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Sample records for changing channel protein

  1. Lipid ion channels and the role of proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Mosgaard, Lars D

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes in the absence of proteins can display quantized conduction events for ions that are virtually indistinguishable from those of protein channel. By indistinguishable we mean that one cannot decide based on the current trace alone whether conductance events originate from a membrane, which does or does not contain channel proteins. Additional evidence is required to distinguish between the two cases, and it is not always certain that such evidence can be provided. The phenomenological similarities are striking and span a wide range of phenomena: The typical conductances are of equal order and both lifetime distributions and current histograms are similar. One finds conduction bursts, flickering, and multistep-conductance. Lipid channels can be gated by voltage, and can be blocked by drugs. They respond to changes in lateral membrane tension and temperature. Thus, they behave like voltage-gated, temperature-gated and mechano-sensitive protein channels, or like receptors. Lipid channels ...

  2. The human role in changing river channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, K. J.

    2006-09-01

    Direct consequences of the human role, where human activity affects river channels through engineering works including channelization, dam construction, diversion and culverting, have been long recognised [Marsh, G.P., 1864. Man and Nature or Physical Geography as Modified by Human Action. Charles Scribner, New York; Thomas Jr., W.L., (ed.) 1956. Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.]. The less obvious indirect effects of point and reach changes occurring downstream and throughout the basin, however, are much more recently appreciated, dating from key contributions by Strahler [Strahler, A.N., 1956. The nature of induced erosion and aggradation. In W. L. Thomas (Ed.), Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 621-638.], Wolman [Wolman, M.G., 1967. A cycle of sedimentation and erosion in urban river channels. Geografiska Annaler 49A, 385-95.], Schumm [Schumm, S.A., 1969. River metamorphosis. Proceedings American Society of Civil Engineers, Journal Hydraulics Division 95, 255-73.], and Graf [Graf, W.L., 1977. The rate law in fluvial geomorphology. American Journal of Science, 277, 178-191.]. These are complemented by effects of alterations of land use, such as deforestation, intensive agriculture and incidence of fire, with the most extreme effects produced by building activity and urbanisation. Changing river channels are most evident in the channel cross-section where changes of size, shape and composition are now well-established, with up to tenfold increases or decreases illustrated by results from more than 200 world studies. In addition the overall channel planform, the network and the ecology have changed. Specific terms have become associated with changing river channels including enlargement, shrinkage and metamorphosis. Although the scope of adjustment has been established, it has not always been possible to predict what will happen in a particular location

  3. Modulation of KCNQ4 channel activity by changes in cell volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Charlotte; Klaerke, Dan A; Hoffmann, Else K;

    2004-01-01

    KCNQ4 channels expressed in HEK 293 cells are sensitive to cell volume changes, being activated by swelling and inhibited by shrinkage, respectively. The KCNQ4 channels contribute significantly to the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) process following cell swelling. Under isoosmotic conditions......, the KCNQ4 channel activity is modulated by protein kinases A and C, G protein activation, and a reduction in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but these signalling pathways are not responsible for the increased channel activity during cell swelling....

  4. Probing Protein Channel Dynamics At The Single Molecule Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. Ann; Dunn, Robert C.

    1997-03-01

    It would be difficult to overstate the importance played by protein ion channels in cellular function. These macromolecular pores allow the passage of ions across the cellular membrane and play indispensable roles in all aspects of neurophysiology. While the patch-clamp technique continues to provide elegant descriptions of the kinetic processes involved in ion channel gating, the associated conformational changes remain a mystery. We are using the spectroscopic capabilities and single molecule fluorescence sensitivity of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe these dynamics at the single channel level. Using a newly developed cantilevered NSOM probe capable of probing soft biological samples with single molecule fluorescence sensitivity, we have begun mapping the location of single NMDA receptors in intact rat cortical neurons with <100 nm spatial resolution. We will also present recent results exploring the conformational changes accompanying activation of nuclear pore channels located in the nuclear membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Our recent NSOM and AFM measurements on single nuclear pore complexes reveal large conformational changes taking place upon activation, providing rich, new molecular level details of channel function.

  5. Channel changes downstream from a dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, R.F.; Emmett, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    A flood-control dam was completed during 1979 on Bear Creek, a small tributary stream to the South Platte River in the Denver, Colorado, area. Before and after dam closure, repetitive surveys between 1977 and 1992 at five cross sections downstream of the dam documented changes in channel morphology. During this 15-year period, channel width increased slightly, but channel depth increased by more than 40 percent. Within the study reach, stream gradient decreased and median bed material sizes coarsened from sand in the pools and fine gravel on the riffle to a median coarse gravel throughout the reach. The most striking visual change was from a sparse growth of streamside grasses to a dense growth of riparian woody vegetation.

  6. Intra-membrane molecular interactions of K+ channel proteins :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moczydlowski, Edward G.

    2013-07-01

    Ion channel proteins regulate complex patterns of cellular electrical activity and ionic signaling. Certain K+ channels play an important role in immunological biodefense mechanisms of adaptive and innate immunity. Most ion channel proteins are oligomeric complexes with the conductive pore located at the central subunit interface. The long-term activity of many K+ channel proteins is dependent on the concentration of extracellular K+; however, the mechanism is unclear. Thus, this project focused on mechanisms underlying structural stability of tetrameric K+ channels. Using KcsA of Streptomyces lividans as a model K+ channel of known structure, the molecular basis of tetramer stability was investigated by: 1. Bioinformatic analysis of the tetramer interface. 2. Effect of two local anesthetics (lidocaine, tetracaine) on tetramer stability. 3. Molecular simulation of drug docking to the ion conduction pore. The results provide new insights regarding the structural stability of K+ channels and its possible role in cell physiology.

  7. ThermoTRP channels as modular proteins with allosteric gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Ramon; Brauchi, Sebastian; Orta, Gerardo; Zaelzer, Cristián; Vargas, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    Ion channels activate by sensing stimuli such as membrane voltage, ligand binding or temperature and transduce this information into conformational changes that open the channel pore. Thus, a key question in understanding ion channel function is how do the protein domains involved in sensing stimuli (sensors) and opening the pore (gates) communicate. In this regard, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels that confer thermosensation [A. Dhaka, V. Viswanath, A. Patapoutian, TRP ion channels and temperature sensation, Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 29 (2006) 135-161; I.S. Ramsey, M. Delling, D.E. Clapham, An introduction to TRP channels, Annu. Rev. Physiol. 68 (2006) 619-647] (thermoTRP; Q(10)>10) are unique to the extent that they integrate a variety of physical and chemical stimuli. In some cases such as, for example, the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 [M.J. Caterina, M.A. Schumacher, M. Tominaga, T.A. Rosen, J.D. Levine, D. Julius, The capsaicin receptor: a heat-activated ion channel in the pain pathway, Nature 389 (1997) 816-824] and TRPA1 [G.M. Story, A.M. Peier, A.J. Reeve, S.R. Eid, J. Mosbacher, T.R. Hricik, T.J. Earley, A.C. Hergarden, D.A. Andersson, S.W. Hwang, P. McIntyre, T. Jegla, S. Bevan, A. Patapoutian, ANKTM1, a TRP-like channel expressed in nociceptive neurons, is activated by cold temperatures, Cell 112 (2003) 819-829; S. Jordt, D. Julius, Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chilli peppers, Cell 108 (2002) 421-430] the integration of these stimuli elicit pain [M. Tominaga, M.J. Caterina, A.B. Malmberg, T.A. Rosen, H. Gilbert, K. Skinner, B.E. Raumann, A.I. Basbaum, D. Julius, The cloned capsaicin receptor integrates multiple pain-producing stimuli, Neuron 21 (1998) 531-543; M. Bandell, A. Dubin, M. Petrus, A. Orth, J. Mathur, S. Hwang, A. Patapoutian, High-throughput random mutagenesis screen reveals TRPM8 residues specifically required for activation by menthol, Nat. Neurosci. 9 (2006) 466-468; S. Zurborg, B. Yurgionas, JA. Jira, O

  8. River Morphology and River Channel Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Howard H

    2008-01-01

    River morphology has been a subject of great challenge to scientists and engineers who recognize that any effort with regard to river engineering must be based on a proper understanding of the morphological features involved and the responses to the imposed changes. In this paper,an overview of river morphology is presented from the geomorphic viewpoint. Included in the scope are the regime concept, river channel classification, thresholds in river morphology, and geomor-phic analysis of river responses. Analytical approach to river morphology based on the physical principles for the hydraulics of flow and sediment transport processes is also presented. The appli-cation of analytical river morphology is demonstrated by an example. Modeling is the modern tech-nique to determine both short-term and long-term river channel responses to any change in the en-vironment. The physical foundation of fluvial process-response must be applied in formatting a mathematical model. A brief introduction of the mathematical model FLUVIAL-12 is described.

  9. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  10. Ancient association between cation leak channels and Mid1 proteins is conserved in fungi and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo eGhezzi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal resting potential can tune the excitability of neural networks, affecting downstream behavior. Sodium leak channels (NALCN play a key role in rhythmic behaviors by helping set, or subtly changing neuronal resting potential. The full complexity of these newly described channels is just beginning to be appreciated, however. NALCN channels can associate with numerous subunits in different tissues and can be activated by several different peptides and second messengers. We recently showed that NALCN channels are closely related to fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. Here, we use this relationship to predict a family of NALCN-associated proteins in animals on the basis of homology with the yeast protein Mid1, the subunit of the yeast calcium channel. These proteins all share a cysteine-rich region that is necessary for Mid1 function in yeast. We validate this predicted association by showing that the Mid1 homolog in Drosophila, encoded by the CG33988 gene, is coordinately expressed with NALCN, and that knockdown of either protein creates identical phenotypes in several behaviors associated with NALCN function. The relationship between Mid1 and leak channels has therefore persisted over a billion years of evolution, despite drastic changes to both proteins and the organisms in which they exist.

  11. Fluorometric functional assay for ion channel proteins in lipid nanovesicle membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patti, J T [Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Montemagno, C D [College of Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Voltage-gated membrane proteins function as biomolecular transistors, making them attractive components for biologically based nanodevices. A functional assay for purified channel proteins is described and demonstrated with sodium selective, voltage-gated NaChBac ion channels. Purified NaChBac proteins were incorporated into a nanovesicle system utilizing oxonol VI, a fluorescent indicator of trans-membrane voltage. The ionophore valinomycin was used to trigger a change in membrane potential, allowing the observation of sodium permeability using a fluorometer. This method is suitable for concurrently testing a large population of purified proteins prior to incorporation in nanodevices.

  12. Fluorometric functional assay for ion channel proteins in lipid nanovesicle membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, J. T.; Montemagno, C. D.

    2007-08-01

    Voltage-gated membrane proteins function as biomolecular transistors, making them attractive components for biologically based nanodevices. A functional assay for purified channel proteins is described and demonstrated with sodium selective, voltage-gated NaChBac ion channels. Purified NaChBac proteins were incorporated into a nanovesicle system utilizing oxonol VI, a fluorescent indicator of trans-membrane voltage. The ionophore valinomycin was used to trigger a change in membrane potential, allowing the observation of sodium permeability using a fluorometer. This method is suitable for concurrently testing a large population of purified proteins prior to incorporation in nanodevices.

  13. Noise analysis of ionization kinetics in a protein ion channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    1993-08-01

    We observed excess current noise generated by the reversible ionization of sites in a transmembrane protein ion channel, which is analogous to current fluctuations found recently in solid state microstructure electronic devices. Specifically the current through fully open single channels formed by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin shows pH dependent fluctuations. We show that noise analysis of the open channel current can be used to evaluate the ionization rate constants, the number of sites participating in the ionization process, and the effect of recharging a single site on the channel conductance.

  14. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Hildebrand

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7, and B (between TM5 and 6, respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all

  15. Amphiphile regulation of ion channel function by changes in the bilayer spring constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Koeppe, R.E.; Andersen, Oluf Sten

    2010-01-01

    effect of amphiphiles, at concentrations often used in biological research, on the bilayer elastic response to a change in the hydrophobic length of an embedded protein. The effects of structurally diverse amphiphiles can be described by changes in a phenomenological bilayer spring constant (H......Many drugs are amphiphiles that, in addition to binding to a particular target protein, adsorb to cell membrane lipid bilayers and alter intrinsic bilayer physical properties (e. g., bilayer thickness, monolayer curvature, and elastic moduli). Such changes can modulate membrane protein function......-B) that summarizes the bilayer elastic properties, as sensed by a bilayer-spanning protein. Amphiphile-induced changes in H-B, measured using gA channels of a particular length, quantitatively predict changes in lifetime for channels of a different length-as well as changes in the inactivation of voltage...

  16. Regulation of heartbeat by G protein-coupled ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M

    1990-12-01

    The coupling of ion channels to receptors by G proteins is the subject of this American Physiological Society Walter B. Cannon Memorial "Physiology in Perspective" Lecture. This subject is particularly appropriate because it includes a molecular explanation of a homeostatic mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system and the latter subject preoccupied Dr. Cannon during most of his career. With the use of reconstitution methods, we and others have shown that heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins couple receptors to ion channels by both membrane-delimited, direct pathways and cytoplasmic second messenger pathways. Furthermore, one set of receptors may be coupled to as many as three different sets of ion channels to form networks. Dual G protein pathways lead to the prediction of biphasic ion current responses in cell signaling, and this prediction was confirmed. In sinoatrial pacemaker cells, the pacemaking hyperpolarization-activated inward current (If) is directly regulated by the G proteins Gs and Go, and the two can act simultaneously. This could explain the classical observation that vagal inhibition of heart rate is greater during sympathetic stimulation. Because deactivation of the muscarinic response occurs much faster than the G protein alpha-subunit hydrolyzes guanosine 5'-triphosphate, we looked for accessory cellular factors. A surprising result was that the small monomeric ras G protein blocked the muscarinic pathway. The significance of this observation is unknown, but it appears that small and large G proteins may interact in ion channel signaling pathways.

  17. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.;

    2010-01-01

    Membrane protein function is regulated by the host lipid bilayer composition. This regulation may depend on specific chemical interactions between proteins and individual molecules in the bilayer, as well as on non-specific interactions between proteins and the bilayer behaving as a physical enti...... use of gramicidin channels as molecular force probes for studying this mechanism, with a unique ability to discriminate between consequences of changes in monolayer curvature and bilayer elastic moduli....

  18. [Study of changes in Chinese herbal medicine distribution channel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hua; Yang, Guang; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-07-01

    Distribution channel of Chinese herbal medicines has been changing. From Han to Ming Dynasty, Chinese herbal medicine were mainly trafficked to urban by dealers or farmers; From the Ming Dynasty to the foundation of new China, distribution channels are primarily intermediated with township "bazaar" and national distribution center with fixed place and regularly trading hours. In the planned economy period, the state-owned herbal medicine company was the sole medium with monopoly nature. From the mid1980s to the end of last century, planned economy and market economy have been co-existing. Stepping into 21st century, producing area highlighted in the distribution channels. Presence or absence and rise or fall of different types of distribution market went throughout the changing process of distribution channels, which became an important clue. Changes were motivated by economical consideration of channel subject, which originated from commodity characteristic and social environment changes. PMID:25272514

  19. Climate Change and Closure of Thyborøn Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    of the channel. The coasts in the Limfjord are most sensitive to flooding and the climate changes will call for many types of precautions for the rising sea level. The closure of Thyborøn Channel should be understood as an alternative to many local solutions especially in the western part of the fjord....... In general, the public conceives the channel as a preservation-worthy piece of nature but the inconvenient truth is that the channel exists only because of human intervention in the nature. At suggestion of Jørgen Bülow Beck and the author the matter was reopened in 2005 because of the discussion...

  20. Changing water affinity from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in hydrophobic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Shotaro; Kodaira, Tetsuya; Hata, Kenji

    2015-01-27

    The behavior of water at hydrophobic interfaces can play a significant role in determining chemical reaction outcomes and physical properties. Carbon nanotubes and aluminophosphate materials have one-dimensional hydrophobic channels, which are entirely surrounded by hydrophobic interfaces. Unique water behavior was observed in such hydrophobic channels. In this article, changes in the water affinity in one-dimensional hydrophobic channels were assessed using water vapor adsorption isotherms at 303 K and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic behavior of water adsorbed in channels wider than 3 nm was observed for both adsorption and desorption processes, owing to the hydrophobic environment. However, water showed hydrophilic properties in both adsorption and desorption processes in channels narrower than 1 nm. In intermediate-sized channels, the hydrophobic properties of water during the adsorption process were seen to transition to hydrophilic behavior during the desorption process. Hydrophilic properties in the narrow channels for both adsorption and desorption processes are a result of the relatively strong water-channel interactions (10-15 kJ mol(-1)). In the 2-3 nm channels, the water-channel interaction energy of 4-5 kJ mol(-1) was comparable to the thermal translational energy. The cohesive water interaction was approximately 35 kJ mol(-1), which was larger than the others. Thus, the water affinity change in the 2-3 nm channels for the adsorption and desorption processes was attributed to weak water-channel interactions and strong cohesive interactions. These results are inherently important to control the properties of water in hydrophobic environments.

  1. Side-effects of protein kinase inhibitors on ion channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youn Kyoung Son; Hongzoo Park; Amy L Firth; Won Sun Park

    2013-12-01

    Protein kinases are one of the largest gene families and have regulatory roles in all aspects of eukaryotic cell function. Modulation of protein kinase activity is a desirable therapeutic approach for a number of human diseases associated with aberrant kinase activity, including cancers, arthritis and cardiovascular disorders. Several strategies have been used to develop specific and selective protein kinase modulators, primarily via inhibition of phosphorylation and down-regulation of kinase gene expression. These strategies are effective at regulating intracellular signalling pathways, but are unfortunately associated with several undesirable effects, particularly those that modulate ion channel function. In fact, the side-effects have precluded these inhibitors from being both useful experimental tools and therapeutically viable. This review focuses on the ion channel side-effects of several protein kinase inhibitors and specifically on those modulating K+, Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. It is hoped that the information provided with a detailed summary in this review will assist the future development of novel specific and selective compounds targeting protein kinases both for experimental tools and for therapeutic approaches.

  2. Activation of purified calcium channels by stoichiometric protein phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) on their function. Both the rate and extent of 45Ca2+ uptake into vesicles containing reconstituted calcium channels were increased severalfold after incubation with ATP and PK-A. The degree of stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake was linearly proportional to the extent of phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the calcium channel up to a stoichiometry of approximately 1 mol of phosphate incorporated into each subunit. The calcium channels activated by phosphorylation were determined to be incorporated into the reconstituted vesicles in the inside-out orientation and were completely inhibited by low concentrations of dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Mg2+. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between PK-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the purified calcium channel and activation of the ion conductance activity of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels

  3. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels by RGK Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraei, Zafir; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Due to their essential biological roles, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are regulated by a myriad of molecules and mechanisms. Fifteen years ago, RGK proteins were discovered to bind the VGCC β subunit (Cavβ) and potently inhibit high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels. RGKs (Rad, Rem, Rem2 and Gem/Kir) are a family of monomeric small GTPases belonging to the superfamily of Ras GTPases. They exert dual inhibitory effects on VGCCs, decreasing surface expression and suppressing surface channels through immobilization of the voltage sensor or reduction of channel open probability. While Cavβ is required for all forms of RGK inhibition, not all inhibition is mediated by the RGK-Cavβ interaction. Some RGK proteins also interact directly with the pore-forming α1 subunit of some types of VGCCs (Cavα1). Importantly, RGK proteins tonically inhibit VGCCs in native cells, regulating cardiac and neural functions. This minireview summarizes the mechanisms, molecular determinants, and physiological impact of RGK inhibition of VGCCs. PMID:25966691

  4. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  5. Changes in single K+ channel behavior through the lipid phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Seeger, Heiko M; Alessandrini, Andrea; Facci, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    We show that the activity of an ion channel is strictly related to the phase state of the lipid bilayer hosting the channel. By measuring unitary conductance, dwell times, and open probability of the K+ channel KcsA as a function of temperature in lipid bilayers composed of POPE and POPG in different relative proportions, we obtain that all those properties show a trend inversion when the bilayer is in the transition region between the liquid disordered and the solid ordered phase. These data suggest that the physical properties of the lipid bilayer influence ion channel activity likely via a fine tuning of its conformations. In a more general interpretative framework, we suggest that other parameters such as pH, ionic strength, and the action of amphiphilic drugs can affect the physical behavior of the lipid bilayer in a fashion similar to temperature changes resulting in functional changes of transmembrane proteins.

  6. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  7. Single residue substitutions that change the gating properties of a mechanosensitive channel in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, P.; Sukharev, S. I.; Schroeder, M. J.; Nagle, S. K.; Kung, C.

    1996-01-01

    MscL is a channel that opens a large pore in the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane in response to mechanical stress. Previously, we highly enriched the MscL protein by using patch clamp as a functional assay and cloned the corresponding gene. The predicted protein contains a largely hydrophobic core spanning two-thirds of the molecule and a more hydrophilic carboxyl terminal tail. Because MscL had no homology to characterized proteins, it was impossible to predict functional regions of the protein by simple inspection. Here, by mutagenesis, we have searched for functionally important regions of this molecule. We show that a short deletion from the amino terminus (3 amino acids), and a larger deletion of 27 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of this protein, had little if any effect in channel properties. We have thus narrowed the search of the core mechanosensitive mechanism to 106 residues of this 136-amino acid protein. In contrast, single residue substitutions of a lysine in the putative first transmembrane domain or a glutamine in the periplasmic loop caused pronounced shifts in the mechano-sensitivity curves and/or large changes in the kinetics of channel gating, suggesting that the conformational structure in these regions is critical for normal mechanosensitive channel gating.

  8. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  9. Channel changes following headwater reforestation: The Ganaraska river, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reforestation of headwater slopes of the Ganaraska River basin in southern Ontario following World War II has resulted in decreased peak flows and has likely reduced sediment yields. Changes in channel morphology produced by these modifications to the hydrologic regime were examined for a 6.7 km section of river in the context of Schumm's (1977) qualitative model of channel response to reforestation. Flood channel width (measured from air photographs) has decreased since 1928, while cross-sectional measurements during stream gauging in the study section revealed a decrease in the channel's width/depth ratio between 1960 and 1975. Both of these trends agree with Schumm's model. Changes in channel planform were dominated by downstream translation of meander bends and by meander cutoffs. The model predicted an increase in channel sinuosity in response to decreased peak flows and bed-material yield from the basin. However, sinuosity for the entire river section decreased significantly between 1928 and 1988, and only one reach experienced an increase in sinuosity following reforestation. A possible explanation for the model's failure to describe temporal changes in the Ganaraska's sinuosity involves a negative feedback whereby the increased sinuosity produced by decreased flow and sediment yield enhances potential for ice jams and meander cutoffs, which in turn reduce sinuosity. This limited test of Schumm's model suggests that caution be used when applying the model and its variants to reconstructions of basin palaeohydrology, and predictions of channel response to anthropogenic and natural changes to the hydrologic regime. 31 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  10. Evolutionary conservation and changes in insect TRP channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tominaga Makoto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TRP (Transient Receptor Potential channels respond to diverse stimuli and thus function as the primary integrators of varied sensory information. They are also activated by various compounds and secondary messengers to mediate cell-cell interactions as well as to detect changes in the local environment. Their physiological roles have been primarily characterized only in mice and fruit flies, and evolutionary studies are limited. To understand the evolution of insect TRP channels and the mechanisms of integrating sensory inputs in insects, we have identified and compared TRP channel genes in Drosophila melanogaster, Bombyx mori, Tribolium castaneum, Apis mellifera, Nasonia vitripennis, and Pediculus humanus genomes as part of genome sequencing efforts. Results All the insects examined have 2 TRPV, 1 TRPN, 1 TRPM, 3 TRPC, and 1 TRPML subfamily members, demonstrating that these channels have the ancient origins in insects. The common pattern also suggests that the mechanisms for detecting mechanical and visual stimuli and maintaining lysosomal functions may be evolutionarily well conserved in insects. However, a TRPP channel, the most ancient TRP channel, is missing in B. mori, A. mellifera, and N. vitripennis. Although P. humanus and D. melanogaster contain 4 TRPA subfamily members, the other insects have 5 TRPA subfamily members. T. castaneum, A. mellifera, and N. vitripennis contain TRPA5 channels, which have been specifically retained or gained in Coleoptera and Hymenoptera. Furthermore, TRPA1, which functions for thermotaxis in Drosophila, is missing in A. mellifera and N. vitripennis; however, they have other Hymenoptera-specific TRPA channels (AmHsTRPA and NvHsTRPA. NvHsTRPA expressed in HEK293 cells is activated by temperature increase, demonstrating that HsTRPAs function as novel thermal sensors in Hymenoptera. Conclusion The total number of insect TRP family members is 13-14, approximately half that of mammalian TRP

  11. KCNQ1 channels sense small changes in cell volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; MacAulay, Nanna;

    2003-01-01

    Many important physiological processes involve changes in cell volume, e.g. the transport of salt and water in epithelial cells and the contraction of cardiomyocytes. In this study, we show that voltage-gated KCNQ1 channels, which are strongly expressed in epithelial cells or cardiomyocytes...... role in cell volume control, e.g. during transepithelial transport of salt and water. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jun-1......, and KCNQ4 channels, expressed in hair cells and the auditory tract, are tightly regulated by small cell volume changes when co-expressed with aquaporin 1 water-channels (AQP1) in Xenopus oocytes. The KCNQ1 and KCNQ4 current amplitudes precisely reflect the volume of the oocytes. By contrast, the related...

  12. Chaotic changes in distribution channels : implications for hospitality companies

    OpenAIRE

    Gursoy, Dogan

    2010-01-01

    Distribution channels of hospitality products are going through chaotic changes and slowly making the traditional tourism and travel marketing obsolete. These changes are already having significant impact on hospitality companies’ operational strategies. As a result, required skills and talents of hospitality employees are evolving from reservation taking and confirming to inventory controlling and forecasting to selling to managing revenue. In addition, the need for synchroniz...

  13. STIM1 and STIM2 proteins differently regulate endogenous store-operated channels in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygin, Alexey; Skopin, Anton; Kalinina, Vera; Zimina, Olga; Glushankova, Lyuba; Mozhayeva, Galina N; Kaznacheyeva, Elena

    2015-02-20

    The endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensors stromal interaction molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2) are key modulators of store-operated calcium entry. Both these sensors play a major role in physiological functions in normal tissue and in pathology, but available data on native STIM2-regulated plasma membrane channels are scarce. Only a few studies have recorded STIM2-induced CRAC (calcium release-activated calcium) currents. On the other hand, many cell types display store-operated currents different from CRAC. The STIM1 protein regulates not only CRAC but also transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, but it has remained unclear whether STIM2 is capable of regulating store-operated non-CRAC channels. Here we present for the first time experimental evidence for the existence of endogenous non-CRAC STIM2-regulated channels. As shown in single-channel patch clamp experiments on HEK293 cells, selective activation of native STIM2 proteins or STIM2 overexpression results in store-operated activation of Imin channels, whereas STIM1 activation blocks this process. Changes in the ratio between active STIM2 and STIM1 proteins can switch the regulation of Imin channels between store-operated and store-independent modes. We have previously characterized electrophysiological properties of different Ca(2+) influx channels coexisting in HEK293 cells. The results of this study show that STIM1 and STIM2 differ in the ability to activate these store-operated channels; Imin channels are regulated by STIM2, TRPC3-containing INS channels are induced by STIM1, and TRPC1-composed Imax channels are activated by both STIM1 and STIM2. These new data about cross-talk between STIM1 and STIM2 and their different roles in store-operated channel activation are indicative of an additional level in the regulation of store-operated calcium entry pathways.

  14. Protein expression of G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plummer Howard K

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous data from our laboratory has indicated that a functional link exists between the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK channel and the beta-adrenergic receptor pathway in breast cancer cell lines, and these pathways were involved in growth regulation of these cells. Alcohol is an established risk factor for breast cancer and has been found to open GIRK. In order to further investigate GIRK channels in breast cancer and possible alteration by ethanol, we identified GIRK channel protein expression in breast cancer cells. Results Cell pellets were collected and membrane protein was isolated to determine GIRK protein expression. GIRK protein was also analyzed by immuno-precipitation. GIRK protein was over-expressed in cells by transfection of GIRK plasmids. Gene expression studies were done by real-time RT-PCR. GIRK protein expression was identified in breast cancer cell lines. Expression of GIRK1 at the indicated molecular weight (MW (62 kDa was seen in cell lines MDA-MB-453 and ZR-75-1. In addition, GIRK1 expression was seen at a lower MW (40–42 kDa in MDA-MB-361, MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, ZR-75-1, and MDA-MB-453 cell lines. To prove the lower MW protein was GIRK1, MDA-MB-453 cells were immuno-precipitated. GIRK2 expression was seen in MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, and ZR-75-1 and was variable in MDA-MB-453, while GIRK4 protein expression was seen in all six cell lines tested. This is the first report indicating GIRK protein expression in breast cancer cells. To determine functionality, MDA-MB-453 cells were stimulated with ethanol. Decreased GIRK1 protein expression levels were seen after treatment with 0.12% ethanol in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Serum-free media decreased GIRK protein expression, possibly due to lack of estrogen in the media. Transfection of GIRK1 or GIRK4 plasmids increased GIRK1 protein expression and decreased gene expression in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Conclusion Our data indicates

  15. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  16. SLOB, a SLOWPOKE channel binding protein, regulates insulin pathway signaling and metabolism in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Sheldon

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that ion channel modulation by accessory proteins within a macromolecular complex can regulate channel activity and thereby impact neuronal excitability. However, the downstream consequences of ion channel modulation remain largely undetermined. The Drosophila melanogaster large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel SLOWPOKE (SLO undergoes modulation via its binding partner SLO-binding protein (SLOB. Regulation of SLO by SLOB influences the voltage dependence of SLO activation and modulates synaptic transmission. SLO and SLOB are expressed especially prominently in median neurosecretory cells (mNSCs in the pars intercerebralis (PI region of the brain; these cells also express and secrete Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs. Previously, we found that flies lacking SLOB exhibit increased resistance to starvation, and we reasoned that SLOB may regulate aspects of insulin signaling and metabolism. Here we investigate the role of SLOB in metabolism and find that slob null flies exhibit changes in energy storage and insulin pathway signaling. In addition, slob null flies have decreased levels of dilp3 and increased levels of takeout, a gene known to be involved in feeding and metabolism. Targeted expression of SLOB to mNSCs rescues these alterations in gene expression, as well as the metabolic phenotypes. Analysis of fly lines mutant for both slob and slo indicate that the effect of SLOB on metabolism and gene expression is via SLO. We propose that modulation of SLO by SLOB regulates neurotransmission in mNSCs, influencing downstream insulin pathway signaling and metabolism.

  17. In vivo measurement of protein functional changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aili Wang, Zhicheng Zhang, Qinyi Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Conformational changes in proteins are fundamental to all biological functions. In protein science, the concept of protein flexibility is widely used to describe protein dynamics and thermodynamic properties that control protein conformational changes. In this study, we show that urea, which has strong sedative potency, can be administered to fish at high concentrations, and that protein functional changes related to anesthesia induction can be measured in vivo. Ctenopharyngodon idellus (the grass carp has two different types of N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA receptors, urea-insensitive and urea-sensitive, which are responsible for the heat endurance of fish. The urea-sensitive NMDA receptor showed high protein flexibility, the gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor showed less flexibility, and the protein that is responsible for ethanol anesthesia showed the lowest flexibility. The results suggest that an increase in protein flexibility underlies the fundamental biophysical mechanisms of volatile general anesthetics.

  18. Historical changes in channel network extent and channel planform in an intensively managed landscape: Natural versus human-induced effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Bruce L.; Lewis, Quinn W.; Andresen, William

    2016-01-01

    Humans have become major geomorphological agents, effecting substantial change in the characteristics of Earth's physical landscapes. The agricultural Midwest of the United States is a region marked by pronounced human influence at the landscape scale. Humans undoubtedly have strongly influenced critical zone processes, including fluvial processes, in intensively managed agricultural landscapes, yet the exact nature of human alteration of these processes is unknown. This study documents historical changes in the extent of the stream channel network and in channel planform within the upper Sangamon River basin - an intensively managed agricultural watershed in Illinois. Results indicate that the modern channel network is nearly three times more extensive than the channel network in the 1820s. Most change in drainage density has occurred in headwater portions of the basin where numerous drainage ditches have been added to the network to drain flat uplands. No detectable change in channel position is evident between 1940 and 2012 along about 60% of the total length of the Sangamon River and its major tributaries. Nearly 30% of the total length exhibits change related to meander dynamics (cutoffs and lateral migration), whereas about 8% has changed as a result of channelization. Channelized sections typically remain straight for decades following human modification, supporting the notion that humans produce long-lasting catastrophic change in channel planform in this region. The findings confirm that humans are effective agents of morphological change in fluvial systems in this intensively managed watershed. Documenting human-induced versus natural changes in fluvial systems is important for evaluating how other critical zone processes in intensively managed landscapes have been affected by these changes. Human-induced changes in channel extent and planform most likely have altered this landscape from one dominated by biogeochemical transformations and storage of water

  19. Electrochemical evaluation of chemical selectivity of glutamate receptor ion channel proteins with a multi-channel sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, M; Hirano, A; Rehák, M; Nakanishi, J; Kawai, K; Sato, H; Umezawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    A new method for evaluating chemical selectivity of agonists towards receptor ion channel proteins is proposed by using glutamate receptor (GluR) ion channel proteins and their agonists N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), L-glutamate, and (2S, 3R, 4S) isomer of 2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-IV). Integrated multi-channel currents, corresponding to the sum of total amount of ions passed through the multiple open channels, were used as a measure of agonists' selectivity to recognize ion channel proteins and induce channel currents. GluRs isolated from rat synaptic plasma membranes were incorporated into planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) formed by the folding method. The empirical factors that affect the selectivity were demonstrated: (i) the number of GluRs incorporated into BLMs varied from one membrane to another; (ii) each BLM contained different subtypes of GluRs (NMDA and/or non-NMDA subtypes); and (iii) the magnitude of multi-channel responses induced by L-glutamate at negative applied potentials was larger than at positive potentials, while those by NMDA and L-CCG-IV were linearly related to applied potentials. The chemical selectivity among NMDA, L-glutamate and L-CCG-IV for NMDA subtype of GluRs was determined with each single BLM in which only NMDA subtype of GluRs was designed to be active by inhibiting the non-NMDA subtypes using a specific antagonist DNQX. The order of selectivity among the relevant agonists for the NMDA receptor subtype was found to be L-CCG-IV > L-glutamate > NMDA, which is consistent with the order of binding affinity of these agonists towards the same NMDA subtypes. The potential use of this approach for evaluating chemical selectivity towards non-NMDA receptor subtypes of GluRs and other receptor ion channel proteins is discussed.

  20. ABA Signaling in Guard Cells Entails a Dynamic Protein-Protein Interaction Relay from the PYL-RCAR Family Receptors to Ion Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Chul Lee; Chae Woo Lim; Wenzhi Lan; Kai He; Sheng Luan

    2013-01-01

    Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) serves as an integrator of environmental stresses such as drought to trigger stomatal closure by regulating specific ion channels in guard cells.We previously reported that SLACl,an outward anion channel required for stomatal closure,was regulated via reversible protein phosphorylation events involving ABA signaling components,including protein phosphatase 2C members and a SnRK2-type kinase (OST1).In this study,we reconstituted the ABA signaling pathway as a protein-protein interaction relay from the PYL/RCAR-type receptors,to the PP2C-SnRK2 phosphatase-kinase pairs,to the ion channel SLACl.The ABA receptors interacted with and inhibited PP2C phosphatase activity against the SnRK2-type kinase,releasing active SnRK2 kinase to phosphorylate,and activate the SLACl channel,leading to reduced guard cell turgor and stomatal closure.Both yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays were used to verify the interactions among the components in the pathway.These biochemical assays demonstrated activity modifications of phosphatases and kinases by their interaction partners.The SLACl channel activity was used as an endpoint readout for the strength of the signaling pathway,depending on the presence of different combinations of signaling components.Further study using transgenic plants overexpressing one of the ABA receptors demonstrated that changing the relative level of interacting partners would change ABA sensitivity.

  1. Protein kinase C is involved in regulation of Ca2+ channels in plasmalemma of Nitella syncarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherelova, O M

    1989-01-01

    Ca2+ current recordings have been made on Nitella syncarpa cells using the intracellular perfusion and the voltage-clamp technique. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), a substance capable of activating protein kinase C from plasmalemma of Nitella cells, modulates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Polymixin B, inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks the Nitella plasmalemma Ca2+ channels; the rate of channel blockage depends on the concentration and exposure time of the substance. PMID:2536617

  2. Ca2+ channels as integrators of G protein-mediated signaling in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Jesse; Diversé-Pierluissi, María A

    2004-11-01

    The observations from Dunlap and Fischbach that transmitter-mediated shortening of the duration of action potentials could be caused by a decrease in calcium conductance led to numerous studies of the mechanisms of modulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Calcium channels are well known targets for inhibition by receptor-G protein pathways, and multiple forms of inhibition have been described. Inhibition of Ca(2+) channels can be mediated by G protein betagamma-subunits or by kinases, such as protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. In the last few years, it has been shown that integration of G protein signaling can take place at the level of the calcium channel by regulation of the interaction of the channel pore-forming subunit with different cellular proteins.

  3. Amphipathic antenna of an inward rectifier K+ channel responds to changes in the inner membrane leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masayuki; Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Membrane lipids modulate the function of membrane proteins. In the case of ion channels, they bias the gating equilibrium, although the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that the N-terminal segment (M0) of the KcsA potassium channel mediates the effect of changes in the lipid milieu on channel gating. The M0 segment is a membrane-anchored amphipathic helix, bearing positively charged residues. In asymmetric membranes, the M0 helix senses the presence of negatively charged phospholipids on the inner leaflet. Upon gating, the M0 helix revolves around the axis of the helix on the membrane surface, inducing the positively charged residues to interact with the negative head groups of the lipids so as to stabilize the open conformation (i.e., the "roll-and-stabilize model"). The M0 helix is thus a charge-sensitive "antenna," capturing temporary changes in lipid composition in the fluidic membrane. This unique type of sensory device may be shared by various types of membrane proteins.

  4. Evidence for functional diversity between the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 and its closest related protein HVRP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris H Kim

    Full Text Available The Hv1 channel and voltage-sensitive phosphatases share with voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels the ability to detect changes in membrane potential through voltage-sensing domains (VSDs. However, they lack the pore domain typical of these other channels. NaV, KV, and CaV proteins can be found in neurons and muscles, where they play important roles in electrical excitability. In contrast, VSD-containing proteins lacking a pore domain are found in non-excitable cells and are not involved in neuronal signaling. Here, we report the identification of HVRP1, a protein related to the Hv1 channel (from which the name Hv1 Related Protein 1 is derived, which we find to be expressed primarily in the central nervous system, and particularly in the cerebellum. Within the cerebellar tissue, HVRP1 is specifically expressed in granule neurons, as determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Analysis of subcellular distribution via electron microscopy and immunogold labeling reveals that the protein localizes on the post-synaptic side of contacts between glutamatergic mossy fibers and the granule cells. We also find that, despite the similarities in amino acid sequence and structural organization between Hv1 and HVRP1, the two proteins have distinct functional properties. The high conservation of HVRP1 in vertebrates and its cellular and subcellular localizations suggest an important function in the nervous system.

  5. GIS methodology for quantifying channel change in Las Vegas, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, S.E.; Whitney, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study applies spatial analyses to examine the consequences of accelerated urban expansion on a hydrologic system over a period of 24 years. Three sets of historical aerial photos are used in a GIS analysis to document the geomorphic history of Las Vegas Wash, which drains the rapidly growing Las Vegas urban area in southern Nevada. New spatial techniques are introduced to make quantitative measurements of the erosion at three specific time intervals in the hydrologic evolution of the channel and floodplain. Unlike other erosion studies that use two different elevation surfaces to assess erosion, this study used a single elevation surface to remove systematic and nonsystemic elevation errors. The spatial analysis quantifies channel changes for discrete time periods, calculates erosion volumes, and provides a foundation to examine how the specific mechanisms related to urban expansion have affected Las Vegas Wash. The erosion calculated over 24 years is the largest documented sediment loss attributed to the effect of rapid urban growth. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  6. Dengue virus M protein C-terminal peptide (DVM-C) forms ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, A; Horan, C R; Gage, P W

    2005-03-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide consisting of the C-terminus of the M protein of the Dengue virus type 1 strain Singapore S275/90 (DVM-C) produced ion channel activity in artificial lipid bilayers. The channels had a variable conductance and were more permeable to sodium and potassium ions than to chloride ions and more permeable to chloride ions than to calcium ions. Hexamethylene amiloride (100 microM) and amantadine (10 microM), blocked channels formed by DVM-C. Ion channels may play an important role in the life cycle of many viruses and drugs that block these channels may prove to be useful antiviral agents.

  7. Regulation of the membrane insertion and conductance activity of the metamorphic chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 by cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Valenzuela

    Full Text Available The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer.

  8. Direct protein-protein interactions and substrate channeling between cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and CYP26B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cara H; Peng, Chi-Chi; Lutz, Justin D; Yeung, Catherine K; Zelter, Alex; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABPs) bind all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) tightly. This study aimed to determine whether atRA is channeled directly to cytochrome P450 (CYP) CYP26B1 by CRABPs, and whether CRABPs interact directly with CYP26B1. atRA bound to CRABPs (holo-CRABP) was efficiently metabolized by CYP26B1. Isotope dilution experiments showed that delivery of atRA to CYP26B1 in solution was similar with or without CRABP. Holo-CRABPs had higher affinity for CYP26B1 than free atRA, but both apo-CRABPs inhibited the formation of 4-OH-RA by CYP26B1. Similar protein-protein interactions between soluble binding proteins and CYPs may be important for other lipophilic CYP substrates.

  9. Pannexin1 channel proteins in the zebrafish retina have shared and unique properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kurtenbach

    Full Text Available In mammals, a single pannexin1 gene (Panx1 is widely expressed in the CNS including the inner and outer retinae, forming large-pore voltage-gated membrane channels, which are involved in calcium and ATP signaling. Previously, we discovered that zebrafish lack Panx1 expression in the inner retina, with drPanx1a exclusively expressed in horizontal cells of the outer retina. Here, we characterize a second drPanx1 protein, drPanx1b, generated by whole-genome duplications during teleost evolution. Homology searches strongly support the presence of pannexin sequences in cartilaginous fish and provide evidence that pannexins evolved when urochordata and chordata evolution split. Further, we confirm Panx1 ohnologs being solely present in teleosts. A hallmark of differential expression of drPanx1a and drPanx1b in various zebrafish brain areas is the non-overlapping protein localization of drPanx1a in the outer and drPanx1b in the inner fish retina. A functional comparison of the evolutionary distant fish and mouse Panx1s revealed both, preserved and unique properties. Preserved functions are the capability to form channels opening at resting potential, which are sensitive to known gap junction and hemichannel blockers, intracellular calcium, extracellular ATP and pH changes. However, drPanx1b is unique due to its highly complex glycosylation pattern and distinct electrophysiological gating kinetics. The existence of two Panx1 proteins in zebrafish displaying distinct tissue distribution, protein modification and electrophysiological properties, suggests that both proteins fulfill different functions in vivo.

  10. Correlation of apical fluid-regulating channel proteins with lung function in human COPD lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runzhen Zhao

    Full Text Available Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, and aquaporin 5 (AQP5 proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI and II (ATII-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD.

  11. Investigation of TRPC channel-modulating progestins and proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Miehe, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of this study, we have identified the two steroid hormones progesterone and norgestimate as novel TRPC channel blockers. Both substances blocked TRPC-mediated Ca2+ influx with micromolar activities in fluorometric measurements. TRPC channel inhibition did not seem to be a general steroid effect since another progestin, the norgestimate metabolite levonorgestrel, was not effective. Norgestimate was 4- to 5-fold more active on the TRPC3/6/7 subfamily compared to TRPC4/5, where...

  12. Phycodnavirus potassium ion channel proteins question the virus molecular piracy hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Hamacher

    Full Text Available Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K(+ channels. To determine if these viral K(+ channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K(+ channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K(+ channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K(+ channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K(+ channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K(+ channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K(+ channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms.

  13. Ion permeation of AQP6 water channel protein. Single channel recordings after Hg2+ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazama, Akihiro; Kozono, David; Guggino, William B; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato

    2002-08-01

    Aquaporin-6 (AQP6) has recently been identified as an intracellular vesicle water channel with anion permeability that is activated by low pH or HgCl2. Here we present direct evidence of AQP6 channel gating using patch clamp techniques. Cell-attached patch recordings of AQP6 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes indicated that AQP6 is a gated channel with intermediate conductance (49 picosiemens in 100 mm NaCl) induced by 10 microm HgCl2. Current-voltage relationships were linear, and open probability was fairly constant at any given voltage, indicating that Hg2+-induced AQP6 conductance is voltage-independent. The excised outside-out patch recording revealed rapid activation of AQP6 channels immediately after application of 10 microm HgCl2. Reduction of both Na+ and Cl- concentrations from 100 to 30 mm did not shift the reversal potential of the Hg2+-induced AQP6 current, suggesting that Na+ is as permeable as Cl-. The Na+ permeability of Hg2+-induced AQP6 current was further demonstrated by 22Na+ influx measurements. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Cys-155 and Cys-190 residues as the sites of Hg2+ activation both for water permeability and ion conductance. The Hill coefficient from the concentration-response curve for Hg2+-induced conductance was 1.1 +/- 0.3. These data provide the first evidence of AQP6 channel gating at a single-channel level and suggest that each monomer contains the pore region for ions based on the number of Hg2+-binding sites and the kinetics of Hg2+-activation of the channel. PMID:12034750

  14. Bassoon specifically controls presynaptic P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels via RIM-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, Daria; Marini, Claudia; King, Claire; Klueva, Julia; Bischof, Ferdinand; Romorini, Stefano; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Heine, Martin; Schneider, Romy; Schröder, Markus S; Altrock, Wilko D; Henneberger, Christian; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (CaVs) represent the principal source of Ca(2+) ions that trigger evoked neurotransmitter release from presynaptic boutons. Ca(2+) influx is mediated mainly via CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) and CaV2.2 (N-type) channels, which differ in their properties. Their relative contribution to synaptic transmission changes during development and tunes neurotransmission during synaptic plasticity. The mechanism of differential recruitment of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 to release sites is largely unknown. Here, we show that the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon localizes specifically CaV2.1 to active zones via molecular interaction with the RIM-binding proteins (RBPs). A genetic deletion of Bassoon or an acute interference with Bassoon-RBP interaction reduces synaptic abundance of CaV2.1, weakens P/Q-type Ca(2+) current-driven synaptic transmission, and results in higher relative contribution of neurotransmission dependent on CaV2.2. These data establish Bassoon as a major regulator of the molecular composition of the presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites. PMID:24698275

  15. Co- and post-translational translocation through the protein-conducting channel : analogous mechanisms at work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitra, Kakoli; Frank, Joachim; Driessen, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    Many proteins are translocated across, or integrated into, membranes. Both functions are fulfilled by the 'translocon/translocase', which contains a membrane-embedded proteinconducting channel (PCC) and associated soluble factors that drive translocation and insertion reactions using nucleotide trip

  16. A Fairness-Based Access Control Scheme to Optimize IPTV Fast Channel Changing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Lai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IPTV services are typically featured with a longer channel changing delay compared to the conventional TV systems. The major contributor to this lies in the time spent on intraframe (I-frame acquisition during channel changing. Currently, most widely adopted fast channel changing (FCC methods rely on promptly transmitting to the client (conducting the channel changing a retained I-frame of the targeted channel as a separate unicasting stream. However, this I-frame acceleration mechanism has an inherent scalability problem due to the explosions of channel changing requests during commercial breaks. In this paper, we propose a fairness-based admission control (FAC scheme for the original I-frame acceleration mechanism to enhance its scalability by decreasing the bandwidth demands. Based on the channel changing history of every client, the FAC scheme can intelligently decide whether or not to conduct the I-frame acceleration for each channel change request. Comprehensive simulation experiments demonstrate the potential of our proposed FAC scheme to effectively optimize the scalability of the I-frame acceleration mechanism, particularly in commercial breaks. Meanwhile, the FAC scheme only slightly increases the average channel changing delay by temporarily disabling FCC (i.e., I-frame acceleration for the clients who are addicted to frequent channel zapping.

  17. Assessment of long-term channel changes in the Mekong River using remote sensing and a channel-evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    River-channel changes are a key factor affecting physical, ecological and management issues in the fluvial environment. In this study, long-term channel changes in the Mekong River were assessed using remote sensing and a channel-evolution model. A channel-evolution model for calculating long-term channel changes of a measndering river was developed using a previous fluid-dynamic model [Zolezzi and Seminara, 2001], and was applied in order to quantify channel changes of two meandering reaches in the Mekong River. Quite few attempts have been made so far to combine remote sensing observation of meandering planform change with the application of channel evolution models within relatively small-scale gravel-bed systems in humid temperate regions. The novel point of the present work is to link state-of-art meandering planform evolution model with observed morphological changes within large-scale sand-bed rivers with higher bank height in tropical monsoonal climate regions, which are the highly dynamic system, and assess the performance. Unstable extents of the reaches could be historically identified using remote-sensing technique. The instability caused i) bank erosion and accretion of meander bends and ii) movement or development of bars and changes in the flow around the bars. The remote sensing measurements indicate that maximum erosion occurred downstream of the maximum curvature of the river-center line in both reaches. The model simulations indicates that under the mean annual peak discharge the maximum of excess longitudinal velocity near the banks occurs downstream of the maximum curvature in both reaches. The channel migration coefficients of the reaches were calibrated by comparing remote-sensing measurements and model simulations. The diffrence in the migration coefficients between both reaches depends on the diffrence in bank height rather than the geotechnical properties of floodplain sediments. Possible eroded floodplain areas and accreted floodplain

  18. The TRPC2 channel forms protein-protein interactions with Homer and RTP in the rat vomeronasal organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brann Jessica H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The signal transduction cascade operational in the vomeronasal organ (VNO of the olfactory system detects odorants important for prey localization, mating, and social recognition. While the protein machinery transducing these external cues has been individually well characterized, little attention has been paid to the role of protein-protein interactions among these molecules. Development of an in vitro expression system for the transient receptor potential 2 channel (TRPC2, which establishes the first electrical signal in the pheromone transduction pathway, led to the discovery of two protein partners that couple with the channel in the native VNO. Results Homer family proteins were expressed in both male and female adult VNO, particularly Homer 1b/c and Homer 3. In addition to this family of scaffolding proteins, the chaperones receptor transporting protein 1 (RTP1 and receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1 were also expressed. RTP1 was localized broadly across the VNO sensory epithelium, goblet cells, and the soft palate. Both Homer and RTP1 formed protein-protein interactions with TRPC2 in native reciprocal pull-down assays and RTP1 increased surface expression of TRPC2 in in vitro assays. The RTP1-dependent TRPC2 surface expression was paralleled with an increase in ATP-stimulated whole-cell current in an in vitro patch-clamp electrophysiological assay. Conclusions TRPC2 expression and channel activity is regulated by chaperone- and scaffolding-associated proteins, which could modulate the transduction of chemosignals. The developed in vitro expression system, as described here, will be advantageous for detailed investigations into TRPC2 channel activity and cell signalling, for a channel protein that was traditionally difficult to physiologically assess.

  19. Probing conformational changes of gramicidin ion channels by single-molecule patch-clamp fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Gregory S.; Orr, Galya; Montal, Mauricio; Thrall, Brian D.; Colson, Steve D.; Lu, H Peter

    2003-09-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes often regulate the dynamics of ion channels. Such inhomogeneity makes it difficult, if not impossible; to be characterized not only by ensemble-averaged experiments by also by single-channel patch recording that does not specifically probe the associated conformational changes. Here, we report on our work using a new approach combining single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and single-channel patch recording to investigate conformational changes of individual gramicidin ion channels. We observed fluorescence self-quenching and single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) from dye-labeled gramicidin dimmers within the channel was open. We also observed that the efficiency of self-quenching and spFRETS is widely distributed when the channel is closed. Our results strongly suggest a hitherto undetectable correlation of multiple conformational states of the gramicidin channel associated with closed and open states under physiologically-related conditions.

  20. G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-fei GAO; Hai-lin ZHANG; Zhen-dong YOU; Chang-lin LU; Cheng HE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK) are important for neuronal signaling and membrane excitability. In the present study, we intend to find whether GIRK channels express functionally in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods: We used RT-PCR to detect mRNA for4 subunits of GIRK in the adult DRG. The whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to confirm GIRK channels functionally expressed. Results: The mRNA for the 4 subunits of GIRK were detected in the adult DRG. GTPγS enhanced inwardly rectifying potassium (K+) currents of the DRG neurons, while Ba2+inhibited such currents. Furthermore, the GIRK channels were shown to be coupled to the GABAB receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, as baclofen increased the inwardly rectifying K+ currents. Conclusion: GIRK channels are expressed and functionally coupled with GABAB receptors in adult rat DRG neurons.

  1. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Koprowski

    Full Text Available Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  2. Functional reconstitution and channel activity measurements of purified wildtype and mutant CFTR protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2015-03-09

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates.

  3. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E; Yue, David T

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca(2+) channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca(2+) channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca(2+) channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family. PMID:27456671

  4. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E.; Yue, David T.

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca2+ channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family.

  5. An electronic channel switching-based aptasensor for ultrasensitive protein detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongbo; Wang Cui [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Wu Zaisheng, E-mail: wuzaisheng@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Lu Limin; Qiu Liping; Zhou Hui; Shen Guoli [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Yu Ruqin, E-mail: rqyu@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2013-01-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target IgE is successfully designed to serve as a barrier to separate enzyme from its substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sensing platform of electronic channel switching-based aptasensor can be simply manipulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stable hairpin structure of anti-IgE aptamer is utilized to detect target IgE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensor is ultrasensitive sensitivity, excellent selectivity and small volume of sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a powerful platform to be further expanded to detect more kinds of proteins and even cells. - Abstract: Due to the ubiquity and essential of the proteins in all living organisms, the identification and quantification of disease-specific proteins are particularly important. Because the conformational change of aptamer upon its target or probe/target/probe sandwich often is the primary prerequisite for the design of an electrochemical aptameric assay system, it is extremely difficult to construct the electrochemical aptasensor for protein assay because the corresponding aptamers cannot often meet the requirement. To circumvent the obstacles mentioned, an electronic channel switching-based (ECS) aptasensor for ultrasensitive protein detection is developed. The essential achievement made is that an innovative sensing concept is proposed: the hairpin structure of aptamer is designed to pull electroactive species toward electrode surface and makes the surface-immobilized IgE serve as a barrier that separates enzyme from its substrate. It seemingly ensures that the ECS aptasensor exhibits most excellent assay features, such as, a detection limit of 4.44 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} {mu}g mL{sup -1} (22.7 fM, 220 zmol in 10-{mu}L sample) (demonstrating a 5 orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity compared with classical electronic aptasensors) and dynamic response range from 4.44 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 4.44 Multiplication

  6. Structural Changes of Malt Proteins During Boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the physicochemical properties and structure of proteins derived from two malt varieties (Baudin and Guangmai during wort boiling were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results showed that both protein content and amino acid composition changed only slightly during boiling, and that boiling might cause a gradual unfolding of protein structures, as indicated by the decrease in surface hydrophobicity and free sulfhydryl content and enthalpy value, as well as reduced α-helix contents and markedly increased random coil contents. It was also found that major component of both worts was a boiling-resistant protein with a molecular mass of 40 kDa, and that according to the two-dimensional electrophoresis and SE-HPLC analyses, a small amount of soluble aggregates might be formed via hydrophobic interactions. It was thus concluded that changes of protein structure caused by boiling that might influence beer quality are largely independent of malt variety.

  7. Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Bertrand; Xiao, Bailong; Santos, Jose S; Syeda, Ruhma; Grandl, Jörg; Spencer, Kathryn S; Kim, Sung Eun; Schmidt, Manuela; Mathur, Jayanti; Dubin, Adrienne E; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2012-03-01

    Mechanotransduction has an important role in physiology. Biological processes including sensing touch and sound waves require as-yet-unidentified cation channels that detect pressure. Mouse Piezo1 (MmPiezo1) and MmPiezo2 (also called Fam38a and Fam38b, respectively) induce mechanically activated cationic currents in cells; however, it is unknown whether Piezo proteins are pore-forming ion channels or modulate ion channels. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster Piezo (DmPiezo, also called CG8486) also induces mechanically activated currents in cells, but through channels with remarkably distinct pore properties including sensitivity to the pore blocker ruthenium red and single channel conductances. MmPiezo1 assembles as a ∼1.2-million-dalton homo-oligomer, with no evidence of other proteins in this complex. Purified MmPiezo1 reconstituted into asymmetric lipid bilayers and liposomes forms ruthenium-red-sensitive ion channels. These data demonstrate that Piezo proteins are an evolutionarily conserved ion channel family involved in mechanotransduction.

  8. The KCNQ5 potassium channel from mouse: a broadly expressed M-current like potassium channel modulated by zinc, pH, and volume changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Callø, Kirstine; Jespersen, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    The KCNQ proteins compose a sub-group of the voltage-activated potassium channel family. The family consists of five members (KCNQ1 to 5--also named Kv7.1 to Kv7.5) encoded by single genes, which all give rise to proteins forming slowly activating potassium-selective ion channels. The physiological...

  9. Potential changes in benthic macrofaunal distributions from the English Channel simulated under climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, Isabelle; Beaugrand, Grégory; Dauvin, Jean-Claude

    2012-03-01

    Climate-induced changes in the distribution of species are likely to affect the functioning and diversity of marine ecosystems. Therefore, in economic and ecological important areas, such as the English Channel, projections of the future distributions of key species under changing environmental conditions are urgently needed. Ecological Niche Models (ENMs) have been applied successfully to determine potential distributions of species based on the information of the environmental niche of a species (sensu Hutchinson). In this study, the niches of two commercially exploited benthic species, Pecten maximus and Glycymeris glycymeris, and two ecologically important species, Abra alba and Ophelia borealis were derived using four contemporary hydrographic variables, i.e. sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, water depth and sediment type. Consequently, using these ecological envelopes, the Non-Parametric Probalistic Ecological Niche model (NPPEN) was applied to calculate contemporary probabilities of occurrence for each species in the North East Atlantic and to predict potential re-distributions under the climate change scenario A2 for two time periods 2050-2059 and 2090-2099. Results show general northern displacements of the four benthic species from the English Channel into the North Sea and southern Norwegian coast. The projections mostly indicate a reduction of suitable habitat for benthic species with a notable disappearance of their distributions in the English Channel, except for A. alba. However, interpretations should be treated with caution since many uncertainties and assumptions are attached to ecological niche models in general. Furthermore, opening up potential habitats for benthic species does not necessarily imply that the species will actually occupy these sites in the future. The displacement and colonisation success of species are a function of many other non-climatic factors such as species life histories, dispersal abilities, adaptability

  10. Detecting significant changes in protein abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kammers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We review and demonstrate how an empirical Bayes method, shrinking a protein's sample variance towards a pooled estimate, leads to far more powerful and stable inference to detect significant changes in protein abundance compared to ordinary t-tests. Using examples from isobaric mass labelled proteomic experiments we show how to analyze data from multiple experiments simultaneously, and discuss the effects of missing data on the inference. We also present easy to use open source software for normalization of mass spectrometry data and inference based on moderated test statistics.

  11. Signatures of protein structure in the cooperative gating of mechanosensitive ion channels

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins deform the surrounding lipid bilayer, which can lead to membrane-mediated interactions between neighboring proteins. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we demonstrate how the observed differences in protein structure can affect membrane-mediated interactions and cooperativity among membrane proteins. We find that distinct oligomeric states of MscL lead to distinct gateway states for the clustering of MscL, and predict signatures of MscL structure and spatial organization in the cooperative gating of MscL. Our modeling approach establishes a quantitative relation between the observed shapes and cooperative function of membrane~proteins.

  12. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming

    2015-10-01

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors. PMID:26450298

  13. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming, E-mail: dming@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-07

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  14. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming

    2015-10-01

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  15. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors

  16. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming

    2015-10-01

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  17. Transient calnexin interaction confers long-term stability on folded K+ channel protein in the ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Rajesh; Lee, Eun Jeon; Papazian, Diane M

    2004-06-15

    We recently showed that an unglycosylated form of the Shaker potassium channel protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and degraded by proteasomes in mammalian cells despite apparently normal folding and assembly. These results suggest that channel proteins with a native structure can be substrates for ER-associated degradation. We have now tested this hypothesis using the wild-type Shaker protein. Wild-type Shaker is degraded by cytoplasmic proteasomes when it is trapped in the ER and prevented from interacting with calnexin. Neither condition alone is sufficient to destabilize the protein. Proteasomal degradation of the wild-type protein is abolished when ER mannosidase I trimming of the core glycan is inhibited. Our results indicate that transient interaction with calnexin provides long-term protection from ER-associated degradation. PMID:15161937

  18. Rv1698 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis represents a new class of channel-forming outer membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroy, Axel; Mailaender, Claudia; Harder, Daniel; Koerber, Stephanie; Wolschendorf, Frank; Danilchanka, Olga; Wang, Ying; Heinz, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-06-27

    Mycobacteria contain an outer membrane composed of mycolic acids and a large variety of other lipids. Its protective function is an essential virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only OmpA, which has numerous homologs in Gram-negative bacteria, is known to form channels in the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis so far. Rv1698 was predicted to be an outer membrane protein of unknown function. Expression of rv1698 restored the sensitivity to ampicillin and chloramphenicol of a Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant lacking the main porin MspA. Uptake experiments showed that Rv1698 partially complemented the permeability defect of the M. smegmatis porin mutant for glucose. These results indicated that Rv1698 provides an unspecific pore that can partially substitute for MspA. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that purified Rv1698 is an integral membrane protein that indeed produces channels. The main single channel conductance is 4.5 +/- 0.3 nanosiemens in 1 M KCl. Zero current potential measurements revealed a weak preference for cations. Whole cell digestion of recombinant M. smegmatis with proteinase K showed that Rv1698 is surface-accessible. Taken together, these experiments demonstrated that Rv1698 is a channel protein that is likely involved in transport processes across the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. Rv1698 has single homologs of unknown functions in Corynebacterineae and thus represents the first member of a new class of channel proteins specific for mycolic acid-containing outer membranes. PMID:18434314

  19. Protein and cell patterning in closed polymer channels by photoimmobilizing proteins on photografted poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Mikkelsen, Morten Bo Lindholm; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2014-01-01

    Definable surface chemistry is essential for many applications of microfluidic polymer systems. However, small cross-section channels with a high surface to volume ratio enhance passive adsorption of molecules that depletes active molecules in solution and contaminates the channel surface. Here, we...... to greatly improve cell adhesion compared to unexposed areas. This method opens for easy surface modification of closed microfluidic systems through combining a low protein binding PEG-based coating with spatially defined protein patterns of interest....... present a one-step photochemical process to coat the inner surfaces of closed microfluidic channels with a nanometer thick layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), well known to strongly reduce non-specific adsorption, using only commercially available reagents in an aqueous environment. The coating consists...

  20. Sensitivity of a hydraulic model to changes in channel erosion during extreme flooding

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Jefferson S.; Freer, Jim E; Bates, Paul D.; Stephens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research into flood modelling has primarily concentrated on the simulation of inundation flow without considering the influences of channel morphology. River channels are often represented by a simplified geometry that is implicitly assumed to remain unchanged during flood simulations. However, field evidence demonstrates that significant morphological changes can occur during floods to mobilise the boundary sediments. Despite this, the effect of channel morphology on model results has...

  1. Complement regulatory protein genes in channel catfish and their involvement in disease defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yun; Song, Lin; Li, Chao; Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is one of the most important defense systems of innate immunity, which plays a crucial role in disease defense responses in channel catfish. However, inappropriate and excessive complement activation could lead to potential damage to the host cells. Therefore the complement system is controlled by a set of complement regulatory proteins to allow normal defensive functions, but prevent hazardous complement activation to host tissues. In this study, we identified nine complement regulatory protein genes from the channel catfish genome. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses were conducted to determine their orthology relationships, supporting their correct annotation and potential functional inferences. The expression profiles of the complement regulatory protein genes were determined in channel catfish healthy tissues and after infection with the two main bacterial pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare. The vast majority of complement regulatory protein genes were significantly regulated after bacterial infections, but interestingly were generally up-regulated after E. ictaluri infection while mostly down-regulated after F. columnare infection, suggesting a pathogen-specific pattern of regulation. Collectively, these findings suggested that complement regulatory protein genes may play complex roles in the host immune responses to bacterial pathogens in channel catfish.

  2. Structure and inhibition of the SARS coronavirus envelope protein ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Pervushin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The envelope (E protein from coronaviruses is a small polypeptide that contains at least one alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Absence, or inactivation, of E protein results in attenuated viruses, due to alterations in either virion morphology or tropism. Apart from its morphogenetic properties, protein E has been reported to have membrane permeabilizing activity. Further, the drug hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not amiloride, inhibited in vitro ion channel activity of some synthetic coronavirus E proteins, and also viral replication. We have previously shown for the coronavirus species responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV that the transmembrane domain of E protein (ETM forms pentameric alpha-helical bundles that are likely responsible for the observed channel activity. Herein, using solution NMR in dodecylphosphatidylcholine micelles and energy minimization, we have obtained a model of this channel which features regular alpha-helices that form a pentameric left-handed parallel bundle. The drug HMA was found to bind inside the lumen of the channel, at both the C-terminal and the N-terminal openings, and, in contrast to amiloride, induced additional chemical shifts in ETM. Full length SARS-CoV E displayed channel activity when transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 cells in a whole-cell patch clamp set-up. This activity was significantly reduced by hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not by amiloride. The channel structure presented herein provides a possible rationale for inhibition, and a platform for future structure-based drug design of this potential pharmacological target.

  3. Engineering of an E. coli outer membrane protein FhuA with increased channel diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dworeck Tamara

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Channel proteins like FhuA can be an alternative to artificial chemically synthesized nanopores. To reach such goals, channel proteins must be flexible enough to be modified in their geometry, i.e. length and diameter. As continuation of a previous study in which we addressed the lengthening of the channel, here we report the increasing of the channel diameter by genetic engineering. Results The FhuA Δ1-159 diameter increase has been obtained by doubling the amino acid sequence of the first two N-terminal β-strands, resulting in variant FhuA Δ1-159 Exp. The total number of β-strands increased from 22 to 24 and the channel surface area is expected to increase by ~16%. The secondary structure analysis by circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows a high β-sheet content, suggesting the correct folding of FhuA Δ1-159 Exp. To further prove the FhuA Δ1-159 Exp channel functionality, kinetic measurement using the HRP-TMB assay (HRP = Horse Radish Peroxidase, TMB = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine were conducted. The results indicated a 17% faster diffusion kinetic for FhuA Δ1-159 Exp as compared to FhuA Δ1-159, well correlated to the expected channel surface area increase of ~16%. Conclusion In this study using a simple "semi rational" approach the FhuA Δ1-159 diameter was enlarged. By combining the actual results with the previous ones on the FhuA Δ1-159 lengthening a new set of synthetic nanochannels with desired lengths and diameters can be produced, broadening the FhuA Δ1-159 applications. As large scale protein production is possible our approach can give a contribution to nanochannel industrial applications.

  4. Millenial scale changes in flood magnitude and frequency and the role of changes in channel adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croke, Jacky; Thompson, Christopher; Denham, Robert; Haines, Heather; Sharma, Ashneel; Pietsch, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    With access to only limited gauging records (~ 37 years in eastern Australia), Australia like many parts of the globe is heavily constrained in its ability to meaningfully predict the magnitude and frequency of extreme flood events. Flood inundation data gathered during recent floods (2011 and 213) now forms an essential insight into how landscapes may respond to future floods and to guide planning and policy. This study presents the first singe-catchment flood reconstruction analyses in a region of recognised hydrological variability, as characterised by alternating extremes of floods and droughts. The resultant 'Big Flood' data set consists of a unique combination of high-resolution topographic data on landscape changes during recent floods, and a detailed reconstruction of both the timing and estimated magnitude of past food events derived using OSL dating of flood deposits from a range of sedimentary environments. While distinct flood and drought 'phases' are recognisable over the timescale of several thousand years, the extent to which these reflect changes in flood magnitude and/or frequency remains complicated by catchment-specific geomorphology. Issues of flood sample preservation are discussed in this talk within the context of geomorphic setting and notably non-linear variations in the capacity for channel adjustment. This talk outlines the key factors which must be considered in evaluating the role of climate, landuse change and geomorphology in informing flood risk management in Queensland.

  5. Description and control of dissociation channels in gas-phase protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thachuk, Mark; Fegan, Sarah K.; Raheem, Nigare

    2016-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the charged apo-hemoglobin protein complex, this work expands upon our initial report [S. K. Fegan and M. Thachuk, J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 722-728 (2014)] about control of dissociation channels in the gas phase using specially designed charge tags. Employing a charge hopping algorithm and a range of temperatures, a variety of dissociation channels are found for activated gas-phase protein complexes. At low temperatures, a single monomer unfolds and becomes charge enriched. At higher temperatures, two additional channels open: (i) two monomers unfold and charge enrich and (ii) two monomers compete for unfolding with one eventually dominating and the other reattaching to the complex. At even higher temperatures, other more complex dissociation channels open with three or more monomers competing for unfolding. A model charge tag with five sites is specially designed to either attract or exclude charges. By attaching this tag to the N-terminus of specific monomers, the unfolding of those monomers can be decidedly enhanced or suppressed. In other words, using charge tags to direct the motion of charges in a protein complex provides a mechanism for controlling dissociation. This technique could be used in mass spectrometry experiments to direct forces at specific attachment points in a protein complex, and hence increase the diversity of product channels available for quantitative analysis. In turn, this could provide insight into the function of the protein complex in its native biological environment. From a dynamics perspective, this system provides an interesting example of cooperative behaviour involving motions with differing time scales.

  6. Molecular Characterization of LRB7 Gene and a Water Channel Protein TIP2 in Chorispora bungeana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaoxu; Di, Cuixia; Fang, Weikuan; Wu, Kaichao; Chen, Maoshan; He, Shanshan; Zeng, Yuan; Jing, Yan; Liang, Jun; Tan, Fang; Li, Song; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Guangxiu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Water channel proteins, also called aquaporins, are integral membrane proteins from major intrinsic protein (MIP) family and involved in several pathways including not only water transport but also cell signaling, reproduction, and photosynthesis. The full cDNA and protein sequences of aquaporin in Chorispora bungeana Fisch. & C.A. Mey (C. bungeana) are still unknown. Results. In this study, PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends approaches were used to clone the full cDNA of LRB7 (GenBank accession number: EU636988) of C. bungeana. Sequence analysis indicated that it was 1235 bp, which had two introns and encoded a protein of 250 amino acids. Structure analysis revealed that the protein had two conserved NPA motifs, one of which is MIP signature sequence (SGxHxNPAVT), six membrane helix regions, and additional membrane-embedded domains. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the protein was from TIP2 subgroup. Surprisingly, semiquantitative RT-PCR experiment and western blot analysis showed that LRB7 and TIP2 were only detectable in roots, unlike Arabidopsis and Raphanus. Connecting with our previous studies, LRB7 was supported to associate with chilling-tolerance in C. bungeana. Conclusion. This is the first time to characterize the full sequences of LRB7 gene and water channel protein in C. bungeana. Our findings contribute to understanding the water transports in plants under low temperatures.

  7. Molecular Characterization of LRB7 Gene and a Water Channel Protein TIP2 in Chorispora bungeana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Water channel proteins, also called aquaporins, are integral membrane proteins from major intrinsic protein (MIP family and involved in several pathways including not only water transport but also cell signaling, reproduction, and photosynthesis. The full cDNA and protein sequences of aquaporin in Chorispora bungeana Fisch. & C.A. Mey (C. bungeana are still unknown. Results. In this study, PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends approaches were used to clone the full cDNA of LRB7 (GenBank accession number: EU636988 of C. bungeana. Sequence analysis indicated that it was 1235 bp, which had two introns and encoded a protein of 250 amino acids. Structure analysis revealed that the protein had two conserved NPA motifs, one of which is MIP signature sequence (SGxHxNPAVT, six membrane helix regions, and additional membrane-embedded domains. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the protein was from TIP2 subgroup. Surprisingly, semiquantitative RT-PCR experiment and western blot analysis showed that LRB7 and TIP2 were only detectable in roots, unlike Arabidopsis and Raphanus. Connecting with our previous studies, LRB7 was supported to associate with chilling-tolerance in C. bungeana. Conclusion. This is the first time to characterize the full sequences of LRB7 gene and water channel protein in C. bungeana. Our findings contribute to understanding the water transports in plants under low temperatures.

  8. The small envelope protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus possesses ion channel protein-like properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small envelope (E) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a hydrophobic 73 amino acid protein encoded in the internal open reading frame (ORF) of the bicistronic mRNA2. As a first step towards understanding the biological role of E protein during PRRSV replication, E gene expression was blocked in a full-length infectious clone by mutating the ATG translational initiation to GTG, such that the full-length mutant genomic clone was unable to synthesize the E protein. DNA transfection of PRRSV-susceptible cells with the E gene knocked-out genomic clone showed the absence of virus infectivity. P129-ΔE-transfected cells however produced virion particles in the culture supernatant, and these particles contained viral genomic RNA, demonstrating that the E protein is essential for PRRSV infection but dispensable for virion assembly. Electron microscopy suggests that the P129-ΔE virions assembled in the absence of E had a similar appearance to the wild-type particles. Strand-specific RT-PCR demonstrated that the E protein-negative, non-infectious P129-ΔE virus particles were able to enter cells but further steps of replication were interrupted. The entry of PRRSV has been suggested to be via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and lysomotropic basic compounds and known ion-channel blocking agents both inhibited PRRSV replication effectively during the uncoating process. The expression of E protein in Escherichia coli-mediated cell growth arrests and increased the membrane permeability. Cross-linking experiments in cells infected with PRRSV or transfected with E gene showed that the E protein was able to form homo-oligomers. Taken together, our data suggest that the PRRSV E protein is likely an ion-channel protein embedded in the viral envelope and facilitates uncoating of virus and release of the genome in the cytoplasm

  9. Tuning the mechanosensitivity of a BK channel by changing the linker length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Some large-conductance Ca2+ and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels are activated by membrane stretch. However, the mechanism of mechano-gating of the BK channels is still not well understood. Previous studies have led to the proposal that the tinker-gating ring complex functions as a passive spring, transducing the force generated by intraceilular Ca2+ to the gate to open the channel. This raises the question as to whether membrane stretch is also transmitted to the gate of mechanosensitive (MS) BK channels via the tinker-gating complex. To study this, we changed the linker length in the stretch-activated BK channel (SAKCaC), and examined the effect of membrane stretch on the gating of the resultant mutant channels. Shortening the tinker increased, whereas extending the tinker reduced, the channel mechanosensitivity both in the presence and in the absence of intracellular Ca2+. However, the voltage and Ca2+ sensitivities were not significantly altered by membrane stretch. Furthermore, the SAKCaC became less sensitive to membrane stretch at relatively high intracellular Ca2+ concentrations or membrane depolarization. These observations suggest that once the channel is in the open-state conformation, tension on the spring is partially released and membrane stretch is less effective. Our results are consistent with the idea that membrane stretch is transferred to the gate via the tinker-gating ring complex of the MS BK channels.

  10. Formation of individual protein channels in lipid bilayers suspended in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, André; Han, Xiaojun; Winkler, Fritz K; Tiefenauer, Louis X

    2009-10-15

    Free-standing lipid bilayers are formed in regularly arranged nanopores of 200, 400 and 800 nm in a 300 nm thin hydrophobic silicon nitride membrane separating two fluid compartments. The extraordinary stability of the lipid bilayers allows us to monitor channel formation of the model peptide melittin and alpha-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. We observed that melittin channel formation is voltage-dependent and transient, whereas transmembrane heptameric alpha-hemolysin channels in nano-BLMs persist for hours. The onset of alpha-hemolysin-mediated conduction depends on the applied protein concentration and strongly on the diameter of the nanopores. Heptameric channel formation from adsorbed alpha-hemolysin monomers needs more time in bilayers suspended in 200 nm pores compared to bilayers in pores of 400 and 800 nm diameters. Diffusion of sodium ions across alpha-hemolysin channels present in a sufficiently high number in the bilayers was quantitatively and specifically determined using ion selective electrodes. The results demonstrate that relatively small variations of nano-dimensions have a tremendous effect on observable dynamic biomolecular processes. Such nanopore chips are potentially useful as supports for stable lipid bilayers to establish functional assays of membrane proteins needed in basic research and drug discovery.

  11. Protein kinase CK2 is coassembled with small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels and regulates channel gating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bildl, Wolfgang; Strassmaier, Tim; Thurm, Henrike;

    2004-01-01

    Small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (SK channels) couple the membrane potential to fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in many types of cells. SK channels are gated by Ca2+ ions via calmodulin that is constitutively bound to the intracellular C terminus of the channels and...

  12. Gas Channels for NH3: Proteins from Hyperthermophiles Complement an Escherichia coli Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Soupene, Eric; Chu, Tony; Corbin, Rebecca W.; Hunt, Donald F.; Kustu, Sydney

    2002-01-01

    Ammonium transport (Amt) proteins appear to be bidirectional channels for NH3. The amt genes of the hyperthermophiles Aquifex aeolicus and Methanococcus jannaschii complement enteric amtB mutants for growth at 25 nM NH3 at 37°C. To our knowledge, Amt proteins are the first hyperthermophilic membrane transport proteins shown to be active in a mesophilic bacterium. Despite low expression levels, His-tagged Aquifex Amt could be purified by heating and nickel chelate affinity chromatography. It c...

  13. The first discovered water channel protein, later called aquaporin 1: molecular characteristics, functions and medical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    After a decade of work on the water permeability of red blood cells (RBC) Benga group in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, discovered in 1985 the first water channel protein in the RBC membrane. The discovery was reported in publications in 1986 and reviewed in subsequent years. The same protein was purified by chance by Agre group in Baltimore, USA, in 1988, who called in 1991 the protein CHIP28 (CHannel forming Integral membrane Protein of 28 kDa), suggesting that it may play a role in linkage of the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer. In 1992 the Agre group identified CHIP28's water transport property. One year later CHIP28 was named aquaporin 1, abbreviated as AQP1. In this review the molecular structure-function relationships of AQP1 are presented. In the natural or model membranes AQP1 is in the form of a homotetramer, however, each monomer has an independent water channel (pore). The three-dimensional structure of AQP1 is described, with a detailed description of the channel (pore), the molecular mechanisms of permeation through the channel of water molecules and exclusion of protons. The permeability of the pore to gases (CO(2), NH(3), NO, O(2)) and ions is also mentioned. I have also reviewed the functional roles and medical implications of AQP1 expressed in various organs and cells (microvascular endothelial cells, kidney, central nervous system, eye, lacrimal and salivary glands, respiratory apparatus, gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary compartments, female and male reproductive system, inner ear, skin). The role of AQP1 in cell migration and angiogenesis in relation with cancer, the genetics of AQP1 and mutations in human subjects are also mentioned. The role of AQP1 in red blood cells is discussed based on our comparative studies of water permeability in over 30 species. PMID:22705445

  14. Channels and Volume Changes in the Life and Death of the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasantes-Morales, Herminia

    2016-09-01

    Volume changes deviating from original cell volume represent a major challenge for cellular homeostasis. Cell volume may be altered either by variations in the external osmolarity or by disturbances in the transmembrane ion gradients that generate an osmotic imbalance. Cells respond to anisotonicity-induced volume changes by active regulatory mechanisms that modify the intracellular/extracellular concentrations of K(+), Cl(-), Na(+), and organic osmolytes in the direction necessary to reestablish the osmotic equilibrium. Corrective osmolyte fluxes permeate across channels that have a relevant role in cell volume regulation. Channels also participate as causal actors in necrotic swelling and apoptotic volume decrease. This is an overview of the types of channels involved in either corrective or pathologic changes in cell volume. The review also underlines the contribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, notably TRPV4, in volume regulation after swelling and describes the role of other TRPs in volume changes linked to apoptosis and necrosis. Lastly we discuss findings showing that multimers derived from LRRC8A (leucine-rich repeat containing 8A) gene are structural components of the volume-regulated Cl(-) channel (VRAC), and we underline the intriguing possibility that different heteromer combinations comprise channels with different intrinsic properties that allow permeation of the heterogenous group of molecules acting as organic osmolytes. PMID:27358231

  15. Subseasonal changes observed in subglacial channel pressure, size, and sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbert, Florent; Tsai, Victor C.; Amundson, Jason M.; Bartholomaus, Timothy C.; Walter, Jacob I.

    2016-04-01

    Water that pressurizes the base of glaciers and ice sheets enhances glacier velocities and modulates glacial erosion. Predicting ice flow and erosion therefore requires knowledge of subglacial channel evolution, which remains observationally limited. Here we demonstrate that detailed analysis of seismic ground motion caused by subglacial water flow at Mendenhall Glacier (Alaska) allows for continuous measurement of daily to subseasonal changes in basal water pressure gradient, channel size, and sediment transport. We observe intermittent subglacial water pressure gradient changes during the melt season, at odds with common assumptions of slowly varying, low-pressure channels. These observations indicate that changes in channel size do not keep pace with changes in discharge. This behavior strongly affects glacier dynamics and subglacial channel erosion at Mendenhall Glacier, where episodic periods of high water pressure gradients enhance glacier surface velocity and channel sediment transport by up to 30% and 50%, respectively. We expect the application of this framework to future seismic observations acquired at glaciers worldwide to improve our understanding of subglacial processes.

  16. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated homocysteine levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared to control subjects. We further observed that administration of homocysteine or acetylcysteine significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared...

  17. A vesicle-trafficking protein commandeers Kv channel voltage sensors for voltage-dependent secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefen, Christopher; Karnik, Rucha; Larson, Emily; Lefoulon, Cécile; Wang, Yizhou; Waghmare, Sakharam; Zhang, Ben; Hills, Adrian; Blatt, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Growth in plants depends on ion transport for osmotic solute uptake and secretory membrane trafficking to deliver material for wall remodelling and cell expansion. The coordination of these processes lies at the heart of the question, unresolved for more than a century, of how plants regulate cell volume and turgor. Here we report that the SNARE protein SYP121 (SYR1/PEN1), which mediates vesicle fusion at the Arabidopsis plasma membrane, binds the voltage sensor domains (VSDs) of K(+) channels to confer a voltage dependence on secretory traffic in parallel with K(+) uptake. VSD binding enhances secretion in vivo subject to voltage, and mutations affecting VSD conformation alter binding and secretion in parallel with channel gating, net K(+) concentration, osmotic content and growth. These results demonstrate a new and unexpected mechanism for secretory control, in which a subset of plant SNAREs commandeer K(+) channel VSDs to coordinate membrane trafficking with K(+) uptake for growth.

  18. A theoretical analysis of river bars stability under changing channel width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, S.; Zolezzi, G.; Tubino, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new theoretical model to investigate the influence of temporal changes in channel width on river bar stability. This is achieved by performing a nonlinear stability analysis, which includes temporal width variations as a small-amplitude perturbation of the basic flow. In order to quantify width variability, channel width is related with the instantaneous discharge using existing empirical formulae proposed for channels with cohesionless banks. Therefore, width can vary (increase and/or decrease) either because it adapts to the temporally varying discharge or, if discharge is constant, through a relaxation relation describing widening of an initially overnarrow channel towards the equilibrium width. Unsteadiness related with changes in channel width is found to directly affect the instantaneous bar growth rate, depending on the conditions under which the widening process occurs. The governing mathematical system is solved by means of a two-parameters (ɛ, δ) perturbation expansion, where ɛ is related to bar amplitude and δ to the temporal width variability. In general width unsteadiness is predicted to play a destabilizing role on free bar stability, namely during the peak stage of a flood event in a laterally unconfined channel and invariably for overnarrow channels fed with steady discharge. In this latter case, width unsteadiness tends to shorten the most unstable bar wavelength compared to the case with constant width, in qualitative agreement with existing experimental observations.

  19. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  20. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  1. Polyester Modification of the Mammalian TRPM8 Channel Protein: Implications for Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chike Cao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The TRPM8 ion channel is expressed in sensory neurons and is responsible for sensing environmental cues, such as cold temperatures and chemical compounds, including menthol and icilin. The channel functional activity is regulated by various physical and chemical factors and is likely to be preconditioned by its molecular composition. Our studies indicate that the TRPM8 channel forms a structural-functional complex with the polyester poly-(R-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB. We identified by mass spectrometry a number of PHB-modified peptides in the N terminus of the TRPM8 protein and in its extracellular S3-S4 linker. Removal of PHB by enzymatic hydrolysis and site-directed mutagenesis of both the serine residues that serve as covalent anchors for PHB and adjacent hydrophobic residues that interact with the methyl groups of the polymer resulted in significant inhibition of TRPM8 channel activity. We conclude that the TRPM8 channel undergoes posttranslational modification by PHB and that this modification is required for its normal function.

  2. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. PMID:27284048

  3. Cell volume changes regulate slick (Slo2.1, but not slack (Slo2.2 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Tejada

    Full Text Available Slick (Slo2.1 and Slack (Slo2.2 channels belong to the family of high-conductance K+ channels and have been found widely distributed in the CNS. Both channels are activated by Na+ and Cl- and, in addition, Slick channels are regulated by ATP. Therefore, the roles of these channels in regulation of cell excitability as well as ion transport processes, like regulation of cell volume, have been hypothesized. It is the aim of this work to evaluate the sensitivity of Slick and Slack channels to small, fast changes in cell volume and to explore mechanisms, which may explain this type of regulation. For this purpose Slick and Slack channels were co-expressed with aquaporin 1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and cell volume changes of around 5% were induced by exposure to hypotonic or hypertonic media. Whole-cell currents were measured by two electrode voltage clamp. Our results show that Slick channels are dramatically stimulated (196% of control by cell swelling and inhibited (57% of control by a decrease in cell volume. In contrast, Slack channels are totally insensitive to similar cell volume changes. The mechanism underlining the strong volume sensitivity of Slick channels needs to be further explored, however we were able to show that it does not depend on an intact actin cytoskeleton, ATP release or vesicle fusion. In conclusion, Slick channels, in contrast to the similar Slack channels, are the only high-conductance K+ channels strongly sensitive to small changes in cell volume.

  4. Mechanosensitive channels of Escherichia coli: the MscL gene, protein, and activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharev, S. I.; Blount, P.; Martinac, B.; Kung, C.

    1997-01-01

    Although mechanosensory responses are ubiquitous and diverse, the molecular bases of mechanosensation in most cases remain mysterious MscL, a mechanosensitive channel of large conductance of Escherichia coli and its bacterial homologues are the first and currently only channel molecules shown to directly sense mechanical stretch of the membrane. In response to the tension conveyed via the lipid bilayer, MscL increases its open probability by several orders of magnitude. In the present review we describe the identification, cloning, and first sets of biophysical and structural data on this simplest mechanosensory molecule. We discovered a 2.5-ns mechanosensitive conductance in giant E. coli spheroplasts. Using chromatographies to enrich the target and patch clamp to assay the channel activity in liposome-reconstituted fractions, we identified the MscL protein and cloned the mscL gene. MscL comprises 136 amino acid residues (15 kDa), with two highly hydrophobic regions, and resides in the inner membrane of the bacterium. PhoA-fusion experiments indicate that the protein spans the membrane twice with both termini in the cytoplasm. Spectroscopic techniques show that it is highly helical. Expression of MscL tandems and covalent cross-linking suggest that the active channel complex is a homo-hexamer. We have identified several residues, which when deleted or substituted, affect channel kinetics or mechanosensitivity. Although unique when discovered, highly conserved MscL homologues in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found, suggesting their ubiquitous importance among bacteria.

  5. Anthropogenic changes to the tidal channel network, sediment rerouting, and social implications in southwest Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Sams, S.; Small, C.

    2015-12-01

    The tidal channel network in southwest Bangladesh has been undergoing major adjustment in response to anthropogenic modification over the past few decades. Densely inhabited, agricultural islands that have been embanked to protect against inundation by tides, river flooding, and storm surges (i.e., polders) preclude tidal exchange and sedimentation. Studies reveal this results in elevation deficits relative to mean high water, endangering local communities when embankment failures occur (e.g., during storms, lateral channel erosion). In addition, many studies suggest that the decrease in tidal prism and associated change in hydrodynamics from poldering causes shoaling in remaining tidal channels, which can cause a disruption in transportation. The widespread closure and conversion of tidal channel areas to profitable shrimp aquaculture is also prevalent in this region. In this study, we quantify the direct closure of tidal channels due to poldering and shrimp aquaculture using historical Landsat and Google Earth imagery, and analyze the morphologic adjustment of the tidal channel network due to these perturbations. In the natural Sundarbans mangrove forest, the tidal channel network has remained relatively constant since the 1970s. In contrast, construction of polders removed >1000 km of primary tidal creeks and >90 km2 has been reclaimed outside of polders through infilling and closure of formerly-active, higher order conduit channels now used for shrimp aquaculture. Field validation confirm tidal restriction by large sluice gates is prevalent, favoring local channel siltation at rates up to 20cm/yr. With the impoundment of primary creeks and closure of 30-60% of conduit channels in the study area, an estimated 1,400 x 106 m3 of water has been removed from the tidal prism and potentially redirected within remaining channels. This has significant implications for tidal amplification in this region. Further, we estimate that 12.3 x 106 MT of sediment annually

  6. How Will Climate Change Affect Channel Morphology and Salmonid Habitat in Mountain Basins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, J. M.; Goode, J.

    2010-12-01

    Riverine habitat for salmonids is intimately linked to channel morphology and fluvial processes (channel hydraulics, sediment transport and scour regime) which are, in turn, controlled by watershed hydrology and erosional processes that input sediment to the fluvial system. Climate change has the potential to alter the timing, magnitude, and style of sediment and water inputs to mountain rivers. Channel response to these changes may range from small-scale adjustments of channel characteristics (e.g., width, depth, grain size, scour depth) to larger-scale changes in channel type (e.g., metamorphosis from a pool-riffle channel to a plane-bed morphology). Identifying which parts of the river network will remain relatively stable in response to climate change, and which are likely to cross critical morphologic and scour thresholds is important for predicting effects on salmonid populations. Toward this end, a regime framework is presented for predicting the relative degree of morphologic stability and scour potential in different physiographic settings (different water and sediment regimes). Digital elevation models are used to explore the spatial distribution of these conditions and potential consequences for salmonid habitat across the landscape. Results suggest that the potential for scour and morphologic variability are strongly influenced by hydroclimate; snowmelt channels are relatively stable across floods of different magnitude, while rainfall-dominated channels are more variable and less stable. Transitional changes in hydrologic regime (mixed rain and snow) have the greatest potential for altering geomorphic conditions and salmonid habitat. However, the vulnerability of salmonids to climate-driven changes in scour regime depend on the species and its life history (i.e., depth to which eggs are buried and timing of incubation relative to scouring flows). Overall, the regime approach provides a useful first-order assessment of channel condition and response

  7. Inhibition of G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels by different classes of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Various antidepressants are commonly used for the treatment of depression and several other neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition to their primary effects on serotonergic or noradrenergic neurotransmitter systems, antidepressants have been shown to interact with several receptors and ion channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of antidepressants have not yet been sufficiently clarified. G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+ (GIRK, Kir3 channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and heart rate, and GIRK channel modulation has been suggested to have therapeutic potential for several neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the effects of various classes of antidepressants on GIRK channels using the Xenopus oocyte expression assay. In oocytes injected with mRNA for GIRK1/GIRK2 or GIRK1/GIRK4 subunits, extracellular application of sertraline, duloxetine, and amoxapine effectively reduced GIRK currents, whereas nefazodone, venlafaxine, mianserin, and mirtazapine weakly inhibited GIRK currents even at toxic levels. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent, with various degrees of potency and effectiveness. Furthermore, the effects of sertraline were voltage-independent and time-independent during each voltage pulse, whereas the effects of duloxetine were voltage-dependent with weaker inhibition with negative membrane potentials and time-dependent with a gradual decrease in each voltage pulse. However, Kir2.1 channels were insensitive to all of the drugs. Moreover, the GIRK currents induced by ethanol were inhibited by sertraline but not by intracellularly applied sertraline. The present results suggest that GIRK channel inhibition may reveal a novel characteristic of the commonly used antidepressants, particularly sertraline, and contributes to some of the therapeutic effects and adverse effects.

  8. Channel changes and floodplain management in the meandering middle Ebro River, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollero, Alfredo

    2010-05-01

    The 346 km of the middle Ebro River between Logroño and La Zaida is a free meandering channel in a wide floodplain. This reach contains a discontinuous riparian corridor, including valuable riparian forests and oxbow lakes. The Ebro has witnessed substantial changes in channel morphology, gravel bars, riparian vegetation and floodplain uses over the last 80 years. The growth in sinuosity, migrations and meander cut-offs have been frequent before 1981. Afterwards, bank protections and dykes have stabilized the channel. There has been a progressive and significant decrease of both the area covered by water and the gravel bars without plant colonization. As a result the width of the riparian corridor has been dramatically reduced for human use. The deceleration and near elimination of the free meander dynamics of the Ebro channel represent an important loss of natural heritage. Dams, land-use changes throughout the basin, and construction of flood defences that restrict the main channel have changed the river system behaviour, which urgently needs a management plan combining both improvement and risk reduction. The solution proposed is the creation of a "Fluvial Territory".

  9. Expression of G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs in lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuller Hildegard M

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous data from our laboratory has indicated that there is a functional link between the β-adrenergic receptor signaling pathway and the G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1 in human breast cancer cell lines. We wanted to determine if GIRK channels were expressed in lung cancers and if a similar link exists in lung cancer. Methods GIRK1-4 expression and levels were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and real-time PCR. GIRK protein levels were determined by western blots and cell proliferation was determined by a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU assay. Results GIRK1 mRNA was expressed in three of six small cell lung cancer (SCLC cell lines, and either GIRK2, 3 or 4 mRNA expression was detected in all six SCLC cell lines. Treatment of NCI-H69 with β2-adrenergic antagonist ICI 118,551 (100 μM daily for seven days led to slight decreases of GIRK1 mRNA expression levels. Treatment of NCI-H69 with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (10 μM decreased growth rates in these cells. The GIRK inhibitor U50488H (2 μM also inhibited proliferation, and this decrease was potentiated by isoproterenol. In the SCLC cell lines that demonstrated GIRK1 mRNA expression, we also saw GIRK1 protein expression. We feel these may be important regulatory pathways since no expression of mRNA of the GIRK channels (1 & 2 was found in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, a suggested cell of origin for SCLC, nor was GIRK1 or 2 expression found in human small airway epithelial cells. GIRK (1,2,3,4 mRNA expression was also seen in A549 adenocarcinoma and NCI-H727 carcinoid cell lines. GIRK1 mRNA expression was not found in tissue samples from adenocarcinoma or squamous cancer patients, nor was it found in NCI-H322 or NCI-H441 adenocarcinoma cell lines. GIRK (1,3,4 mRNA expression was seen in three squamous cell lines, GIRK2 was only expressed in one squamous cell line. However, GIRK1 protein

  10. Expression of G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) in lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous data from our laboratory has indicated that there is a functional link between the β-adrenergic receptor signaling pathway and the G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1) in human breast cancer cell lines. We wanted to determine if GIRK channels were expressed in lung cancers and if a similar link exists in lung cancer. GIRK1-4 expression and levels were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. GIRK protein levels were determined by western blots and cell proliferation was determined by a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay. GIRK1 mRNA was expressed in three of six small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, and either GIRK2, 3 or 4 mRNA expression was detected in all six SCLC cell lines. Treatment of NCI-H69 with β2-adrenergic antagonist ICI 118,551 (100 μM) daily for seven days led to slight decreases of GIRK1 mRNA expression levels. Treatment of NCI-H69 with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (10 μM) decreased growth rates in these cells. The GIRK inhibitor U50488H (2 μM) also inhibited proliferation, and this decrease was potentiated by isoproterenol. In the SCLC cell lines that demonstrated GIRK1 mRNA expression, we also saw GIRK1 protein expression. We feel these may be important regulatory pathways since no expression of mRNA of the GIRK channels (1 & 2) was found in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, a suggested cell of origin for SCLC, nor was GIRK1 or 2 expression found in human small airway epithelial cells. GIRK (1,2,3,4) mRNA expression was also seen in A549 adenocarcinoma and NCI-H727 carcinoid cell lines. GIRK1 mRNA expression was not found in tissue samples from adenocarcinoma or squamous cancer patients, nor was it found in NCI-H322 or NCI-H441 adenocarcinoma cell lines. GIRK (1,3,4) mRNA expression was seen in three squamous cell lines, GIRK2 was only expressed in one squamous cell line. However, GIRK1 protein expression was not seen in any non-SCLC cells

  11. Modelling of Phase Change Heat Transfer System for Micro-channel and Chaos Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiao-Ping; CUI Z. F.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic properties for the micro-channel phase change heat transfer system axe studied by theoretical method combined with experiment. Liquid-vapour interface dynamic systems are obtained by introducing disjoining pressure produced by three phase molecular interactions and Lie algebra analysis. Experiments for 0.6 mm×2 mm rectangular micro-channel are carried out to obtain the pressure time serials. Power spectrum density analysis for these serials shows that the system is in chaotic state if the frequency is above 7.39 Hz. The result indicates that the high heat transfer performance of the micro channel phase change system may re/ate to the characteristics of chaos. The chaos attractor is drawn by the simulation of the obtained differential dynamic system under the conditions of our experiment.

  12. cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Produces Interdomain Movement in SUR2B Leading to Activation of the Vascular KATP Channel*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yun; Chen, Xianfeng; Wu, Zhongying; Shi, Weiwei; Yang, Yang; Cui, Ningren; Jiang, Chun; Harrison, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular ATP-sensitive K+ channels are activated by multiple vasodilating hormones and neurotransmitters via PKA. A critical PKA phosphorylation site (Ser-1387) is found in the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2) of the SUR2B subunit. To understand how phosphorylation at Ser-1387 leads to changes in channel activity, we modeled the SUR2B using a newly crystallized ABC protein SAV1866. The model showed that Ser-1387 was located on the interface of NBD2 with TMD1 and...

  13. Cooperative regulation by G proteins and Na+ of neuronal GIRK2 K+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Touhara, Kouki K; Weir, Keiko; Bean, Bruce P; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    G protein gated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels open and thereby silence cellular electrical activity when inhibitory G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are stimulated. Here we describe an assay to measure neuronal GIRK2 activity as a function of membrane-anchored G protein concentration. Using this assay we show that four Gβγ subunits bind cooperatively to open GIRK2, and that intracellular Na+ – which enters neurons during action potentials – further amplifies opening mostly by increasing Gβγ affinity. A Na+ amplification function is characterized and used to estimate the concentration of Gβγ subunits that appear in the membrane of mouse dopamine neurons when GABAB receptors are stimulated. We conclude that GIRK2, through its dual responsiveness to Gβγ and Na+, mediates a form of neuronal inhibition that is amplifiable in the setting of excess electrical activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15751.001 PMID:27074662

  14. Role of protein sulfation in vasodilation induced by minoxidil sulfate, a K+ channel opener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisheri, K.D.; Oleynek, J.J.; Puddington, L. (Cardiovascular Diseases Research, Upjohn Laboratories, Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, MI (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Evidence from contractile, radioisotope ion flux and electrophysiological studies suggest that minoxidil sulfate (MNXS) acts as a K+ channel opener in vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to examine possible biochemical mechanisms by which MNXS exerts such an effect. Experiments performed in the isolated rabbit mesenteric artery (RMA) showed that MNXS, 5 microM, but not the parent compound minoxidil, was a potent vasodilator. Whereas the relaxant effects of an another K+ channel opener vasodilator, BRL-34915 (cromakalim), were removed by washing with physiological saline solution, the effects of MNXS persisted after repeated washout attempts. Furthermore, after an initial exposure of segments of intact RMA to (35S) MNXS, greater than 30% of the radiolabel was retained 2 hr after removal of the drug. In contrast, retention of radiolabel was not detected with either (3H)MNXS (label on the piperidine ring of MNXS) or (3H)minoxidil (each less than 3% after a 2-hr washout). These data suggested that the sulfate moiety from MNXS was closely associated with the vascular tissue. To determine if proteins were the acceptors of sulfate from MNXS, intact RMAs were incubated with (35S)MNXS, and then 35S-labeled proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analyzed by fluorography. Preferential labeling of a 116 kD protein was detected by 2 and 5 min of treatment. A 43 kD protein (resembling actin) also showed significant labeling. A similar profile of 35S-labeled proteins was observed in (35S) MNXS-treated A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells, suggesting that the majority of proteins labeled by (35S)MNXS in intact RMA were components of smooth muscle cells.

  15. Online multi-channel microfluidic chip-mass spectrometry and its application for quantifying noncovalent protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu; Chen, Qiushui; Lin, Xuexia; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-03-01

    To establish an automatic and online microfluidic chip-mass spectrometry (chip-MS) system, a device was designed and fabricated for microsampling by a hybrid capillary. The movement of the capillary was programmed by a computer to aspirate samples from different microfluidic channels in the form of microdroplets (typically tens of nanoliters in volume), which were separated by air plugs. The droplets were then directly analyzed by MS via paper spray ionization without any pretreatment. The feasibility and performance were demonstrated by a concentration gradient experiment. Furthermore, after eliminating the effect of nonuniform response factors by an internal standard method, determination of the association constant within a noncovalent protein-protein complex was successfully accomplished with the MS-based titration indicating the versatility and the potential of this novel platform for widespread applications. PMID:25597452

  16. Pre and postprandial changes in orexigenic and anorexigenic factors in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined pre- and postprandial changes in the expression of plasma ghrelin (GHRL) and mRNAs encoding GRLN, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and cholecystokinin (CCK) in channel catfish. Fish were either offered feed (Fed) or fasted (Unfed). Feeding incr...

  17. Channel-conveyance capacity, channel change, and sediment transport in the lower Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers, western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Chistopher S.; Voss, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    Draining the volcanic, glaciated terrain of Mount Rainier, Washington, the Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers convey copious volumes of water and sediment down to Commencement Bay in Puget Sound. Recent flooding in the lowland river system has renewed interest in understanding sediment transport and its effects on flow conveyance throughout the lower drainage basin. Bathymetric and topographic data for 156 cross sections were surveyed in the lower Puyallup River system by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and were compared with similar datasets collected in 1984. Regions of significant aggradation were measured along the Puyallup and White Rivers. Between 1984 and 2009, aggradation totals as measured by changes in average channel elevation were as much as 7.5, 6.5, and 2 feet on the Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers, respectively. These aggrading river sections correlated with decreasing slopes in riverbeds where the rivers exit relatively confined sections in the upper drainage and enter the relatively unconstricted valleys of the low-gradient Puget Lowland. Measured grain-size distributions from each riverbed showed a progressive fining downstream. Analysis of stage-discharge relations at streamflow-gaging stations along rivers draining Mount Rainier demonstrated the dynamic nature of channel morphology on river courses influenced by glaciated, volcanic terrain. The greatest rates of aggradation since the 1980s were in the Nisqually River near National (5.0 inches per year) and the White River near Auburn (1.8 inches per year). Less pronounced aggradation was measured on the Puyallup River and the White River just downstream of Mud Mountain Dam. The largest measured rate of incision was measured in the Cowlitz River at Packwood (5.0 inches per year). Channel-conveyance capacity estimated using a one-dimensional hydraulic model decreased in some river reaches since 1984. The reach exhibiting the largest decrease (about 20-50 percent) in channel

  18. Fast Atomic Charge Calculation for Implementation into a Polarizable Force Field and Application to an Ion Channel Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raiker Witter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polarization of atoms plays a substantial role in molecular interactions. Class I and II force fields mostly calculate with fixed atomic charges which can cause inadequate descriptions for highly charged molecules, for example, ion channels or metalloproteins. Changes in charge distributions can be included into molecular mechanics calculations by various methods. Here, we present a very fast computational quantum mechanical method, the Bond Polarization Theory (BPT. Atomic charges are obtained via a charge calculation method that depend on the 3D structure of the system in a similar way as atomic charges of ab initio calculations. Different methods of population analysis and charge calculation methods and their dependence on the basis set were investigated. A refined parameterization yielded excellent correlation of R=0.9967. The method was implemented in the force field COSMOS-NMR and applied to the histidine-tryptophan-complex of the transmembrane domain of the M2 protein channel of influenza A virus. Our calculations show that moderate changes of side chain torsion angle χ1 and small variations of χ2 of Trp-41 are necessary to switch from the inactivated into the activated state; and a rough two-side jump model of His-37 is supported for proton gating in accordance with a flipping mechanism.

  19. Differential effects of two-pore channel protein 1 and 2 silencing in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahidin, Aisyah H; Stewart, Teneale A; Thompson, Erik W; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2016-09-01

    Two-pore channel proteins, TPC1 and TPC2, are calcium permeable ion channels found localized to the membranes of endolysosomal calcium stores. There is increasing interest in the role of TPC-mediated intracellular signaling in various pathologies; however their role in breast cancer has not been extensively evaluated. TPC1 and TPC2 mRNA was present in all non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic breast cell lines assessed. Silencing of TPC2 but not TPC1 attenuated epidermal growth factor-induced vimentin expression in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. This effect was not due to a general inhibition of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) as TPC2 silencing had no effect on epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced changes on E-cadherin expression. TPC1 and TPC2 were also shown to differentially regulate cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-mediated changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+). These findings indicate potential differential regulation of signaling processes by TPC1 and TPC2 in breast cancer cells. PMID:27353380

  20. Src family protein tyrosine kinase regulates the basolateral K channel in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) by phosphorylation of KCNJ10 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengbiao; Wang, Lijun; Thomas, Sherin; Wang, Kemeng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Rinehart, Jesse; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-09-01

    The loss of function of the basolateral K channels in the distal nephron causes electrolyte imbalance. The aim of this study is to examine the role of Src family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in regulating K channels in the basolateral membrane of the mouse initial distal convoluted tubule (DCT1). Single-channel recordings confirmed that the 40-picosiemen (pS) K channel was the only type of K channel in the basolateral membrane of DCT1. The suppression of SFK reversibly inhibited the basolateral 40-pS K channel activity in cell-attached patches and decreased the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K currents in DCT1. Inhibition of SFK also shifted the K reversal potential from -65 to -43 mV, suggesting a role of SFK in determining the membrane potential in DCT1. Western blot analysis showed that KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a key component of the basolateral 40-pS K channel in DCT1, was a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. LC/MS analysis further confirmed that SFK phosphorylated KCNJ10 at Tyr(8) and Tyr(9). The single-channel recording detected the activity of a 19-pS K channel in KCNJ10-transfected HEK293T cells and a 40-pS K channel in the cells transfected with KCNJ10+KCNJ16 (Kir.5.1) that form a heterotetramer in the basolateral membrane of the DCT. Mutation of Tyr(9) did not alter the channel conductance of the homotetramer and heterotetramer. However, it decreased the whole-cell K currents, the probability of finding K channels, and surface expression of KCNJ10 in comparison to WT KCNJ10. We conclude that SFK stimulates the basolateral K channel activity in DCT1, at least partially, by phosphorylating Tyr(9) on KCNJ10. We speculate that the modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of KCNJ10 should play a role in regulating membrane transport function in DCT1.

  1. Development of heart failure is independent of K+ channel-interacting protein 2 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speerschneider, Tobias; Grubb, Søren; Metoska, Artina;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract  Abnormal ventricular repolarization in ion channelopathies and heart disease is a major cause of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. K(+) channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) expression is significantly reduced in human heart failure (HF), contributing to a loss of the...... before and every 2 weeks after the operation. Ten weeks post-surgery, surface ECG was recorded and we paced the heart in vivo to induce arrhythmias. Afterwards, tissue from the left ventricle was used for immunoblotting. Time courses of HF development were comparable in TAC-operated WT and KChIP2...

  2. Changes underlying arrhythmia in the transgenic heart overexpressing Refsum disease gene-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Byung Chul; Kim, Jae Ha; Ahn, Young Keun; Lee, Hyang Sim; Baik, Yung Hong; Kim, Kyung Keun

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we identified a novel neuron-specific protein (PAHX-AP1) that binds to Refsum disease gene product (PAHX), and we developed transgenic (TG) mice that overexpress heart-targeted PAHX-AP1. These mice have atrial tachycardia and increased susceptibility to aconitine-induced arrhythmia. This study was undertaken to elucidate the possible changes in ion channels underlying the susceptibility to arrhythmia in these mice. RT-PCR analyses revealed that the cardiac expression of adrenergic beta(1)-receptor (ADRB1) was markedly lower, whereas voltage-gated potassium channel expression (Kv2.1) was higher in PAHX-AP1 TG mice compared with non-TG mice. However, the expression of voltage-sensitive sodium and calcium channels, and muscarinic receptor was not significantly different. Propranolol pretreatment, a non-specific beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, blocked aconitine-induced arrhythmia in non-TG mice, but not in PAHX-AP1 TG mice. Our results indicate that, in the PAHX-AP1 TG heart, the modulation of voltage-gated potassium channel and ADRB1 expression seem to be important in the electrophysiological changes associated with altered ion channel functions, but ADRB1 is not involved in the greater susceptibility to aconitine-induced arrhythmia.

  3. TRPC1 protein forms only one type of native store-operated channels in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopin, Anton; Shalygin, Alexey; Vigont, Vladimir; Zimina, Olga; Glushankova, Lyubov; Mozhayeva, Galina N; Kaznacheyeva, Elena

    2013-02-01

    TRPC1 is a major component of store-operated calcium entry in many cell types. In our previous studies, three types of endogenous store-operated calcium channels have been described in HEK293 cells, but it remained unknown which of these channels are composed of TRPC1 proteins. Here, this issue has been addressed by performing single-channel analysis in HEK293 cells transfected with anti-TRPC1 siRNA (siTPRC1) or a TPRC1-encoding plasmid. The results show that thapsigargin-or agonist-induced calcium influx is significantly attenuated in siTRPC1-transfected HEK293 cells. TRPC1 knockdown by siRNA results in the disappearance of store-operated I(max) channels, while the properties of I(min) and I(NS) channels are unaffected. In HEK293 cells with overexpressed TRPC1 protein, the unitary current-voltage relationship of exogenous TRPC1 channels is almost linear, with a slope conductance of about 17 pS. The extrapolated reversal potential of expressed TRPC1 channels is +30 mV. Therefore, the main electrophysiological and regulatory properties of expressed TRPC1 and native I(max) channels are identical. Moreover, TRPC1 overexpression in HEK293 cells results in an increased number of store-operated I(max) channels. All these data allow us to conclude that TRPC1 protein forms native store-operated I(max) channels but is not an essential subunit for other store-operated channel types in HEK293 cells.

  4. Entropy-enthalpy compensation at the single protein level: pH sensing in the bacterial channel OmpF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Antonio; Queralt-Martín, María; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Aguilella, Vicente M; Mafé, Salvador

    2014-12-21

    The pH sensing mechanism of the OmpF channel operates via ligand modification: increasing acidity induces the replacement of cations with protons in critical binding sites decreasing the channel conductance. Aside from the change in enthalpy associated with the binding, there is also a change in the microscopic arrangements of ligands, receptors and the surrounding solvent. We show that the pH-modulation of the single channel conduction involves small free energy changes because large enthalpic and entropic contributions change in opposite ways, demonstrating an approximate enthalpy-entropy compensation for different salts and concentrations.

  5. CFTR anion channel modulates expression of human transmembrane mucin MUC3 through the PDZ protein GOPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaseyed, Thaher; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2011-09-15

    The transmembrane mucins in the enterocyte are type 1 transmembrane proteins with long and rigid mucin domains, rich in proline, threonine and serine residues that carry numerous O-glycans. Three of these mucins, MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17 are unique in harboring C-terminal class I PDZ motifs, making them suitable ligands for PDZ proteins. A screening of 123 different human PDZ domains for binding to MUC3 identified a strong interaction with the PDZ protein GOPC (Golgi-associated PDZ and coiled-coil motif-containing protein). This interaction was mediated by the C-terminal PDZ motif of MUC3, binding to the single GOPC PDZ domain. GOPC is also a binding partner for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that directs CFTR for degradation. Overexpression of GOPC downregulated the total levels of MUC3, an effect that was reversed by introducing CFTR. The results suggest that CFTR and MUC3 compete for binding to GOPC, which in turn can regulate levels of these two proteins. For the first time a direct coupling between mucins and the CFTR channel is demonstrated, a finding that will shed further light on the still poorly understood relationship between cystic fibrosis and the mucus phenotype of this disease.

  6. Morphological changes of Gumara River channel over 50 years, upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Mengiste; Nyssen, Jan; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Moges, Michael M.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Enku, Temesgen; Adgo, Enyew

    2015-06-01

    In response to anthropogenic disturbances, alluvial rivers adjust their geometry. The alluvial river channels in the upper Blue Nile basin have been disturbed by human-induced factors since a longtime. This paper examines channel adjustment along a 38-km stretch of the Gumara River which drains towards Lake Tana and then to the Blue Nile. Over a 50 years period, agriculture developed rapidly in the catchment and flooding of the alluvial plain has become more frequent in recent times. The objectives of this study were to document the changes in channel planform and cross-section of the Gumara River and to investigate whether the changes could have contributed to the frequent flooding or vice versa. Two sets of aerial photographs (1957 and 1980) were scanned, and then orthorectified. Recent channel planform information was extracted from SPOT images of 2006 and Google Earth. Channel planform and bed morphology (vertical changes) were determined for these nearly 50 years period. The vertical changes were determined based on aggradation along a permanent structure, historic information on river cross-sections at a hydrological gauging station, and field observations. The results indicate that the lower reach of Gumara near its mouth has undergone major planform changes. A delta with approx. 1.12 km2 of emerged land was created between 1957 and 1980 and an additional 1 km2 of land has been added between 1980 and 2006. The sinuosity of the river changed only slightly: negatively (-1.1% i.e. meandering decreased) for the period from 1957 to 1980 and positively (+3.0%) for the period 1980-2006. Comparison of cross-sections at the hydrological gauging station showed that the deepest point in the river bed aggraded by 2.91 m for the period 1963-2009. The importance of sediment deposition in the stream and on its banks is related to land degradation in the upper catchment, and to artificial rising of Lake Tana level that creates a backwater effect and sediment deposition in

  7. Microstructural Changes in High-Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated with Extruded or Toasted Milk Protein Concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, J C; Clark, S; Lamsal, B P

    2016-02-01

    Milk protein concentrates with more than 80% protein (that is, MPC80) are underutilized as the primary protein source in high-protein nutrition bars as they impart crumbliness and cause hardening during storage. High-protein nutrition bar texture changes are often associated with internal protein aggregations and macronutrient phase separation. These changes were investigated in model high-protein nutrition bars formulated with MPC80 and physically modified MPC80s. High-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80s hardened slower than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80. Extruded MPC80 had reduced free sulfhydryl group exposure, whereas measurable increases were seen in the toasted MPC80. High-protein nutrition bar textural performance may be related to the number of exposed free sulfhydryl groups in MPC80. Protein aggregations resulting from ingredient modification and high-protein nutrition bar storage were studied with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disulfide-based protein aggregations and changes in free sulfhydryl concentration were not consistently relatable to high-protein nutrition bar texture change. However, the high-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80 were less prone to phase separations, as depicted by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and underwent less texture change during storage than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80.

  8. Dynamics of energy distribution in three channel alpha helix protein based on Davydov’s ansatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faozan; Alatas, Husin [Theoretical Physics Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Sciences Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia, 16680 faozan@ipb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    An important aspect of many biological processes at molecular level is the transfer and storage mechanism of bioenergy released in the reaction of the hydrolysis of Adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) by biomacromolecule especially protein. Model of Soliton Davydov is a new break-through that could describe that mechanism. Here we have reformulated quantum mechanical the Davydov theory, using least action principle. Dynamical aspect of the model is analyzed by numerical calculation. We found two dynamical cases: the traveling and pinning soliton that we suggest they are related to the energy transfer and storage mechanism in the protein. Traveling and pinning soliton can be controlled by strength of coupling. In 3- channel approach, we found the breather phenomena in which its frequency is determined by interchannel coupling parameter.

  9. IUPHAR-DB: the IUPHAR database of G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmar, Anthony J; Hills, Rebecca A; Rosser, Edward M; Jones, Martin; Buneman, O Peter; Dunbar, Donald R; Greenhill, Stuart D; Hale, Valerie A; Sharman, Joanna L; Bonner, Tom I; Catterall, William A; Davenport, Anthony P; Delagrange, Philippe; Dollery, Colin T; Foord, Steven M; Gutman, George A; Laudet, Vincent; Neubig, Richard R; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Olsen, Richard W; Peters, John; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Ruffolo, Robert R; Searls, David B; Wright, Mathew W; Spedding, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The IUPHAR database (IUPHAR-DB) integrates peer-reviewed pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and anatomical information on the 354 nonsensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), 71 ligand-gated ion channel subunits and 141 voltage-gated-like ion channel subunits encoded by the human, rat and mouse genomes. These genes represent the targets of approximately one-third of currently approved drugs and are a major focus of drug discovery and development programs in the pharmaceutical industry. IUPHAR-DB provides a comprehensive description of the genes and their functions, with information on protein structure and interactions, ligands, expression patterns, signaling mechanisms, functional assays and biologically important receptor variants (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms and splice variants). In addition, the phenotypes resulting from altered gene expression (e.g. in genetically altered animals or in human genetic disorders) are described. The content of the database is peer reviewed by members of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR); the data are provided through manual curation of the primary literature by a network of over 60 subcommittees of NC-IUPHAR. Links to other bioinformatics resources, such as NCBI, Uniprot, HGNC and the rat and mouse genome databases are provided. IUPHAR-DB is freely available at http://www.iuphar-db.org. PMID:18948278

  10. Dramatic nano-fluidic properties of carbon nanotube membranes as a platform for protein channel mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have three key attributes that make them of great interest for novel membrane applications: 1) atomically flat graphite surface allows for ideal fluid slip boundary conditions and extremely fast flow rates 2) the cutting process to open CNTs inherently places functional chemistry at CNT core entrance for chemical selectivity and 3) CNT are electrically conductive allowing for electrochemical reactions and application of electric fields gradients at CNT tips. Pressure driven flux of a variety of solvents (H2O, hexane, decane ethanol, methanol) are 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than conventional Newtonian flow [Nature 2005, 438, 44] due to atomically flat graphite planes inducing nearly ideal slip conditions. However this is eliminated with selective chemical functionalization [ACS Nano 2011 5(5) 3867-3877] needed to give chemical selectivity. These unique properties allow us to explore the hypothesis of producing ``Gatekeeper'' membranes that mimic natural protein channels to actively pump through rapid nm-scale channels. With anionic tip functionality strong electroosmotic flow is induced by unimpeded cation flow with similar 10,000 fold enhancements [Nature Nano 2012 7(2) 133-39]. With enhanced power efficiency, carbon nanotube membranes were employed as the active element of a switchable transdermal drug delivery device that can facilitate more effective treatments of drug abuse and addiction. Recently methods to deposit Pt monolayers on CNT surface have been developed making for highly efficient catalytic platforms. Discussed are other applications of CNT protein channel mimetics, for large area robust engineering platforms, including water purification, flow battery energy storage, and biochemical/biomass separations. DOE EPSCoR (DE-FG02-07ER46375) and DARPA, W911NF-09-1-0267

  11. Interaction of Human Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 1 (CLIC1) with Lipid Bilayers: A Fluorescence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Joanna E; Goodchild, Sophia C; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J

    2016-07-12

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is very unusual as it adopts a soluble glutathione S-transferase-like canonical fold but can also autoinsert into lipid bilayers to form an ion channel. The conversion between these forms involves a large, but reversible, structural rearrangement of the CLIC1 module. The only identified environmental triggers controlling the metamorphic transition of CLIC1 are pH and oxidation. Until now, there have been no high-resolution structural data available for the CLIC1 integral membrane state, and consequently, a limited understanding of how CLIC1 unfolds and refolds across the bilayer to form a membrane protein with ion channel activity exists. Here we show that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to establish the interaction and position of CLIC1 in a lipid bilayer. Our method employs a fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) approach between CLIC1 and a dansyl-labeled lipid analogue to probe the CLIC1-lipid interface. Under oxidizing conditions, a strong FRET signal between the single tryptophan residue of CLIC1 (Trp35) and the dansyl-lipid analogue was detected. When considering the proportion of CLIC1 interacting with the lipid bilayer, as estimated by fluorescence quenching experiments, the FRET distance between Trp35 and the dansyl moiety on the membrane surface was determined to be ∼15 Å. This FRET-detected interaction provides direct structural evidence that CLIC1 associates with membranes. The results presented support the current model of an oxidation-driven interaction of CLIC1 with lipid bilayers and also propose a membrane anchoring role for Trp35. PMID:27299171

  12. The role of water channel proteins in facilitating recovery of leaf hydraulic conductance from water stress in Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Laur

    Full Text Available Gas exchange is constrained by the whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant. Leaves account for an important fraction of Kplant and may therefore represent a major determinant of plant productivity. Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf decreases with increasing water stress, which is due to xylem embolism in leaf veins and/or the properties of the extra-xylary pathway. Water flow through living tissues is facilitated and regulated by water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs. Here we assessed changes in the hydraulic conductance of Populus trichocarpa leaves during a dehydration-rewatering episode. While leaves were highly sensitive to drought, Kleaf recovered only 2 hours after plants were rewatered. Recovery of Kleaf was absent when excised leaves were bench-dried and subsequently xylem-perfused with a solution containing AQP inhibitors. We examined the expression patterns of 12 highly expressed AQP genes during a dehydration-rehydration episode to identify isoforms that may be involved in leaf hydraulic adjustments. Among the AQPs tested, several genes encoding tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs showed large increases in expression in rehydrated leaves, suggesting that TIPs contribute to reversing drought-induced reductions in Kleaf. TIPs were localized in xylem parenchyma, consistent with a role in facilitating water exchange between xylem vessels and adjacent living cells. Dye uptake experiments suggested that reversible embolism formation in minor leaf veins contributed to the observed changes in Kleaf.

  13. Nucleolar proteins change in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, M. A.; Kordyum, E. L.; Gonzalez-Camacho, F.; Medina, F. J.

    Discovery of gravisensitivity of cells no specified to gravity perception focused continuous attention on an elucidation of mechanisms involved in altered gravity effects at the different levels of cellular organization A nucleolus is the nuclear domain in which the major portion of ribosome biogenesis takes place This is a basic process for cell vitality beginning with the transcription of rDNA followed by processing newly synthesized pre-rRNA molecules A wide range of nucleolar proteins plays a highly significant role in all stages of biosynthesis of ribosomes Different steps of ribosome biogenesis should respond to various external factors affecting generally the cell metabolism Nevertheless a nucleolus remains not enough studied under the influence of altered environmental conditions For this reason we studied root apices from 2-day old Lepidium sativum seedlings germinated and grown under slow horizontal clinorotation and stationary conditions in darkness The extraction of cell nuclei followed by sequential fractionation of nuclear proteins according to their solubility in buffers of increasing ionic strength was carried out This procedure gave rise to 5 distinct fractions We analyzed nuclear subproteomes of the most soluble fraction called S2 It is actually a functionally significant fraction consisting of ribonucleoproteins actively engaged in pre-rRNA synthesis and processing 2D-electrophoresis of S2 fraction proteins was carried out The gels were silver stained and stained gels were scanned and analyzed

  14. Channel degradation and restoration of an Alpine river and related morphological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Daniela; Marchese, Enrico; Theule, Joshua I.; Comiti, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    River degradation and thus necessity for restoration are major issues worldwide. However, adequate methodologies to assess morphological variations linked to these actions and the morphological success of restoration interventions are still to be determined. The Ahr River (South Tyrol, Italian Alps) was characterized until the mid-twentieth century by an anabranching and meandering pattern, but starting from the 1960s it underwent intense channel degradation in terms of narrowing, incision, and floodplain disconnection. In the period 2003-2011, several reaches of the Ahr River were restored by widening and raising the channel bed. The planimetric changes that occurred historically in the Ahr River were determined by the interpretation of 10 maps and aerial photos covering the period 1820-2011. The estimation of the incision that occurred during the degradation phase was assessed by the difference in elevation between gravel surfaces, whereas the changes introduced by restoration interventions in two reaches were evaluated through the comparison of topographic cross sections surveyed in year 2000 and a high-resolution bathymetric LiDAR survey flown in late 2012. The MQI (Morphological Quality Index) was applied to different reaches in order to test how assessment methodologies respond to degradation and restoration actions. The combined analysis of planform and vertical changes indicates that gravel mining has been the largest pressure for the river, but a change in sediment/flow regimes probably led to the channel adjustments that occurred during the early twentieth century. The restoration measures have locally increased channel width, elevation, and morphometrical diversity compared to the unrestored reaches, as well as the morphological quality assessed by MQI. However, the extent of the modifications brought about by restoration works differs between the two restored reaches, pointing out the need for a quantitative analysis of the historical evolution of each

  15. CFTR channel in oocytes from Xenopus laevis and its regulation by xShroom1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Alejandra G; Galizia, Luciano; Kotsias, Basilio A; Marino, Gabriela I

    2016-05-01

    Shroom is a family of related proteins linked to the actin cytoskeleton. xShroom1 is constitutively expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and it is required for the expression of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). As there is a close relationship between ENaC and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), we examined the action of xShroom1 on CFTR expression and activity. Biotinylation was used to measure CFTR surface expression, and currents were registered with voltage clamp when stimulated with forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Oocytes were coinjected with CFTR complementary RNAs (cRNAs) and xShroom1 sense or antisense oligonucleotides. We observed an increment in CFTR currents and CFTR surface expression in oocytes coinjected with CFTR and xShroom1 antisense oligonucleotides. MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor, did not prevent the increment in currents when xShroom1 was suppressed by antisense oligonucleotides. In addition, we inhibited the delivery of newly synthesized proteins to the plasma membrane with BFA and we found that the half-life of plasma membrane CFTR was prolonged when coinjected with the xShroom1 antisense oligonucleotides. Chloroquine, an inhibitor of the late endosome/lysosome, did not significantly increase CFTR currents when xShroom1 expression was inhibited. The higher expression of CFTR when xShroom1 is suppressed is in concordance with the functional studies suggesting that the suppression of the xShroom1 protein resulted in an increment in CFTR currents by promoting the increase of the half-life of CFTR in the plasma membrane. The role of xShroom1 in regulating CFTR expression could be relevant in the understanding of the channel malfunction in several diseases.

  16. Conformational changes and slow dynamics through microsecond polarized atomistic molecular simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelkmar, Pär; Niemelä, Perttu S; Vattulainen, Ilpo;

    2009-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels, in particular the motion of the S4 helix, is a highly interesting and hotly debated topic in current membrane protein research. It has critical implications for insertion and stabilization of membrane proteins as well as for finding how...... transitions occur in membrane proteins-not to mention numerous applications in drug design. Here, we present a full 1 micros atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of an integral Kv1.2 ion channel, comprising 120,000 atoms. By applying 0.052 V/nm of hyperpolarization, we observe structural rearrangements...... process. The coordinates of the transmembrane part of the simulated channel actually stay closer to the recently determined higher-resolution Kv1.2 chimera channel than the starting structure for the entire second half of the simulation (0.5-1 micros). Together with lipids binding in matching positions...

  17. From channelization to restoration: Sociohydrologic modeling with changing community preferences in the Kissimmee River Basin, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Dingbao; Tian, Fuqiang; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-02-01

    The Kissimmee River Basin (Florida, USA) underwent river channelization in the 1960s and subsequent restoration in the 1990s, revealing a shift in management emphasis from flood protection to wetland health. In this paper, this shift is hypothesized to result from changing human values and preferences, and a power differential between the more numerous and affluent upstream urban residents (who prioritize wetland restoration) and downstream rural residents (who prioritize flood protection). We develop a conceptual sociohydrologic model to simulate the interactions between community interests and hydrology. The modeling results show that flood intensity decreased after channelization, which reduced concern about flooding. However, channelization also led to a decrease in wetland storage, which caused an increase of wetland concern, especially among the urban residents. Eventually, the community sensitivity switched from favoring flood protection to favoring wetlands, and subsequent management strategies switched from channelization to restoration. Using the model, we project that the wetlands will be recovering for the next 20 years and community sensitivity will slowly go back to a neutral state. However, possible rainfall intensification in the future could return the community sensitivity to favoring flood protection again. The preferential increase of upstream population growth will raise the community's concern about wetlands and the preferential increase of downstream population growth will magnify concern about flooding. This study provides insight into the driving forces behind human-water interactions in the Kissimmee River Basin while simultaneously demonstrating the potential of sociohydrologic modeling to describe complex human-water coupled systems with simple concepts and equations.

  18. Morphological change in a stream channel as consequence of the fluvial dynamics (Vallcebre)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study shows the morphological changes observed in a stream channel as consequence of the fluvial dynamics in an experimental research basin (Vallcebre, Eastern Pyrenees). The cross sections were measured 21 times from 2003 to 2008. Along the study period, higher deposition rates were observed in summer whereas higher erosion rates were observed in April. Considering the whole period, an average resulting deposition of 7 cm has been measured. At the flood scale, correlation analysis, revealed weak correlation between the magnitude of the changes in the stream bed and the main hydro meteorological variables. (Author) 4 refs.

  19. Response of Step-pool Mountain Channels to Wildfire Under Changing Climate-fire Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A.; O'Dowd, A. P.; Storesund, R.; Parker, A.; Roberts-Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    The western U.S. is becoming more susceptible to wildfire, even though wildfires have occurred throughout history and pre-history. Warming climates leading to drier conditions have increased the occurrence of wildfires. Fire suppression policies throughout the twentieth century have also allowed fuel loads to build and increased the potential for larger and more frequent fires. These trends have growing impacts on human society, as evidenced in increasing number of structures destroyed and related costs of firefighting and resulting damages. Besides the first-order effects of wildfire, such as burned vegetation and reduced infiltration capacities, changing climate-fire regimes have significant indirect effects on hydrologic and geomorphologic responses. This contribution explores how these changes affect the stability and functioning of step-pool mountain streams in the context of landscape evolution. Step-pool systems are stable features adjusted to the prevailing flow and channel morphology, serving important functions of energy dissipation in high-energy environments. Steps and pools are also important ecologically, as they provide diverse habitats for sensitive organisms. Whereas step-pool channels are typically restructured by flows with recurrence intervals often exceeding 50 years, these flows are reached more frequently under changing climate-fire regimes. Following the Waldo Canyon Fire of June/July 2012, one of several recent wildfires that spread along the Colorado Front Range, we track the stability, destruction, and re-development of step-pool systems in two basins in Pike National Forest using terrestrial LiDAR scanning and surveys of longitudinal profiles and cross sections. We document how the first geomorphologically significant event on 1 July 2013 obliterated the step-pool structure in Williams Canyon, widened river channels and lowered channel beds by as much as one meter. Changes in ecological character accompanied the conversion of channel

  20. Cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 interacts with and is regulated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Gavillet, Bruno; van Bemmelen, Miguel X;

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify proteins interacting with the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5, we used the last 66 amino acids of the C-terminus of the channel as bait to screen a human cardiac cDNA library. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1 as an interacting protein. Pull...

  1. Influenza matrix protein 2 alters CFTR expression and function through its ion channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londino, James D; Lazrak, Ahmed; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Collawn, James F; Noah, James W; Matalon, Sadis

    2013-05-01

    The human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-activated chloride (Cl(-)) channel in the lung epithelium that helps regulate the thickness and composition of the lung epithelial lining fluid. We investigated whether influenza M2 protein, a pH-activated proton (H(+)) channel that traffics to the plasma membrane of infected cells, altered CFTR expression and function. M2 decreased CFTR activity in 1) Xenopus oocytes injected with human CFTR, 2) epithelial cells (HEK-293) stably transfected with CFTR, and 3) human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) expressing native CFTR. This inhibition was partially reversed by an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. Next we investigated whether the M2 inhibition of CFTR activity was due to an increase of secretory organelle pH by M2. Incubation of Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTR with ammonium chloride or concanamycin A, two agents that alkalinize the secretory pathway, inhibited CFTR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of M2- and CFTR-expressing oocytes with the M2 ion channel inhibitor amantadine prevented the loss in CFTR expression and activity; in addition, M2 mutants, lacking the ability to transport H(+), did not alter CFTR activity in Xenopus oocytes and HEK cells. Expression of an M2 mutant retained in the endoplasmic reticulum also failed to alter CFTR activity. In summary, our data show that M2 decreases CFTR activity by increasing secretory organelle pH, which targets CFTR for destruction by the ubiquitin system. Alteration of CFTR activity has important consequences for fluid regulation and may potentially modify the immune response to viral infection.

  2. Chloride channel protein 2 prevents glutamate-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Miao-Miao; Hong, Sen; Ma, Ling-Jun; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Lu, Jia; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Ya-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of chloride channel protein 2 (ClC-2) in glutamate-induced apoptosis in the retinal ganglion cell line (RGC-5). Materials and Methods: RGC-5 cells were treated with 1 mM glutamate for 24 hr. The expression of ClC-2, Bax, and Bcl-2 was detected by western blot analysis. Cell survival and apoptosis were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry assays, respectively. Caspase-3 and -9 activities were determined by a colorimetric assay. The roles of ClC-2 in glutamate-induced apoptosis were examined by using ClC-2 complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and small inference ribonucleic acid (RNA) transfection technology. Results: Overexpression of ClC-2 in RGC-5 cells significantly decreased glutamate-induced apoptosis and increased cell viability, whereas silencing of ClC-2 with short hairpin (sh) RNA produced opposite effects. ClC-2 overexpression increased the expression of Bcl-2, decreased the expression of Bax, and decreased caspase-3 and -9 activation in RGC-5 cells treated with glutamate, but silencing of ClC-2 produced opposite effects. Conclusion: Our data suggest that ClC-2 chloride channels might play a protective role in glutamate-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. PMID:27635193

  3. The role of water channel proteins and nitric oxide signaling in rice seed germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan Liu; Xin Yu; Da-Yong Cui; Mei-Hao Sun; Wei-Ning Sun; Zhang-Cheng Tang; Sang-Soo Kwak; Wei-Ai Su

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the possible role of several aquaporins in seed germination. But systematic investigation of the role of aquaporin family members in this process is lacking. Here, the developmental regulation of plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) expression throughout germination and post-germination processes in rice embryos was analyzed. The expression patterns of the PIPs suggest these aquaporins play different roles in seed germination and seedling growth. Partial silencing of the water channel genes, OsPIP1; 1 and OsPIP1;3, reduced seed germination while over-expression of OsPIPl;3 promoted seed germination under water-stress conditions. Moreover, spatial expression analysis indicates that OsPIP1;3 is expressed predominantly in embryo during seed germination. Our data also revealed that the nitric oxide (NO) donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), promoted seed germination; furthermore, the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, inhibited germination and reduced the stimulative effects of SNP and GSNO on rice germination. Exogenous NO stimulated the transcription of OsPIP1;1, OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;8 in germinating seeds. These results suggest that water channels play an important role in seed germination, acting, at least partly, in response to the NO signaling pathway.

  4. Channel and Floodplain Change Analysis over a 100-Year Period: Lower Yuba River, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Aalto

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic gold mining in the Sierra Nevada, California (1853–1884 displaced ~1.1 billion m3 of sediment from upland placer gravels that were deposited along piedmont rivers below dams where floods can remobilize them. This study uses topographic and planimetric data from detailed 1906 topographic maps, 1999 photogrammetric data, and pre- and post-flood aerial photographs to document historic sediment erosion and deposition along the lower Yuba River due to individual floods at the reach scale. Differencing of 3 × 3-m topographic data indicates substantial changes in channel morphology and documents 12.6 × 106 m3 of erosion and 5.8 × 106 m3 of deposition in these reaches since 1906. Planimetric and volumetric measurements document spatial and temporal variations of channel enlargement and lateral migration. Over the last century, channels incised up to ~13 m into mining sediments, which dramatically decreased local flood frequencies and increased flood conveyance. These adjustments were punctuated by event-scale geomorphic changes that redistributed sediment and associated contaminants to downstream lowlands.

  5. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. PMID:26721627

  6. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level. PMID:27309309

  7. Kinetic changes and modulation by carbamazepine on voltage-gated sodium channels in rat CA1 neurons after epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Sun; T.R. Werkman; W.J. Wadman

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the functional properties of sodium channels, and subsequently the channel modulation by carbamazepine (CBZ) in hippocampal CA1 neurons can be changed after epileptic seizures. METHODS: We used the acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from epilepsy model rats 3 w

  8. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  9. BISTRIȚA RIVER CHANNEL CHANGES IN THE SUBCARPATHIAN SECTOR, IN THE LAST TWO CENTURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D-.A. CHELARU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Over time, the hydrographic network corresponding to Bistrița basin has undergone numerous changes, mostly human induced, materialized through the hydrotechnical works made in order to create accumulation lakes (especially after 1960, to encrease electricity production, regularization, damming and embankment, land reclamation or achievement of adduction related to public water supply, and also for built-up area or transport routes network expansion. These actions have led to significant changes regarding the hydrographic network morphometry, by reducing the length of the river, degreasing slopes or sinuosity index. The succesion of changes was analyzed by using the following cartographic documents: Austrian maps published by von Otzellowitz (1788-1790, topographic maps (1:50.000 scale published in 1894, military maps (1:20.000 scale edited in 1917-1920, topographic plans (1:5.000 scale, 1975-1976 edition, cadastral plans printed in 1986 (1:10.000 scale and 2005-2006 ortophotomaps at 1:5.000 scale. Overlapping these maps using GIS techniques highlighted the significant reduction of unplaite and sinuosity index. Also, following the deviation of the natural course of Bistrița river through the creation of a 30 kilometers drainage channel were brought important changes to the river channel morphometry, to the position and river confluences angles, and to the whole hydrographic network of the subcarpathian sector of this river.

  10. Reduced fine sediment flux and channel change in response to the managed diversion of an upland river channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, Matthew Thomas; Warburton, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a novel mitigation approach and subsequent adaptive management, designed to reduce the transfer of fine sediment (indicates a reduction in residuals through time (p < 0.001), with the developed LOWESS model over-predicting sediment concentrations as the channel stabilizes. However, the channel is continuing to adjust to the reconfigured morphology, with evidence of a headward propagating knickpoint which has migrated 120 m at an exponentially decreasing rate over the last 7 years since diversion. The study demonstrates that channel reconfiguration can be effective in mitigating fine sediment flux in headwater streams but the full value of this may take many years to achieve whilst the fluvial system slowly readjusts.

  11. Decreased levels of canonical transient receptor potential channel 3 protein in the rat cerebral cortex after chronic treatment with lithium or valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaeri, Sasan; Farjadian, Shirin; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Lithium and valproate modulate disturbances in intracellular calcium homeostasis implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Two subtypes of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family, i.e. TRPC3 and TRPM2, are potential candidates involved in calcium signaling and implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. This study was designed to investigate whether mood stabilizers such as lithium and valproate affect the expression of TRPC3 and TRPM2. Rats were treated with intraperitoneal injections of lithium (2 mEq/kg b.i.d.) or valproate (300 mg/kg b.i.d.) acutely (for 24 h) or chronically (for 4 weeks). The changes in mRNA and protein levels of TRPC3 and TRPM2 were measured with real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The chronic administration of lithium and valproate significantly reduced levels of TRPC3 by 19.7% and 19.3%, respectively. No change was detected in the mRNA level of this channel. Neither acute nor chronic treatment with lithium or valproate had any effect on TRPM2 levels. The results suggest that downregulation of the TRPC3 channel is an important shared mechanism by which lithium and valproate can modulate calcium disturbances, whereas the TRPM2 channel does not appear to be affected by mood stabilizers, at least under non stressed conditions. PMID:26752988

  12. Comparative protein profiles of Butea superba tubers under seasonal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelahawong, Chonchanok; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Sangvanich, Polkit

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal changes are major factors affecting environmental conditions which induce multiple stresses in plants, leading to changes in protein relative abundance in the complex cellular plant metabolic pathways. Proteomics was applied to study variations in proteome composition of Butea. superba tubers during winter, summer and rainy season throughout the year using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with a nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 191 protein spots were identified and also classified into 12 functional groups. The majority of these were mainly involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism (30.37 %) and defense and stress (18.32 %). The results exhibited the highest numbers of identified proteins in winter-harvested samples. Forty-five differential proteins were found in different seasons, involving important metabolic pathways. Further analysis indicated that changes in the protein levels were due mainly to temperature stress during summer and to water stress during winter, which affected cellular structure, photosynthesis, signal transduction and homeostasis, amino-acid biosynthesis, protein destination and storage, protein biosynthesis and stimulated defense and stress mechanisms involving glycolytic enzymes and relative oxygen species catabolizing enzymes. The proteins with differential relative abundances might induce an altered physiological status within plant tubers for survival. The work provided new insights into the better understanding of the molecular basis of plant proteomes and stress tolerance mechanisms, especially during seasonal changes. The finding suggested proteins that might potentially be used as protein markers in differing seasons in other plants and aid in selecting B. superba tubers with the most suitable medicinal properties in the future. PMID:27198528

  13. Development of supported biomimetic membranes for insertion of aquaporin protein water channels for novel water filtration applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard

    in a horizontal chamber design. Chapter 4 characterizes reconstitution and folding of E. coli Aquaporin–Z (AqpZ) and the spinach plasma integral protein 2;1 (SoPIP2;1) aquaporins into model membranes. A central part of this chapter is the development of a method for formation of giant protein vesicles (≥10 μm......Aquaporins represent a class of membrane protein channels found in all living organisms that selectively transport water molecules across biological membranes. The work presented in this thesis was motivated by the conceptual idea of incorporating aquaporin water channels into biomimetic membranes...... to develop novel water separation technologies. To accomplish this, it is necessary to construct an efficient platform to handle biomimetic membranes. Moreover, general methods are required to reliable and controllable reconstitute membrane proteins into artificially made model membranes...

  14. Channel and island change in the lower Platte River, Eastern Nebraska, USA: 1855 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeckel, R. M.; Henebry, G. M.

    2008-12-01

    The lower Platte River has undergone considerable change in channel and bar characteristics since the mid-1850s in four 20-25 km-long study stretches. The same net effect of historical channel shrinkage that was detected upstream from Grand Island, Nebraska, can also be detected in the lower river but differences in the behaviors of study stretches upstream and downstream from major tributaries are striking. The least relative decrease occurred downstream from the Loup River confluence, and the stretch downstream from the Elkhorn River confluence actually showed an increase in channel area during the 1940s. Bank erosion was also greater downstream of the tributaries between ca. 1860 and 1938/1941, particularly in stretch RG, which showed more lateral migration. The cumulative island area and the ratio of island area to channel area relative to the 1938/1941 baseline data showed comparatively great fluctuations in median island size in both downstream stretches. The erratic behavior of island size distributions over time indicates that large islands were accreted to the banks at different times, and that some small, newly-stabilized islands were episodically "flushed" out of the system. In the upstream stretches the stabilization of mobile bars to create new, small islands had a more consistent impact over time. Channel decrease by the abandonment of large, long-lived anabranches and by the in-place narrowing resulting from island accretion were more prominent in these upstream stretches. Across all of the study area, channel area appears to be stabilizing gradually as the rate of decrease lessens. This trend began earliest in stretch RG in the late 1950s and was accompanied by shifts in the size distributions of stabilized islands in that stretch into the 1960s. Elsewhere, even in the easternmost study stretch, stabilizing was occurring by the late 1960s, the same time frame documented by investigations of the Platte system upstream of the study area. Comprehensive

  15. Ecological change on California's Channel Islands from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Torben C.; Sillett, T. Scott; Ghalambor, Cameron K.; Hofman, Courtney A.; Ralls, Katherine; Anderson, R. Scott; Boser, Christina L.; Braje, Todd J.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Chesser, R. Terry; Collins, Paul W.; Erlandson, Jon M.; Faulkner, Kate R.; Fleischer, Robert; Funk, W. Chris; Galipeau, Russell; Huston, Ann; King, Julie; Laughrin, Lyndal L.; Maldonado, Jesus; McEachern, Kathryn; Muhs, Daniel R.; Newsome, Seth D.; Reeder-Myers, Leslie; Still, Christopher; Morrison, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Historical ecology is becoming an important focus in conservation biology and offers a promising tool to help guide ecosystem management. Here, we integrate data from multiple disciplines to illuminate the past, present, and future of biodiversity on California's Channel Islands, an archipelago that has undergone a wide range of land-use and ecological changes. Our analysis spans approximately 20,000 years, from before human occupation and through Native American hunter–gatherers, commercial ranchers and fishers, the US military, and other land managers. We demonstrate how long-term, interdisciplinary research provides insight into conservation decisions, such as setting ecosystem restoration goals, preserving rare and endemic taxa, and reducing the impacts of climate change on natural and cultural resources. We illustrate the importance of historical perspectives for understanding modern patterns and ecological change and present an approach that can be applied generally in conservation management planning.

  16. Progressive changes in the Western English Channel foster a reorganization in the plankton food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reygondeau, Gabriel; Molinero, Juan Carlos; Coombs, Steve; MacKenzie, Brian R.; Bonnet, Delphine

    2015-09-01

    Growing evidence has shown a profound modification of plankton communities of the North East Atlantic and adjacent seas over the past decades. This drastic change has been attributed to a modification of the environmental conditions that regulate the dynamics and the spatial distribution of ectothermic species in the ocean. Recently, several studies have highlighted modifications of the regional climate station L4 (50° 15.00‧N, 4° 13.02‧W) in the Western English Channel. We here focus on the modification of the plankton community by studying the long-term, annual and seasonal changes of five zooplankton groups and eight copepod genera. We detail the main composition and the phenology of the plankton communities during four climatic periods identified at the L4 station: 1988-1994, 1995-2000, 2001-2007 and 2008-2012. Our results show that long-term environmental changes underlined by Molinero et al. (2013) drive a profound restructuration of the plankton community modifying the phenology and the dominance of key planktonic groups including fish larvae. Consequently, the slow but deep modifications detected in the plankton community highlight a climate driven ecosystem shift in the Western English Channel.

  17. Activation of Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 4 and ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Cumulatively Decreases Superoxide Production in Insect Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocińska, Malgorzata; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-01-01

    It has been evidenced that mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) and ATP-regulated potassium channel (mKATP channel) of insect Gromphadorhina coqereliana mitochondria decrease superoxide anion production. We elucidated whether the two energy-dissipating systems work together on a modulation of superoxide level in cockroach mitochondria. Our data show that the simultaneous activation of UCP4 by palmitic acid and mKATP channel by pinacidil revealed a cumulative effect on weakening mitochondrial superoxide formation. The inhibition of UCP4 by GTP (and/or ATP) and mKATP channel by ATP elevated superoxide production. These results suggest a functional cooperation of both energy-dissipating systems in protection against oxidative stress in insects.

  18. A radio frequency device for measurement of minute dielectric property changes in microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunrong; Wang, Pingshan

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a sensitive radio frequency (rf) device to detect small dielectric property changes in microfluidic channel. The device consists of an on-chip Wilkinson power divider and a rat-race hybrid, which are built with planar microstrip lines and thin film chip resistors. Interference is used to cancel parasitic background signals. As a result, the measurement sensitivity is improved by more than 20 dB compared with conventional transmission lines. Compared with an ultrasensitive slot antenna/cuvette assembly [K. M. Taylor and D. W. van der Weide, IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 53, 1576 (2005)], the proposed rf device is two times more sensitive.

  19. Comparing and Linking Post-fire Hillslope Erosion and Channel Change for Different Storm Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lee; Kampf, Stephanie; Brogan, Dan; Schmeer, Sarah; Nelson, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Moderate and high severity wildfires can greatly reduce infiltration rates, leading to orders of magnitude increases in hillslope-scale runoff and erosion rates. These increases can cause dramatic downstream channel change, with post-fire deposition being most common, but this depends on the number, magnitude and timing of storm events. The objective of this study is to compare post-fire hillslope erosion rates and downstream channel change from two distinct rainfall events approximately one year after burning. The first was a set of relatively typical, higher-intensity convective storms in June-August 2013, and the second was a highly unusual, week-long ~270 mm rainstorm in September 2013. The study was conducted in two ~15 km2 watersheds that had two-thirds of their area burned at high or moderate severity by 2012 High Park Fire in northcentral Colorado, USA. Hillslope erosion was measured with sediment fences at 29 sites grouped into five clusters, with each cluster having an associated tipping bucket rain gage. Downstream channel change was monitored at approximately ten cross-sections in each of the two watersheds, Skin Gulch and Hill Gulch. Twelve summer storms produced an overall mean hillslope erosion of 6 Mg ha-1, with higher rainfall intensities at lower elevations and in Skin Gulch causing higher sediment yields. The higher sediment yields in Skin Gulch caused substantial downstream deposition of up to 0.8 m at most cross-sections. Generally lower rainfall in Hill Gulch resulted in less Horton overland flow and hence lower erosion rates and much less downstream deposition. The September storm had roughly twice as much rainfall as the summer thunderstorms, but there were much lower peak rainfall intensities and hillslope-scale sediment yields except where shallow bedrock induced saturation overland flow. The much longer duration of the September storm resulted in sustained high flows, and these flows plus the lower hillslope erosion caused most of the

  20. Functional reconstitution and characterization of AqpZ, the E. coli water channel protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgnia, M J; Kozono, D; Calamita, G; Maloney, P C; Agre, P

    1999-09-01

    Understanding the selectivity of aquaporin water channels will require structural and functional studies of wild-type and modified proteins; however, expression systems have not previously yielded aquaporins in the necessary milligram quantities. Here we report expression of a histidine-tagged form of Escherichia coli aquaporin-Z (AqpZ) in its homologous expression system. 10-His-AqpZ is solubilized and purified to near homogeneity in a single step with a final yield of approximately 2.5 mg/l of culture. The histidine tag is removed by trypsin, yielding the native protein with the addition of three N-terminal residues, as confirmed by microsequencing. Sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis showed that the native, solubilized AqpZ protein is a trypsin-resistant tetramer. Unlike other known aquaporins, AqpZ tetramers are not readily dissociated by 1% SDS at neutral pH. Hydrophilic reducing agents have a limited effect on the stability of the tetramer in 1% SDS, whereas incubations for more than 24 hours, pH values below 5.6, or exposure to the hydrophobic reducing agent ethanedithiol cause dissociation into monomers. Cys20, but not Cys9, is necessary for the stability of the AqpZ tetramer in SDS. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, AqpZ displays very high osmotic water permeability (pf > or = 10 x 10(-14) cm3 s-1 subunit-1) and low Arrhenius activation energy (Ea = 3.7 kcal/mol), similar to mammalian aquaporin-1 (AQP1). No permeation by glycerol, urea or sorbitol was detected. Expression of native and modified AqpZ in milligram quantities has permitted biophysical characterization of this remarkably stable aquaporin tetramer, which is being utilized for high-resolution structural studies. PMID:10518952

  1. A multi-channel gel electrophoresis and continuous fraction collection apparatus for high throughput protein separation and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Megan; Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Cornell, Earl; Dong, Ming; Biggin, Mark D.; Jin, Jian

    2009-10-02

    To facilitate a direct interface between protein separation by PAGE and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we developed a multichannel system that continuously collects fractions as protein bands migrate off the bottom of gel electrophoresis columns. The device was constructed using several short linear gel columns, each of a different percent acrylamide, to achieve a separation power similar to that of a long gradient gel. A Counter Free-Flow elution technique then allows continuous and simultaneous fraction collection from multiple channels at low cost. We demonstrate that rapid, high-resolution separation of a complex protein mixture can be achieved on this system using SDS-PAGE. In a 2.5 h electrophoresis run, for example, each sample was separated and eluted into 48-96 fractions over a mass range of 10-150 kDa; sample recovery rates were 50percent or higher; each channel was loaded with up to 0.3 mg of protein in 0.4 mL; and a purified band was eluted in two to three fractions (200 L/fraction). Similar results were obtained when running native gel electrophoresis, but protein aggregation limited the loading capacity to about 50 g per channel and reduced resolution.

  2. Molecular determinants of voltage-gated sodium channel regulation by the Nedd4/Nedd4-like proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Bruce, M Christine;

    2004-01-01

    The voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)) form a family composed of 10 genes. The COOH termini of Na(v) contain a cluster of amino acids that are nearly identical among 7 of the 10 members. This COOH-terminal sequence, PPSYDSV, is a PY motif known to bind to WW domains of E3 protein...

  3. Replacement of fish meal in juvenile channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, diets using a yeast-derived protein source

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the effects of a yeast-derived protein source (NuPro) as a replacement for menhaden fish meal on weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), food conversion ratio (FCR), whole-body composition, and disease resistance in juvenile channel catfish. NuPro replaced 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% o...

  4. TRP channel-associated factors are a novel protein family that regulates TRPM8 trafficking and activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gkika, D.; Lemonnier, L.; Shapovalov, G.; Gordienko, D.; Poux, C.; Bernardini, M.; Bokhobza, A.; Bidaux, G.; Degerny, C.; Verreman, K.; Guarmit, B.; Benahmed, M.; Launoit, Y. de; Bindels, R.J.M.; Fiorio Pla, A.; Prevarskaya, N.

    2015-01-01

    TRPM8 is a cold sensor that is highly expressed in the prostate as well as in other non-temperature-sensing organs, and is regulated by downstream receptor-activated signaling pathways. However, little is known about the intracellular proteins necessary for channel function. Here, we identify two pr

  5. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein Part II: Structure-Function Relationships and Fragmented Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis…

  6. Organic bioelectronics probing conformational changes in surface confined proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Alberga, Domenico; Manoli, Kyriaki; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F; Magliulo, Maria; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giordano, Francesco; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The study of proteins confined on a surface has attracted a great deal of attention due to its relevance in the development of bio-systems for laboratory and clinical settings. In this respect, organic bio-electronic platforms can be used as tools to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes involving protein interfaces. In this work, biotin-binding proteins have been integrated in two different organic thin-film transistor (TFT) configurations to separately address the changes occurring in the protein-ligand complex morphology and dipole moment. This has been achieved by decoupling the output current change upon binding, taken as the transducing signal, into its component figures of merit. In particular, the threshold voltage is related to the protein dipole moment, while the field-effect mobility is associated with conformational changes occurring in the proteins of the layer when ligand binding occurs. Molecular Dynamics simulations on the whole avidin tetramer in presence and absence of ligands were carried out, to evaluate how the tight interactions with the ligand affect the protein dipole moment and the conformation of the loops surrounding the binding pocket. These simulations allow assembling a rather complete picture of the studied interaction processes and support the interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:27312768

  7. Organic bioelectronics probing conformational changes in surface confined proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Alberga, Domenico; Manoli, Kyriaki; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Magliulo, Maria; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giordano, Francesco; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-06-01

    The study of proteins confined on a surface has attracted a great deal of attention due to its relevance in the development of bio-systems for laboratory and clinical settings. In this respect, organic bio-electronic platforms can be used as tools to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes involving protein interfaces. In this work, biotin-binding proteins have been integrated in two different organic thin-film transistor (TFT) configurations to separately address the changes occurring in the protein-ligand complex morphology and dipole moment. This has been achieved by decoupling the output current change upon binding, taken as the transducing signal, into its component figures of merit. In particular, the threshold voltage is related to the protein dipole moment, while the field-effect mobility is associated with conformational changes occurring in the proteins of the layer when ligand binding occurs. Molecular Dynamics simulations on the whole avidin tetramer in presence and absence of ligands were carried out, to evaluate how the tight interactions with the ligand affect the protein dipole moment and the conformation of the loops surrounding the binding pocket. These simulations allow assembling a rather complete picture of the studied interaction processes and support the interpretation of the experimental results.

  8. Biomimetic membranes with aqueous nano channels but without proteins: impedance of impregnated cellulose ester filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocherginsky, Nikolai M; Lvovich, Vadim F

    2010-12-01

    Earlier we have shown that many important properties of ionic aqueous channels in biological membranes can be imitated using simple biomimetic membranes. These membranes are composed of mixed cellulose ester-based filters, impregnated with isopropyl myristate or other esters of fatty acids, and can be used for high-throughput drug screening. If the membrane separates two aqueous solutions, combination of relatively hydrophilic polymer support with immobilized carboxylic groups results in the formation of thin aqueous layers covering inner surface of the pores, while the pore volume is filled by lipid-like substances. Because of these aqueous layers biomimetic membranes even without proteins have a cation/anion ion selectivity and specific (per unit of thickness) electrical properties, which are similar to typical properties of biological membranes. Here we describe frequency-dependent impedance of the isopropyl myristate-impregnated biomimetic membranes in the 4-electrode arrangement and present the results as Bode and Nyquist diagrams. When the membranes are placed in deionized water, it is possible to observe three different dispersion processes in the frequency range 0.1 Hz to 30 kHz. Only one dispersion is observed in 5 mM KH(2)PO(4) solution. It is suggested that these three dispersion features are determined by (a) conductivity in aqueous structures/channels, formed near the internal walls of the filter pores at high frequencies, (b) dielectric properties of the whole membrane at medium frequencies, determined by polymer support, aqueous layers and impregnating oil, and, finally, (c) by the processes in hydrated liquid crystal structures formed in pores by impregnating oil in contact with water at low frequencies.

  9. Expression of tetraspan protein CD63 activates protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) and enhances the PTK-induced inhibition of ROMK channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, D.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Zhang, Y.; Jin, Y.; Sterling, H.; Yue, P.; Roos, M.; Duffield, A.; Spencer, J.; Caplan, M.; Wang, W.H.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we tested the role of CD63 in regulating ROMK1 channels by protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK). Immunocytochemical staining shows that CD63 and receptor-linked tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) are expressed in the cortical collecting duct and outer medulla collecting duct. Immu

  10. Plan form changes of Gumara River channel over 50 years (Upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Mengiste; Nyssen, Jan; Mehari, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Channel plan form changes were investigated along the 65 km long Gumara River in Lake Tana basin (Ethiopia) by overlaying information from aerial photographs and SPOT imagery. Two sets of aerial photographs (1957 and 1980) were scanned, and then orthorectified in ENVI 4.2 environment. Recent channel plan form information was extracted from SPOT images of 2006. ERDAS 2010 and ArcGIS 10.1 tools were used for the data preparation and analysis. The information on river plan form changes spans from 1957 to 2006 (49 years), during which time the Gumara catchment has been subjected to changes in land use/cover and increasing water abstraction, which may have affected its hydrogeomorphology. The results indicated that the lower reach of Gumara at its mouth has undergone major plan form changes. A delta of 1.12 km² was created between 1957 and 1980 and additional 1.00 km² land has been created between 1980 and 2006. The sinuosity of the plan form changed only slightly through the study period: 1.78 in 1957, 1.76 in 1980, and 1.81 in 2006. Comparison of cross sections at the hydrological gauging station showed that the river bed aggraded in the order of 1.5 m to 2.5 m for the period 1963-2009. The trend analysis of stream flow of Gumara River versus rainfall in the catchment also indicated that the bed level of the Gumara river at its gauging station has risen. From field observations, the impact of direct human interventions was identified. The building of artificial levees along the river banks has contributed to huge deposition in the river bed. At locations where intensive irrigation takes place in the floodplain, seepage water through the banks created river bank failure and modifications in plan form. The unstable segments of the river reach were identified and will be further analysed.

  11. Rational Design of Analyte Channels of the Green Fluorescent Protein for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natta Tansila, Tanawut Tantimongcolwat, Chartchalerm Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chanin Nantasenamat, Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel solvent-exposed analyte channel, generated by F165G substitution, on the surface of green fluorescent protein (designated His6GFPuv/F165G was successfully discovered by the aid of molecular modeling software (PyMOL in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis. Regarding the high predictive performance of PyMOL, two pore-containing mutants namely His6GFPuv/H148G and His6GFPuv/H148G/F165G were also revealed. The pore sizes of F165G, H148G, and the double mutant H148G/F165G were in the order of 4, 4.5 and 5.5 Å, respectively. These mutants were subjected to further investigation on the effect of small analytes (e.g. metal ions and hydrogen peroxide as elucidated by fluorescence quenching experiments. Results revealed that the F165G mutant exhibited the highest metal sensitivity at physiological pH. Meanwhile, the other 2 mutants lacking histidine at position 148 had lower sensitivity against Zn2+ and Cu2+ than those of the template protein (His6GFPuv. Hence, a significant role of this histidine residue in mediating metal transfer toward the GFP chromophore was proposed and evidently demonstrated by testing in acidic condition. Results revealed that at pH 6.5 the order of metal sensitivity was found to be inverted whereby the H148G/F165G became the most sensitive mutant. The dissociation constants (Kd to metal ions were in the order of 4.88×10-6 M, 16.67×10-6 M, 25×10-6 M, and 33.33×10-6 M for His6GFPuv/F165G, His6GFPuv, His6GFPuv/H148G/F165G and His6GFPuv/H148G, respectively. Sensitivity against hydrogen peroxide was in the order of H148G/F165G > H148G > F165G indicating the crucial role of pore diameters. However, it should be mentioned that H148G substitution caused a markedly decrease in pH- and thermo-stability. Taken together, our findings rendered the novel pore of GFP as formed by F165G substitution to be a high impact channel without adversely affecting the intrinsic fluorescent properties. This opens up a great potential of

  12. Water surface and channel bed morphology change before and after a laboratory meander neck cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B.; Endreny, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Meander evolution of narrowing point bars ultimately forms a straight reach and an associated oxbow lake after meand bend cutoff. Observing the water surface and bed topography change during the meander cutoff process allows scientists and engineers to better understand flow mechanisms in meandering rivers, predict river behavior following cutoff, and minimize damage to life and property. Theoretical river evolution model indicates that head loss between the upstream and downstream meander neck increases during meander evolution, and this leads to an increasing hydraulic gradient and intensification of the cutoff. Yet no detailed observations are available to support the theory. In this research, we establish a physical model of a meander cutoff in a 1.8 m * 3.7 m laboratory river table using 0.18 mm median diameter sand and river discharge of 100 mL/s. The initial meander is a highly curved meander with a sinuosity of 5.6. Erosion is initiated by stream flow and the meander goes through the cutoff process. Water surface elevation along the river, river bed topography, and groundwater head in the intra-meander zone are precisely measured with an accuracy of up to 0.4 mm using a close range photogrammetry technique and ultrasonic sensors. The measurements are taken every 5 hours before the cutoff, immediately after the cutoff, and 1 hour, 5 hours after the cutoff respectively. Our results show that hydraulic gradient gradually steepens crossing the meander neck before the cutoff. River bed elevation gradients crossing the meander neck are enlarged due to the continuous deposition at the upstream neck and erosion at the downstream neck. However, the river bed elevation differences is counter balanced by the water depth which is smaller at the upstream and larger at the downstream, and the head loss across the neck remains nearly the same during cutoff. Immediately after the meander cutoff, a cascade emerges, and then rapidly dissipates into the new channel during

  13. Protein expression changes in breast cancer and their importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Semerci Sevimli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies about nucleic acids have increased after thepublication of DNA’s three dimensional structure by Watsonand Crick. Nucleic acids are the heritable moleculeswhich contain codes for proteins. Proteins are the mostimportant elements in molecular world because they arethe basic structural and functional components of a livingorganism. Clarifying the celluler events that involve proteinsare important in many areas for example diagnosisand treatment determination of diseases or developmentof new drugs. Proteome that comes from a combinationof the terms protein and genome, is one of the importantfield in these days. The studies in this area have acceleratedand gained a different place especially with afterthe completion of human genome project. In synthesis ofa protein just only genetic information is not enough. Atthe same time the change or changes of a protein afterthe synthesis, the final version and transporting to finallocalization of it also important. Because having defects inmailing cells of breast cancer, the first targets of treatmentmust be proteins. In this way the studies on proteins areimportant to determine prognostic and diagnostic diseasemarkers and also significant for identifying new treatmentstrategies.Key words: Genom, proteom, breast cancer

  14. Plasma-assisted quadruple-channel optosensing of proteins and cells with Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenghui; Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-02-01

    Information extraction from nano-bio-systems is crucial for understanding their inner molecular level interactions and can help in the development of multidimensional/multimodal sensing devices to realize novel or expanded functionalities. The intrinsic fluorescence (IF) of proteins has long been considered as an effective tool for studying protein structures and dynamics, but not for protein recognition analysis partially because it generally contributes to the fluorescence background in bioanalysis. Here we explored the use of IF as the fourth channel optical input for a multidimensional optosensing device, together with the triple-channel optical output of Mn-doped ZnS QDs (fluorescence from ZnS host, phosphorescence from Mn2+ dopant, and Rayleigh light scattering from the QDs), to dramatically improve the protein recognition and discrimination resolution. To further increase the cross-reactivity of the multidimensional optosensing device, plasma modification of proteins was explored to enhance the IF difference as well as their interactions with Mn-doped ZnS QDs. Such a sensor device was demonstrated for highly discriminative and precise identification of proteins in human serum and urine samples, and for cancer and normal cells as well.Information extraction from nano-bio-systems is crucial for understanding their inner molecular level interactions and can help in the development of multidimensional/multimodal sensing devices to realize novel or expanded functionalities. The intrinsic fluorescence (IF) of proteins has long been considered as an effective tool for studying protein structures and dynamics, but not for protein recognition analysis partially because it generally contributes to the fluorescence background in bioanalysis. Here we explored the use of IF as the fourth channel optical input for a multidimensional optosensing device, together with the triple-channel optical output of Mn-doped ZnS QDs (fluorescence from ZnS host, phosphorescence from Mn2

  15. Changes to channel sediments resulting from complex human impacts in a gravel-bed river, Polish Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiejska, Joanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Mikuś, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    During the second half of the twentieth century, many sections of the Czarny Dunajec River, Polish Carpathians, were considerably modified by channelization as well as gravel-mining and the resultant channel incision (up to 3.5 m). This paper examines changes to the longitudinal pattern of grain size and sorting of bed material in an 18-km-long river reach. Surface bed-material grain size was established on 47 gravel bars and compared with a reference downstream fining trend of bar sediments derived from the sites with average river width and a vertically stable channel. Contrary to expectations, the extraction of cobbles from the channel bed in the upper part of the study reach, conducted in the past decades, has resulted in the marked coarsening of bed material in this river section. The extraction facilitated entrainment of exposed finer grains and has led to rapid bed degradation, whereas the concentration of flood flows in the increasingly deep and narrow channel has increased their competence and enabled a delivery of the coarse particles previously typical of the upstream reach. The middle section of the study reach, channelized to prevent sediment delivery to a downstream reservoir, now transfers the bed material flushed out from the incising upstream section. With considerably increased transport capacity of the river and with sediment delivery from bank erosion eliminated by bank reinforcements, bar sediments in the channelized section are typified by increased size of the finer fraction and better-than-average sorting. In the wide, multi-thread channel in the lower part of the reach, low unit stream power and high channel-form roughness facilitate sediment deposition and are reflected in relatively fine grades of bar gravels. The study showed that selective extraction of larger particles from the channel bed leads to channel incision at and upstream of the mining site. However, unlike bulk gravel mining, selective extraction does not result in sediment

  16. Adenosine regulates a chloride channel via protein kinase C and a G protein in a rabbit cortical collecting duct cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwiebert, E. M.; Karlson, K H; Friedman, P A; Dietl, P.; Spielman, W S; Stanton, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the regulation by adenosine of a 305-pS chloride (Cl-) channel in the apical membrane of a continuous cell line derived from rabbit cortical collecting duct (RCCT-28A) using the patch clamp technique. Stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors by N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) activated the channel in cell-attached patches. Phorbol 12,13-didecanoate and 1-oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol, activators of protein kinase C (PKC), mimicked the effect of CHA, whereas the PKC inhibitor H7 blocked the ac...

  17. Protein-directed synthesis of Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots: a dual-channel biosensor for two proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng; Zhao, Ting; Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Lan; Hou, Xiandeng

    2013-06-01

    Proteins typically have nanoscale dimensions and multiple binding sites with inorganic ions, which facilitates the templated synthesis of nanoparticles to yield nanoparticle-protein hybrids with tailored functionality, water solubility, and tunable frameworks with well-defined structure. In this work, we report a protein-templated synthesis of Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) by exploring bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the template. The obtained Mn-doped ZnS QDs give phosphorescence emission centered at 590 nm, with a decay time of about 1.9 ms. A dual-channel sensing system for two different proteins was developed through integration of the optical responses (phosphorescence emission and resonant light scattering (RLS)) of Mn-doped ZnS QDs and recognition of them by surface BSA phosphorescent sensing of trypsin and RLS sensing of lysozyme. Trypsin can digest BSA and remove BSA from the surface of Mn-doped ZnS QDs, thus quenching the phosphorescence of QDs, whereas lysozyme can assemble with BSA to lead to aggregation of QDs and enhanced RLS intensity. The detection limits for trypsin and lysozyme were 40 and 3 nM, respectively. The selectivity of the respective channel for trypsin and lysozyme was evaluated with a series of other proteins. Unlike other protein sensors based on nanobioconjugates, the proposed dual-channel sensor employs only one type of QDs but can detect two different proteins. Further, we found the RLS of QDs can also be useful for studying the BSA-lysozyme binding stoichiometry, which has not been reported in the literature. These successful biosensor applications clearly demonstrate that BSA not only serves as a template for growth of Mn-doped ZnS QDs, but also impacts the QDs for selective recognition of analyte proteins. PMID:23576296

  18. Changes of Ca2+ activated potassium channels and cellular proliferation in autogenous vein grafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱济先; 宋胜云; 马保安; 范清宇

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes of Ca2+ activated potassium channels (KCa) in autogenous vein grafts. Methods: Contraction of venous ring was measured by means of perfusion in vitro. The intimal rabbits proliferation of vascular and proliferation of cultured smooth muscle cells(vascular smooth muscle cells, VSMCs)were observed by the means of computerised image analysis and MTT method respectively. Furthermore, whole cell mode of patch clamp was used to record KCa of VSMCs isolated from autogenous vein grafts. Results: One week after transplantation there were no significant differences of contraction and intimal relative thickness between autogenous vein grafts and control. Contraction and intimal relative thickness of autogenous vein graft were significantly increased 2 weeks after transplantation (P<0.05, n=8 vs control), and they was more enhanced 4 weeks after vein transplantation (P<0.01, n=8 vs control).TEA(blocker of Ca2+ activated potassium channels)increased MTT A490 nm value of VSMCs from femoral vein in a dose dependent manner(P<0.05, n=8). KCa current density was significantly attenuated in VSMCs from autogenous vein grafts (1-4) week after transplantation(P<0.05, n=5).Conclusion: KCa is inhibited in autogenous vein graft, which account for vasospasm and intimal proliferation.

  19. Changes in the bacterial community of soil from a neutral mine drainage channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Bianca Pereira

    Full Text Available Mine drainage is an important environmental disturbance that affects the chemical and biological components in natural resources. However, little is known about the effects of neutral mine drainage on the soil bacteria community. Here, a high-throughput 16S rDNA pyrosequencing approach was used to evaluate differences in composition, structure, and diversity of bacteria communities in samples from a neutral drainage channel, and soil next to the channel, at the Sossego copper mine in Brazil. Advanced statistical analyses were used to explore the relationships between the biological and chemical data. The results showed that the neutral mine drainage caused changes in the composition and structure of the microbial community, but not in its diversity. The Deinococcus/Thermus phylum, especially the Meiothermus genus, was in large part responsible for the differences between the communities, and was positively associated with the presence of copper and other heavy metals in the environmental samples. Other important parameters that influenced the bacterial diversity and composition were the elements potassium, sodium, nickel, and zinc, as well as pH. The findings contribute to the understanding of bacterial diversity in soils impacted by neutral mine drainage, and demonstrate that heavy metals play an important role in shaping the microbial population in mine environments.

  20. Potent neutralization of influenza A virus by a single-domain antibody blocking M2 ion channel protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Wei

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus poses serious health threat to humans. Neutralizing antibodies against the highly conserved M2 ion channel is thought to offer broad protection against influenza A viruses. Here, we screened synthetic Camel single-domain antibody (VHH libraries against native M2 ion channel protein. One of the isolated VHHs, M2-7A, specifically bound to M2-expressed cell membrane as well as influenza A virion, inhibited replication of both amantadine-sensitive and resistant influenza A viruses in vitro, and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, M2-7A showed blocking activity for proton influx through M2 ion channel. These pieces of evidence collectively demonstrate for the first time that a neutralizing antibody against M2 with broad specificity is achievable, and M2-7A may have potential for cross protection against a number of variants and subtypes of influenza A viruses.

  1. Requirement of Fra proteins for communication channels between cells in the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Mariscal, Vicente; Austin, Jotham R; Haselkorn, Robert

    2015-08-11

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 differentiates specialized cells, heterocysts, that fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer the fixed nitrogen to adjacent vegetative cells. Reciprocally, vegetative cells transfer fixed carbon to heterocysts. Several routes have been described for metabolite exchange within the filament, one of which involves communicating channels that penetrate the septum between adjacent cells. Several fra gene mutants were isolated 25 y ago on the basis of their phenotypes: inability to fix nitrogen and fragmentation of filaments upon transfer from N+ to N- media. Cryopreservation combined with electron tomography were used to investigate the role of three fra gene products in channel formation. FraC and FraG are clearly involved in channel formation, whereas FraD has a minor part. Additionally, FraG was located close to the cytoplasmic membrane and in the heterocyst neck, using immunogold labeling with antibody raised to the N-terminal domain of the FraG protein.

  2. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakravarty

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U and bound (B forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA, secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69% of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered residues in the U form which are observed (ordered in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial.

  3. Changes in the tear proteins of diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin A J

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown a significant increase in tear protein peaks in the tears of diabetic patients suffering from dry eye. The aim of this study was to analyze the tear protein patterns from patients with diabetes mellitus who do not suffer from ocular surface diseases (DIA. Methods A total of 515 patients were examined in this study (255 healthy subjects (controls and 260 patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. Tear proteins were separated by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After digital image analysis densitometric data files were created and subsequently used for multivariate statistical procedures. Results A significant increase in the number of peaks was detected in diabetic patients compared to controls (P Conclusions The tear protein patterns of diabetic patients are very different in the number and intensity of spots from those of healthy subjects. Furthermore, it could be demonstrated that the differences found in the tear patterns of diabetic patients are not equal to those found in previous studies in patients suffering from dry-eye disease. The alterations in the diabetic tears were correlated with the duration of the diabetic disease. With longer disease, history changes in the tear protein patterns increased. With the course of the disease some protein peaks appeared that are not present in healthy persons. Our study shows that the analysis of electrophoretic tear protein patterns is a new non-invasive approach in the early diagnosis and analysis of the pathogenesis of diabetes induced ocular surface disease.

  4. Water channel proteins: from their discovery in 1985 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, to the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Gh

    2006-10-30

    Water channel proteins, later called aquaporins, are transmembrane proteins that have as their main(specific) function the water transport across biological membranes. The first water channel protein (WCP), now called aquaporin 1, was identified or "seen" in situ (hence discovered) in the human red blood cell (RBC) membrane in 1985 by Benga's group (Cluj-Napoca, Romania). This was achieved by a very selective radiolabeling of RBC membrane proteins with the water transport inhibitor [203Hg]-p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (PCMBS), under conditions of specific inhibition. The presence and location of the WCP was discovered among the polypeptides migrating in the region of 35-60 kDa on the electrophoretogram of RBC membrane proteins. The work was first published in 1986 in Biochemistry and Eur. J. Cell Biol. and reviewed by Benga in several articles in 1988-2004. We have thus a world priority in the discovery of the first water channel in the RBC membrane, that was re-discovered by chance by the group of Agre (Baltimore, USA) in 1988, when they isolated a new protein from the RBC membrane, nick-named CHIP28 (channel-forming integral membrane protein of 28 kDa). However, in addition to the 28 kDa component, this protein had a 35-60 kDa glycosylated component, the one detected by Benga's group. Only in 1992 the Agre's group suggested that "it is likely that CHIP28 is a functional unit of membrane water channels". In 1993 CHIP28 was renamed aquaporin 1. Looking in retrospect, asking the crucial question, when was the first WCP, discovered, a fair and clear cut answer would be: the first WCP, now called aquaporin 1, was identified or "seen" (hence discovered) in situ in the human RBC membrane by Benga and coworkers in 1985. It was again "seen" when it was purified in 1988 and again identified when its water transport property was found byAgre's group in 1992. If we make a comparison with the discovery of New World of America, the first man who has "seen" a part, very

  5. Ferritin Protein Nanocages Use Ion Channels, Catalytic Sites, and Nucleation Channels To Manage Iron/Oxygen Chemistry: A review for: Current Opinion In Chemical Biology/Bioinorganic Chemistry: Iron Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    The ferritin superfamily is composed of ancient, nanocage proteins with an internal cavity, 60% of total volume, that reversibly synthesize solid minerals of hydrated ferric oxide; the minerals are iron concentrates for cell nutrition as well as antioxidants due to ferrous and oxygen consumption during mineralization. The cages have multiple iron entry/exit channels, oxidoreductase enzyme sites, and, in eukaryotes, Fe(III)O nucleation channels with clustered exits that extend protein activity...

  6. Numerical investigation on detonation cell evolution in a channel with area-changing cross section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The two-dimensional cellular detonation propagating in a channel with area- changing cross section was numerically simulated with the dispersion-controlled dissipative scheme and a detailed chemical reaction model. Effects of the flow expansion and compression on the cellular detonation cell were investigated to illustrate the mechanism of the transverse wave development and the cellular detonation cell evolution. By examining gas composition variations behind the leading shock, the chemical reaction rate, the reaction zone length, and thermodynamic parameters, two kinds of the abnormal detonation waves were identified. To explore their development mechanism, chemical reactions, reflected shocks and rarefaction waves were discussed, which interact with each other and affect the cellular detonation in different ways.

  7. Numerical investigation on detonation cell evolution in a channel with area-changing cross section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG; Bo

    2007-01-01

    The two-dimensional cellular detonation propagating in a channel with area- changing cross section was numerically simulated with the dispersion-controlled dissipative scheme and a detailed chemical reaction model. Effects of the flow expansion and compression on the cellular detonation cell were investigated to illustrate the mechanism of the transverse wave development and the cellular detonation cell evolution. By examining gas composition variations behind the leading shock, the chemical reaction rate, the reaction zone length, and thermodynamic parameters, two kinds of the abnormal detonation waves were identified. To explore their development mechanism, chemical reactions, reflected shocks and rarefaction waves were discussed, which interact with each other and affect the cellular detonation in different ways.  ……

  8. Estimating changes in riparian and channel features along the Trinity River downstream of Lewiston Dam, California, 1980 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Dam construction, flow diversion, and legacy landuse effects reduced the transport capacity, sediment supply, channel complexity and floodplain-connectivity along the Trinity River, CA below Lewiston Dam. This study documents the geomorphic evolution of the Trinity River Restoration Program’s intensively managed 65-km long restoration reach from 1980 to 2011. The nature and extent of riparian and channel changes were assessed using a series of geomorphic feature maps constructed from ortho-rectified photography acquired at low flow conditions in 1980, 1997, 2001, 2006, 2009, and 2011. Since 1980 there has been a general conversion of riparian to channel features and expansion of the active channel area. The primary mechanism for expansion of the active channel was bank erosion from 1980 to 1997 and channel widening was well distributed longitudinally throughout the study reach. Subsequent net bar accretion from 1997 to 2001, followed by slightly higher net bar scour from 2001 to 2006, occurred primarily in the central and lower reaches of the study area. In comparison, post-2006 bank and bar changes were spatially-limited to reaches with sufficient local transport capacity or sediment supply supported by gravel augmentation, mechanical channel rehabilitation, and tributary contributions to flow and sediment supply. A series of tributary floods in 1997, 1998 and 2006 were the primary factors leading to documented increases in channel complexity and floodplain connectivity. During the post-2006 period managed flow releases, in the absence of large magnitude tributary flooding, combined with gravel augmentation and mechanical restoration caused localized increases in sediment supply and transport capacity leading to smaller but measurable increases in channel complexity and floodplain connectivity primarily in the upper river below Lewiston Dam.

  9. Distribution of Water Channel Protein RWC3 and Its Regulation by GA and Sucrose in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNMei-Hao; ZHANGMin-Hua; LIUHong-Yan; LILe-Gong; YUXin; SUWei-Ai; TANGZhang-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    Water channel proteins facilitate water flux across cell membranes and play important roles in plant growth and development. By GUS histochemical assay in RWC3 promoter-GUS transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Shenxiangjin 4), one of the members of water channel proteins in rice, RWC3, was found to distribute widely in variety of organs, from vegetative and reproductive organs. Further studies showed that gibberellin (GA) enhanced the GUS activity in the transgenic calli, suspension cells and leaves, whereas ancymidol (anc), an inhibitor of GA synthesis, reduced the GUS activity. Sucrose was found to inhibit the effects induced by addition of GA, suggesting a possible cross-talk between GA and sucrose signaling on regulation of the RWC3 gene expression.

  10. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca2+-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    86Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca2+-activated K+-channels. Depolarization of 86Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca2+-activated 86Rb-efflux by 400%. The 86Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La3+ indicating the involvement of Ca2+-activated K+-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca2+-activated 86Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca2+-activated K+-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca2+-activated K+-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology

  11. Bioinspired Protein Channel-Based Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (Bio-SICM) for Simultaneous Conductance and Specific Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macazo, Florika C; White, Ryan J

    2016-03-01

    The utility of stochastic single-molecule detection using protein nanopores has found widespread application in bioanalytical sensing as a result of the inherent signal amplification of the resistive pulse method. Integration of protein nanopores with high-resolution scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) extends the utility of SICM by enabling selective chemical imaging of specific target molecules, while simultaneously providing topographical information about the net ion flux through a pore under a concentration gradient. In this study, we describe the development of a bioinspired scanning ion conductance microscopy (bio-SICM) approach that couples the imaging ability of SICM with the sensitivity and chemical selectivity of protein channels to perform simultaneous pore imaging and specific molecule mapping. To establish the framework of the bio-SICM platform, we utilize the well-studied protein channel α-hemolysin (αHL) to map the presence of β-cyclodextrin (βCD) at a substrate pore opening. We demonstrate concurrent pore and specific molecule imaging by raster scanning an αHL-based probe over a glass membrane containing a single 25-μm-diameter glass pore while recording the lateral positions of the probe and channel activity via ionic current. We use the average channel current to create a conductance image and the raw current-time traces to determine spatial localization of βCD. With further optimization, we believe that the bio-SICM platform will provide a powerful analytical methodology that is generalizable, and thus offers significant utility in a myriad of bioanalytical applications. PMID:26848947

  12. Suprachiasmatic nucleus function and circadian entrainment are modulated by G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying (GIRK) channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hablitz, L M; Molzof, H E; Paul, J R; Johnson, R L; Gamble, K L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract G protein signalling within the central circadian oscillator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is essential for conveying time-of-day information. We sought to determine whether G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) modulate SCN physiology and circadian behaviour. We show that GIRK current and GIRK2 protein expression are greater during the day. Pharmacological inhibition of GIRKs and genetic loss of GIRK2 depolarized the day-time resting membrane potential of SCN neurons compared to controls. Behaviourally, GIRK2 knockout (KO) mice failed to shorten free running period in response to wheel access in constant darkness and entrained more rapidly to a 6 h advance of a 12 h:12 h light–dark (LD) cycle than wild-type (WT) littermate controls. We next examined whether these effects were due to disrupted signalling of neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is known to mediate non-photic phase shifts, attenuate photic phase shifts and activate GIRKs. Indeed, GIRK2 KO SCN slices had significantly fewer silent cells in response to NPY, likely contributing to the absence of NPY-induced phase advances of PER2::LUC rhythms in organotypic SCN cultures from GIRK2 KO mice. Finally, GIRK channel activation is sufficient to cause a non-photic-like phase advance of PER2::LUC rhythms on a Per2Luc+/− background. These results suggest that rhythmic regulation of GIRK2 protein and channel function in the SCN contributes to day-time resting membrane potential, providing a mechanism for the fine tuning responses to non-photic and photic stimuli. Further investigation could provide insight into disorders with circadian disruption comorbidities such as epilepsy and addiction, in which GIRK channels have been implicated. PMID:25217379

  13. SPAK and OSR1 Sensitive Cell Membrane Protein Abundance and Activity of KCNQ1/E1 K+ Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Elvira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: KCNQ1/E1 channels are expressed in diverse tissues and serve a variety of functions including endolymph secretion in the inner ear, cardiac repolarization, epithelial transport and cell volume regulation. Kinases involved in regulation of epithelial transport and cell volume include SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1, which are under control of WNK (with-no-K[Lys] kinases. The present study explored whether KCNQ1/E1 channels are regulated by SPAK and/or OSR1. Methods: cRNA encoding KCNQ1/E1 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type SPAK, constitutively active T233ESPAK, WNK insensitive T233ASPAK, catalytically inactive D212ASPAK, wild-type OSR1, constitutively active T185EOSR1, WNK insensitive T185AOSR1 and catalytically inactive D164AOSR1. Voltage gated K+ channel activity was quantified utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp and KCNQ1/E1 channel protein abundance in the cell membrane utilizing chemiluminescence of KCNQ1/E1 containing an extracellular Flag tag epitope (KCNQ1-Flag/E1. Results: KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly enhanced by wild-type SPAK and T233ESPAK, but not by T233ASPAK and D212ASPAK. Similarly, KCNQ1/E1 activity and KCNQ1-Flag/E1 protein abundance were significantly increased by wild-type OSR1 and T185EOSR1, but not by T185AOSR1 and D164AOSR1. Conclusions: SPAK and OSR1 participate in the regulation of KCNQ1/E1 protein abundance and activity.

  14. Protein profile changes during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on protein expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Jian Jiang

    Full Text Available It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 12 proteins were identified as down-regulated. A total of 38 differentially expressed proteins grouped into 5 regulation patterns were determined to relate to the aging and anti-aging process. By using the Gene Ontology system, we found that numerous functional gene products involved in metabolism, stress response, reactive oxygen species and cell cycle regulation were differentially expressed during the oocyte aging process, and most of these proteins are for the first time reported in our study, including 2 novel proteins. In addition, several proteins were found to be modified during oocyte aging. These data contribute new information that may be useful for future research on cellular aging and for improvement of oocyte quality.

  15. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  16. Structural and nutritional changes in irradiated food proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two part study was designed to investigate radiation-induced structural and nutritional changes in food proteins. Model systems composed of 0.1-10% myoglobin, lactalbumin or BSA were used and the effects of propyl gallate, ascorbic acid, air or nitrogen, pH 5, 6 or 7 citrate or phosphate buffer, and addition of glucose and SDS were investigated. We found that 0.02-0.04% propyl gallate (PG), alone or in conjunction with other solutes, inhibited protein aggregation after irradiation to 0.5 and 1.0 megarad and subsequent -20C storage for 3-6 months. PG alone at 0.04% yielded up to 90% retention of myoglobin after 0.5 megarad and up to 94% retention of lactalbumin after 1.0 megarad as compared to unirradiated controls. BSA appeared more radiation sensitive than other proteins, and use of 0.02% PG yielded retention of only 10% of the original protein after 1.0 megarad. Use of synergists such as glucose or SDS together with PG allowed up to a two-fold increase in protein retention, while use of 0.02% ascorbic acid led to lower retention compared to samples irradiated alone in control buffer. Mice fed irradiated lactalbumin in factorial studies grew slightly faster and ate more than unirradiated controls, while those fed protein irradiated with 0.02% PG showed slightly decreased rates of gain and feed consumption

  17. Expression of hNav1.8 sodium channel protein in affected nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ling-lan; JIANG Xiao-zhong; ZHAO Yun-fu; LI Yu-li; HE Jin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pathogenesis of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and to provide a new target for the drug treatment of TN by studying the expression of tetrodotoxin-resistant hNavl. 8 sodium channel protein in affected nerves of patients with TN. Methods: Twelve affected inferior alveolar nerves were obtained from patients with idiopathic TN, to whom the drug therapy was not effective. As negative control, one normal inferior alveolar nerve was obtained from patients who accepted the combined radical neck dissection with glossectomy and mandibulectomy. One muscle sample was obtained as normal control. One dorsal root ganglion from rat was as positive control. These tissues and prepared hNav1.8 antibody were conducted immunohistochemistry response. Results: hNavl. 8 channel protein was expresses in all the 12 specimens of the affected nerves of patients with TN, but not in the muscle sample and the normal inferior alveolar nerve. Conclusion:The abnormal expression of hNavl. 8 channel protein in the affected nerves of patients with TN may play an impo~nt role in the pathogenesis of TN.

  18. Long-lived reactive species formed on proteins induce changes in protein and lipid turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage in vivo due to their high abundance and rapid rates of reaction with both one-electron (radical) and two-electron oxidants (e.g. singlet oxygen, hypochlorous acid, peroxynitrous acid, reactive aldehydes). The turnover of both native and modified proteins is critical for maintenance of cell homeostasis, with this occurring via multiple pathways including proteasomes (for cytosolic species), the Lon protease (in mitochondria), and the endo-lysosomal systems (both extra- and intra-cellular species). Evidence has been presented for both enhanced and diminished rates of catabolism of modified proteins, as well as altered turnover of native (unmodified) proteins as a result of damage to these systems, potentially as a result of the accumulation of damaged proteins. In recent studies we have shown that long-lived reactive species forms on proteins (hydroperoxides, chloramines and aldehydes) can modify the activity of proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes. Some of the above species are efficient inhibitors of the tryptic and chymotryptic activities of the 26S proteasome, as well as lysosomal cathepsin and acid lipase activities. These are key species in the turnover of both proteins and lipoproteins. The loss of enzyme activity is accompanied in many cases, by oxidation of critical thiol residues via molecular reactions. For reactive aldehydes (either free or protein-bound) direct enzyme inhibition can occur as well as modulation of protein levels and, in the case of lysosomes, changes in lysosomal numbers. Overall, these data indicate that the formation of reactive species on proteins can modulate cell function by multiple pathways including interference with the turnover of native proteins (including critical cell signalling molecules) and alterations in the rate of clearance of modified proteins. Both pathways may contribute to the development of a number of human pathologies associated with oxidative damage. PMID:26461411

  19. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  20. Kinetic changes and modulation by carbamazepine on voltage-gated sodium channels in rat CA1 neurons after epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-chun SUN; Taco WERKMAN; Wytse J WADMAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study whether the functional properties of sodium channels, and subsequently the channel modulation by carbamazepine (CBZ) in hippocampal CA1 neurons can be changed after epileptic seizures. Methods: We used the acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from epilepsy model rats 3 weeks and 3 months respectively after kainate injection, and whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Results: After long-term epileptic seizures, both sodium channel voltage-dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation shifted to more hyperpolarizing potentials, which resulted in the enlarged window current; the membrane density of sodium current decreased and the time constant of recovery from inactivation increased. CBZ displayed unchanged efficacy on sodium channels, with a similar binding rate to them, except that at higher concentrations, the voltage shift of inactivation was reduced. For the short-term kainate model rats, no differences were detected between the control and epilepsy groups. Conclusion: These results indicate that the properties of sodium channels in acutely dissociated hippocampal neurons could be changed following long-term epilepsy, but the alternation might not be enough to induce the channel resistance to CBZ.

  1. Changes of neuronal calcium channel following brain damage induced by injection of pertussis bacilli in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立华; 于嘉; 刘丽旭; 曹美鸿

    2002-01-01

    To explore changes of neuronal calcium channel following brain damage induced by injection of pertussis bacilli in rats, and to investigate the relationship between cytosolic free calcium concentration ( [ Ca2 + ] i ) in the synaptosome and Ca2 + -ATPase activities of mitochondria. Methods: The level of [ Ca2+ ]i in the synaptosome and Ca2+ -ATPase activities of mitochondria in the acute brain damage induced by injection of pertussis bacilli (PB)in rat was determined and nimodipine was administrated to show its effects on [ Ca2+ ]i in the synaptosome and on alteration of Ca2+ -ATPase activity in the mitochondria.Seventy-three rats were randomly divided into four groups,ie, normal control group (Group A ), sham-operation control group (Group B), PB group (Group C) and nimodipine treatment group (Group D). Results: The level of [ Ca2+ ]i was significantly increased in the PB-injected cerebral hemisphere in the Group C as compared with that in the Group A and the Group B at 30 minutes after injection of PB. The level of [ Ca2+ ]i was kept higher in the 4 hours and 24 hours subgroups after the injection in the Group C ( P < 0.05).In contrast, the Ca2+ -ATPase activities were decreased remarkably among all of the subgroups in the Group C.Nimodipine, which was administered after injection of PB,could significantly decrease the [ Ca2+ ]i and increase the activity of Ca2 + -ATPase ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusions: The neuronal calcium channel is opened after injection of PB. There is a negative correlation between activities of Ca2 +-ATPase and [ Ca2 + ]i.Nimodipine can reduce brain damage through stimulating the activities of Ca2+ -ATPase in the mitochondria, and decrease the level of [ Ca2+ ]i in the synaptosome.Treatment with nimodipine dramatically reduces the effects of brain damage induced by injection of PB.

  2. Spatiotemporal variations in channel changes caused by cumulative factors in a meandering river: The lower Peixe River, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Eduardo S.; Rocha, Paulo C.; Hooke, Janet

    2016-11-01

    Channel changes in meandering rivers naturally exhibit complex behaviour, and understanding the river dynamics can be challenging in environments also subject to cumulative human impacts. Planform changes were analysed on four reaches of the lower course of the Peixe River, Brazil, at decadal scales over the period 1962-2008 from aerial photographs and satellite imagery, complemented by a historical map from 1907. Analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of channel change mechanisms and morphometry of bends and of the sinuosity and morphodynamic variations of the reaches demonstrates major changes in planform characteristics. Sinuosity in all reaches decreased from ~ 2.6 to ~ 1.7, average wavelength of bends has increased from ~ 200 to ~ 500 m, and the planform has become much simpler. Changes have been progressive from downstream to upstream, with higher intensities of processes, particularly cutoffs first in downstream reaches then more recently in upstream reaches. It is suggested that channel changes represent a morphological adjustment to human interventions, such as reservoir construction and land use. However, evidence of the autogenic behaviour of meanders is highlighted in which the existence of compound meanders reveals control over the spatial variation in the reaches. The results suggest that geomorphic thresholds associated with the compound meander formation and the bend evolution should be considered, even in impacted meandering rivers, because they exert primary controls on the spatial-temporal adjustment of channels.

  3. Regulator of G-protein signalling and GoLoco proteins suppress TRPC4 channel function via acting at Gαi/o.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Pyo; Thakur, Dhananjay P; Tian, Jin-Bin; So, Insuk; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-05-15

    Transient receptor potential canonical 4 (TRPC4) forms non-selective cation channels implicated in the regulation of diverse physiological functions. Previously, TRPC4 was shown to be activated by the Gi/o subgroup of heterotrimeric G-proteins involving Gαi/o, rather than Gβγ, subunits. Because the lifetime and availability of Gα-GTP are regulated by regulators of G-protein signalling (RGS) and Gαi/o-Loco (GoLoco) domain-containing proteins via their GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and guanine-nucleotide-dissociation inhibitor (GDI) functions respectively, we tested how RGS and GoLoco domain proteins affect TRPC4 currents activated via Gi/o-coupled receptors. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we show that both RGS and GoLoco proteins [RGS4, RGS6, RGS12, RGS14, LGN or activator of G-protein signalling 3 (AGS3)] suppress receptor-mediated TRPC4 activation without causing detectable basal current or altering surface expression of the channel protein. The inhibitory effects are dependent on the GAP and GoLoco domains and facilitated by enhancing membrane targeting of the GoLoco protein AGS3. In addition, RGS, but not GoLoco, proteins accelerate desensitization of receptor-activation evoked TRPC4 currents. The inhibitory effects of RGS and GoLoco domains are additive and are most prominent with RGS12 and RGS14, which contain both RGS and GoLoco domains. Our data support the notion that the Gα, but not Gβγ, arm of the Gi/o signalling is involved in TRPC4 activation and unveil new roles for RGS and GoLoco domain proteins in fine-tuning TRPC4 activities. The versatile and diverse functions of RGS and GoLoco proteins in regulating G-protein signalling may underlie the complexity of receptor-operated TRPC4 activation in various cell types under different conditions. PMID:26987813

  4. Voltage-gated Na(+) channels in chemoreceptor afferent neurons--potential roles and changes with development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, David F

    2013-01-01

    Carotid body chemoreceptors increase their action potential (AP) activity in response to a decrease in arterial oxygen tension and this response increases in the post-natal period. The initial transduction site is likely the glomus cell which responds to hypoxia with an increase in intracellular calcium and secretion of multiple neurotransmitters. Translation of this secretion to AP spiking levels is determined by the excitability of the afferent nerve terminals that is largely determined by the voltage-dependence of activation of Na(+) channels. In this review, we examine the biophysical characteristics of Na(+) channels present at the soma of chemoreceptor afferent neurons with the assumption that similar channels are present at nerve terminals. The voltage dependence of this current is consistent with a single Na(+) channel isoform with activation around the resting potential and with about 60-70% of channels in the inactive state around the resting potential. Channel openings, due to transitions from inactive/open or closed/open states, may serve to amplify external depolarizing events or generate, by themselves, APs. Over the first two post-natal weeks, the Na(+) channel activation voltage shifts to more negative potentials, thus enhancing the amplifying action of Na(+) channels on depolarization events and increasing membrane noise generated by channel transitions. This may be a significant contributor to maturation of chemoreceptor activity in the post-natal period.

  5. Tuning the ion selectivity of tetrameric cation channels by changing the number of ion binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derebe, Mehabaw G.; Sauer, David B.; Zeng, Weizhong; Alam, Amer; Shi, Ning; Jiang, Youxing (UTSMC); (ETH Zurich)

    2015-11-30

    Selective ion conduction across ion channel pores is central to cellular physiology. To understand the underlying principles of ion selectivity in tetrameric cation channels, we engineered a set of cation channel pores based on the nonselective NaK channel and determined their structures to high resolution. These structures showcase an ensemble of selectivity filters with a various number of contiguous ion binding sites ranging from 2 to 4, with each individual site maintaining a geometry and ligand environment virtually identical to that of equivalent sites in K{sup +} channel selectivity filters. Combined with single channel electrophysiology, we show that only the channel with four ion binding sites is K{sup +} selective, whereas those with two or three are nonselective and permeate Na{sup +} and K{sup +} equally well. These observations strongly suggest that the number of contiguous ion binding sites in a single file is the key determinant of the channel's selectivity properties and the presence of four sites in K{sup +} channels is essential for highly selective and efficient permeation of K{sup +} ions.

  6. Dam-induced and natural channel changes in the Saskatchewan River below the E.B. Campbell Dam, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Norman D.; Morozova, Galina S.; Pérez-Arlucea, Marta; Gibling, Martin R.

    2016-09-01

    The E.B. Campbell Dam on the Saskatchewan River, east-central Saskatchewan, was constructed in 1962, forming Tobin Lake (2.2 billion m3 capacity), which today impounds most fluvial sediment and disrupts normal outflow patterns. Thirty-five kilometers below the dam, the river diverts into a 500 km2 belt of alluvial sediment initiated by an avulsion ~ 140 years ago, rejoining the parent channel 108 km from the dam. Effects of the dam on channel geomorphology, including the historical channel (reach I) and the more recent avulsion-affected channels, were investigated by pre- and post-dam cross section surveys combined with grain-size and bedload measurements. Twenty-three sites were surveyed at least twice, and 14 were resurveyed annually in 2003-2014 (except 2007) during which significant floods occurred in 2005, 2011, and 2013. All channel cross sections up to 81 km below the dam have coarsened and enlarged since closure, resulting in excavation of 35.4 × 106 m3 of channel-perimeter sediment since 1962. The most proximal segment is armored and has changed little in recent years. Since 2003, channel enlargement has been greatest in the 35-81 km segment between the avulsion site and the Forks (reaches II, III), manifested as widening and deepening. Enlargement rates were greatest during the three floods, and the paucity of bedload has prevented degraded portions of the channel bed from replenishment following flooding. Budget calculations based on bedload measurements and channel cross-section areas suggest that > 30 years would be required to replace the sediment removed between 2003 and 2014, assuming all available bedload remains in the affected reach. Dam effects appear to be absent or uncertain beyond 81 km, a multichanneled region of varied stages of activity (reach IV), recombining and eventually rejoining the parent Saskatchewan River channel at km 108 (reach V). Sediment evacuated from reaches I-III is sufficient to sustain modest aggradation in some distal

  7. Eutrophication and algal blooms in channel type reservoirs: A novel enclosure experiment by changing light intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjin Cao; Binghui Zheng; Zhenlou Chen; Minsheng Huang; Jialei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    To explore eutrophication and algal bloom mechanisms in channel type reservoirs,a novel enclosure experiment was conducted by changing light intensity (LI) in the Daning River of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR).Square enclosures (side 5.0 m) were covered on the surface with shading materials of different thickness,and with their bases open to the river.Changes and characteristics of the main eutrophication factors under the same water quality and hydrodynamic conditions but different LI were evaluated.All experimental water samples were neutral and alkalescent,with high nitrogen and phosphate concentrations,low potassium permanganate index,stable water quality,and different LI.At the same water depth,LI decreased with increasing shade material,while dissolved oxygen and water temperature were both stable.The growth peak of phytoplankton was with light of 345-4390 lux underwater or 558-7450lux above the water surface,and water temperature of 25.6-26.5℃.Algae were observed in all water samples,accounting for 6 phylum and 57 species,with algal density changing frequently.The results showed that significantly strong or weak light was unfavorable for phytoplankton growth and the function together with suitable temperature and LI and ample sunshine encouraged algal blooms under the same water quality and hydrodynamic conditions.Correlation analysis indicated that algae reduced gradually lengthwise along water depth in the same enclosure while pH became high.The power exponent relationship between chlorophyll a (Chl-a) and LI was found by curve fitting,that is Chi-a =K(LI)n.

  8. Interaction of the epithelial Ca2+ channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 with the intestine- and kidney-enriched PDZ protein NHERF4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, S.F.J. van de; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Gisler, S.M.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 constitute the apical Ca(2+) influx pathway in epithelial Ca(2+) transport. PDZ proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the targeting or anchoring of ion channels and transporters in the apical domain of the cell. In this study, we des

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation of Kv1.3 channel is disregulated by adaptor proteins Grb10 and nShc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are important regulators of growth and regeneration, and acutely, they can modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Previously we have shown that acute brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activation of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB suppresses the Shaker voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3 via phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues in the N and C terminal aspects of the channel protein. It is not known how adaptor proteins, which lack catalytic activity, but interact with members of the neurotrophic signaling pathway, might scaffold with ion channels or modulate channel activity. Results We report the co-localization of two adaptor proteins, neuronal Src homology and collagen (nShc and growth factor receptor-binding protein 10 (Grb10, with Kv1.3 channel as demonstrated through immunocytochemical approaches in the olfactory bulb (OB neural lamina. To further explore the specificity and functional ramification of adaptor/channel co-localization, we performed immunoprecipitation and Western analysis of channel, kinase, and adaptor transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK 293. nShc formed a direct protein-protein interaction with Kv1.3 that was independent of BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3, whereas Grb10 did not complex with Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells. Both adaptors, however, co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.3 in native OB. Grb10 was interestingly able to decrease the total expression of Kv1.3, particularly at the membrane surface, and subsequently eliminated the BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3. To examine the possibility that the Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of Grb10 were directly binding to basally phosphorylated tyrosines in Kv1.3, we utilized point mutations to substitute multiple tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Removal of the tyrosines 111–113 and 449 prevented Grb10 from decreasing Kv1.3 expression. In the absence of either adaptor protein

  10. Specific changes of serum proteins in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Lu

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify and validate protein change in the serum from PD patients. We used serum samples from 21 PD patients and 20 age-matched normal people as control to conduct a comparative proteomic study. We performed 2-DE and analyzed the differentially expressed protein spots by LC-MS/MS. In PD group 13 spots were shown to be differentially expressed compared to control group. They were identified as 6 proteins. Among these, 3 proteins were confirmed by Western blot analysis. It showed that the frequency of fibrinogen γ-chain (FGG appeared 70% in PD, which could not be detected in control group. The protein of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITI-H4 was found to exist two forms in serum. The full size (120 kDa of the protein was increased and the fragmented ITI-H4 (35 kDa was decreased in PD group. The ratio of full size ITI-H4 to fragmented ITI-H4 in PD patients was 3.85 ± 0.29-fold higher than in control group. Furthermore, fragmented Apo A-IV (∼ 26 kDa was mainly detected in control group, while it was rare to be found in PD group. Above findings might be useful for diagnosis of PD. When the expressions of FGG and 120 kDa ITI-H4 are increase, as well as ∼ 26 kDa Apo A-IV disappear would provide strong evidence for PD.

  11. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Buijsman, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to the relative change of the stimulus, often reffered to as fold-change detection. Here, we present a mechanism consisting of two interacting proteins, able to detect a fold-change effectively. This mechanism, in contrast to other proposed mechanisms, does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism can have a fast, precise and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  12. Channel change as a response to reforestation and population decline in the rural Toulourenc basin, southern French Prealps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Z.; Janes, K.; Kondolf, G. M.; Natali, J.; Radke, J.

    2011-12-01

    As a result of demographic changes, forest cover in the southern French Prealp mountains has increased dramatically during the 20th century. Over the same time period stream morphology within these sub-Mediterranean mountain basins has also changed. At two mainstem locations and eight upstream tributary sites within the Toulourenc basin (~150 km2), we investigated the relationship between hillslope erosion processes and the evolution of stream channel morphology through analysis of historic cadastral maps (circa 1850), aerial photographs (1950-current), topographic surveys (2009-2011), dendrochronolgy of vegetative establishment on abandoned terraces, and bed material size distribution. We observed narrowing of the active channel width, channel degradation, and pavement development along the Toulourenc mainstem and upstream tributaries. On the mainstem Toulourenc, the active channel has narrowed approximately 50% (30m) between 1950 and 2011. As with other studies within the southern French Prealps, the channel modifications appear to be induced by a decrease in the coarse sediment supply as agricultural and logging lands were reforested between 1890 and 1945.

  13. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in α-helix conformation and a decrease in β-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in α-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  14. Protein synthesis and consolidation of memory-related synaptic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Gary; Kramár, Enikö A; Gall, Christine M

    2015-09-24

    Although sometimes disputed, it has been assumed for several decades that new proteins synthesized following a learning event are required for consolidation of subsequent memory. Published findings and new results described here challenge this idea. Protein synthesis inhibitors did not prevent Theta Bust Stimulation (TBS) from producing extremely stable long-term potentiation (LTP) in experiments using standard hippocampal slice protocols. However, the inhibitors were effective under conditions that likely depleted protein levels prior to attempts to induce the potentiation effect. Experiments showed that induction of LTP at one input, and thus a prior episode of protein synthesis, eliminated the effects of inhibitors on potentiation of a second input even in depleted slices. These observations suggest that a primary role of translation and transcription processes initiated by learning events is to prepare neurons to support future learning. Other work has provided support for an alternative theory of consolidation. Specifically, if the synaptic changes that support memory are to endure, learning events/TBS must engage a complex set of signaling processes that reorganize and re-stabilize the spine actin cytoskeleton. This is accomplished in fast (10 min) and slow (50 min) stages with the first requiring integrin activation and the second a recovery of integrin functioning. These results align with, and provide mechanisms for, the long-held view that memories are established and consolidated over a set of temporally distinct phases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25485773

  15. The dynamic feedbacks between channel changes in the Colorado River Basin and the rapid invasion of Tamarisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    The resiliency and sensitivity of western rivers to future climate change may be partly anticipated by the response of these rivers to past perturbations in stream flow and sediment supply. Predictions of earlier spring runoff and reduced peak flows of snowmelt-dominated streams mimic hydrologic changes caused by the closure and operation of large dams built within the past century. In the Colorado River Basin, channels have narrowed between 5 and 26% following large dam construction, but the correlation between flow reduction and channel narrowing is confounded by changes in bank strength caused by the rapid spread of the non-native riparian shrub, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). Thus, predictions of future changes in channel form and analysis of past changes related to dams must distinguish between channel narrowing caused by direct changes in flow, and caused by the indirect effects wherein changes in flow regime allow expansion of non-native riparian vegetation that in turn leads to accelerated channel narrowing. Our research evaluates the geomorphic controls on tamarisk colonization, the role of tamarisk in accelerating the narrowing process, and the dynamic feedbacks between channel changes on western rivers and the invasion of non-native riparian species. The transformation of formerly active bars and channel margins into stable inset floodplain surfaces is the dominant process by which these channels have narrowed, as determined by detailed alluvial stratigraphy and dendrogeomorphology. We recreated the 3-dimensional bar surface present at the time of tamarisk establishment by excavating an extensive network of trenches. In doing this, we evaluated the hydraulic environment within which tamarisk established. We also characterized the hydrodynamic roughness of aging tamarisk stands from ground-based LiDAR scans to evaluate the role of tamarisk in the promotion of floodplain formation. Our study sites are representative of the predominant geomorphic organization of

  16. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the alpha1 pore-forming subunit of high voltage-activated calcium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eNeely

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Openings of high-voltage-activated calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, high-voltage-activated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1 associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels.

  17. Structure of a Bacterial Virus DNA-Injection Protein Complex Reveals a Decameric Assembly with a Constricted Molecular Channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Zhao

    Full Text Available The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. The assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. The gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device.

  18. Immunohistochemical investigation of voltage-gated potassium channel-interacting protein 1 in normal rat brain and Pentylenettrazole-induced seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao SU; Ai-Hua LUO; Wen-Dong CONG; Wei-Wen SUN; Wei-Yi DENG; Qi-Hua ZHAO; Zhuo-Hua ZHANG; Wei-Ping LIAO

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the possible role of voltage-gated potassium channel-interacting protein 1 (KChIP1) in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Methods Sprague Dawley female adult rats were treated with pentylenettrazole (PTZ) to develop acute and chronic epilepsy models. The approximate coronal sections of normal and epilepsy rat brain were processed for immunohistochemistry. Double-labeling confocal microscopy was used to determine the coexistence of KChIP1 and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Results KChIP1 was expressed abundantly throughout adult rat brain.KChIP1 is highly co-localize with GABA transmitter in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. In the acute PTZ-induced convulsive rats, the number of KChIP1-postive cells was significantly increased especially in the regions of CA 1 and CA3 (P < 0.05); whereas the chronic PTZ-induced convulsive rats were found no changes. The number of GABA-labeled and co-labeled neurons in the hippocampus appeared to have no significant alteration responding to the epilepsy-genesis treatments. Conclusion KChIP1 might be involved in the PTZ-induced epileptogenesis process as a regulator to neuronal excitability through influencing the properties of potassium channels. KChIP1 is preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons, but its changes did not couple with GABA in the epileptic models.

  19. Causes and effects of morphological changes of the regulated channel of the river Toplica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đeković Vojislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of small torrential watercourses outside the urbanized areas is often based on the so-called field type of regulation. In the selection of this concept, after the regulation works, the new channel is left to the natural process of the morphological formation of the water cross-section taking care not to disturb the general stability of the regulated channel. We present the process of morphological development of the regulated channel of the river Toplica, tributary of the river Kolubara, in the period 1982-2004 i.e. from immediately after the regulation works to the present day.

  20. Lipid Regulation of Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avanzo, N

    2016-01-01

    The lipid landscapes of cellular membranes are complex and dynamic, are tissue dependent, and can change with the age and the development of a variety of diseases. Researchers are now gaining new appreciation for the regulation of ion channel proteins by the membrane lipids in which they are embedded. Thus, as membrane lipids change, for example, during the development of disease, it is likely that the ionic currents that conduct through the ion channels embedded in these membranes will also be altered. This chapter provides an overview of the complex regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic voltage-dependent sodium (Nav) channels by fatty acids, sterols, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cannabinoids. The impact of lipid regulation on channel gating kinetics, voltage-dependence, trafficking, toxin binding, and structure are explored for Nav channels that have been examined in heterologous expression systems, native tissue, and reconstituted into artificial membranes. Putative mechanisms for Nav regulation by lipids are also discussed. PMID:27586290

  1. A clinico-radiological phenotype of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody-mediated disorder presenting with seizures and basal ganglia changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Wright, Sukhvir; Siddiqui, Ata; Pandya, Nikki; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2012-12-01

    In childhood, central nervous system (CNS) presentations associated with antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex include limbic encephalitis, status epilepticus, epileptic encephalopathy, and autistic regression. We report the cases of two individuals (a 6-year-old male and an 11-year-old female) who presented with an acute-onset explosive seizure disorder with positive VGKC complex antibodies and bilateral basal ganglia changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both patients made a complete clinical recovery, without immunotherapy, with resolution of the MRI changes and normalization of the antibody levels. Extended antibody testing, including testing for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein 2, and contactin-2 was negative. This could suggest that the clinico-radiological phenotype in our patients may in fact be associated with a novel autoreactive target(s) within the VGKC complex, as may be the case in other children with VGKC complex-mediated CNS disorders.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF BED TOPOGRAPHY CHANGES INDUCED BY DEEP WATER NAVIGATION CHANNEL PROJECT IN THE YANGTZE ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jing-xin; Liu Hua; He You-sheng; Zhang Fu-ran; Qi Ding-man

    2003-01-01

    A study on the mathematical modeling of the two dimensional,time-dependent variation of bottom topography caused by the spur dikes of the deep water navigation channel project in the Yangtze estuary is reported. The hydrodynamic flows are computed using the DELFT3D which serves as the base of computation of sediment transport and bottom deformation. A model of fine sediment transport is developed and implemented in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system by the finite difference method. Using the observed water depth of the North Channel of Yangtze estuary from 2001 to 2002, the model is calibrated and validated to determine the parameters in the sediment model. The computational results of the changes of the bed in the North Channel induced by the spur dikes coincide with the measured data except the area near the structures.

  3. Exploring topographic methods for monitoring morphological changes in mountain channels of different size and slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theule, Joshua; Bertoldi, Gabriele; Comiti, Francesco; Macconi, Pierpaolo; Mazzorana, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    High resolution digital elevation models (DEM) can easily be obtained using either laser scanning technology or photogrammetry with structure from motion (SFM). The scale, resolution, and accuracy can vary according to how the data is acquired, such as by helicopter, drone, or extendable pole. In the Autonomous Province of Bozen-Bolzano (Northern Italy), we had the opportunity to compare several of these techniques at different scales in mountain streams ranging from low-gradient braided rivers to steep debris flow channels. The main objective is to develop protocols for efficient monitoring of morphologic changes in different parts of the river systems. For SFM methods, we used the software "Photoscan Professional" (Agisoft) to generate densified point clouds. Both artificial and natural targets were used to georeference them. In some cases, targets were not even necessary and point clouds could be aligned with older point clouds by using the iterative closest point algorithm in the freeware "CloudCompare". At the Mareit/Mareta River, a restored braided river, an airborne laser scan survey (2011) was compared to a SFM DEM derived from a helicopter photo survey (2014) carried out (by the Autonomous Province of Bolzano) at approximately 100 m above ground. Photogrammetry point clouds had an alignment error of 1.5 cm and had three times more data coverage than laser scanning. Indeed, the large spacing and clustering of 2011 ALS swaths led to areas of no data when a 10-cm grid is developed. In the Gadria basin, a debris flow monitoring catchment, we used a sediment retention basin to compare debris flow volumes resulting from i) a drone (by the "Mavtech" company) survey at 10 m above ground (with GoPro camera), ii) a 5-m pole-mounted camera (with Canon EOS 700D) and iii) a 3-m pole-mounted camera (with GoPro Hero Silver3+) to a iv) TLS survey. As the drone had limited load capacity (especially at high elevations) we used the lightweight GoPro Hero 3+, but due to the

  4. Real-time visualization of conformational changes within single MloK1 cyclic nucleotide-modulated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangl, Martina; Miyagi, Atsushi; Kowal, Julia; Stahlberg, Henning; Nimigean, Crina M; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-09-20

    Eukaryotic cyclic nucleotide-modulated (CNM) ion channels perform various physiological roles by opening in response to cyclic nucleotides binding to a specialized cyclic nucleotide-binding domain. Despite progress in structure-function analysis, the conformational rearrangements underlying the gating of these channels are still unknown. Here, we image ligand-induced conformational changes in single CNM channels from Mesorhizobium loti (MloK1) in real-time, using high-speed atomic force microscopy. In the presence of cAMP, most channels are in a stable conformation, but a few molecules dynamically switch back and forth (blink) between at least two conformations with different heights. Upon cAMP depletion, more channels start blinking, with blinking heights increasing over time, suggestive of slow, progressive loss of ligands from the tetramer. We propose that during gating, MloK1 transitions from a set of mobile conformations in the absence to a stable conformation in the presence of ligand and that these conformations are central for gating the pore.

  5. Flow Structure and Channel Change in Chute Cutoffs On Meandering Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinger, J. A.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Freely meandering rivers typically exhibit complex, continuously evolving patterns of planform geometry involving elongation of the channel path through lateral migration and shorting of this path through bend cutoffs. Despite the importance of cutoffs in shaping the planform geometry of meandering rivers, the fluvial processes operative immediately after initiation of a cutoff are poorly understood. Two recent chute cutoff events on a single bend on the Wabash River, IL-IN, have provided an unprecedented opportunity to document the morphologic evolution and flow structure of chute cutoffs in a large, unregulated, meandering river. Here, we present results of ADCP measurements of three-dimensional flow velocity and bed topography at these cutoffs and describe a conceptual model for the morphodynamics of chute cutoffs prior to oxbow lake formation. Our results indicate that the flow structure at upstream and downstream ends of cutoff channels, prior to plugging of the entrance and exit of the abandoned bend with sediment, is analogous to flow through diffluence - confluence units. The interaction of this flow structure with an erodible bed and banks can cause rapid widening of the upstream end of the cutoff channel and bar development i) in the main channel where velocities are reduced, and ii) in the separation zone of the cutoff channel. Over time, these patterns of deposition and erosion will lead formation of an oxbow lake and complete capture of the flow by the cutoff channel.

  6. The DEG/ENaC cation channel protein UNC-8 drives activity-dependent synapse removal in remodeling GABAergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Fleming, Tyne W; Petersen, Sarah C; Manning, Laura; Matthewman, Cristina; Gornet, Megan; Beers, Allison; Hori, Sayaka; Mitani, Shohei; Bianchi, Laura; Richmond, Janet; Miller, David M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic programming and neural activity drive synaptic remodeling in developing neural circuits, but the molecular components that link these pathways are poorly understood. Here we show that the C. elegans Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel (DEG/ENaC) protein, UNC-8, is transcriptionally controlled to function as a trigger in an activity-dependent mechanism that removes synapses in remodeling GABAergic neurons. UNC-8 cation channel activity promotes disassembly of presynaptic domains in DD type GABA neurons, but not in VD class GABA neurons where unc-8 expression is blocked by the COUP/TF transcription factor, UNC-55. We propose that the depolarizing effect of UNC-8-dependent sodium import elevates intracellular calcium in a positive feedback loop involving the voltage-gated calcium channel UNC-2 and the calcium-activated phosphatase TAX-6/calcineurin to initiate a caspase-dependent mechanism that disassembles the presynaptic apparatus. Thus, UNC-8 serves as a link between genetic and activity-dependent pathways that function together to promote the elimination of GABA synapses in remodeling neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14599.001 PMID:27403890

  7. Features of Motion of Soliton Transported Bio-energy in Aperiodic α-Helix Protein Molecules with Three Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiao-Feng; LIU Mei-Jie

    2009-01-01

    The structure aperiodicities can influence seriously the features of motion of soliton excited in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels. We study the influence of structure aperiodicities on the features of the soliton in the improved model by numerical simulation and Runge-Kulta method. The results obtained show that the new soliton is very robust against the structure aperiodieities including large disorder in the sequence of mass of the amino acids and fluctuations of spring constant, coupling constant, dipole-dipole interactional constant, ground state energy and chain-chain interaction. However, very strong structure aperiodicities can also destroy the stability of the soliton in the α-helix protein molecules.

  8. Identification of Characteristic Protein Folding Channels in a Coarse-Grained Hydrophobic-Polar Peptide Model

    OpenAIRE

    Schnabel, Stefan; Bachmann, Michael; Janke, Wolfhard

    2007-01-01

    Folding channels and free-energy landscapes of hydrophobic-polar heteropolymers are discussed on the basis of a minimalistic off-lattice coarse-grained model. We investigate how rearrangements of hydrophobic and polar monomers in a heteropolymer sequence lead to completely different folding behaviors. Studying three exemplified sequences with the same content of hydrophobic and polar residues, we can reproduce within this simple model two-state folding, folding through intermediates, as well ...

  9. Protein Translocation by Bacterial Toxin Channels: A Comparison of Diphtheria Toxin and Colicin Ia

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhengyan; Jakes, Karen S.; Samelson-Jones, Ben S.; Lai, Bing; Zhao, Gang; London, Erwin; Finkelstein, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Regions of both colicin Ia and diphtheria toxin N-terminal to the channel-forming domains can be translocated across planar phospholipid bilayer membranes. In this article we show that the translocation pathway of diphtheria toxin allows much larger molecules to be translocated than does the translocation pathway of colicin Ia. In particular, the folded A chain of diphtheria toxin is readily translocated by that toxin but is not translocated by colicin Ia. This difference cannot be attributed...

  10. DNA translocation across protein channels: How does a polymer worm through a hole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, M.

    2001-03-01

    Free energy barriers control the translocation of polymers through narrow channels. Based on an analogy with the classical nucleation and growth process, we have calculated the translocation time and its dependencies on the length, stiffness, and sequence of the polymer, solution conditions, and the strength of the driving electrochemical potential gradient. Our predictions will be compared with experimental results and prospects of reading polymer sequences.

  11. Using poly(ethylene glycol) silane to prevent protein adsorption in microfabricated silicon channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Darrel J.; Brody, James P.; Yager, Paul

    1998-03-01

    Microfluidic devices fabricated in silicon are quickly finding use in many areas of technology. Exploration of new applications of this technology has shown both advantages and disadvantages to extreme miniaturization of chemical assays. While accuracy, efficiency and smaller sample volumes are among the advantages, interactions between the walls of the micro-channels and the fluid or particles it contains are among the disadvantages. Our group is applying this technology to chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agent purification and detection. We present preliminary result towards achieving a long-term antifouling surface in our detection system. A microfluidic device was anisotropically etched in a (100) silicon wafer and attached to a Pyrex glass slip to create an enclosed channel. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane was covalently bonded to the hydroxyls of an oxide layer on the silicon device and the Pyrex cover slip. Fluorescently labeled ovalbumin, a CBW simulant, was in contact with an unmodified and PEG-modified channel. The extent of adsorption was determined using fluorescence microscopy.

  12. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14 P75L mutant. The ttd14 P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14 P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  13. Properties of Soliton-Transported Bio-energy in α-Helix Protein Molecules with Three Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study numerically the propagating properties of soliton-transported bio-energy excited in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels in the cases of the short-time and long-time motions and its features of collision at temperature T = 0 and biological temperature T = 300 K by the dynamic equations in the improved Davydov theory and fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, respectively. From these simulation experiments we see that the new solitons in the improved model can move without dispersion at a constant speed retaining its shape and energy in the cases of motion of both short-time or T = 0 and long time or T = 300 K and can go through each other without scattering in their collisions. In these cases its lifetime is, at least, 120 ps at 300 K, in which the soliton can travel over about 700 amino acid residues. This result is consistent with analytic result obtained by quantum perturbed theory in this model. In the meanwhile, the influences of structure disorder of α-helix protein molecules, including the inhomogeneous distribution of amino acids with different masses and fluctuations of spring constant, dipole-dipole interaction, exciton-phonon coupling constant and diagonal disorder, on the solitons are also studied by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the soliton still is very robust against the structure disorders and thermal perturbation of proteins at biological temperature 300 K. Therefore we can conclude that the new soliton in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels is a possible carrier of bio-energy transport and the improved model is possibly a candidate for the mechanism of this transport.

  14. Characterisation of spatial and temporal changes in pH gradients in microfluidic channels using optically trapped fluorescent sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Norbert; Monaghan, Paul; Sinclair, Gavin; Padgett, Miles; Cooper, Jon

    2006-06-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of micron sized beads, modified with fluorescent dyes, as non-invasive sensors to probe the local changes in pH, within a microfluidic channel. To achieve this, amine modified polystyrene spheres (either 3 microm or 6 microm in diameter) were functionalised with the pH sensitive fluorochrome SNARF-1 to produce point sensors. The modified beads were trapped at defined positions close to a pair of integrated planar gold microelectrodes within the channel, using optical tweezers. Both transient and steady-state electrochemical potentials were applied to the microelectrode pair in order to generate changes in the local pH, associated with electrolysis. The functionalised beads indicated the pH changes in the channel, measured as a change in the fluorescence signal, generated by the immobilised pH sensitive dye. Responses were measured with temporal resolutions of between 1 and 200 ms, whilst the spatial resolution of the pH gradients was limited by the size of the beads to 3 microm.

  15. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Peterson, B C; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that increased growth in channel catfish is associated with expression of the genes that code for uncoupling proteins (UCP) 2 and 3, members of the mitochondrial channel proteins involved in nutrient sensing and metabolism. The specific objective was to contrast the levels of UCP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in fast vs slow growing catfish as well as in fed vs fasted catfish. Two distinct UCP2 transcripts were identified and named UCP2a and UCP2b, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence of catfish UCP2s were highly similar to UCP2 and other UCPs from other fish and mammals (>75%). Expression of UCP2a mRNA was detectable at very low levels in various metabolically active tissues, whereas the expression of UCP2b mRNA was readily detectable in the muscle and heart. In a 21-wk feeding study, fish that grew faster had a greater percent body fat at the end of the study (P muscle was increased (P growth and associated fat accumulation appears to be independent of muscle UCP2b mRNA expression and UCP2b-mediated mechanisms.

  16. Bedform migration in steep channels: from local avalanches to large scale changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettra, F.; Heyman, J.; Ancey, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have emphasized the strength of bedload transport fluctuations in steep streams, especially at low and intermediate transport conditions (relative to the threshold of incipient motion). The origins of these fluctuations, which appear on a wide range of time scales, are still not well understood. In this study, we present the data obtained from a 2D idealized laboratory experiment with the objective of simultaneously recording the channel bed evolution and bedload transport rate at a high temporal resolution. A 3-m long by 8-cm wide transparent flume filled with well-sorted natural gravel (d50=6.5 mm) was used. An efficient technique using accelerometers has been developed to record the arrival time of every particle at the outlet of the flume for long experimental durations (up to a few days). In addition, bed elevation was monitored using cameras filming from the side of the channel, allowing the observation of global aggradation/degradation as well as bedform migration. The experimental parameters were the water discharge, the flume inclination (from 2° to 5°) and the constant feeding rate of sediments. Large-scale bed evolution showed successive aggradation and rapid degradation periods. Indeed, the measured global channel slope, i.e. mean slope over the flume length, fluctuated continuously within a range sometimes wider than 1° (experimental parameters were constant over the entire run). The analysis of these fluctuations provides evidence that steep channels behave like metastable systems, similarly to grain piles. The metastable effects increased for steeper channels and lower transport conditions. In this measurement campaign, we mainly observed upstream-migrating antidunes. For each run, various antidune heights and celerities were measured. On average, the mean antidune migration rate increased with decreasing channel slope and increasing sediment feeding rate. Relatively rare tall and fast-moving antidunes appeared more frequently at high

  17. The Phospholipid-binding Protein SESTD1 Is a Novel Regulator of the Transient Receptor Potential Channels TRPC4 and TRPC5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, Susanne; Bieberstein, Andrea; Arnould, Isabelle; Ihdene, Orhia; Rütten, Hartmut; Strübing, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    TRPC4 and TRPC5 are two closely related members of the mammalian transient receptor potential cation channel family that have been implicated in important physiological functions, such as growth cone guidance and smooth muscle contraction. To further unravel the role of TRPC4 and TRPC5 in these processes in vivo, detailed information about the molecular composition of native channel complexes and their association with cellular signaling networks is needed. We therefore searched a human aortic cDNA library for novel TRPC4-interacting proteins using a modified yeast two-hybrid assay. This screen identified SESTD1, a previously uncharacterized protein containing a lipid-binding SEC14-like domain as well as spectrin-type cytoskeleton interaction domains. SESTD1 was found to associate with TRPC4 and TRPC5 via the channel's calmodulin- and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding domain. In functional studies, we demonstrate that SESTD1 binds several phospholipid species in vitro and is essential for efficient receptor-mediated activation of TRPC5. Notably, phospholipid binding to SESTD1 was Ca2+-dependent. Because TRPC4 and -5 conduct Ca2+, SESTD1-channel signaling may be bidirectional and also couple TRPC activity to lipid signaling through SESTD1. The modulation of TRPC channel function by specific lipid-binding proteins, such as SESTD1, adds another facet to the complex regulation of these channels complementary to the previously described effects of direct channel-phospholipid interaction. PMID:20164195

  18. Microwave irradiation induced changes in protein molecular structures of barley grains: relationship to changes in protein chemical profile, protein subfractions, and digestion in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaogang; Khan, Nazir A; Zhang, Fangyu; Yang, Ling; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-07-16

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate microwave irradiation (MIR) induced changes in crude protein (CP) subfraction profiles, ruminal CP degradation characteristics and intestinal digestibility of rumen undegraded protein (RUP), and protein molecular structures in barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains. Samples from hulled (n = 1) and hulless cultivars (n = 2) of barley, harvested from four replicate plots in two consecutive years, were evaluated. The samples were either kept as raw or irradiated in a microwave for 3 min (MIR3) or 5 min (MIR5). Compared to raw grains, MIR5 decreased the contents of rapidly degradable CP subfraction (from 45.22 to 6.36% CP) and the ruminal degradation rate (from 8.16 to 3.53%/h) of potentially degradable subfraction. As a consequence, the effective ruminal degradability of CP decreased (from 55.70 to 34.08% CP) and RUP supply (from 43.31 to 65.92% CP) to the postruminal tract increased. The MIR decreased the spectral intensities of amide 1, amide II, α-helix, and β-sheet and increased their ratios. The changes in protein spectral intensities were strongly correlated with the changes in CP subfractions and digestive kinetics. These results show that MIR for a short period (5 min) with a lower energy input can improve the nutritive value and utilization of CP in barely grains.

  19. Compositional changes in the channel layer of an amorphous In–Ga–Zn-O thin film transistor after thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the possible reason for the improved device performances of amorphous In–Ga–Zn-O (a-IGZO) thin film transistors after thermal annealing, changes in the elemental concentrations in the a-IGZO channel regions and related device performances due to thermal annealing were observed. It was found that thermal annealing introduces a substantial level of oxygen deficiencies in the channel layer accompanying significantly enhanced device performances. The improved device performances are attributed to the oxygen deficiency which is believed to be averaged over the entire structure to function as shallow donors increasing the carrier concentrations. Such a deduction was supported by the changes in the absorption spectra of the a-IGZO films with various thermal histories. (paper)

  20. Pathological Changes in Internal Organs after Blocking Low Hydraulic Resistance Channels along the Stomach Meridian in Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Ting Zhou; Shu-Yong Jia; Yu-Qing Zhang; Yu-Ying Tian; Guang-Jun Wang; Tao Huang; Li Pang; Yong-Sheng Zhou; Xue-Yan Sun; Wei-Bo Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The correlation between meridians and organs (Zang-fu) is an important aspect of meridian theory. The objective of this paper is to investigate the pathological changes in the organs resulting from blocking low hydraulic resistance channel (LHRC) along the stomach meridian by injecting gel in pigs so as to offer some insight into the correlation between meridians and internal organs. Methods. Four white piglets and twelve black minipigs were divided into four batches and were obser...

  1. Aplysia synapse associated protein (APSAP): identification, characterization, and selective interactions with Shaker-type potassium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Reissner, Kathryn J.; Boyle, Heather D.; Ye, Xiaojing; Carew, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The vertebrate post-synaptic density (PSD) is a region of high molecular complexity in which dynamic protein interactions modulate receptor localization and synaptic function. Members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins represent a major structural and functional component of the vertebrate PSD. In order to investigate the expression and significance of orthologous PSD components associated with the Aplysia sensory neuron-motor neuron synapse, we have cloned...

  2. Cardiac calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) in control and cardiomyopathic human hearts: mRNA and protein contents are differentially regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainte Beuve, C; Allen, P D; Dambrin, G; Rannou, F; Marty, I; Trouvé, P; Bors, V; Pavie, A; Gandgjbakch, I; Charlemagne, D

    1997-04-01

    Abnormal intracellular calcium handling in cardiomyopathic human hearts has been associated with an impaired function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but previous reports on the gene expression of the ryanodine receptors (Ry2) are contradictory. We measured the mRNA levels, the protein levels and the number of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding sites in the left ventricle of non-failing (n = 9) and failing human hearts [idiopathic dilated (IDCM n = 16), ischemic (ICM n = 7) or mixed (MCM n = 8) cardiomyopathies]. Ry2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in IDCM (-30%) and unchanged in MCM and ICM and Ry2 protein levels were similar. In contrast, we observed a two-fold increase in the number of high affinity Ry2 (B(max) = 0.43 +/- 0.11 v 0.22 +/- 0.13 pmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.01) and an unchanged K(d). Furthermore, levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA and protein per g of tissue were similar in failing and non-failing hearts, suggesting that the observed differences in Ry2 are not caused by the increase in fibrosis in failing heart. Therefore, the dissociation between the two-fold increase in the number of high affinity ryanodine receptors observed in all failing hearts and the slightly decreased mRNA level or unchanged protein level suggests that the ryanodine binding properties are affected in failing myocardium and that such modifications rather than a change in gene expression alter the channel activity and could contribute to abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ handling. PMID:9160875

  3. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClafferty Heather

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP

  4. Early post parturient changes in milk acute phase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Funmilola C; Waterston, Mary; Hastie, Peter; Haining, Hayley; Eckersall, P David

    2016-08-01

    The periparturient period is one of the most critical periods in the productive life of a dairy cow, and is the period when dairy cows are most susceptible to developing new intramammary infections (IMI) leading to mastitis. Acute phase proteins (APP) such as haptoglobin (Hp), mammary associated serum amyloid A3 (M-SAA3) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been detected in milk during mastitis but their presence in colostrum and milk in the immediate postpartum period has had limited investigation. The hypothesis was tested that APP are a constituent of colostrum and milk during this period. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to determine each APP's concentration in colostrum and milk collected daily from the first to tenth day following calving in 22 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. Haptoglobin was assessed in individual quarters and composite milk samples while M-SAA3 and CRP concentration were determined in composite milk samples. Change in Hp in relation to the high abundance proteins during the transition from colostrum to milk were evaluated by 1 and 2 dimension electrophoresis and western blot. In 80% of the cows all APPs were detected in colostrum on the first day following parturition at moderately high levels but gradually decreased to minimal values in the milk by the 6th day after calving. The remaining cows (20%) showed different patterns in the daily milk APP concentrations and when an elevated level is detected could reflect the presence of IMI. Demonstration that APP are present in colostrum and milk following parturition but fall to low levels within 4 days means that elevated APP after this time could be biomarkers of post parturient mastitis allowing early intervention to reduce disease on dairy farms. PMID:27600971

  5. MaxiK channel interactome reveals its interaction with GABA transporter 3 and heat shock protein 60 in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H; Li, M; Hall, L; Chen, S; Sukur, S; Lu, R; Caputo, A; Meredith, A L; Stefani, E; Toro, L

    2016-03-11

    Large conductance voltage and calcium-activated potassium (MaxiK) channels are activated by membrane depolarization and elevated cytosolic Ca(2+). In the brain, they localize to neurons and astrocytes, where they play roles such as resetting the membrane potential during an action potential, neurotransmitter release, and neurovascular coupling. MaxiK channels are known to associate with several modulatory proteins and accessory subunits, and each of these interactions can have distinct physiological consequences. To uncover new players in MaxiK channel brain physiology, we applied a directed proteomic approach and obtained MaxiK channel pore-forming α subunit brain interactome using specific antibodies. Controls included immunoprecipitations with rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and with anti-MaxiK antibodies in wild type and MaxiK channel knockout mice (Kcnma1(-/-)), respectively. We have found known and unreported interactive partners that localize to the plasma membrane, extracellular space, cytosol and intracellular organelles including mitochondria, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Localization of MaxiK channel to mitochondria was further confirmed using purified brain mitochondria colabeled with MitoTracker. Independent proof of MaxiK channel interaction with previously unidentified partners is given for GABA transporter 3 (GAT3) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60). In human embryonic kidney 293 cells containing SV40 T-antigen (HEK293T) cells, both GAT3 and HSP60 coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with MaxiK channel; colabeling was observed mainly at the cell periphery with GAT3 and intracellularly with HSP60 with protein proximity indices of ∼ 0.6 and ∼ 0.4, respectively. In rat primary hippocampal neurons, colocalization index was identical for GAT3 (∼ 0.6) and slightly higher for HSP60 (∼ 0.5) association with MaxiK channel. The results of this study provide a complete interactome of MaxiK channel the mouse brain, further establish

  6. MaxiK channel interactome reveals its interaction with GABA transporter 3 and heat shock protein 60 in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H; Li, M; Hall, L; Chen, S; Sukur, S; Lu, R; Caputo, A; Meredith, A L; Stefani, E; Toro, L

    2016-03-11

    Large conductance voltage and calcium-activated potassium (MaxiK) channels are activated by membrane depolarization and elevated cytosolic Ca(2+). In the brain, they localize to neurons and astrocytes, where they play roles such as resetting the membrane potential during an action potential, neurotransmitter release, and neurovascular coupling. MaxiK channels are known to associate with several modulatory proteins and accessory subunits, and each of these interactions can have distinct physiological consequences. To uncover new players in MaxiK channel brain physiology, we applied a directed proteomic approach and obtained MaxiK channel pore-forming α subunit brain interactome using specific antibodies. Controls included immunoprecipitations with rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and with anti-MaxiK antibodies in wild type and MaxiK channel knockout mice (Kcnma1(-/-)), respectively. We have found known and unreported interactive partners that localize to the plasma membrane, extracellular space, cytosol and intracellular organelles including mitochondria, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Localization of MaxiK channel to mitochondria was further confirmed using purified brain mitochondria colabeled with MitoTracker. Independent proof of MaxiK channel interaction with previously unidentified partners is given for GABA transporter 3 (GAT3) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60). In human embryonic kidney 293 cells containing SV40 T-antigen (HEK293T) cells, both GAT3 and HSP60 coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with MaxiK channel; colabeling was observed mainly at the cell periphery with GAT3 and intracellularly with HSP60 with protein proximity indices of ∼ 0.6 and ∼ 0.4, respectively. In rat primary hippocampal neurons, colocalization index was identical for GAT3 (∼ 0.6) and slightly higher for HSP60 (∼ 0.5) association with MaxiK channel. The results of this study provide a complete interactome of MaxiK channel the mouse brain, further establish

  7. Effects of changing channel morphology on vegetation, groundwater, and soil moisture regimes in groundwater dependent ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loheide, S. P.; Booth, E. G.

    2008-12-01

    Channel incision and excessive floodplain sedimentation are major causes of riparian degradation across the country. Though the causes and consequences of these processes vary significantly, the resulting morphology in both cases is steep streambanks and a stream that is less connected with the floodplain. A case study from semi-arid, wet meadows with snow-melt driven hydrology in the Sierra Nevada of CA will be compared with one from a riparian wet prairie in the humid environment of the Driftless Area of southern Wisconsin. In the mountain meadows, 80 years of logging and overgrazing led to more flashy runoff and downcutting of the stream. This led to drainage of groundwater from the meadow and a shift in vegetation composition from sedges and rushes to dryland grasses and sagebrush in this groundwater dependent ecosystem. In the Driftless Area of WI, the introduction of agricultural practices by European settlers in the 1830s resulted in severe erosion from the cropped areas in the uplands. This sediment was transported to the stream valleys where it was deposited on the floodplain, raising this surface relative to the streambed. As a result, the water table is at a greater depth from this elevated land surface. In this ecosystem, the vegetation has shifted from wet prairie and sedge meadow communities to grasses and lowland forests dominated by box elder trees. The geomorphic result at both sites was a channel bounded by tall banks with reduced hydrologic connectivity with the floodplain. In both cases, the slope of the water table towards the stream is greater than the topographic slope across the riparian zone and the greatest depth to the water table is found adjacent to the channel. Transects exhibit a decreasing trend in soil moisture with increasing variability toward the channel. Remotely sensed imagery shows trends of drier vegetation communities adjacent to channels and wetter vegetation communities toward the margin of the riparian zones. Coupled

  8. Chemical Changes in Proteins Produced by Thermal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutson, T. R.; Orcutt, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses effects of thermal processing on proteins, focusing on (1) the Maillard reaction; (2) heat denaturation of proteins; (3) aggregation, precipitation, gelation, and degradation; and (4) other thermally induced protein reactions. Also discusses effects of thermal processing on muscle foods, egg proteins, fruits and vegetables, and cereal…

  9. Changes of protein profile during the brewing process

    OpenAIRE

    Benkovská, D. (Dagmar); Flodrová, D. (Dana); Bobálová, J. (Janette)

    2012-01-01

    Our work was focused on the protein identification in individual stages of brewing process. The greatest attention was paid to the proteins that resist the harsh conditions applied during brewing and therefore may influence various beer properties. These proteins (nsLTPs, protein Z and group of protease/alpha-amylase inhibitors) belong to the group of PRs.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of peptide conformations. These findings are consistent with experimental results, and give a molecular level interpretation for the reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to some extent upon graphene exposure. Meanwhile, this study provides some significant insights into the detailed mechanism of graphene-induced protein conformation transition.

  11. Training-induced changes in membrane transport proteins of human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, C.

    2006-01-01

    Training improves human physical performance by inducing structural and cardiovascular changes, metabolic changes, and changes in the density of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the training-induced changes in proteins involved in sarcolemmal membrane transport. It is concluded...... that the same type of training affects many transport proteins, suggesting that all transport proteins increase with training, and that both sprint and endurance training in humans increase the density of most membrane transport proteins. There seems to be an upper limit for these changes: intense...... training for 6-8 weeks substantially increases the density of membrane proteins, whereas years of training (as performed by athletes) have no further effect. Studies suggest that training-induced changes at the protein level are important functionally. The underlying factors responsible for these changes...

  12. A Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Interactswith and Activates A Calcium Channel toRequlate Pollen Tube Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Calcium, as a ubiquitous second messenger, plays essential roles in tip-growing cells, such as animal neu-rons, plant pollen tubes, and root hairs. However, little is known concerning the regulatory mechanisms that code anddecode Ca2+ signals in plants. The evidence presented here indicates that a calcium-dependent protein kinase, CPK32,controls polar growth of pollen tubes. Overexpression of CPK32 disrupted the polar growth along with excessive Ca2+accumulation in the tip. A search of downstream effector molecules for CPK32 led to identification of a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, CNGC18, as an interacting partner for CPK32. Co-expression of CPK32 and CNGC18 resulted in activationof CNGC18 in Xenopus oocytes where expression of CNGC18 alone did not exhibit significant calcium channel activity.Overexpression of CNGC18 produced a growth arrest phenotype coupled with accumulation of calcium in the tip, simi-lar to that induced by CPK32 overexpression. Co-expression of CPK32 and CNGC18 had a synergistic effect leading tomore severe depolarization of pollen tube growth. These results provide a potential feed-forward mechanism in whichcalcium-activated CPK32 activates CNGC18, further promoting calcium entry during the elevation phase of Ca2+ oscilla-tions in the polar growth of pollen tubes.

  13. Lithic Resource Control and Economic Change in the Santa Barbara Channel Region

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Jeanne E

    1990-01-01

    The territory occupied by the Chumash and their prehistoric predecessors encompassed the northern Channel Islands and a large mainland area extending from modern San Luis Obispo to Malibu and inland to the western margin of the San Joaquin Valley. The region is characterized by significant physiographic, biotic, and geological diversity. Each of these dimensions of variability has implications for the forms of human adaptation that developed during the course of several millennia of prehistor...

  14. Detecting changes in respiratory patterns in high frequency chest compression therapy by single-channel blind source separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Parhi, Keshab K; Warwick, Warren J

    2009-01-01

    High Frequency Chest Compression (HFCC) is used as a method to remove the mucus in the airway for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. As the characteristics of the tracheal sound reflect the conditions of airways, in this paper, we propose a novel method to evaluate the respiratory patterns in HFCC therapy by using single channel tracheal sounds only. The difficulty of analyzing tracheal sounds lies in that it has a wider frequency band than the air flow at the mouth, and is always corrupted by other biomedical signals and noises. During HFCC therapy, the tracheal sound is also affected by the HFCC machine noise. For this reason, it is difficult to extract respiratory patterns and other related features by traditional filtering techniques. In this paper, we demonstrate use of single-channel independent component analysis to extract respiratory patterns from the tracheal sounds before, during and after HFCC therapy, and use basis features in the tracheal sound to detect the change in respiratory patterns.

  15. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Takashi; Masseck, Olivia A; Mark, Melanie D; Herlitze, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the central nervous system and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing, and reproductive success. Therefore, serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23734105

  16. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  17. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-07-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design.

  18. Expression of VAMP-2-like protein in kidney collecting duct intracellular vesicles. Colocalization with Aquaporin-2 water channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S; Marples, D; Birn, H; Mohtashami, M; Dalby, N O; Trimble, M; Knepper, M

    1995-01-01

    Body water balance is controlled by vasopressin, which regulates Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels in kidney collecting duct cells by vesicular trafficking between intracellular vesicles and the plasma membrane. To examine the molecular apparatus involved in vesicle trafficking and vasopressin regulation of AQP2 in collecting duct cells, we tested if targeting proteins expressed in the synaptic vesicles, namely vesicle-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (VAMP1 and 2), are expressed in kidney collecting duct. Immunoblotting revealed specific labeling of VAMP2 (18-kD band) but not VAMP1 in membrane fractions prepared from kidney inner medulla. Controls using preadsorbed antibody or preimmune serum were negative. Bands of identical molecular size were detected in immunoblots of brain membrane vesicles and purified synaptic vesicles. VAMP2 in kidney membranes was cleaved by tetanus toxin, revealing a tetanus toxin-sensitive VAMP homologue. Similarly, tetanus toxin cleaved VAMP2 in synaptic vesicles. In kidney inner medulla, VAMP2 was predominantly expressed in the membrane fraction enriched for intracellular vesicles, with little or no VAMP2 in the plasma membrane enriched fraction. This was confirmed by immunocytochemistry using semithin cryosections, which showed mainly vesicular labeling in collecting duct principal cells, with no labeling of intercalated cells. VAMP2 immunolabeling colocalized with AQP2 labeling in intracellular vesicles, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy after double immunolabeling of isolated vesicles. Quantitative analysis of 1,310 vesicles revealed a highly significant association of both AQP2 and VAMP2 in the same vesicles (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the presence of AQP2 in vesicles immunoisolated with anti-VAMP2 antibodies was confirmed by immunoblotting. In conclusion, VAMP2, a component of the neuronal SNARE complex, is expressed in vesicles carrying AQP2, suggesting a role in vasopressin-regulated vesicle trafficking of AQP2

  19. IgG from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients Increases Current Through P-Type Calcium Channels in Mammalian Cerebellar Purkinje Cells and in Isolated Channel Protein in Lipid Bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinas, R.; Sugimori, M.; Cherksey, B. D.; Smith, R. Glenn; Delbono, O.; Stefani, E.; Appel, S.

    1993-12-01

    The effect of the IgG from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients was tested on the voltage-dependent barium currents (IBa) in mammalian dissociated Purkinje cells and in isolated P-type calcium channels in lipid bilayers. Whole cell clamp of Purkinje cells demonstrates that ALS IgG increases the amplitude of IBa without modifying their voltage kinetics. This increased IBa could be blocked by a purified nonpeptide toxin from Agelenopsis aperta venom (purified funnel-web spider toxin) or by a synthetic polyamine analog (synthetic funnel-web spider toxin) and by a peptide toxin from the same spider venom, ω-Aga-IVA. Similar results were obtained on single-channel recordings from purified P channel protein. The addition of ALS IgG increased single-channel IBa open time without affecting slope conductance. The results described above were not seen with normal human IgG nor with boiled ALS IgG. It is concluded that ALS IgG enhances inward current through P-type calcium channels. Since P-type Ca2+ channels are present in motoneuron axon terminals, we propose that the enhanced calcium current triggered by ALS IgG may contribute to neuronal damage in ALS.

  20. Template-assembled melittin: structural and functional characterization of a designed, synthetic channel-forming protein.

    OpenAIRE

    PAWLAK, M.; Meseth, U; Dhanapal, B.; Mutter, M.; Vogel, H.

    1994-01-01

    Template-assembled proteins (TASPs) comprising 4 peptide blocks, each of either the natural melittin sequence (melittin-TASP) or of a truncated melittin sequence (amino acids 6-26, melittin6-26-TASP), C-terminally linked to a (linear or cyclic) 10-amino acid template were synthesized and characterized, structurally by CD, by fluorescence spectroscopy, and by monolayer experiments, and functionally, by electrical conductance measurements on planar bilayers and release experiments on dye-loaded...

  1. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hassan, Mubashir; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18). Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor-ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. PMID:24899801

  2. Opening the Shaker K+ channel with hanatoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Milescu, Mirela; Lee, Hwa C.; Bae, Chan Hyung; Kim, Jae Il; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-activated ion channels open and close in response to changes in membrane voltage, a property that is fundamental to the roles of these channels in electrical signaling. Protein toxins from venomous organisms commonly target the S1–S4 voltage-sensing domains in these channels and modify their gating properties. Studies on the interaction of hanatoxin with the Kv2.1 channel show that this tarantula toxin interacts with the S1–S4 domain and inhibits opening by stabilizing a closed state....

  3. Change of Water—Soluble—Protein,Urea—Soluble—Protein and Membrane Intrinsic Protein in Human Senile Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuirenZhao; JianhuaYang

    1995-01-01

    Purpose:To analyze the change of water-soluble-protein(WSP),urea-soluble-protein(USP)and membrane intrinsic protein(MIP)in human senile catarct.Methods:The water-soluble-fractions(WSF)were prepared basically according to the method of Kibbelear,et al.But in this study,5mmol/LB-mercaptoethanol was added to the buffer solution.The urea-soluble-fractions(USF)were pre-pared basically according to the method of Kibbelear,et al.Lens fiber cell mem-branes were purified basically according to the method of Russell,et al.SDS-PAGE were performed according to the procedure of Laemmili,et al.using re-solving gel13%and3%stacking gel.Results:The WSPwas fractionated intoHM+α-,β1-3-andγ-crystallin compo-nents.In nuclear cataractous lenses HM+α-and B-crystallin increase,while r-crystallin decrease.The USP from clear lenses contains mainlyαβchains of22KD,whereas in cataractous lenses,especially in nuclear cataractous lenses,the relative amount of the 28-and23KDpolypeptide(the components of β-crys-tallin)increased markedly.Lens fiber cell MIP,clear lens and cataract lens con-tained the main polypeptide of 27KD(MIP)and23KD(MP23).Conclusion:The water-insolube protein,whether in quantity or in quality,plays an important role in cataract formation.Eye Science 1995,11:124-127.

  4. Attribution of atmospheric sulfur dioxide over the English Channel to dimethyl sulfide and changing ship emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2) was measured continuously from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) near Plymouth, United Kingdom, between May 2014 and November 2015. This coastal site is exposed to marine air across a wide wind sector. The predominant southwesterly winds carry relatively clean background Atlantic air. In contrast, air from the southeast is heavily influenced by exhaust plumes from ships in the English Channel as well as near Plymouth Sound. A new International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulation came into force in January 2015 to reduce the maximum allowed sulfur content in ships' fuel 10-fold in sulfur emission control areas such as the English Channel. Our observations suggest a 3-fold reduction in ship-emitted SO2 from 2014 to 2015. Apparent fuel sulfur content calculated from coincidental SO2 and carbon dioxide (CO2) peaks from local ship plumes show a high level of compliance to the IMO regulation (> 95 %) in both years (˜ 70 % of ships in 2014 were already emitting at levels below the 2015 cap). Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is an important source of atmospheric SO2 even in this semi-polluted region. The relative contribution of DMS oxidation to the SO2 burden over the English Channel increased from about one-third in 2014 to about one-half in 2015 due to the reduction in ship sulfur emissions. Our diel analysis suggests that SO2 is removed from the marine atmospheric boundary layer in about half a day, with dry deposition to the ocean accounting for a quarter of the total loss.

  5. The chloride channel inhibitor NS3736 [corrected] prevents bone resorption in ovariectomized rats without changing bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Sophie; Henriksen, Kim; Sveigaard, Christina;

    2004-01-01

    Chloride channel activity is essential for osteoclast function. Consequently, inhibition of the osteoclastic chloride channel should prevent bone resorption. Accordingly, we tested a chloride channel inhibitor on bone turnover and found that it inhibits bone resorption without affecting bone form...

  6. Probing structural changes of proteins incorporated into water-in-oil emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Lene; van de Weert, Marco; Vermehren, Charlotte;

    2004-01-01

    (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) as model proteins. FTIR shows that the overall secondary structure of the proteins changes to some extent, 12% for BSA and 9% for HSA, when these are incorporated into the emulsion. There was no evidence of changes in the distribution of secondary structural elements...... indicated that the domains in the proteins change because the shape of the transition peaks changes, when the proteins were incorporated into the emulsions. The total enthalpy decreases for BSA and HSA when these are incorporated into the emulsion, and some changes to the transition temperatures...

  7. Is the internet delivery channel changing banks' performance? The case of Spanish banks

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Hernando; María J. Nieto

    2006-01-01

    In spite of the conspicuous use of the Internet as a delivery channel, there is a relative dearth of empirical studies that provide a quantitative analysis of the impact of the Internet on banks´ financial performance. This paper attempts to fill this gap by identifying and estimating the impact of the adoption of a transactional web site on financial performance using a sample of 72 commercial banks operating in Spain over the period 1994-2002. The impact on banks´ performance of transaction...

  8. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal SA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mubashir Hassan, Sajid Rashid National Center for Bioinformatics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18. Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. Keywords: migraine, bioinformatics, modeling and docking, KCNK18, TRESK, virtual screening, pharmacoinformatics

  9. Changes in high-flow frequency and channel geometry of the Neosho River downstream from John Redmond Dam, southeastern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studley, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The streamflow regimen of the Neosho River downstream from John Redmond Dam in southeastern Kansas has changed significantly since the dam's completion in 1964. The controlled releases from the dam have decreased the magnitudes of peak discharges and increased the magnitudes of low discharges. The trends in river stage for selected discharges also have changed at two of the streamflow-gaging stations--those closest to the dam. There is a significant downward trend in the stages associated with the median annual peak discharges, but no significant trend in the stages associated with the annual mean discharges, which indicates that the river channel is increasing in width but not depth or that the hflow velocity has increased at the streamflow-gaging stations. Because there were not significant trends present in precipitation, mean annual discharge, or annual peak discharge, the changes are attributed to John Redmond Dam.

  10. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  11. Three-dimensional flow of liquid crystalline polymers through rectangular channels with abrupt change in geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Yamasaki, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yusuke; Mori, Noriyasu

    2006-07-01

    Three-dimensional flows of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) in a rectangular 3 to 1 abrupt contraction channel and a rectangular 1 to 3 abrupt expansion channel are numerically analyzed to investigate the molecular orientation behavior of LCPs in complex flows. A modified Doi model is used as a constitutive equation and MAC (marker and cell)-based finite difference method is employed for the numerical technique for solving the basic equations. In the contraction flow, most molecules are aligned in the flow direction near the contraction owing to elongational flow except for a vortex region. Just downstream of the contraction, the velocity overshoot occurs owing to the molecular orientation near the contraction. In the expansion flow, on the other hand, molecules near the mid-plane are aligned perpendicular to the flow direction just downstream of the expansion. This alignment is related to a concave velocity profile appeared in this region. Moreover, the decelerating flow downstream of the expansion causes a three-dimensional structure of directors called a twist structure.

  12. Calcium-dependent modulation and plasma membrane targeting of the AKT2 potassium channel by the CBL4/ CIPK6 calcium sensor/protein kinase complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrin Held; Jean-Baptiste Thibaud; J(o)rg Kudla; Francois Pascaud; Christian Eckert; Pawel Gajdanowicz; Kenji Hashimoto; Claire Corratgé-Faillie; Jan Niklas Offenborn; Beno(i)t Lacombe; Ingo Dreyer

    2011-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channel function is fundamental to many physiological processes. However, components and mechanisms regulating the activity of plant K+ channels remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the calcium (Ca2+)sensor CBL4 together with the interacting protein kinase CIPK6 modulates the activity and plasma membrane (PM)targeting of the K+ channel AKT2 from Arabidopsis thaliana by mediating translocation of AKT2 to the PM in plant cells and enhancing AKT2 activity in oocytes. Accordingly, akt2, cbl4 and cipk6 mutants share similar developmental and delayed flowering pheuotypes. Moreover, the isolated regulatory C-terminal domain of CIPK6 is sufficient for mediating CBL4- and Ca2+-dependent channel translocation from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane to the PM by a novel targeting pathway that is dependent on dual lipid modifications of CBL4 by myristoylation and palmitoylation. Thus, we describe a critical mechanism of ion-channel regulation where a Ca2+ sensor modulates K+ channel activity by promoting a kinase interaction-dependent but phosphorylation-independent translocation of the channel to the PM.

  13. Patients with polymyositis show changes in muscle protein charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E M; Jacobsen, Søren; Rasmussen, L;

    1989-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) appears with indolent proximal muscle weakness and is an inflammatory disease with breakdown of muscle cells. In our study the protein charge concentrations of the contractile proteins in the A and I bands were determined, applying a microelectrode technique. Patients with PM show...... a lower protein charge concentration than healthy control subjects which may be caused by the breakdown and removal of the proteins in the contractile filaments. A tool to judge the state of the disease as well as an aid in diagnosis may have been found in this method....

  14. Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is not a transcriptional regulator of cardiac electrical remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Sine V; Tuomainen, Tomi; Borup, Rehannah; Tavi, Pasi; Antoons, Gudrun; Thomsen, Morten B

    2016-01-01

    The heart-failure relevant Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) augments CaV1.2 and KV4.3. KChIP3 represses CaV1.2 transcription in cardiomyocytes via interaction with regulatory DNA elements. Hence, we tested nuclear presence of KChIP2 and if KChIP2 translocates into the nucleus in a Ca(2+) dependent manner. Cardiac biopsies from human heart-failure patients and healthy donor controls showed that nuclear KChIP2 abundance was significantly increased in heart failure; however, this was secondary to a large variation of total KChIP2 content. Administration of ouabain did not increase KChIP2 content in nuclear protein fractions in anesthetized mice. KChIP2 was expressed in cell lines, and Ca(2+) ionophores were applied in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The cell lines had KChIP2-immunoreactive protein in the nucleus in the absence of treatments to modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Neither increasing nor decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations caused translocation of KChIP2. Microarray analysis did not identify relief of transcriptional repression in murine KChIP2(-/-) heart samples. We conclude that although there is a baseline presence of KChIP2 in the nucleus both in vivo and in vitro, KChIP2 does not directly regulate transcriptional activity. Moreover, the nuclear transport of KChIP2 is not dependent on Ca(2+). Thus, KChIP2 does not function as a conventional transcription factor in the heart. PMID:27349185

  15. Regulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in insulinoma cells: Activation by somatostatin and protein kinase C and the role of cAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actions of somatostatin and of the phorbol ester 4β-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells by electrophysiological and 86Rb+ flux techniques. Both PMA and somatostatin hyperpolarize insulinoma cells by activating ATP-sensitive K+ channels. The presence of intracellular GTP is required for the somatostatin effects. PMA- and somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization and channel activity are inhibited by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide. Glibenclamide-sensitive 86Rb+ efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by somatostatin in a dose-dependent manner (half maximal effect at 0.7 nM) and abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Mutual roles of a GTP-binding protein, of protein kinase C, and of cAMP in the regulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels are discussed

  16. Controlling for gene expression changes in transcription factor protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Charles A S; Lee, Zachary T; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L; Seidel, Chris W; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein-protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions.

  17. cGMP stimulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels co-expressed with cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II but not type Ibeta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); W.C. Poller; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A. Smolenski; S. Schneider-Rasp; A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); B.J. Scholte (Bob); T. Jarchau; U. Walter

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn order to investigate the involvement of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) type II in cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion, cGMP-dependent activation and phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels was ana

  18. Isotype-specific activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-chloride channels by cGMP-dependent protein kinase II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. French (Pim); J. Bijman (Jan); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); B.J. Scholte (Bob); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); A.C. Nairn; H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractType II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) isolated from pig intestinal brush borders and type I alpha cGK (cGKI) purified from bovine lung were compared for their ability to activate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-Cl- channel in excis

  19. Effect of the I(to) activator NS5806 on cloned K(V)4 channels depends on the accessory protein KChIP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Jespersen, Thomas; Schmitt, Nicole;

    2010-01-01

    The compound NS5806 increases the transient outward current (I(to)) in canine ventricular cardiomyocytes and slows current decay. In human and canine ventricle, I(to) is thought to be mediated by K(V)4.3 and various ancillary proteins, yet, the exact subunit composition of I(to) channels is still...

  20. Effects of fasting on IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-binding protein mRNA concentrations in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of fasting on IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) in channel catfish were examined. Fed control fish (Fed) were compared to fish that had been fasted for 30 days followed by 15 days of additional feeding (Restricted). Sequence alignment and similarity to orthologous protei...

  1. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein, Part I: Affordances and Limitations of Ribbon Diagrams, Vines, and Hydrophobic/Polar Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This project focuses on students' understanding of three external representations of the potassium ion channel protein. This is part I of a two-part study, which focuses on the affordances and…

  2. Effect of Stepwise Pressure Change on Porosity Evolution during Directional Solidification in Small Cylindrical Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R.N.; Lee, C.P.; Cox, M.C.; Blandford, B.T.; Anilkumar, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Controlled directional solidification experiments were performed in capillary channels, using nitrogen-saturated succinonitrile, to examine the effect of an in-situ stepwise processing pressure increase on an isolated pore evolution. Two experiments were performed using different processing pressure input profiles. The results indicate that a processing pressure increase has a transient effect on pore growth geometry characterized by an initial phase of decreasing pore diameter, followed by a recovery phase of increasing pore diameter. The experimental results also show that processing pressure can be used as a control parameter to either increase or terminate porosity formation. A theoretical model is introduced which indicates that the pore formation process is limited by the diffusion of solute-gas through the melt, and that the observed response toa pressure increase is attributed to the re-equilibration of solute concentration in the melt associated with the increased melt pressure.

  3. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  4. The Earliest Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; Wei, C.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying protocells with ions required assistance from channels spanning their membrane walls. The earliest channels were most likely short proteins that formed transmembrane helical bundles surrounding a water-filled pore. These simple aggregates were capable of transporting ions with efficiencies comparable to those of complex, contemporary ion channels. Channels with wide pores exhibited little ion selectivity but also imposed only modest constraints on amino acid sequences of channel-forming proteins. Channels with small pores could have been selective but also might have required a more precisely defined sequence of amino acids. In contrast to modern channels, their protocellular ancestors had only limited capabilities to regulate ion flux. It is postulated that subsequent evolution of ion channels progressed primarily to acquire precise regulation, and not high efficiency or selectivity. It is further proposed that channels and the surrounding membranes co-evolved.

  5. Crowded, cell-like environment induces shape changes in aspherical protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    How the crowded environment inside cells affects the structures of proteins with aspherical shapes is a vital question because many proteins and protein--protein complexes in vivo adopt anisotropic shapes. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a football-shaped protein (i.e. Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) under crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein-folding dynamics as well as overall protein shape. In crowded milieus, distinct conformational changes in VlsE are accompanied by secondary structure alterations that lead to exposure of a hidden antigenic region. Our work demonstrates the malleability of ``native'' proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo.

  6. Mapping spatial patterns of stream power and channel change along a gravel-bed river in northern Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Devin M.; Legleiter, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    Stream power represents the rate of energy expenditure along a river and can be calculated using topographic data acquired via remote sensing or field surveys. This study sought to quantitatively relate temporal changes in the form of Soda Butte Creek, a gravel-bed river in northeastern Yellowstone National Park, to stream power gradients along an 8-km reach. Aerial photographs from 1994 to 2012 and ground-based surveys were used to develop a locational probability map and morphologic sediment budget to assess lateral channel mobility and changes in net sediment flux. A drainage area-to-discharge relationship and DEM developed from LiDAR data were used to obtain the discharge and slope values needed to calculate stream power. Local and lagged relationships between mean stream power gradient at median peak discharge and volumes of erosion, deposition, and net sediment flux were quantified via spatial cross-correlation analyses. Similarly, autocorrelations of locational probabilities and sediment fluxes were used to examine spatial patterns of sediment sources and sinks. Energy expended above critical stream power was calculated for each time period to relate the magnitude and duration of peak flows to the total volumetric change in each time increment. Collectively, we refer to these methods as the stream power gradient (SPG) framework. The results of this study were compromised by methodological limitations of the SPG framework and revealed some complications likely to arise when applying this framework to small, wandering, gravel-bed rivers. Correlations between stream power gradients and sediment flux were generally weak, highlighting the inability of relatively simple statistical approaches to link sub-budget cell-scale sediment dynamics to larger-scale driving forces such as stream power gradients. Improving the moderate spatial resolution techniques used in this study and acquiring very-high resolution data from recently developed methods in fluvial remote

  7. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  8. Effect of low temperature on the transmembrane transport of potassium ion channel protein%温度变化对钾离子跨膜通道蛋白传输能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李代禧; 刘宝林; 乔勇进; 张燕; 翟振

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of temperature changing on trans membrane transport in cells, the transport capability and mechanism of a potassium (K+) ion transmembrane channel protein was researched by means of molecular dynamic simulation and umbrella sampling with Gromacs software package and Gromo96 (53a6) forcefield at 300 K and 275 K, respectively. The potentials of mean force (PMF) during a potassium ion going through the potassium ion channel protein indicated that the decrease of temperature obviously affect the transport capability of a potassium ion channel protein. For example, the process of the K+ ion going through the potassium ion channel protein is completely spontaneous at 300 K on thermodynamics according to the results of PMF free energies. However, the PMF free energy of the cavum for trapping ions increases when the temperature decreases to 275 K, and therefore the capability to trap ions decreases. And the PMF free energy of the latter part of transport channel obviously increases. Thus the PMF free energy of exit became larger than those of entrance at 275 K. Finally, the process of the K+ ion going through the potassium ion channel protein became non-spontaneous at 275 K. Namely, the decrease of temperature from 300 K to 275 K reversed the transport direction of potassium ion channel protein, in summary, the transport capability of transmembrane channel protein would decrease, even vanish at low temperature. Those results were also expected to give a significant insight into the mechanism of chilling damage on fruits and vegetables. That is, the decrease or vanish of the transport capability of biomembrane is the mainly reason that results to the chilling damage at low temperature.%为了研究温度变化对生物膜跨膜传输能力的影响,本文以钾离子跨膜通道蛋白为研究对象,利用Gromacs分子生物学模拟软件包和Gromos96 (53a6)分子力场,通过分子动力模拟技术和伞

  9. Heat shock induced change in protein ubiquitination in Chlamydomonas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubiquitin was purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its antibody was produced. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody cross-reacted with ubiquitins from a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a brown alga Laminaria angustata and a red alga Porphyridium cruentum but not with ubiquitin from a blue-green alga Synechococcus sp. In Chlamydomonas, the antibody also reacted with some ubiquitinated proteins including 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides. The isoelectric points of Chlamydomonas ubiquitin and the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins were 8.0, 8.9 and 10.3, respectively. The ubiquitinated proteins, including the 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides were detected after in vitro ATP-dependent ubiquitination of Chlamydomonas cell extract with l25I-labeled bovine ubiquitin. Heat treatment of Chlamydomonas cells (>40°C) caused drastic increase of ubiquitinated proteins with high mol wt (>60kDa), and coordinated redistribution or decrease of other ubiquitinated proteins and free ubiquitin. Quantitative analysis revealed that the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins showed different responses against heat stress, i.e. the former being more sensitive than the latter. (author)

  10. Environmental Pressure May Change the Composition Protein Disorder in Prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Vicedo

    Full Text Available Many prokaryotic organisms have adapted to incredibly extreme habitats. The genomes of such extremophiles differ from their non-extremophile relatives. For example, some proteins in thermophiles sustain high temperatures by being more compact than homologs in non-extremophiles. Conversely, some proteins have increased volumes to compensate for freezing effects in psychrophiles that survive in the cold. Here, we revealed that some differences in organisms surviving in extreme habitats correlate with a simple single feature, namely the fraction of proteins predicted to have long disordered regions. We predicted disorder with different methods for 46 completely sequenced organisms from diverse habitats and found a correlation between protein disorder and the extremity of the environment. More specifically, the overall percentage of proteins with long disordered regions tended to be more similar between organisms of similar habitats than between organisms of similar taxonomy. For example, predictions tended to detect substantially more proteins with long disordered regions in prokaryotic halophiles (survive high salt than in their taxonomic neighbors. Another peculiar environment is that of high radiation survived, e.g. by Deinococcus radiodurans. The relatively high fraction of disorder predicted in this extremophile might provide a shield against mutations. Although our analysis fails to establish causation, the observed correlation between such a simplistic, coarse-grained, microscopic molecular feature (disorder content and a macroscopic variable (habitat remains stunning.

  11. Low pH-induced conformational changes in 33 kD protein of photosystem Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Jun; TAN Cuiyan; YU Yong; RUAN Kangcheng; XU Chunhe

    2004-01-01

    33 kD protein, located on the lumen side of thylakoid membranes, is one of three extrinsic proteins of photosystemⅡ(PSⅡ). Previous study showed that NBS modification of W241, the only tryptophan in 33 kD protein, is helpful for understanding the function of W241 in maintaining functional conformation of 33 kD protein. In this paper, studies of both circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra showed that upon decreasing pH from 6.2 to 2.5, the conformation of soluble 33 kD protein changed significantly, with an increase or a decrease in percentage of random coil or ?-helix and turns. The changes in secondary structures of this protein are pH reversible. After NBS modification at pH 2.5, the conformational change of 33 kD protein was kept fixed. The CD ellipticity at 200 nm for NBS-modified 33 kD protein is much lower than that for control, indicating that the unfolding degree of 33 kD protein was enhanced after the NBS modification. Moreover, the conformational flexibility is lost in NBS-modified 33 kD protein, and the conformational change becomes pH irreversible, indicating that NBS modification blocked the reversibility of conformational change of 33 kD protein. The specific binding capability of NBS-modi- fied 33 kD protein is much lower than that of low pH-treated control. Furthermore, the rebinding of modified protein on PSⅡ membranes cannot restore the activity of oxygen evolution. We suggest that it is low pH but not NBS modification of W241 that leads to the conformational change of 33 kD protein from one functional to another non-functional state. The significant capability of proton transport of 33 kD protein is discussed.

  12. The fundament of food, crop protein production, is threatened by climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvordsen, Cathrine Heinz; Gislum, René; Jørgensen, Johannes Ravn;

    2016-01-01

    Income growth, urbanization, and changes in lifestyles and food preferences combined with continuing population growth lead to increasing demand for plant protein production worldwide. All the proteins we eat are produced by crops, including the proteins we get from animals, which initially come...

  13. Monitoring channel head erosion processes in response to an artificially induced abrupt base level change using time-lapse photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. H.; Nearing, M.; Hernandez, M.; Polyakov, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    Gullies that terminate at a vertical-wall are ubiquitous throughout arid and semiarid regions. Multi-year assessments of gully evolution and headcut advance are typically accomplished using traditional ground surveys and aerial photographs, with much recent research focused on integrating data collected at very high spatial resolutions using new techniques such as aerial surveys with blimps or kites and ground surveys with LiDar scanners. However, knowledge of specific processes that drive headcut advance is limited due to inadequate observation and documentation of flash floods and subsequent erosion that can occur at temporal resolutions not captured through repeat surveys. This paper presents a method for using very-high temporal resolution ground-based time-lapse photography to capture short-duration flash floods and gully head evolution in response. In 2004, a base level controlling concrete weir was removed from the outlet of a 1.29 ha semiarid headwater drainage on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in southeastern Arizona, USA. During the ten year period from 2004 to 2014 the headcut migrated upchannel a total of 14.5 m reducing the contributing area at the headwall by 9.5%. Beginning in July 2012, time-lapse photography was employed to observe event scale channel evolution dynamics. The most frequent erosion processes observed during three seasons of time-lapse photography were plunge pool erosion and mass wasting through sidewall or channel headwall slumping that occurred during summer months. Geomorphic change during the ten year period was dominated by a single piping event in August 2014 that advanced the channel head 7.4 m (51% of the overall advance) and removed 11.3 m3 of sediment. High temporal resolution time-lapse photography was critical for identifying subsurface erosion processes, in the absence of time-lapse images piping would not have been identified as an erosion mechanism responsible for advancing the gully headwall at this site.

  14. Self-Assembly of Synthetic Metabolons through Synthetic Protein Scaffolds: One-Step Purification, Co-immobilization, and Substrate Channeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, C; Zhang, YHP

    2013-02-01

    One-step purification of a multi-enzyme complex was developed based on a mixture of cell extracts containing three dockerin-containing enzymes and one family 3 cellulose-binding module (CBM3)-containing scaffoldin through high-affinity adsorption on low-cost solid regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC). The three-enzyme complex, called synthetic metabolon, was self-assembled through the high-affinity interaction between the dockerin in each enzyme and three cohesins in the synthetic scaffoldin. The metabolons were either immobilized on the external surface of RAC or free when the scaffoldin contained an intein between the CBM3 and three cohesins. The immobilized and free metabolons containing triosephosphate isomerase, aldolase, and fructose 1,6-biphosphatase exhibited initial reaction rates 48 and 38 times, respectively, that of the non-complexed three-enzyme mixture at the same enzyme loading. Such reaction rate enhancements indicated strong substrate channeling among synthetic metabolons due to the close spatial organization among cascade enzymes. These results suggested that the construction of synthetic metabolons by using cohesins, dockerins, and cellulose-binding modules from cellulosomes not only decreased protein purification labor and cost for in vitro synthetic biology projects but also accelerated reaction rates by 1 order of magnitude compared to non-complexed enzymes. Synthetic metabolons would be an important biocatalytic module for in vitro and in vivo synthetic biology projects.

  15. Adsorption of charged protein residues on an inorganic nanosheet: Computer simulation of LDH interaction with ion channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Alexey A.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional and hybrid nanomaterials based on layered double hydroxides (LDH), cationic clays, layered oxyhydroxides and hydroxides of metals possess large specific surface area and strong electrostatic properties with permanent or pH-dependent electric charge. Such nanomaterials may impact cellular electrostatics, changing the ion balance, pH and membrane potential. Selective ion adsorption/exchange may alter the transmembrane electrochemical gradient, disrupting potential-dependent cellular processes. Cellular proteins as a rule have charged residues which can be effectively adsorbed on the surface of layered hydroxide based nanomaterials. The aim of this study is to attempt to shed some light on the possibility and mechanisms of protein "adhesion" an LDH nanosheet and to propose a new direction in anticancer medicine, based on physical impact and strong electrostatics. An unbiased molecular dynamics simulation was performed and the combined process free energy estimation (COPFEE) approach was used.

  16. Changes in phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins during postmortem development of porcine muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Lametsch, Rene

    2012-01-01

    phosphorylated protein bands with the highest scores. The results indicate that the phosphorylation pattern of myofibrillar proteins in PM muscle is mainly changed with PM time, but only to a minor extent influenced by the rate of pH decline, suggesting that the phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins may......A gel-based phosphoproteomic study was performed to investigate the postmortem (PM) changes in protein phosphorylation of the myofibrillar proteins in three groups of pigs with different pH decline rates, from PM 1 h to 24 h. The global phosphorylation level in the group with a fast pH decline rate...... was higher than that in the slow and intermediate groups at early PM time, but became the lowest at 24 h. The protein phosphorylation level of seven individual protein bands was only significantly (ptime, and two protein bands were subjected to a synergy effect between PM time and p...

  17. Delineation of concentration ranges and longitudinal changes of human plasma protein variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgica Trenchevska

    Full Text Available Human protein diversity arises as a result of alternative splicing, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and posttranslational modifications. Because of these processes, each protein can exists as multiple variants in vivo. Tailored strategies are needed to study these protein variants and understand their role in health and disease. In this work we utilized quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassays to determine the protein variants concentration of beta-2-microglobulin, cystatin C, retinol binding protein, and transthyretin, in a population of 500 healthy individuals. Additionally, we determined the longitudinal concentration changes for the protein variants from four individuals over a 6 month period. Along with the native forms of the four proteins, 13 posttranslationally modified variants and 7 SNP-derived variants were detected and their concentration determined. Correlations of the variants concentration with geographical origin, gender, and age of the individuals were also examined. This work represents an important step toward building a catalog of protein variants concentrations and examining their longitudinal changes.

  18. Coastline changes and sedimentation related with the opening of an artificial channel: the Valo Grande Delta, SE Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mahiques, Michel M; Figueira, Rubens C L; Alves, Daniel P V; Italiani, Diana M; Martins, Cristina C; Dias, João M A

    2014-12-01

    The role played by human activity in coastline changes indicates a general tendency of retreating coasts, especially deltaic environments, as a result of the recent trend of sea level rise as well as the blockage of the transfer of sediments towards the coast, especially due to the construction of dams. This is particularly important in deltaic environments which have been suffering a dramatic loss of area in the last decades. In contrast, in this paper, we report the origin and evolution of an anthropogenic delta, the Valo Grande delta, on the south-eastern Brazilian coast, whose origin is related to the opening of an artificial channel and the diversion of the main flow of the Ribeira de Iguape River. The methodology included the analysis of coastline changes, bathymetry and coring, which were used to determine the sedimentation rates and grain-size changes over time. The results allowed us to recognize the different facies of the anthropogenic delta and establish its lateral and vertical depositional trends. Despite not being very frequent, anthropogenic deltas represent a favorable environment for the record of natural and anthropogenic changes in historical times and, thus, deserve more attention from researchers of different subjects.

  19. Difference of Sodium Currents between Pediatric and Adult Human Atrial Myocytes: Evidence for Developmental Changes of Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzhi Cai, Xiaoqin Mu, Dongmei Gong, Shulin Jiang, Jianping Li, Qingxin Meng, Yunlong Bai, Yanju Liu, Xinyue Wang, Xueying Tan, Baofeng Yang, Yanjie Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium currents and potassium currents were shown to undergo developmental changes in postnatal human and animal cardiomocytes. However, so far, there is no evidence whether sodium currents also presented the developmental changes in postnatal human atrial cells. The aim of this study was to observe age-related changes of sodium currents between pediatric and adult atrial myocytes. Human atrial myocytes were acutely isolated and the whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to record sodium currents isolated from pediatric and adult atrial cardiomocytes. The peak amplitude of sodium currents recorded in adult atrial cells was significantly larger than that in pediatric atrial myocytes. However, there was no significant difference of the activation voltage for peak sodium currents between two kinds of atrial myocytes. The time constants for the activation and inactivation of sodium currents were smaller in adult atria than pediatric atria. The further study revealed that the voltage-dependent inactivation of sodium currents were more slow in adult atrial cardiomyocytes than pediatric atrial cells. A significant difference was also observed in the recovery process of sodium channel from inactivation. In summary, a few significant differences were demonstrated in sodium currents characteristics between pediatric and adult atrial myocytes, which indicates that sodium currents in human atria also undergo developmental changes.

  20. GS-5806 Inhibits Pre- to Postfusion Conformational Changes of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel, Dharmaraj; Xing, Weimei; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Wong, Jinny S; Hung, Magdeleine; Brendza, Katherine M.; Perron, Michel; Jordan, Robert; Sperandio, David; Liu, Xiaohong; Mackman, Richard; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    GS-5806 is a small-molecule inhibitor of human respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein-mediated viral entry. During viral entry, the fusion protein undergoes major conformational changes, resulting in fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. This process is reproduced in vitro using a purified, truncated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein. GS-5806 blocked these conformational changes, suggesting a possible mechanism for antiviral activity.

  1. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  2. Pre and postprandial changes in orexigenic and anorexigenic factors in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin (GRLN), cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and cholecystokinin (CCK) are neuropeptides involved in the regulation of appetite and feeding in vertebrates. We examined pre- and postprandial changes in the expression of plasma GHRL and mRNAs encoding GRL...

  3. Protein Changes in Response to Pyrene Stress in Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-You Xu; Ying-Xu Chen; Wei-Xiang Wu; Shao-Jian Zheng; Sheng-Guo Xue; Shi-Ying Yang; Yi-Jin Peng

    2007-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a relatively new approach to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the environment. When plants are grown under pyrene treatment, they respond by synthesizing a set of protective proteins. To learn more about protein changes in response to pyrene treatment, we extracted total proteins from the leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) 1 week after pyrene treatment. The proteins extracted were separated with twodimensional gel electrophoresis. In total, approximately 54 protein spots were found by comparing gels from treated and control groups. According to the isoelectric point, molecular weight, and abundance of these protein spots, 20 pyrene-induced proteins were found to have changed abundance. Of these, 15 protein spots were increased and five protein spots were newly appeared in pyrene-treated plant leaves. Six model upregulated protein spots of different molecular weights were excised from the gels and subjected to trypsin digestion followed by peptide separation using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Peptlde masses were used to search the matrix-science database for protein identification. Two of the proteins were identified on the basis of the homology of their peptide profiles with existing protein sequences as pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase and the rlbulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit. These proteins are involved in the regulation of carbohydrate and energy metabolism. The present study gives new insights into the pyrene stress response in maize leaves and demonstrates the power of the proteomlc approach in phytoremediation of PAHs.

  4. Physicochemical Changes of Antioxidant Peptides Hydrolyzed From Porcine Plasma Protein Subject to Free Hydroxyl Radical System

    OpenAIRE

    Hehong Yang; Yanqing Li; Peijun Li; Qian Liu; Baohua Kong; Xu Huang; Zengbao Wu

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidant peptides have attracted much attention for potential application as natural food ingredients but the fate of them, as well as oxidized proteins in foods during processing, is still poorly understood. Physicochemical changes in antioxidant peptides hydrolysated from porcine plasma protein were discussed in a free hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation system. Porcine Plasma Protein Hydrolysates (PPH) was prepared by hydrolyzing porcine plasma protein with Alcalase for 5 h at pH 8.0, 5...

  5. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  6. Channel Change in 2007 at Selected Sites on the Marias River, Montana, Following a 2006 High-Flow Release from Tiber Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auble, Gregor T.; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2006, an opportunistic high-flow release was made from Tiber Dam on the Marias River in Montana to investigate possible alternatives for partially restoring the river's natural flow pattern and variability. At two sites along the river, we measured channel geometry in 2006 before and after the high-flow release to evaluate channel change and alteration of physical habitat. Here we provide data from a resurvey of those sites, conducted in August 2007.

  7. Protein abundance changes of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in different sugar concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Niu, Chen; Liu, Bin; Wei, JianPing; Wang, HuXuan; Yuan, YaHong; Yue, TianLi

    2016-09-16

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a yeast which can cause spoilage in the concentrated juice industries. It exhibits resistance to high sugar concentrations but genome- and proteome-wide studies on Z. rouxii in response to high sugar concentrations have been poorly investigated. Herein, by using a 2-D electrophoresis based workflow, the proteome of a wild strain of Z. rouxii under different sugar concentrations has been analyzed. Proteins were extracted, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the pH range 4-7. Differences in growth (lag phase), protein content (13.97-19.23mg/g cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (196-296) were found between sugar concentrations. ANOVA test showed that 168 spots were different, and 47 spots, corresponding to 40 unique gene products have been identified. These protein species are involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, response to stimulus, protein transport and vesicle organization, cell morphogenesis regulation, transcription and translation, nucleotide metabolism, amino-sugar nucleotide-sugar pathways, oxidoreductases balancing, and ribosome biogenesis. The present study provides important information about how Z. rouxii acts to cope with high sugar concentration at molecular levels, which might enhance our global understanding of Z. rouxii's high sugar-tolerance trait. PMID:27322723

  8. Farmer Identification and Commitment Responses to Institutional Change in Marketing Channel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gow, Hamish R.; Stevenson, Mark; Westgren, Randall E.; Sonka, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of the New Zealand merino industry has been through a period of rapid organizational change and marketing innovation over the past decade. This has seen it move away from a publicly regulated spot auction market structure characterised by undifferentiated product receiving pooled equilibrium commodity prices often at a discount to the international market price to a market structure composed of both privately controlled strongly vertically integrated marketing initiatives charac...

  9. Evaluation of Potential Climate Change Impacts on Particle Movement in Open Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, E.; Tsai, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to develop a forecast model to predict the trajectory of sediment particles when extreme flow events occur. In extreme flow environments, the stochastic jump diffusion particle tracking model (SJD-PTM) can be used to model the movement of sediment particles in response to extreme events. This proposed SJD-PTM can be separated into three main parts — a drift motion, a turbulence term and a jump term due to random occurrences of extreme flow events. The study is intended to modify the jump term, which models the abrupt changes of particle position in the extreme flow environments. The frequency of extreme flow occurrences might change due to many uncertain factors such as climate change. The study attempts to use the concept of the logistic regression and the parameter of odds ratio, namely the trend magnitude to investigate the frequency change of extreme flow event occurrences and its impact on sediment particle movement. With the SJD-PTM, the ensemble mean and variance of particle trajectory can be quantified via simulations. The results show that by taking the effect of the trend magnitude into consideration, the particle position and its uncertainty may undergo a significant increase. Such findings will have many important implications to the environmental and hydraulic engineering design and planning. For instance, when the frequency of the occurrence of flow events with higher extremity increases, particles can travel further and faster downstream. It is observed that flow events with higher extremity can induce a higher degree of entrainment and particle resuspension, and consequently more significant bed and bank erosion.

  10. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  11. CHANGES IN CHANNEL PATTERN OF RIVER GANGA BETWEEN MUSTAFABAD AND RAJMAHAL, GANGETIC PLAINS SINCE 18TH CENTURY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabhata K. SWAMEE; Barham PARKASH; Jayaprakash V. THOMAS; Satvindar SINGH

    2003-01-01

    Morphological analyses require quantitative description of river course by providing its equation. Such an equation is not possible as the river plan-form contains loops that cannot be described by it. To circumvent this difficulty a system of parametric equations is devised for describing the river plan-form.The system of equations was used to obtain morphological attributes like sinuosity and curvature. Using the plan-form data for the River Ganga for years 1780, 1828, 1853, 1935 and 1978 the parametric equations were setup for these years. The plan-forms were to study the changes in channel pattern,sinuosities and mode of movement of meander loops with time in the last two centuries and in the downstream direction in the Ganga River between Mustafabad and Rajmahal over about 900 km long course.

  12. Tarantula toxins interacting with voltage sensors in potassium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Kenton J.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-activated ion channels open and close in response to changes in membrane voltage, a process that is crucial for electrical signaling in the nervous system. The venom from many poisonous creatures contains a diverse array of small protein toxins that bind to voltage-activated channels and modify the gating mechanism. Hanatoxin and a growing number of related tarantula toxins have been shown to inhibit activation of voltage-activated potassium (Kv) channels by interacting with their vol...

  13. Changes in protein expression in p53 deleted spontaneous thymic lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik; Pedersen, Anders Elm;

    2004-01-01

    spontaneous p53-/- thymic lymphomas, SM5 and SM7. A total of around 1500 proteins were detected on individual gels. Only changes in protein expression by a factor of 2 or more were considered. In the thymic lymphoma cells 3-5% of the proteins were found to be differentially regulated when compared...... with the protein expression in p53+/+ and p53-/- thymocytes. Only a minority (13 proteins) of the quantitatively changed proteins were common for the two thymic lymphoma cell lines, suggesting that the p53 deficiency mainly results in genetic dysfunctions which are individual for a given tumor. Two of the detected...... structure containing motifs of the glyoxalase-bleomycin resistance protein family (MDR) as deduced from the cDNA....

  14. The molecular physiology of CRAC channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakriya, Murali

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Ca2+release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel is a highly Ca2+-selective store-operated channel expressed in T cells, mast cells, and various other tissues. CRAC channels regulate critical cellular processes such as gene expression, motility, and the secretion of inflammatory mediators. The identification of Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, and STIM1, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor, have provided the tools to illuminate the mechanisms of regulation and the pore properties of CRAC channels. Recent evidence indicates that the activation of CRAC channels by store depletion involves a coordinated series of steps, which include the redistributions of STIM1 and Orai1, direct physical interactions between these proteins, and conformational changes in Orai1, culminating in channel activation. Additional studies have revealed that the high Ca2+ selectivity of CRAC channels arises from the presence of an intrapore Ca2+ binding site, the properties of which are finely honed to occlude the permeation of the much more prevalent Na+. Structure-function studies have led to the identification of the potential pore-binding sites for Ca2+, providing a firm framework for understanding the mechanisms of selectivity and gating of the CRAC channel. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of CRAC channel activation, pore properties, and modulation. PMID:19754891

  15. Galanin Activates G Protein Gated Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels and Suppresses Kisspeptin-10 Activation of GnRH Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-08-01

    GnRH neurons are regulated by hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons. Recently, galanin was identified in a subpopulation of kisspeptin neurons. Although the literature thoroughly describes kisspeptin activation of GnRH neurons, little is known about the effects of galanin on GnRH neurons. This study investigated whether galanin could alter kisspeptin signaling to GnRH neurons. GnRH cells maintained in explants, known to display spontaneous calcium oscillations, and a long-lasting calcium response to kisspeptin-10 (kp-10), were used. First, transcripts for galanin receptors (GalRs) were examined. Only GalR1 was found in GnRH neurons. A series of experiments was then performed to determine the action of galanin on kp-10 activated GnRH neurons. Applied after kp-10 activation, galanin 1-16 (Gal1-16) rapidly suppressed kp-10 activation. Applied with kp-10, Gal1-16 prevented kp-10 activation until its removal. To determine the mechanism by which galanin inhibited kp-10 activation of GnRH neurons, Gal1-16 and galanin were applied to spontaneously active GnRH neurons. Both inhibited GnRH neuronal activity, independent of GnRH neuronal inputs. This inhibition was mimicked by a GalR1 agonist but not by GalR2 or GalR2/3 agonists. Although Gal1-16 inhibition relied on Gi/o signaling, it was independent of cAMP levels but sensitive to blockers of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels. A newly developed bioassay for GnRH detection showed Gal1-16 decreased the kp-10-evoked GnRH secretion below detection threshold. Together, this study shows that galanin is a potent regulator of GnRH neurons, possibly acting as a physiological break to kisspeptin excitation. PMID:27359210

  16. Protein self-assembly and lipid binding in the folding of the potassium channel KcsA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Francisco N; Renart, M Lourdes; Poveda, José A; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette; González-Ros, José M

    2008-02-19

    Moderate concentrations of the alcohol 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) cause the coupled unfolding and dissociation into subunits of the homotetrameric potassium channel KcsA, in a process that is partially irreversible when the protein is solubilized in plain dodecyl beta-d-maltoside (DDM) micelles [Barrera et al. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 14344-52]. Here we report that the transition from the folded tetramer to the unfolded monomer becomes completely reversible when KcsA is solubilized in mixed micelles composed of the detergent DDM and the lipids DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) and DOPG (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)]). This result suggests that lipids may act as effectors in the tetramerization of KcsA. The observed reversibility allowed the determination of the standard free energy of the folding reaction of KcsA: DeltaG = 30.5 +/- 3.1 kcal x mol-1. We also observed that, prior to the unfolding of the tetramer, the presence of lower TFE concentrations causes the disassembly of supramolecular clusters of KcsA into the individual tetrameric molecules. Within the limits of experimental resolution, this is also a reversible process, but unlike the tetramer to monomer transition from above, the level of clustering is not influenced by the presence of solubilized lipids. These observations suggest a distinct role of the lipids in the different in vitro assembly steps (folding/tetramerization and clustering) of KcsA. PMID:18205389

  17. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of voltage-gated calcium channel beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito eNakao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs induces numerous intracellular events such as neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and gene regulation. It has been shown that genes related to Ca2+ signaling, such as the CACNA1C, CACNB2, and CACNA1I genes that encode VGCC subunits, are associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Recently, VGCC beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP was identified as a novel regulator of VGCC activity via the interaction of VGCC β subunits. To examine the role of the BARP in higher brain functions, we generated BARP knockout (KO mice and conducted a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. BARP KO mice exhibited greatly reduced locomotor activity, as evidenced by decreased vertical activity, stereotypic counts in the open field test, and activity level in the home cage, and longer latency to complete a session in spontaneous T-maze alteration test, which reached study-wide significance. Acoustic startle response was also reduced in the mutants. Interestingly, they showed multiple behavioral phenotypes that are seemingly opposite to those seen in the mouse models of schizophrenia and its related disorders, including increased working memory, flexibility, prepulse inhibition, and social interaction, and decreased locomotor activity, though many of these phenotypes are statistically weak and require further replications. These results demonstrate that BARP is involved in the regulation of locomotor activity and, possibly, emotionality. The possibility was also suggested that BARP KO mice may serve as a unique tool for investigating the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders. Further evaluation of the molecular and physiological phenotypes of the mutant mice would provide new insights into the role of BARP in higher brain functions.

  18. Functional Interaction of the SNARE Protein NtSyp121 in Ca2+ Channel Gating,Ca2+ Transients and ABA Signalling of Stomatal Guard Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergei Sokolovski; Adrian Hills; Robert A.Gay; Michael R.Blatt

    2008-01-01

    There is now growing evidence that membrane vesicle trafficking proteins,especially of the superfamily of SNAREs,are critical for cellular signalling in plants.Work from this laboratory first demonstrated that a soluble,inhibitory (dominant-negative) fragment of the SNARE NtSyp121 blocked K+ and Cl- channel responses to the stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA),but left open a question about functional impacts on signal intermediates,especially on Ca2+-mediated signalling events.Here,we report one mode of action for the SNARE mediated directly through alterations in Caz+ channel gating and its consequent effects on cytosolic-free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) elevation.We find that expressing the same inhibitory fragment of NtSyp121 blocks ABA-evoked stomatal closure,but only partially suppresses stomatal closure in the presence of the NO donor,SNAP,which promotes [Ca2+]i elevation independently of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channels.Consistent with these observations,Ca2+ channel gating at the plasma membrane is altered by the SNARE fragment in a manner effective in reducing the potential for triggering a rise in [Ca2+]i,and we show directly that its expression in vivo leads to a pronounced suppression of evoked [Ca2+]i transients.These observations offer primary evidence for the functional coupling of the SNARE with Ca2+ channels at the plant cell plasma membrane and,because [Ca2+]i plays a key role in the control of K+ and Cl- channel currents in guard cells,they underscore an important mechanism for SNARE integration with ion channel regulation during stomatal closure.

  19. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  20. Improvements and adaptive changes to the fuel channel fitness-for-service assessment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first formal Fitness-for-Service (FFS) assessment methodology in the CANDU industry was issued to the AECB in 1991 in the CANDU Pressure Tube Fitness-for-Service Guidelines (FFSG), which were later incorporated into CSA N285.8 in the mid 1990s. While the utilities have continued to benefit greatly from repeated, successful FFS assessments, industry changes since 1991 have conspired to apply mounting pressures on the FFS community, to the potential detriment of the assessment process. This paper identifies inherent challenges, historical challenges, and more recent difficulties encountered by the FFS assessment community and gives recommendations for relieving some of the mounting pressures on the FFS assessors and for improving the FFS assessment process. (author)

  1. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equall...

  2. Effects of Na+ channel blockers on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-03-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents which belong to class Ia (quinidine) and Ic (flecainide) reportedly increase propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmia, whereas class Ib agents (lidocaine and mexiletine) are recognized as safe antiarrhythmics. Clinically, tachyarrhythmia is often initiated by a premature ectopic beat, which increases spatial nonuniformities in ventricular conduction and repolarization thus facilitating reentry. This study examined if electrical derangements evoked by premature excitation may be accentuated by flecainide and quinidine, but unchanged by lidocaine and mexiletine, which would explain the difference in their safety profile. In perfused guinea pig hearts, a premature excitation evoked over late repolarization phase was associated with prolonged epicardial activation time, reduced monophasic action potential duration (APD), and increased transepicardial dispersion of the activation time and APD. Flecainide and quinidine increased conduction slowing evoked by extrasystolic stimulation, prolonged APD, and accentuated spatial heterogeneities in ventricular conduction and repolarization associated with premature excitation. Spontaneous episodes of nonsustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed in 50% of heart preparations exposed to drug infusion. In contrast, lidocaine and mexiletine had no effect on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization or arrhythmic susceptibility. These findings suggest that flecainide and quinidine may promote arrhythmia by exaggerating electrophysiological abnormalities evoked by ectopic beats.

  3. Dynamic changes in protein functional linkage networks revealed by integration with gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhada R Hegde

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Response of cells to changing environmental conditions is governed by the dynamics of intricate biomolecular interactions. It may be reasonable to assume, proteins being the dominant macromolecules that carry out routine cellular functions, that understanding the dynamics of protein:protein interactions might yield useful insights into the cellular responses. The large-scale protein interaction data sets are, however, unable to capture the changes in the profile of protein:protein interactions. In order to understand how these interactions change dynamically, we have constructed conditional protein linkages for Escherichia coli by integrating functional linkages and gene expression information. As a case study, we have chosen to analyze UV exposure in wild-type and SOS deficient E. coli at 20 minutes post irradiation. The conditional networks exhibit similar topological properties. Although the global topological properties of the networks are similar, many subtle local changes are observed, which are suggestive of the cellular response to the perturbations. Some such changes correspond to differences in the path lengths among the nodes of carbohydrate metabolism correlating with its loss in efficiency in the UV treated cells. Similarly, expression of hubs under unique conditions reflects the importance of these genes. Various centrality measures applied to the networks indicate increased importance for replication, repair, and other stress proteins for the cells under UV treatment, as anticipated. We thus propose a novel approach for studying an organism at the systems level by integrating genome-wide functional linkages and the gene expression data.

  4. Correct interpretation of comprehensive phosphorylation dynamics requires normalization by protein expression changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ronghu; Dephoure, Noah; Haas, Wilhelm; Huttlin, Edward L; Zhai, Bo; Sowa, Mathew E; Gygi, Steven P

    2011-08-01

    The interpretation of quantitative phosphoproteomics studies is complicated because each differential phosphorylation event integrates both changes in protein expression and phosphorylation. Here we investigated this phenomenon by performing parallel comparisons of protein expression and phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae. In each of two experiments comparing yeast mutants bearing deletions in FUS3 or STE7 with their wild-type counterparts, we quantified over 4100 proteins, including all members of the yeast mating pathway. We also identified 12,499 unique phosphorylation sites in this work. We demonstrate the critical importance of controlling the protein-level false-discovery rate and provide a novel method to assess the accuracy of protein false-discovery rate estimates. For the first time, 96% of nonredundant phosphopeptide ratios could be calibrated by protein levels, allowing truly differential phosphorylation to be distinguished from altered protein expression. This revealed a starkly different view, with 25% of seemingly differential phosphopeptides now attributed to changes in protein expression. Combined protein expression and phosphorylation surveys uncovered both independent and concerted changes in protein expression and phosphorylation, while highlighting the partially redundant role of a second MAPK (Kss1) in the mating pathway. PMID:21551504

  5. Changes in cationic selectivity of the nicotinic channel at the rat ganglionic synapse: a role for chloride ions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Sacchi

    Full Text Available The permeability of the nicotinic channel (nAChR at the ganglionic synapse has been examined, in the intact rat superior cervical ganglion in vitro, by fitting the Goldman current equation to the synaptic current (EPSC I-V relationship. Subsynaptic nAChRs, activated by neurally-released acetylcholine (ACh, were thus analyzed in an intact environment as natively expressed by the mature sympathetic neuron. Postsynaptic neuron hyperpolarization (from -40 to -90 mV resulted in a change of the synaptic potassium/sodium permeability ratio (P(K/P(Na from 1.40 to 0.92, corresponding to a reversible shift of the apparent acetylcholine equilibrium potential, E(ACh, by about +10 mV. The effect was accompanied by a decrease of the peak synaptic conductance (g(syn and of the EPSC decay time constant. Reduction of [Cl(-](o to 18 mM resulted in a change of P(K/P(Na from 1.57 (control to 2.26, associated with a reversible shift of E(ACh by about -10 mV. Application of 200 nM αBgTx evoked P(K/P(Na and g(syn modifications similar to those observed in reduced [Cl(-](o. The two treatments were overlapping and complementary, as if the same site/mechanism were involved. The difference current before and after chloride reduction or toxin application exhibited a strongly positive equilibrium potential, which could not be explained by the block of a calcium component of the EPSC. Observations under current-clamp conditions suggest that the driving force modification of the EPSC due to P(K/P(Na changes represent an additional powerful integrative mechanism of neuron behavior. A possible role for chloride ions is suggested: the nAChR selectivity was actually reduced by increased chloride gradient (membrane hyperpolarization, while it was increased, moving towards a channel preferentially permeable for potassium, when the chloride gradient was reduced.

  6. Prediction of change in protein unfolding rates upon point mutations in two state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Priyashree; Naganathan, Athi N; Gromiha, M Michael

    2016-09-01

    Studies on protein unfolding rates are limited and challenging due to the complexity of unfolding mechanism and the larger dynamic range of the experimental data. Though attempts have been made to predict unfolding rates using protein sequence-structure information there is no available method for predicting the unfolding rates of proteins upon specific point mutations. In this work, we have systematically analyzed a set of 790 single mutants and developed a robust method for predicting protein unfolding rates upon mutations (Δlnku) in two-state proteins by combining amino acid properties and knowledge-based classification of mutants with multiple linear regression technique. We obtain a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.79/s and a Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.71 between predicted unfolding rates and experimental observations using jack-knife test. We have developed a web server for predicting protein unfolding rates upon mutation and it is freely available at https://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/proteinunfolding/unfoldingrace.html. Prominent features that determine unfolding kinetics as well as plausible reasons for the observed outliers are also discussed. PMID:27264959

  7. The effects of beta-amyloid protein and presenilin on potassium channel%淀粉样蛋白及早老素对钾通道的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟晓永; 王晓良

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer病目前是痴呆的最常见原因,病理学特征是:神经纤维缠结,神经斑块,神经元丢失,淀粉样血管改变。临床上最显著的特点是学习记忆障碍。钾通道在学习记忆中起着重要作用。Alzheimer病人成纤维细胞以及嗅成纤维细胞113pS四已胺敏感的钾通道缺失。记忆相关蛋白Cp20以及与Alzheimer病遗传密切相关的淀粉样蛋白前体蛋白及早老素均能调节钾通道活性。Alzheimer病时钾通道亚型的改变尚需进一步的理论研究。钾通道在Alzhe imer病治疗方面有可能成为重要靶点。%Alzheimer disease(AD) is the most common cau se of dementia today. Th e characteristic histopathologic changes include neurofibrillary tangles, neurit ic plaques, neuronal loss, and amyloid angiopathy. The noted Alzheimer symptom is the dysfunction of learning a nd memory. Potassium channels play a key role in it. A 113-pS tetraethylammoniu m-sensitive potassium channel was consistently absent from AD fibroblasts and o lfactory neuroblasts. Cp20, a memory-associated protein, amyloid precuror prote in and presenilin which are all tightly associated with genetic Alzheimer diseas e can regulate the activities of potassium channels. The changes of potassium ch annels subtype need further study. Potassium channels are maybe the important dr ug targets in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  8. Closure of multiple types of K+ channels is necessar to induce changes in renal vascular resistance in vivo in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Giese, Isaiah; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig;

    2011-01-01

    flow (RBF) in vivo in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Test agents were infused directly into the renal artery to avoid systemic effects. Inhibition of BK(Ca) and K(ir) channels (with TEA and Ba(2+), respectively) caused small and transient reductions in RBF (to 93¿±¿2% and 95¿±¿1% of baseline...... reduction. The effect of the cocktail of K(+) channel blockers was confirmed in mice using the isolated blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation. A cocktail of K(+) channel openers (K(+), NS309, NS1619 and pinacidil) had only a minor effect on baseline RBF in vivo in rats, but reduced......Inhibition of K(+) channels might mediate renal vasoconstriction. As inhibition of a single type of K(+) channel caused minor or no renal vasoconstriction in vivo in rats, we hypothesized that several classes of K(+) channels must be blocked to elicit renal vasoconstriction. We measured renal blood...

  9. Quinone-induced protein handling changes: Implications for major protein handling systems in quinone-mediated toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David, E-mail: david.ross@ucdenver.edu

    2014-10-15

    Para-quinones such as 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ) and menadione (MD) and ortho-quinones including the oxidation products of catecholamines, are derived from xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules. The effects of quinones on major protein handling systems in cells; the 20/26S proteasome, the ER stress response, autophagy, chaperone proteins and aggresome formation, have not been investigated in a systematic manner. Both BQ and aminochrome (AC) inhibited proteasomal activity and activated the ER stress response and autophagy in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. AC also induced aggresome formation while MD had little effect on any protein handling systems in N27 cells. The effect of NQO1 on quinone induced protein handling changes and toxicity was examined using N27 cells stably transfected with NQO1 to generate an isogenic NQO1-overexpressing line. NQO1 protected against BQ–induced apoptosis but led to a potentiation of AC- and MD-induced apoptosis. Modulation of quinone-induced apoptosis in N27 and NQO1-overexpressing cells correlated only with changes in the ER stress response and not with changes in other protein handling systems. These data suggested that NQO1 modulated the ER stress response to potentiate toxicity of AC and MD, but protected against BQ toxicity. We further demonstrated that NQO1 mediated reduction to unstable hydroquinones and subsequent redox cycling was important for the activation of the ER stress response and toxicity for both AC and MD. In summary, our data demonstrate that quinone-specific changes in protein handling are evident in N27 cells and the induction of the ER stress response is associated with quinone-mediated toxicity. - Highlights: • Unstable hydroquinones contributed to quinone-induced ER stress and toxicity.

  10. Gramicidin Channels: Versatile Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Olaf S.; Koeppe, Roger E., II; Roux, Benoît

    Gramicidin channels are miniproteins in which two tryptophan-rich subunits associate by means of transbilayer dimerization to form the conducting channels. That is, in contrast to other ion channels, gramicidin channels do not open and close; they appear and disappear. Each subunit in the bilayer-spanning channel is tied to the bilayer/solution interface through hydrogen bonds that involve the indole NH groups as donors andwater or the phospholipid backbone as acceptors. The channel's permeability characteristics are well-defined: gramicidin channels are selective for monovalent cations, with no measurable permeability to anions or polyvalent cations; ions and water move through a pore whose wall is formed by the peptide backbone; and the single-channel conductance and cation selectivity vary when the amino acid sequence is varied, even though the permeating ions make no contact with the amino acid side chains. Given the plethora of available experimental information—for not only the wild-type channels but also for channels formed by amino acid-substituted gramicidin analogues—gramicidin channels continue to provide important insights into the microphysics of ion permeation through bilayer-spanning channels. For similar reasons, gramicidin channels constitute a system of choice for evaluating computational strategies for obtaining mechanistic insights into ion permeation through the more complex channels formed by integral membrane proteins.

  11. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  12. Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation in pea epicotyl segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Chengappa, S.; Raghothama, K.G.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation were studied by labeling pea epicotyl segments with (/sup 32/P) PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ and analyzing the phosphoproteins by two dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Analysis of phosphoproteins revealed auxin-regulated changes in the phosphorylation of specific polypeptides. In the presence of auxin, phosphorylation of 23,000, 82,000, 105,000 and 110,000 molecular weight polypeptides was markedly decreased whereas phosphorylation of 19,000, 24,000, 28,000 molecular weight polypeptides was increased. Some of these changes are very rapid and could be observed within minutes. Furthermore, their studies with calmodulin antagonists indicate the possible involvement of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and/or phosphatases in auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation. In view of these results, they suggest that auxin-regulated protein phosphorylation could be the one of the earliest events in regulating diverse physiological processes by this hormone.

  13. Protein changes in the retina following experimental retinal detachment in rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandal, Nakul; Lewis, Geoffrey P; Fisher, Steven K;

    2011-01-01

    Retinal detachment leads to the widespread cellular remodeling of the retina. The purpose of this study was to identify protein changes that accompany these cellular alterations by comparing the proteomic profiles of sham and experimentally detached rabbit retina. Elucidation of the proteins most...

  14. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Haiyan [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Zhang Guanglin [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  15. Yellow fluorescent protein-based assay to measure GABA(A channel activation and allosteric modulation in CHO-K1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teres Johansson

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A ion channels are important drug targets for treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Finding GABA(A channel subtype selective allosteric modulators could lead to new improved treatments. However, the progress in this area has been obstructed by the challenging task of developing functional assays to support screening efforts and the generation of cells expressing functional GABA(A ion channels with the desired subtype composition. To address these challenges, we developed a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-based assay to be able to study allosteric modulation of the GABA(A ion channel using cryopreserved, transiently transfected, assay-ready cells. We show for the first time how the MaxCyte STX electroporation instrument can be used to generate CHO-K1 cells expressing functional GABA(A α2β3γ2 along with a halide sensing YFP-H148Q/I152L (YFP-GABA(A2 cells. As a basis for a cell-based assay capable of detecting allosteric modulators, experiments with antagonist, ion channel blocker and modulators were used to verify GABA(A subunit composition and functionality. We found that the I(- concentration used in the YFP assay affected both basal quench of YFP and potency of GABA. For the first time the assay was used to study modulation of GABA with 7 known modulators where statistical analysis showed that the assay can distinguish modulatory pEC50 differences of 0.15. In conclusion, the YFP assay proved to be a robust, reproducible and inexpensive assay. These data provide evidence that the assay is suitable for high throughput screening (HTS and could be used to discover novel modulators acting on GABA(A ion channels.

  16. Angiotensin-2-mediated Ca2+ signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium: role of angiotensin-receptor-associated-protein and TRPV2 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Barro-Soria

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (AngII receptor (ATR is involved in pathologic local events such as neovascularisation and inflammation including in the brain and retina. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE expresses ATR in its AT1R form, angiotensin-receptor-associated protein (Atrap, and transient-receptor-potential channel-V2 (TRPV2. AT1R and Atrap co-localize to the basolateral membrane of the RPE, as shown by immunostaining. Stimulation of porcine RPE (pRPE cells by AngII results in biphasic increases in intracellular free Ca(2+inhibited by losartan. Xestospongin C (xest C and U-73122, blockers of IP3R and PLC respectively, reduced AngII-evoked Ca(2+response. RPE cells from Atrap(-/- mice showed smaller AngII-evoked Ca(2+peak (by 22% and loss of sustained Ca(2+elevation compared to wild-type. The TRPV channel activator cannabidiol (CBD at 15 µM stimulates intracellular Ca(2+-rise suggesting that porcine RPE cells express TRPV2 channels. Further evidence supporting the functional expression of TRPV2 channels comes from experiments in which 100 µM SKF96365 (a TRPV channel inhibitor reduced the cannabidiol-induced Ca(2+-rise. Application of SKF96365 or reduction of TRPV2 expression by siRNA reduced the sustained phase of AngII-mediated Ca(2+transients by 53%. Thus systemic AngII, an effector of the local renin-angiotensin system stimulates biphasic Ca(2+transients in the RPE by releasing Ca(2+from cytosolic IP3-dependent stores and activating ATR/Atrap and TRPV2 channels to generate a sustained Ca(2+elevation.

  17. Ionizing radiation induces immediate protein acetylation changes in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a highly regulated post-translational protein modification that is known to regulate several signaling pathways. However, little is known about the radiation-induced changes in the acetylome. In this study, we analyzed the acute post-translational acetylation changes in primary human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells 4 h after a gamma radiation dose of 2 Gy. The acetylated peptides were enriched using anti-acetyl conjugated agarose beads. A total of 54 proteins were found to be altered in their acetylation status, 23 of which were deacetylated and 31 acetylated. Pathway analyses showed three protein categories particularly affected by radiation-induced changes in the acetylation status: the proteins involved in the translation process, the proteins of stress response, and mitochondrial proteins. The activation of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways affecting actin cytoskeleton signaling and cell cycle progression was predicted. The protein expression levels of two nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylases, sirtuin 1 and sirtuin 3, were significantly but transiently upregulated 4 but not 24 h after irradiation. The status of the p53 protein, a target of sirtuin 1, was found to be rapidly stabilized by acetylation after radiation exposure. These findings indicate that post-translational modification of proteins by acetylation and deacetylation is essentially affecting the radiation response of the endothelium. (author)

  18. Changes in ribosomal proteins in wheat embryos in the course of grain development and maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Weidner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It was found, by comparing the densitometric profiles of ribosomal proteins of wheat embryos in milk and full grain ripeness, that in the process of development and ripening of caryopses the percentual proportion of low molecular weight proteins increases at the cost of those of high molecular weight. This concerns both acidic and basic proteins. In electrophoretic separation of ribosomal proteins from embryos of fully ripe seeds by the method of two-dimensional electrophoresis the appearance of three new low molecular weight proteins - an acidic one and two basic ones - was observed. These proteins were not found in the embryos of caryopses of milk ripeness. These results indicate that with development and ripening of wheat caryopses new low molecular weight ribosomal proteins are built into the ribosomes in the embryo. These changes are both quantitative and qualitative.

  19. Oscillatory change of SR-protein kinase activities during oocyte maturation meiosis in fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仲安; 曹丹; 桂建芳

    2000-01-01

    The SR-protein kinase activity was analyzed and the cytological changes were observed during oocyte maturation in bisexual transparent color crucian carp ( Carassius auratus color variety). The results revealed that the SR-protein kinase activity was sensitive to the artificially induced spawning hormones, and the change of oscillatory activity was similar to that of the maturation-promoting factor (MPF) kinase that regulates meiotic cell cycle in fish.

  20. The effect of protein kinase C on voltage-gated potassium channel in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from rats exposed to chronic hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永昶; 倪望; 张珍祥; 徐永健

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic hypoxia can cause pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary heart disease with high mortality.The signal transduction pathway of protein kinase C (PKC) plays an important role in chronic pulmonary hypertension. So it is necessary to investigate the effect of PKC on voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of rats exposed to chronic hypoxia.Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group (group A) and a chronic hypoxia group (group B). Group B received hypoxia [oxygen concentration (10±1)%] eight hours per day for four consecutive weeks. Single pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were obtained using an acute enzyme separation method. Conventional whole cell patch clamp technique was used to record resting membrane potential, membrane capacitance and voltage-gated K+ currents. The changes in voltage-gated K+ currents before and after applying paramethoxyamphetamine (PMA) (500 nmol/L), an agonist of PKC, and PMA plus carbohydrate mixture of glucose, fructose and xylitol (GFX) (30 nmol/L), an inhibitor of PKC, were compared between the two groups. Results The resting membrane potential in group B was significantly lower than that of group A: -(29.0±4.8) mV (n=18) vs -(42.5±4.6) mV (n=35) (P0.05). The voltage-gated K+ currents were significantly inhibited by PMA in group A, and this effect was reversed by GFX. However, the voltage-gated K+ currents in group B were not affected by PMA.Conclusions The resting membrane potential and voltage-gated K+ currents in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from rats exposed to chronic hypoxia decreased significantly. It seems that PKC has different effects on the voltage-gated K+ currents of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells under different conditions.

  1. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Barati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG⁎ conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1 proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2 proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB, supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase, suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis.

  2. Protein expression profile changes in human fibroblasts induced by low dose energetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Clement, Jade Q.; Gridley, Daila S.; Rodhe, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-12-01

    Extrapolation of known radiation risks to the risks from low dose and low dose-rate exposures of human population, especially prolonged exposures of astronauts in the space radiation environment, relies in part on the mechanistic understanding of radiation induced biological consequences at the molecular level. While some genomic data at the mRNA level are available for cells or animals exposed to radiation, the data at the protein level are still lacking. Here, we studied protein expression profile changes using Panorama antibody microarray chips that contain antibodies to 224 proteins (or their phosphorylated forms) involved in cell signaling that included mostly apoptosis, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and signal transduction. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured until fully confluent and then exposed to 2 cGy of 150 MeV protons at high-dose rate. The proteins were isolated at 2 or 6 h after exposure and labeled with Cy3 for the irradiated cells and with Cy5 for the control samples before loading onto the protein microarray chips. The intensities of the protein spots were analyzed using ScanAlyze software and normalized by the summed fluorescence intensities and the housekeeping proteins. The results showed that low dose protons altered the expression of more than 10% of the proteins listed in the microarray analysis in various protein functional groups. Cell cycle (24%) related proteins were induced by protons and most of them were regulators of G1/S-transition phase. Comparison of the overall protein expression profiles, cell cycle related proteins, cytoskeleton and signal transduction protein groups showed significantly more changes induced by protons compared with other protein functional groups.

  3. cAMP-independent dilation of coronary arterioles to adenosine : role of nitric oxide, G proteins, and K(ATP) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, T W; Kuo, L

    1999-10-01

    Adenosine is known to play an important role in the regulation of coronary blood flow during metabolic stress. However, there is sparse information on the mechanism of adenosine-induced dilation at the microcirculatory levels. In the present study, we examined the role of endothelial nitric oxide (NO), G proteins, cyclic nucleotides, and potassium channels in coronary arteriolar dilation to adenosine. Pig subepicardial coronary arterioles (50 to 100 microm in diameter) were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized to 60 cm H(2)O without flow for in vitro study. The arterioles developed basal tone and dilated dose dependently to adenosine. Disruption of endothelium, blocking of endothelial ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels by glibenclamide, and inhibition of NO synthase by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and of soluble guanylyl cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one produced identical attenuation of vasodilation to adenosine. Combined administration of these inhibitors did not further attenuate the vasodilatory response. Production of NO from coronary arterioles was significantly increased by adenosine. Pertussis toxin, but not cholera toxin, significantly inhibited vasodilation to adenosine, and this inhibitory effect was only evident in vessels with an intact endothelium. Tetraethylammonium, glibenclamide, and a high concentration of extraluminal KCl abolished vasodilation of denuded vessels to adenosine; however, inhibition of calcium-activated potassium channels by iberiotoxin had no effect on this dilation. Rp-8-Br-cAMPS, a cAMP antagonist, inhibited vasodilation to cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP but failed to block adenosine-induced dilation. Furthermore, vasodilations to 8-Br-cAMP and sodium nitroprusside were not inhibited by glibenclamide, indicating that cAMP- and cGMP-induced dilations are not mediated by the activation of K(ATP) channels. These results suggest that adenosine activates both endothelial and smooth muscle pathways to exert

  4. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the "carrier" snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th - 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide. PMID:24486516

  5. Central functions of bicarbonate in S-type anion channel activation and OST1 protein kinase in CO 2 signal transduction in guard cell

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Shaowu

    2011-03-18

    Plants respond to elevated CO(2) via carbonic anhydrases that mediate stomatal closing, but little is known about the early signalling mechanisms following the initial CO(2) response. It remains unclear whether CO(2), HCO(3)(-) or a combination activates downstream signalling. Here, we demonstrate that bicarbonate functions as a small-molecule activator of SLAC1 anion channels in guard cells. Elevated intracellular [HCO(3)(-)](i) with low [CO(2)] and [H(+)] activated S-type anion currents, whereas low [HCO(3)(-)](i) at high [CO(2)] and [H(+)] did not. Bicarbonate enhanced the intracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity of S-type anion channel activation in wild-type and ht1-2 kinase mutant guard cells. ht1-2 mutant guard cells exhibited enhanced bicarbonate sensitivity of S-type anion channel activation. The OST1 protein kinase has been reported not to affect CO(2) signalling. Unexpectedly, OST1 loss-of-function alleles showed strongly impaired CO(2)-induced stomatal closing and HCO(3)(-) activation of anion channels. Moreover, PYR/RCAR abscisic acid (ABA) receptor mutants slowed but did not abolish CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) signalling, redefining the convergence point of CO(2) and ABA signalling. A new working model of the sequence of CO(2) signalling events in gas exchange regulation is presented.

  6. Regulation of sodium channel function by bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, Jens A; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J;

    2004-01-01

    kinetics of the protein conformational changes therefore will be regulated by the bilayer elasticity, which is determined by the lipid composition. This hydrophobic coupling mechanism has been studied extensively in gramicidin channels, where the channel-bilayer hydrophobic interactions link a...... "conformational" change (the monomerdimer transition) to an elastic bilayer deformation. Gramicidin channels thus are regulated by the lipid bilayer elastic properties (thickness, monolayer equilibrium curvature, and compression and bending moduli). To investigate whether this hydrophobic coupling mechanism could...... be a general mechanism regulating membrane protein function, we examined whether voltage-dependent skeletal-muscle sodium channels, expressed in HEK293 cells, are regulated by bilayer elasticity, as monitored using gramicidin A (gA) channels. Nonphysiological amphiphiles (beta...

  7. Trafficking and gating of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are regulated by interaction with tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) and cyclic AMP at distinct sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Han; Y. Noam; A.S. Lewis; J.J. Gallagher; W.J. Wadman; T.Z. Baram; D.M. Chetkovich

    2011-01-01

    Ion channel trafficking and gating are often influenced by interactions with auxiliary subunits. Tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) is an auxiliary subunit for neuronal hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. TRIP8b interacts directly w

  8. Global structural changes of an ion channel during its gating are followed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnenberg, Albert; Yilmaz, Duygu; Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Dimitrova, Anna; Marrink, Siewert J; Li, Zhuolun; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine; Sobott, Frank; Koçer, Armağan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels are sensors probing membrane tension in all species; despite their importance and vital role in many cell functions, their gating mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we determined the conditions for releasing intact mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (M

  9. σ-1 Receptor Inhibition of ASIC1a Channels is Dependent on a Pertussis Toxin-Sensitive G-Protein and an AKAP150/Calcineurin Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Yelenis; Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier

    2015-10-01

    ASIC1a channels play a major role in various pathophysiological conditions including depression, anxiety, epilepsy, and neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke. Sigma-1 (σ-1) receptor stimulation depresses the activity of ASIC1a channels in cortical neurons, but the mechanism(s) by which σ-1 receptors exert their influence on ASIC1a remains unknown. Experiments were undertaken to elucidate the signaling cascade linking σ-1 receptors to ASIC1a channels. Immunohistochemical studies showed that σ-1 receptors, ASIC1a and A-kinase anchoring peptide 150 colocalize in the plasma membrane of the cell body and processes of cortical neurons. Fluorometric Ca(2+) imaging experiments showed that disruption of the macromolecular complexes containing AKAP150 diminished the effects of the σ-1 on ASIC1a, as did application of the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A and FK-506. Moreover, whole-cell patch clamp experiments showed that σ-1 receptors were less effective at decreasing ASIC1a-mediated currents in the presence of the VIVIT peptide, which binds to calcineurin and prevents cellular effects dependent on AKAP150/calcineurin interaction. The coupling of σ-1 to ASIC1a was also disrupted by preincubation of the neurons in the G-protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX). Taken together, our data reveal that σ-1 receptor block of ASIC1a function is dependent on activation of a PTX-sensitive G-protein and stimulation of AKAP150 bound calcineurin. PMID:24925261

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B. I. Ligand-induced changes in the protein motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H. J.; Frimurer, T.M.; Andersen, J.N.;

    1999-01-01

    Activity of enzymes, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is often associated with structural changes in the enzyme, resulting in selective and stereospecific reactions with the substrate. To investigate the effect of a substrate on the motions occurring in PTPs, we have performed...... in the protein region, where the N-terminal of the substrate is located, and in the loop region Val(198-)Gly(209). Displacements in the latter loop are associated with the motions in the WPD loop, which contains a catalytically important aspartic acid. Estimation of the pK(a) of the active-site cysteine along...

  11. Monitoring channel head erosion processes in response to an artificially induced abrupt base level change using time-lapse photography 2301

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headcut and channel extension in response to an abrupt base level change in 2004 of approximately 1m was studied in a 1.29 ha semiarid headwater drainage on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona, USA. Field observations and time-lapse photography were coupled with hy...

  12. Pathological Changes in Internal Organs after Blocking Low Hydraulic Resistance Channels along the Stomach Meridian in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The correlation between meridians and organs (Zang-fu is an important aspect of meridian theory. The objective of this paper is to investigate the pathological changes in the organs resulting from blocking low hydraulic resistance channel (LHRC along the stomach meridian by injecting gel in pigs so as to offer some insight into the correlation between meridians and internal organs. Methods. Four white piglets and twelve black minipigs were divided into four batches and were observed in different periods. Each batch included two pairs of pigs and each pair matched two pigs with similar conditions among which gel was injected into 6~8 low hydraulic resistance points along the the stomach meridian in the experimental pig and the same amount of saline was injected into the same points in the control pig. The state of stomach and intestine was observed 6~10 weeks after the blocking model was developed. Results. The results showed that there were bloated stomach or/and intestine in all the experimental pigs while there were normal states in seven control pigs except one dead during the experiment. Conclusion. The findings confirmed that the blockage of LHRC along the stomach meridian can influence the state of stomach and intestine, leading to a distension on stomach or/and intestine.

  13. Pathological Changes in Internal Organs after Blocking Low Hydraulic Resistance Channels along the Stomach Meridian in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Ting; Jia, Shu-Yong; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Tian, Yu-Ying; Wang, Guang-Jun; Huang, Tao; Pang, Li; Zhou, Yong-Sheng; Sun, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Wei-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The correlation between meridians and organs (Zang-fu) is an important aspect of meridian theory. The objective of this paper is to investigate the pathological changes in the organs resulting from blocking low hydraulic resistance channel (LHRC) along the stomach meridian by injecting gel in pigs so as to offer some insight into the correlation between meridians and internal organs. Methods. Four white piglets and twelve black minipigs were divided into four batches and were observed in different periods. Each batch included two pairs of pigs and each pair matched two pigs with similar conditions among which gel was injected into 6~8 low hydraulic resistance points along the the stomach meridian in the experimental pig and the same amount of saline was injected into the same points in the control pig. The state of stomach and intestine was observed 6~10 weeks after the blocking model was developed. Results. The results showed that there were bloated stomach or/and intestine in all the experimental pigs while there were normal states in seven control pigs except one dead during the experiment. Conclusion. The findings confirmed that the blockage of LHRC along the stomach meridian can influence the state of stomach and intestine, leading to a distension on stomach or/and intestine. PMID:23935689

  14. Understanding Sodium Channel Function and Modulation Using Atomistic Simulations of Bacterial Channel Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, C; Allen, T W

    2016-01-01

    Sodium channels are chief proteins involved in electrical signaling in the nervous system, enabling critical functions like heartbeat and brain activity. New high-resolution X-ray structures for bacterial sodium channels have created an opportunity to see how these proteins operate at the molecular level. An important challenge to overcome is establishing relationships between the structures and functions of mammalian and bacterial channels. Bacterial sodium channels are known to exhibit the main structural features of their mammalian counterparts, as well as several key functional characteristics, including selective ion conduction, voltage-dependent gating, pore-based inactivation and modulation by local anesthetic, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptic drugs. Simulations have begun to shed light on each of these features in the past few years. Despite deviations in selectivity signatures for bacterial and mammalian channels, simulations have uncovered the nature of the multiion conduction mechanism associated with Na(+) binding to a high-field strength site established by charged glutamate side chains. Simulations demonstrated a surprising level of flexibility of the protein, showing that these side chains are active participants in the permeation process. They have also uncovered changes in protein structure, leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate that have been proposed to correspond to inactivated structures. These observations offer the potential to examine the mechanisms of state-dependent drug activity, focusing on pore-blocking and pore-based slow inactivation in bacterial channels, without the complexities of inactivation on multiple timescales seen in eukaryotic channels. Simulations have provided molecular views of the interactions of drugs, consistent with sites predicted in mammalian channels, as well as a wealth of other sites as potential new drug targets. In this chapter, we survey the new insights into sodium channel function that

  15. Relationship of sperm small heat-shock protein 10 and voltage-dependent anion channel 2 with semen freezability in boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilagran, Ingrid; Yeste, Marc; Sancho, Sílvia; Casas, Isabel; Rivera del Álamo, Maria M; Bonet, Sergi

    2014-08-01

    Freezability differences between boar ejaculates exist, but there is no useful method to predict the ejaculate freezability before sperm cryopreservation takes place. In this context, the present study sought to determine whether the amounts of small heat-shock protein 10 (also known as outer dense fiber protein 1) (ODF1/HSPB10) and voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) may be used as boar sperm freezability markers. With this aim, 26 boar ejaculates were split into two fractions: one for protein extraction and the other for cryopreservation purposes. Ejaculates were subsequently classified into two groups (good freezability ejaculates [GFE] and poor freezability ejaculates [PFE]) based on viability and sperm motility assessments after 30 and 240 minutes of after thawing. Although the VDAC2 amounts, analyzed through Western blot, were significantly higher (P cryopreservation procedures. PMID:24933094

  16. Redox control of calcium channels: from mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hool, Livia C; Corry, Ben

    2007-04-01

    Calcium plays an integral role in cellular function. It is a well-recognized second messenger necessary for signaling cellular responses, but in excessive amounts can be deleterious to function, causing cell death. The main route by which calcium enters the cytoplasm is either from the extracellular compartment or internal addistores via calcium channels. There is good evidence that calcium channels can respond to pharmacological compounds that reduce or oxidize thiol groups on the channel protein. In addition, reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide that can mediate oxidative pathology also mediate changes in channel function via alterations of thiol groups. This review looks at the structure and function of calcium channels, the evidence that changes in cellular redox state mediate changes in channel function, and the role of redox modification of channels in disease processes. Understanding how redox modification of the channel protein alters channel structure and function is providing leads for the design of therapeutic interventions that target oxidative stress responses.

  17. Comparing ion conductance recordings of synthetic lipid bilayers with cell membranes containing TRP channels

    CERN Document Server

    Laub, Katrine R; Blicher, Andreas; Madsen, Soren B; Luckhoff, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article we compare electrical conductance events from single channel recordings of three TRP channel proteins (TRPA1, TRPM2 and TRPM8) expressed in human embryonic kidney cells with channel events recorded on synthetic lipid membranes close to melting transitions. Ion channels from the TRP family are involved in a variety of sensory processes including thermo- and mechano-reception. Synthetic lipid membranes close to phase transitions display channel-like events that respond to stimuli related to changes in intensive thermodynamic variables such as pressure and temperature. TRP channel activity is characterized by typical patterns of current events dependent on the type of protein expressed. Synthetic lipid bilayers show a wide spectrum of electrical phenomena that are considered typical for the activity of protein ion channels. We find unitary currents, burst behavior, flickering, multistep-conductances, and spikes behavior in both preparations. Moreover, we report conductances and lifetimes for lipi...

  18. Marine Toxins Targeting Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo R. Arias

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This introductory minireview points out the importance of ion channels for cell communication. The basic concepts on the structure and function of ion channels triggered by membrane voltage changes, the so-called voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs, as well as those activated by neurotransmitters, the so-called ligand-gated ion channel (LGICs, are introduced. Among the most important VGIC superfamiles, we can name the voltage-gated Na+ (NaV, Ca2+ (CaV, and K+ (KV channels. Among the most important LGIC super families, we can include the Cys-loop or nicotinicoid, the glutamate-activated (GluR, and the ATP-activated (P2XnR receptor superfamilies. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of different ions in a specific or unspecific manner. For instance, the activation of NaV, CaV, or KV channels opens a pore that is specific for Na+, Ca2+, or K+, respectively. On the other hand, the activation of certain LGICs such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, GluRs, and P2XnRs allows the passage of cations (e.g., Na+, K+, and/or Ca2+, whereas the activation of other LGICs such as type A γ-butyric acid and glycine receptors allows the passage of anions (e.g., Cl− and/or HCO3−. In this regard, the activation of NaV and CaV as well as ligand-gated cation channels produce membrane depolarization, which finally leads to stimulatory effects in the cell, whereas the activation of KV as well as ligand-gated anion channels induce membrane hyperpolarization that finally leads to inhibitory effects in the cell. The importance of these ion channel superfamilies is emphasized by considering their physiological functions throughout the body as well as their pathophysiological implicance in several neuronal diseases. In this regard, natural molecules, and especially marine toxins, can be potentially used as modulators (e.g., inhibitors or prolongers of ion channel functions to treat or to alleviate a specific

  19. Rapid Oligo-Galacturonide Induced Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Hoon, Divya; Minkoff, Benjamin B; Sussman, Michael R; Kohorn, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs)(1)are receptor protein kinases that bind to long polymers of cross-linked pectin in the cell wall. These plasma-membrane-associated protein kinases also bind soluble pectin fragments called oligo-galacturonides (OGs) released from the wall after pathogen attack and damage. WAKs are required for cell expansion during development but bind water soluble OGs generated from walls with a higher affinity than the wall-associated polysaccharides. OGs activate a WAK-dependent, distinct stress-like response pathway to help plants resist pathogen attack. In this report, a quantitative mass-spectrometric-based phosphoproteomic analysis was used to identify Arabidopsis cellular events rapidly induced by OGsin planta Using N(14/)N(15)isotopicin vivometabolic labeling, we screened 1,000 phosphoproteins for rapid OG-induced changes and found 50 proteins with increased phosphorylation, while there were none that decreased significantly. Seven of the phosphosites within these proteins overlap with those altered by another signaling molecule plants use to indicate the presence of pathogens (the bacterial "elicitor" peptide Flg22), indicating distinct but overlapping pathways activated by these two types of chemicals. Genetic analysis of genes encoding 10 OG-specific and two Flg22/OG-induced phosphoproteins reveals that null mutations in eight proteins compromise the OG response. These phosphorylated proteins with genetic evidence supporting their role in the OG response include two cytoplasmic kinases, two membrane-associated scaffold proteins, a phospholipase C, a CDPK, an unknown cadmium response protein, and a motor protein. Null mutants in two proteins, the putative scaffold protein REM1.3, and a cytoplasmic receptor like kinase ROG2, enhance and suppress, respectively, a dominantWAKallele. Altogether, the results of these chemical and genetic experiments reveal the identity of several phosphorylated proteins involved in the kinase

  20. Solid phase extraction of proteins from buffer solutions employing capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers as the stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Carolyn Q; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2013-02-21

    Polypropylene (PP) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers are applied for solid phase extraction (SPE) of proteins from aqueous buffer solutions using a micropipette tip-based format. A process was developed in which centrifugation is used as the moving force for solution passage in the loading/washing steps instead of the previously employed manual aspiration. The complete procedure requires ~15 minutes, with the number of samples run in parallel limited only by the capacity of the centrifuge. The method performance was evaluated based on adsorption and elution characteristics of several proteins (cytochrome c, lysozyme, myoglobin, and glucose oxidase) from 150 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. Protein concentration ranges of ~2 to 100 μg mL(-1) were employed and the recovery characteristics determined through UV-Vis absorbance spectrophotometry for protein quantification. The protein loading capacities across the range of proteins was ~1.5 μg for the 5 mg fiber tips. Average recoveries from PBS were determined for each protein sample; cytochrome c ~86%, lysozyme ~80%, myoglobin ~86%, and glucose oxidase ~89%. Recoveries from more complex matrices, synthetic urine and synthetic saliva, were determined to be ~90%. A 10× dilution study for a fixed 1 μg protein application yielded 94 ± 3.2% recoveries. The C-CP tips provided significantly higher recoveries for myoglobin in a 150 mM PBS matrix in comparison to a commercially available protein SPE product, with the added advantages of low cost, rapid processing, and reusability.

  1. Nonbilayer lipids affect peripheral and integral membrane proteins via changes in the lateral pressure profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink-van der Laan, Els; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-01

    Nonbilayer lipids can be defined as cone-shaped lipids with a preference for nonbilayer structures with a negative curvature, such as the hexagonal phase. All membranes contain these lipids in large amounts. Yet, the lipids in biological membranes are organized in a bilayer. This leads to the question: what is the physiological role of nonbilayer lipids? Different models are discussed in this review, with a focus on the lateral pressure profile within the membrane. Based on this lateral pressure model, predictions can be made for the effect of nonbilayer lipids on peripheral and integral membrane proteins. Recent data on the catalytic domain of Leader Peptidase and the potassium channel KcsA are discussed in relation to these predictions and in relation to the different models on the function of nonbilayer lipids. The data suggest a general mechanism for the interaction between nonbilayer lipids and membrane proteins via the membrane lateral pressure. PMID:15519321

  2. Effects of Angiotensin Ⅱ on Expression of the Gap Junction Channel Protein Connexin 43 in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yang; Wei Wu

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of angiotensin Ⅱ,as a mediator of cardiac hypertrophy,on expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and correlation of expression of Cx43 and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.Methods Cardiomyocytes were isolated from newborn SD rats.Angiotensin Ⅱ was added into the media to induce myocyte hypertrophy.Cultures were exposed to 10 ~6 mol/L angiotensin Ⅱ for 72 h,Cx43 expression was characterized by RT-PCR and Immunofluorescence methods.Results Immunofluorescence analysis revealed decreased Cx43 immunoreactivity in cells treated for 72 h with angiotensin Ⅱ.RT-PCR analysis demonstrated there was an obvious decrease of Cx43 mRNA level in cells exposed to angiotensin Ⅱ for 72 h.The changes of expression of connexin 43 were related to its entrance into S phase of the cell cycle.Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed for 72 h to increase concentrations of angiotensin Ⅱ ( 1.0 × 10-9 ~ 1.0 × 10-6mol/L),resulting in significantly decreased Cx43 expression.Conclusions Angiotensin Ⅱ leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in Cx43 protein in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes by decreasing Cx43 mRNA synthesis.Signal transduction pathways activated by angiotensin Ⅱ under pathophysiologic conditions of cardiac hypertrophy could initiate remodeling of gap junctions.

  3. Relationship between seawater pollution and qualitative changes in the extracted proteins from mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorinstein, Shela [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, POB 12065, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)]. E-mail: gorin@cc.huji.ac.il; Moncheva, Snejana [Institute of Oceanology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BAS), POB 152, 9000 Varna (Bulgaria); Toledo, Fernando [Department of Basic Sciences, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Chillan (Chile); Arancibia-Avila, Patricia [Department of Basic Sciences, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Chillan (Chile); Trakhtenberg, Simon [Kaplan University Medical Center, Rehovot (Israel); Gorinstein, Arkadi [Arkadi Engineering Service Co., Jerusalem 97854 (Israel); Goshev, Ivan [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Center of Phytochemistry, BAS, 1040 Sofia (Bulgaria); Namiesnik, Jacek [Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, Gdansk, 80952 (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to find a reliable biomarker of seawater pollution. For this purpose the contents of Zn and Cu, proteins and antioxidant activity in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis collected from polluted and non-polluted sites of the Bulgarian Black Sea coast were compared. To determine the above-mentioned indices atomic spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and two antioxidant tests were used. It was found that the amounts of Zn and Cu were significantly higher in the mussel proteins from the polluted than from the non-polluted sites (P < 0.05). FT-IR spectroscopy and fluorescence revealed specific qualitative changes in secondary and tertiary structures in mussel proteins in the samples from polluted sites. The thermodynamic properties of proteins and the changes upon denaturation were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of {alpha}-helix. Purified protein scavenging activity against 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation (ABTS{sup {center_dot}}{sup +}) was significantly higher in mussel samples from polluted than from non-polluted sites. Therefore, the changes in Zn and Cu concentration, in protein's secondary and tertiary structures and antioxidant activity in mussels M. galloprovincialis from polluted sites can be a reliable biomarker of the level of the seawater pollution.

  4. A network model to correlate conformational change and the impedance spectrum of single proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Pennetta, Cecilia; Reggiani, Lino [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano, Lecce (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia (CNISM) (Italy)

    2008-02-13

    Integrated nanodevices based on proteins or biomolecules are attracting increasing interest in today's research. In fact, it has been shown that proteins such as azurin and bacteriorhodopsin manifest some electrical properties that are promising for the development of active components of molecular electronic devices. Here we focus on two relevant kinds of protein: bovine rhodopsin, prototype of G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR) proteins, and the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), whose inhibition is one of the most qualified treatments of Alzheimer's disease. Both these proteins exert their function starting with a conformational change of their native structure. Our guess is that such a change should be accompanied with a detectable variation of their electrical properties. To investigate this conjecture, we present an impedance network model of proteins, able to estimate the different impedance spectra associated with the different configurations. The distinct types of conformational change of rhodopsin and AChE agree with their dissimilar electrical responses. In particular, for rhodopsin the model predicts variations of the impedance spectra up to about 30%, while for AChE the same variations are limited to about 10%, which supports the existence of a dynamical equilibrium between its native and complexed states.

  5. Investigating historical changes in morphodynamic processes associated with channelization of a large Alpine river: the Etsch/Adige River, NE Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Simone; Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zolezzi, Guido; Bertoldi, Walter; Comiti, Francesco; Surian, Nicola; Prà, Elena Dai

    2016-04-01

    River channel management within the last centuries has largely modified fluvial processes and morphodynamic evolution of most large European rivers. Several river systems experienced extensive channelization early in the 19th century, thus strongly challenging our present ability to detect their morphodynamic functioning with contemporary photogrammetry or cartographical sources. This consequently leaves open questions about their potential future response, especially to management strategies that "give more room" to the river, aiming at partially rehabilitating their natural functioning. The Adige River (Etsch in German), the second longest Italian river, is an exemplary case where channelization occurred more than 150 years ago, and is the focus of the present work. This work aims (i) to explore changes in fundamental morphodynamic processes associated with massive channelization of the Adige River and (ii) to quantify the alteration in river bars characteristics, by using morphodynamic models of bars and meandering. To fulfil our aims we combine the analysis of historical data with morphodynamic mathematical modelling. Historical sources (recovered in a number of European archives), such as hydrotopographical maps, airborne photogrammetry and hydrological datasets were collected to investigate channel morphology before and after the channelization. Information extracted from this analysis was combined with morphodynamic linear models of free migrating and forced steady bars, to investigate river bars and bend stability properties under different hydromorphological scenarios. Moreover, a morphodynamic model for meandering channel was applied to investigate the influence of river channel planform on the evolution of the fluvial bars. Results from the application of morphodynamic models allowed to predict the type, position and geometry of bars characterizing the channelized configuration of the river, and to explain the presently observed relative paucity of bars

  6. River channel sensitivity to change in the context of human activities and natural factors: an 80-year record of channel morphodynamics on the lower Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, P. W.; Dusterhoff, S. R.; Sears, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    River channel adjustments arise from the application of numerous catchment-based stressors operating at different space and time scales. Natural stressors include the impact of climatic phenomena and their inheritance; human stressors include both direct and indirect factors whose impacts have grown in magnitude and intensity during the Anthropocene, especially since about 1945. Consequently, the sensitivity of river channel morphodynamics is likely to have changed also, with implications for landform understanding and river management. Reconstructing channel morphodynamics during the Anthropocene requires interpreting multiple historical and secondary data sources to document changes at sufficient (i.e., reach-scale) resolution: for the 60-km lower Santa Clara River (LSCR), Ventura County, California, we used flow, sediment and precipitation records, repeat aerial photographs, LiDAR data, repeat topographic surveys, in-channel vegetation data, field observations, numerical modeling of high flow events, and narrative accounts. The catchment historical context since European-American settlement includes periods dominated by ranching and colonization (ca.1820-1890), irrigations and diversions (ca.1890-1955), dams and river modifications (1955-1990), and urban population growth (1990-present). Natural stressors were investigated based on the correlation of instantaneous flood peaks with annual rainfall records in this semi-arid setting. Successful prediction of the majority of gauged floods since about 1950 allows a flood sequence to be reconstructed back to 1873. Floods are clustered and of considerably greater magnitude in El Nino years of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. The great majority of sediment transport thus occurs in El Nino years so that the dominant discharge is the largest discharge on record, in contrast to humid-region alluvial rivers. Responding to these stressors, the average width of the active channel bed has become narrower by almost 50% (1938

  7. Adjustments in channel morphology due to land-use changes and check dam installation in mountain torrents of Calabria (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortugno, Diego; Zema, Demetrio Antonio; Bombino, Giuseppe; Tamburino, Vincenzo; Quinonero Rubio, Juan Manuel; Boix-Fayos, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean semi-arid conditions the geomorphic effects of land-use changes and check dam installation on active channel headwater morphology are not completely understood. In such environments, the availability of specific studies, which monitor channel adjustments as a response to reforestation and check dams over representative observation periods, could help develop new management strategies and erosion control measures. This investigation is an integrated approach assessing the adjustments of channel morphology in a typical torrent (Sant'Agata, Calabria, Southern Italy) after land-use changes (e.g. fire, reforestation, land abandonment) and check dam construction across a period of about 60 years (1955-2012). A statistical analysis of historical rainfall records, an analysis of land-use change in the catchment area and a geomorphological mapping of channel adjustments were carried out and combined with field surveys of bed surface grain-size over a 5-km reach including 14 check dams. The analysis of the historical rainfall records showed a slight decrease in the amount and erosivity of precipitation. Mapping of land-use changes highlighted a general increase of vegetal coverage on the slopes adjacent to the monitored reaches. Together with the check dam network installation, this increase could have induced a reduction in water and sediment supply. The different erosional and depositional forms and adjustments showed a general narrowing between consecutive check dams together with local modifications detected upstream (bed aggradation and cross section expansion together with low-flow realignments) and downstream (local incision) of the installed check dams. Changes in the torrent bends were also detected as a response to erosional and depositional processes with different intensities. The study highlighted: (i) the efficiency of check dams against the disrupting power of the most intense floods by stabilising the active channel; and (ii) the influence of

  8. Discrete control of TRPV4 channel function in the distal nephron by protein kinases A and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamenko, Mykola; Zaika, Oleg L; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Berrout, Jonathan; O'Neil, Roger G; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2013-07-12

    We have recently documented that the Ca(2+)-permeable TRPV4 channel, which is abundantly expressed in distal nephron cells, mediates cellular Ca(2+) responses to elevated luminal flow. In this study, we combined Fura-2-based [Ca(2+)]i imaging with immunofluorescence microscopy in isolated split-opened distal nephrons of C57BL/6 mice to probe the molecular determinants of TRPV4 activity and subcellular distribution. We found that activation of the PKC pathway with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly increased [Ca(2+)]i responses to flow without affecting the subcellular distribution of TRPV4. Inhibition of PKC with bisindolylmaleimide I diminished cellular responses to elevated flow. In contrast, activation of the PKA pathway with forskolin did not affect TRPV4-mediated [Ca(2+)]i responses to flow but markedly shifted the subcellular distribution of the channel toward the apical membrane. These actions were blocked with the specific PKA inhibitor H-89. Concomitant activation of the PKA and PKC cascades additively enhanced the amplitude of flow-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses and greatly increased basal [Ca(2+)]i levels, indicating constitutive TRPV4 activation. This effect was precluded by the selective TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. Therefore, the functional status of the TRPV4 channel in the distal nephron is regulated by two distinct signaling pathways. Although the PKA-dependent cascade promotes TRPV4 trafficking and translocation to the apical membrane, the PKC-dependent pathway increases the activity of the channel on the plasma membrane. PMID:23709216

  9. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ian D; Fuiman, Lee A

    2011-06-01

    Protein synthesis is one of the major energy-consuming processes in all living organisms. Post-prandial changes in protein synthesis have been studied in a range of animal taxa but have been little studied in fish larvae. Using the flooding-dose method, we measured post-prandial changes in whole-body rates of protein synthesis in regularly fed red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (Linnaeus) larvae for 24-28 h following their daily meal. Fractional rates of protein synthesis increased from a baseline (pre-feeding) rate of 16% day(-1) to a post-prandial peak of 48% day(-1) ca. 8 h after feeding before declining to 12% day(-1) after 24-28 h. The overall mean daily rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 27% day(-1). Although suggested as energetically impossible in larval poikilotherms, our results show that rates in excess of 30% day(-1) can be attained by larval fishes for a few hours but are not sustained. The average daily energetic cost of protein synthesis was estimated as 34% of daily total oxygen consumption, ranging from 19% immediately before feeding to 61% during the post-prandial peak in protein synthesis. This suggests that during the post-prandial peak, protein synthesis will require a large proportion of the hourly energy production, which, given the limited metabolic scope in fish larvae, may limit the energy that could otherwise be allocated to other energy-costly functions, such as foraging and escape responses. PMID:21562168

  10. Lateral diffusion, function, and expression of the slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome αC418W nicotinic receptor mutation with changes in lipid raft components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A; Martínez, Hernán L; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-10-30

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR.

  11. Lysine 362 in cytochrome c oxidase regulates opening of the K-channel via changes in pKA and conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelke, Anna Lena; Galstyan, Gegham; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2014-12-01

    The metabolism of aerobic life uses the conversion of molecular oxygen to water as an energy source. This reaction is catalyzed by cytochrome e oxidase (CeO) consuming four electrons and four protons, which move along specific routes. While all four electrons are transferred via the same cofactors to the binuclear reaction center (BNC), the protons take two different routes in the A-type CeO, i.e., two of the four chemical protons consumed in the reaction arrive via the D-channel in the oxidative first half starting after oxygen binding. The other two chemical protons enter via the K-channel in the reductive second half of the reaction cycle. To date, the mechanism behind these separate proton transport pathways has not been understood. In this study, we propose a model that can explain the reaction-step specific opening and closing of the K-channel by conformational and pKA changes of its central lysine 362. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal an upward movement of Lys362 towards the BNC, which had already been supposed by several experimental studies. Redox state-dependent pKA calculations provide evidence that Lys362 may protonate transiently, thereby opening the K-channel only in the reductive second half of the reaction cycle. From our results, we develop a model that assigns a key role to Lys362 in the proton gating between the two proton input channels of the A-type CeO. PMID:25149865

  12. Methods for detecting channel bed surface changes in a mountain torrent – experiences from the Dorfbach torrent

    OpenAIRE

    C. Willi; Graf, C.; Y. Deubelbeiss; Keiler, M.

    2015-01-01

    The erosion of and depositions on channel bed surfaces are instrumental to understanding debris flow processes. We present an overview of existing field methods and highlight their respective advantages and disadvantages. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), airborne laser scanning (ALS), erosion sensors, cross sections (CS) and geomorphological mapping are compared. Additionally, two of these approaches (i.e. TLS and CS) are tested and applied in the channel reaches of the tor...

  13. Morvan's syndrome with anti contactin associated protein like 2 – voltage gated potassium channel antibody presenting with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjani Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morvan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by triad of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, autonomic dysfunction, and central nervous system symptoms. Antibodies against contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2, a subtype of voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC complex, are found in a significant proportion of patients with Morvan's syndrome and are thought to play a key role in peripheral as well as central clinical manifestations. We report a patient of Morvan's syndrome with positive CASPR2–anti-VGKC antibody having syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone as a cause of persistent hyponatremia.

  14. Morvan's syndrome with anti contactin associated protein like 2 – voltage gated potassium channel antibody presenting with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjani Kumar; Kaur, Manminder; Paul, Madhuparna

    2016-01-01

    Morvan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by triad of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, autonomic dysfunction, and central nervous system symptoms. Antibodies against contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2), a subtype of voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, are found in a significant proportion of patients with Morvan's syndrome and are thought to play a key role in peripheral as well as central clinical manifestations. We report a patient of Morvan's syndrome with positive CASPR2–anti-VGKC antibody having syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone as a cause of persistent hyponatremia.

  15. Morvan's syndrome with anti contactin associated protein like 2 – voltage gated potassium channel antibody presenting with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjani Kumar; Kaur, Manminder; Paul, Madhuparna

    2016-01-01

    Morvan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by triad of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, autonomic dysfunction, and central nervous system symptoms. Antibodies against contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2), a subtype of voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, are found in a significant proportion of patients with Morvan's syndrome and are thought to play a key role in peripheral as well as central clinical manifestations. We report a patient of Morvan's syndrome with positive CASPR2–anti-VGKC antibody having syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone as a cause of persistent hyponatremia. PMID:27695240

  16. Application of linear free energy relations to protein conformational changes: the quaternary structural change of hemoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, W A; Henry, E. R.; Hofrichter, J

    1991-01-01

    The transition state for the R in equilibrium with T quaternary conformational change of hemoglobin has thermodynamic properties much closer to those of the R conformation than to those of the T conformation. This finding is based on a comparison of activation and equilibrium enthalpy and entropy changes and on the observation of a linear free energy relationship between quaternary rate and equilibrium constants. A previous theoretical study [Janin, J. & Wodak, S. J. (1985) Biopolymers 24, 50...

  17. Characterizing changes in the rate of protein-protein dissociation upon interface mutation using hotspot energy and organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Agius

    Full Text Available Predicting the effects of mutations on the kinetic rate constants of protein-protein interactions is central to both the modeling of complex diseases and the design of effective peptide drug inhibitors. However, while most studies have concentrated on the determination of association rate constants, dissociation rates have received less attention. In this work we take a novel approach by relating the changes in dissociation rates upon mutation to the energetics and architecture of hotspots and hotregions, by performing alanine scans pre- and post-mutation. From these scans, we design a set of descriptors that capture the change in hotspot energy and distribution. The method is benchmarked on 713 kinetically characterized mutations from the SKEMPI database. Our investigations show that, with the use of hotspot descriptors, energies from single-point alanine mutations may be used for the estimation of off-rate mutations to any residue type and also multi-point mutations. A number of machine learning models are built from a combination of molecular and hotspot descriptors, with the best models achieving a Pearson's Correlation Coefficient of 0.79 with experimental off-rates and a Matthew's Correlation Coefficient of 0.6 in the detection of rare stabilizing mutations. Using specialized feature selection models we identify descriptors that are highly specific and, conversely, broadly important to predicting the effects of different classes of mutations, interface regions and complexes. Our results also indicate that the distribution of the critical stability regions across protein-protein interfaces is a function of complex size more strongly than interface area. In addition, mutations at the rim are critical for the stability of small complexes, but consistently harder to characterize. The relationship between hotregion size and the dissociation rate is also investigated and, using hotspot descriptors which model cooperative effects within

  18. Reversible Conformational Changes of PsbO Protein Detected by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hua; CHEN Gui-Ying; LI Shu-Qin; WANG Li

    2009-01-01

    We used a terahertz time-domain spectroscope (THz-TDS) to detect the reversible conformations2 changes of PsbO protein induced by N-bromosuccinimide and Guanidine Hydrochloride.The veracity and sensitivity are confirmed by the fluorescence emission spectra.The results demonstrate that THz-TDS has both advantages and disadvantages in monitoring the denaturation process of proteins,which is important in applying THz-TDS technique to studying biomolecules.

  19. Triggered drug release from dynamic microspheres via a protein conformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J; Pytel, Nicholas J; Ng, Kelvin; Murphy, William L

    2010-06-11

    In this study we formed and characterized dynamic hydrogel microspheres in which a protein conformational change was used to control microsphere volume changes and the release of an encapsulated drug. In particular, a specific biochemical ligand, trifluoperazine, induced calmodulin's nanometer scale conformation change, which translated to a 48.7% microsphere volume decrease. This specific, ligand-induced volume change triggered the release of a model drug, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), at pre-determined times. After release from the microspheres, 85.6 +/- 10.5% of VEGF was in its native conformation. Taken together, these results suggest that protein conformational change could serve as a useful mechanism to control drug release from dynamic hydrogels.

  20. Regulatory Implications of Structural Changes in Tyr201 of the Oxygen Sensor Protein FixL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawaki, Takeo; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizuno, Misao; Nakamura, Hiro; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-07-26

    FixL is a heme-based oxygen-sensing histidine kinase that induces the expression of nitrogen fixation genes under hypoxic conditions. Oxygen dissociation from heme iron in the sensor domain of FixL initiates protein conformational changes that are transmitted to the histidine kinase domain, activating autophosphorylation activity. Conversely, oxygen binding inhibits FixL kinase activity. It is essential to elucidate the changes that occur in the protein structure upon this oxygen dissociation for understanding of the allosteric transduction mechanism. We measured ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra of FixL and its mutants for deoxy, oxy, and carbonmonoxy forms to examine the changes in protein structure upon oxygen dissociation. The observed spectral changes indicated that Tyr201 and its neighboring residues undergo structural changes upon oxygen dissociation. Kinase assays showed that substitution of Tyr201 significantly decreased the inhibition of kinase activity upon oxygen binding. These data mean that weakening of the hydrogen bond of Tyr201 that is induced by oxygen dissociation is essential for inhibition of kinase activity. We also observed spectral changes in Tyr residues in the kinase domain upon oxygen dissociation from FixL, which is the first observation of oxygen-dependent structural changes in the kinase domain of FixL. The observed structural changes support the allosteric transduction pathway of FixL which we proposed previously [ Yano, S., Ishikawa, H., Mizuno, M., Nakamura, H., Shiro, Y., and Mizutani, Y. ( 2013 ) J. Phys. Chem. B 117 , 15786 - 15791 ]. PMID:27367650

  1. Changes of Nuclear Matrix Proteins Following the Differentiation of Human Osteosarcoma MG-63 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hong Zhao; Qi-Fu Li; Yan Zhao; Jing-Wen Niu; Zhi-Xing Li; Jin-An Chen

    2006-01-01

    Human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells were induced into differentiation by 5 mmol/L hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). Their nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs) were selectively extracted and subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis.The results of protein patterns were analyzed by Melanie software. The spots of differentially expressed NMPs were excised and subjected to in situ digestion with trypsin. The maps of peptide mass fingerprinting were obtained by MALDI-TOFMS analysis, and were submitted for NCBI database searches by Mascot tool.There were twelve spots changed remarkably during the differentiation induced by HMBA, nine of which were identified. The roles of the regulated proteins during the MG-63 differentiation were analyzed. This study suggests that the induced differentiation of cancer cells is accompanied by the changes of NMPs, and confirms the presence of some specific NMPs related to the cancer cell proliferation and differentiation. The changed NMPs are potential markers for cancer diagnosis or targets for cancer therapy.

  2. Controllable liquid colour-changing lenses with microfluidic channels for vision protection, camouflage and optical filtering based on soft lithography fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Li, Songjing

    2016-01-01

    In this work, liquid colour-changing lenses for vision protection, camouflage and optical filtering are developed by circulating colour liquids through microfluidic channels on the lenses manually. Soft lithography technology is applied to fabricate the silicone liquid colour-changing layers with microfluidic channels on the lenses instead of mechanical machining. To increase the hardness and abrasion resistance of the silicone colour-changing layers on the lenses, proper fabrication parameters such as 6:1 (mass ration) mixing proportion and 100 °C curing temperature for 2 h are approved for better soft lithography process of the lenses. Meanwhile, a new surface treatment for the irreversible bonding of silicone colour-changing layer with optical resin (CR39) substrate lens by using 5 % (volume ratio) 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane solution is proposed. Vision protection, camouflage and optical filtering functions of the lenses are investigated with different designs of the channels and multi-layer structures. Each application can not only well achieve their functional demands, but also shows the advantages of functional flexibility, rapid prototyping and good controllability compared with traditional ways. Besides optometry, some other designs and applications of the lenses are proposed for potential utility in the future. PMID:27247877

  3. Study of the interaction of unaggregated and aggregated amyloid β protein (10-21) with outward potassium channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; ChaoFeng; FAN; Li; YANG; Pin

    2007-01-01

    Metal ion-induced aggregation of Aβinto insoluble plaques is a central factor in Alzheimer's disease. Zn2+ is the only physiologically available transition metal ion responsible for aggregating Aβ at pH 7.4. To make it clear that the neurotoxicity of Zn2+-induced aggregation of Aβ on neurons is the key to understand Aβ mechanism of action further. In this paper, we choose Aβ (10-21) as the model fragment to research hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. For the first time, we adopt the combination of spectral analysis with patch-clamp technique for the preliminary study of the mutual relations of Zn2+, Aβ and ion channel from the cell level. The following expounds upon the effects and mode of action of two forms (unaggregated and aggregated) of Aβ (10-21) on hippocampus outward potassium channel three processes (activation, inactivation and reactivation). It also shows the molecular mechanics of AD from the channel level. These results are significant for the further study of Aβ nosogenesis and the development of new types of target drugs for the treatment of AD.

  4. COOH-terminal association of human smooth muscle calcium channel Ca(v)1.2b with Src kinase protein binding domains: effect of nitrotyrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minho; Ross, Gracious R; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2007-12-01

    The carboxyl terminus of the calcium channel plays an important role in the regulation of calcium entry, signal transduction, and gene expression. Potential protein-protein interaction sites within the COOH terminus of the L-type calcium channel include those for the SH3 and SH2 binding domains of c-Src kinase that regulates calcium currents in smooth muscle. In this study, we examined the binding sites involved in Src kinase-mediated phosphorylation of the human voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(v)) 1.2b (hCav1.2b) and the effect of nitrotyrosylation. Cotransfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells with hCa(v)1.2b and c-Src resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of the calcium channel, which was prevented by nitration of tyrosine residues by peroxynitrite. Whole cell calcium currents were reduced by 58 + 5% by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 and 64 + 6% by peroxynitrite. Nitrotyrosylation prevented Src-mediated regulation of the currents. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein of the distal COOH terminus of hCa(v)1.2b (1809-2138) bound to SH2 domain of Src following tyrosine phosphorylation, while binding to SH3 required the presence of the proline-rich motif. Site-directed mutation of Y(2134) prevented SH2 binding and resulted in reduced phosphorylation of hCa(v)1.2b. Within the distal COOH terminus, single, double, or triple mutations of Y(1837), Y(1861), and Y(2134) were constructed and expressed in HEK-293 cells. The inhibitory effects of PP2 and peroxynitrite on calcium currents were significantly reduced in the double mutant Y(1837-2134F). These data demonstrate that the COOH terminus of hCa(v)1.2b contains sites for the SH2 and SH3 binding of Src kinase. Nitrotyrosylation of these sites prevents Src kinase regulation and may be importantly involved in calcium influx regulation during inflammation.

  5. Change detection in the dynamics of an intracellular protein synthesis model using nonlinear Kalman filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G; Rigatou, Efthymia G; Djida, Jean Daniel

    2015-10-01

    A method for early diagnosis of parametric changes in intracellular protein synthesis models (e.g. the p53 protein - mdm2 inhibitor model) is developed with the use of a nonlinear Kalman Filtering approach (Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter) and of statistical change detection methods. The intracellular protein synthesis dynamic model is described by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. It is shown that such a dynamical system satisfies differential flatness properties and this allows to transform it, through a change of variables (diffeomorphism), to the so-called linear canonical form. For the linearized equivalent of the dynamical system, state estimation can be performed using the Kalman Filter recursion. Moreover, by applying an inverse transformation based on the previous diffeomorphism it becomes also possible to obtain estimates of the state variables of the initial nonlinear model. By comparing the output of the Kalman Filter (which is assumed to correspond to the undistorted dynamical model) with measurements obtained from the monitored protein synthesis system, a sequence of differences (residuals) is obtained. The statistical processing of the residuals with the use of x2 change detection tests, can provide indication within specific confidence intervals about parametric changes in the considered biological system and consequently indications about the appearance of specific diseases (e.g. malignancies).

  6. Change detection in the dynamics of an intracellular protein synthesis model using nonlinear Kalman filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G; Rigatou, Efthymia G; Djida, Jean Daniel

    2015-10-01

    A method for early diagnosis of parametric changes in intracellular protein synthesis models (e.g. the p53 protein - mdm2 inhibitor model) is developed with the use of a nonlinear Kalman Filtering approach (Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter) and of statistical change detection methods. The intracellular protein synthesis dynamic model is described by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. It is shown that such a dynamical system satisfies differential flatness properties and this allows to transform it, through a change of variables (diffeomorphism), to the so-called linear canonical form. For the linearized equivalent of the dynamical system, state estimation can be performed using the Kalman Filter recursion. Moreover, by applying an inverse transformation based on the previous diffeomorphism it becomes also possible to obtain estimates of the state variables of the initial nonlinear model. By comparing the output of the Kalman Filter (which is assumed to correspond to the undistorted dynamical model) with measurements obtained from the monitored protein synthesis system, a sequence of differences (residuals) is obtained. The statistical processing of the residuals with the use of x2 change detection tests, can provide indication within specific confidence intervals about parametric changes in the considered biological system and consequently indications about the appearance of specific diseases (e.g. malignancies). PMID:26280184

  7. Silent Polymorphisms: Can the tRNA Population Explain Changes in Protein Properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Cabrera-Cabrera, Florencia; Ehrlich, Ricardo; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Silent mutations are being intensively studied. We previously showed that the estrogen receptor alpha Ala87’s synonymous polymorphism affects its functional properties. Whereas a link has been clearly established between the effect of silent mutations, tRNA abundance and protein folding in prokaryotes, this connection remains controversial in eukaryotic systems. Although a synonymous polymorphism can affect mRNA structure or the interaction with specific ligands, it seems that the relative frequencies of isoacceptor tRNAs could play a key role in the protein-folding process, possibly through modulation of translation kinetics. Conformational changes could be subtle but enough to cause alterations in solubility, proteolysis profiles, functional parameters or intracellular targeting. Interestingly, recent advances describe dramatic changes in the tRNA population associated with proliferation, differentiation or response to chemical, physical or biological stress. In addition, several reports reveal changes in tRNAs’ posttranscriptional modifications in different physiological or pathological conditions. In consequence, since changes in the cell state imply quantitative and/or qualitative changes in the tRNA pool, they could increase the likelihood of protein conformational variants, related to a particular codon usage during translation, with consequences of diverse significance. These observations emphasize the importance of genetic code flexibility in the co-translational protein-folding process. PMID:26901226

  8. Protein Modifications and Lipid Composition Changes in Rat Lenses in Postnatal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knyazev D.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study age dynamics of posttranslational protein modification level and the changes of rat lens membranes, and the consideration of possible mechanisms of membrane effect on the composition and intensity of protein modifications in lens. Materials and Methods. The experiments were carried out on Wistar rats of three age groups: 1, 12 and 24 months. Protein level, sulfhydryl (SH group concentration, and protein carbonyl derivatives level were measured spectrophotometrically. The content of tryptophan, bityrosine and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs were assessed by fluorescence intensity. Phospholipids and neutral lipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Densitometric analysis and quantitative processing of chromatograms were performed using NIH Image J software. Results. Protein content in lens homogenate was found to increase with age, indicating the accumulation of slightly soluble protein aggregates. There was uniform decrease of SH-group concentration and protein carbonyl derivatives in homogenate. On the other hand, there was observed the accumulation of AGEs, bityrosine and tryptophan in water-soluble fraction. The main age changes of lens membrane lipid composition were the increasing ratio of sphingomyelin and neutral lipids. The changes could be caused by the growth of the proportion of mature fibers forming the nucleus of lens compared to poorly- and medium-moderately fibers and cells of epithelium. The principal component of neutral lipids was cholesterol and cholesterol esters. Conclusion. Lens membrane enrichment by lipids characterized by relatively high “ordering” inhibits the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, but at the same time, can disbalance intercellular communication resulting in proteolysis (and tryptophan exposure and AGEs accumulation.

  9. Coupling effect analysis between landslides, river channel changes and sediment budgets - extreme climate events in Laishe River, southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo-Jen; Huang, Mei-Jen; Tseng, Chih-Ming

    2016-04-01

    amount of migration along Laishe River by analyzing the 3D DEM before and after the typhoon Morakot. The DEMs are built by using the aerial images taken by digital mapping camera (DMC) and by airborne digital scanner 40 (ADS40) before and after typhoon event. Recently, this research integrates Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and oblique photogrammetric technologies for image acquisition by 5-10cm GSD photos. This approach permits to construct true 3D model so as to decipher ground information more realistically. 10-20cm DSM and DEM, and field GPS, were compiled together to decipher the morphologic changes. All the information, especially by means of true 3D model, the datasets provides detail ground information that may use to evaluate the landslide triggering mechanism and river channel evolution. The goals of this study is to integrates the UAS system and to decipher the sliding process and morphologic changes of large landslide areas, sediment transport and budgets, and to investigate the phenomenon of river migration. The results of this study provides not only geomatics and GIS dataset of the hazards, but also for essential geomorphologic information for other study, and for hazard mitigation and planning, as well.

  10. Effect of Attitude Change on Unmanned Aerial Vehicle MIMO Channel Capacity%姿态变化对无人机MIMO信道容量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈登伟; 高喜俊; 许鑫; 齐伟伟

    2015-01-01

    考虑无人机多天线通信需求,在无人机上以圆阵方式布置4元天线。为分析无人机多入多出( Multi⁃Input Multi⁃Output, MIMO)通信系统,建立了统一的坐标系,并构建了基于四发两收的无人机MIMO三维GBSBCM信道模型,采用信道矩阵分解、信道系数归一化的方法,推导了无人机的MIMO平均信道相关矩阵。仿真分析了无人机姿态变化参数对无人机MIMO信道容量的影响,对合理调整无人机姿态参数来提高无人机MIMO通信容量提供理论参考。%Aiming at the demand of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for Multi⁃Input Multi⁃Output ( UAV⁃MIMO) communication,four antennas are laid as circular array in UAV.To analyze UAV⁃MIMO communication system,the uniform coordinate is built,and also the 3D⁃GBSBCM ( Geometrically Based Single Bounce Cylinder Model) channel model of UAV⁃MIMO based on four transmitters and two receivers is constructed.The method of channel matrix factorization and channel coefficient normalization are put forward to deduce the average channel correlation matrix of UAV MIMO.At last,the effect of UAV attitude change parameters on UAV MIMO channel capacity is simulated and analyzed.The simulation results provides theory reference for improving UAV⁃MIMO system capacity by changing the attitude parameters.

  11. Quantifying the evolutionary divergence of protein structures: the role of function change and function conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-García, Alberto; Abia, David; Méndez, Raúl; Nido, Gonzalo S; Bastolla, Ugo

    2010-01-01

    The molecular clock hypothesis, stating that protein sequences diverge in evolution by accumulating amino acid substitutions at an almost constant rate, played a major role in the development of molecular evolution and boosted quantitative theories of evolutionary change. These studies were extended to protein structures by the seminal paper by Chothia and Lesk, which established the approximate proportionality between structure and sequence divergence. Here we analyse how function influences the relationship between sequence and structure divergence, studying four large superfamilies of evolutionarily related proteins: globins, aldolases, P-loop and NADP-binding. We introduce the contact divergence, which is more consistent with sequence divergence than previously used structure divergence measures. Our main findings are: (1) Small structure and sequence divergences are proportional, consistent with the molecular clock. Approximate validity of the clock is also supported by the analysis of the clustering coefficient of structure similarity networks. (2) Functional constraints strongly limit the structure divergence of proteins performing the same function and may allow to identify incomplete or wrong functional annotations. (3) The rate of structure versus sequence divergence is larger for proteins performing different functions than for proteins performing the same function. We conjecture that this acceleration is due to positive selection for new functions. Accelerations in structure divergence are also suggested by the analysis of the clustering coefficient. (4) For low sequence identity, structural diversity explodes. We conjecture that this explosion is related to functional diversification. (5) Large indels are almost always associated with function changes.

  12. Mutation in the myelin proteolipid protein gene alters BK and SK channel function in the caudal medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Avishai, Nanthawan; Balan, Kannan; Wilson, Christopher G.; Miller, Martha J.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolipid protein (Plp) gene mutation in rodents causes severe CNS dysmyelination, early death, and lethal hypoxic ventilatory depression (Miller et al. 2004). To determine if Plp mutation alters neuronal function critical for control of breathing, the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) of four rodent strains were studied: myelin deficient rats (MD), myelin synthesis deficient (Plpmsd), and Plpnull mice, as well as shiverer (Mbpshi) mice, a myelin basic protein mutant. Current-voltage relation...

  13. Emergence of ion channel modal gating from independent subunit kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, Brendan A; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2016-09-01

    Many ion channels exhibit a slow stochastic switching between distinct modes of gating activity. This feature of channel behavior has pronounced implications for the dynamics of ionic currents and the signaling pathways that they regulate. A canonical example is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) channel, whose regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is essential for numerous cellular processes. However, the underlying biophysical mechanisms that give rise to modal gating in this and most other channels remain unknown. Although ion channels are composed of protein subunits, previous mathematical models of modal gating are coarse grained at the level of whole-channel states, limiting further dialogue between theory and experiment. Here we propose an origin for modal gating, by modeling the kinetics of ligand binding and conformational change in the IP3R at the subunit level. We find good agreement with experimental data over a wide range of ligand concentrations, accounting for equilibrium channel properties, transient responses to changing ligand conditions, and modal gating statistics. We show how this can be understood within a simple analytical framework and confirm our results with stochastic simulations. The model assumes that channel subunits are independent, demonstrating that cooperative binding or concerted conformational changes are not required for modal gating. Moreover, the model embodies a generally applicable principle: If a timescale separation exists in the kinetics of individual subunits, then modal gating can arise as an emergent property of channel behavior. PMID:27551100

  14. Change detection and maritime situation awareness in the Channel area : Feasibility of space borne SAR for maritime situation awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, A.C. van den; Breejen, E. den; Dekker, R.J.; Smith, A.J.E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we have analyzed military and security requirements for surveillance. Using a data-set of wide swath SAR imagery for the English channel and high resolution SAR data for the Zeebrugge and Rotterdam harbour we have discussed if these requirements can be met by using this kind of data. T

  15. Assessment of redox changes to hydrogen peroxide-sensitive proteins during EGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, Sarah L; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide acts as a second messenger in growth factor signaling where it can oxidize and modify the function of redox-sensitive proteins. While selective thiol oxidation has been measured, there has been no global assessment of protein oxidation following growth factor activation. Significant changes to the abundant and widely distributed redox sensitive thiol proteins were observed in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide, but no changes were observed following treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF). This included members of the peroxiredoxin family, which were also monitored in the presence of the thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin to limit their capacity to recycle to the reduced form. We conclude that widespread thiol oxidation does not occur in cells during EGF signaling, and that hydrogen peroxide must act in a highly localized or selective manner.

  16. Changes of p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase and Apoptosis after Spinal Cord Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-yu Zhang; Chu-song Zhou; Zheng-da Kuang

    2005-01-01

    @@ There were very few studies about signal transduction of apoptosis of the spinal cord injury (SCI). We applied spinal cord compression rats model (Nystrom's method) to study the changes of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK) and its relationship with apoptosis.

  17. Protein changes in rice seedlings during the enhancement of chilling resistance by different stress pretreatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENGShaoxi; WANGYirou; LIMeiru

    1997-01-01

    The changes of proteins in the rice (Oryza sativa L. ) Tesanai 2 seedling under salt ( NaCl ,4 g/L), heat shock (42℃, 3h), and cold(14℃, 3d) pretreatments were compared toexplore the mechanism of the cross adaptationto different environmental stresses.

  18. Cation gating and selectivity in a purified, reconstituted, voltage-dependent sodium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In excitable membranes, the voltage-dependent sodium channel controls the primary membrane conductance change necessary for the generation of an action potential. Over the past four decades, the time- and voltage-dependent sodium currents gated by this channel have been thoroughly documented with increasingly sophisticated voltage-clamp techniques. Recent advances in the biochemistry of membrane proteins have led to the solubilization and purification of this channel protein from nerve (6) and from muscle (4) or muscle-derived (1) membranes, and have provided an approach to the correlation of the channel's molecular structure with its functional properties. Each of these sodium channel preparations appears to contain a large glycoprotein either as its sole component (2) or in association with several small subunits (6, 3). Evidence that these purified proteins represent the excitable membrane sodium channel is presented. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Physicochemical Changes of Antioxidant Peptides Hydrolyzed From Porcine Plasma Protein Subject to Free Hydroxyl Radical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehong Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant peptides have attracted much attention for potential application as natural food ingredients but the fate of them, as well as oxidized proteins in foods during processing, is still poorly understood. Physicochemical changes in antioxidant peptides hydrolysated from porcine plasma protein were discussed in a free hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation system. Porcine Plasma Protein Hydrolysates (PPH was prepared by hydrolyzing porcine plasma protein with Alcalase for 5 h at pH 8.0, 55°C. The content of carbonyl groups increased significantly at various degrees when PPH exposed to free radical-mediated oxidation for different time and different concentrations of H2O2, while total sulfhydryls, reactive sulfhydryls and free amines contents decreased. It was concluded that PPH played an antioxidant role in the radical-mediated oxidation system. This provides a potential way for antioxidation in food production.

  20. Association between dietary protein and change in body composition among children (EYHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vught, Anneke J A H; Heitmann, Berit L; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G;

    2009-01-01

    of protein, arginine, lysine and subsequent 6-year change in body composition among 8-10-year-old children. METHODS: Data of 364 children were collected from Odense, Denmark, during 1997-1998 and 6-year later as part of the European Youth Heart Study. Body mass index among children was subdivided by fat free......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Growth hormone (GH) affects body composition by a relatively reduced fat mass and increased fat free mass. The intake of protein as well as the specific amino acids arginine and lysine potently stimulate GH secretion. This study investigated associations between intakes...... with a body mass index in the 5th quintile, protein intake was associated with DeltaFFMI (p=0.04), and more specific when LYS intake was high, ARG intake was associated with DeltaFFMI (p=0.04). CONCLUSION: Among girls high protein intakes may decrease body fat gain and increase fat free mass gain, depending...

  1. Dynamic change of protein polypeptide of Ginkgo biloba seed during germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-yan; LI Sheng-ping; PENG Fang-ren

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic changes of protein polypeptide in endosperms of Gingkgo biloba seeds during seed germination were studied by SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). The results showed that 80 kinds of protein spots in endosperms of Gingkgo biloba were clear observed in the 2-DE spectrum. Protein molecular weights were in the range of 26-52kD, and their isoelectric points were in the range of 5.8-7.8. In the course of seed germination, 13 kinds of proteins were degraded, and 13 kinds of proteins were synthesized; 7kinds of proteins with different molecular weights and isoelectric points of 35kD/pI6.8, 31kD/pI6.8, 29kD/pI6.8, 33kD/pI6.6, 33kD/pI 6.4,34kD/pI7.7 and 31 kD/pI7.7 were identified primarily as vegetative storage proteins (VSPs).

  2. G protein-gated IKACh channels as therapeutic targets for treatment of sick sinus syndrome and heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesirca, Pietro; Bidaud, Isabelle; Briec, François; Evain, Stéphane; Torrente, Angelo G; Le Quang, Khai; Leoni, Anne-Laure; Baudot, Matthias; Marger, Laurine; Chung You Chong, Antony; Nargeot, Joël; Striessnig, Joerg; Wickman, Kevin; Charpentier, Flavien; Mangoni, Matteo E

    2016-02-16

    Dysfunction of pacemaker activity in the sinoatrial node (SAN) underlies "sick sinus" syndrome (SSS), a common clinical condition characterized by abnormally low heart rate (bradycardia). If untreated, SSS carries potentially life-threatening symptoms, such as syncope and end-stage organ hypoperfusion. The only currently available therapy for SSS consists of electronic pacemaker implantation. Mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 Ca(2+) channels (Cav1.3(-/-)) recapitulate several symptoms of SSS in humans, including bradycardia and atrioventricular (AV) dysfunction (heart block). Here, we tested whether genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of the muscarinic-gated K(+) channel (IKACh) could rescue SSS and heart block in Cav1.3(-/-) mice. We found that genetic inactivation of IKACh abolished SSS symptoms in Cav1.3(-/-) mice without reducing the relative degree of heart rate regulation. Rescuing of SAN and AV dysfunction could be obtained also by pharmacological inhibition of IKACh either in Cav1.3(-/-) mice or following selective inhibition of Cav1.3-mediated L-type Ca(2+) (ICa,L) current in vivo. Ablation of IKACh prevented dysfunction of SAN pacemaker activity by allowing net inward current to flow during the diastolic depolarization phase under cholinergic activation. Our data suggest that patients affected by SSS and heart block may benefit from IKACh suppression achieved by gene therapy or selective pharmacological inhibition.

  3. Association of brominated proteins and changes in protein expression in the rat kidney with subcarcinogenic to carcinogenic doses of bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolisetty, Narendrababu [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Bull, Richard J. [MoBull Consulting, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Costyn, Leah J. [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Delker, Don A. [School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Guo, Zhongxian [Water Quality Office, Public Utilities Board, 608576 (Singapore); Cotruvo, Joseph A. [Joseph Cotruvo and Associates, LLC, Washington, DC 20016 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Cummings, Brian S., E-mail: bsc@rx.uga.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The water disinfection byproduct bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup −}) produces cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in rat kidneys. Our previous studies demonstrated that BrO{sub 3}{sup −} caused sex-dependent differences in renal gene and protein expression in rats and the elimination of brominated organic carbon in their urine. The present study examined changes in renal cell apoptosis and protein expression in male and female F344 rats treated with BrO{sub 3}{sup −} and associated these changes with accumulation of 3-bromotyrosine (3-BT)-modified proteins. Rats were treated with 0, 11.5, 46 and 308 mg/L BrO{sub 3}{sup −} in drinking water for 28 days and renal sections were prepared and examined for apoptosis (TUNEL-staining), 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG), 3-BT, osteopontin, Kim-1, clusterin, and p-21 expression. TUNEL-staining in renal proximal tubules increased in a dose-related manner beginning at 11.5 mg BrO{sub 3}{sup −}/L in female rats and 46 mg/L in males. Increased 8-oxoG staining was observed at doses as low as 46 mg/L. Osteopontin expression also increased in a dose-related manner after treatment with 46 mg/L, in males only. In contrast, Kim-1 expression increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes, although to a greater extent in females at the highest dose. Clusterin and p21 expression also increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes. The expression of 3-BT-modified proteins only increased in male rats, following a pattern previously reported for accumulation of α-2{sub u}-globulin. Increases in apoptosis in renal proximal tubules of male and female rats at the lowest doses suggest a common mode of action for renal carcinogenesis for the two sexes that is independent of α-2{sub u}-globulin nephropathy. - Highlights: • Bromate induced nephrotoxicity in both male and female rats by similar mechanisms. • Apoptosis was seen in both male and female rats at the lowest doses tested. • Bromate-induced apoptosis correlated to 8-oxo

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of protein plugs of the common channel in children with congenital biliary dilatation%先天性胆管扩张症合并共同管内蛋白栓的诊断和处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龙; 张金山; 孙海林; 袁新宇; 刘树立; 刁美; 张军

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨先天性胆管扩张症合并共同管蛋白栓的诊断和清除方法.方法 2001年6月至2009年1月,在收治的先天性胆管扩张症203例患儿中,经手术前超声、CT、MRCP和术中胆道造影检查发现22例合并胰胆合流异常患儿的共同管内有蛋白栓存在,年龄1岁8个月至12岁,平均6.1岁.对其临床表现、影像学特点及手术中蛋白栓的清除方法进行分析,并对其术后症状、生化检测和胆道改变进行随访.结果 22例患儿均以腹痛症状为主,并发呕吐,其中13例患儿合并黄疸,2例囊肿穿孔.19例患儿腹痛的发作期,血和尿中的胰淀粉酶升高.术中胆道造影22例均发现共同管内充盈缺损和扩张,胰管显影,其中9例合并胰管扩张.采用插管和尿道镜冲洗清除后,共同管的直径回缩,胰管不再显影.蛋白栓非常脆软,很容易被水流的冲力破碎成较小的颗粒.经再次共同管造影证实,蛋白栓清除干净.其中8例经小儿尿道镜直视下证实蛋白栓清除干净.患儿随访3个月至8年,22例患儿经血生化和超声检查,无胰淀粉酶升高和再发共同管和胰管内结石者.结论 1岁以上先天性胆管扩张症患儿,以腹痛为主,发作时血和尿中的胰淀粉酶升高,影像学共同管充盈缺损和扩张者,应怀疑共同管内蛋白栓.术中胆道造影是可靠的诊断方法.插管冲洗或尿道镜下清除蚩白栓安全有效,远期预后好.%Objective To investigate the method of diagnosis and removal for protein plugs in the common channel in children with congenital biliary dilatation.Methods The clinical presentation,radiological features and surgical treatment of 22 cases with congenital biliary dilatation(CBD) with protein plugs of the common channel were analyzed.The postoperative symptoms,laboratory examination and bile duct changes were evaluated during follow-up term.Results The 22 children had an average age of 6.1 years,ranging from 1 year 8 months to 12

  5. Nitrogen matter changes during ripening of semihard cheese based on milk protein coaggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Jovanović

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cheeses made on milk protein coaggregate basis are different thantraditionally made cheeses, in technological production process and sensory characteristics, especially texture and taste. In this research it was assumed that applied milk thermal treatment, as well as curd processing, will have appropriate influence on proteins as substratum. During ripening, due to a presence of whey proteins, which influence decrease of casein content in total cheese proteins, substratum is hydrolyzed. In traditionally made cheeses, casein is the basis of protein matrix. In comparison to whey proteins, casein is substantially faster changed during ripening, while whey proteins incorporated in the curd give so called «unspecific» ripening. Besides, application of high temperatures influences decrease of plasmin activity in cheese, regardless of its significant thermal stability. During 4 months ofexperimental cheeses ripening, changes of nitrogen matter were investigated. Significant changes of milk proteins, such as increase of soluble nitrogen matter content, the primary and secondary nitrogen products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening, as well as non-protein nitrogen (12 % TCA and phospho-tungstic-soluble nitrogen (5 % PTA were observed. The average content of soluble nitrogen after production after 15, 30, 60 and 120 days of ripening were: 135.48 mg %, 358.72 mg %, 473.52 mg %, 672.32 mg % and 845.13 mg %,respectively. According to soluble nitrogen content increase, coefficient of ripening also increased and for the same ripening period was: 4.42 %, 10.14 %, 12.95 %, 18.21 % and 23.60 %, respectively. Content of primary and secondary products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening had significant rising trend from the first day of production to 120th day of ripening. At the end of investigated ripening period, content of primary products of protein decomposition was 4.90 times higher compared to the first day of ripening, while content of

  6. Gating motions in voltage-gated potassium channels revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treptow, W.; Marrink, S.J.; Tarek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electric signaling of excitable tissues. A fundamental property of these channels is the ability to open or close in response to changes in the membrane potential. To date, their structure-based activation mechan

  7. Upregulation of voltage-activated potassium channels in hippocampus of Aβ25.35-treated rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-liangWANG; Ya-pingPAN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Potassium channels dysfunction has been indicated in Alzheimer disease. In the present study, the mRNA and protein expression alterations and the functional changes ot VOltage- activated potassium channels were studied in rat hippocampus after a single intracerebro- ventricular injection of β-amyloid peptide 25-35 (Aβ25.35). METHODS: The expressions of mRNA

  8. High temperature ion channels and pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaofeng (Inventor); Gu, Li Qun (Inventor); Cheley, Stephen (Inventor); Bayley, Hagan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention includes an apparatus, system and method for stochastic sensing of an analyte to a protein pore. The protein pore may be an engineer protein pore, such as an ion channel at temperatures above 55.degree. C. and even as high as near 100.degree. C. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable electrical current signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may also be detected.

  9. Long-distance conformational changes in a protein engineered by modulated sequence duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Sagermann, Martin; Gay, Leslie; Matthews, Brian W

    2003-01-01

    There are few, if any, known instances in which a biological signal is transmitted via a large conformational change through the body of a protein. We describe here a mutant of T4 lysozyme that was engineered to permit structural change at a distance. The design uses a tandem sequence repeat that makes it possible to transmit large-scale structural changes from one end of an α-helix to the other over a distance of 17–25 Å. The method should be of general applicability ...

  10. Connexin channels and phospholipids: association and modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Andrew L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For membrane proteins, lipids provide a structural framework and means to modulate function. Paired connexin hemichannels form the intercellular channels that compose gap junction plaques while unpaired hemichannels have regulated functions in non-junctional plasma membrane. The importance of interactions between connexin channels and phospholipids is poorly understood. Results Endogenous phospholipids most tightly associated with purified connexin26 or connexin32 hemichannels or with junctional plaques in cell membranes, those likely to have structural and/or modulatory effects, were identified by tandem electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using class-specific interpretative methods. Phospholipids were characterized by headgroup class, charge, glycerol-alkyl chain linkage and by acyl chain length and saturation. The results indicate that specific endogenous phospholipids are uniquely associated with either connexin26 or connexin32 channels, and some phospholipids are associated with both. Functional effects of the major phospholipid classes on connexin channel activity were assessed by molecular permeability of hemichannels reconstituted into liposomes. Changes to phospholipid composition(s of the liposome membrane altered the activity of connexin channels in a manner reflecting changes to the surface charge/potential of the membrane and, secondarily, to cholesterol content. Together, the data show that connexin26 and connexin32 channels have a preference for tight association with unique anionic phospholipids, and that these, independent of headgroup, have a positive effect on the activity of both connexin26 and connexin32 channels. Additionally, the data suggest that the likely in vivo phospholipid modulators of connexin channel structure-function that are connexin isoform-specific are found in the cytoplasmic leaflet. A modulatory role for phospholipids that promote negative curvature is also inferred. Conclusion

  11. The Damping of Large Sediment Input Signals due to Attrition, Channel Morphologic Change, and Storage: the Fly River Watershed, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, W. E.; Cui, Y.; Parker, G.; Moi, A.

    2001-12-01

    the 15 year period, 30% of the sediment was stored in the fan and gravel bedded reaches, 18% in the bed of the sand bedded channel, 17% on the adjacent floodplains, 2% was dredged from the channel and only 28% of the total load was transported to the lower end of the middle Fly. Modeling which generally predicts well the field observations, demonstrates that: 1) about 70% of the gravel input broke down to silt and clay, 2) channel widening (which is not modeled) strongly reduces aggradation thickness, 3) sand aggradation is damped by steepening slopes and increased transport, 4) rates of overbank deposition markedly increases with channel bed aggradataion, and 5) post-mining (and end of sediment input) , the aggraded gravel will eroded and disperse downstream (though trapped within the gravel reach), whereas the sand slug will move as an aggradation wave downstream for many decades. These findings demonstrate that upstream sediment pulses are strongly damped by particle attrition, channel widening and transient storage effects. Prediction of downstream fining of the sand bedded reach and channel width change in response to large fluctuations in sediment load remain significant theoretical challenges.

  12. Distinct transport selectivity of two structural subclasses of the nodulin-like intrinsic protein family of plant aquaglyceroporin channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ian S; Roberts, Daniel M

    2005-12-27

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) are a diverse class of integral membrane proteins that facilitate the transport of water and some small solutes across cellular membranes. X-ray structures of MIPs indicate that a tetrad of residues (the ar/R region) form a narrow pore constriction that constitutes the selectivity filter. In comparison with mammalian and microbial species, plants have a greater number and diversity of MIPs with greater than 30 genes encoding four phylogenetic subfamilies with eight different classes of ar/R sequences. The nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily in Arabidopsis can be subdivided into two ar/R subgroups: the NIP subgroup I, which resembles the archetype of the family, soybean nodulin 26, and the NIP subgroup II, which is represented by the Arabidopsis protein AtNIP6;1. These two NIPs differ principally by the substitution of a conserved alanine (NIP subgroup II) for a conserved tryptophan (NIP subgroup I) in the helix 2 position (H2) of the ar/R filter. A comparison of the water and solute tranport properties of the two proteins was performed by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Nodulin 26 is an aquaglyceroporin with a modest osmotic water permeability (P(f)) and the ability to transport uncharged solutes such as glycerol and formamide. In constrast, AtNIP6;1 showed no measurable water permeability but transported glycerol, formamide, as well as larger solutes that were impermeable to nodulin 26. By site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the H2 position is the crucial determinant that confers these transport behaviors. A comparison of the NIPs and tonoplast-intrinsic proteins (TIP) shows that the H2 residue can predict the transport profile for water and glycerol with histidine found in TIP-like aquaporins, tryptophan found in aquaglyceroporins (NIP I), and alanine found in water-impermeable glyceroporins (AtNIP6;1). PMID:16363796

  13. RFI channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A class of channel models is presented which exhibit varying burst error severity much like channels encountered in practice. An information-theoretic analysis of these channel models is made, and conclusions are drawn that may aid in the design of coded communication systems for realistic noisy channels.

  14. BK Channels in the Vascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy-Natarajan, G; Koide, M

    2016-01-01

    Autoregulation of blood flow is essential for the preservation of organ function to ensure continuous supply of oxygen and essential nutrients and removal of metabolic waste. This is achieved by controlling the diameter of muscular arteries and arterioles that exhibit a myogenic response to changes in arterial blood pressure, nerve activity and tissue metabolism. Large-conductance voltage and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels (BK channels), expressed exclusively in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the vascular wall of healthy arteries, play a critical role in regulating the myogenic response. Activation of BK channels by intracellular, local, and transient ryanodine receptor-mediated "Ca(2+) sparks," provides a hyperpolarizing influence on the SMC membrane potential thereby decreasing the activity of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and limiting Ca(2+) influx to promote SMC relaxation and vasodilation. The BK channel α subunit, a large tetrameric protein with each monomer consisting of seven-transmembrane domains, a long intracellular C-terminal tail and an extracellular N-terminus, associates with the β1 and γ subunits in vascular SMCs. The BK channel is regulated by factors originating within the SMC or from the endothelium, perivascular nerves and circulating blood, that significantly alter channel gating properties, Ca(2+) sensitivity and expression of the α and/or β1 subunit. The BK channel thus serves as a central receiving dock that relays the effects of the changes in several such concomitant autocrine and paracrine factors and influences cardiovascular health. This chapter describes the primary mechanism of regulation of myogenic response by BK channels and the alterations to this mechanism wrought by different vasoactive mediators. PMID:27238270

  15. Candida albicans PROTEIN PROFILE CHANGES IN RESPONSE TO THE BUTANOLIC EXTRACT OF Sapindus saponariaL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana FIORINI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen that is capable of causing superficial and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Extracts of Sapindus saponaria have been used as antimicrobial agents against various organisms. In the present study, we used a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS to identify the changes in protein abundance of C. albicans after exposure to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC of the butanolic extract (BUTE of S. saponaria and also to fluconazole. A total of six different proteins with greater than 1.5 fold induction or repression relative to the untreated control cells were identified among the three treatments. In general, proteins/enzymes involved with the glycolysis (GPM1, ENO1, FBA1, amino acid metabolism (ILV5, PDC11 and protein synthesis (ASC1 pathways were detected. In conclusion, our findings reveal antifungal-induced changes in protein abundance of C. albicans. By using the previously identified components of the BUTE of S. saponaria(e.g., saponins and sesquiterpene oligoglycosides, it will be possible to compare the behavior of compounds with unknown mechanisms of action, and this knowledge will help to focus the subsequent biochemical work aimed at defining the effects of these compounds.

  16. Dietary n-6 PUFA, carbohydrate:protein ratio and change in body weight and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Madsen, Lise; Dethlefsen, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    -order terms, protein intake, long-chain n-3 PUFA intake and other potential confounders. Due to adjustment for intake of protein, levels of carbohydrate indirectly reflect levels of the carbohydrate:protein ratio. SETTING: Diet, Cancer and Health follow-up study, Denmark. SUBJECTS: Women and men (n 29 152......) aged 55 years. RESULTS: For a high intake of n-6 PUFA (6·9 % of energy) v. a low intake of n-6 PUFA (3·4 % of energy), the difference in 5-year weight change was -189·7 g (95 % CI -636·8, 257·4 g) at a low carbohydrate:protein ratio and -86·7 g (95 % CI -502·9, 329·6 g) at a high carbohydrate......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the intake of n-6 PUFA and subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference at different levels of the carbohydrate:protein ratio. DESIGN: Follow-up study with anthropometric measurements at recruitment and on average 5·3 years later...

  17. Changes in IGF-I and its Binding Proteins Are Associated with Diabetes in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneke, Chino S.; Parrinello, Christina M.; Rajpathak, Swapnil N.; Rohan, Thomas E.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Bůžková, Petra; Kizer, Jorge R.; Newman, Anne B.; Strickler, Howard D.; Kaplan, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about long-term changes in insulin-like growth Factor (IGF) proteins and glycemic status. We hypothesized that changes in IGF proteins are exaggerated in participants with type 2 diabetes or worsening glycemia versus those that remain normoglycemic over a 9-year follow-up period. Design Retrospective analysis of cohort study. Setting Participants were recruited from four States: North Carolina, California, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Participants 897 participants enrolled in CHS All Stars, a cohort study of community dwelling adults aged ≥65 years. Measurements Plasma IGF-I, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 levels were assessed and ADA cut-points for IGT, IFG, and diabetes were used to classify participants at baseline (1996–1997) and follow-up (2005–2006). Results At baseline, mean age was 76.3 years (± 3.6) and 18.5% had diabetes. Individuals with IFG alone and IGT+IFG had the highest levels of IGF-I and lowest levels of IGFBP-1, compared to individuals with normoglycemia or diabetes. The greatest percent change in IGF levels occurred in those who had diabetes at baseline (9-year changes: −9.3% for IGF-I, 59.7% for IGFBP-1, −13.4% for IGFBP-3); the smallest in individuals who remained normoglycemic at follow-up (9-year changes: −3.7% for IGF-I, 25.6% for IGFBP-1, −6.4% for IGFBP-3); and intermediate changes in those who were normoglycemic but developed IFG at follow-up. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that degrees of glycemic impairment are associated with varying levels of changes in IGF proteins. The exaggerated changes observed in the diabetes group have been previously shown to be associated with heart failure, cancer and non-cancer mortality. PMID:25989565

  18. Fluvial system response to late Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level change on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R. Randall; Pigati, Jeffery S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is one of four east-west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the five islands in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA. The island setting provides an unparalleled environment in which to record the response of fluvial systems to major changes of sea level. Many of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, leaving a relict floodplain as much as 12–14 m above the present channel. The period of falling sea level between the end of the last interglacial highstand at ~ 80 ka and the last glacial lowstand at ~ 21 ka was marked by erosion and incision in the uplands and by deposition of alluvial sediment on the exposed marine shelf. Sea level rose relatively rapidly following the last glacial lowstand of − 106 m, triggering a shift from an erosional to a depositional sedimentary regime. Accumulation of sediment occurred first through vertical and lateral accretion in broad, shallow channels on the shelf. Channel avulsion and delta sedimentation produced widespread deposition, creating lobes or wedges of sediment distributed across relatively large areas of the shelf during the latest Pleistocene. Backfilling of valleys onshore (landward of present sea level) appears to have progressed in a more orderly and predictable fashion throughout the Holocene primarily because the streams were confined to their valleys. Vertical aggradation locally reduced stream gradients, causing frequent overbank flooding and lateral channel shift by meandering and/or avulsion. Local channel gradient and morphology, short-term climate variations, and intrinsic controls also affected the timing and magnitudes of these cut, fill, and flood events, and are reflected in the thickness and spacing of the episodic alluvial sequences. Floodplain aggradation within the valleys continued until at least 500 years ago

  19. Fluvial system response to late Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level change on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R. Randall; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-09-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is one of four east-west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the five islands in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA. The island setting provides an unparalleled environment in which to record the response of fluvial systems to major changes of sea level. Many of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, leaving a relict floodplain as much as 12-14 m above the present channel. The period of falling sea level between the end of the last interglacial highstand at ~ 80 ka and the last glacial lowstand at ~ 21 ka was marked by erosion and incision in the uplands and by deposition of alluvial sediment on the exposed marine shelf. Sea level rose relatively rapidly following the last glacial lowstand of - 106 m, triggering a shift from an erosional to a depositional sedimentary regime. Accumulation of sediment occurred first through vertical and lateral accretion in broad, shallow channels on the shelf. Channel avulsion and delta sedimentation produced widespread deposition, creating lobes or wedges of sediment distributed across relatively large areas of the shelf during the latest Pleistocene. Backfilling of valleys onshore (landward of present sea level) appears to have progressed in a more orderly and predictable fashion throughout the Holocene primarily because the streams were confined to their valleys. Vertical aggradation locally reduced stream gradients, causing frequent overbank flooding and lateral channel shift by meandering and/or avulsion. Local channel gradient and morphology, short-term climate variations, and intrinsic controls also affected the timing and magnitudes of these cut, fill, and flood events, and are reflected in the thickness and spacing of the episodic alluvial sequences. Floodplain aggradation within the valleys continued until at least 500 years ago, followed by

  20. Subpicosecond protein backbone changes detected during the green-absorbing proteorhodopsin primary photoreaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsden, Jason J; Kralj, Joel M; Chieffo, Logan R; Wang, Xihua; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Spudich, Elena N; Spudich, John L; Ziegler, Lawrence D; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2007-10-11

    Recent studies demonstrate that photoactive proteins can react within several picoseconds to photon absorption by their chromophores. Faster subpicosecond protein responses have been suggested to occur in rhodopsin-like proteins where retinal photoisomerization may impulsively drive structural changes in nearby protein groups. Here, we test this possibility by investigating the earliest protein structural changes occurring in proteorhodopsin (PR) using ultrafast transient infrared (TIR) spectroscopy with approximately 200 fs time resolution combined with nonperturbing isotope labeling. PR is a recently discovered microbial rhodopsin similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) found in marine proteobacteria and functions as a proton pump. Vibrational bands in the retinal fingerprint (1175-1215 cm(-1)) and ethylenic stretching (1500-1570 cm(-1)) regions characteristic of all-trans to 13-cis chromophore isomerization and formation of a red-shifted photointermediate appear with a 500-700 fs time constant after photoexcitation. Bands characteristic of partial return to the ground state evolve with a 2.0-3.5 ps time constant. In addition, a negative band appears at 1548 cm(-1) with a time constant of 500-700 fs, which on the basis of total-15N and retinal C15D (retinal with a deuterium on carbon 15) isotope labeling is assigned to an amide II peptide backbone mode that shifts to near 1538 cm(-1) concomitantly with chromophore isomerization. Our results demonstrate that one or more peptide backbone groups in PR respond with a time constant of 500-700 fs, almost coincident with the light-driven retinylidene chromophore isomerization. The protein changes we observe on a subpicosecond time scale may be involved in storage of the absorbed photon energy subsequently utilized for proton transport. PMID:17880126

  1. In-Line Desalting of Proteins from Buffer and Synthetic Urine Solution Prior to ESI-MS Analysis via a Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fiber Microcolumn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Carolyn Q.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2013-06-01

    Presented here is a novel in-line solid phase extraction (SPE) method utilizing a capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fiber microcolumn prior to introduction to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The high permeability of the microcolumn allows for operation under syringe pump or HPLC driven flow, ultimately providing greater mass spectral clarity and accurate molecular weight determinations for different protein/buffer combinations. Studies presented here focus on the desalting of several target proteins from a standard phosphate buffered saline (PBS) matrix and a synthetic urine solution prior to ESI-MS determinations. In every case, responses for μM-level proteins in PBS improve from the situation of not permitting molecular weight determinations to values that are precise to better than ±10 Da, without internal standards, with relative improvements in the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) on the order of 3,000×. De-salting of a myoglobin-spiked (12 μM) synthetic urine results in equally-improved spectral quality.

  2. Nesfatin-1 Suppresses Cardiac L-type Ca2+ Channels Through Melanocortin Type 4 Receptor and the Novel Protein Kinase C Theta Isoform Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoqian Ying

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nesfatin-1 (NF-1, an anorexic nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2-derived hypothalamic peptide, acts as a peripheral cardiac modulator and it can induce negative inotropic effects. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects in cardiomyocytes remain unclear. Methods: Using patch clamp, protein kinase assays, and western blot analysis, we studied the effect of NF-1 on L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa,L and to explore the regulatory mechanisms of this effect in adult ventricular myocytes. Results: NF-1 reversibly decreased ICa,L in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was mediated by melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4-R and was associated with a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of inactivation. Dialysis of cells with GDP-β-S or anti-Gβ antibody as well as pertussis toxin pretreatment abolished the inhibitory effects of NF-1 on ICa,L. Protein kinase C (PKC antagonists abolished NF-1-induced responses, whereas inhibition of PKA activity or intracellular application of the fast Ca2+-chelator BAPTA elicited no such effects. Application of NF-1 increased membrane abundance of PKC theta isoform (PKCθ, and PKCθ inhibition abolished the decrease in ICa,L induced by NF-1. Conclusion: These data suggest that NF-1 suppresses L-type Ca2+ channels via the MC4-R that couples sequentially to the βγ subunits of Gi/o-protein and the novel PKCθ isoform in adult ventricular myocytes.

  3. Membrane targeting of cGMP-dependent protein kinase is required for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); A. Smolenski; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); W.E. Boomaars (Wendy); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA recently cloned isoform of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK), designated type II, was implicated as the mediator of cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion based on its localization in the apical membrane of enterocytes and on its capacity to activate cys

  4. Study of anomalous top quark flavor-changing neutral current interactions via the tW channel of single-top-quark production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesami, S. M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.

    2010-06-01

    The potential of the LHC for investigation of anomalous top quark interactions with gluon (tug,tcg) through the production of tW channel of single top quarks is studied. In the standard model, the single top quarks in the tW-channel mode are charge symmetric, meaning that σ(pp→t+W-)=σ(pp→t¯+W+). However, the presence of anomalous flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) couplings leads to charge asymmetry. In this paper, a method is proposed in which this charge asymmetry may be used to constrain anomalous FCNC couplings. The strength of resulting constraints is estimated for the LHC for the center of mass energies of 7 and 14 TeV.

  5. EFFECTS OF PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION ON MUSCULAR PERFORMANCE AND RESTING HORMONAL CHANGES IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R. Hoffman

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of protein supplementation on athletic performance and hormonal changes was examined in 21 experienced collegiate strength/power athletes participating in a 12-week resistance training program. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a protein supplement (PR; n = 11 or a placebo (PL; n = 10 group. During each testing session subjects were assessed for strength (one repetition maximum [1-RM] bench press and squat, power (Wingate anaerobic power test and body composition. Resting blood samples were analyzed at weeks 0 (PRE, 6 (MID and 12 (POST for total testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, and IGF-1. No difference was seen in energy intake between PR and PL (3034 ± 209 kcal and 3130 ± 266 kcal, respectively, but a significant difference in daily protein intake was seen between PR (2.00 g·kg body mass[BM]-1·d-1 and PL (1.24 g·kgBM-1·d-1. A greater change (p < 0.05 in the ∆ 1-RM squat was seen in PR (23.5 ± 13.6 kg compared to PL (9.1 ± 11.9 kg. No other significant strength or power differences were seen between the groups. Cortisol concentrations were significantly lower at MID for PL and this difference was significantly different than PR. No significant changes were noted in resting growth hormone or IGF-1 concentrations in either group. Although protein supplementation appeared to augment lower body strength development, similar upper body strength, anaerobic power and lean tissue changes do not provide clear evidence supporting the efficacy of a 12-week protein supplementation period in experienced resistance trained athletes

  6. Structural Changes in Rice Bran Protein upon Different Extrusion Temperatures: A Raman Spectroscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Linyi Zhou; Yong Yang; Haibin Ren; Yan Zhao; Zhongjiang Wang; Fei Wu; Zhigang Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is critically evaluated to establish the limits to which it may be used to detect changes in protein conformation upon extrusion. Rice bran protein (RBP) extruded with different temperatures (100, 120, 140, and 160°C, labeled as ERBP-) was considered. DSC showed that extrusion at 100°C increased TD of RBP but decreased its ΔH, while, after extrusion treatment at 120°C, RBP completely denatured. A progressive increase in unordered structure and a general decrease in α-helix ...

  7. Quantitative Proteomics of Sleep-Deprived Mouse Brains Reveals Global Changes in Mitochondrial Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie-Mei; Zhang, Ju-en; Lin, Rui; Chen, She; Luo, Minmin; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a ubiquitous, tightly regulated, and evolutionarily conserved behavior observed in almost all animals. Prolonged sleep deprivation can be fatal, indicating that sleep is a physiological necessity. However, little is known about its core function. To gain insight into this mystery, we used advanced quantitative proteomics technology to survey the global changes in brain protein abundance. Aiming to gain a comprehensive profile, our proteomics workflow included filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), which increased the coverage of membrane proteins; tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, for relative quantitation; and high resolution, high mass accuracy, high throughput mass spectrometry (MS). In total, we obtained the relative abundance ratios of 9888 proteins encoded by 6070 genes. Interestingly, we observed significant enrichment for mitochondrial proteins among the differentially expressed proteins. This finding suggests that sleep deprivation strongly affects signaling pathways that govern either energy metabolism or responses to mitochondrial stress. Additionally, the differentially-expressed proteins are enriched in pathways implicated in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Alzheimer’s, hinting at possible connections between sleep loss, mitochondrial stress, and neurodegeneration. PMID:27684481

  8. Immunological identification of candidate proteins involved in regulating active shape changes of outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, M; Zimmermann, U; Köpschall, I; Rohbock, K; Jüngling, S; Zenner, H P

    1995-06-01

    By employing immunological methods, it has been demonstrated that myosin, myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) proteins in outer hair cells (OHC) are immunologically different from isoforms in platelets, smooth muscle and heart muscle, and are probably more related to isoforms found in red blood cells (RBC). Moreover, proteins related to band 3 protein (b3p) and protein 4.1 (p 4.1), ankyrin as well as fodrin and spectrin, but not glycophorin, have been identified in isolated OHCs. Both OHCs and RBC differ from other motile non-muscle cells in their lack of smooth muscle isoforms of actin, their common high levels of spectrin-, ankyrin- and band 3-like proteins, as well as the expression of the 80 kDa protein 4.1 isoform. The data support the notion that motility of OHC may be based upon regulation of the b3p/p 4.1/ankyrin complex, and thus may be reminiscent to the active shape changes in RBC.

  9. Isolation of proflavine as a blocker of G protein-gated inward rectifier potassium channels by a cell growth-based screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Hitoshi; Inanobe, Atsushi; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2016-10-01

    The overexpression of Kir3.2, a subunit of the G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) channel, is implicated in some of the neurological phenotypes of Down syndrome (DS). Chemical compounds that block Kir3.2 are expected to improve the symptoms of DS. The purpose of this study is to develop a cell-based screening system to identify Kir3.2 blockers and then investigate the mode of action of the blocker. Chemical screening was carried out using a K(+) transporter-deficient yeast strain that expressed a constitutively active Kir3.2 mutant. The mode of action of an effective blocker was electrophysiologically analyzed using Kir channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Proflavine was identified to inhibit the growth of Kir3.2-transformant cells and Kir3.2 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. The current inhibition was strong when membrane potentials (Vm) was above equilibrium potential of K(+) (EK). When Vm was below EK, the blockage apparently depended on the difference between Vm and [K(+)]. Furthermore, the inhibition became stronger by lowering extracellular [K(+)]. These results indicated that the yeast strain serves as a screening system to isolate Kir3.2 blockers and proflavine is a prototype of a pore blocker of Kir3.2. PMID:27236080

  10. Mapping of the detergent-exposed surface of membrane proteins and peptides by 1H solution NMR in detergent: Application to the gramicidin A ion channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigneuret, Michel [Universite Paris 6, LPBC (URA 2056) (France); Le guerneve, Christine [INRA-IPV (France)

    1999-01-15

    The present work evaluates the use of intermolecular polypeptide-detergent 1H through-space connectivities to determine the bilayer exposed-surface and the bilayer topography of membrane polypeptides solubilized in non- deuterated detergents. For this purpose, the membrane peptide gramicidin A, solubilized in non-deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate as its dimeric {beta}6,3 helix channel conformation was used. For this peptide, a high-resolution 3D structure, as well as reasonable assumptions concerning its membrane arrangement, exist. Band-selective 2D NOESY, ROESY and 3D NOESY-NOESY experiments were used to detect detergent-polypeptide through-space correlations in the presence of an excess of the non-deuterated detergent. The observed intermolecular NOEs appear to be strongly temperature- dependent. Based on the known 3D structure of the gramicidin channel, the detergent-polypeptide through-space correlations appear to be selective for 1H located on the hydrophobic surface of gramicidin A with very few contributions from interior 1H or water-exposed 1H. It is suggested that this method can be of general use to evaluate the bilayer-exposed surface and topography of membrane peptides and small proteins.

  11. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-[3H]PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-[3H]PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 μM for the agonist (±)-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, (±)-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since (-)-PN200-110 (1-200 μM) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS) on binding parameters. GTPγS did increase the ability of (±)-[3H]PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites

  12. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol changes the transition kinetics and subunit interactions in the small bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akitake, Bradley; Spelbrink, Robin E J; Anishkin, Andriy; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben; Sukharev, Sergei

    2007-04-15

    2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE), a low-dielectric solvent, has recently been used as a promising tool to probe the strength of intersubunit interactions in membrane proteins. An analysis of inner membrane proteins of Escherichia coli has identified several SDS-resistant protein complexes that separate into subunits upon exposure to TFE. One of these was the homo-heptameric stretch-activated mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS), a ubiquitous component of the bacterial turgor-regulation system. Here we show that a substantial fraction of MscS retains its oligomeric state in cold lithium-dodecyl-sulfate gel electrophoresis. Exposure of MscS complexes to 10-15 vol % TFE in native membranes or nonionic detergent micelles before lithium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis results in a complete dissociation into monomers, suggesting that at these concentrations TFE by itself disrupts or critically compromises intersubunit interactions. Patch-clamp analysis of giant E. coli spheroplasts expressing MscS shows that exposure to TFE in lower concentrations (0.5-5.0 vol %) causes leftward shifts of the dose-response curves when applied extracellularly, and rightward shifts when added from the cytoplasmic side. In the latter case, TFE increases the rate of tension-dependent inactivation and lengthens the process of recovery to the resting state. MscS responses to pressure ramps of different speeds indicate that in the presence of TFE most channels reside in the resting state and only at tensions near the activation threshold does TFE dramatically speed up inactivation. The effect of TFE is reversible as normal channel activity returns 15-30 min after a TFE washout. We interpret the observed midpoint shifts in terms of asymmetric partitioning of TFE into the membrane and distortion of the bilayer lateral pressure profile. We also relate the increased rate of inactivation and subunit separation with the capacity of TFE to perturb buried interhelical contacts in proteins

  13. Foams prepared from whey protein isolate and egg white protein: 2. Changes associated with angel food cake functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tristan K; Yang, Xin; Foegeding, E Allen

    2009-06-01

    The effects of sucrose on the physical properties and thermal stability of foams prepared from 10% (w/v) protein solutions of whey protein isolate (WPI), egg white protein (EWP), and their combinations (WPI/EWP) were investigated in wet foams and angel food cakes. Incorporation of 12.8 (w/v) sucrose increased EWP foam stability (drainage 1/2 life) but had little effect on the stability of WPI and WPI/EWP foams. Increased stability was not due to viscosity alone. Sucrose increased interfacial elasticity (E ') of EWP and decreased E' of WPI and WPI/EWP combinations, suggesting that altered interfacial properties increased stability in EWP foams. Although 25% WPI/75% EWP cakes had similar volumes as EWP cakes, cakes containing WPI had larger air cells. Changes during heating showed that EWP foams had network formation starting at 45 degrees C, which was not observed in WPI and WPI/EWP foams. Moreover, in batters, which are foams with additional sugar and flour, a stable foam network was observed from 25 to 85 degrees C for batters made from EWP foams. Batters containing WPI or WPI/EWP mixtures showed signs of destabilization starting at 25 degrees C. These results show that sucrose greatly improved the stability of wet EWP foams and that EWP foams form network structures that remain stable during heating. In contrast, sucrose had minimal effects on stability of WPI and WPI/EWP wet foams, and batters containing these foams showed destabilization prior to heating. Therefore, destabilization processes occurring in the wet foams and during baking account for differences in angel food cake quality. PMID:19646042

  14. Thermal bleaching induced changes in photosystem II function not reflected by changes in photosystem II protein content of Stylophora pistillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, J.; Szabó, M.; Campbell, D. A.; Larkum, A. W. D.; Ralph, P. J.; Hill, R.

    2014-03-01

    Scleractinian corals exist in a symbiosis with marine dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium that is easily disrupted by changes in the external environment. Increasing seawater temperatures cause loss of pigments and expulsion of the symbionts from the host in a process known as coral bleaching; though, the exact mechanism and trigger of this process has yet to be elucidated. We exposed nubbins of the coral Stylophora pistillata to bleaching temperatures over a period of 14 daylight hours. Fifty-nine percent of the symbiont population was expelled over the course of this short-term treatment. Maximum quantum yield ( F V/ F M) of photosystem (PS) II for the in hospite symbiont population did not change significantly over the treatment period, but there was a significant decline in the quantity of PSII core proteins (PsbA and PsbD) at the onset of the experimental increase in temperature. F V/ F M from populations of expelled symbionts dropped sharply over the first 6 h of temperature treatment, and then toward the end of the experiment, it increased to an F V/ F M value similar to that of the in hospite population. This suggests that the symbionts were likely damaged prior to expulsion from the host, and the most damaged symbionts were expelled earlier in the bleaching. The quantity of PSII core proteins, PsbA and PsbD, per cell was significantly higher in the expelled symbionts than in the remaining in hospite population over 6-10 h of temperature treatment. We attribute this to a buildup of inactive PSII reaction centers, likely caused by a breakdown in the PSII repair cycle. Thus, thermal bleaching of the coral S. pistillata induces changes in PSII content that do not follow the pattern that would be expected based on the results of PSII function.

  15. Unintended Changes in Genetically Modified Rice Expressing the Lysine-Rich Fusion Protein Gene Revealed by a Proteomics Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiang-xiang; TANG Tang; LIU Fu-xia; LU Chang-li; HU Xiao-lan; JI Li-lian; LIU Qiao-quan

    2013-01-01

    Development of new technologies for evaluating genetically modiifed (GM) crops has revealed that there are unintended insertions and expression changes in GM crops. Proifling techniques are non-targeted approaches and are capable of detecting more unintended changes in GM crops. Here, we report the application of a comparative proteomic approach to investigate the protein proifle differences between a GM rice line, which has a lysine-rich protein gene, and its non-transgenic parental line. Proteome analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrum analysis of the seeds identiifed 22 differentially expressed protein spots. Apart from a number of glutelins that were detected as targeted proteins in the GM line, the majority of the other changed proteins were involved in carbohydrate metabolism, protein synthesis and stress responses. These results indicated that the altered proteins were not associated with plant allergens or toxicity.

  16. Fine-tuning of voltage sensitivity of the Kv1.2 potassium channel by interhelix loop dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Rheanna; Sharmin, Nazlee; Morgan, Carla; Gallin, Warren J

    2013-04-01

    Many proteins function by changing conformation in response to ligand binding or changes in other factors in their environment. Any change in the sequence of a protein, for example during evolution, which alters the relative free energies of the different functional conformations changes the conditions under which the protein will function. Voltage-gated ion channels are membrane proteins that open and close an ion-selective pore in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. The charged S4 transmembrane helix transduces changes in transmembrane voltage into a change in protein internal energy by interacting with the rest of the channel protein through a combination of non-covalent interactions between adjacent helices and covalent interactions along the peptide backbone. However, the structural basis for the wide variation in the V50 value between different voltage-gated potassium channels is not well defined. To test the role of the loop linking the S3 helix and the S4 helix in voltage sensitivity, we have constructed a set of mutants of the rat Kv1.2 channel that vary solely in the length and composition of the extracellular loop that connects S4 to S3. We evaluated the effect of these different loop substitutions on the voltage sensitivity of the channel and compared these experimental results with molecular dynamics simulations of the loop structures. Here, we show that this loop has a significant role in setting the precise V50 of activation in Kv1 family channels.

  17. Metabolomic changes in fatty liver can be modified by dietary protein and calcium during energy restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taru K Pilvi; Tuulikki Sepp(a)nen-Laakso; Helena Simolin; Piet Finckenberg; Anne Huotari; Karl-Heinz Herzig; Riitta Korpela; Matej Ore(s)i(c); Eero M Mervaala

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To characterise the effect of energy restriction (ER) on liver lipid and primary metabolite profile by using metabolomic approach. We also investigated whether the effect of energy restriction can be further enhanced by modification of dietary protein source and calcium.METHODS: Liver metabolomic profile of lean and obese C57BI/6] mice (n = 10/group) were compared with two groups of weight-reduced mice. ER was performed on control diet and whey protein-based high-calcium diet (whey + Ca). The metabolomic an alyses were performed using the UPLC/MS based lipidomic platform and the HPLC/MS/MS based primary metabolite platform.RESULTS: ER on both diets significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation and lipid droplet size, while only whey + Ca diet significantly decreased blood glucose (P 0.05, vs lean). These changes were accompanied with up-regulated TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway metabolites.CONCLUSION: ER-induced changes on hepatic metabolomic profile can be significantly affected by dietary protein source. The therapeutic potential of whey protein and calcium should be further studied.

  18. Structural Changes in Rice Bran Protein upon Different Extrusion Temperatures: A Raman Spectroscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linyi Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is critically evaluated to establish the limits to which it may be used to detect changes in protein conformation upon extrusion. Rice bran protein (RBP extruded with different temperatures (100, 120, 140, and 160°C, labeled as ERBP- was considered. DSC showed that extrusion at 100°C increased TD of RBP but decreased its ΔH, while, after extrusion treatment at 120°C, RBP completely denatured. A progressive increase in unordered structure and a general decrease in α-helix structure and β-sheet structure of extruded RBP were observed from Raman study. Meanwhile the content of unordered structure increased up to 140°C and then decreased at 160°C, while the trend of α-helix and β-sheet content was opposite, which was contributed to the composite effect of formation of some more protein aggregation and protein denaturation. Extrusion generally induced a significant decrease in Trp band near 760 cm−1 but an increase at 160°C. No significant difference was observed in Tyr doublet ratios between controlled RBP samples and extruded RBP below 160°C, whereas Tyr doublet ratios of extruded RBP decreased at 160°C. Intensity of the band assigned to CHn bending decreased progressively and then increased as extrusion temperature increased, indicating changes in microenvironment and polarity.

  19. Changes of β3 Integrins and Extracellular Matrix Proteins in the Endometrium of Unexplained Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王化丽; 曲陆荣; 何丽霞; 张颐

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of β3 integrins and extracellular matrix proteins including fibronectin (FN) , laminin (LN) and collagen type Ⅳ (CL type Ⅳ) on the endometrium of secretory phase from 31 fertile women (fertility group)and 34 women with unexplained infertility (infertility group) by a histochemical method. The results were as follows : In glandular epithelium, β3 integrin appeared in the mid secretory phase and continued to late secretory phase in the fertility group, but was not expressed during the secretory phase in the infertility group.Extracellular matrix proteins from the fertility group were expressed more strongly in mid secretory phase than that in the early secretory phase, and were weakest in the late secretory phase. Compared with the fertility group, the levels of extracellular matrix proteins in the infertility group were elevated in the secretory phase. In conclusion: our current study demonstrate that fie integrin and extracellular matrix proteins are expressed at different levels in the endometrium during the menstrual cycle. They are involved in endometrial changes during the menstrual cycle and during the implantation of the blastocyst. Their unusual expression result in the failure of implantation.

  20. Age-related changes in AMP-activated protein kinase after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fudong; Benashski, Sharon E; Persky, Rebecca; Xu, Yan; Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionary conserved energy sensor sensitive to changes in cellular AMP/ATP ratio which is activated by phosphorylation (pAMPK). pAMPK levels decrease in peripheral tissues with age, but whether this also occurs in the aged brain, and how this contributes to the ability of the aged brain to cope with ischemic stress is unknown. This study investigated the activation of AMPK and the response to AMPK inhibition after induced stroke...

  1. *CHANGING PATTERN OF THE SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ERYTHROBLAST MACROPHAGE PROTEIN (EMP) DURING MACROPHAGE DIFFERENTIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2006-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp), mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages, and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity ...

  2. Role of spike protein conformational changes in fusion of Semliki Forest virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Justman, J.; Klimjack, M R; Kielian, M

    1993-01-01

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and a number of other enveloped animal viruses infect cells via a membrane fusion reaction triggered by the low pH within endocytic vesicles. In addition to having a low pH requirement, SFV fusion and infection are also strictly dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the host cell membrane. A number of conformational changes in the SFV spike protein occur following low-pH treatment, including dissociation of the E1-E2 dimer, conformational change...

  3. Identification of cypermethrin induced protein changes in green algae by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-04-29

    Cypermethrin (CYP) is one of the most widely used pesticides in large scale for agricultural and domestic purpose and the residue often seriously affects aquatic system. Environmental pollutant-induced protein changes in organisms could be detected by proteomics, leading to discovery of potential biomarkers and understanding of mode of action. While proteomics investigations of CYP stress in some animal models have been well studied, few reports about the effects of exposure to CYP on algae proteome were published. To determine CYP effect in algae, the impact of various dosages (0.001μg/L, 0.01μg/L and 1μg/L) of CYP on green algae Chlorella vulgaris for 24h and 96h was investigated by using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics technique. A total of 162 and 198 proteins were significantly altered after CYP exposure for 24h and 96h, respectively. Overview of iTRAQ results indicated that the influence of CYP on algae protein might be dosage-dependent. Functional analysis of differentially expressed proteins showed that CYP could induce protein alterations related to photosynthesis, stress responses and carbohydrate metabolism. This study provides a comprehensive view of complex mode of action of algae under CYP stress and highlights several potential biomarkers for further investigation of pesticide-exposed plant and algae. PMID:26961939

  4. Transient changes in intercellular protein variability identify sources of noise in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhyudai

    2014-11-01

    Protein levels differ considerably between otherwise identical cells, and these differences significantly affect biological function and phenotype. Previous work implicated various noise mechanisms that drive variability in protein copy numbers across an isogenic cell population. For example, transcriptional bursting of mRNAs has been shown to be a major source of noise in the expression of many genes. Additional expression variability, referred to as extrinsic noise, arises from intercellular variations in mRNA transcription and protein translation rates attributed to cell-to-cell differences in cell size, abundance of ribosomes, etc. We propose a method to determine the magnitude of different noise sources in a given gene of interest. The method relies on blocking transcription and measuring changes in protein copy number variability over time. Our results show that this signal has sufficient information to quantify both the extent of extrinsic noise and transcription bursting in gene expression. Moreover, if the mean mRNA count is known, then the relative contributions of transcription versus translation rate fluctuations to extrinsic noise can also be determined. In summary, our study provides an easy-to-implement method for characterizing noisy protein expression that complements existing techniques for studying stochastic dynamics of genetic circuits.

  5. Isolation and characterization of channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli and Borrelia species

    OpenAIRE

    Denker, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    In this study pore forming proteins of the gram-negative bacteria B. burgdorferi, B. duttonii and E.coli were investigated. Therefore the study is subdivided into three parts. In the first part outer membrane preparation of three relapsing fever Borrelia were investigated. In the second part the putative TolC homologue BB0124 of B. burgdorferi, the Lyme borreliosis agent, was studied. In the last part the influence of point mutants within the greasy slide of the maltose specific porin (LamB) ...

  6. Changes in Protein Synthesis in Rapeseed (Brassica napus) Seedlings during a Low Temperature Treatment 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Basso, Luis; Alberdi, Miren; Raynal, Monique; Ferrero-Cadinanos, Maria-Luz; Delseny, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Changes induced by cold treatment in young rapeseed (Brassica napus) seedlings were investigated at the molecular level. Following germination at 18°C for 48 hours, one half of the seedlings was transferred to 0°C for another 48 hour period, the other half being kept at 18°C as a control. Newly synthesized proteins were labeled for the last 6 hours of incubation with [35S]methionine. The different polypeptides were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Newly synthesized proteins were revealed by fluorography. Protein synthesis clearly continues at 0°C and some polypeptides preferentially accumulate at this temperature. On the other hand, synthesis of several others is repressed while many are insensitive to cold treatment. Similar changes are also observed when mRNA is prepared from cold treated seedlings, translated in vitro in a reticulocyte cell free system and compared with the products of mRNA extracted from control samples. Among the genes which are repressed we identified the small subunit of ribulose 1,6-bisphosphate carboxylase. These changes are also detectable after shorter treatments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16665102

  7. Nutritional Regulation of IGFs in Channel Catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined changes in hepatic IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA, insulin like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2) mRNA, muscle IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA in fed (fed daily for 45 days) and restricted (not fed for 30 days followed by feeding for 15 days) channel catfish. By day 30, liver IGF-I mRNA...

  8. Water and molecular chaperones act as weak links of protein folding networks: energy landscape and punctuated equilibrium changes point towards a game theory of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, István A; Szalay, Máté S; Csermely, Peter

    2005-04-25

    Water molecules and molecular chaperones efficiently help the protein folding process. Here we describe their action in the context of the energy and topological networks of proteins. In energy terms water and chaperones were suggested to decrease the activation energy between various local energy minima smoothing the energy landscape, rescuing misfolded proteins from conformational traps and stabilizing their native structure. In kinetic terms water and chaperones may make the punctuated equilibrium of conformational changes less punctuated and help protein relaxation. Finally, water and chaperones may help the convergence of multiple energy landscapes during protein-macromolecule interactions. We also discuss the possibility of the introduction of protein games to narrow the multitude of the energy landscapes when a protein binds to another macromolecule. Both water and chaperones provide a diffuse set of rapidly fluctuating weak links (low affinity and low probability interactions), which allow the generalization of all these statements to a multitude of networks. PMID:15848154

  9. Evidence for nonlinear capacitance in biomembrane channel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Bera, A K; Das, S

    1999-10-01

    The electrophysiological properties of voltage-dependent anion channels from mitochondrial membrane have been studied in a bilayer membrane system. It was observed that the probability of opening of the membrane channel depends on externally applied voltage and the plot is a bell-shaped curve symmetric around probability axis. A scheme of conformational energy levels under varying externally applied voltage was formulated. Assuming that the probability follows Boltzmann distribution, we arrive at an expression of change in energy containing a separate term identical to the energy of a capacitor. This fact indicates the possibility of existence of an added capacitance due to the channel protein. Further it was shown that the aforesaid channel capacitor could be a function of voltage leading to nonlinearity. We have offered a general method of calculating nonlinear capacitance from the experimental data on opening probability of a membrane channel. In case of voltage-dependent anion channel the voltage dependence of the capacitor has a power 0.786. The results have been interpreted in view of the structural organization of the channel protein in the membrane. Our hypothesis is that the phenomenon of capacitor behaviour is a general one for membrane channels.

  10. Dynamic changes of beta-amyloid protein deposition in hippocampus of female ovariectomized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Jianda Zhou; Shaodan Sun; Xuhong Li; Liming Deng; Fengmei Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate and summarize the effects of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve on the treatment of SICAS. Recently, research on β-amyloid protein has focused on the regulatory effects of es-trogen or phytoestrogen on its deposition. However, there have been only a few reports on dynamic changes of β-amyloid protein deposition in hippocampus of ovariectomized rats.OBJECTIVE: To measureβ-amyloid protein deposition in the hippocampal formation of ovariectomized rats by using immunohistochemistry; to observe time-dependent dynamic changes. DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the Central Laboratory of the Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from November 2005 to December 2006. Fifty healthy female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing (293 ± 10) g, were provided by the Animal Laboratory of Xiangya Medical College, Central South University. All rats had neither a childbearing history nor hepatic or renal disease, or skeletal deformity. Β-amyloid protein immunohistochemical kit was provided by Wuhan Boster Company. The ex-periment was in accordance with animal ethics standards.METHODS: All rats were randomly divided into five groups, including normal control group (n = 10), sham operation group (n = 10), and ovariectomized group (n = 30). After anesthesia in the ovariectomized group, the bilateral ovaries were separated and resected. The same volume of fat was resected in the sham operation group. Rats from the normal control group, however, did not receive any surgical treatments. Rats in the normal control group and sham operation group were sacrificed by anesthesia 7 weeks after surgery. Every ten rats from the ovariectomized group was respectively sacrificed at 7, 15, and 30 weeks after surgery. Immunohistochemistry was used to detectβ-amyloid protein deposition in hippocampal sections. Cell counting and gray value

  11. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  12. A proteomic perspective on the changes in milk proteins due to high somatic cell count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Boeren, S; van Hooijdonk, A C M; Vervoort, J M; Hettinga, K A

    2015-08-01

    Although cows with subclinical mastitis have no difference in the appearance of their milk, milk composition and milk quality are altered because of the inflammation. To know the changes in milk quality with different somatic cell count (SCC) levels, 5 pooled bovine milk samples with SCC from 10(5) to 10(6) cells/mL were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using both one-dimension sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE and filter-aided sample preparation coupled with dimethyl labeling, both followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Minor differences were found on the qualitative level in the proteome from milk with different SCC levels, whereas the concentration of milk proteins showed remarkable changes. Not only immune-related proteins (cathelicidins, IGK protein, CD59 molecule, complement regulatory protein, lactadherin), but also proteins with other biological functions (e.g., lipid metabolism: platelet glycoprotein 4, butyrophilin subfamily 1 member A1, perilipin-2) were significantly different in milk from cows with high SCC level compared with low SCC level. The increased concentration of protease inhibitors in the milk with higher SCC levels may suggest a protective role in the mammary gland against protease activity. Prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase showed a linear relation with SCC, which was confirmed with an ELISA. However, the correlation coefficient was lower in individual cows compared with bulk milk. These results indicate that prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase may be used as an indicator to evaluate bulk milk quality and thereby reduce the economic loss in the dairy industry. The results from this study reflect the biological phenomena occurring during subclinical mastitis and in addition provide a potential indicator for the detection of bulk milk with high SCC. PMID:26094216

  13. Proteome analysis of interleukin-1beta-induced changes in protein expression in rat islets of Langerhans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P M; Fey, S J; Larsen, M R;

    2001-01-01

    The intracellular molecular events involved in the beta-cell death process are complex but poorly understood. Cytokines, e.g., interleukin (IL)-1beta, may play a crucial role in inducing this process. Protein synthesis is necessary for the deleterious effect of IL-1, and induction of both...... protective and deleterious proteins has been described. To characterize the rather complex pattern of islet protein expression in rat islets in response to IL-1, we have attempted to identify proteins of altered expression level after IL-1 exposure by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Of 105...... significantly changed (i.e., up- or downregulated or de novo-induced) protein spots, we obtained positive protein identification for 60 protein spots. The 60 identifications corresponded to 57 different proteins. Of these, 10 proteins were present in two to four spots, suggesting that posttranslatory...

  14. GIRK Channel Plasticity and Implications for Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marron Fernandez de Velasco, Ezequiel; McCall, Nora; Wickman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse can "hijack" synaptic plasticity, a physiological basis of learning and memory, establishing maladaptations that can promote drug addiction. A wealth of data supports the existence and importance of neuroadaptations in excitatory neurotransmission upon drug exposure. Recent discoveries, however, have shown that inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (K(+)) (GIRK/Kir3) channels is also subject to adaptation triggered by exposure to drugs of abuse. GIRK channels are expressed in neuronal populations relevant to reward and reward-related behaviors, where their activation by neurotransmitters such as GABA, dopamine, and adenosine reduces neuronal excitability. Studies in animal models have implicated GIRK channels in a number of behaviors including reward. Drugs of abuse also affect the inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GIRK channels. These changes might be important for the development, maintenance, or relapse of addiction, making GIRK channels promising targets for novel addiction therapies. PMID:26422986

  15. Suppression of protein inactivation during freezing by minimizing pH changes using ionic cryoprotectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausková, Ľubica; Procházková, Jitka; Klašková, Martina; Filipová, Lenka; Chaloupková, Radka; Malý, Stanislav; Damborský, Jiří; Heger, Dominik

    2016-07-25

    Freezing and lyophilization are often used for stabilization of biomolecules; however, this sometimes results in partial degradation and loss of biological function in these molecules. In this study we examined the effect of freezing-induced acidity changes on denaturation of the model enzyme haloalkane dehalogenase under various experimental conditions. The effective local pH of frozen solutions is shown to be the key causal factor in protein stability. To preserve the activity of frozen-thawed enzymes, acidity changes were prevented by the addition of an ionic cryoprotectant, a compound which counteracts pH changes during freezing due to selective incorporation of its ions into the ice. This approach resulted in complete recovery of enzyme activity after multiple freeze-thaw cycles. We propose the utilization of ionic cryoprotectants as a new and effective cryopreservation method in research laboratories as well as in industrial processes. PMID:27224008

  16. Effect of Protein Intake on Strength, Body Composition and Endocrine Changes in Strength/Power Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Jie

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comparison of protein intakes on strength, body composition and hormonal changes were examined in 23 experienced collegiate strength/power athletes participating in a 12-week resistance training program. Subjects were stratified into three groups depending upon their daily consumption of protein; below recommended levels (BL; 1.0 – 1.4 g·kg-1·day-1; n = 8, recommended levels (RL; 1.6 – 1.8 g·kg-1·day-1; n = 7 and above recommended levels (AL; > 2.0 g·kg-1·day-1; n = 8. Subjects were assessed for strength [one-repetition maximum (1-RM bench press and squat] and body composition. Resting blood samples were analyzed for total testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor. No differences were seen in energy intake (3,171 ± 577 kcal between the groups, and the energy intake for all groups were also below the recommended levels for strength/power athletes. No significant changes were seen in body mass, lean body mass or fat mass in any group. Significant improvements in 1-RM bench press and 1-RM squat were seen in all three groups, however no differences between the groups were observed. Subjects in AL experienced a 22% and 42% greater change in Δ 1-RM squat and Δ 1-RM bench press than subjects in RL, however these differences were not significant. No significant changes were seen in any of the resting hormonal concentrations. The results of this study do not provide support for protein intakes greater than recommended levels in collegiate strength/power athletes for body composition improvements, or alterations in resting hormonal concentrations.

  17. Role of spike protein conformational changes in fusion of Semliki Forest virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, J; Klimjack, M R; Kielian, M

    1993-12-01

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and a number of other enveloped animal viruses infect cells via a membrane fusion reaction triggered by the low pH within endocytic vesicles. In addition to having a low pH requirement, SFV fusion and infection are also strictly dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the host cell membrane. A number of conformational changes in the SFV spike protein occur following low-pH treatment, including dissociation of the E1-E2 dimer, conformational changes in the E1 and E2 subunits, and oligomerization of E1 to a homotrimer. To allow the ordering of these events, we have compared the kinetics of these conformational changes with those of fusion, using pH treatment near the fusion threshold and low-temperature incubation to slow the fusion reaction. Dimer dissociation, the E1 conformational change, and E1 trimerization all occur prior to the mixing of virus and cell membranes. Studies of cells incubated at 20 degrees C showed that as with virus fusion, E1 trimerization occurred in the endosome before transport to lysosomes. However, unlike the strictly cholesterol-dependent membrane fusion reaction, the E1 homotrimer was produced in vivo during virus uptake by cholesterol-depleted cells or in vitro by low-pH treatment of virus in the presence of artificial liposomes with or without cholesterol. Purified, lipid-free spike protein rosettes were assayed to determine the requirement for virus membrane cholesterol in E1 homotrimer formation. Spike protein rosettes were found to undergo E1 oligomerization upon exposure to low pH and target liposomes and showed an enhancement of oligomerization with cholesterol-containing membranes. The E1 homotrimer may represent a perfusion complex that requires cholesterol to carry out the final coalescence of the viral and target membranes. PMID:8230478

  18. Changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in rat trigeminal ganglia following chronic constriction injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuanyin; Wang, Liecheng; Wang, Xuxia

    2016-08-17

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), especially the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav1.3 and Nav1.7, and the tetrodotoxin-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, have been implicated in acute and chronic neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of VGSC Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 after nerve injury and their roles in the development of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We used the infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury model of TN in the rat. The time course of changes in the mechanical pain threshold was examined. In addition, real-time PCR and double immunofluorescence staining of VGSC α subunits were used to evaluate messenger RNA and protein expression, respectively, in the trigeminal ganglion. Behavioral tests showed that the mechanical pain threshold decreased significantly 4-42 days after surgery and reached the lowest observed value by day 12. Compared with sham-operated controls, we found that trigeminal ganglion in rats subjected to an infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury showed upregulation of Nav1.3 and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 messenger RNA and protein levels. Our findings suggest that VGSC may participate in the regulation of TN. PMID:27327156

  19. Regulation of store-operated and voltage-operated Ca2+ channels in the proliferation and death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells by golli proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M Paez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OPCs (oligodendrocyte precursor cells) express golli proteins which, through regulation of Ca2+ influx, appear to be important in OPC process extension/retraction and migration. The aim of the present study was to examine further the role of golli in regulating OPC development. The effects of golli ablation and overexpression were examined in primary cultures of OPCs prepared from golli-KO (knockout) and JOE (golli J37-overexpressing) mice. In OPCs lacking golli, or overexpressing golli, differentiation induced by growth factor withdrawal was impaired. Proliferation analysis in the presence of PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor), revealed that golli enhanced the mitogen-stimulated proliferation of OPCs through activation of SOCCs (store-operated Ca2+ channels). PDGF treatment induced a biphasic increase in OPC intracellular Ca2+, and golli specifically increased Ca2+ influx during the second SOCC-dependent phase that followed the initial release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. This store-operated Ca2+ uptake appeared to be essential for cell division, since specific SOCC antagonists completely blocked the effects of PDGF and golli on OPC proliferation. Additionally, in OPCs overexpressing golli, increased cell death was observed after mitogen withdrawal. This phenomenon could be prevented by exposure to VOCC (voltage-operated Ca2+ channel) blockers, indicating that the effect of golli on cell death involved increased Ca2+ influx through VOCCs. The results showed a clear effect of golli on OPC development and support a role for golli in modulating multiple Ca2+-regulatory events through VOCCs and SOCCs. Our results also suggest that PDGF engagement of its receptor resulting in OPC proliferation proceeds through activation of SOCCs.

  20. Elevated extracellular calcium increases expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene via a calcium channel and ERK pathway in human dental pulp cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental pulp cells, which have been shown to share phenotypical features with osteoblasts, are capable of differentiating into odontoblast-like cells and generating a dentin-like mineral structure. Elevated extracellular Ca2+Cao2+ has been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of Cao2+ signaling in odontogenesis remains unclear. We found that elevated Cao2+ increases bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 gene expression in human dental pulp cells. The increase was modulated not only at a transcriptional level but also at a post-transcriptional level, because treatment with Ca2+ increased the stability of BMP-2 mRNA in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. A similar increase in BMP-2 mRNA level was observed in other human mesenchymal cells from oral tissue; periodontal ligament cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, the latter cells exhibited considerably lower expression of BMP-2 mRNA compared with dental pulp cells and periodontal ligament cells. The BMP-2 increase was markedly inhibited by pretreatment with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, and partially inhibited by the L-type Ca2+ channels inhibitor, nifedipine. However, pretreatment with nifedipine had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation triggered by Ca2+, suggesting that the Ca2+ influx from Ca2+ channels may operate independently of ERK signaling. Dental pulp cells do not express the transcript of Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSR) and only respond slightly to other cations such as Sr2+ and spermine, suggesting that dental pulp cells respond to Cao2+ to increase BMP-2 mRNA expression in a manner different from CaSR and rather specific for Cao2+ among cations.

  1. Xanthurenic acid binds to neuronal G-protein-coupled receptors that secondarily activate cationic channels in the cell line NCB-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleb, Omar; Maammar, Mohammed; Brumaru, Daniel; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Schmitt, Martine; Klein, Christian; Kemmel, Véronique; Maitre, Michel; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy

    2012-01-01

    Xanthurenic acid (XA) is a metabolite of the tryptophan oxidation pathway through kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine. XA was until now considered as a detoxification compound and dead-end product reducing accumulation of reactive radical species. Apart from a specific role for XA in the signaling cascade resulting in gamete maturation in mosquitoes, nothing was known about its functions in other species including mammals. Based upon XA distribution, transport, accumulation and release in the rat brain, we have recently suggested that XA may potentially be involved in neurotransmission/neuromodulation, assuming that neurons presumably express specific XA receptors. Recently, it has been shown that XA could act as a positive allosteric ligand for class II metabotropic glutamate receptors. This finding reinforces the proposed signaling role of XA in brain. Our present results provide several lines of evidence in favor of the existence of specific receptors for XA in the brain. First, binding experiments combined with autoradiography and time-course analysis led to the characterization of XA binding sites in the rat brain. Second, specific kinetic and pharmacological properties exhibited by these binding sites are in favor of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Finally, in patch-clamp and calcium imaging experiments using NCB-20 cells that do not express glutamate-induced calcium signals, XA elicited specific responses involving activation of cationic channels and increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Altogether, these results suggest that XA, acting through a GPCR-induced cationic channel modulatory mechanism, may exert excitatory functions in various brain neuronal pathways. PMID:23139790

  2. Xanthurenic acid binds to neuronal G-protein-coupled receptors that secondarily activate cationic channels in the cell line NCB-20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Taleb

    Full Text Available Xanthurenic acid (XA is a metabolite of the tryptophan oxidation pathway through kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine. XA was until now considered as a detoxification compound and dead-end product reducing accumulation of reactive radical species. Apart from a specific role for XA in the signaling cascade resulting in gamete maturation in mosquitoes, nothing was known about its functions in other species including mammals. Based upon XA distribution, transport, accumulation and release in the rat brain, we have recently suggested that XA may potentially be involved in neurotransmission/neuromodulation, assuming that neurons presumably express specific XA receptors. Recently, it has been shown that XA could act as a positive allosteric ligand for class II metabotropic glutamate receptors. This finding reinforces the proposed signaling role of XA in brain. Our present results provide several lines of evidence in favor of the existence of specific receptors for XA in the brain. First, binding experiments combined with autoradiography and time-course analysis led to the characterization of XA binding sites in the rat brain. Second, specific kinetic and pharmacological properties exhibited by these binding sites are in favor of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Finally, in patch-clamp and calcium imaging experiments using NCB-20 cells that do not express glutamate-induced calcium signals, XA elicited specific responses involving activation of cationic channels and increases in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest that XA, acting through a GPCR-induced cationic channel modulatory mechanism, may exert excitatory functions in various brain neuronal pathways.

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative Changes in Protein Profile of Various Tissue of Tropical Tasar Silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, quantitative and qualitative changes in protein profile of different tissue of larvae, pupae, adult and eggs of Tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta Drury was investigated. Stage and age dependent variation in protein concentration and SDS-PAGE protein profile of 36 and 64 kDa protein was observed in different tissue. The concentration of protein was recorded higher in eggs laid by fresh moth than 3 days old moth and significant variation was also noticed in normal and depressed eggs. Interestingly, substantial changes in SDS-PAGE protein profile was observed in normal and depressed eggs and eggs laid by fresh moth than 3 days old moth. Haemolymph and midgut protein concentration was recorded higher in 3rd and 5th instar feeding larvae and in 4th instar mature larvae. Concentration of protein in the haemolymph of pupae before the brain window becomes opaque was higher in both the sexes than opaque stage. Fat body protein concentration in larvae showed increasing trend from 3rd to 5th instar larvae and it was higher in pupae after the brain window becomes opaque and fresh moth. In addition, higher protein concentration was recorded in gonads of pupae after the brain window becomes opaque and in reproductive organs of fresh moth. Present findings would promote to further understand the precise reason for depression of eggs and changes in protein profile in different tissue of A. mylitta.

  4. Theory and Normal Mode Analysis of Change in Protein Vibrational Dynamics on Ligand Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortisugu, Kei [RIKEN, Japan; Njunda, Brigitte [Computational Molecular Biophysics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR); Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    The change of protein vibrations on ligand binding is of functional and thermodynamic importance. Here, this process is characterized using a simple analytical 'ball-and-spring' model and all-atom normal-mode analysis (NMA) of the binding of the cancer drug, methotrexate (MTX) to its target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The analytical model predicts that the coupling between protein vibrations and ligand external motion generates entropy-rich, low-frequency vibrations in the complex. This is consistent with the atomistic NMA which reveals vibrational softening in forming the DHFR-MTX complex, a result also in qualitative agreement with neutron-scattering experiments. Energy minimization of the atomistic bound-state (B) structure while gradually decreasing the ligand interaction to zero allows the generation of a hypothetical 'intermediate' (I) state, without the ligand force field but with a structure similar to that of B. In going from I to B, it is found that the vibrational entropies of both the protein and MTX decrease while the complex structure becomes enthalpically stabilized. However, the relatively weak DHFR:MTX interaction energy results in the net entropy gain arising from coupling between the protein and MTX external motion being larger than the loss of vibrational entropy on complex formation. This, together with the I structure being more flexible than the unbound structure, results in the observed vibrational softening on ligand binding.

  5. Stimulation of Slack K(+) Channels Alters Mass at the Plasma Membrane by Triggering Dissociation of a Phosphatase-Regulatory Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Matthew R; Brown, Maile R; Kronengold, Jack; Zhang, Yalan; Jenkins, David P; Barcia, Gulia; Nabbout, Rima; Bausch, Anne E; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar S; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-30

    Human mutations in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Slack sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels result in childhood epilepsy with severe intellectual disability. Slack currents can be increased by pharmacological activators or by phosphorylation of a Slack C-terminal residue by protein kinase C. Using an optical biosensor assay, we find that Slack channel stimulation in neurons or transfected cells produces loss of mass near the plasma membrane. Slack mutants associated with intellectual disability fail to trigger any change in mass. The loss of mass results from the dissociation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) targeting protein, Phactr-1, from the channel. Phactr1 dissociation is specific to wild-type Slack channels and is not observed when related potassium channels are stimulated. Our findings suggest that Slack channels are coupled to cytoplasmic signaling pathways and that dysregulation of this coupling may trigger the aberrant intellectual development associated with specific childhood epilepsies. PMID:27545877

  6. Stimulation of Slack K+ Channels Alters Mass at the Plasma Membrane by Triggering Dissociation of a Phosphatase-Regulatory Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Fleming

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human mutations in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Slack sodium-activated potassium (KNa channels result in childhood epilepsy with severe intellectual disability. Slack currents can be increased by pharmacological activators or by phosphorylation of a Slack C-terminal residue by protein kinase C. Using an optical biosensor assay, we find that Slack channel stimulation in neurons or transfected cells produces loss of mass near the plasma membrane. Slack mutants associated with intellectual disability fail to trigger any change in mass. The loss of mass results from the dissociation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 targeting protein, Phactr-1, from the channel. Phactr1 dissociation is specific to wild-type Slack channels and is not observed when related potassium channels are stimulated. Our findings suggest that Slack channels are coupled to cytoplasmic signaling pathways and that dysregulation of this coupling may trigger the aberrant intellectual development associated with specific childhood epilepsies.

  7. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  8. Changes in cod muscle proteins during frozen storage revealed by proteome analysis and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgård, Inger Vibeke Holst; Nørrelykke, M.R.; Jessen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    Multivariate data analysis has been combined with proteomics to enhance the recovery of information from 2-DE of cod muscle proteins during different storage conditions. Proteins were extracted according to 11 different storage conditions and samples were resolved by 2-DE. Data generated by 2-DE...... was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares regression (DPLSR). Applying PCA to 2-DE data revealed the samples to form groups according to frozen storage time, whereas differences due to different storage temperatures or chilled storage in modified atmosphere...... light chain 1, 2 and 3, triose-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase A and two ?-actin fragments, and a nuclease diphosphate kinase B fragment to change in concentration, during frozen storage. Application of proteomics, multivariate data analysis and MS/MS to analyse...

  9. Amino acid and protein changes in tilapia and spanish mackerel after irradiation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some amino acids in tilapia decreased while some others increased when subjected to doses up to 10.0 kGy. However, 10 kGy contributed to a significant reduction in all amino acids of Spanish mackerel. Variations in amino acid contents continued during post-irradiation storage with no consistent trend of increase or decrease. SDS-PAGE of protein from both fish showed 27 bands of subunits with MW < 14.0-94.0 KD. Isoelectric focusing patterns of sarcoplasmic protein of unirradiated and irradiated fish showed no charge in the number of bands, while some changes were observed in the intensities of the anodic and cathodic bands depending on isoelectric points (pIs)

  10. Chicken or Egg? Resolving the Relative Roles of Non-Native Vegetation Invasion and Changing Flow Regime in Channel Narrowing and Planform Simplification of Large Rivers of the American Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. C.; Dean, D. J.; Manners, R.; Fortney, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    Channel narrowing and planform simplification have been ubiquitous processes on those parts of the Colorado River, the Green River and its tributaries, and the Rio Grande where suspended sediment loads are large. These rivers have been subject to (1) significant flow regime changes caused by dams and diversions and (2) large-scale invasion of non-native tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) and/or giant cane (Arundo donax). Because the timing of flow regime changes and non-native vegetation invasion is similar, it is difficult to evaluate the relative role of these forcing mechanisms. Narrowing and planform simplification have occurred by vertical accretion of stagnating alternate bars in meandering alluvial river segments, colonization of eddy bars in debris fan-affected canyons, and by abandonment of secondary channels where the channels are multi-threaded. Positive feedbacks occur among vegetation establishment, channel narrowing, and vertical accretion, because vegetation strengthens the banks, reduces channel-margin flow velocities, and contributes to reduced channel conveyance. Thus, even where flows have been greatly reduced, sediment deposition can occur at high stages wherever channels shrink in size. The field studies on which these findings are based depend on a rigorous mix of temporally robust studies of channel change at the cross-section scale and spatially robust determination of channel change over long channel segments. Temporally robust studies include detailed stratigraphic interpretation of floodplain deposits that take advantage of recent advances in interpretation of tree-ring chronologies. Future geomorphic research must address the effectiveness of non-native vegetation removal on floodplains in alluvial and debris fan-affected canyons, because these management activities are now widespread. There is a widespread assumption that mechanical removal of tamarisk and tamarisk defoliation by the tamarisk leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata) have the potential to

  11. PERUBAHAN ALERGENISITAS PROTEIN KACANG KEDELAI DAN KACANG BOGOR AKIBAT PENGOLAHAN DENGAN PANAS [Allergenicity Changes of Soybean and Bambara Groundnut Protein Due to Heat Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurheni Sri Palupi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Legumes contain protein as a potential allergen. Heating process was expected to eliminate the protein allergen. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in molecular weight and allergenicty of soybean grobogan variety and bambara groundnut proteins due to heat processing, i.e. boiling, steaming, oven, and roasting protein isolate was prepared by pH adjusting. SDS-PAGE method was used to determine the profile of protein molecular weight and the alergenicity was determined by ELISA method. Protein molecular weight profile of grobogan soybean and bambara groundnut that have been boiled, steamed, ovened, and roasted for 30 minutes showed variations when compared to the unheated soybean and bambara groundnut protein isolate. The amount of protein detected was reduced compared with unheated soybean and bambara groundnut. The protein allergens in grobogan soybean had molecular weight 110.0, 98.3, 84.5, 67.4, and 60.2. The heat treatment for 30 minutes removed allergenicity as indicated by no detectable protein band in immunoblotting results and the smaller Optical Density value compared with unheated soybean. Thus, the allergenicity of soybean protein due to heat processing was minimized. Bambara groundnut had protein allergens with molecular weight 113.1, 59.8, and 25.2 kDa. Protein allergen with molecular weight 25.2 and 59.8 kDa were detected in bambara groundnut processed through boiling and steaming for 30 minutes, respectively, but ELISA result showed there were still protein allergen of bambara groundnut after the heat treatment for 30 minutes.

  12. Driving Calmodulin Protein towards Conformational Shift by Changing Ionization States of Select Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Sunita; Rana Atilgan, Ali; Atilgan, Canan

    2012-12-01

    Proteins are complex systems made up of many conformational sub-states which are mainly determined by the folded structure. External factors such as solvent type, temperature, pH and ionic strength play a very important role in the conformations sampled by proteins. Here we study the conformational multiplicity of calmodulin (CaM) which is a protein that plays an important role in calcium signaling pathways in the eukaryotic cells. CaM can bind to a variety of other proteins or small organic compounds, and mediates different physiological processes by activating various enzymes. Binding of calcium ions and proteins or small organic molecules to CaM induces large conformational changes that are distinct to each interacting partner. In particular, we discuss the effect of pH variation on the conformations of CaM. By using the pKa values of the charged residues as a basis to assign protonation states, the conformational changes induced in CaM by reducing the pH are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Our current view suggests that at high pH, barrier crossing to the compact form is prevented by repulsive electrostatic interactions between the two lobes. At reduced pH, not only is barrier crossing facilitated by protonation of residues, but also conformations which are on average more compact are attained. The latter are in accordance with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment results of other workers. The key events leading to the conformational change from the open to the compact conformation are (i) formation of a salt bridge between the N-lobe and the linker, stabilizing their relative motions, (ii) bending of the C-lobe towards the N-lobe, leading to a lowering of the interaction energy between the two-lobes, (iii) formation of a hydrophobic patch between the two lobes, further stabilizing the bent conformation by reducing the entropic cost of the compact form, (iv) sharing of a Ca+2 ion between the two lobes.

  13. Protein corona change the drug release profile of nanocarriers: the "overlooked" factor at the nanobio interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Serpooshan, Vahid; Sakhtianchi, Ramin; Müller, Beate; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of nanocarrier systems in drug delivery applications has ushered in rapid development of new classes of therapeutic agents which can provide an essential breakthrough in the fight against refractory diseases. However, successful clinical application of nano-drug delivery devices has been limited mainly due to the lack of control on sustained release of therapeutics from the carriers. A wide range of sophisticated approaches employs the formation of crosslinkable, non-crosslinkable, stimuli-responsive polymer nanocarriers in order to enhance their delivery efficiency. Despite the extensive research conducted on the development of various nanocarriers, the effect of the biological milieu on the drug release profile of these constructs is not yet fully investigated. In particular, the formation of a protein corona on the surface of nanocarriers, when they interact with living organisms in vivo is largely decisive for their biological function. Using a number of synthetized (i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and polymeric nanocapsules) and commercialized nanocarriers (i.e., Abraxane®, albumin-bound paclitaxel drug), this study demonstrates that the protein corona can shield the nanocarriers and, consequently, alters the release profile of the drugs from the nanocarriers. More specifically, the protein corona could significantly reduce the burst effect of either protein conjugated nanocarriers or carriers with surface loaded drug (i.e., SPIONs). However, the corona shell only slightly changed the release profile of polymeric nanocapsules. Therefore, the intermediary, buffer effect of the protein shells on the surface of nanoscale carriers plays a crucial role in their successful high-yield applications in vivo.

  14. Inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein CGS 25159 and changes in lipoproteins in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, H V; Poirier, K J; Lee, W H; Satoh, Y

    1997-01-01

    As a result of screening, several isoflavans were identified to be antagonists of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The present study evaluates CGS 25159, a synthetic isoflavan, as a putative inhibitor of CETP activity of human and hamster plasma. Determined by [3]CE transfer from HDL to VLDL + LDL fraction or by fluorescent-CE transfer assay, CGS 25159 inhibited CETP in both human plasma bottom fraction (d = 1.21 g/ml) and in plasma from Golden Syrian Hamsters with an IC50 contention that pharmacological down regulation of CETP activity could result in favorable changes in lipoprotein profile. PMID:9051198

  15. Lipid Ion Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation electrical phenomena in biomembranes is usually based on the assumption that the experimentally found discrete ion conduction events are due to a particular class of proteins called ion channels while the lipid membrane is considered being an inert electrical insulator. The particular protein structure is thought to be related to ion specificity, specific recognition of drugs by receptors and to macroscopic phenomena as nerve pulse propagation. However, lipid membranes in their chain melting regime are known to be highly permeable to ions, water and small molecules, and are therefore not always inert. In voltage-clamp experiments one finds quantized conduction events through protein-free membranes in their melting regime similar to or even undistinguishable from those attributed to proteins. This constitutes a conceptual problem for the interpretation of electrophysiological data obtained from biological membrane preparations. Here, we review the experimental evidence for lipid ion channels...

  16. Brain marker protein changes after short- and long-term ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmesen, L; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Hemmingsen, R;

    1987-01-01

    The brain marker proteins, D1, D2, and D3, localised to neuronal membranes, and mitochondrial and cytoplasmic marker proteins (MM and CM), were studied during 1-6 days (short term) intragastrically-induced severe ethanol intoxication and during 1 month (long-term) ethanol intoxication established...... by a liquid diet regimen. The concentrations of the same brain proteins were also measured during withdrawal from the ethanol intoxication periods. Three categories of effect were encountered: decreased concentration of brain marker proteins during severe short-term intoxication the effect being most marked...... for D3, possibly indicating degradation of mature synapses; increased concentration of proteins D2 and MM during withdrawal, the D2 changes possibly indicating formation of new synapses; increased concentration of D1 protein and MM during long-term intoxication. We suggest that the changes in brain...

  17. Protein Conformational Change Based on a Two-dimensional Generalized Langevin Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-xi Wang; Shuang-mu Linguang; Nan-rong Zhao; Yi-jing Yan

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional generalized Langevin equation is proposed to describe the protein conformational change,compatible to the electron transfer process governed by atomic packing density model.We assume a fractional Gaussian noise and a white noise through bond and through space coordinates respectively,and introduce the coupling effect coming from both fluctuations and equilibrium variances.The general expressions for autocorrelation functions of distance fluctuation and fluorescence lifetime variation are derived,based on which the exact conformational change dynamics can be evaluated with the aid of numerical Laplace inversion technique.We explicitly elaborate the short time and long time approximations.The relationship between the two-dimensional description and the one-dimensional theory is also discussed.

  18. Voltage-gated sodium channel expression and action potential generation in differentiated NG108-15 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Jinxu; Tu Huiyin; Zhang Dongze; Zheng Hong; Li Yu-Long

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The generation of action potential is required for stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter release in most neurons. Although various voltage-gated ion channels are involved in action potential production, the initiation of the action potential is mainly mediated by voltage-gated Na+ channels. In the present study, differentiation-induced changes of mRNA and protein expression of Na+ channels, Na+ currents, and cell membrane excitability were investigated in NG108-15 cells. Result...

  19. 水通道蛋白理论在疾病诊断中的应用%The application of water channel protein theory in disease diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜名; 辛军; 赵周社; 郭启勇

    2015-01-01

    水通道蛋白(AQPs)广泛分布于细胞,介导水分子的跨膜转运。 AQPs与人类正常生理活动及多种疾病的发生发展有着密切的联系。以水通道蛋白理论为基础的诊断医学具有巨大的发展潜力,采用正电子核素标记示踪剂PET成像和MR水分子扩散加权成像采用多b值、高b值能够显示AQPs分布和表达水平。 AQPs分子成像技术对于疾病早期诊断和指导个体化治疗均具有重要的价值。%The aquaporins (AQPs) are widely distributed in the cells, mediating the transport of water molecules on different types of cell membrane. They are closely related to human normal physiological activities and disease. With the theory of water channel protein in the disease diagnosis, medicine has huge development potential. PET imaging with positron nuclide labeling tracer and MR water molecules diffusion-weighted with different and high b values can show distribution and the expression level of AQPs. AQP molecular imaging technique is of important value not only for the early disease diagnosis but also for the individualized treatment.

  20. PIP2 regulation of KCNQ channels: biophysical and molecular mechanisms for lipid modulation of voltage-dependent gating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Zaydman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels contain voltage-sensing (VSD and pore-gate (PGD structural domains. During voltage-dependent gating, conformational changes in the two domains are coupled giving rise to voltage-dependent opening of the channel. In addition to membrane voltage, KCNQ (Kv7 channel opening requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Recent studies suggest that PIP2 serves as a cofactor to mediate VSD-PGD coupling in KCNQ1