fiber orientation during skin aging and collagen/water interactions by polarized-FTIR microimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklouh-Molinier, Christophe; Happillon, Teddy; Bouland, Nicole; Fichel, Caroline; Diébold, Marie-Danièle; Angiboust, Jean-François; Manfait, Michel; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; Piot, Olivier

    2015-09-21

    Upon chronological aging, human skin undergoes structural and molecular modifications, especially at the level of type I collagen. This macromolecule is one of the main dermal structural proteins and presents several age-related alterations. It exhibits a triple helical structure and assembles itself to form fibrils and fibers. In addition, water plays an important role in stabilizing the collagen triple helix by forming hydrogen-bonds between collagen residues. However, the influence of water on changes of dermal collagen fiber orientation with age has not been yet understood. Polarized-Fourier Transform Infrared (P-FTIR) imaging is an interesting biophotonic approach to determine in situ the orientation of type I collagen fibers, as we have recently shown by comparing skin samples of different ages. In this work, P-FTIR spectral imaging was performed on skin samples from two age groups (35- and 38-year-old on the one hand, 60- and 66-year-old on the other hand), and our analyses were focused on the effect of H2O/D2O substitution. Spectral data were processed with fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering in order to distinguish different orientations of collagen fibers. We demonstrated that the orientation was altered with aging, and that D2O treatment, affecting primarily highly bound water molecules, is more marked for the youngest skin samples. Collagen-bound water-related spectral markers were also highlighted. Our results suggest a weakening of water/collagen interactions with age. This non-destructive and label-free methodology allows us to understand better the importance of bound water in collagen fiber orientation alterations occurring with skin aging. Obtaining such structural information could find benefits in dermatology as well as in cosmetics. PMID:26120602

  18. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Attenburrow, Don P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. × 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components.

  19. Extracellular Matrix components regulate cellular polarity and tissue structure in the developing and mature Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  20. Drifting field-aligned density structures in the night-side polar cap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Pickett, J. S.; Maršálek, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 32, - (2005), L06106-1. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0832; GA MŠk ME 650; GA MŠk 1P05ME811 Grant ostatní: NASA (US) NAG5-9974; NASA (US) NNG04GB98G; NSF(US) 0307319; ESA PECS(XE) 98025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Magnetospheric Physics * Plasma convection * Plasma waves and instabilities * Polar cap phenomena * Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.491, year: 2005

  1. Bistable states of TM polarized non-linear waves guided by symmetric layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispersion relations for TM polarized non-linear waves propagating in a symmetric single film optical waveguide are derived. The system consists of a layer of thickness d with dielectric constant epsilon1 bounded at two sides by a non-linear medium characterized by the diagonal dielectric tensor epsilon11=epsilon22=epsilon0, epsilon33=epsilon0+α|E3|2, where E3 is the normal electric field component. For sufficiently large d/lambda (lambda is the wavelength) we predict bistable states of both symmetric and antisymmetric modes provided that the power flow is the control parameter. (author)

  2. The collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical coherence tomography and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography images of equine articular cartilage are presented. Measurements were made on intact joint surfaces. Significant (e.g. x 2) variations in the intrinsic birefringence were found over spatial scales of a few millimetres, even on samples taken from young (18 month) animals that appeared visually homogeneous. A comparison of data obtained on a control tissue (equine flexor tendon) further suggests that significant variations in the orientation of the collagen fibres relative to the plane of the joint surface exist. Images of visually damaged cartilage tissue show characteristic features both in terms of the distribution of optical scatterers and of the birefringent components

  3. Constructional change, paradigmatic structure and the orientation of usage processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltoft, Lars

    2014-01-01

    strategy different from a description in terms of prototypicality, but compatible with it. The identification of changes in the paradigmatic organisation of constructions is a precondition for identifying and interpreting the changes we observe in usage. In a concluding example, the reanalyses of the verbs...... bebrejde ‘reproach’ and gifte sig ‘marry’ are compared, and two kinds of usage processes (actualisation processes) are identified: (1) actualisation processes that are a consequence of structural change in the sense of reanalysis, and (2) processes of redistribution which, in the present case, move verb...

  4. Muscle structural changes in mitochondrial myopathy relate to genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, David B.; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Ørngreen, Mette C.;

    2003-01-01

    typically not been associated with mitochondrial disease. We investigated gross and microscopic muscle morphology in thigh muscles by muscle biopsy and MRI in 16 patients with MM, and compared findings with those obtained in muscular dystrophy patients and healthy subjects. Changes of muscle architecture......It is well known that morphological changes at the cellular level occur in muscle of patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but changes in muscle structure with fat infiltration and gross variation of muscle fiber size with giant fibers, normally encountered in the muscular dystrophies, have...

  5. Investigating crystalline-polarity-dependent electronic structures of GaN by hard x-ray photoemission and ab-initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Takeo; Ueda, Shigenori; Suzuki, Motohiro; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Williams, Jesse R.; Ohashi, Naoki

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline-polarity-dependent electronic structures of gallium nitride (GaN) were studied by photoemission spectroscopy (PES) using soft and hard x-rays with different linear polarizations. A peak located near the valence band (VB) maximum was enhanced for a (0001) surface compared with that for a ( 000 1 ¯ ) surface regardless of photon energy. Comparison of the VB density of states obtained by ab-initio calculations with the observed VB-PES spectra indicates that the crystalline-polarity dependence is associated with the Ga 4p and N 2p states. The most plausible origin of the crystalline-polarity-dependent VB feature is based on the photoemission phenomena of electrons in the pz-orbitals due to spontaneous electric polarization along the c-axis of GaN.

  6. THE STRUCTURE AND LINEAR POLARIZATION OF THE KILOPARSEC-SCALE JET OF THE QUASAR 3C 345

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep Very Large Array imaging of the quasar 3C 345 at 4.86 and 8.44 GHz has been used to study the structure and linear polarization of its radio jet on scales ranging from 2 to 30 kpc. There is a 7-8 Jy unresolved core with spectral index α ≅ –0.24 (Iν∝να). The jet (typical intensity 15 mJy beam–1) consists of a 2.''5 straight section containing two knots, and two additional non-co-linear knots at the end. The jet's total projected length is about 27 kpc. The spectral index of the jet varies over –1.1 ∼ 0.5. Despite the indication of jet precession in the total intensity structure, the polarization images suggest instead a jet re-directed at least twice by collisions with the external medium. Surprisingly, the electric vector position angles in the main body of the jet are neither longitudinal nor transverse, but make an angle of about 55° with the jet axis in the middle while along the edges the vectors are transverse, suggesting a helical magnetic field. There is no significant Faraday rotation in the source, so that is not the cause of the twist. The fractional polarization in the jet averages 25% and is higher at the edges. In a companion paper, Roberts and Wardle show that differential Doppler boosting in a diverging relativistic velocity field can explain the electric vector pattern in the jet.

  7. Internal structure changes of eyelash induced by eye makeup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Ken-Ichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kawai, Tomomitsu; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how eye makeup affects eyelash structure, internal structure of eyelashes were observed with a scanning X-ray microscopic tomography system using synchrotron radiation light source. Eyelash samples were obtained from 36 Japanese women aged 20-70 years and whose use of eye makeup differed. Reconstructed cross-sectional images showed that the structure of the eyelash closely resembled that of scalp hair. The eyelash structure is changed by use of eye makeup. There was a positive correlation between the frequency of mascara use and the degree of cracking in cuticle. The positive correlation was also found between the frequency of mascara use and the porosity of the cortex. By contrast, the use of eyelash curler did not affect the eyelash structure with statistical significance. PMID:25507464

  8. Internal structure changes of eyelash induced by eye makeup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Ken-Ichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kawai, Tomomitsu; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how eye makeup affects eyelash structure, internal structure of eyelashes were observed with a scanning X-ray microscopic tomography system using synchrotron radiation light source. Eyelash samples were obtained from 36 Japanese women aged 20-70 years and whose use of eye makeup differed. Reconstructed cross-sectional images showed that the structure of the eyelash closely resembled that of scalp hair. The eyelash structure is changed by use of eye makeup. There was a positive correlation between the frequency of mascara use and the degree of cracking in cuticle. The positive correlation was also found between the frequency of mascara use and the porosity of the cortex. By contrast, the use of eyelash curler did not affect the eyelash structure with statistical significance. PMID:25423741

  9. Atomistic mechanisms governing structural stability change of zinc antimony thermoelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaolong [Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710054 (China); Lin, Jianping, E-mail: jaredlin@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China); Qiao, Guanjun [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Zhao, E-mail: zwangzhao@gmail.com [Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710054 (China); State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-01-05

    The structural stability of thermoelectric materials is a subject of growing importance for their energy harvesting applications. Here, we study the microscopic mechanisms governing the structural stability change of zinc antimony at its working temperature, using molecular dynamics combined with experimental measurements of the electrical and thermal conductivity. Our results show that the temperature-dependence of the thermal and electrical transport coefficients is strongly correlated with a structural transition. This is found to be associated with a relaxation process, in which a group of Zn atoms migrates between interstitial sites. This atom migration gradually leads to a stabilizing structural transition of the entire crystal framework, and then results in a more stable crystal structure of β–Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} at high temperature.

  10. CALCULATION OF THE FINE STRUCTURE OF OXYGEN-LIKE IONS USING THE POLARIZATION POTENTIAL FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG YONG; WANG RONG; JIANG GANG; ZHU ZHENG-HE

    2001-01-01

    We have calculated the forbidden transition energies and magnetic dipole transition probabilities of 2s22p4(3pl-3P2) and 2s22p4 (3p0-3p1) of oxygen-like isoelectronic sequences (Z=10-32) by a method of polarization potential correction. The transition energies show good agreement with experiment and are much better than the calculations in the literature. These results also illustrate that it is feasible to use the dipole expansion of the polarization potential to deal with some dynamic and non-dynamic effects in the central field approach. The relation of polarizability and cut-off radius with atomic number is discussed. We also give the fitted formula between the polarizability α1 and atomic number Z as c1 =0.73429-9.56644× 10-4Z+7.43016× 10-5Z2 -2.53298×10-6Z3+2.08306× 10-8Z4.

  11. Effective Organizational Structures and Processes: Addressing Issues of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes organizational structures and processes at the institutional and project levels for the development and support of distance learning initiatives. It addresses environmental and stakeholder issues and explores principles and strategies of effective leadership for change creation and management.

  12. Changes in Age Structure and Rural Community Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, David A.

    1985-01-01

    Whatever migration patterns evolve, changes in the age structure mean that rural communities in general can expect fairly stable elementary school population, reduced high school population, slower growth in new business and employment, and continued increase in the elderly population. (JHZ)

  13. Changes in plasma membrane structure upon irradiation on thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymocytes were irradiated with doses of 4 to 104 Gy. The binding of 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulphonate and Ca2+ to plasma membranes; viscosity and lipid peroxidation; Stern-Folmer constant; and the number of Sh-groups of membrane proteins were determined. The structural changes in plasma membranes after irradiation of thymocytes were found to be cooperative

  14. CHANGES IN THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF THERMALLY TREATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birol Uner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the chemical structure of hornbeam and uludag fir woods during thermal treatment were investigated at three temperatures (170, 190, and 210 oC and three durations (4, 8, and 12 hours. After thermal treatment, the extents of degradation in the chemical structure of the samples were determined, and the effects on the chemical composition of hornbeam wood and uludag fir wood were investigated. The data obtained were analyzed using variance analysis, and Tukey’s test was used to determine the changes in the chemical structure of uludag fir and hornbeam woods. The results showed that heating wood permanently changes several of its chemical structures and that the changes are mainly caused by thermal degradation of wood polymers. It was found that decreasing of the cellulose and holocelluloses ratio had a favorable effect on the interaction of the wood with moisture. According to the obtained results, hornbeam wood is affected more than uludag fir wood. For each wood, the maximum decreases of holocellulose and α-cellulose were found at 210oC for 12 hours, and the maximum increase of lignin occurred at the same treatment combination.

  15. North polar region of Mars: Advances in stratigraphy, structure, and erosional modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Skinner, James A.; Bourke, Mary C.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Eric J.; Okubo, Chris H.

    2008-08-01

    We have remapped the geology of the north polar plateau on Mars, Planum Boreum, and the surrounding plains of Vastitas Borealis using altimetry and image data along with thematic maps resulting from observations made by the Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. New and revised geographic and geologic terminologies assist with effectively discussing the various features of this region. We identify 7 geologic units making up Planum Boreum and at least 3 for the circumpolar plains, which collectively span the entire Amazonian Period. The Planum Boreum units resolve at least 6 distinct depositional and 5 erosional episodes. The first major stage of activity includes the Early Amazonian (˜3 to 1 Ga) deposition (and subsequent erosion) of the thick (locally exceeding 1000 m) and evenly-layered Rupes Tenuis unit (A Brt), which ultimately formed approximately half of the base of Planum Boreum. As previously suggested, this unit may be sourced by materials derived from the nearby Scandia region, and we interpret that it may correlate with the deposits that regionally underlie pedestal craters in the surrounding lowland plains. The second major episode of activity during the Middle to Late Amazonian ( ˜Olympia Planum underlying the dunes of Olympia Undae are interpreted to consist mostly of the Planum Boreum cavi unit (A Bb c). Planum Boreum materials were then deeply eroded to form spiral troughs, Chasma Boreale, and marginal scarps that define the major aspects of the polar plateau's current regional topography. Locally- to regionally-extensive (though vertically minor) episodes of deposition of evenly-bedded, light- and dark-toned layered materials and subsequent erosion of these materials persisted throughout the Late Amazonian. Sand saltation, including dune migration, is likely to account for much of the erosion of Planum Boreum, particularly at its margin, alluding to the lengthy sedimentological history of the

  16. Measurements of relativistic emission from runaway electrons in Alcator C-Mod: spectrum, polarization, and spatial structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granetz, Robert; Mumgaard, Robert

    2014-10-01

    At low densities, runaway electrons (RE's) can be generated during the flattop of Alcator C-Mod discharges with highly relativistic energies, γ >> 1 , allowing careful study under steady conditions. These RE's emit light in a narrow forward-peaked cone which is detected with a number of diagnostics, including spectrometers, a video imaging camera, and polarimetry (using the MSE system), in addition to the standard hard x-ray detectors. These measurements of the relativistic emission can provide information about the RE energy distribution, pitch angle distribution, and spatial distribution. Unlike most other tokamaks, C-Mod's high magnetic field shifts the peak of the continuum emission into the visible, due to the smaller gyroradius and higher gyro-frequency, allowing for excellent spectral coverage with standard spectrometers, and thus detailed comparison to theoretical predictions of synchrotron and bremsstrahlung spectra. Additionally, camera images occasionally show highly structured formations. Profiles of the polarization fraction and polarization angle show radial structure, including a jump of 90° outboard of the magnetic axis, in qualitative agreement with recent theoretical calculations for relativistic electrons in a tokamak field. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN THE RAT TESTES CAUSED BY DIAZINON ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. TOMAN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find the structural changes in the rat testis after a diazinon administration. The testis structure changes after the diazinon administration of 20 mg/kg b.w. (i.p. and daily dose of 40 mg/l in drinking water (p.o. were evaluated in light microscopy. 36 hours after the diazion i.p. administration, the vacuolization of the seminiferous epithelium, evacuation of germ cells into the tubule lumen, epithelium necrosis and interstitium extension were observed. After 90 days of daily oral administration, the changes in the testis were not as visible as in the acute intoxication. The germ cells released from the basal lamina and then were visible in the tubule lumen. Diazinon causes the damage of the germinal epithelium in the testes leading to the spermatogenesis failure. The infertility can then appear.

  18. Social dilemma structures hidden behind traffic flow with lane changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming to merge traffic flow analysis with evolutionary game theory, we investigated the question of whether such structures can be formed from frequent lane changes in usual traffic flow without any explicit bottlenecks. In our model system, two classes of driver-agents coexist: C-agents (cooperative strategy) always remain in the lane they are initially assigned, whereas D-agents (defective strategy) try to change lanes to move ahead. In relatively high-density flows, such as the metastable and high-density phases, we found structures that correspond to either n-person prisoner dilemma (n-PD) games or quasi-PD games. In these situations, lane changes by D-agents create heavy traffic jams that reduce social efficiency. (paper)

  19. Inflatable shape changing colonies assembling versatile smart space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Thomas; Hilbich, Daniel; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    Various plants have the ability to follow the sun with their flowers or leaves during the course of a day via a mechanism known as heliotropism. This mechanism is characterised by the introduction of pressure gradients between neighbouring motor cells in the plant's stem, enabling the stem to bend. By adapting this bio-inspired mechanism to mechanical systems, a new class of smart structures can be created. The developed overall structure is made up of a number of cellular colonies, each consisting of a central pressure source surrounded by multiple cells. After launch, the cellular arrays are deployed in space and are either preassembled or alternatively are attached together during their release or afterwards. A central pressure source is provided by a high-pressure storage unit with an integrated valve, which provides ingress gas flow to the system; the gas is then routed through the system via a sequence of valve operations and cellular actuations, allowing for any desired shape to be achieved within the constraints of the deployed array geometry. This smart structure consists of a three dimensional adaptable cellular array with fluid controlling Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) components enabling the structure to change its global shape. The proposed MEMS components include microvalves, pressure sensors, mechanical interconnect structures, and electrical routing. This paper will also give an overview of the system architecture and shows the feasibility and shape changing capabilities of the proposed design with multibody dynamic simulations. Example applications of this lightweight shape changing structure include concentrators, mirrors, and communications antennas that are able to dynamically change their focal point, as well as substructures for solar sails that are capable of steering through solar winds by altering the sails' subjected area.

  20. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelkmar, Pär; Niemelä, Perttu S; Vattulainen, Ilpo;

    2009-01-01

    the crystal structure where the hyperpolarization destabilizes S4-lipid hydrogen bonds, which leads to the helix rotating to keep the arginine side chains away from the hydrophobic phase, and the driving force for final relaxation by downward translation is partly entropic, which would explain the......, including up to 120 degrees rotation of the S4 segment, changes in hydrogen-bonding patterns, but only low amounts of translation. A smaller rotation ( approximately 35 degrees ) of the extracellular end of all S4 segments is present also in a reference 0.5 micros simulation without applied field, which...... indicates that the crystal structure might be slightly different from the natural state of the voltage sensor. The conformation change upon hyperpolarization is closely coupled to an increase in 3(10) helix contents in S4, starting from the intracellular side. This could support a model for transition from...