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Sample records for changed transcription factor-binding

  1. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  2. Negative Example Aided Transcription Factor Binding Site Search

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2011-01-01

    Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched for the past decade. Negative examples have long been utilized in de novo motif discovery and have been shown useful in transcription factor binding site search as well. However, understanding of the roles of negative examples in binding site search is still very limited. We propose the 2-centroid and optimal discriminating vector methods, taking into account negative examples. Cross-val...

  3. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  4. Searching for transcription factor binding sites in vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Chih; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched in the past decade. Learning from known binding sites, new binding sites of a transcription factor in unannotated sequences can be identified. A number of search methods have been introduced over the years. However, one can rarely find one single method that performs the best on all the transcription factors. Instead, to identify the best method for a particular trans...

  5. DNA methylation changes are a late event in acute promyelocytic leukemia and coincide with loss of transcription factor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoofs, Till; Rohde, Christian; Hebestreit, Katja;

    2013-01-01

    The origin of aberrant DNA methylation in cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we elucidated the DNA methylome in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and the role of promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARα) in establishing these patterns. Cells from APL......-trans retinoic acid also did not result in immediate DNA methylation changes. The results of the present study suggest that aberrant DNA methylation is associated with leukemia phenotype but is not required for PML-RARα-mediated initiation of leukemogenesis....

  6. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  7. MORPHEUS, a webtool for transcription factor binding analysis using position weight matrices with dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenio Gómez Minguet; Stéphane Segard; Céline Charavay; François Parcy

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use ...

  8. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  9. JASPAR: an open-access database for eukaryotic transcription factor binding profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Sandelin, Albin; Alkema, Wynand; Engström, Pär; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Lenhard, Boris

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of regulatory regions in genome sequences is strongly based on the detection of potential transcription factor binding sites. The preferred models for representation of transcription factor binding specificity have been termed position-specific scoring matrices. JASPAR is an open-access database of annotated, high-quality, matrix-based transcription factor binding site profiles for multicellular eukaryotes. The profiles were derived exclusively from sets of nucleotide sequences e...

  10. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs

  11. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  12. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. Identification of candidate transcription factor binding sites in the cattle genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A resource that provides candidate transcription factor binding sites does not currently exist for cattle. Such data is necessary, as predicted sites may serve as excellent starting locations for future 'omics studies to develop transcriptional regulation hypotheses. In order to generate this resour...

  14. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provid...

  15. Probabilistic Inference of Transcription Factor Binding from Multiple Data Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rust, Alistair G.; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    An important problem in molecular biology is to build a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes in the cell. We have developed a flexible, probabilistic framework to predict TF binding from multiple data sources that differs from the standard hypothesis testing (scanning) methods in several ways. Our probabilistic modeling framework estimates the probability of binding and, thus, naturally reflects our degree of belief in binding. Probabilistic modeling also allows for ...

  16. Reliable prediction of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic verification

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaoman; Zhong, Sheng; Wong, Wing H.

    2005-01-01

    We present a statistical methodology that largely improves the accuracy in computational predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in eukaryote genomes. This method models the cross-species conservation of binding sites without relying on accurate sequence alignment. It can be coupled with any motif-finding algorithm that searches for overrepresented sequence motifs in individual species and can increase the accuracy of the coupled motif-finding algorithm. Because this method is ...

  17. The next generation of transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mathelier

    Full Text Available Finding where transcription factors (TFs bind to the DNA is of key importance to decipher gene regulation at a transcriptional level. Classically, computational prediction of TF binding sites (TFBSs is based on basic position weight matrices (PWMs which quantitatively score binding motifs based on the observed nucleotide patterns in a set of TFBSs for the corresponding TF. Such models make the strong assumption that each nucleotide participates independently in the corresponding DNA-protein interaction and do not account for flexible length motifs. We introduce transcription factor flexible models (TFFMs to represent TF binding properties. Based on hidden Markov models, TFFMs are flexible, and can model both position interdependence within TFBSs and variable length motifs within a single dedicated framework. The availability of thousands of experimentally validated DNA-TF interaction sequences from ChIP-seq allows for the generation of models that perform as well as PWMs for stereotypical TFs and can improve performance for TFs with flexible binding characteristics. We present a new graphical representation of the motifs that convey properties of position interdependence. TFFMs have been assessed on ChIP-seq data sets coming from the ENCODE project, revealing that they can perform better than both PWMs and the dinucleotide weight matrix extension in discriminating ChIP-seq from background sequences. Under the assumption that ChIP-seq signal values are correlated with the affinity of the TF-DNA binding, we find that TFFM scores correlate with ChIP-seq peak signals. Moreover, using available TF-DNA affinity measurements for the Max TF, we demonstrate that TFFMs constructed from ChIP-seq data correlate with published experimentally measured DNA-binding affinities. Finally, TFFMs allow for the straightforward computation of an integrated TF occupancy score across a sequence. These results demonstrate the capacity of TFFMs to accurately model DNA

  18. Reliable prediction of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoman; Zhong, Sheng; Wong, Wing H

    2005-11-22

    We present a statistical methodology that largely improves the accuracy in computational predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in eukaryote genomes. This method models the cross-species conservation of binding sites without relying on accurate sequence alignment. It can be coupled with any motif-finding algorithm that searches for overrepresented sequence motifs in individual species and can increase the accuracy of the coupled motif-finding algorithm. Because this method is capable of accurately detecting TF binding sites, it also enhances our ability to predict the cis-regulatory modules. We applied this method on the published chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that its sensitivity and specificity are 9% and 14% higher than those of two recent methods. We also recovered almost all of the previously verified TF binding sites and made predictions on the cis-regulatory elements that govern the tight regulation of ribosomal protein genes in 13 eukaryote species (2 plants, 4 yeasts, 2 worms, 2 insects, and 3 mammals). These results give insights to the transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:16286651

  19. Probabilistic inference of transcription factor binding from multiple data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rust, Alistair G; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    An important problem in molecular biology is to build a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes in the cell. We have developed a flexible, probabilistic framework to predict TF binding from multiple data sources that differs from the standard hypothesis testing (scanning) methods in several ways. Our probabilistic modeling framework estimates the probability of binding and, thus, naturally reflects our degree of belief in binding. Probabilistic modeling also allows for easy and systematic integration of our binding predictions into other probabilistic modeling methods, such as expression-based gene network inference. The method answers the question of whether the whole analyzed promoter has a binding site, but can also be extended to estimate the binding probability at each nucleotide position. Further, we introduce an extension to model combinatorial regulation by several TFs. Most importantly, the proposed methods can make principled probabilistic inference from multiple evidence sources, such as, multiple statistical models (motifs) of the TFs, evolutionary conservation, regulatory potential, CpG islands, nucleosome positioning, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-chip binding segments and other (prior) sequence-based biological knowledge. We developed both a likelihood and a Bayesian method, where the latter is implemented with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Results on a carefully constructed test set from the mouse genome demonstrate that principled data fusion can significantly improve the performance of TF binding prediction methods. We also applied the probabilistic modeling framework to all promoters in the mouse genome and the results indicate a sparse connectivity between transcriptional regulators and their target promoters. To facilitate analysis of other sequences and additional data, we have developed an on-line web tool, ProbTF, which implements our probabilistic TF binding prediction method using multiple data sources

  20. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function. PMID:25775564

  1. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade. PMID:26285209

  2. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Gómez Minguet

    Full Text Available Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade.

  3. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  4. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels T Marstrand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In studies of gene regulation the efficient computational detection of over-represented transcription factor binding sites is an increasingly important aspect. Several published methods can be used for testing whether a set of hypothesised co-regulated genes share a common regulatory regime based on the occurrence of the modelled transcription factor binding sites. However there is little or no information available for guiding the end users choice of method. Furthermore it would be necessary to obtain several different software programs from various sources to make a well-founded choice. METHODOLOGY: We introduce a software package, Asap, for fast searching with position weight matrices that include several standard methods for assessing over-representation. We have compared the ability of these methods to detect over-represented transcription factor binding sites in artificial promoter sequences. Controlling all aspects of our input data we are able to identify the optimal statistics across multiple threshold values and for sequence sets containing different distributions of transcription factor binding sites. CONCLUSIONS: We show that our implementation is significantly faster than more naïve scanning algorithms when searching with many weight matrices in large sequence sets. When comparing the various statistics, we show that those based on binomial over-representation and Fisher's exact test performs almost equally good and better than the others. An online server is available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/asap/.

  5. Functional and phylogenetic analyses of chromosome 21 promoters and hominid-specific transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Querfurth, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this work addresses functional studies of human and primate promoters, and the genome-wide localization and validation of human-specific transcription factor binding sites of the essential transcription factor GABPa. In this context, the development of an improved PCR protocol, including the careful adjustment of PCR additives to compose an efficient enhancer mix, was central to the amplification of large GC-rich promoter fragments used as source for the functional studies. Based...

  6. SPIC: A novel similarity metric for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs based on information contents

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Xiguo; Du, Chuanbin; Su, Zhengchang

    2013-01-01

    Background Discovering transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) is one of primary challenges to decipher complex gene regulatory networks encrypted in a genome. A set of short DNA sequences identified by a transcription factor (TF) is known as a motif, which can be expressed accurately in matrix form such as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) and a position frequency matrix. Very frequently, we need to query a motif in a database of motifs by seeking its similar motifs, merge similar ...

  7. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  8. Prediction of transcription factor binding to DNA using rule induction methods

    OpenAIRE

    Huss, Mikael; Nordström, Karin

    2005-01-01

    The transcription of DNA into mRNA is initiated and aided by a number of transcription factors (TFs), proteins with DNA-binding regions that attach themselves to binding sites in the DNA (transcription factor binding sites, TFBSs). As it has become apparent that both TFs and TFBSs are highly variable, tools are needed to quantify the strength of the interaction resulting from a certain TF variant binding to a certain TFBS. We used a simple way to predict interactions between protein and DNA: ...

  9. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Troels T; Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida;

    2008-01-01

    promoter sequences. Controlling all aspects of our input data we are able to identify the optimal statistics across multiple threshold values and for sequence sets containing different distributions of transcription factor binding sites. CONCLUSIONS: We show that our implementation is significantly faster...... regime based on the occurrence of the modelled transcription factor binding sites. However there is little or no information available for guiding the end users choice of method. Furthermore it would be necessary to obtain several different software programs from various sources to make a well...... than more naïve scanning algorithms when searching with many weight matrices in large sequence sets. When comparing the various statistics, we show that those based on binomial over-representation and Fisher's exact test performs almost equally good and better than the others. An online server is...

  10. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  11. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Quader Saad; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC) and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this pape...

  12. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Minli Xu; Zhengchang Su

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between ...

  13. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Down Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS" but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS". We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation.

  14. Generation of a synthetic mammalian promoter library by modification of sequences spacing transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Jens; Kusk, P.; Johansen, T.E.;

    2002-01-01

    fluorescent protein and secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter assays. By replacing sequences separating the transcription factor binding sites with randomized sequences of the same length, sets of new promoters with different strengths, spanning a 10-fold range of transcriptional activity in cell culture......The development of a set of synthetic mammalian promoters with different specific activities is described. The library is based on a synthetic promoter, JeT, constructed as a 200 bp chimeric promoter built from fragments of the viral SV40 early promoter and the human beta-actin and ubiquitin C...... promoters. The JeT promoter was made by separating the included consensus boxes by the same distances in base pairs as found in the wild-type promoters, thus preserving transcription factor interaction. The resulting promoter was shown to drive reporter expression to high levels in enhanced green...

  15. Generation of a synthetic mammalian promoter library by modification of sequences spacing transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Jens; Kusk, P.; Johansen, T.E.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    The development of a set of synthetic mammalian promoters with different specific activities is described. The library is based on a synthetic promoter, JeT, constructed as a 200 bp chimeric promoter built from fragments of the viral SV40 early promoter and the human beta-actin and ubiquitin C...... promoters. The JeT promoter was made by separating the included consensus boxes by the same distances in base pairs as found in the wild-type promoters, thus preserving transcription factor interaction. The resulting promoter was shown to drive reporter expression to high levels in enhanced green...... fluorescent protein and secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter assays. By replacing sequences separating the transcription factor binding sites with randomized sequences of the same length, sets of new promoters with different strengths, spanning a 10-fold range of transcriptional activity in cell culture...

  16. Number of active transcription factor binding sites is essential for the Hes7 oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly accepted that embryonic segmentation of vertebrates is regulated by a segmentation clock, which is induced by the cycling genes Hes1 and Hes7. Their products form dimers that bind to the regulatory regions and thereby repress the transcription of their own encoding genes. An increase of the half-life of Hes7 protein causes irregular somite formation. This was shown in recent experiments by Hirata et al. In the same work, numerical simulations from a delay differential equations model, originally invented by Lewis, gave additional support. For a longer half-life of the Hes7 protein, these simulations exhibited strongly damped oscillations with, after few periods, severely attenuated the amplitudes. In these simulations, the Hill coefficient, a crucial model parameter, was set to 2 indicating that Hes7 has only one binding site in its promoter. On the other hand, Bessho et al. established three regulatory elements in the promoter region. Results We show that – with the same half life – the delay system is highly sensitive to changes in the Hill coefficient. A small increase changes the qualitative behaviour of the solutions drastically. There is sustained oscillation and hence the model can no longer explain the disruption of the segmentation clock. On the other hand, the Hill coefficient is correlated with the number of active binding sites, and with the way in which dimers bind to them. In this paper, we adopt response functions in order to estimate Hill coefficients for a variable number of active binding sites. It turns out that three active transcription factor binding sites increase the Hill coefficient by at least 20% as compared to one single active site. Conclusion Our findings lead to the following crucial dichotomy: either Hirata's model is correct for the Hes7 oscillator, in which case at most two binding sites are active in its promoter region; or at least three binding sites are active, in which

  17. Alteration in transcription factor binding in murine thymocytes after low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose radiation on gene transcription regulation of murine thymocytes. Methods: Alteration in transcription factor binding in murine thymocytes 4 h after whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays was investigated with gel mobility shift assay. Results: Increased binding to CREB, NF-kB and APl consensus sequences was found with nuclear extracts prepared from thymocytes of irradiated versus sham-irradiated mice. Binding to the CREB, NF-kB and APl consensus sequences by nuclear extracts derived from irradiated mice was 6-fold, 4,3-fold and 2-fold higher than that from sham-irradiated respectively. The present report demonstrates that WBI with 75 mGy X-rays is capable of increasing expression of CREB, NF-kB and APl in murine thymocytes. competition with the cold oligonucleotide containing the consensus sequences for CREB and NF-kB resulted in loss of the shifted band, indicating specific binding. Conclusions: X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction of gene transcription

  18. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  19. Defining transcriptional networks through integrative modeling of mRNA expression and transcription factor binding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussemaker Harmen J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional genomics studies are yielding information about regulatory processes in the cell at an unprecedented scale. In the yeast S. cerevisiae, DNA microarrays have not only been used to measure the mRNA abundance for all genes under a variety of conditions but also to determine the occupancy of all promoter regions by a large number of transcription factors. The challenge is to extract useful information about the global regulatory network from these data. Results We present MA-Networker, an algorithm that combines microarray data for mRNA expression and transcription factor occupancy to define the regulatory network of the cell. Multivariate regression analysis is used to infer the activity of each transcription factor, and the correlation across different conditions between this activity and the mRNA expression of a gene is interpreted as regulatory coupling strength. Applying our method to S. cerevisiae, we find that, on average, 58% of the genes whose promoter region is bound by a transcription factor are true regulatory targets. These results are validated by an analysis of enrichment for functional annotation, response for transcription factor deletion, and over-representation of cis-regulatory motifs. We are able to assign directionality to transcription factors that control divergently transcribed genes sharing the same promoter region. Finally, we identify an intrinsic limitation of transcription factor deletion experiments related to the combinatorial nature of transcriptional control, to which our approach provides an alternative. Conclusion Our reliable classification of ChIP positives into functional and non-functional TF targets based on their expression pattern across a wide range of conditions provides a starting point for identifying the unknown sequence features in non-coding DNA that directly or indirectly determine the context dependence of transcription factor action. Complete analysis results are

  20. Model-based Comparative Prediction of Transcription-Factor Binding Motifs in Anabolic Responses in Bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andy B. Chen; Kazunori Hamamura; Guohua Wang; Weirong Xing; Subburaman Mohan; Hiroki Yokota; Yunlong Liu

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory mechanism that controls the alteration of global gene expression patterns continues to be a challenging task in computational biology. We previously developed an ant algorithm, a biologically-inspired computational technique for microarray data, and predicted putative transcription-factor binding motifs (TFBMs) through mimicking interactive behaviors of natural ants. Here we extended the algorithm into a set of web-based software, Ant Modeler, and applied it to investigate the transcriptional mechanism underlying bone formation. Mechanical loading and administration of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are two known treatments to strengthen bone. We addressed a question: Is there any TFBM that stimulates both "anabolic responses of mechanical loading" and "BMP-mediated osteogenic signaling"? Although there is no significant overlap among genes in the two responses, a comparative model-based analysis suggests that the two independent osteogenic processes employ common TFBMs, such as a stress responsive element and a motif for peroxisome proliferator-activated recep- tor (PPAR). The post-modeling in vitro analysis using mouse osteoblast cells sup- ported involvements of the predicted TFBMs such as PPAR, Ikaros 3, and LMO2 in response to mechanical loading. Taken together, the results would be useful to derive a set of testable hypotheses and examine the role of specific regulators in complex transcriptional control of bone formation.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Regulatory Motif Discovery Tools for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, identification of specific regulatory motifs or transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in non-coding DNA sequences, which is essential to elucidate transcriptional regulatory networks, has emerged as an obstacle that frustrates many researchers. Consequently, numerous motif discovery tools and correlated databases have been applied to solving this problem. However, these existing methods, based on different computational algorithms, show diverse motif prediction efficiency in non-coding DNA sequences. Therefore, understanding the similarities and differences of computational algorithms and enriching the motif discovery literatures are important for users to choose the most appropriate one among the online available tools. Moreover, there still lacks credible criterion to assess motif discovery tools and instructions for researchers to choose the best according to their own projects. Thus integration of the related resources might be a good approach to improve accuracy of the application. Recent studies integrate regulatory motif discovery tools with experimental methods to offer a complementary approach for researchers, and also provide a much-needed model for current researches on transcriptional regulatory networks. Here we present a comparative analysis of regulatory motif discovery tools for TFBSs.

  2. rVISTA 2.0: Evolutionary Analysis of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2004-01-28

    Identifying and characterizing the patterns of DNA cis-regulatory modules represents a challenge that has the potential to reveal the regulatory language the genome uses to dictate transcriptional dynamics. Several studies have demonstrated that regulatory modules are under positive selection and therefore are often conserved between related species. Using this evolutionary principle we have created a comparative tool, rVISTA, for analyzing the regulatory potential of noncoding sequences. The rVISTA tool combines transcription factor binding site (TFBS) predictions, sequence comparisons and cluster analysis to identify noncoding DNA regions that are highly conserved and present in a specific configuration within an alignment. Here we present the newly developed version 2.0 of the rVISTA tool that can process alignments generated by both zPicture and PipMaker alignment programs or use pre-computed pairwise alignments of seven vertebrate genomes available from the ECR Browser. The rVISTA web server is closely interconnected with the TRANSFAC database, allowing users to either search for matrices present in the TRANSFAC library collection or search for user-defined consensus sequences. rVISTA tool is publicly available at http://rvista.dcode.org/.

  3. A structural-based strategy for recognition of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisi Xu

    Full Text Available Scanning through genomes for potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is becoming increasingly important in this post-genomic era. The position weight matrix (PWM is the standard representation of TFBSs utilized when scanning through sequences for potential binding sites. However, many transcription factor (TF motifs are short and highly degenerate, and methods utilizing PWMs to scan for sites are plagued by false positives. Furthermore, many important TFs do not have well-characterized PWMs, making identification of potential binding sites even more difficult. One approach to the identification of sites for these TFs has been to use the 3D structure of the TF to predict the DNA structure around the TF and then to generate a PWM from the predicted 3D complex structure. However, this approach is dependent on the similarity of the predicted structure to the native structure. We introduce here a novel approach to identify TFBSs utilizing structure information that can be applied to TFs without characterized PWMs, as long as a 3D complex structure (TF/DNA exists. This approach utilizes an energy function that is uniquely trained on each structure. Our approach leads to increased prediction accuracy and robustness compared with those using a more general energy function. The software is freely available upon request.

  4. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family. PMID:20098703

  5. A novel alignment-free method for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minli Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor binding site (TFBS motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family.

  6. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  7. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  8. Predicting transcription factor binding sites using local over-representation and comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touzet Hélène

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying cis-regulatory elements is crucial to understanding gene expression, which highlights the importance of the computational detection of overrepresented transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in coexpressed or coregulated genes. However, this is a challenging problem, especially when considering higher eukaryotic organisms. Results We have developed a method, named TFM-Explorer, that searches for locally overrepresented TFBSs in a set of coregulated genes, which are modeled by profiles provided by a database of position weight matrices. The novelty of the method is that it takes advantage of spatial conservation in the sequence and supports multiple species. The efficiency of the underlying algorithm and its robustness to noise allow weak regulatory signals to be detected in large heterogeneous data sets. Conclusion TFM-Explorer provides an efficient way to predict TFBS overrepresentation in related sequences. Promising results were obtained in a variety of examples in human, mouse, and rat genomes. The software is publicly available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/TFM-Explorer.

  9. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  10. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  11. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J.; Chen, Chih-Yu; Denay, Grégoire; Lee, Jessica; Shi, Wenqiang; Shyr, Casper; Tan, Ge; Worsley-Hunt, Rebecca; Zhang, Allen W.; Parcy, François; Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we expanded the JASPAR CORE collection with 494 new TF binding profiles (315 in vertebrates, 11 in nematodes, 3 in insects, 1 in fungi and 164 in plants) and updated 59 profiles (58 in vertebrates and 1 in f...

  12. oPOSSUM: identification of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in co-expressed genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Sui, Shannan J; Mortimer, James R.; Arenillas, David J.; Brumm, Jochen; Walsh, Christopher J.; Kennedy, Brian P; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2005-01-01

    Targeted transcript profiling studies can identify sets of co-expressed genes; however, identification of the underlying functional mechanism(s) is a significant challenge. Established methods for the analysis of gene annotations, particularly those based on the Gene Ontology, can identify functional linkages between genes. Similar methods for the identification of over-represented transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been successful in yeast, but extension to human genomics has la...

  13. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  14. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains). PMID:26220934

  15. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell–specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte–specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte–specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell–regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell–specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  16. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell-specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte-specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte-specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell-regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell-specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  17. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, John V K; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra C; Cannon, Virginetta S; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S; Ford, Byron D

    2013-02-01

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. PMID:23246490

  18. Quantitative models of the mechanisms that control genome-wide patterns of transcription factor binding during early Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Kaplan

    Full Text Available Transcription factors that drive complex patterns of gene expression during animal development bind to thousands of genomic regions, with quantitative differences in binding across bound regions mediating their activity. While we now have tools to characterize the DNA affinities of these proteins and to precisely measure their genome-wide distribution in vivo, our understanding of the forces that determine where, when, and to what extent they bind remains primitive. Here we use a thermodynamic model of transcription factor binding to evaluate the contribution of different biophysical forces to the binding of five regulators of early embryonic anterior-posterior patterning in Drosophila melanogaster. Predictions based on DNA sequence and in vitro protein-DNA affinities alone achieve a correlation of ∼0.4 with experimental measurements of in vivo binding. Incorporating cooperativity and competition among the five factors, and accounting for spatial patterning by modeling binding in every nucleus independently, had little effect on prediction accuracy. A major source of error was the prediction of binding events that do not occur in vivo, which we hypothesized reflected reduced accessibility of chromatin. To test this, we incorporated experimental measurements of genome-wide DNA accessibility into our model, effectively restricting predicted binding to regions of open chromatin. This dramatically improved our predictions to a correlation of 0.6-0.9 for various factors across known target genes. Finally, we used our model to quantify the roles of DNA sequence, accessibility, and binding competition and cooperativity. Our results show that, in regions of open chromatin, binding can be predicted almost exclusively by the sequence specificity of individual factors, with a minimal role for protein interactions. We suggest that a combination of experimentally determined chromatin accessibility data and simple computational models of transcription

  19. Energy-dependent fitness: A quantitative model for the evolution of yeast transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Mustonen, Ville; Kinney, Justin; Callan, Curtis G.; Lässig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We present a genomewide cross-species analysis of regulation for broad-acting transcription factors in yeast. Our model for binding site evolution is founded on biophysics: the binding energy between transcription factor and site is a quantitative phenotype of regulatory function, and selection is given by a fitness landscape that depends on this phenotype. The model quantifies conservation, as well as loss and gain, of functional binding sites in a coherent way. Its predictions are supported...

  20. Characterization of transcription factors binding to-120 GATA motif of rat βbminy-globin promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović Sonja T.; Mitrović Tatjana; Karan-Đurašević Teodora; Nikčević Gordana T.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulation of rat adult βbminy-globin gene transcription. We used DNasel foot printing, gel mobility shift and super shift assays to characterize transcription factors involved in this regulation. In this study we analyzed GATA motif at-120 bp in the distal promoter of βbminy-globin gene. Footprint analysis revealed the binding of nuclear factors from MEL cells to the GATA motif. By using gel mobility shift assay two protein complexes were detected. ...

  1. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Gavin M; Wilson, Michael D; Moses, Alan M

    2016-06-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions.We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  2. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Gavin M.; Wilson, Michael D.; Moses, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions. We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  3. A systematic, large-scale comparison of transcription factor binding site models

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach, Daniela; Schwarz, Jana Marie; Peter N. Robinson; Schuelke, Markus; Seelow, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background The modelling of gene regulation is a major challenge in biomedical research. This process is dominated by transcription factors (TFs) and mutations in their binding sites (TFBSs) may cause the misregulation of genes, eventually leading to disease. The consequences of DNA variants on TF binding are modelled in silico using binding matrices, but it remains unclear whether these are capable of accurately representing in vivo binding. In this study, we present a systematic comparison ...

  4. JASPAR 2014: an extensively expanded and updated open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mathelier, Anthony; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zhang, Allen W.; Parcy, François; Worsley-Hunt, Rebecca; Arenillas, David J.; Buchman, Sorana; Chen, Chih-Yu; Chou, Alice; Ienasescu, Hans; Lim, Jonathan; Shyr, Casper; Tan, Ge; Zhou, Michelle; Lenhard, Boris

    2013-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the largest open-access database of matrix-based nucleotide profiles describing the binding preference of transcription factors from multiple species. The fifth major release greatly expands the heart of JASPAR—the JASPAR CORE subcollection, which contains curated, non-redundant profiles—with 135 new curated profiles (74 in vertebrates, 8 in Drosophila melanogaster, 10 in Caenorhabditis elegans and 43 in Arabidopsis thaliana; a 30% increase in total) and ...

  5. Psoriasis drug development and GWAS interpretation through in silico analysis of transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Swindell, William R.; Sarkar, Mrinal K; Stuart, Philip E.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Johnston, Andrew; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a cytokine-mediated skin disease that can be treated effectively with immunosuppressive biologic agents. These medications, however, are not equally effective in all patients and are poorly suited for treating mild psoriasis. To develop more targeted therapies, interfering with transcription factor (TF) activity is a promising strategy. Methods Meta-analysis was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the lesional skin from psoriasis patients (n = 237...

  6. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Yevshin, Ivan S; Soboleva, Anastasiia V; Kasianov, Artem S; Ashoor, Haitham; Ba-Alawi, Wail; Bajic, Vladimir B; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Kolpakov, Fedor A; Makeev, Vsevolod J

    2016-01-01

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences. PMID:26586801

  7. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  8. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  9. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J; Chen, Chih-Yu; Denay, Grégoire; Lee, Jessica; Shi, Wenqiang; Shyr, Casper; Tan, Ge; Worsley-Hunt, Rebecca; Zhang, Allen W; Parcy, François; Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we expanded the JASPAR CORE collection with 494 new TF binding profiles (315 in vertebrates, 11 in nematodes, 3 in insects, 1 in fungi and 164 in plants) and updated 59 profiles (58 in vertebrates and 1 in fungi). The introduced profiles represent an 83% expansion and 10% update when compared to the previous release. We updated the structural annotation of the TF DNA binding domains (DBDs) following a published hierarchical structural classification. In addition, we introduced 130 transcription factor flexible models trained on ChIP-seq data for vertebrates, which capture dinucleotide dependencies within TF binding sites. This new JASPAR release is accompanied by a new web tool to infer JASPAR TF binding profiles recognized by a given TF protein sequence. Moreover, we provide the users with a Ruby module complementing the JASPAR API to ease programmatic access and use of the JASPAR collection of profiles. Finally, we provide the JASPAR2016 R/Bioconductor data package with the data of this release. PMID:26531826

  10. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Portales-Casamar, E; Thongjuea, S.; Kwon, A. T.; Arenillas, D.; Zhao, X; Valen, E.; Yusuf, D; Lenhard, B.; Wasserman, W. W.; Sandelin, A

    2010-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database to date: the database now holds 457 non-redundant, curated profiles. The new entries include the first batch of profiles derived from ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip whole-genome binding experiments, and 177...

  11. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T;

    2009-01-01

    active research community. As binding models are refined by newer data, the JASPAR database now uses versioning of matrices: in this release, 12% of the older models were updated to improved versions. Classification of TF families has been improved by adopting a new DNA-binding domain nomenclature. A......JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...

  12. HOCOMOCO: A comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2012-11-21

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. The Author(s) 2012.

  13. Sequence and chromatin determinants of cell-type-specific transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvey, Aaron; Agius, Phaedra; Noble, William Stafford; Leslie, Christina

    2012-09-01

    Gene regulatory programs in distinct cell types are maintained in large part through the cell-type-specific binding of transcription factors (TFs). The determinants of TF binding include direct DNA sequence preferences, DNA sequence preferences of cofactors, and the local cell-dependent chromatin context. To explore the contribution of DNA sequence signal, histone modifications, and DNase accessibility to cell-type-specific binding, we analyzed 286 ChIP-seq experiments performed by the ENCODE Consortium. This analysis included experiments for 67 transcriptional regulators, 15 of which were profiled in both the GM12878 (lymphoblastoid) and K562 (erythroleukemic) human hematopoietic cell lines. To model TF-bound regions, we trained support vector machines (SVMs) that use flexible k-mer patterns to capture DNA sequence signals more accurately than traditional motif approaches. In addition, we trained SVM spatial chromatin signatures to model local histone modifications and DNase accessibility, obtaining significantly more accurate TF occupancy predictions than simpler approaches. Consistent with previous studies, we find that DNase accessibility can explain cell-line-specific binding for many factors. However, we also find that of the 10 factors with prominent cell-type-specific binding patterns, four display distinct cell-type-specific DNA sequence preferences according to our models. Moreover, for two factors we identify cell-specific binding sites that are accessible in both cell types but bound only in one. For these sites, cell-type-specific sequence models, rather than DNase accessibility, are better able to explain differential binding. Our results suggest that using a single motif for each TF and filtering for chromatin accessible loci is not always sufficient to accurately account for cell-type-specific binding profiles. PMID:22955984

  14. LASAGNA-Search: an integrated web tool for transcription factor binding site search and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chic; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-03-01

    The release of ChIP-seq data from the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (modENCODE) projects has significantly increased the amount of transcription factor (TF) binding affinity information available to researchers. However, scientists still routinely use TF binding site (TFBS) search tools to scan unannotated sequences for TFBSs, particularly when searching for lesser-known TFs or TFs in organisms for which ChIP-seq data are unavailable. The sequence analysis often involves multiple steps such as TF model collection, promoter sequence retrieval, and visualization; thus, several different tools are required. We have developed a novel integrated web tool named LASAGNA-Search that allows users to perform TFBS searches without leaving the web site. LASAGNA-Search uses the LASAGNA (Length-Aware Site Alignment Guided by Nucleotide Association) algorithm for TFBS alignment. Important features of LASAGNA-Search include (i) acceptance of unaligned variable-length TFBSs, (ii) a collection of 1726 TF models, (iii) automatic promoter sequence retrieval, (iv) visualization in the UCSC Genome Browser, and (v) gene regulatory network inference and visualization based on binding specificities. LASAGNA-Search is freely available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/. PMID:23599922

  15. Nonspecific transcription factor binding can reduce noise in the expression of downstream proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M.; Bokes, P.; Fox, Z.; Singh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) interact with a multitude of binding sites on DNA and partner proteins inside cells. We investigate how nonspecific binding/unbinding to such decoy binding sites affects the magnitude and time-scale of random fluctuations in TF copy numbers arising from stochastic gene expression. A stochastic model of TF gene expression, together with decoy site interactions is formulated. Distributions for the total (bound and unbound) and free (unbound) TF levels are derived by analytically solving the chemical master equation under physiologically relevant assumptions. Our results show that increasing the number of decoy binding sides considerably reduces stochasticity in free TF copy numbers. The TF autocorrelation function reveals that decoy sites can either enhance or shorten the time-scale of TF fluctuations depending on model parameters. To understand how noise in TF abundances propagates downstream, a TF target gene is included in the model. Intriguingly, we find that noise in the expression of the target gene decreases with increasing decoy sites for linear TF-target protein dose-responses, even in regimes where decoy sites enhance TF autocorrelation times. Moreover, counterintuitive noise transmissions arise for nonlinear dose-responses. In summary, our study highlights the critical role of molecular sequestration by decoy binding sites in regulating the stochastic dynamics of TFs and target proteins at the single-cell level.

  16. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Ángel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs.

  17. Allele-specific transcription factor binding to common and rare variants associated with disease and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marco; Pan, Gang; Nord, Helena; Wallerman, Ola; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Berggren, Olof; Elvers, Ingegerd; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Lindblad Toh, Kerstin; Wadelius, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of disease-associated SNPs, but in few cases the functional variant and the gene it controls have been identified. To systematically identify candidate regulatory variants, we sequenced ENCODE cell lines and used public ChIP-seq data to look for transcription factors binding preferentially to one allele. We found 9962 candidate regulatory SNPs, of which 16 % were rare and showed evidence of larger functional effect than common ones. Functionally rare variants may explain divergent GWAS results between populations and are candidates for a partial explanation of the missing heritability. The majority of allele-specific variants (96 %) were specific to a cell type. Furthermore, by examining GWAS loci we found >400 allele-specific candidate SNPs, 141 of which were highly relevant in our cell types. Functionally validated SNPs support identification of an SNP in SYNGR1 which may expose to the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as an SNP in the last intron of COG6 exposing to the risk of psoriasis. We propose that by repeating the ChIP-seq experiments of 20 selected transcription factors in three to ten people, the most common polymorphisms can be interrogated for allele-specific binding. Our strategy may help to remove the current bottleneck in functional annotation of the genome. PMID:26993500

  18. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Harris H.

    2016-01-01

    ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF)-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology. PMID:27104615

  19. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antonio L C; Wang, Harris H

    2016-04-01

    ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF)-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology. PMID:27104615

  20. Pipeline for Efficient Mapping of Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Comparison of Their Models

    KAUST Repository

    Ba alawi, Wail

    2011-06-01

    The control of genes in every living organism is based on activities of transcription factor (TF) proteins. These TFs interact with DNA by binding to the TF binding sites (TFBSs) and in that way create conditions for the genes to activate. Of the approximately 1500 TFs in human, TFBSs are experimentally derived only for less than 300 TFs and only in generally limited portions of the genome. To be able to associate TF to genes they control we need to know if TFs will have a potential to interact with the control region of the gene. For this we need to have models of TFBS families. The existing models are not sufficiently accurate or they are too complex for use by ordinary biologists. To remove some of the deficiencies of these models, in this study we developed a pipeline through which we achieved the following: 1. Through a comparison analysis of the performance we identified the best models with optimized thresholds among the four different types of models of TFBS families. 2. Using the best models we mapped TFBSs to the human genome in an efficient way. The study shows that a new scoring function used with TFBS models based on the position weight matrix of dinucleotides with remote dependency results in better accuracy than the other three types of the TFBS models. The speed of mapping has been improved by developing a parallelized code and shows a significant speed up of 4x when going from 1 CPU to 8 CPUs. To verify if the predicted TFBSs are more accurate than what can be expected with the conventional models, we identified the most frequent pairs of TFBSs (for TFs E4F1 and ATF6) that appeared close to each other (within the distance of 200 nucleotides) over the human genome. We show unexpectedly that the genes that are most close to the multiple pairs of E4F1/ATF6 binding sites have a co-expression of over 90%. This indirectly supports our hypothesis that the TFBS models we use are more accurate and also suggests that the E4F1/ATF6 pair is exerting the

  1. The thumb subdomain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is involved in processivity, transcript fidelity and mitochondrial transcription factor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Gilberto; Sousa, Rui; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    Single subunit RNA polymerases have evolved 2 mechanisms to synthesize long transcripts without falling off a DNA template: binding of nascent RNA and interactions with an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mitochondrial RNA polymerases share a common ancestor with T-odd bacteriophage single subunit RNA polymerases. Herein we characterized the role of the thumb subdomain of the yeast mtRNA polymerase gene (RPO41) in complex stability, processivity, and fidelity. We found that deletion and point mutants of the thumb subdomain of yeast mtRNA polymerase increase the synthesis of abortive transcripts and the probability that the polymerase will disengage from the template during the formation of the late initial transcription and elongation complexes. Mutations in the thumb subdomain increase the amount of slippage products from a homopolymeric template and, unexpectedly, thumb subdomain deletions decrease the binding affinity for mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1). The latter suggests that the thumb subdomain is part of an extended binding surface area involved in binding Mtf1. PMID:25654332

  2. Studying the evolution of transcription factor binding events using multi-species ChIP-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Hongyu

    2013-03-01

    Recent technology advances make it possible to collect whole-genome transcription factor binding (TFB) profiles from multiple species through the ChIP-Seq data. This provides rich information to understand TFB evolution. However, few rigorous statistical models are available to infer TFB evolution from these data. We have developed a phylogenetic tree based method to model the on/off rates of TFB events. There are two unique features of our method compared to existing models. First, we mask nucleotide substitutions and focus on INDEL disruption of TFB events, which are rarer evolution events and more appropriate for divergent species and non-coding regulatory regions. Second, we correct for ascertainment bias in ChIP-Seq data by maximizing likelihood conditional on the observed (incomplete) data. Simulations show that our method works well in model selection and parameter estimation when there are sufficient aligned TFB events. When this method is applied to a ChIP-Seq data set with five vertebrates, we find that the instantaneous transition rates to INDELs are higher in TFB regions than in homologous non-binding regions. This is driven by an excess of alignment columns showing binding in one species but gaps in all other species. When we compare the inferred transition rates between the conserved and non-conserved regions, as expected, the conserved regions are estimated to have lower transition rates. The R package TFBphylo that implements the described model can be downloaded from http://bioinformatics.med.yale.edu/. PMID:23446869

  3. MicroRNA genes preferentially expressed in dendritic cells contain sites for conserved transcription factor binding motifs in their promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a fundamental role in the regulation of gene expression by translational repression or target mRNA degradation. Regulatory elements in miRNA promoters are less well studied, but may reveal a link between their expression and a specific cell type. Results To explore this link in myeloid cells, miRNA expression profiles were generated from monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs. Differences in miRNA expression among monocytes, DCs and their stimulated progeny were observed. Furthermore, putative promoter regions of miRNAs that are significantly up-regulated in DCs were screened for Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs based on TFBS motif matching score, the degree to which those TFBSs are over-represented in the promoters of the up-regulated miRNAs, and the extent of conservation of the TFBSs in mammals. Conclusions Analysis of evolutionarily conserved TFBSs in DC promoters revealed preferential clustering of sites within 500 bp upstream of the precursor miRNAs and that many mRNAs of cognate TFs of the conserved TFBSs were indeed expressed in the DCs. Taken together, our data provide evidence that selected miRNAs expressed in DCs have evolutionarily conserved TFBSs relevant to DC biology in their promoters.

  4. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  5. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  6. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurav Ghosh; Satish Sati; Shantanu Sengupta; Vinod Scaria

    2015-03-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a new class of noncoding RNAs that have been extensively studied in the recent past as a regulator of gene expression, including modulation of epigenetic regulation. The lncRNAs class encompasses a number of subclasses, classified based on their genomic loci and relation to protein-coding genes. Functional differences between subclasses have been increasingly studied in the recent years, though the regulation of expression and biogenesis of lncRNAs have been poorly studied. The availability of genome-scale datasets of epigenetic marks has motivated us to understand the patterns and processes of epigenetic regulation of lncRNAs. Here we analysed the occurrence of expressive and repressive histone marks at the transcription start site (TSS) of lncRNAs and their subclasses, and compared these profiles with that of the protein-coding regions. We observe distinct differences in the density of histone marks across the TSS of a few lncRNA subclasses. The sense-intronic lncRNA subclass showed a paucity for mapped histone marks across the TSS which were significantly different than all the lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in most cases. Similar pattern was also observed for the density of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). These observations were generally consistent across cell and tissue types. The differences in density across the promoter were significantly associated with the expression level of the genes, but the differences between the densities across long noncoding and protein-coding gene promoters were consistent irrespective of the expression levels. Apart from suggesting general differences in epigenetic regulatory marks across long noncoding RNA promoters, our analysis suggests a possible alternative mechanism of regulation and/or biogenesis of sense-intronic lncRNAs.

  7. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  8. Genome-wide profiling of transcription factor binding and epigenetic marks in adipocytes by ChIP-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    the most widely used of these technologies. Using these methods, association of transcription factors, cofactors, and epigenetic marks can be mapped to DNA in a genome-wide manner. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for performing ChIP-seq analyses in preadipocytes and adipocytes. We have focused...

  9. JASPAR, the open access database of transcription factor-binding profiles: new content and tools in the 2008 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryne, J.C.; Valen, E.; Tang, M.H.E.; Marstrand, T.; Winther, Ole; da Piedade, I.; Krogh, A.; Lenhard, B.; Sandelin, A.

    2008-01-01

    JASPAR is a popular open-access database for matrix models describing DNA-binding preferences for transcription factors and other DNA patterns. With its third major release, JASPAR has been expanded and equipped with additional functions aimed at both casual and power users. The heart of the JASPAR...

  10. Two distinct factors bind to the rabbit uteroglobin TATA-box region and are required for efficient transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Klug, J.; Knapp, S.; Castro, I; Beato, M.

    1994-01-01

    The rabbit uteroglobin gene is expressed in a variety of epithelial cell types like the lung Clara cells and the glandular and luminal epithelial cells of the endometrium. Expression in Clara cells is on a high constitutive level, whereas expression in the rabbit endometrium is under tight hormonal control. One important element of the rabbit uteroglobin gene mediating its efficient transcription in two epithelial cell lines from human endometrium (Ishikawa) and lung (NCI-H441) is its noncano...

  11. JASPAR, the open access database of transcription factor-binding profiles: new content and tools in the 2008 update

    OpenAIRE

    Bryne, Jan Christian; Valen, Eivind; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Marstrand, Troels; Winther, Ole; da Piedade, Isabelle; Krogh, Anders; Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin

    2007-01-01

    JASPAR is a popular open-access database for matrix models describing DNA-binding preferences for transcription factors and other DNA patterns. With its third major release, JASPAR has been expanded and equipped with additional functions aimed at both casual and power users. The heart of the JASPAR database—the JASPAR CORE sub-database—has increased by 12% in size, and three new specialized sub-databases have been added. New functions include clustering of matrix models by similarity, generat...

  12. Nanopore current transduction analysis of protein binding to non-terminal and terminal DNA regions: analysis of transcription factor binding, retroviral DNA terminus dynamics, and retroviral integrase-DNA binding

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Iftekhar; Davis Amanda; Winters-Hilt Stephen; Morales Eric

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Synthetic transcription factors (STFs) promise to offer a powerful new therapeutic against Cancer, AIDS, and genetic disease. Currently, 10% of drugs are of this type, including salicylate and tamoxifen. STFs that can appropriately target (and release) their transcription factor binding sites on native genomic DNA provide a means to directly influence cellular mRNA production. An effective mechanism for screening amongst transcription factor (TF) candidates would itself be...

  13. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  14. Data in support of FSH induction of IRS-2 in human granulosa cells: Mapping the transcription factor binding sites in human IRS-2 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surleen Kaur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2 plays critical role in the regulation of various metabolic processes by insulin and IGF-1. The defects in its expression and/or function are linked to diseases like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, insulin resistance and cancer. To predict the transcription factors (TFs responsible for the regulation of human IRS-2 gene expression, the transcription factor binding sites (TFBS and the corresponding TFs were investigated by analysis of IRS-2 promoter sequence using MatInspector Genomatix software (Cartharius et al., 2005 [1]. The ibid data is part of author׳s publication (Anjali et al., 2015 [2] that explains Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH mediated IRS-2 promoter activation in human granulosa cells and its importance in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Further analysis was carried out for binary interactions of TF regulatory genes in IRS-2 network using Cytoscape software tool and R-code. In this manuscript, we describe the methodology used for the identification of TFBSs in human IRS-2 promoter region and provide details on experimental procedures, analysis method, validation of data and also the raw files. The purpose of this article is to provide the data on all TFBSs in the promoter region of human IRS-2 gene as it has the potential for prediction of the regulation of IRS-2 gene in normal or diseased cells from patients with metabolic disorders and cancer.

  15. Assessment of clusters of transcription factor binding sites in relationship to human promoter, CpG islands and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaki Yoshiyuki

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs that interact with regulatory cis-elements on DNA sequences. To identify functional regulatory elements, computer searching can predict TF binding sites (TFBS using position weight matrices (PWMs that represent positional base frequencies of collected experimentally determined TFBS. A disadvantage of this approach is the large output of results for genomic DNA. One strategy to identify genuine TFBS is to utilize local concentrations of predicted TFBS. It is unclear whether there is a general tendency for TFBS to cluster at promoter regions, although this is the case for certain TFBS. Also unclear is the identification of TFs that have TFBS concentrated in promoters and to what level this occurs. This study hopes to answer some of these questions. Results We developed the cluster score measure to evaluate the correlation between predicted TFBS clusters and promoter sequences for each PWM. Non-promoter sequences were used as a control. Using the cluster score, we identified a PWM group called PWM-PCP, in which TFBS clusters positively correlate with promoters, and another PWM group called PWM-NCP, in which TFBS clusters negatively correlate with promoters. The PWM-PCP group comprises 47% of the 199 vertebrate PWMs, while the PWM-NCP group occupied 11 percent. After reducing the effect of CpG islands (CGI against the clusters using partial correlation coefficients among three properties (promoter, CGI and predicted TFBS cluster, we identified two PWM groups including those strongly correlated with CGI and those not correlated with CGI. Conclusion Not all PWMs predict TFBS correlated with human promoter sequences. Two main PWM groups were identified: (1 those that show TFBS clustered in promoters associated with CGI, and (2 those that show TFBS clustered in promoters independent of CGI. Assessment of PWM matches will allow more positive interpretation of TFBS in

  16. Statistical tests for natural selection on regulatory regions based on the strength of transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Moses Alan M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although cis-regulatory changes play an important role in evolution, it remains difficult to establish the contribution of natural selection to regulatory differences between species. For protein coding regions, powerful tests of natural selection have been developed based on comparisons of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions, and analogous tests for regulatory regions would be of great utility. Results Here, tests for natural selection on regulatory regions are pr...

  17. A general integrative genomic feature transcription factor binding site prediction method applied to analysis of USF1 binding in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tianyuan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transcription factors are key mediators of human complex disease processes. Identifying the target genes of transcription factors will increase our understanding of the biological network leading to disease risk. The prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is one method to identify these target genes; however, current prediction methods need improvement. We chose the transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor l (USF1 to evaluate the performance of our novel TFBS prediction method because of its known genetic association with coronary artery disease (CAD and the recent availability of USF1 chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-chip results. The specific goals of our study were to develop a novel and accurate genome-scale method for predicting USF1 binding sites and associated target genes to aid in the study of CAD. Previously published USF1 ChIP-chip data for 1 per cent of the genome were used to develop and evaluate several kernel logistic regression prediction models. A combination of genomic features (phylogenetic conservation, regulatory potential, presence of a CpG island and DNaseI hypersensitivity, as well as position weight matrix (PWM scores, were used as variables for these models. Our most accurate predictor achieved an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.827 during cross-validation experiments, significantly outperforming standard PWM-based prediction methods. When applied to the whole human genome, we predicted 24,010 USF1 binding sites within 5 kilobases upstream of the transcription start site of 9,721 genes. These predictions included 16 of 20 genes with strong evidence of USF1 regulation. Finally, in the spirit of genomic convergence, we integrated independent experimental CAD data with these USF1 binding site prediction results to develop a prioritised set of candidate genes for future CAD studies. We have shown that our novel prediction method, which employs

  18. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  19. Transcription factor binding site polymorphism in the motilin gene associated with left-sided displacement of the abomasum in German Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mömke, Stefanie; Sickinger, Marlene; Rehage, Jürgen; Doll, Klaus; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Left-sided displacement of the abomasum (LDA) is a common disease in many dairy cattle breeds. A genome-wide screen for QTL for LDA in German Holstein (GH) cows indicated motilin (MLN) as a candidate gene on bovine chromosome 23. Genomic DNA sequence analysis of MLN revealed a total of 32 polymorphisms. All informative polymorphisms used for association analyses in a random sample of 1,136 GH cows confirmed MLN as a candidate for LDA. A single nucleotide polymorphism (FN298674:g.90T>C) located within the first non-coding exon of bovine MLN affects a NKX2-5 transcription factor binding site and showed significant associations (OR(allele) = 0.64; -log(10)P(allele) = 6.8, -log(10)P(genotype) = 7.0) with LDA. An expression study gave evidence of a significantly decreased MLN expression in cows carrying the mutant allele (C). In individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the mutation, MLN expression was decreased by 89% relative to the wildtype. FN298674:g.90T>C may therefore play a role in bovine LDA via the motility of the abomasum. This MLN SNP appears useful to reduce the incidence of LDA in German Holstein cattle and provides a first step towards a deeper understanding of the genetics of LDA. PMID:22536407

  20. Transcription factor binding site polymorphism in the motilin gene associated with left-sided displacement of the abomasum in German Holstein cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Mömke

    Full Text Available Left-sided displacement of the abomasum (LDA is a common disease in many dairy cattle breeds. A genome-wide screen for QTL for LDA in German Holstein (GH cows indicated motilin (MLN as a candidate gene on bovine chromosome 23. Genomic DNA sequence analysis of MLN revealed a total of 32 polymorphisms. All informative polymorphisms used for association analyses in a random sample of 1,136 GH cows confirmed MLN as a candidate for LDA. A single nucleotide polymorphism (FN298674:g.90T>C located within the first non-coding exon of bovine MLN affects a NKX2-5 transcription factor binding site and showed significant associations (OR(allele = 0.64; -log(10P(allele = 6.8, -log(10P(genotype = 7.0 with LDA. An expression study gave evidence of a significantly decreased MLN expression in cows carrying the mutant allele (C. In individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the mutation, MLN expression was decreased by 89% relative to the wildtype. FN298674:g.90T>C may therefore play a role in bovine LDA via the motility of the abomasum. This MLN SNP appears useful to reduce the incidence of LDA in German Holstein cattle and provides a first step towards a deeper understanding of the genetics of LDA.

  1. TET2 Mutations Affect Non-CpG Island DNA Methylation at Enhancers and Transcription Factor-Binding Sites in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R; Godley, Lucy A; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-07-15

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here, we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild-type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites [28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGI) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGI)]. TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. In contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and nonpromoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1 and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:25972343

  2. Effective transcription factor binding site prediction using a combination of optimization, a genetic algorithm and discriminant analysis to capture distant interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkulova Tatyana I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliable transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction methods are essential for computer annotation of large amount of genome sequence data. However, current methods to predict TFBSs are hampered by the high false-positive rates that occur when only sequence conservation at the core binding-sites is considered. Results To improve this situation, we have quantified the performance of several Position Weight Matrix (PWM algorithms, using exhaustive approaches to find their optimal length and position. We applied these approaches to bio-medically important TFBSs involved in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation as well as in inflammatory, immune, and antiviral responses (NF-κB, ISGF3, IRF1, STAT1, obesity and lipid metabolism (PPAR, SREBP, HNF4, regulation of the steroidogenic (SF-1 and cell cycle (E2F genes expression. We have also gained extra specificity using a method, entitled SiteGA, which takes into account structural interactions within TFBS core and flanking regions, using a genetic algorithm (GA with a discriminant function of locally positioned dinucleotide (LPD frequencies. To ensure a higher confidence in our approach, we applied resampling-jackknife and bootstrap tests for the comparison, it appears that, optimized PWM and SiteGA have shown similar recognition performances. Then we applied SiteGA and optimized PWMs (both separately and together to sequences in the Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD. The resulting SiteGA recognition models can now be used to search sequences for BSs using the web tool, SiteGA. Analysis of dependencies between close and distant LPDs revealed by SiteGA models has shown that the most significant correlations are between close LPDs, and are generally located in the core (footprint region. A greater number of less significant correlations are mainly between distant LPDs, which spanned both core and flanking regions. When SiteGA and optimized PWM models were applied

  3. rSNP_Guide, a database system for analysis of transcription factor binding to target sequences: application to SNPs and site-directed mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Ponomarenko, Julia V.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.; Gennady V Vasiliev; Levashova, Zoya B.; Orlova, Galina V.; Lavryushev, Sergey V.; Fokin, Oleg N.; Ponomarenko, Mikhail P.; Frolov, Anatoly S.; Sarai, Akinori

    2001-01-01

    rSNP_Guide is a novel curated database system for analysis of transcription factor (TF) binding to target sequences in regulatory gene regions altered by mutations. It accumulates experimental data on naturally occurring site variants in regulatory gene regions and site-directed mutations. This database system also contains the web tools for SNP analysis, i.e., active applet applying weight matrices to predict the regulatory site candidates altered by a mutation. T...

  4. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip) using MYCN amplified\\/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016), with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription factor affecting the

  5. PscanChIP: finding over-represented transcription factor-binding site motifs and their correlations in sequences from ChIP-Seq experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing with next-generation technologies (ChIP-Seq) has become the de facto standard for building genome-wide maps of regions bound by a given transcription factor (TF). The regions identified, however, have to be further analyzed to determine the actual DNA-binding sites for the TF, as well as sites for other TFs belonging to the same TF complex or in general co-operating or interacting with it in transcription regulation. PscanChIP is a web server that, starting from a collection of genomic regions derived from a ChIP-Seq experiment, scans them using motif descriptors like JASPAR or TRANSFAC position-specific frequency matrices, or descriptors uploaded by users, and it evaluates both motif enrichment and positional bias within the regions according to different measures and criteria. PscanChIP can successfully identify not only the actual binding sites for the TF investigated by a ChIP-Seq experiment but also secondary motifs corresponding to other TFs that tend to bind the same regions, and, if present, precise positional correlations among their respective sites. The web interface is free for use, and there is no login requirement. It is available at http://www.beaconlab.it/pscan_chip_dev. PMID:23748563

  6. Multi-species comparative analysis of the equine ACE gene identifies a highly conserved potential transcription factor binding site in intron 16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Hamilton

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE is essential for control of blood pressure. The human ACE gene contains an intronic Alu indel (I/D polymorphism that has been associated with variation in serum enzyme levels, although the functional mechanism has not been identified. The polymorphism has also been associated with cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, renal disease and elite athleticism. We have characterized the ACE gene in horses of breeds selected for differing physical abilities. The equine gene has a similar structure to that of all known mammalian ACE genes. Nine common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discovered in pooled DNA were found to be inherited in nine haplotypes. Three of these SNPs were located in intron 16, homologous to that containing the Alu polymorphism in the human. A highly conserved 18 bp sequence, also within that intron, was identified as being a potential binding site for the transcription factors Oct-1, HFH-1 and HNF-3β, and lies within a larger area of higher than normal homology. This putative regulatory element may contribute to regulation of the documented inter-individual variation in human circulating enzyme levels, for which a functional mechanism is yet to be defined. Two equine SNPs occurred within the conserved area in intron 16, although neither of them disrupted the putative binding site. We propose a possible regulatory mechanism of the ACE gene in mammalian species which was previously unknown. This advance will allow further analysis leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the associations seen between the human Alu polymorphism and enzyme levels, cardiovascular disease states and elite athleticism.

  7. Skp2B overexpression alters a prohibitin-p53 axis and the transcription of PAPP-A, the protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Chander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously reported that the degradation of prohibitin by the SCF(Skp2B ubiquitin ligase results in a defect in the activity of p53. We also reported that MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice develop mammary gland tumors that are characterized by an increased proteolytic cleavage of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4, an inhibitor of IGF signaling. However, whether a link exists between a defect in p53 activity and proteolysis of IGFBP-4 was not established. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A, the protease of IGFBP-4, in MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice and found that PAPP-A levels are elevated. Further, we found a p53 binding site in intron 1 of the PAPP-A gene and that both wild type and mutant p53 bind to this site. However, binding of wild type p53 results in the transcriptional repression of PAPP-A, while binding of mutant p53 results in the transcriptional activation of PAPP-A. Since MMTV-Skp2B mice express wild type p53 and yet show elevated levels of PAPP-A, at first, these observations appeared contradictory. However, further analysis revealed that the defect in p53 activity in Skp2B overexpressing cells does not only abolish the activity of wild type of p53 but actually mimics that of mutant p53. Our results suggest that in absence of prohibitin, the half-life of p53 is increased and like mutant p53, the conformation of p53 is denatured. CONCLUSIONS: These observations revealed a novel function of prohibitin as a chaperone of p53. Further, they suggest that binding of denatured p53 in intron 1 causes an enhancer effect and increases the transcription of PAPP-A. Therefore, these findings indicate that the defect in p53 function and the increased proteolysis of IGFBP-4, we had observed, represent two components of the same pathway, which contributes to the oncogenic function of Skp2B.

  8. Changes of insulin-like growth factor-Ⅱ and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in cerebrospinal fluid of children with tuberculous meningitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have found that insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have stronger neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. But whether their levels in cerebrospinal fluid could be used as an auxiliary indicator in differentially diagnosing tuberculous meningitis and viral encephalitis is not yet clear.OBJECTIVE: To explore the changes of insulin-like growth factor-Ⅱ (IGF-Ⅱ ) and IGFBP-3 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with tuberculous meningitis and the significance of the changes.DESIGN: A non-randomized concurrent controlled study.SETTING: Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: Thirty children with tuberculous meningitis (14 males and 16 females) were selected from the Department of Pediatric Internal Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical College from January 2005 to December 2006. Tuberculous meningitis was diagnosed according to their clinical manifestations, the history of close contact with tuberculosis, typical cerebrospinal fluid changes of tuberculous meningitis, positive tuberculosis antibody and effective antituberculosis treatment. There were 30 children (13 males and 17 females) with viral encephalitis, and viral encephalitis was diagnosed according to epidemiological history, clinical manifestations, conventional and biochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid, and negative bacteriology judgment. Meanwhile, 30 children (13 males and 17 females) without infectious and central nervous system disease were selected as the control group. Informed consent was obtained from the parents of all the enrolled children.METHODS: ① The lumbar puncture operation was implemented immediately to obtain cerebrospinal fluid (3 mL). The contents of IGF-Ⅱ and IGFBP-3 were detected with immunoradiometric assay. The concentrations of glucose and protein in cerebrospinal fluid were determined

  9. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  10. STIFDB2: An Updated Version of Plant Stress-Responsive TranscrIption Factor DataBase with Additional Stress Signals, Stress-Responsive Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Stress-Responsive Genes in Arabidopsis and Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Naika, Mahantesha; Shameer, Khader; Mathew, Oommen K; Gowda, Ramanjini; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the principles of abiotic and biotic stress responses, tolerance and adaptation remains important in plant physiology research to develop better varieties of crop plants. Better understanding of plant stress response mechanisms and application of knowledge derived from integrated experimental and bioinformatics approaches are gaining importance. Earlier, we showed that compiling a database of stress-responsive transcription factors and their corresponding target binding sites in...

  11. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  12. Heritable Change Caused by Transient Transcription Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Alasdair J. E.; Satory, Dominik; Halliday, Jennifer A.; Herman, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations) and protein conformation (prions) can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change (‘epim...

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in goldfish, Carassius auratus: molecular cloning, tissue expression, and mRNA expression responses to periprandial changes and cadmium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenbo; Zhang, Zhen; Dong, Haiyan; Yan, Fangfang

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the cDNA encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) was cloned from the liver of goldfish (Carassius auratus). The obtained goldfish IGFBP-1 cDNA sequence was 1037 bp in length and had an open reading frame of 789 bp encoding a predicted polypeptide of 262 amino acid residues. IGFBP-1 transcript was detected in all tested central nervous and peripheral tissues. The relatively higher levels of IGFBP-1 mRNA were observed in the liver, gill, kidney, heart, spleen, fat and testis, while the lower levels were found in all different regions of brain, muscle and intestine. In the skin, IGFBP-1 mRNA expression level was extremely low. The IGFBP-1 mRNA expression level in liver was significantly elevated after feeding. With cadmium exposure for 24 h, IGFBP-1 mRNA expression levels in spleen and liver were significantly increased at different cadmium concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 10 ppm. The results in this study provided the data regarding molecular characteristics and expression patterns of IGFBP-1 in goldfish and showed that the expression of IGFBP-1 mRNA might be associated with metabolic status and heavy metal stress and regulated by metabolic factors and cadmium in fish. PMID:26753895

  14. ADRENERGIC RESPONSES TO STRESS: TRANSCRIPTIONAL AND POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Dona L.; Tai, T. C.; Wong-Faull, David C.; Claycomb, Robert; Kvetnansky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Stress effects on adrenergic responses in rats were examined in adrenal medulla, the primary source of circulating epinephrine (Epi). Irrespective of duration, immobilization (IMMO) increased adrenal corticosterone to the same extent. In contrast, epinephrine changed little, suggesting that Epi synthesis replenishes adrenal pools and sustains circulating levels for the heightened alertness and physiological changes required of the "flight or fight" response. IMMO also induced the epinephrine-...

  15. Deciphering transcriptional regulations coordinating the response to environmental changes

    OpenAIRE

    Acuña, Vicente; Aravena, Andrés; Guziolowski, Carito; Eveillard, Damien; Siegel, Anne; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Gene co-expression evidenced as a response to environmental changes has shown that transcriptional activity is coordinated, which pinpoints the role of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs). Nevertheless, the prediction of TRNs based on the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) with binding sites (BSs) generally produces an over-estimation of the observable TF/BS relations within the network and therefore many of the predicted relations are spurious. Results We present Lomba...

  16. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward;

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to...

  17. Transcriptional changes common to human cocaine, cannabis and phencyclidine abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Lehrmann

    Full Text Available A major goal of drug abuse research is to identify and understand drug-induced changes in brain function that are common to many or all drugs of abuse. As these may underlie drug dependence and addiction, the purpose of the present study was to examine if different drugs of abuse effect changes in gene expression that converge in common molecular pathways. Microarray analysis was employed to assay brain gene expression in postmortem anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC from 42 human cocaine, cannabis and/or phencyclidine abuse cases and 30 control cases, which were characterized by toxicology and drug abuse history. Common transcriptional changes were demonstrated for a majority of drug abuse cases (N = 34, representing a number of consistently changed functional classes: Calmodulin-related transcripts (CALM1, CALM2, CAMK2B were decreased, while transcripts related to cholesterol biosynthesis and trafficking (FDFT1, APOL2, SCARB1, and Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER functions (SEMA3B, GCC1 were all increased. Quantitative PCR validated decreases in calmodulin 2 (CALM2 mRNA and increases in apolipoprotein L, 2 (APOL2 and semaphorin 3B (SEMA3B mRNA for individual cases. A comparison between control cases with and without cardiovascular disease and elevated body mass index indicated that these changes were not due to general cellular and metabolic stress, but appeared specific to the use of drugs. Therefore, humans who abused cocaine, cannabis and/or phencyclidine share a decrease in transcription of calmodulin-related genes and increased transcription related to lipid/cholesterol and Golgi/ER function. These changes represent common molecular features of drug abuse, which may underlie changes in synaptic function and plasticity that could have important ramifications for decision-making capabilities in drug abusers.

  18. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  19. Specific transcriptional changes in human fetuses with autosomal trisomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altug-Teber, O; Bonin, M; Walter, M; Mau-Holzmann, U A; Dufke, A; Stappert, H; Tekesin, I; Heilbronner, H; Nieselt, K; Riess, O

    2007-01-01

    Among full autosomal trisomies, only trisomies of chromosome 21 (Down syndrome), 18 (Edwards syndrome) and 13 (Patau syndrome) are compatible with postnatal survival. But the mechanisms, how a supernumerary chromosome disrupts the normal development and causes specific phenotypes, are still not fully explained. As an alternative to gene dosage effect due to the trisomic chromosome a genome-wide transcriptional dysregulation has been postulated. The aim of this study was to define the transcriptional changes in trisomy 13, 18, and 21 during early fetal development in order to obtain more insights into the molecular etiopathology of aneuploidy. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we analyzed whole genome expression profiles in cultured amniocytes (AC) and chorionic villus cells (CV) from pregnancies with a normal karyotype and with trisomies of human chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. We observed a low to moderate up-regulation for a subset of genes of the trisomic chromosomes. Transcriptional levels of most of the genes on the supernumerary chromosome appeared similar to the respective chromosomal pair in normal karyotypes. A subset of chromosome 21 genes including the DSCR1 gene involved in fetal heart development was consistently up-regulated in different prenatal tissues (AC, CV) of trisomy 21 fetuses whereas only minor changes were found for genes of all other chromosomes. In contrast, in trisomy 18 vigorous downstream transcriptional changes were found. Global transcriptome analysis for autosomal trisomies 13, 18, and 21 supported a combination of the two major hypotheses. PMID:18253026

  20. The basal transcription complex component TAF3 transduces changes in nuclear phosphoinositides into transcriptional output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijf-Bultsma, Yvette; Sommer, Lilly; Tauber, Maria; Baalbaki, Mai; Giardoglou, Panagiota; Jones, David R; Gelato, Kathy A; van Pelt, Jason; Shah, Zahid; Rahnamoun, Homa; Toma, Clara; Anderson, Karen E; Hawkins, Philip; Lauberth, Shannon M; Haramis, Anna-Pavlina G; Hart, Daniel; Fischle, Wolfgang; Divecha, Nullin

    2015-05-01

    Phosphoinositides (PI) are important signaling molecules in the nucleus that influence gene expression. However, if and how nuclear PI directly affects the transcriptional machinery is not known. We report that the lipid kinase PIP4K2B regulates nuclear PI5P and the expression of myogenic genes during myoblast differentiation. A targeted screen for PI interactors identified the PHD finger of TAF3, a TATA box binding protein-associated factor with important roles in transcription regulation, pluripotency, and differentiation. We show that the PI interaction site is distinct from the known H3K4me3 binding region of TAF3 and that PI binding modulates association of TAF3 with H3K4me3 in vitro and with chromatin in vivo. Analysis of TAF3 mutants indicates that TAF3 transduces PIP4K2B-mediated alterations in PI into changes in specific gene transcription. Our study reveals TAF3 as a direct target of nuclear PI and further illustrates the importance of basal transcription components as signal transducers. PMID:25866244

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins: a structural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briony eForbes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6 bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that influence processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by influencing gene transcription.IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, Linker and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP to date, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarises structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. It also highlights future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease.

  2. Changes in serum concentrations of growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins 1 and 3 and urinary growth hormone excretion during the menstrual cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Scheike, Thomas Harder; Pedersen, A T;

    1997-01-01

    Few studies exist on the physiological changes in the concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factors (IGF) and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP) within the menstrual cycle, and some controversy remains. We therefore decided to study the impact of endogenous sex steroids on the GH......-IGF-IGFBP axis during the ovulatory menstrual cycle in 10 healthy women (aged 18-40 years). Blood sampling and urinary collection was performed every morning at 0800 h for 32 consecutive days. Every second day the subjects were fasted overnight before blood sampling. Follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing...... hormone (LH), oestradiol, progesterone, IGF-I, IGFBP-3, sex hormone-binding globulin, dihydroepiandrosterone sulphate and GH were determined in all samples, whereas insulin and IGFBP-1 were determined in fasted samples only. Serum IGF-I concentrations showed some fluctuation during the menstrual cycle...

  3. Changes in serum concentrations of growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins 1 and 3 and urinary growth hormone excretion during the menstrual cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Scheike, Thomas Harder; Pedersen, A T;

    1997-01-01

    -IGF-IGFBP axis during the ovulatory menstrual cycle in 10 healthy women (aged 18-40 years). Blood sampling and urinary collection was performed every morning at 0800 h for 32 consecutive days. Every second day the subjects were fasted overnight before blood sampling. Follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing......Few studies exist on the physiological changes in the concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factors (IGF) and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP) within the menstrual cycle, and some controversy remains. We therefore decided to study the impact of endogenous sex steroids on the GH...... hormone (LH), oestradiol, progesterone, IGF-I, IGFBP-3, sex hormone-binding globulin, dihydroepiandrosterone sulphate and GH were determined in all samples, whereas insulin and IGFBP-1 were determined in fasted samples only. Serum IGF-I concentrations showed some fluctuation during the menstrual cycle...

  4. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein production and regulation in fetal rat lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, W A; Moats-Staats, B M; D'Ercole, A J; Stiles, A D

    1993-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are expressed in lung from early in gestation and may modulate IGF-stimulated fetal lung cell proliferation and/or differentiation. To begin to define IGFBP production and regulation in lung cells during development, we prepared primary cultures of 19 day gestation fetal rat lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells and identified IGFBPs secreted into medium. Ligand blot analysis of conditioned media (CM) from both cell types demonstrated IGFBP bands of approximately 39,000-45,000, 32,000, 24,000, and 22,000 M(r). These migration characteristics allowed the identification of the 39,000-45,000 M(r) bands as IGFBP-3 and the 24,000 M(r) band as IGFBP-4, while Western immunoblot analyses localized IGFBP-2 to the 32,000 M(r) band and IGFBP-5 to the 22,000 M(r) band. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNAs generated by reverse transcription of fibroblast and epithelial cell RNA using specific oligodeoxynucleotide primers for IGFBPs 1 through 6, demonstrated the presence of amplified products for IGFBP-2, -3, -4, -5, and -6. In both cell types, IGFBP-2 and -3 production was sustained during 48 h of incubation in serum-free medium, whereas IGFBP-4 abundance increased only during the first 6 to 12 h of incubation. CM from fibroblasts and epithelial cells plated at low densities contained a high abundance of IGFBP-2 per microgram cellular DNA compared with cells at higher densities. In contrast, IGFBP-3 and -4 abundance normalized to cell DNA did not change with differing cell densities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682822

  5. The Basal Transcription Complex Component TAF3 Transduces Changes in Nuclear Phosphoinositides into Transcriptional Output

    OpenAIRE

    Stijf-Bultsma, Y.; Sommer, L.; Tauber, M; M. Baalbaki; Giardoglou, P.; D. Jones; Gelato, K.; Pelt, J.; Shah, Z.; Rahnamoun, H.; Toma, C; Anderson, K.(Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, U.S.A.); Hawkins, P; Lauberth, S.; Haramis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phosphoinositides (PI) are important signaling molecules in the nucleus that influence gene expression. However, if and how nuclear PI directly affects the transcriptional machinery is not known. We report that the lipid kinase PIP4K2B regulates nuclear PI5P and the expression of myogenic genes during myoblast differentiation. A targeted screen for PI interactors identified the PHD finger of TAF3, a TATA box binding protein-associated factor with important roles in transcription regul...

  6. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2, 28 kDa an 24 kDa insulin-like growth factor binding protein levels are decreased in fluid of dominant follicles, obtained from normal and polycystic ovaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); T.D. Pache; E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn order to investigate potential changes in insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) during human follicle maturation, we examined the IGFBP profiles in follicular fluid from follicles in different stages of maturation. Samples were obtained from ovaries of women with regula

  7. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    A cis-regulatory sequence also known as zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) located in intron 5 of LMBR1 is essential for expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the developing posterior limb bud mesenchyme. Even though many point mutations causing preaxial duplication defects...

  8. Transcriptional control of behavior: Engrailed knockout changes cockroach escape trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, David; Marie, Bruno; Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    The cerci of the cockroach are covered with identified sensory hairs, which detect air movements. The sensory neurons which innervate these hairs synapse with giant interneurons (GIs) in the terminal ganglion which in turn synapse with interneurons and leg motorneurons in thoracic ganglia. This neural circuit mediates the animal's escape behavior. The transcription factor Engrailed (En) is expressed only in the medially born sensory neurons, which suggested it could work as a positional deter...

  9. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-01

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile. PMID:26940969

  10. Active transcription and ultrastructural changes during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila R.P. Ferreira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of proliferating epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi , the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas’ disease, into the infective and non-proliferating metacyclic forms can be reproduced in the laboratory by incubating the cells in a chemically-defined medium that mimics the urine of the insect vector. Epimastigotes have a spherical nucleus, a flagellum protruding from the middle of the protozoan cell, and a disk-shaped kinetoplast - an organelle that corresponds to the mitochondrial DNA. Metacyclic trypomastigotes have an elongated shape with the flagellum protruding from the posterior portion of the cell and associated with a spherical kinetoplast. Here we describe the morphological events of this transformation and characterize a novel intermediate stage by three-dimensional reconstruction of electron microscope serial sections. This new intermediate stage is characterized by a kinetoplast compressing an already elongated nucleus, indicating that metacyclogenesis involves active movements of the flagellar structure relative to the cell body. As transcription occurs more intensely in proliferating epimastigotes than in metacyclics, we also examined the presence of RNA polymerase II and measured transcriptional activity during the differentiation process. Both the presence of the enzyme and transcriptional activity remain unchanged during all steps of metacyclogenesis. RNA polymerase II levels and transcriptional activity only decrease after metacyclics are formed. We suggest that transcription is required during the epimastigote-to-metacyclic trypomastigote differentiation process, until the kinetoplast and flagellum reach the posterior position of the parasites in the infective form.A diferenciação de formas epimastigotas (proliferativas do Trypanosoma cruzi, parasita protozoário causador da doença de Chagas, em formas metacíclicas tripomastigotas (infectivas e não proliferativas, pode ser reproduzida em laborat

  11. Heat shock response in yeast involves changes in both transcription rates and mRNA stabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25 °C to 37 °C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

  12. Transcriptional changes of mouse splenocyte organelle components following acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Li, Fa-Cai; Song, Hui-Qun; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a globally spread zoonosis. The pathogen Toxoplasma gondii can hijack cellular organelles of host for replication. Although a number of important cellular life events are controlled by cell organelles, very little is known of the transcriptional changes of host cellular organelles after infection with T. gondii. Herein, we performed RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and bioinformatics analyses to study the global organelle component changes. It was found that many transcripts of the mouse spleen cellular organelle components were altered by acute T. gondii infection with the RH strain (Type I). Most differentially expressed transcripts of mitochondrial components were downregulated, especially those involved in biosynthetic and metabolic processes. Moreover, mitochondria based apoptosis process was downregulated. In terms of cytoskeleton, most differentially expressed transcript of cytoskeleton components were also downregulated, including septin cytoskeleton, cytoskeleton organization, centrosome and myosin. For endolysosomal system, ion transporters were downregulated at mRNA level, whereas the cytolytic components were increased, such as granzymes, Rab27a and perforin1 (Prf1). The main transcripts of Golgi apparatus components involved in sialylation or vesicle-mediated transportation were downregulated, while immune related components were upregulated. For endoplasmic reticulum (ER), posttranslational modification, drug metabolism and material transportation related transcripts were downregulated. In addition, T. gondii antigen cross-presentation by MHC-I complex could be downregulated by the downregulation of CD76 and ubiquitination related transcripts. The present study, for the first time, described the transcriptional changes of the mouse spleen cellular organelles following acute T. gondii infection, which provides a foundation to study the interaction between T. gondii and host cells at the sub-cellular level. PMID:27132051

  13. Nuclear actions of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Robert C

    2015-09-10

    In addition to its actions outside the cell, cellular uptake and nuclear import of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has been recognized for almost two decades, but knowledge of its nuclear actions has been slow to emerge. IGFBP-3 has a functional nuclear localization signal and interacts with the nuclear transport protein importin-β. Within the nucleus IGFBP-3 appears to have a role in transcriptional regulation. It can bind to the nuclear receptor, retinoid X receptor-α and several of its dimerization partners, including retinoic acid receptor, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). These interactions modulate the functions of these receptors, for example inhibiting VDR-dependent transcription in osteoblasts and PPARγ-dependent transcription in adipocytes. Nuclear IGFBP-3 can be detected by immunohistochemistry in cancer and other tissues, and its presence in the nucleus has been shown in many cell culture studies to be necessary for its pro-apoptotic effect, which may also involve interaction with the nuclear receptor Nur77, and export from the nucleus. IGFBP-3 is p53-inducible and in response to DNA damage, forms a complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), translocating to the nucleus to interact with DNA-dependent protein kinase. Inhibition of EGFR kinase activity or downregulation of IGFBP-3 can inhibit DNA double strand-break repair by nonhomologous end joining. IGFBP-3 thus has the ability to influence many cell functions through its interactions with intranuclear pathways, but the importance of these interactions in vivo, and their potential to be targeted for therapeutic benefit, require further investigation. PMID:26074086

  14. Neuroendocrine Cancer-Specific Up-Regulating Mechanism of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-2 in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yazawa, Takuya; Sato, Hanako; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Okudela, Koji; Woo, Tetsukan; Tajiri, Michihiko; Ogura, Takashi; Ogawa, Nobuo; Suzuki, Takehisa; Mitsui, Hideaki; Ishii, Jun; Miyata, Chie; Sakaeda, Masashi; Goto, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Korehito

    2009-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) exhibits insulin-like growth factor-dependent growth. SCLC is the most aggressive among known in vivo lung cancers, whereas in vitro growth of SCLC is paradoxically slow as compared with that of non-SCLC (NSCLC). In this study, we demonstrate that SCLC cells overexpress insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 via NeuroD, a neuroendocrine cell-specific transcription factor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, electrophoretic mobility shift, and IGFBP-2 pro...

  15. Isolation of transcription factors binding auxin response elements using a yeast one-hybrid system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐眉; 黄美娟; 陈凡

    2002-01-01

    Plant hormones play an important role during higher plant embryogenesis. Auxin is central to the development of vascular tissues, formation of lateral and adventitious roots, control of apical dominance, and tropic responses. Auxin response element (AuxRE), present in the promoters of many auxin-induced genes, can confer auxin responsiveness. Using carrot somatic embryo under specific developmental phase, a cDNA expression library was constructed. Several plasmids were recombined containing the tetramer of AuxRE as a bait. After screening by a yeast one-hy- brid system, one positive clone was confirmed and characterized. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that AxRF1 protein expressed in yeast cell could bind AuxRE in vitro. It suggests that AxRF1 participates in regulation of the expression of auxin responsive gene during carrot somatic embryogenesis.

  16. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  17. Hypomethylation of ETS Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Upregulation of PARP1 Expression in Endometrial Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fang-Fang Bi; Da Li; Qing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Although PARP1 promoter methylation is involved in the regulation of PARP1 expression in human keratinocyte lines and lymphoblastoid cell lines, its roles in human endometrial cancer are unknown. DNA from forty normal endometrium (NE) and fifty endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC) tissues were analyzed by bisulfite sequencing using primers focusing on the core promoter region of PARP1. Expression levels of PARP1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Associations between patient...

  18. Hypomethylation of ETS Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Upregulation of PARP1 Expression in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Fang Bi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although PARP1 promoter methylation is involved in the regulation of PARP1 expression in human keratinocyte lines and lymphoblastoid cell lines, its roles in human endometrial cancer are unknown. DNA from forty normal endometrium (NE and fifty endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC tissues were analyzed by bisulfite sequencing using primers focusing on the core promoter region of PARP1. Expression levels of PARP1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Associations between patient clinicopathological characteristics and PARP1 protein levels were assessed by Fisher’s exact test. Here, PARP1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in EAC tissues (P<0.05. CpG sites within the ETS motif in the PARP1 promoter exhibited significant hypomethylation in EAC tissues, and there was a significant negative correlation between PARP1 mRNA levels and the number of methylated sites in both NE and EAC tissues (R2=0.262, P<0.001. Notably, PARP1 protein expression was associated with FIGO stage (P=0.026, histological grade (P=0.002 , and body mass index (P=0.04. Our findings imply that PARP1 overexpression may participate in endometrial cancer progression, and abnormal hypomethylation of CpG sites within the ETS motif in the core promoter region may be responsible for PARP1 overexpression in EAC tissues.

  19. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

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    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  20. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius

    OpenAIRE

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M.; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) wer...

  1. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney.

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    Zach K O'Brown

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator, IFNγ (a STAT1 activator, or TNFα (an NFκB activator recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney.

  2. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  3. Reverse-engineering the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptional network under changing environmental conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Carrera, Javier; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Elena, Santiago F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular mechanisms plants have evolved to adapt their biological activities to a constantly changing environment is an intriguing question and one that requires a systems biology approach. Here we present a network analysis of genome-wide expression data combined with reverse-engineering network modeling to dissect the transcriptional control of Arabidopsis thaliana. The regulatory network is inferred by using an assembly of microarray data containing steady-st...

  4. Transcriptional infidelity promotes heritable phenotypic change in a bistable gene network.

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    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Bistable epigenetic switches are fundamental for cell fate determination in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Regulatory proteins associated with bistable switches are often present in low numbers and subject to molecular noise. It is becoming clear that noise in gene expression can influence cell fate. Although the origins and consequences of noise have been studied, the stochastic and transient nature of RNA errors during transcription has not been considered in the origin or modeling of noise nor has the capacity for such transient errors in information transfer to generate heritable phenotypic change been discussed. We used a classic bistable memory module to monitor and capture transient RNA errors: the lac operon of Escherichia coli comprises an autocatalytic positive feedback loop producing a heritable all-or-none epigenetic switch that is sensitive to molecular noise. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the frequency of epigenetic switching from one expression state to the other is increased when the fidelity of RNA transcription is decreased due to error-prone RNA polymerases or to the absence of auxiliary RNA fidelity factors GreA and GreB (functional analogues of eukaryotic TFIIS. Therefore, transcription infidelity contributes to molecular noise and can effect heritable phenotypic change in genetically identical cells in the same environment. Whereas DNA errors allow genetic space to be explored, RNA errors may allow epigenetic or expression space to be sampled. Thus, RNA infidelity should also be considered in the heritable origin of altered or aberrant cell behaviour.

  5. Epigenetic analyses of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 gene in type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Tianwei; Falhammar, Henrik; Gu, Harvest F.; Brismar, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical observations have demonstrated that high levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) are associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D), whereas low serum IGFBP-1 levels are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, we reported that increased DNA methylation levels in the IGFBP1 gene were associated with T2D. In the present study, we evaluated the epigenetic changes of IGFBP1 in T1D and diabetic nephropathy (DN). Results In total,...

  6. Transcriptional profiling of pea ABR17 mediated changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Deyholos Michael K

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenesis-related proteins belonging to group 10 (PR10 are elevated in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Previously, we have shown a drastic salinity-induced increase in the levels of ABR17, a member of the PR10 family, in pea. Furthermore, we have also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus enhances their germination and early seedling growth under stress. Although it has been reported that several members of the PR10 family including ABR17 possess RNase activity, the exact mechanism by which the aforementioned characteristics are conferred by ABR17 is unknown at this time. We hypothesized that a study of differences in transcriptome between wild type (WT and ABR17 transgenic A. thaliana may shed light on this process. Results The molecular changes brought about by the expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in A. thaliana in the presence or absence of salt stress were investigated using microarrays consisting of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes. Statistical analysis identified number of genes which were over represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts in the transgenic line. Our results highlight the important roles of many abscisic acid (ABA and cytokinin (CK responsive genes in ABR17 transgenic lines. Although the transcriptional changes followed a general salt response theme in both WT and transgenic seedlings under salt stress, many genes exhibited differential expression patterns when the transgenic and WT lines were compared. These genes include plant defensins, heat shock proteins, other defense related genes, and several transcriptional factors. Our microarray results for selected genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion Transcriptional analysis in ABR17 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, both under normal and saline conditions, revealed significant changes in abundance of

  7. A Biclustering Approach to Combinatorial Transcription Control

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Venkataraghavan

    2005-01-01

    Combinatorial control of transcription is a well established phenomenon in the cell. Multiple transcription factors often bind to the same transcriptional control region of a gene and interact with each other to control the expression of the gene. It is thus necessary to consider the joint conservation of sequence pairs in order to identify combinations of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind. Conventional motif finding algorithms fail to address this issue. We propose a nove...

  8. Supplementation of selenium-enriched yeast attenuates age-dependent transcriptional changes of heart in mitochondrial DNA mutator mice

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    Rijin Xiao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age is a major risk factor in developing heart diseases and has been associated with profound transcriptional changes in mammalian tissues. Low tissue selenium has recently been linked to several age-related diseases, including cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the global effects of age and dietary supplementation of selenium on heart transcriptional profiles in POLG mutator mice. Methods: Heart transcription profiles from young (2-month-old and old (13-month-old animals fed either a control diet or a diet supplemented with 1.0 mg selenium from seleniumenriched yeast (SP/kg diet were obtained and validated using microarray and real-time RTPCR techniques. Results: Aging led to significant transcriptional changes, where the expression of 1942 genes in old animals was changed by a fold change larger than 2.0, when compared to young animals. Age-regulated genes are associated with cardiovascular system development, immune and inflammatory response, and cellular oxidative stress response. Multiple genes linked with cardiomyocyte apoptosis, hypertrophy, and cardiac fibrosis, such as Myh7, Lcn2, Spp1, and Serpine1, were significantly up-regulated in old animals. SP supplementation also caused significant transcriptional changes in the heart, especially in old mice where many age-dependent transcriptional changes were totally or partially reversed by SP. Upstream regulator analysis further indicated that genes for Foxo1 and Foxo3, two transcriptional regulators involved in the regulation of cardiac muscle remodeling, were significantly activated by SP, suggesting that Foxo-mediated transcriptional activities play important roles in the anti-aging properties of SP. Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2014; 4(3:98- 119 Page 99 of 119 Conclusions: Results of this study indicate that SP supplementation attenuated age-related transcriptional changes in the heart of old POLG mice, which implies a potential clinical application of

  9. Aspergillus flavus infection induces transcriptional and physical changes in developing maize kernels

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    Andrea L Dolezal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Maize kernels are susceptible to infection by the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus flavus. Infection results in reduction of grain quality and contamination of kernels with the highly carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxin. To understanding host response to infection by the fungus, transcription of approximately 9,000 maize genes were monitored during the host-pathogen interaction with a custom designed Affymetrix GeneChip® DNA array. More than 1,000 maize genes were found differentially expressed at a fold change of 2 or greater. This included the up regulation of defense related genes and signaling pathways. Transcriptional changes also were observed in primary metabolism genes. Starch biosynthetic genes were down regulated during infection, while genes encoding maize hydrolytic enzymes, presumably involved in the degradation of host reserves, were up regulated. These data indicate that infection of the maize kernel by A. flavus induced metabolic changes in the kernel, including the production of a defense response, as well as a disruption in kernel development.

  10. Targeting transcription factors by small compounds-Current strategies and future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenbuchner, Judith; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Transcription factors are central regulators of gene expression and critically steer development, differentiation and death. Except for ligand-activated nuclear receptors, direct modulation of transcription factor function by small molecules is still widely regarded as "impossible". This "un-druggability" of non-ligand transcription factors is due to the fact that the interacting surface between transcription factor and DNA is huge and subject to significant changes during DNA-binding. Besides some "success studies" with compounds that directly interfere with DNA binding, drug targeting approaches mostly address protein-protein interfaces with essential co-factors, transcription factor dimerization partners, chaperone proteins or proteins that regulate subcellular shuttling. An alternative strategy represent DNA-intercalating, alkylating or DNA-groove-binding compounds that either block transcription factor-binding or change the 3D-conformation of the consensus DNA-strand. Recently, much interest has been focused on chromatin reader proteins that steer the recruitment and activity of transcription factors to a gene transcription start site. Several small compounds demonstrate that these epigenetic reader proteins are exciting new drug targets for inhibiting lineage-specific transcription in cancer therapy. In this research update we will discuss recent advances in targeting transcription factors with small compounds, the challenges that are related to the complex function and regulation of these proteins and also the possible future directions and applications of transcription factor drug targeting. PMID:26686579

  11. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor [(Ser99, Tyr126)ANF] binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF [des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2] (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease

  12. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius.

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    Donato Gerin

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI vs. non-inducing (OTAN cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05 were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps and chloroperoxidase (cpo was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome.

  13. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI) or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks), non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps) and chloroperoxidase (cpo) was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome. PMID:26765536

  14. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M.; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI) or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks), non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps) and chloroperoxidase (cpo) was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome. PMID:26765536

  15. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

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    Reiner Ulrich

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy

  16. A novel method to prioritize RNAseq data for post-hoc analysis based on absolute changes in transcript abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Patrick; Gut, Ian; Hubbard, Kyle; Beske, Phil

    2015-06-01

    The use of fold-change (FC) to prioritize differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for post-hoc characterization is a common technique in the analysis of RNA sequencing datasets. However, the use of FC can overlook certain population of DEGs, such as high copy number transcripts which undergo metabolically expensive changes in expression yet fail to exceed the ratiometric FC cut-off, thereby missing potential important biological information. Here we evaluate an alternative approach to prioritizing RNAseq data based on absolute changes in normalized transcript counts (ΔT) between control and treatment conditions. In five pairwise comparisons with a wide range of effect sizes, rank-ordering of DEGs based on the magnitude of ΔT produced a power curve-like distribution, in which 4.7-5.0% of transcripts were responsible for 36-50% of the cumulative change. Thus, differential gene expression is characterized by the high production-cost expression of a small number of genes (large ΔT genes), while the differential expression of the majority of genes involves a much smaller metabolic investment by the cell. To determine whether the large ΔT datasets are representative of coordinated changes in the transcriptional program, we evaluated large ΔT genes for enrichment of gene ontologies (GOs) and predicted protein interactions. In comparison to randomly selected DEGs, the large ΔT transcripts were significantly enriched for both GOs and predicted protein interactions. Furthermore, enrichments were were consistent with the biological context of each comparison yet distinct from those produced using equal-sized populations of large FC genes, indicating that the large ΔT genes represent an orthagonal transcriptional response. Finally, the composition of the large ΔT gene sets were unique to each pairwise comparison, indicating that they represent coherent and context-specific responses to biological conditions rather than the non-specific upregulation of a family of genes

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional changes induced by phagocytosis or growth on bacteria in Dictyostelium

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    Peracino Barbara

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phagocytosis plays a major role in the defense of higher organisms against microbial infection and provides also the basis for antigen processing in the immune response. Cells of the model organism Dictyostelium are professional phagocytes that exploit phagocytosis of bacteria as the preferred way to ingest food, besides killing pathogens. We have investigated Dictyostelium differential gene expression during phagocytosis of non-pathogenic bacteria, using DNA microarrays, in order to identify molecular functions and novel genes involved in phagocytosis. Results The gene expression profiles of cells incubated for a brief time with bacteria were compared with cells either incubated in axenic medium or growing on bacteria. Transcriptional changes during exponential growth in axenic medium or on bacteria were also compared. We recognized 443 and 59 genes that are differentially regulated by phagocytosis or by the different growth conditions (growth on bacteria vs. axenic medium, respectively, and 102 genes regulated by both processes. Roughly one third of the genes are up-regulated compared to macropinocytosis and axenic growth. Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes with different tools revealed that phagocytosis induces profound changes in carbohydrate, aminoacid and lipid metabolism, and in cytoskeletal components. Genes regulating translation and mitochondrial biogenesis are mostly up-regulated. Genes involved in sterol biosynthesis are selectively up-regulated, suggesting a shift in membrane lipid composition linked to phagocytosis. Very few changes were detected in genes required for vesicle fission/fusion, indicating that the intracellular traffic machinery is mostly in common between phagocytosis and macropinocytosis. A few putative receptors, including GPCR family 3 proteins, scaffolding and adhesion proteins, components of signal transduction and transcription factors have been identified, which could

  18. Luteolin modulates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced transcriptional changes of stress response pathways in PC12 cells.

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    Ling-Wei Hu

    Full Text Available The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, which causes transcriptional changes associated with oxidative and proteotoxic stress, has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. The food-derived compound luteolin has multi-target actions including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic activities. The aim of this study is to investigate how luteolin affects 6-OHDA-mediated stress response pathways. The results showed that when PC12 cells were pre-treated with luteolin (20 µM 30 min prior to 6-OHDA (100 µM exposure, 6-OHDA-induced ROS overproduction, cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activation, and mRNA expression of BIM, TRB3 and GADD34 were significantly attenuated. Moreover, 6-OHDA-mediated cell cycle arrest and transcription of p53 target genes, p21, GADD45α and PUMA, were reduced by luteolin. Luteolin also significantly down-regulated 6-OHDA-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR, leading to decreases in phospho-eIF2α, ATF4, GRP78 and CHOP. In addition, luteolin attenuated 6-OHDA-induced Nrf2-mediated HO-1 and GCLC. Taken together, these results suggest that diminishing intracellular ROS formation and down-regulation of p53, UPR and Nrf2-ARE pathways may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of luteolin.

  19. Aureochrome 1 illuminated: structural changes of a transcription factor probed by molecular spectroscopy.

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    Silke Kerruth

    Full Text Available Aureochrome 1 from Vaucheria frigida is a recently identified blue-light receptor that acts as a transcription factor. The protein comprises a photosensitive light-, oxygen- and voltage-sensitive (LOV domain and a basic zipper (bZIP domain that binds DNA rendering aureochrome 1 a prospective optogenetic tool. Here, we studied the photoreaction of full-length aureochrome 1 by molecular spectroscopy. The kinetics of the decay of the red-shifted triplet state and the blue-shifted signaling state were determined by time-resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy. It is shown that the presence of the bZIP domain further prolongs the lifetime of the LOV390 signaling state in comparison to the isolated LOV domain whereas bound DNA does not influence the photocycle kinetics. The light-dark Fourier transform infrared (FTIR difference spectrum shows the characteristic features of the flavin mononucleotide chromophore except that the S-H stretching vibration of cysteine 254, which is involved in the formation of the thio-adduct state, is significantly shifted to lower frequencies compared to other LOV domains. The presence of the target DNA influences the light-induced FTIR difference spectrum of aureochrome 1. Vibrational bands that can be assigned to arginine and lysine side chains as well to the phosphate backbone, indicate crucial changes in interactions between transcription factor and DNA.

  20. Interleukin 2 gene transcription is regulated by Ikaros-induced changes in histone acetylation in anergic T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanmay; Duré, Myrianne; Paroder, Monika; Soto-Nieves, Noemí; Puga, Irene; Macián, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    In T cells anergy may be evoked by an unbalanced stimulation of the T-cell receptor in the absence of costimulation. Anergic T cells are unresponsive to new antigen receptor engagement and do not produce interleukin 2. We present evidence that anergizing stimuli induce changes in histone acetylation, which mediates transcriptional repression of interleukin 2 expression. In response to calcium signaling, anergic T cells up-regulate the expression of Ikaros, a zinc finger transcription factor e...

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 influences pancreatic cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah K Johnson; Randy S Haun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) overexpression in pancreatic cancer (PaC).METHODS: The effects of IGFBP-5 on cell growth were assessed by stable transfection of BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cell lines and measuring cell number and DNA synthesis. Alterations in the cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses.Changes in cell survival and signal transduction were evaluated after mitogen activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor treatment.RESULTS: After serum depr ivat ion, IGFBP-5 expression increased both cell number and DNA synthesis in BxPC-3 cells, but reduced cell number in PANC-1 cells. Consistent with this observation, cell cycle analysis of IGFBP-5-expressing cells revealed accelerated cell cycle progression in BxPC-3 and G2/M arrest of PANC-1 cells. Signal transduction analysis revealed that Akt activation was increased in BxPC-3, but reduced in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. Inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) activation in BxPC-3, but enhanced ERK1/2 activation in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. When MEK1/2 was blocked, Akt activation remained elevated in IGFBP-5 expressing PaC cells; however, inhibition of PI3K or MEK1/2 abrogated IGFBP-5-mediated cell survival.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that IGFBP-5 expression affects the cell cycle and survival signal pathways and thus it may be an important mediator of PaC cell growth.

  2. DksA involvement in transcription fidelity buffers stochastic epigenetic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satory, Dominik; Gordon, Alasdair J E; Wang, Mengyu; Halliday, Jennifer A; Golding, Ido; Herman, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    DksA is an auxiliary transcription factor that interacts with RNA polymerase and influences gene expression. Depending on the promoter, DksA can be a positive or negative regulator of transcription initiation. Moreover, DksA has a substantial effect on transcription elongation where it prevents the collision of transcription and replication machineries, plays a key role in maintaining transcription elongation when translation and transcription are uncoupled and has been shown to be involved in transcription fidelity. Here, we assessed the role of DksA in transcription fidelity by monitoring stochastic epigenetic switching in the lac operon (with and without an error-prone transcription slippage sequence), partial phenotypic suppression of a lacZ nonsense allele, as well as monitoring the number of lacI mRNA transcripts produced in the presence and absence of DksA via an operon fusion and single molecule fluorescent in situ hybridization studies. We present data showing that DksA acts to maintain transcription fidelity in vivo and the role of DksA seems to be distinct from that of the GreA and GreB transcription fidelity factors. PMID:26304546

  3. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed as...... production or to increased cleavage by proteases other than MMP-9....

  4. Differential Transcriptional Changes in Mice Exposed to Chemically Distinct Diesel Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Tina; Hester, Susan; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) with increased asthmatic symptoms. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a predominant source of vehicle derived ambient PM, and experimental studies have demonstrated that they may have adjuvant potential when given with an antigen. We previously compared 3 DEP samples: N-DEP, A-DEP, and C-DEP in a murine ovalbumin (OVA) mucosal sensitization model and reported the adjuvant activity to be: C-DEP ≈ A-DEP > N-DEP. The present study analyzed gene expression changes from the lungs of these mice. Transcription profiling demonstrated that all the DEP samples altered cytokine and toll-like receptor pathways regardless of type, with or without antigen sensitization. Further analysis of DEP exposure with OVA showed that all DEP treatments altered networks involved in immune and inflammatory responses. The A- and C-DEP/OVA treatments induced differential expression of apoptosis pathways in association with stronger adjuvant responses, while expression of cell cycle control and DNA damage pathways were also altered in the C-DEP/OVA treatment. This comprehensive approach using gene expression analysis to examine changes at a pathway level provides detailed information on events occurring in the lung after DEP exposure, and confirms that the most bioactive sample induced many more individual genes and changes in immunoregulatory and homeostatic pathways.

  5. Transcriptional changes of cytokines in rooster testis and epididymis during sexual maturation stages and Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, M; Michailidis, G

    2016-08-01

    Infection of rooster testis and epididymis by pathogens can lead to impaired fertility, resulting in economic losses in the poultry industry. Antimicrobial protection of rooster reproductive organs is, therefore, an important aspect of reproductive physiology. Salmonellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases, caused by Salmonella bacteria including Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) and is usually the result of infection of the reproductive organs. Thus, knowledge of the endogenous innate immune mechanisms of the rooster testis and epididymis is an emerging aspect of reproductive physiology. Cytokines are key factors for stimulating the immune response and inflammation in chickens to Salmonella infection. In the present study the expression profile of 11 pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in the rooster testis and epididymis in vivo and transcriptional changes in these organs during sexual maturation and SE infection were investigated. Gene expression analysis data revealed that in both testis and epididymis nine cytokines namely the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, IL-16, IL-17 and IL-18 genes were expressed, while no mRNA transcripts were detected in both organs for IL-2 and IL-4. Furthermore, the expression of various cytokine genes during sexual maturation appeared to be developmentally regulated, while SE infection resulted in a significant up-regulation of IL-1β, -6, -12 and -18 genes in the testis and an increase in the mRNA relative abundance of IL-1β, -6, -12, -16 and -18 in the epididymis of SE-infected sexually mature 28-week-old roosters. These results suggest a cytokine-mediated immune response mechanism against Salmonella infection in the rooster reproductive tract. PMID:27289435

  6. Active and passive MDMA ('ecstasy') intake induces differential transcriptional changes in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez-Castillo, N; Orejarena, M J; Ribasés, M; Blanco, E; Casas, M; Robledo, P; Maldonado, R; Cormand, B

    2012-02-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is a recreational drug widely used by adolescents and young adults. Although its rewarding effects are well established, there is controversy on its addictive potential. We aimed to compare the consequences of active and passive MDMA administration on gene expression in the mouse brain since all previous studies were based on passive MDMA administration. We used a yoked-control operant intravenous self-administration paradigm combined with microarray technology. Transcriptomic profiles of ventral striatum, frontal cortex, dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus were analysed in mice divided in contingent MDMA, yoked MDMA and yoked saline groups, and several changes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The comparison of contingent MDMA and yoked MDMA vs. yoked saline mice allowed the identification of differential expression in several genes, most of them with immunological and inflammatory functions, but others being involved in neuroadaptation. In the comparison of contingent MDMA vs. yoked MDMA administration, hippocampus and the dorsal raphe nucleus showed statistically significant changes. The altered expression of several genes involved in neuroadaptative changes and synapse function, which may be related to learning self-administration behaviour, could be validated in these two brain structures. In conclusion, our study shows a strong effect of MDMA administration on the expression of immunological and inflammatory genes in all the four brain regions studied. In addition, experiments on MDMA self-administration suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus may be involved in active MDMA-seeking behaviour, and show specific alterations on gene expression that support the addictive potential of this drug. PMID:21951708

  7. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in preterm infants with retinopathy of prematurity

    OpenAIRE

    Manizheh Mostafa Gharehbaghi; Ali Peirovifar; Karim Sadeghi; Haleh Mostafidi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is the main cause of visual impairment in preterm newborn infants. Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3) is associated with proliferative ROP and has a role in pathogenesis of the disease in premature infants. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 preterm infants born at or before 32 weeks of gestation participated in this study. Studied patients consisted of 41 neonates with...

  8. Purification and characterization of native human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6

    OpenAIRE

    Taferner, Andrea; Micutkova, Lucia; Hermann, Martin; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Pircher, Haymo

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are key regulators of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) mediated signal transduction and thereby can profoundly influence cellular phenotypes and cell fate. Whereas IGFBPs are extracellular proteins, intracellular activities were described for several IGFBP family members, such as IGFBP-3, which can be reinternalized by endocytosis and reaches the nucleus through routes that remain to be fully established. Within the family of IGFBPs, IGFBP-...

  9. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in glucose and lipid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ho-Seong

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 has roles in modulating the effect of IGFs by binding to IGFs and inhibiting cell proliferation in an IGF-independent manner. Although recent studies have been reported that IGFBP-3 has also roles in metabolic regulation, their exact roles in adipose tissue are poorly understood. In this review, we summarized the studies about the biological roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. IGFBP-3 overexpression in transgenic mice suggested that IGFB...

  10. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 promotes ovarian cancer cell invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Jinsong; Wang Huamin; Shmulevich Ilya; Mircean Cristian; Lee Eun-Ju; Niemistö Antti; Kavanagh John J; Lee Je-Ho; Zhang Wei

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) is overexpressed in ovarian malignant tissues and in the serum and cystic fluid of ovarian cancer patients, suggesting an important role of IGFBP2 in the biology of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of increased IGFBP2 in ovarian cancer cells. Results Using western blotting and tissue microarray analyses, we showed that IGFBP2 was frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinomas compared wit...

  11. Associations between transcriptional changes and protein phenotypes provide insights into immune regulation in corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, Lauren E; Pinzόn C, Jorge H; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2016-09-01

    Disease outbreaks in marine ecosystems have driven worldwide declines of numerous taxa, including corals. Some corals, such as Orbicella faveolata, are particularly susceptible to disease. To explore the mechanisms contributing to susceptibility, colonies of O. faveolata were exposed to immune challenge with lipopolysaccharides. RNA sequencing and protein activity assays were used to characterize the response of corals to immune challenge. Differential expression analyses identified 17 immune-related transcripts that varied in expression post-immune challenge. Network analyses revealed several groups of transcripts correlated to immune protein activity. Several transcripts, which were annotated as positive regulators of immunity were included in these groups, and some were downregulated following immune challenge. Correlations between expression of these transcripts and protein activity results further supported the role of these transcripts in positive regulation of immunity. The observed pattern of gene expression and protein activity may elucidate the processes contributing to the disease susceptibility of species like O. faveolata. PMID:27109903

  12. Environmental cues induce changes of steviol glycosides contents and transcription of corresponding biosynthetic genes in Stevia rebaudiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongheng; Huang, Suzhen; Han, Yulin; Yuan, Haiyan; Gu, Chunsun; Wang, Zhongwei

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth and secondary metabolism are commonly regulated by external cues such as light, temperature and water availability. In this study, the influences of low and high temperatures, dehydration, photoperiods, and different growing stages on the changes of steviol glycosides (SGs) contents and transcription levels of fifteen genes involved in SGs biosynthesis of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni were examined using HPLC and RT-PCR. The observations showed that the transcript levels of all the fifteen genes were maximum under 25 °C treatment, and the transcription of SrDXS, SrDXR, SrMCT, SrCMK, SrMDS, SrHDS, SrHDR, SrIDI, SrGGDPS, SrCPPS1, SrUGT85C2 and SrUGT76G1 were restrained both in low temperature (15 °C) and high temperature (35 °C). Most genes in SGs biosynthesis pathway exhibited down-regulation in dehydration. To elucidate the effect of photoperiods, the plants were treated by different simulated photoperiods (8 L/16 D, 1 0L/14 D, 14 L/10 D and 16 L/8 D), but no significant transcription changes were observed. In the study of growing stages, there were evident changes of SGs contents, and the transcript levels of all the fifteen genes were minimal in fast growing period, and exhibited evident increase both in flower-bud appearing stage and flowering stage. The obtained results strongly suggest that the effect of environmental cues on steviol glycosides contents and transcription of corresponding biosynthetic genes in S. rebaudiana is significant. It is worth to study deeply. PMID:25500454

  13. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    degrees C, indicating that sigma 32 adopts a highly flexible structure. At 42 degrees C we observed a slow correlated exchange of 30 additional amide hydrogens and localized it to a helix-loop-helix motif within domain sigma 2 that is responsible for the recognition of the -10 region in heat shock......Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...

  14. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms. PMID:27089421

  15. Transcriptional changes in Crassostrea gigas oyster spat following a parental exposure to the herbicide diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon, R; Akcha, F; Alonso, P; Menard, D; Rouxel, J; Montagnani, C; Mitta, G; Cosseau, C; Grunau, C

    2016-06-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is the main oyster species produced in the world, and a key coastal economic resource in France. High mortalities affect Pacific oysters since 2008 in France and Europe. Their origins have been attributed to a combination of biotic and abiotic factors, underlining the importance of environment quality. The impact of water pollution has been pointed out and one of the pollutants, the genotoxic herbicide diuron, occurs at high concentrations all along the French coasts. Previous work has revealed that a parental exposure to diuron had a strong impact on hatching rates and offspring development even if spats were not exposed to diuron themselves. In this study, we explored for the first time the transcriptional changes occurring in oyster spats (non exposed) originating from genitors exposed to an environmentally relevant concentration of diuron during gametogenesis using the RNAseq methodology. We identified a transcriptomic remodeling revealing an effect of the herbicide. Different molecular pathways involved in energy production, translation and cell proliferation are particularly disturbed. This analysis revealed modulated candidate genes putatively involved in response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in offspring of genitors exposed to diuron. Complementary measures of the activity of enzymes involved in these latter processes corroborate the results obtained at the transcriptomic level. In addition, our results suggested an increase in energy production and mitotic activity in 5-month-spats from diuron-exposed genitors. These results could correspond to a "catch-up growth" phenomenon allowing the spats from diuron-exposed genitors, which displayed a growth delay at 3 months, to gain a normal size when they reach the age of 6 months. These results indicate that exposure to a concentration of diuron that is frequently encountered in the field during the oyster's gametogenesis stage can impact the next generation

  16. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  17. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration1

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wei; Xiang, Cunli; Cazacu, Simona; Brodie, Chaya; Mikkelsen, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7) is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time...

  18. Functional modulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 expression in melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Altaf A.; Majid, Shahana; Nosrati, Mehdi; deSemir, David; Federman, Scot; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) is a member of the IGFBP family, which regulates mitogenic and anti-apoptotic effects of insulin-like growth factors. In this report we evaluated the role of IGFBP3 in melanoma. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western and ELISA analysis indicated a significant downregulation of IGFBP3 expression in melanoma cell lines as compared to a normal melanocyte cell line. Melanoma cell lines treated with the demethylating agent 5-AZA-2′ deoxy...

  19. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Jiang; Cunli Xiang; Simona Cazacu; Chaya Brodie; Tom Mikkelsen

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7) is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time...

  20. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in the Plasma of Growing Horses

    OpenAIRE

    Burk, John Robert

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) are modulators of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), which functions as a regulator of cartilage and bone development. Rapid growth and high starch diets have been associated with increased circulating concentrations of IGF-I, which lead to developmental orthopedic disorders in foals. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of age, diet, growth and season on plasma IGFBP and IGF-I concentrations from birth to 16 mo of age in...

  1. Detection of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in porcine serum

    OpenAIRE

    Masnikosa Romana; Baričević Ivona; Lagundžin Dragana; Nedić Olgica

    2010-01-01

    Multiple insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are found in sera of various species. This study was conducted to investigate whether IGFBPs in porcine serum could be detected using antibodies and antisera raised against human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -4. Western ligand blot procedure was used for the identification of c in porcine serum. The results presented in this work showed that the heterologous antibodies can be used to identify IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3, but not IGFBP-4 in...

  2. Global changes in transcription orchestrate metabolic differentiation during symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colebatch, Gillian; Desbrosses, Guilhem; Ott, Thomas; Krusell, Lene; Montanari, Ombretta; Kloska, Sebastian; Kopka, Joachim; Udvardi, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    Research on legume nodule metabolism has contributed greatly to our knowledge of primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants in general, and in symbiotic nitrogen fixation in particular. However, most previous studies focused on one or a few genes/enzymes involved in selected metabolic...... transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Several metabolic pathways appeared to be co-ordinately upregulated in nodules, including glycolysis, CO(2) fixation, amino acid biosynthesis, and purine, haem, and redox metabolism. Insight into the physiological conditions that prevail within nodules was obtained...

  3. JASPAR, the open access database of transcription factor-binding profiles: new content and tools in the 2008 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryne, J.C.; Valen, E.; Tang, M.H.E.;

    2008-01-01

    databasethe JASPAR CORE sub-databasehas increased by 12 in size, and three new specialized sub-databases have been added. New functions include clustering of matrix models by similarity, generation of random matrices by sampling from selected sets of existing models and a language-independent Web Service...... applications programming interface for matrix retrieval. JASPAR is available at http://jaspar.genereg.net....

  4. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J;

    2016-01-01

    expanded the JASPAR CORE collection with 494 new TF binding profiles (315 in vertebrates, 11 in nematodes, 3 in insects, 1 in fungi and 164 in plants) and updated 59 profiles (58 in vertebrates and 1 in fungi). The introduced profiles represent an 83% expansion and 10% update when compared to the previous...

  5. A Multidisciplinary Approach for Identifying Stage-specific Transcription Factor Binding Sites in the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen, Phytophthora infestans

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Sourav

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans, an oomycete within the phylum Heterokontophyta is one of the most devastating phytopathogens, causing late blight in potato and tomato. Its pathogenic success depends on the formation of different asexual spores such as sporangia and zoospores. Our goal was to identify what regulates transition between each of the five different asexual stages viz. hyphae, spores, cleaving sporangia, swimming zoospores and germinating cysts, by understanding what determines stage-spec...

  6. FOXA1 promotes tumor progression in prostate cancer via the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Imamura

    Full Text Available Fork-head box protein A1 (FOXA1 is a "pioneer factor" that is known to bind to the androgen receptor (AR and regulate the transcription of AR-specific genes. However, the precise role of FOXA1 in prostate cancer (PC remains unknown. In this study, we report that FOXA1 plays a critical role in PC cell proliferation. The expression of FOXA1 was higher in PC than in normal prostate tissues (P = 0.0002, and, using immunohistochemical analysis, we found that FOXA1 was localized in the nucleus. FOXA1 expression levels were significantly correlated with both PSA and Gleason scores (P = 0.016 and P = 0.031, respectively. Moreover, FOXA1 up-regulation was a significant factor in PSA failure (P = 0.011. Depletion of FOXA1 in a prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP using small interfering RNA (siRNA significantly inhibited AR activity, led to cell-growth suppression, and induced G0/G1 arrest. The anti-proliferative effect of FOXA1 siRNA was mediated through insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3. An increase in IGFBP-3, mediated by depletion of FOXA1, inhibited phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt, and increased expression of the cell cycle regulators p21 and p27. We also found that the anti-proliferative effect of FOXA1 depletion was significantly reversed by simultaneous siRNA depletion of IGFBP-3. These findings provide direct physiological and molecular evidence for a role of FOXA1 in controlling cell proliferation through the regulation of IGFBP-3 expression in PC.

  7. Reversible Burst of Transcriptional Changes during Induction of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Talinum triangulare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhaus, Dominik; Bräutigam, Andrea; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Winter, Klaus; Weber, Andreas P M

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerance is a key factor for agriculture in the 21st century as it is a major determinant of plant survival in natural ecosystems as well as crop productivity. Plants have evolved a range of mechanisms to cope with drought, including a specialized type of photosynthesis termed Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM is associated with stomatal closure during the day as atmospheric CO2 is assimilated primarily during the night, thus reducing transpirational water loss. The tropical herbaceous perennial species Talinum triangulare is capable of transitioning, in a facultative, reversible manner, from C3 photosynthesis to weakly expressed CAM in response to drought stress. The transcriptional regulation of this transition has been studied. Combining mRNA-Seq with targeted metabolite measurements, we found highly elevated levels of CAM-cycle enzyme transcripts and their metabolic products in T. triangulare leaves upon water deprivation. The carbohydrate metabolism is rewired to reduce the use of reserves for growth to support the CAM-cycle and the synthesis of compatible solutes. This large-scale expression dataset of drought-induced CAM demonstrates transcriptional regulation of the C3-CAM transition. We identified candidate transcription factors to mediate this photosynthetic plasticity, which may contribute in the future to the design of more drought-tolerant crops via engineered CAM. PMID:26530316

  8. Reversible Burst of Transcriptional Changes during Induction of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Talinum triangulare1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerance is a key factor for agriculture in the 21st century as it is a major determinant of plant survival in natural ecosystems as well as crop productivity. Plants have evolved a range of mechanisms to cope with drought, including a specialized type of photosynthesis termed Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM is associated with stomatal closure during the day as atmospheric CO2 is assimilated primarily during the night, thus reducing transpirational water loss. The tropical herbaceous perennial species Talinum triangulare is capable of transitioning, in a facultative, reversible manner, from C3 photosynthesis to weakly expressed CAM in response to drought stress. The transcriptional regulation of this transition has been studied. Combining mRNA-Seq with targeted metabolite measurements, we found highly elevated levels of CAM-cycle enzyme transcripts and their metabolic products in T. triangulare leaves upon water deprivation. The carbohydrate metabolism is rewired to reduce the use of reserves for growth to support the CAM-cycle and the synthesis of compatible solutes. This large-scale expression dataset of drought-induced CAM demonstrates transcriptional regulation of the C3–CAM transition. We identified candidate transcription factors to mediate this photosynthetic plasticity, which may contribute in the future to the design of more drought-tolerant crops via engineered CAM. PMID:26530316

  9. Changes in global DNA methylation intensity and DNMT1 transcription during the aging process of scallop Chlamys farreri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shanshan; He, Yan; Li, Xue; Zhao, Bosong; Hou, Rui; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lingling; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-08-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulatory mechanism that influences genomic stability, gene activation, X-chromosome inactivation and other factors. A change in DNA methylation is usually associated with aging and cellular senescence. DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is the most abundant DNA methyltransferase, and it plays an important role in maintaining the established methylation pattern during DNA replication in vertebrates. Although the effect of aging on DNA methylation has been well studied in vertebrates, little research has been conducted in invertebrates, especially in marine bivalves. In this study, we examined global DNA methylation levels in four groups of adult Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri at different ages. The results showed that both the age and tissue type had a strong effect on the DNA methylation. In addition, a significant decrease in DNA methylation with aging (1-4 years) can be detected in mantle, kidney and hepatopancreas. We further measured the change in DNMT1 transcript abundance using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), which revealed that DNMT1 transcription significantly decreased with aging in mantle and hepatopancreas and strongly correlated with DNA methylation ( R = 0.72). Our data provided greater insight into the aging-related decline of DNA methylation, which could aid in gaining a better understanding of the relationship between DNA methylation and the aging process in bivalve mollusks.

  10. Regional DNA methylation differences between humans and chimpanzees are associated with genetic changes, transcriptional divergence and disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Kei; Ichiyanagi, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Go, Yasuhiro; Udono, Toshifumi; Wada, Seitaro; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Soejima, Hidenobu; Saitou, Naruya; Ito, Takashi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Changes in gene expression have been proposed to have an important role in the evolutionary changes in phenotypes. Interspecific changes in gene expression can result not only from genetic changes in regulatory regions but also from epigenetic changes in such regions. Here we report the identification of genomic regions showing differences in DNA methylation between humans and chimpanzees (termed S-DMRs for species-specific differentially methylated regions) on chromosomes 21 and 22. These regional methylation differences are frequently associated with genes, including those relevant to a disease, such as Alzheimer's disease, diabetes mellitus or cancer. Methylation differences are often correlated with changes in promoter activity or alternative splicing. Comparative studies including other great ape species provide evidence for the contribution of genetic changes to some of these S-DMRs. Genetic changes responsible for the S-DMRs include gain or loss of CTCF-binding site and changes in CpG density in microsatellite repeats. Our results suggest that DNA methylation changes, often caused by small sequence changes, contribute to transcriptional and phenotypic diversification in hominid evolution. PMID:23739127

  11. A Systems Level Analysis of Transcriptional Changes in Alzheimer's Disease and Normal Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jeremy A; Oldham, Michael C.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of elderly individuals worldwide. Advances in the genetics of AD have led to new levels of understanding and treatment opportunities. Here, we used a systems biology approach based on weighted gene coexpression network analysis to determine transcriptional networks in AD. This method permits a higher order depiction of gene expression relationships and identifies modules of coexpressed genes that are func...

  12. CHANGES IN ENDOGENOUS GENE TRANSCRIPT AND PROTEIN LEVELS IN MAIZE PLANTS EXPRESSING THE SOYBEAN FERRITIN TRANSGENE

    OpenAIRE

    Kanobe, Milly N.; Rodermel, Steven R.; Theodore eBailey; Paul eScott

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and exp...

  13. Changes in methylation during progressive transcriptional silencing in transgenic subterranean clover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Nicholas D; Spencer, Donald; Moore, Andrew E; Higgins, Thomas J V

    2003-11-01

    A transgenic line of subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) containing a gene for a sulphur-rich sunflower seed albumin (ssa gene) and a gene conferring tolerance to the herbicide phosphinothricin (bar gene) was previously shown to stably express these genes as far as the T3 generation. In subsequent generations there was a progressive decline in the level of expression of both of these genes such that, by the T7 generation, the plants were almost completely susceptible to the herbicide and the mean level of sunflower seed albumin was reduced to 10-30% of the level in the T2 and T3 generations. The decline in SSA protein correlated closely with a decline in the level of ssa RNA. In vitro transcription experiments with nuclei isolated from plants of the early and late generations showed that the reduced mRNA level was associated with a reduced level of transcription of the ssa transgene. Transcription of the bar transgene was also reduced in the late generations. Bisulphite sequencing analysis showed that the decline in expression of the ssa gene between T3 and subsequent generations correlated closely with increased CpG methylation in the promoter, but not in the coding region. Analysis of the bar gene promoter showed that high levels of CpG methylation preceded the first detectable decline in expression of the bar gene by one generation, suggesting that methylation was not the direct cause of transgene silencing in these plants. PMID:17134405

  14. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403,173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  15. Decrease of H1 histone and changes in chromatin structure and transcription in pea seedlings after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds and seedlings of pea have been irradiated between zero to 300 Gy doses of 60Co gamma-irradiation and examinations were carried out on the chromatin of shoots of 1-week-old etiolated seedlings. There was only a slight change in the gross composition of chromatin after irradiation (in the mass ratios of DNA:RNA:histone:non-histone proteins). Separation of histones, however, showed that after 300 Gy irradiation the quantity of H1 histones decreased by 33% after seed irradiation and 43% after seedling irradiation. The ratio of H1 subfractions also changed. Enzymes DNAase II and micrococcal nuclease digested the chromatin of the irradiated sample 30% faster than the unirradiated one. Transcription kinetics of chromatin showed a gradual decrease of Ksub(m) value on increasing doses of irradiation. There was, however, no difference in the rate of transcription of DNAs, isolated from the chromatin of the control and irradiated samples. Protease and RNAase activity of whole shoots showed enhancement after irradiation. These data suggest that irradiation of either seeds or seedlings results in loosening of the seedling chromatin structure, while there is no change in basic nucleosomal structure. The specific degradation or dissociation of histone H1, localized in the internucleosomal region may be responsible for these changes in the higher order structure of chromatin. This may explain the easier accessibility of chromatin to DNAase II after irradiation and the more tightly bound RNA polymerase, exhibited in decreasing Ksub(m) values. (Auth.)

  16. Identification of Transcription Factor-DNA Interactions in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Odom, Duncan T.

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological developments have revolutionized our understanding of transcriptional regulation by providing an unprecedented ability to interrogate in vivo transcription factor binding. The combination of high-throughput sequencing with chromatin precipitation of transcription factors and specifically labeled histones has allowed direct protein-DNA contacts to be visualized across genomes as large and complex as mammals at base-pair resolution. This chapter reviews the developments tha...

  17. The grammar of transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Segal, Eran

    2014-06-01

    Eukaryotes employ combinatorial strategies to generate a variety of expression patterns from a relatively small set of regulatory DNA elements. As in any other language, deciphering the mapping between DNA and expression requires an understanding of the set of rules that govern basic principles in transcriptional regulation, the functional elements involved, and the ways in which they combine to orchestrate a transcriptional output. Here, we review the current understanding of various grammatical rules, including the effect on expression of the number of transcription factor binding sites, their location, orientation, affinity and activity; co-association with different factors; and intrinsic nucleosome organization. We review different methods that are used to study the grammar of transcription regulation, highlight gaps in current understanding, and discuss how recent technological advances may be utilized to bridge them. PMID:24390306

  18. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 delays replicative senescence of human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas; Li, Chen;

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be induced by a variety of mechanisms, and recent data suggest a key role for cytokine networks to maintain the senescent state. Here, we have used a proteomic LC-MS/MS approach to identify new extracellular regulators of senescence in human fibroblasts. We identified 26...... extracellular proteins with significantly different abundance in conditioned media from young and senescent fibroblasts. Among these was insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6), which was chosen for further analysis. When IGFBP-6 gene expression was downregulated, cell proliferation was inhibited...... and apoptotic cell death was increased. Furthermore, downregulation of IGFBP-6 led to premature entry into cellular senescence. Since IGFBP-6 overexpression increased cellular lifespan, the data suggest that IGFBP-6, in contrast to other IGF binding proteins, is a negative regulator of cellular...

  19. Imatinib treatment causes substantial transcriptional changes in adult Schistosoma mansoni in vitro exhibiting pleiotropic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Buro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. For decades Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely used for controlling schistosomiasis. The absence of a vaccine and fear of PZQ resistance have motivated the search for alternatives. Studies on protein kinases (PKs demonstrated their importance for diverse physiological processes in schistosomes. Among others two Abl tyrosine kinases, SmAbl1 and SmAbl2, were identified in Schistosoma mansoni and shown to be transcribed in the gonads and the gastrodermis. SmAbl1 activity was blocked by Imatinib, a known Abl-TK inhibitor used in human cancer therapy (Gleevec/Glivec. Imatinib exhibited dramatic effects on the morphology and physiology of adult schistosomes in vitro causing the death of the parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show modeling data supporting the targeting of SmAbl1/2 by Imatinib. A biochemical assay confirmed that SmAbl2 activity is also inhibited by Imatinib. Microarray analyses and qRT-PCR experiments were done to unravel transcriptional processes influenced by Imatinib in adult schistosomes in vitro demonstrating a wide influence on worm physiology. Surface-, muscle-, gut and gonad-associated processes were affected as evidenced by the differential transcription of e.g. the gynecophoral canal protein gene GCP, paramyosin, titin, hemoglobinase, and cathepsins. Furthermore, transcript levels of VAL-7 and egg formation-associated genes such as tyrosinase 1, p14, and fs800-like were affected as well as those of signaling genes including a ribosomal protein S6 kinase and a glutamate receptor. Finally, a comparative in silico analysis of the obtained microarray data sets and previous data analyzing the effect of a TGFβR1 inhibitor on transcription provided first evidence for an association of TGFβ and Abl kinase signaling. Among others GCP and egg formation-associated genes were identified as common

  20. Time-dependent c-Myc transactomes mapped by Array-based nuclear run-on reveal transcriptional modules in human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinshui Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The definition of transcriptional networks through measurements of changes in gene expression profiles and mapping of transcription factor binding sites is limited by the moderate overlap between binding and gene expression changes and the inability to directly measure global nuclear transcription (coined "transactome". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a method to measure nascent nuclear gene transcription with an Array-based Nuclear Run-On (ANRO assay using commercial microarray platforms. This strategy provides the missing component, the transactome, to fully map transcriptional networks. ANRO measurements in an inducible c-Myc expressing human P493-6 B cell model reveals time-dependent waves of transcription, with a transactome early after c-Myc induction that does not persist at a late, steady-state phase, when genes that are regulated by c-Myc and E2F predominate. Gene set matrix analysis further uncovers functionally related groups of genes putatively regulated by waves of transcription factor motifs following Myc induction, starting with AP1 and CREB that are followed by EGR1, NFkB and STAT, and ending with E2F, Myc and ARNT/HIF motifs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By coupling ANRO with previous global mapping of c-Myc binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP in P493-6 cells, we define a set of transcriptionally regulated direct c-Myc target genes and pave the way for the use of ANRO to comprehensively map any transcriptional network.

  1. Transcriptional stochasticity in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipniacki, Tomasz; Paszek, Pawel; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Brasier, Allan R; Kimmel, Marek

    2006-01-21

    Due to the small number of copies of molecular species involved, such as DNA, mRNA and regulatory proteins, gene expression is a stochastic phenomenon. In eukaryotic cells, the stochastic effects primarily originate in regulation of gene activity. Transcription can be initiated by a single transcription factor binding to a specific regulatory site in the target gene. Stochasticity of transcription factor binding and dissociation is then amplified by transcription and translation, since target gene activation results in a burst of mRNA molecules, and each mRNA copy serves as a template for translating numerous protein molecules. In the present paper, we explore a mathematical approach to stochastic modeling. In this approach, the ordinary differential equations with a stochastic component for mRNA and protein levels in a single cells yield a system of first-order partial differential equations (PDEs) for two-dimensional probability density functions (pdf). We consider the following examples: Regulation of a single auto-repressing gene, and regulation of a system of two mutual repressors and of an activator-repressor system. The resulting PDEs are approximated by a system of many ordinary equations, which are then numerically solved. PMID:16039671

  2. Gene transcription changes in asthmatic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and comparison to those in atopic dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Plager

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthmatic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (aCRSwNP is a common disruptive eosinophilic disease without effective medical treatment. Therefore, we sought to identify gene expression changes, particularly those occurring early, in aCRSwNP. To highlight expression changes associated with eosinophilic epithelial inflammation, we further compared the changes in aCRSwNP with those in a second eosinophilic epithelial disease, atopic dermatitis (AD, which is also closely related to asthma. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genome-wide mRNA levels measured by exon array in both nasosinus inflamed mucosa and adjacent polyp from 11 aCRSwNP patients were compared to those in nasosinus tissue from 17 normal or rhinitis subjects without polyps. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR or immunoassay, and transcription changes common to AD were identified. Comparison of aCRSwNP inflamed mucosa and polyp to normal/rhinitis tissue identified 447 differentially transcribed genes at > or = 2 fold-change and adjusted p-value < 0.05. These included increased transcription of chemokines localized to chromosome 17q11.2 (CCL13, CCL2, CCL8, and CCL11 that favor eosinophil and monocyte chemotaxis and chemokines (CCL18, CCL22, and CXCL13 that alternatively-activated monocyte-derived cells have been shown to produce. Additional transcription changes likely associated with Th2-like eosinophilic inflammation were prominent and included increased IL1RL1 (IL33 receptor and EMR1&3 and decreased CRISP2&3. A down-regulated PDGFB-centric network involving several smooth muscle-associated genes was also implicated. Genes at 17q11.2, genes associated with alternative activation or smooth muscle, and the IL1RL1 gene were also differentially transcribed in AD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data implicate several genes or gene sets in aCRSwNP and eosinophilic epithelial inflammation, some that likely act in the earlier stages of inflammation

  3. Changes in Dietary Fat Content Rapidly Alters the Mouse Plasma Coagulation Profile without Affecting Relative Transcript Levels of Coagulation Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Janna A.; Verhoef, Daniël; Voshol, Peter J.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with a hypercoagulable state and increased risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events. Objective Establish the onset and reversibility of the hypercoagulable state during the development and regression of nutritionally-induced obesity in mice, and its relation to transcriptional changes and clearance rates of coagulation factors as well as its relation to changes in metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (10% kcal as fat; LFD) or high fat diet (45% kcal as fat; HFD) for 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. To study the effects of weight loss, mice were fed the HFD for 16 weeks and switched to the LFD for 1, 2 or 4 weeks. For each time point analyses of plasma and hepatic mRNA levels of coagulation factors were performed after overnight fasting, as well as measurements of circulating metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Furthermore, in vivo clearance rates of human factor (F) VII, FVIII and FIX proteins were determined after 2 weeks of HFD-feeding. Results HFD feeding gradually increased the body and liver weight, which was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose levels from 8 weeks onwards, while insulin levels were affected after 16 weeks. Besides a transient rise in cytokine levels at 2 weeks after starting the HFD, no significant effect on inflammation markers was present. Increased plasma levels of fibrinogen, FII, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FXI and FXII were observed in mice on a HFD for 2 weeks, which in general persisted throughout the 16 weeks of HFD-feeding. Interestingly, with the exception of FXI the effects on plasma coagulation levels were not paralleled by changes in relative transcript levels in the liver, nor by decreased clearance rates. Switching from HFD to LFD reversed the HFD-induced procoagulant shift in plasma, again not coinciding with transcriptional modulation. Conclusions Changes in dietary fat content rapidly alter the mouse plasma coagulation profile, thereby

  4. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 and human embryonic development during 6-10 gestational weeks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方群; 王艳霞; 周祎

    2004-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), which is a carrier of Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) regulates the fetal development by working as an active factor controlling the combination of IGFs with their receptors. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between IGFBP-1 and human embryonic development during weeks 6 -10 of gestation.Methods A total of 44 pregnant women with singleton pregnancy were divided into two groups: one with abnormal embryo development (n = 32) and the other with normal embryo development (n = 12).Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect IGFBP-1 levels in maternal serum and decidual tissue. The expression of IGFBP-1 mRNA in deciduas was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique.Results The level of IGFBP-1 protein in maternal serum was significantly higher in the abnormal group [ (125.36 ± 47.93) μg/ml] than in the normal group [(70.72 ± 21.21) μg/ml ]. Both of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-1 mRNA in deciduas were higher in abnormal group [ (1.60 ± 1.39) μg/ml and 1.66 ± 1.64, respectively ] than in the normal group [ (0.35 ± 0.23) μg/mi and 0.40 ± 0.20,respectively]. The level of IGFBP-1 in maternal serum was positively correlated with IGFBP-1 mRNA (r=0. 90, P<0.05) and IGFBP-1 protein (r=0.92, P<0.05) in decidual tissue.Conclusions During weeks 6 -10 of gestation, abnormal embryonic development is correlated with elevated IGFBP-1. The level of IGFBP-1 in maternal serum is related to the concentrations of IGFBP1 mRNA and IGFBP-1 in decidual tissue. The IGFBP-1 level in maternal serum may be used as a predictive marker to evaluate embryonic development.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in preterm infants with retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manizheh Mostafa Gharehbaghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is the main cause of visual impairment in preterm newborn infants. Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 is associated with proliferative ROP and has a role in pathogenesis of the disease in premature infants. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 preterm infants born at or before 32 weeks of gestation participated in this study. Studied patients consisted of 41 neonates without vaso-proliferative findings of ROP as the control group and 30 preterm infants with evidence of severe ROP in follow up eye examination as the case group. Blood samples obtained from these infants 6-8 weeks after birth and blood levels of IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: The mean gestation age and birth weight of the studied patients were 28.2±1.6 weeks and 1120.7±197 gram in the case group and 28.4±1.6 weeks and 1189.4±454 gram in the control group (P=0.25 and P=0.44 respectively. The infants in the case group had significantly lower Apgar score at first and 5 min after birth. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with proliferative ROP than the patients without ROP [592.5±472.9 vs. 995.5±422.2 ng/ml (P=0.009]. Using a cut-off point 770.45 ng/ml for the plasma IGFBP-3, we obtained a sensitivity of 65.9% and a specificity of 66.7% in the preterm infants with vasoproliferative ROP. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that the blood levels IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with ROP and it is suspected that IGFBP-3 deficiency in the premature infants may have a pathogenetic role in proliferative ROP.

  6. Downy mildew resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum T39 in susceptible grapevines partially mimics transcriptional changes of resistant genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perazzolli Michele

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Downy mildew, caused by Plasmopara viticola, is one of the most severe diseases of grapevine and is commonly controlled by fungicide treatments. The beneficial microorganism Trichoderma harzianum T39 (T39 can induce resistance to downy mildew, although the molecular events associated with this process have not yet been elucidated in grapevine. A next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq approach was used to study global transcriptional changes associated with resistance induced by T39 in Vitis vinifera Pinot Noir leaves. The long-term aim was to develop strategies to optimize the use of this agent for downy mildew control. Results More than 14.8 million paired-end reads were obtained for each biological replicate of T39-treated and control leaf samples collected before and 24 h after P. viticola inoculation. RNA-Seq analysis resulted in the identification of 7,024 differentially expressed genes, highlighting the complex transcriptional reprogramming of grapevine leaves during resistance induction and in response to pathogen inoculation. Our data show that T39 has a dual effect: it directly modulates genes related to the microbial recognition machinery, and it enhances the expression of defence-related processes after pathogen inoculation. Whereas several genes were commonly affected by P. viticola in control and T39-treated plants, opposing modulation of genes related to responses to stress and protein metabolism was found. T39-induced resistance partially inhibited some disease-related processes and specifically activated defence responses after P. viticola inoculation, causing a significant reduction of downy mildew symptoms. Conclusions The global transcriptional analysis revealed that defence processes known to be implicated in the reaction of resistant genotypes to downy mildew were partially activated by T39-induced resistance in susceptible grapevines. Genes identified in this work are an important source of markers

  7. Detection and properties of A-factor-binding protein from Streptomyces griseus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optically active form of tritium-labeled A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone), a pleiotropic autoregulator responsible for streptomycin production, streptomycin resistance, and sporulation in Streptomyces griseus, was chemically synthesized. By using the radioactive A-factor, a binding protein for A-factor was detected in the cytoplasmic fraction of this organism. The binding protein had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 26,000, as determined by gel filtration. Scatchard analysis suggested that A-factor bound the protein in the molar ratio of 1:1 with a binding constant, Kd, of 0.7 nM. The number of the binding protein was roughly estimated to be 37 per genome. The inducing material virginiae butanolide C (VB-C), which has a structure very similar to that of A-factor and is essential for virginiamycin production in Streptomyces virginiae, did not inhibit binding. In addition, no protein capable of specifically binding 3H-labeled VB-C was found in S. griseus. Together with the observation that VB-C had almost no biological activity on the restoration of streptomycin production or sporulation in an A-factor-deficient mutant of S. griseus, these results indicated that the binding protein had a strict ligand specificity. Examination for an A-factor-binding protein in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces lividans showed the absence of any specifically binding protein

  8. CDNA cloning and mRNA expression of the six mouse insulin-like growth factor binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin); C. Groffen (Cora); J.W. van Neck (Han); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) comprise a family of six distinct proteins which modulate insulin-like growth factor action. We have isolated cDNAs encoding the six mouse IGFBPs (mIGFBPs). In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of the six mIGFBPs during deve

  9. Transcriptional changes associated with resistance to inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor revealed using metaanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EGFR is important in maintaining metabolic homeostasis in healthy cells, but in tumors it activates downstream signaling pathways, causing proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Consequently, EGFR is targeted in cancers using reversible, irreversible or antibody inhibitors. Unfortunately, tumors develop inhibitor resistance by mutations or overexpressing EGFR, or its ligand, or activating secondary, EGFR-independent pathways. Here we present a global metaanalysis comparing transcriptional profiles from matched pairs of EGFR inhibitor-sensitive vs. -resistant cell lines, using 15 datasets comprising 274 microarrays. We also analyzed separately pairs of cell lines derived using reversible, irreversible or antibody inhibitors. The metaanalysis identifies commonalities in cell lines resistant to EGFR inhibitors: in sensitive cell lines, the ontological categories involving the ErbB receptors pathways, cell adhesion and lipid metabolism are overexpressed; however, resistance to EGFR inhibitors is associated with overexpression of genes for ErbB receptors-independent oncogenic pathways, regulation of cell motility, energy metabolism, immunity especially inflammatory cytokines biosynthesis, cell cycle and responses to exogenous and endogenous stimuli. Specifically in Gefitinib-resistant cell lines, the immunity-associated genes are overexpressed, whereas in Erlotinib-resistant ones so are the mitochondrial genes and processes. Unexpectedly, lines selected using EGFR-targeting antibodies overexpress different gene ontologies from ones selected using kinase inhibitors. Specifically, they have reduced expression of genes for proliferation, chemotaxis, immunity and angiogenesis. This metaanalysis suggests that ‘combination therapies’ can improve cancer treatment outcomes. Potentially, use of mitochondrial blockers with Erlotinib, immunity blockers with Gefitinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitors with antibody inhibitors, may have better chance of avoiding

  10. Oenothein B inhibits the expression of PbFKS1 transcript and induces morphological changes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Glaciane D; Ferri, Pedro H; Santos, Suzana C; Bao, Sônia N; Soares, Célia M A; Pereira, Maristela

    2007-11-01

    The fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), the most prevalent human systemic mycosis in Latin America. Drug toxicity and the appearance of resistant strains have created the need to search for new therapeutic approaches. Plants with reputed antimicrobial properties represent a rich screening source of potential antifungal compounds. In this work, the growth of P. brasiliensis yeast cells was evaluated in the presence of oenothein B extracted from Eugenia uniflora. The oenothein B dosage that most effectively inhibited the development (74%) of P. brasiliensis yeast cells in vitro was 500 microg/ml. To verify if oenothein B interferes with cell morphology, we observed oenothein B-treated yeast cells by electron microscopy. The micrographs showed characteristic cell changes noted with glucan synthesis inhibition, including squashing, rough surface, cell wall rupture and cell membrane recess. The expression of P. brasiliensis genes was evaluated in order to investigate the action of oenothein B. Here we report that oenothein B inhibits 1,3-beta-glucan synthase (PbFKS1) transcript accumulation. The results indicate that oenothein B interferes with the cell morphology of P. brasiliensis, probably by inhibiting the transcription of 1,3-beta-glucan synthase gene, which is involved in the cell wall synthesis. PMID:18033615

  11. Tobacco streak virus (strain dahlia) suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing of flavone synthase II in black dahlia cultivars and causes a drastic flower color change.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, Ayumi; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Doi, Motoaki; Ohno, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco streak virus suppressed post-transcriptional gene silencing and caused a flower color change in black dahlias, which supported the role of cyanidin-based anthocyanins for black flower appearance. Black flower color of dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) has been attributed, in part, to the high accumulation of cyanidin-based anthocyanins that occurs when flavone synthesis is reduced because of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of flavone synthase II (DvFNS). There are also purple-flow...

  12. Footprinting of ribosomal RNA genes by transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I.

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, E.; Iida, C T; Kownin, P; Paule, M R

    1985-01-01

    The binding of a species-specific transcription initiation factor (TIF) and purified RNA polymerase I to the promoter region of the 39S ribosomal RNA gene from Acanthamoeba were studied by using DNase I "footprinting." Conditions were chosen such that the footprints obtained could be correlated with the transcriptional activity of the TIF-containing fractions used and that the labeled DNA present would itself serve as a template for transcription. The transcription factor binds upstream from ...

  13. An Improved Systematic Approach to Predicting Transcription Factor Target Genes Using Support Vector Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Song Cui; Eunseog Youn; Joohyun Lee; Maas, Stephan J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological prediction of transcription factor binding sites and their corresponding transcription factor target genes (TFTGs) makes great contribution to understanding the gene regulatory networks. However, these approaches are based on laborious and time-consuming biological experiments. Numerous computational approaches have shown great potential to circumvent laborious biological methods. However, the majority of these algorithms provide limited performances and fail to consider the struct...

  14. Emerging role of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiel M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maaged Akiel, Devaraja Rajasekaran, Rachel Gredler, Ayesha Siddiq, Jyoti Srivastava, Chadia Robertson, Nidhi Himanshu Jariwala, Paul B Fisher, Devanand SarkarDepartment of Human and Molecular Genetics, Massey Cancer Center, VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USAAbstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a vicious and highly vascular cancer with a dismal prognosis. It is a life-threatening illness worldwide that ranks fifth in terms of cancer prevalence and third in cancer deaths. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage by which time conventional therapies are no longer effective. Targeted molecular therapies, such as the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib, provide a modest increase in survival for advanced HCC patients and display significant toxicity. Thus, there is an immense need to identify novel regulators of HCC that might be targeted effectively. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF axis is commonly abnormal in HCC. Upon activation, the IGF axis controls metabolism, tissue homeostasis, and survival. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7 is a secreted protein of a family of low-affinity IGF-binding proteins termed “IGFBP-related proteins” that have been identified as a potential tumor suppressor in HCC. IGFBP7 has been implicated in regulating cellular proliferation, senescence, and angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a comprehensive discussion of the role of IGFBP7 in HCC and the potential use of IGFBP7 as a novel biomarker for drug resistance and as an effective therapeutic strategy.Keywords: HCC, IGFBP7, gene therapy, angiogenesis, senescence, apoptosis

  15. Assessment of fight outcome is needed to activate socially driven transcriptional changes in the zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui F; Simões, José M; Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Catarina R; Becker, Jorg D; Lopes, João S

    2016-02-01

    Group living animals must be able to express different behavior profiles depending on their social status. Therefore, the same genotype may translate into different behavioral phenotypes through socially driven differential gene expression. However, how social information is translated into a neurogenomic response and what are the specific cues in a social interaction that signal a change in social status are questions that have remained unanswered. Here, we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the switch between status-specific neurogenomic states relies on the assessment of fight outcome rather than just on self- or opponent-only assessment of fighting ability. For this purpose, we manipulated the perception of fight outcome in male zebrafish and measured its impact on the brain transcriptome using a zebrafish whole genome gene chip. Males fought either a real opponent, and a winner and a loser were identified, or their own image on a mirror, in which case, despite expressing aggressive behavior, males did not experience either a victory or a defeat. Massive changes in the brain transcriptome were observed in real opponent fighters, with losers displaying both a higher number of differentially expressed genes and of coexpressed gene modules than winners. In contrast, mirror fighters expressed a neurogenomic state similar to that of noninteracting fish. The genes that responded to fight outcome included immediate early genes and genes involved in neuroplasticity and epigenetic modifications. These results indicate that, even in cognitively simple organisms such as zebrafish, neurogenomic responses underlying changes in social status rely on mutual assessment of fighting ability. PMID:26787876

  16. Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Induces Transcriptional Changes in Ex Vivo Human Corneas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP might be considered a novel tool for tissue disinfection in medicine since the active chemical species produced by low plasma doses, generated by ionizing helium gas in air, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS that kill microorganisms without substantially affecting human cells.In this study, we evaluated morphological and functional changes in human corneas exposed for 2 minutes (min to APCP and tested if the antioxidant n-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC was able to inhibit or prevent damage and cell death.Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses of corneal tissues collected at 6 hours (h post-APCP treatment demonstrated no morphological tissue changes, but a transient increased expression of OGG1 glycosylase that returned to control levels in 24 h. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real time PCR performed on different corneas revealed in the treated corneas many differentially expressed genes: namely, 256 and 304 genes showing expression changes greater than ± 2 folds in the absence and presence of NAC, respectively. At 6 h post-treatment, the most over-expressed gene categories suggested an active or enhanced cell functioning, with only a minority of genes specifically concerning oxidative DNA damage and repair showing slight over-expression values (<2 folds. Moreover, time-related expression analysis of eight genes up-regulated in the APCP-treated corneas overall demonstrated the return to control expression levels after 24 h.These findings of transient oxidative stress accompanied by wide-range transcriptome adjustments support the further development of APCP as an ocular disinfectant.

  17. AtRTD2: A Reference Transcript Dataset for accurate quantification of alternative splicing and expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-seq data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Runxuan

    2016-05-06

    Background Alternative splicing is the major post-transcriptional mechanism by which gene expression is regulated and affects a wide range of processes and responses in most eukaryotic organisms. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) can generate genome-wide quantification of individual transcript isoforms to identify changes in expression and alternative splicing. RNA-seq is an essential modern tool but its ability to accurately quantify transcript isoforms depends on the diversity, completeness and quality of the transcript information. Results We have developed a new Reference Transcript Dataset for Arabidopsis (AtRTD2) for RNA-seq analysis containing over 82k non-redundant transcripts, whereby 74,194 transcripts originate from 27,667 protein-coding genes. A total of 13,524 protein-coding genes have at least one alternatively spliced transcript in AtRTD2 such that about 60% of the 22,453 protein-coding, intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis undergo alternative splicing. More than 600 putative U12 introns were identified in more than 2,000 transcripts. AtRTD2 was generated from transcript assemblies of ca. 8.5 billion pairs of reads from 285 RNA-seq data sets obtained from 129 RNA-seq libraries and merged along with the previous version, AtRTD, and Araport11 transcript assemblies. AtRTD2 increases the diversity of transcripts and through application of stringent filters represents the most extensive and accurate transcript collection for Arabidopsis to date. We have demonstrated a generally good correlation of alternative splicing ratios from RNA-seq data analysed by Salmon and experimental data from high resolution RT-PCR. However, we have observed inaccurate quantification of transcript isoforms for genes with multiple transcripts which have variation in the lengths of their UTRs. This variation is not effectively corrected in RNA-seq analysis programmes and will therefore impact RNA-seq analyses generally. To address this, we have tested different genome

  18. Time since onset of disease and individual clinical markers associate with transcriptional changes in uncomplicated dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia A M van de Weg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue virus (DENV infection causes viral haemorrhagic fever that is characterized by extensive activation of the immune system. The aim of this study is to investigate the kinetics of the transcriptome signature changes during the course of disease and the association of genes in these signatures with clinical parameters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Sequential whole blood samples from DENV infected patients in Jakarta were profiled using affymetrix microarrays, which were analysed using principal component analysis, limma, gene set analysis, and weighted gene co-expression network analysis. We show that time since onset of disease, but not diagnosis, has a large impact on the blood transcriptome of patients with non-severe dengue. Clinical diagnosis (according to the WHO classification does not associate with differential gene expression. Network analysis however, indicated that the clinical markers platelet count, fibrinogen, albumin, IV fluid distributed per day and liver enzymes SGOT and SGPT strongly correlate with gene modules that are enriched for genes involved in the immune response. Overall, we see a shift in the transcriptome from immunity and inflammation to repair and recovery during the course of a DENV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Time since onset of disease associates with the shift in transcriptome signatures from immunity and inflammation to cell cycle and repair mechanisms in patients with non-severe dengue. The strong association of time with blood transcriptome changes hampers both the discovery as well as the potential application of biomarkers in dengue. However, we identified gene expression modules that associate with key clinical parameters of dengue that reflect the systemic activity of disease during the course of infection. The expression level of these gene modules may support earlier detection of disease progression as well as clinical management of dengue.

  19. Changes in transcript related to osmosis and intracellular ion homeostasis in Paulownia tomentosa under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang eFan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Paulownia tomentosa is an important economic and greening tree species that is cultivated widely, including salt environment. Our previous studies indicated its autotetraploid induced by colchicine showed better stress tolerance, but the underlying molecular mechanism related to ploidy and salt stress is still unclear. To investigate this issue, physiological measurements and transcriptome profiling of diploid and autotetraploid plants untreated and treated with NaCl were performed. Through the comparisons among four accessions, for one thing, we found different physiological changes between diploid and autotetraploid P. tomentosa; for another, and we detected many differentially expressed unigenes involved in salt stress response. These differentially expressed unigenes were assigned to several metabolic pathways, including plant hormone signal transduction, RNA transporter, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and plant-pathogen interaction, which constructed the complex regulatory network to maintain osmotic and intracellular ion homeostasis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm the expression patterns of 20 unigenes. The results establish the foundation for the genetic basis of salt tolerance in P. tomentosa, which in turn accelerates Paulownia breeding and expands available arable land.

  20. Microbiota-driven transcriptional changes in prefrontal cortex override genetic differences in social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacias, Mar; Gaspari, Sevasti; Santos, Patricia-Mae G; Tamburini, Sabrina; Andrade, Monica; Zhang, Fan; Shen, Nan; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Kiebish, Michael A; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Zachariou, Venetia; Clemente, Jose C; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions impact the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, but the relative contributions are unclear. Here, we identify gut microbiota as sufficient to induce depressive-like behaviors in genetically distinct mouse strains. Daily gavage of vehicle (dH2O) in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice induced a social avoidance behavior that was not observed in C57BL/6 mice. This was not observed in NOD animals with depleted microbiota via oral administration of antibiotics. Transfer of intestinal microbiota, including members of the Clostridiales, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, from vehicle-gavaged NOD donors to microbiota-depleted C57BL/6 recipients was sufficient to induce social avoidance and change gene expression and myelination in the prefrontal cortex. Metabolomic analysis identified increased cresol levels in these mice, and exposure of cultured oligodendrocytes to this metabolite prevented myelin gene expression and differentiation. Our results thus demonstrate that the gut microbiota modifies the synthesis of key metabolites affecting gene expression in the prefrontal cortex, thereby modulating social behavior. PMID:27097105

  1. Transcriptional changes in sensory ganglia associated with primary afferent axon collateral sprouting in spared dermatome model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Harrison

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary afferent collateral sprouting is a process whereby non-injured primary afferent neurons respond to some stimulus and extend new branches from existing axons. Neurons of both the central and peripheral nervous systems undergo this process, which contributes to both adaptive and maladaptive plasticity (e.g., [1–9]. In the model used here (the “spared dermatome” model, the intact sensory neurons respond to the denervation of adjacent areas of skin by sprouting new axon branches into that adjacent denervated territory. Investigations of gene expression changes associated with collateral sprouting can provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Consequently, it can be used to develop treatments to promote functional recovery for spinal cord injury and other similar conditions. This report includes raw gene expression data files from microarray experiments in order to study the gene regulation in spared sensory ganglia in the initiation (7 days and maintenance (14 days phases of the spared dermatome model relative to intact (“naïve” sensory ganglia. Data has been deposited into GEO (GSE72551.

  2. Changes in Transcript Related to Osmosis and Intracellular Ion Homeostasis in Paulownia tomentosa under Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoqiang; Wang, Limin; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng; Zhang, Xiaoshen; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Paulownia tomentosa is an important economic and greening tree species that is cultivated widely, including salt environment. Our previous studies indicated its autotetraploid induced by colchicine showed better stress tolerance, but the underlying molecular mechanism related to ploidy and salt stress is still unclear. To investigate this issue, physiological measurements and transcriptome profiling of diploid and autotetraploid plants untreated and treated with NaCl were performed. Through the comparisons among four accessions, for one thing, we found different physiological changes between diploid and autotetraploid P. tomentosa; for another, and we detected many differentially expressed unigenes involved in salt stress response. These differentially expressed unigenes were assigned to several metabolic pathways, including "plant hormone signal transduction," "RNA transporter," "protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum," and "plant-pathogen interaction," which constructed the complex regulatory network to maintain osmotic and intracellular ion homeostasis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm the expression patterns of 20 unigenes. The results establish the foundation for the genetic basis of salt tolerance in P. tomentosa, which in turn accelerates Paulownia breeding and expands available arable land. PMID:27066034

  3. PPARγ induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through upregulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.Y. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.S.; Lee, M.K. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.S.; Yi, H.K. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Nam, S.Y. [Department of Alternative Therapy, Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.Y.; Hwang, P.H. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-13

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor involved in the carcinogenesis of various cancers. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a tumor suppressor gene that has anti-apoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer mechanism of PPARγ with respect to IGFBP-3. PPARγ was overexpressed in SNU-668 gastric cancer cells using an adenovirus gene transfer system. The cells in which PPARγ was overexpressed exhibited growth inhibition, induction of apoptosis, and a significant increase in IGFBP-3 expression. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of PPARγ in SNU-668 cells using an IGFBP-3 promoter/luciferase reporter system. Luciferase activity was increased up to 15-fold in PPARγ transfected cells, suggesting that PPARγ may directly interact with IGFBP-3 promoter to induce its expression. Deletion analysis of the IGFBP-3 promoter showed that luciferase activity was markedly reduced in cells without putative p53-binding sites (-Δ1755, -Δ1795). This suggests that the critical PPARγ-response region is located within the p53-binding region of the IGFBP-3 promoter. We further demonstrated an increase in PPARγ-induced luciferase activity even in cells treated with siRNA to silence p53 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that PPARγ exhibits its anticancer effect by increasing IGFBP-3 expression, and that IGFBP-3 is a significant tumor suppressor.

  4. PPARγ induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through upregulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor involved in the carcinogenesis of various cancers. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a tumor suppressor gene that has anti-apoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer mechanism of PPARγ with respect to IGFBP-3. PPARγ was overexpressed in SNU-668 gastric cancer cells using an adenovirus gene transfer system. The cells in which PPARγ was overexpressed exhibited growth inhibition, induction of apoptosis, and a significant increase in IGFBP-3 expression. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of PPARγ in SNU-668 cells using an IGFBP-3 promoter/luciferase reporter system. Luciferase activity was increased up to 15-fold in PPARγ transfected cells, suggesting that PPARγ may directly interact with IGFBP-3 promoter to induce its expression. Deletion analysis of the IGFBP-3 promoter showed that luciferase activity was markedly reduced in cells without putative p53-binding sites (-Δ1755, -Δ1795). This suggests that the critical PPARγ-response region is located within the p53-binding region of the IGFBP-3 promoter. We further demonstrated an increase in PPARγ-induced luciferase activity even in cells treated with siRNA to silence p53 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that PPARγ exhibits its anticancer effect by increasing IGFBP-3 expression, and that IGFBP-3 is a significant tumor suppressor

  5. Global transcriptional responses of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 to changes in iron bioavailability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutzke Michael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (DC3000 is a Gram-negative model plant pathogen that is found in a wide variety of environments. To survive in these diverse conditions it must sense and respond to various environmental cues. One micronutrient required for most forms of life is iron. Bioavailable iron has been shown to be an important global regulator for many bacteria where it not only regulates a wide variety of genes involved in general cell physiology but also virulence determinants. In this study we used microarrays to study differential gene regulation in DC3000 in response to changes in levels of cell-associated iron. Results DC3000 cultures were grown under highly controlled conditions and analyzed after the addition of iron citrate or sodium citrate to the media. In the cultures supplemented with iron, we found that cell-associated iron increased rapidly while culture densities were not significantly different over 4 hours when compared to cultures with sodium citrate added. Microarray analysis of samples taken from before and after the addition of either sodium citrate or iron citrate identified 386 differentially regulated genes with high statistical confidence. Differentially regulated genes were clustered based on expression patterns observed between comparison of samples taken at different time points and with different supplements. This analysis grouped genes associated with the same regulatory motifs and/or had similar putative or known function. Conclusion This study shows iron is rapidly taken up from the medium by iron-depleted DC3000 cultures and that bioavailable iron is a global cue for the expression of iron transport, storage, and known virulence factors in DC3000. Furthermore approximately 34% of the differentially regulated genes are associated with one of four regulatory motifs for Fur, PvdS, HrpL, or RpoD.

  6. A New Microsphere-Based Immunoassay for Measuring the Activity of Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chueh-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are several traditional and well-developed methods for analyzing the activity of transcription factors, such as EMSA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reporter gene activity assays. All of these methods have their own distinct disadvantages, but none can analyze the changes in transcription factors in the few cells that are cultured in the wells of 96-well titer plates. Thus, a new microsphere-based immunoassay to measure the activity of transcription factors (MIA-TF was developed. In MIA-TF, NeutrAvidin-labeled microspheres were used as the solid phase to capture biotin-labeled double-strand DNA fragments which contain certain transcription factor binding elements. The activity of transcription factors was detected by immunoassay using a transcription factor-specific antibody to monitor the binding with the DNA probe. Next, analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The targets hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were applied and detected in this MIA-TF method; the results that we obtained demonstrated that this method could be used to monitor the changes of NF-κB or HIF within 50 or 100 ng of nuclear extract. Furthermore, MIA-TF could detect the changes in NF-κB or HIF in cells that were cultured in wells of a 96-well plate without purification of the nuclear protein, an important consideration for applying this method to high-throughput assays in the future. The development of MIA-TF would support further progress in clinical analysis and drug screening systems. Overall, MIA-TF is a method with high potential to detect the activity of transcription factors.

  7. Interaction of Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 and BAX in Mitochondria Promotes Male Germ Cell Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Yue; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Swerdloff, Ronald; Hwang, David; Cobb, Laura J.; Sinha Hikim, Amiya; Lue, Yan He; Cohen, Pinchas; Wang, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Germ cell apoptosis is crucial for spermatogenesis and can be triggered by various stimuli, including intratesticular hormone deprivation. This study proposes a role for insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in male germ cell apoptosis. Groups of adult Sprague-Dawley male rats received one of the following treatments for 5 days: (i) daily intratesticular (IT) injections with saline (control); (ii) a single subcutaneous injection of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonis...

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Regulates Aberrant Expression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 3

    OpenAIRE

    TAKAOKA, MUNENORI; Harada, Hideki; Andl, Claudia D; Oyama, Kenji; Naomoto, Yoshio; Dempsey, Kelly L.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; El-Deiry, Wafik S; GRIMBERG, ADDA; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in esophageal carcinoma and its precursor lesions. To gain insights into how EGFR overexpression affects cellular functions in primary human esophageal cells, we performed gene expression profiling and identified insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 as the most up-regulated gene. IGFBP-3 regulates cell proliferation through both insulin-like growth factor-dependent and independent mechanisms. We found that IGF...

  9. Production of functional human insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) using recombinant expression in HEK293 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Anne Sofie Molsted; Williamson, Michael; Ebersole, Tasja Wainani;

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) display many functions in humans including regulation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. The various roles of human IGFBPs make them attractive protein candidates in drug discovery. Structural and functional knowledge on...... procedure and the final protein yields were between 1 and 12mg protein per liter culture media. The recombinant IGFBPs contained PTMs and exhibited high-affinity interactions with their natural ligands IGF-1 and IGF-2....

  10. Transcript profiles uncover temporal and stress-induced changes of metabolic pathways in germinating sugar beet seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windhövel Andrea

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a cultivation area of 1.75 Mio ha and sugar yield of 16.7 Mio tons in 2006, sugar beet is a crop of great economic importance in Europe. The productivity of sugar beet is determined significantly by seed vigour and field emergence potential; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits. Both traits exhibit large variations within sugar beet germplasm that have been difficult to ascribe to either environmental or genetic causes. Among potential targets for trait improvement, an enhancement of stress tolerance is considered because of the high negative influence of environmental stresses on trait parameters. Extending our knowledge of genetic and molecular determinants of sugar beet germination, stress response and adaptation mechanisms would facilitate the detection of new targets for breeding crop with an enhanced field emergence potential. Results To gain insight into the sugar beet germination we initiated an analysis of gene expression in a well emerging sugar beet hybrid showing high germination potential under various environmental conditions. A total of 2,784 ESTs representing 2,251 'unigenes' was generated from dry mature and germinating seeds. Analysis of the temporal expression of these genes during germination under non-stress conditions uncovered drastic transcriptional changes accompanying a shift from quiescent to metabolically active stages of the plant life cycle. Assay of germination under stressful conditions revealed 157 genes showing significantly different expression patterns in response to stress. As deduced from transcriptome data, stress adaptation mechanisms included an alteration in reserve mobilization pathways, an accumulation of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine, late embryogenesis abundant proteins and detoxification enzymes. The observed transcriptional changes are supposed to be regulated by ABA-dependent signal transduction pathway. Conclusion This study

  11. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA

  12. Genome‐wide analysis reveals conserved transcriptional responses downstream of resting potential change in Xenopus embryos, axolotl regeneration, and human mesenchymal cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Vaibhav P.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Echeverri, Karen; Sundelacruz, Sarah; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endogenous bioelectric signaling via changes in cellular resting potential (V mem) is a key regulator of patterning during regeneration and embryogenesis in numerous model systems. Depolarization of V mem has been functionally implicated in dedifferentiation, tumorigenesis, anatomical re‐specification, and appendage regeneration. However, no unbiased analyses have been performed to understand genome‐wide transcriptional responses to V mem change in vivo. Moreover, it is unknown which genes or gene networks represent conserved targets of bioelectrical signaling across different patterning contexts and species. Here, we use microarray analysis to comparatively analyze transcriptional responses to V mem depolarization. We compare the response of the transcriptome during embryogenesis (Xenopus development), regeneration (axolotl regeneration), and stem cell differentiation (human mesenchymal stem cells in culture) to identify common networks across model species that are associated with depolarization. Both subnetwork enrichment and PANTHER analyses identified a number of key genetic modules as targets of V mem change, and also revealed important (well‐conserved) commonalities in bioelectric signal transduction, despite highly diverse experimental contexts and species. Depolarization regulates specific transcriptional networks across all three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) such as cell differentiation and apoptosis, and this information will be used for developing mechanistic models of bioelectric regulation of patterning. Moreover, our analysis reveals that V mem change regulates transcripts related to important disease pathways such as cancer and neurodegeneration, which may represent novel targets for emerging electroceutical therapies. PMID:27499876

  13. Heterogeneity of binding subunits of the human 150K insulin-like growth factor binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, M C; Gaynes, L A; Greenstein, L A; Nissley, S P

    1990-04-01

    Models for the structure of the GH-dependent 150K insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGF-BP) complex include 1) a binding subunit of 40-60K mol wt associated with a larger nonbinding component, and 2) an oligomeric structure simply made up of six 25-28K monomeric IGF-BP complexes. To evaluate these alternative models we examined the IGF-binding characteristics and behavior on an SP-Sephadex ion exchange column of BP species identified by chemically cross-linking [125I]IGF-I and [125I]IGF-II. In addition, human serum was gel filtered on Sephadex G-200 in 0.05 M NH4HCO3, pH 8.0, and the 150K BP identified by binding of [125I]IGF-II to column fractions. When [125I]IGF-I or [125I]IGF-II was cross-linked to the 150K BP with disuccinimidyl suberate and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (10-15%) and autoradiography, four specifically labeled complexes of 20K, 24K, 33K, and 47K mol wt were identified. We examined the IGF-binding characteristics of these species by cross-linking [125I]IGF-I and [125I]IGF-II after incubation in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled IGF-I or IGF-II. Formation of the 24K complex was inhibited more potently by IGF-II than IGF-I, whereas the relative potency of IGF-I vs. IGF-II for inhibition of the formation of the other complexes depended upon whether [125I]IGF-II or [125I]IGF-I was used. When the 150K BP complex generated from gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 was acid stripped, the only species seen with chemical cross-linking of either [125I]IGF-I or [125I]IGF-II was the 47K complex. By both conventional competitive binding studies and cross-linking [125I]IGF-I and [125I]IGF-II after incubation with increasing concentrations of unlabeled IGF-I or IGF-II, the formation of the 47K complex was usually more potently inhibited by IGF-I than IGF-II. When Cohn fraction IV extract was chromatographed on a SP-Sephadex column (pH 3) and cross-linking performed on the flow-through, the 47K

  14. Casein kinase II phosphorylation increases the rate of serum response factor-binding site exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Marais, R M; Hsuan, J J; McGuigan, C.; Wynne, J; Treisman, R

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses were used to express wild-type serum response factor (SRF) and a mutant, SRF.CKIIA, which lacks all four serine residues in the major casein kinase II (CKII) site at residues 77-90. Purified recombinant SRF binds DNA with an affinity and specificity indistinguishable from that of HeLa cell SRF, and activates transcription in vitro. Comparative phosphopeptide analysis of the wild-type and mutant proteins demonstrated that the wild-type protein is phosphorylated at the...

  15. Computational detection of stage-specific transcription factor clusters during heart development

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian eZeidler; Cornelia eMeckbach; Rebecca eTacke; Farah S. eRaad; Angelica eRoa; Shizuka eUchida; Wolfram Hubertus eZimmermann; Edgar eWingender; Mehmet eGültas

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression in living organisms. In higher organisms, TFs often interact in non-random combinations with each other to control gene transcription. Understanding the interactions is key to decipher mechanisms underlying tissue development. The aim of this study was to analyze co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in a time series dataset from a new cell-culture model of human heart muscle development in order to identify common as well...

  16. Computational Detection of Stage-Specific Transcription Factor Clusters during Heart Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler, Sebastian; Meckbach, Cornelia; Tacke, Rebecca; Raad, Farah S.; Roa, Angelica; Uchida, Shizuka; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Wingender, Edgar; Gültas, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression in living organisms. In higher organisms, TFs often interact in non-random combinations with each other to control gene transcription. Understanding the interactions is key to decipher mechanisms underlying tissue development. The aim of this study was to analyze co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in a time series dataset from a new cell-culture model of human heart muscle development in order to identify common as well...

  17. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcr...

  18. Pluripotency factor binding and Tsix expression act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Tatyana B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of Xist, the master regulator of X chromosome inactivation, is extinguished in pluripotent cells, a process that has been linked to programmed X chromosome reactivation. The key pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 are implicated in Xist gene extinction, at least in part through binding to an element located in Xist intron 1. Other pathways, notably repression by the antisense RNA Tsix, may also be involved. Results Here we employ a transgene strategy to test the role of the intron 1 element and Tsix in repressing Xist in ES cells. We find that deletion of the intron 1 element causes a small increase in Xist expression and that simultaneous deletion of the antisense regulator Tsix enhances this effect. Conclusion We conclude that Tsix and pluripotency factors act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Double mutants do not exhibit maximal levels of Xist expression, indicating that other pathways also play a role.

  19. Binding of the transcription factor Atf1 to promoters serves as a barrier to phase nucleosome arrays and avoid cryptic transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia; Paulo, Esther; Gao, Jun; Wahls, Wayne P.; Ayté, José; Lowy, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe displays a large transcriptional response common to several stress conditions, regulated primarily by the transcription factor Atf1. Atf1-dependent promoters contain especially broad nucleosome depleted regions (NDRs) prior to stress imposition. We show here that basal binding of Atf1 to these promoters competes with histones to create wider NDRs at stress genes. Moreover, deletion of atf1 results in nucleosome disorganization specifically at stress coding regions and derepresses antisense transcription. Our data indicate that the transcription factor binding to promoters acts as an effective barrier to fix the +1 nucleosome and phase downstream nucleosome arrays to prevent cryptic transcription. PMID:25122751

  20. Extracellular matrix contains insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5: potentiation of the effects of IGF-I

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been shown to serve as carrier proteins for the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and to modulate their biologic effects. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to be a reservoir for IGF-I and IGF-II, we examined the ECM of cultured human fetal fibroblasts and found that IGFBP-5 was incorporated intact into ECM, while mostly inert proteolytic fragments were found in the medium. In contrast, two other forms of IGFBP that are s...

  1. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and implications in catabolic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Björn

    1997-01-01

    This thesis has studied the regulation of IGFBP-1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1), which is one factor regulating the bioavailability of IGF-I with special interest how IGFBP-1 is regulated in vitro and in humans, especially in diabetes and catabolic conditions. The IGFBP-1 cDNA was cloned and used for studies in human hepatoma cells, HepG2, which showed that both insulin and IGF-I could decrease IGFBP-1 in the cell conditioned medium. IGF-I inhibited also IGF...

  2. Salmon serum 22 kDa insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) is IGFBP-1

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, M; Dickey, J T; Fukada, H; Dickhoff, W W

    2005-01-01

    Western ligand blotting of salmon serum typically reveals three insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) at 22, 28 and 41 kDa. Physiological regulation of the 22-kDa IGFBP is similar to that of mammalian IGFBP-1; it is increased under catabolic states such as fasting and stress. On the other hand, its molecular weight on Western ligand blotting is closest to mammalian IGFBP-4. The conflict between physiology and molecular weight makes it difficult to conclude the identity of the 2...

  3. Changes in Course-Taking, 1982-1988 in High Schools with Middle- and Low-Achieving Students in States Adopting High Graduation Requirements. Appendix E: High School Transcript Data Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, William H.; And Others

    This statistical appendix is meant to accompany "Changes in Course-Taking, 1982-88: a Study of Transcript Data from Selected Schools and States." The study was designed to provide quantitative data from transcripts about changes in course-taking among graduates of high schools enrolling mostly lower-achieving students in states adopting high…

  4. DNA damage and transcriptional changes in the gills of mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to nanomolar doses of combined metal salts (Cd, Cu, Hg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Varotto

    Full Text Available Aiming at an integrated and mechanistic view of the early biological effects of selected metals in the marine sentinel organism Mytilus galloprovincialis, we exposed mussels for 48 hours to 50, 100 and 200 nM solutions of equimolar Cd, Cu and Hg salts and measured cytological and molecular biomarkers in parallel. Focusing on the mussel gills, first target of toxic water contaminants and actively proliferating tissue, we detected significant dose-related increases of cells with micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in the treated mussels, with differences in the bioconcentration of the three metals determined in the mussel flesh by atomic absorption spectrometry. Gene expression profiles, determined in the same individual gills in parallel, revealed some transcriptional changes at the 50 nM dose, and substantial increases of differentially expressed genes at the 100 and 200 nM doses, with roughly similar amounts of up- and down-regulated genes. The functional annotation of gill transcripts with consistent expression trends and significantly altered at least in one dose point disclosed the complexity of the induced cell response. The most evident transcriptional changes concerned protein synthesis and turnover, ion homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, and intracellular trafficking (transcript sequences denoting heat shock proteins, metal binding thioneins, sequestosome 1 and proteasome subunits, and GADD45 exemplify up-regulated genes while transcript sequences denoting actin, tubulins and the apoptosis inhibitor 1 exemplify down-regulated genes. Overall, nanomolar doses of co-occurring free metal ions have induced significant structural and functional changes in the mussel gills: the intensity of response to the stimulus measured in laboratory supports the additional validation of molecular markers of metal exposure to be used in Mussel Watch programs.

  5. DNA damage and transcriptional changes in the gills of mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to nanomolar doses of combined metal salts (Cd, Cu, Hg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotto, Laura; Domeneghetti, Stefania; Rosani, Umberto; Manfrin, Chiara; Cajaraville, Miren P; Raccanelli, Stefano; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at an integrated and mechanistic view of the early biological effects of selected metals in the marine sentinel organism Mytilus galloprovincialis, we exposed mussels for 48 hours to 50, 100 and 200 nM solutions of equimolar Cd, Cu and Hg salts and measured cytological and molecular biomarkers in parallel. Focusing on the mussel gills, first target of toxic water contaminants and actively proliferating tissue, we detected significant dose-related increases of cells with micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in the treated mussels, with differences in the bioconcentration of the three metals determined in the mussel flesh by atomic absorption spectrometry. Gene expression profiles, determined in the same individual gills in parallel, revealed some transcriptional changes at the 50 nM dose, and substantial increases of differentially expressed genes at the 100 and 200 nM doses, with roughly similar amounts of up- and down-regulated genes. The functional annotation of gill transcripts with consistent expression trends and significantly altered at least in one dose point disclosed the complexity of the induced cell response. The most evident transcriptional changes concerned protein synthesis and turnover, ion homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, and intracellular trafficking (transcript sequences denoting heat shock proteins, metal binding thioneins, sequestosome 1 and proteasome subunits, and GADD45 exemplify up-regulated genes while transcript sequences denoting actin, tubulins and the apoptosis inhibitor 1 exemplify down-regulated genes). Overall, nanomolar doses of co-occurring free metal ions have induced significant structural and functional changes in the mussel gills: the intensity of response to the stimulus measured in laboratory supports the additional validation of molecular markers of metal exposure to be used in Mussel Watch programs. PMID:23355883

  6. Interaction with diurnal and circadian regulation results in dynamic metabolic and transcriptional changes during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinoza

    Full Text Available In plants, there is a large overlap between cold and circadian regulated genes and in Arabidopsis, we have shown that cold (4°C affects the expression of clock oscillator genes. However, a broader insight into the significance of diurnal and/or circadian regulation of cold responses, particularly for metabolic pathways, and their physiological relevance is lacking. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of transcripts and primary metabolites using microarrays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As expected, expression of diurnally regulated genes was massively affected during cold acclimation. Our data indicate that disruption of clock function at the transcriptional level extends to metabolic regulation. About 80% of metabolites that showed diurnal cycles maintained these during cold treatment. In particular, maltose content showed a massive night-specific increase in the cold. However, under free-running conditions, maltose was the only metabolite that maintained any oscillations in the cold. Furthermore, although starch accumulates during cold acclimation we show it is still degraded at night, indicating significance beyond the previously demonstrated role of maltose and starch breakdown in the initial phase of cold acclimation. Levels of some conventional cold induced metabolites, such as γ-aminobutyric acid, galactinol, raffinose and putrescine, exhibited diurnal and circadian oscillations and transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes often also cycled and preceded their cold-induction, in agreement with transcriptional regulation. However, the accumulation of other cold-responsive metabolites, for instance homoserine, methionine and maltose, did not have consistent transcriptional regulation, implying that metabolic reconfiguration involves complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. These data demonstrate the importance of understanding cold acclimation in the correct day-night context, and are further

  7. Notch2 controls prolactin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 expression in decidualizing human stromal cells of early pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlinde R Otti

    Full Text Available Decidualization, the transformation of the human uterine mucosa into the endometrium of pregnancy, is critical for successful implantation and embryonic development. However, key regulatory factors controlling differentiation of uterine stromal cells into hormone-secreting decidual cells have not been fully elucidated. Hence, we herein investigated the role of the Notch signaling pathway in human decidual stromal cells (HDSC isolated from early pregnancy samples. Immunofluorescence of first trimester decidual tissues revealed expression of Notch2 receptor and its putative, membrane-anchored interaction partners Jagged1, Delta-like (DLL 1 and DLL4 in stromal cells whereas other Notch receptors and ligands were absent from these cells. During in vitro differentiation with estrogen/progesterone (E2P4 and/or cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP HDSC constitutively expressed Notch2 and weakly downregulated Jagged1 mRNA and protein, measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. However, increased levels of DLL1 and DLL4 were observed in the decidualizing cultures. Transfection of a Notch luciferase reporter and qPCR of the Notch target gene hairy and enhancer of split 1 (HES1 revealed an induction of canonical Notch activity during in vitro differentiation. In contrast, treatment of HDSC with a chemical Notch/γ-secretase inhibitor decreased cAMP/E2P4-stimulated Notch luciferase activity, HES1 transcript levels and mRNA expression of the decidual marker genes prolactin (PRL and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1. Similarly, siRNA-mediated gene silencing or antibody-mediated blocking of Notch2 diminished HES1, PRL and IGFBP1 mRNA levels as well as secreted PRL protein. In summary, the data suggest that canonical, Notch2-dependent signaling plays a role in human decidualization.

  8. Second Intron of Mouse Nestin Gene Directs its Expression in Pluripotent Embryonic Carcinoma Cells through POU Factor Binding Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang JIN; Li LIU; Hua ZHONG; Ke-Jing ZHANG; Yong-Feng CHEN; Wei BIAN; Le-Ping CHENG; Nai-He JING

    2006-01-01

    Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, is expressed in the neural stem cells of the developing central nervous system. This tissue-specific expression is driven by the neural stem cell-specific enhancer in the second intron of the nestin gene. In this study, we showed that the mouse nestin gene was expressed in pluripotent embryonic carcinoma (EC) P19 and F9 cells, not in the differentiated cell types. This cell typespecific expression was conferred by the enhancer in the second intron. Mutation of the conserved POU factor-binding site in the enhancer abolished the reporter gene expression in EC cells. Oct4, a Class V POU factor, was found to be coexpressed with nestin in EC cells. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and supershift assays showed that a unique protein-DNA complex was formed specifically with nuclear extracts of EC cells, and Oct4 protein was included. Together, these results suggest the functional relevance between the conserved POU factor-binding site and the expression of the nestin gene in pluripotent EC cells.

  9. Global transcriptional profiling reveals distinct functions of thymic stromal subsets and age-related changes during thymic involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Sanghee; Park, Daechan; Selden, Hilary J; Seita, Jun; Chung, Haewon; Kim, Jonghwan; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Ehrlich, Lauren I R

    2014-10-01

    Age-associated thymic involution results in diminished T cell output and function in aged individuals. However, molecular mediators contributing to the decline in thymic function during early thymic involution remain largely unknown. Here, we present transcriptional profiling of purified thymic stromal subsets from mice 1, 3, and 6 months of age spanning early thymic involution. The data implicate unanticipated biological functions for a subset of thymic epithelial cells. The predominant transcriptional signature of early thymic involution is decreased expression of cell-cycle-associated genes and E2F3 transcriptional targets in thymic epithelial subsets. Also, expression of proinflammatory genes increases with age in thymic dendritic cells. Many genes previously implicated in late involution are already deregulated by 3-6 months of age. We provide these thymic stromal data sets, along with thymocyte data sets, in a readily searchable web-based platform, as a resource for investigations into thymocyte:stromal interactions and mechanisms of thymic involution. PMID:25284794

  10. The isolation of transcription factors from lambda gt11 cDNA expression libraries: human steroid 5 alpha-reductase 1 has sequence-specific DNA binding activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaston, K; Fried, M

    1992-01-01

    The Surf-1/Surf-2 bi-directional promoter contains binding sites for at least three transcription factors (Su1, Su2, and Su3). By screening a lambda gt11 HeLa cell cDNA expression library with a concatenated Su2 factor binding site, we isolated a cDNA which encodes a protein with sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Gel retardation assays showed that the cloned factor binds specifically to the Su2 factor binding site present in the human Surf-1/Surf-2 promoter but not to an Su2 site contai...

  11. After-ripening induced transcriptional changes of hormonal genes in wheat seeds: the cases of brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinin and salicylic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya R Chitnis

    Full Text Available Maintenance and release of seed dormancy is regulated by plant hormones; their levels and seed sensitivity being the critical factors. This study reports transcriptional regulation of brassinosteroids (BR, ethylene (ET, cytokinin (CK and salicylic acid (SA related wheat genes by after-ripening, a period of dry storage that decays dormancy. Changes in the expression of hormonal genes due to seed after-ripening did not occur in the anhydrobiotic state but rather in the hydrated state. After-ripening induced dormancy decay appears to be associated with imbibition mediated increase in the synthesis and signalling of BR, via transcriptional activation of de-etiolated2, dwarf4 and brassinosteroid signaling kinase, and repression of brassinosteroid insensitive 2. Our analysis is also suggestive of the significance of increased ET production, as reflected by enhanced transcription of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase in after-ripened seeds, and tight regulation of seed response to ET in regulating dormancy decay. Differential transcriptions of lonely guy, zeatin O-glucosyltransferases and cytokinin oxidases, and pseudo-response regulator between dormant and after-ripened seeds implicate CK in the regulation of seed dormancy in wheat. Our analysis also reflects the association of dormancy decay in wheat with seed SA level and NPR independent SA signaling that appear to be regulated transcriptionally by phenylalanine ammonia lyase, and whirly and suppressor of npr1 inducible1 genes, respectively. Co-expression clustering of the hormonal genes implies the significance of synergistic and antagonistic interaction between the different plant hormones in regulating wheat seed dormancy. These results contribute to further our understanding of the molecular features controlling seed dormancy in wheat.

  12. Time dependent impact of perinatal hypoxia on growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Ömer; Aydınöz, Seçil; Kartal, Ayşe Tuğba; Kelestemur, Taha; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Karademir, Ferhan; Süleymanoğlu, Selami; Kul, Mustafa; Yulug, Burak; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) is a widely used animal model to mimic the preterm or perinatal sublethal hypoxia, including hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It causes diffuse neurodegeneration in the brain and results in mental retardation, hyperactivity, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and neuroendocrine disturbances. Herein, we examined acute and subacute correlations between neuronal degeneration and serum growth factor changes, including growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) after hypoxic-ischemia (HI) in neonatal rats. In the acute phase of hypoxia, brain volume was increased significantly as compared with control animals, which was associated with reduced GH and IGF-1 secretions. Reduced neuronal survival and increased DNA fragmentation were also noticed in these animals. However, in the subacute phase of hypoxia, neuronal survival and brain volume were significantly decreased, accompanied by increased apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus and cortex. Serum GH, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 levels were significantly reduced in the subacute phase of HI. Significant retardation in the brain and body development were noted in the subacute phase of hypoxia. Here, we provide evidence that serum levels of growth-hormone and factors were decreased in the acute and subacute phase of hypoxia, which was associated with increased DNA fragmentation and decreased neuronal survival. PMID:26943480

  13. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  14. Global Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Distinct Functions of Thymic Stromal Subsets and Age-Related Changes during Thymic Involution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghee Ki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Age-associated thymic involution results in diminished T cell output and function in aged individuals. However, molecular mediators contributing to the decline in thymic function during early thymic involution remain largely unknown. Here, we present transcriptional profiling of purified thymic stromal subsets from mice 1, 3, and 6 months of age spanning early thymic involution. The data implicate unanticipated biological functions for a subset of thymic epithelial cells. The predominant transcriptional signature of early thymic involution is decreased expression of cell-cycle-associated genes and E2F3 transcriptional targets in thymic epithelial subsets. Also, expression of proinflammatory genes increases with age in thymic dendritic cells. Many genes previously implicated in late involution are already deregulated by 3–6 months of age. We provide these thymic stromal data sets, along with thymocyte data sets, in a readily searchable web-based platform, as a resource for investigations into thymocyte:stromal interactions and mechanisms of thymic involution.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in follicular fluid from morphologically distinct healthy and atretic bovine antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving-Rodgers, H F; Catanzariti, K D; Master, M; Grant, P A; Owens, P C; Rodgers, R J

    2003-01-01

    In bovine follicles 2-5 mm in diameter, two morphologically distinct types of healthy follicles and two types of atretic follicles have been described recently. Healthy follicles either have columnar basal granulosa cells with follicular basal lamina composed of many layers or 'loops' or they have rounded basal cells with a conventional single-layered, aligned follicular basal lamina. In atretic follicles, cell death either commences at the basal layer and progresses to the antrum (basal atresia) with macrophage penetration of the membrana granulosa or death progresses from the antrum in a basal direction (antral atresia). Little is known about how these different phenotypes develop. To determine whether insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) levels in follicular fluid differ between these different types of follicles, we measured IGFBP levels in fluids from these follicles. A total of 61 follicles were assessed by light microscopy and characterized by morphological analysis as either healthy, with columnar or rounded basal granulosa cells, or as undergoing antral or basal atresia. The IGFBP concentration in the follicular fluid of individual follicles from the four groups (n = 12-20 per group) was identified by Western ligand blots using (125)I-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II as a probe. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 2, 3 (44 and 40 kDa), 4 (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) and 5 were observed. The levels (per volume of fluid) of IGFBPs 2, 4 and 5 were greater in atretic follicles than in healthy follicles. However, there were no statistical differences in levels of each IGFBP between either the two types of healthy follicle or between the two types of atretic follicles. Thus, IGFBP levels are not related to the different types of healthy or atretic follicles. PMID:12921699

  16. Characterization of an Oct1 orthologue in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus: A negative regulator of immunoglobulin gene transcription?

    OpenAIRE

    Miller Norman W; Wilson Melanie R; Kruiswijk Corine P; Ross David A; Hikima Jun-ichi; Lennard Mara L; Warr Gregory W

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The enhancer (Eμ3') of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IGH) of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) has been well characterized. The functional core region consists of two variant Oct transcription factor binding octamer motifs and one E-protein binding μE5 site. An orthologue to the Oct2 transcription factor has previously been cloned in catfish and is a functionally active transcription factor. This study was undertaken to clone and characterize the Oct1 trans...

  17. Detection of growth factor binding to gelatin and heparin using a photonic crystal optical biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug-carrier interactions are important to protein controlled release systems to protect the protein from denaturation and ensure properly timed release. A novel photonic crystal biosensor was used to investigate a gelatin-protein controlled release system to determine the amount of protein bound to the carrier at physiological conditions. The Biomolecular Interaction Detection (BIND) system reflects a narrow band of wavelengths when white light is shone incident to the grating. As mass is deposited onto the surface, the peak wavelength value is shifted due to changes in the optical density of the biosensor. The BIND system was used to detect the binding of growth factors onto acidic gelatin, basic gelatin, and heparin on the sensor surface. Through a series of experiments, including functionalizing the sensor, adjusting the ionic strength of the solution, adjusting the substrate concentration, and minimizing non-specific signal, the adsorption of the gelatins and heparin on the sensor was enhanced. The binding interaction of recombinant human transforming growth factor (rhTGF)-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 with the two types of gelatin and heparin were investigated. The strength of the interaction between rhTGF-β1 and the substrates is in the following order: heparin > acidic gelatin > basic gelatin. RhBMP-2 bound to the substrates but with less intensity than TGF-β1: heparin > basic gelatin > acidic gelatin. This work provides support for the controlled release mechanism through degradation of the gelatin carrier.

  18. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  19. Structural basis of regulation of von Willebrand factor binding to glycoprotein Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenner, Mark A; Dong, Xianchi; Springer, Timothy A

    2014-02-28

    Activation by elongational flow of von Willebrand factor (VWF) is critical for primary hemostasis. Mutations causing type 2B von Willebrand disease (VWD), platelet-type VWD (PT-VWD), and tensile force each increase affinity of the VWF A1 domain and platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) for one another; however, the structural basis for these observations remains elusive. Directed evolution was used to discover a further gain-of-function mutation in A1 that shifts the long range disulfide bond by one residue. We solved multiple crystal structures of this mutant A1 and A1 containing two VWD mutations complexed with GPIbα containing two PT-VWD mutations. We observed a gained interaction between A1 and the central leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of GPIbα, previously shown to be important at high shear stress, and verified its importance mutationally. These findings suggest that structural changes, including central GPIbα LRR-A1 contact, contribute to VWF affinity regulation. Among the mutant complexes, variation in contacts and poor complementarity between the GPIbα β-finger and the region of A1 harboring VWD mutations lead us to hypothesize that the structures are on a pathway to, but have not yet reached, a force-induced super high affinity state. PMID:24391089

  20. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  1. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeffrey M; Wampole, Matthew E; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of therapeutics targeting EGF

  2. Extensive neuroadaptive changes in cortical gene-transcript expressions of the glutamate system in response to repeated intermittent MDMA administration in adolescent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malki Rana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have focused on the implication of the serotonin and dopamine systems in neuroadaptive responses to the recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxy-metamphetamine (MDMA. Less attention has been given to the major excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate known to be implicated in schizophrenia and drug addiction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of repeated intermittent MDMA administration upon gene-transcript expression of the glutamate transporters (EAAT1, EAAT2-1, EAAT2-2, the glutamate receptor subunits of AMPA (GluR1, GluR2, GluR3, the glutamate receptor subunits of NMDA (NR1, NR2A and NR2B, as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1, mGluR2, mGluR3, mGluR5 in six different brain regions. Adolescent male Sprague Dawley rats received MDMA at the doses of 3 × 1 and 3 × 5 mg/kg/day, or 3× vehicle 3 hours apart, every 7th day for 4 weeks. The gene-transcript levels were assessed using real-time PCR validated with a range of housekeeping genes. Results The findings showed pronounced enhancements in gene-transcript expression of GluR2, mGluR1, mGluR5, NR1, NR2A, NR2B, EAAT1, and EAAT2-2 in the cortex at bregma +1.6. In the caudate putamen, mRNA levels of GluR3, NR2A, and NR2B receptor subunits were significantly increased. In contrast, the gene-transcript expression of GluR1 was reduced in the hippocampus. In the hypothalamus, there was a significant increase of GluR1, GluR3, mGluR1, and mGluR3 gene-transcript expressions. Conclusion Repeated intermittent MDMA administration induces neuroadaptive changes in gene-transcript expressions of glutamatergic NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits, metabotropic receptors and transporters in regions of the brain regulating reward-related associative learning, cognition, and memory and neuro-endocrine functions.

  3. Transcriptional Repression of Gata3 Is Essential for Early B Cell Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Anupam; Northrup, Daniel; Boukarabila, Hanane; Jacobsen, Sten Erik W.; Allman, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms underlying the silencing of alternative fate potentials in very early B cell precursors remain unclear. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches together with a synthetic Zinc-finger polypeptide (6ZFP) engineered to prevent transcription factor binding to a defined cis element, we show that the transcription factor EBF1 promotes B cell lineage commitment by directly repressing expression of the T-cell-lineage-requisite Gata3 gene. Ebf1-deficient lymphoid progenitors ...

  4. Regulation of wheat seed dormancy by after-ripening is mediated by specific transcriptional switches that induce changes in seed hormone metabolism and signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Liu

    Full Text Available Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum, temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA, gibberellin (GA, jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were examined in dormant and after-ripened seeds in both dry and imbibed states. After-ripening mediated developmental switch from dormancy to germination appears to be associated with declines in seed sensitivity to ABA and IAA, which are mediated by transcriptional repressions of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C, SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2, ABA INSENSITIVE5 and LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHTASE2, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR and RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1 genes. Transcriptomic analysis of wheat seed responsiveness to ABA suggests that ABA inhibits the germination of wheat seeds partly by repressing the transcription of genes related to chromatin assembly and cell wall modification, and activating that of GA catabolic genes. After-ripening induced seed dormancy decay in wheat is also associated with the modulation of seed IAA and jasmonate contents. Transcriptional control of members of the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE, 3-KETOACYL COENZYME A THIOLASE, LIPOXYGENASE and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE gene families appears to regulate seed jasmonate levels. Changes in the expression of GA biosynthesis genes, GA 20-OXIDASE and GA 3-OXIDASE, in response to after-ripening implicate this hormone in enhancing dormancy release and germination. These findings have important implications in the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of seed dormancy in cereals.

  5. Regulation of wheat seed dormancy by after-ripening is mediated by specific transcriptional switches that induce changes in seed hormone metabolism and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aihua; Gao, Feng; Kanno, Yuri; Jordan, Mark C; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori; Ayele, Belay T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage) in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum), temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA) metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were examined in dormant and after-ripened seeds in both dry and imbibed states. After-ripening mediated developmental switch from dormancy to germination appears to be associated with declines in seed sensitivity to ABA and IAA, which are mediated by transcriptional repressions of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C, SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2, ABA INSENSITIVE5 and LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHTASE2, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR and RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1 genes. Transcriptomic analysis of wheat seed responsiveness to ABA suggests that ABA inhibits the germination of wheat seeds partly by repressing the transcription of genes related to chromatin assembly and cell wall modification, and activating that of GA catabolic genes. After-ripening induced seed dormancy decay in wheat is also associated with the modulation of seed IAA and jasmonate contents. Transcriptional control of members of the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE, 3-KETOACYL COENZYME A THIOLASE, LIPOXYGENASE and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE gene families appears to regulate seed jasmonate levels. Changes in the expression of GA biosynthesis genes, GA 20-OXIDASE and GA 3-OXIDASE, in response to after-ripening implicate this hormone in enhancing dormancy release and germination. These findings have important implications in the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of seed dormancy in cereals. PMID:23437172

  6. A model for aryl hydrocarbon receptor-activated gene expression shows potency and efficacy changes and predicts squelching due to competition for transcription co-activators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted W Simon

    Full Text Available A stochastic model of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription was developed based on activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD and subsequent binding the activated AHR to xenobiotic response elements (XREs on DNA. The model was based on effects observed in cells lines commonly used as in vitro experimental systems. Following ligand binding, the AHR moves into the cell nucleus and forms a heterodimer with the aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator (ARNT. In the model, a requirement for binding to DNA is that a generic coregulatory protein is subsequently bound to the AHR-ARNT dimer. Varying the amount of coregulator available within the nucleus altered both the potency and efficacy of TCDD for inducing for transcription of CYP1A1 mRNA, a commonly used marker for activation of the AHR. Lowering the amount of available cofactor slightly increased the EC50 for the transcriptional response without changing the efficacy or maximal response. Further reduction in the amount of cofactor reduced the efficacy and produced non-monotonic dose-response curves (NMDRCs at higher ligand concentrations. The shapes of these NMDRCs were reminiscent of the phenomenon of squelching. Resource limitations for transcriptional machinery are becoming apparent in eukaryotic cells. Within single cells, nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression appears to be a stochastic process; however, intercellular communication and other aspects of tissue coordination may represent a compensatory process to maintain an organism's ability to respond on a phenotypic level to various stimuli within an inconstant environment.

  7. Transcriptional response of yellow perch to changes in ambient metal concentrations-A reciprocal field transplantation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Bérénice; Normandeau, Eric; Grasset, Julie; Defo, Michel A; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice; Bernatchez, Louis

    2016-04-01

    Recent local adaptation to pollution has been evidenced in several organisms inhabiting environments heavily contaminated by metals. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation to high metal concentrations are poorly understood, especially in fishes. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) populations from lakes in the mining area of Rouyn-Noranda (QC, Canada) have been faced with metal contamination for about 90 years. Here, we examine gene transcription patterns of fish reciprocally transplanted between a reference and a metal-contaminated lake and also fish caged in their native lake. After four weeks, 111 genes were differentially transcribed in metal-naïve fish transferred to the metal-contaminated lake, revealing a plastic response to metal exposure. Genes involved in the citric cycle and beta-oxidation pathways were under-transcribed, suggesting a potential strategy to mitigate the effects of metal stress by reducing energy turnover. However, metal-contaminated fish transplanted to the reference lake did not show any transcriptomic response, indicating a reduced plastic response capability to sudden reduction in metal concentrations. Moreover, the transcription of other genes, especially ones involved in energy metabolism, was affected by caging. Overall, our results highlight environmental stress response mechanisms in yellow perch at the transcriptomic level and support a rapid adaptive response to metal exposure through genetic assimilation. PMID:26867186

  8. Transcriptional changes in developing maize kernels in response to fumonisin-producing and nonproducing strains of Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanubile, Alessandra; Logrieco, Antonio; Battilani, Paola; Proctor, Robert H; Marocco, Adriano

    2013-09-01

    Fusarium verticillioides infects maize producing ear rot, yield loss and the accumulation of fumonisins. In the present study, a transcriptomic approach was employed to investigate the molecular aspects of the interaction of susceptible/resistant maize genotypes with fumonisin-producing/nonproducing strains of F. verticillioides over a time course of 4 days after inoculation. The fumonisin-nonproducing strain led transcription in susceptible maize kernels, starting from 48h post inoculation, with a peak of differentially expressed genes at 72h after inoculation. Pathogen attack altered the mRNA levels of approximately 1.0% of the total number of maize genes assayed, with 15% encoding proteins having potential functions in signal transduction mechanisms, and 9% in the category of transcription factors. These findings indicate that signalling and regulation pathways were prominent in the earlier phases of kernel colonization, inducing the following expression of defense genes. In the resistant maize genotype, the fum1 mutant of F. verticillioides, impaired in this polyketide synthase gene (PKS), provoked a delayed and weakened activation of defense and oxidative stress-related genes, compared to the wild-type strain. The inability to infect resistant kernels may be related to the lack of PKS activity and its association with the lipoxygenase pathway. Plant and fungal 9-lipoxygenases had greater expression after fum1 mutant inoculation, suggesting that PKS plays an indirect effect on pathogen colonization by interfering with the lipid mediated cross-talk between host and pathogen. PMID:23849125

  9. Identification of a novel type of WRKY transcription factor binding site in elicitor-responsive cis-sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machens, Fabian; Becker, Marlies; Umrath, Felix; Hehl, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of bioinformatics and synthetic promoters, novel elicitor-responsive cis-sequences were discovered in promoters of pathogen-upregulated genes from Arabidopsis thaliana. One group of functional sequences contains the conserved core sequence GACTTTT. This core sequence and adjacent nucleotides are essential for elicitor-responsive gene expression in a parsley protoplast system. By yeast one-hybrid screening, WRKY70 was selected with a cis-sequence harbouring the core sequence GACTTTT but no known WRKY binding site (W-box). Transactivation experiments, mutation analyses, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that the sequence CGACTTTT is the binding site for WRKY70 in the investigated cis-sequence and is required for WRKY70-activated gene expression. Using several cis-sequences in transactivation experiments and binding studies, the CGACTTTT sequence can be extended to propose YGACTTTT as WRKY70 binding site. This binding site, designated WT-box, is enriched in promoters of genes upregulated in a WRKY70 overexpressing line. Interestingly, functional WRKY70 binding sites are present in the promoter of WRKY30, supporting recent evidence that both factors play a role in the same regulatory network. PMID:24104863

  10. Transcription Factor Binding Site Polymorphism in the Motilin Gene Associated with Left-Sided Displacement of the Abomasum in German Holstein Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Mömke, Stefanie; Sickinger, Marlene; Rehage, Jürgen; Doll, Klaus; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Left-sided displacement of the abomasum (LDA) is a common disease in many dairy cattle breeds. A genome-wide screen for QTL for LDA in German Holstein (GH) cows indicated motilin (MLN) as a candidate gene on bovine chromosome 23. Genomic DNA sequence analysis of MLN revealed a total of 32 polymorphisms. All informative polymorphisms used for association analyses in a random sample of 1,136 GH cows confirmed MLN as a candidate for LDA. A single nucleotide polymorphism (FN298674:g.90T>C) locate...

  11. Triplex targeting of human PDGF-B (c-sis, proto-oncogene) promoter specifically inhibits factors binding and PDGF-B transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Jing LIU; Xu, Ren-Huan; Jin, You-xin; Wang, De-Bao

    2001-01-01

    Human c-sis/PDGF-B proto-oncogene has been shown to be overexpressed in a large percentage of human tumor cells establishing a growth-promoting, autocrine growth circuit. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can recognize and bind sequences in duplex DNA, and have received considerable attention because of their potential for targeting specific genomic sites. The c-sis/PDGF-B promoter contains a unique homopurine/homopyrimidine sequence (SIS proximal element, ...

  12. The TERT promoter SNP rs2853669 decreases E2F1 transcription factor binding and increases mortality and recurrence risks in liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Eunkyong; Seo, Hyun-Wook; Jung, Eun Sun; Kim, Baek-hui; Jung, Guhung

    2015-01-01

    A common single-nucleotide polymorphism in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter, rs2853669 influences patient survival rates and the risk of developing cancer. Recently, several lines of evidence suggest that the rs2853669 suppresses TERT promoter mutation-mediated TERT expression levels and cancer mortality as well as recurrence rates. However, no reports are available on the impact of rs2853669 on TERT expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its association with pat...

  13. The TERT promoter SNP rs2853669 decreases E2F1 transcription factor binding and increases mortality and recurrence risks in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunkyong; Seo, Hyun-Wook; Jung, Eun Sun; Kim, Baek-hui; Jung, Guhung

    2016-01-01

    A common single-nucleotide polymorphism in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter, rs2853669 influences patient survival rates and the risk of developing cancer. Recently, several lines of evidence suggest that the rs2853669 suppresses TERT promoter mutation-mediated TERT expression levels and cancer mortality as well as recurrence rates. However, no reports are available on the impact of rs2853669 on TERT expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its association with patient survival. Here, we found that HCC-related overall and recurrence-free survival rates were not associated with TERT promoter mutation individually, but rs2853669 and the TERT promoter mutation in combination were associated with poor survival rates. TERT mRNA expression and telomere fluorescence levels were greater in patients with HCC who had both the combination. The combination caused TERT promoter methylation through regulating the binding of DNA methyltransferase 1 and histone deacetylase 1 to the TERT promoter in HCC cell lines. The TERT expression level was significantly higher in HCC tumor with a methylated promoter than in that with an unmethylated promoter. In conclusion, we demonstrate a substantial role for the rs2853669 in HCC with TERT promoter mutation, which suggests that the combination of the rs2853669 and the mutation indicate poor prognoses in liver cancer. PMID:26575952

  14. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 synthesis and secretion by progestin and relaxin in long term cultures of human endometrial stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decidualized endometrium during the first trimester of pregnancy synthesizes and secretes a 32-kDa insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (termed hIGFBP-1) at high levels. IGFBP-1 is the major soluble protein product of this tissue and is principally localized to the differentiated endometrial stromal cell, the decidual cell. In the present study long term culture of stromal cells from the nonpregnant endometrium have been employed to elucidate the hormonal requirements for IGFBP-1 production. Immunoreactive IGFBP-1 was undetectable in control cultures. However, inclusion of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induced rates of 0.35 +/- 0.09 microgram/0.1 mg cell DNA.day after 20-30 days. In these cultures cells exhibited morphological changes consistent with decidual cell differentiation. In all cultures removal of MPA after exposure for 10-16 days, with or without subsequent inclusion of relaxin (RLX), increased production of IGFBP-1 450- to 4600-fold to rates of 150-710 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day or 26-131 micrograms/10(6) cells.day on days 24-26. The rates tended to be higher with the inclusion of RLX and were sustained in contrast to cultures without RLX, where rates fell by day 30. Individual cultures responded differently to RLX when added from the initiation of culture, with either a response similar to MPA alone or a cyclical change in production, achieving maximal rates of 190-290 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day. Cultures in which RLX alone induced high IGFBP-1 high production were obtained from endometrium during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. In cultures exhibiting high rates of immunoreactive IGFBP-1 production, the protein represented their major secretory protein product. This was confirmed by [35S]methionine incorporation and the presence of IGFBP-1 as the predominant protein in serum-free culture medium

  15. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 synthesis and secretion by progestin and relaxin in long term cultures of human endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, S.C.; Jackson, J.A.; Ashmore, J.; Zhu, H.H.; Tseng, L. (Univ. of Leicester, (United Kingdom))

    1991-05-01

    The decidualized endometrium during the first trimester of pregnancy synthesizes and secretes a 32-kDa insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (termed hIGFBP-1) at high levels. IGFBP-1 is the major soluble protein product of this tissue and is principally localized to the differentiated endometrial stromal cell, the decidual cell. In the present study long term culture of stromal cells from the nonpregnant endometrium have been employed to elucidate the hormonal requirements for IGFBP-1 production. Immunoreactive IGFBP-1 was undetectable in control cultures. However, inclusion of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induced rates of 0.35 +/- 0.09 microgram/0.1 mg cell DNA.day after 20-30 days. In these cultures cells exhibited morphological changes consistent with decidual cell differentiation. In all cultures removal of MPA after exposure for 10-16 days, with or without subsequent inclusion of relaxin (RLX), increased production of IGFBP-1 450- to 4600-fold to rates of 150-710 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day or 26-131 micrograms/10(6) cells.day on days 24-26. The rates tended to be higher with the inclusion of RLX and were sustained in contrast to cultures without RLX, where rates fell by day 30. Individual cultures responded differently to RLX when added from the initiation of culture, with either a response similar to MPA alone or a cyclical change in production, achieving maximal rates of 190-290 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day. Cultures in which RLX alone induced high IGFBP-1 high production were obtained from endometrium during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. In cultures exhibiting high rates of immunoreactive IGFBP-1 production, the protein represented their major secretory protein product. This was confirmed by ({sup 35}S)methionine incorporation and the presence of IGFBP-1 as the predominant protein in serum-free culture medium.

  16. Exposure to phenanthrene and depuration: Changes on gene transcription, enzymatic activity and lipid peroxidation in gill of scallops Nodipecten nodosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Rômi S; Trevisan, Rafael; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Wendt, Nestor; Mattos, Jacó J; Lima, Daína; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Mello, Álvaro C P; Zacchi, Flávia L; Serrano, Miguel A S; Gomes, Carlos H A M; Bícego, Márcia C; Almeida, Eduardo A de; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the mechanism of phenanthrene (PHE) biotransformation and related cellular responses in bivalves can be an important tool to elucidate the risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic organisms. In the present study it was analyzed the transcriptional levels of 13 biotransformation genes related to cytochrome P450 (CYP), glutathione S-transferase (GST), sulfotransferase (SULT), flavin-containing monooxygenase and fatty acid-binding proteins by qPCR in gill of scallops Nodipecten nodosus exposed for 24 or 96h to 50 or 200μgL(-1) PHE (equivalent to 0.28 and 1.12μM, respectively), followed by depuration in clean water for 96h (DEP). Likewise, it was quantified the activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), GST and levels of lipid peroxidation. Increased transcriptional levels of CYP2UI-like, CYP2D20-like, CYP3A11-like, GSTomega-like, SULT1B1-like genes were detected in organisms exposed to PHE for 24 or 96h. In parallel, GR and GPX activities increased after 96h exposure to 200μgL(-1) PHE and G6PDH activity increased after 24h exposure to 50μgL(-1) PHE. This enhancement of antioxidant and phase I and II biotransformation systems may be related to the 2.7 and 12.5 fold increases in PHE bioaccumulation after 96h exposure to 50 and 200μgL(-1) PHE, respectively. Interestingly, DEP caused reestablishment of GPX and GR activity, as well as to the transcript levels of all upregulated biotransformation genes (except for SULT1B1-like). Bioaccumulated PHE levels decreased 2.5-2.9 fold after depuration, although some biochemical and molecular modifications were still present. Lipid peroxidation levels remained lower in animals exposed to 200μgL(-1) PHE for 24h and DEP. These data indicate that N. nodosus is able to induce an antioxidant and biotransformation-related response to PHE exposure, counteracting its toxicity, and DEP can

  17. The transcription factor ATF7 mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced epigenetic changes in macrophages involved in innate immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Maekawa, Toshio; Zhu, Yujuan; Renard-Guillet, Claire; Chatton, Bruno; Inoue, Kentaro; Uchiyama, Takeru; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Takuji; Ohno, Naohito; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2015-10-01

    Immunological memory is thought to be mediated exclusively by lymphocytes. However, enhanced innate immune responses caused by a previous infection increase protection against reinfection, which suggests the presence of innate immunological memory. Here we identified an important role for the stress-response transcription factor ATF7 in innate immunological memory. ATF7 suppressed a group of genes encoding factors involved in innate immunity in macrophages by recruiting the histone H3K9 dimethyltransferase G9a. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics bacterial infection, induced phosphorylation of ATF7 via the kinase p38, which led to the release of ATF7 from chromatin and a decrease in repressive histone H3K9me2 marks. A partially disrupted chromatin structure and increased basal expression of target genes were maintained for long periods, which enhanced resistance to pathogens. ATF7 might therefore be important in controlling memory in cells of the innate immune system. PMID:26322480

  18. Changes in the Expression of Transcription Factors Involved in Modulating the Expression of EPO-R in Activated Human CD4-Positive Lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A Lisowska

    Full Text Available We have recently described the presence of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R on CD4(+ lymphocytes and demonstrated that its expression increases during their activation, reaching a level reported to be typical for erythroid progenitors. This observation suggests that EPO-R expression is modulated during lymphocyte activation, which may be important for the cells' function. Here we investigated whether the expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors is correlated with the expression of EPO-R in human CD4(+ lymphocytes stimulated with monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody. The expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors in CD4(+ cells was estimated before and after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody by Western Blot and flow cytometry. The expression of EPO-R was measured using real-time PCR and flow cytometry. There was no change in the expression of GATA1 and GATA3 in CD4(+ lymphocytes after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody. However, stimulation resulted in the significantly increased expression of the Sp1 factor. CD4(+ lymphocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody exhibited an increase in both the expression level of EPOR gene and the number of EPO-R molecules on the cells' surface, the latter being significantly correlated with the increased expression of Sp1. Sp1 is noted to be the single transcription factor among the ones studied whose level changes as a result of CD4(+ lymphocyte stimulation. It seems that Sp1 may significantly affect the number of EPO-R molecules present on the surface of activated CD4(+ lymphocytes.

  19. Functional roles and clinical values of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 in different types of cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G(o)k(c)e Güllü; Sevgi Karabulut; Mustafa Akkiprik

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) are critical regulators of the mitogenic activity of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs).IGFBP5,one of these IGFBPs,has special structural features,including a nuclear transport domain,heparin-binding motif,and IGF/extracellular matrix/acid-labile subunit-binding sites.Furthermore,IGFBP5 has several functional effects on carcinogenesis and even normal cell processes,such as cell growth,death,motility,and tissue remodeling.These biological effects are sometimes related with IGF (IGF-dependent effects) and sometimes not (IGF-independent effects).The functional role of IGFBP5 is most likely determined in a cell-type and tissue-type specific manner but also depends on cell context,especially in terms of the diversity of interacting proteins and the potential for nuclear localization.Clinical findings show that IGFBP5 has the potential to be a useful clinical biomarker for predicting response to therapy and clinical outcome of cancer patients.In this review,we summarize the functional diversity and clinical importance of IGFBP5 in different types of cancers.

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  1. Production of functional human insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) using recombinant expression in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanscher, Anne Sofie Molsted; Williamson, Michael; Ebersole, Tasja Wainani; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) display many functions in humans including regulation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. The various roles of human IGFBPs make them attractive protein candidates in drug discovery. Structural and functional knowledge on human proteins with therapeutic relevance is needed to design and process the next generation of protein therapeutics. In order to conduct structural and functional investigations large quantities of recombinant proteins are needed. However, finding a suitable recombinant production system for proteins such as full-length human IGFBPs, still remains a challenge. Here we present a mammalian HEK293 expression method suitable for over-expression of secretory full-length human IGFBP-1 to -7. Protein purification of full-length human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -5 was conducted using a two-step chromatography procedure and the final protein yields were between 1 and 12mg protein per liter culture media. The recombinant IGFBPs contained PTMs and exhibited high-affinity interactions with their natural ligands IGF-1 and IGF-2. PMID:25448590

  2. A 4-deoxy analogue of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine inhibits heparan sulphate expression and growth factor binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijk, Xander M.R. van; Oosterhof, Arie [Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Broek, Sebastiaan A.M.W. van den [Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Griffioen, Arjan W. [Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Centre, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dam, Gerdy B. ten [Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rutjes, Floris P.J.T.; Delft, Floris L. van [Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kuppevelt, Toin H. van, E-mail: A.vankuppevelt@ncmls.ru.nl [Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 26-28, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-09-10

    Heparan sulphate (HS) is a long, linear polysaccharide, which has a basic backbone of -{beta}1-4GlcA-{alpha}1-4GlcNAc- units. The involvement of HS in many steps of tumourigenesis, including growth and angiogenesis, makes it an appealing target for cancer therapy. To target the biosynthesis of HS by interfering with its chain elongation, a 4-deoxy analogue of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (4-deoxy-GlcNAc) was synthesized. Using immunocytochemistry and agarose gel electrophoresis it was shown that incubation with the 4-deoxysugar resulted in a dose dependent reduction of HS expression of MV3 melanoma cells, 1 mM resulting in an almost nullified HS expression. The parent sugar GlcNAc had no effect. 4-deoxysugar treated cells were viable and proliferated at the same rate as control cells. Other glycan structures appeared to be only mildly affected, as staining by various lectins was generally not or only modestly inhibited. At 1 mM of the 4-deoxysugar, the capacity of cells to bind the HS-dependent pro-angiogenic growth factors FGF-2 and VEGF was greatly compromised. Using an in vitro angiogenesis assay, 4-deoxysugar treated endothelial cells showed a sharp reduction of FGF-2-induced sprout formation. Combined, these data indicate that an inexpensive, easily synthesized, water-soluble monosaccharide analogue can interfere with HS expression and pro-angiogenic growth factor binding.

  3. Advance on Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 in Lung Cancer and Other Solid Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Weiqin; Lu Kaihua

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence has revealed that IGF signalling plays a key role in cellular proliferation, survival, differentiation and senescence. Dysregulation of this signalling pathway is related to the development and progression of many human diseases, including cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is reported to be a modulator of the action of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), whereas IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-2 on cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and mobility have been revealed not only during the embryonic state but also in the pathological state of cancer. IGFBP-2 is involved in the genesis and progress of various malignancies including lung cancer. Recent ifndings show in many pre-clinical trials that IGFBP-2 may contribute to the transformation and progression of lung cancer. These studies suggest that IGFBP-2 may be a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. In this review, we provide an overview on IGFBP-2, review corresponding studies investigating the role of IGFBP-2 as a cancer target in multiple tumors and discuss its possible mechanism in lung cancer.

  4. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF SERUM INSULIN—LIKE GROWTH FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN—3 IN CHILDREN WITH OR WITHOUT GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃舒文; 史轶蘩; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the value of serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels in differential diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency(GHD).Methods:To measure serum IGFBP-3 levels by RIA in normal children and adolescents,GHD children and short-stature children without (GHD).Methods:To measure serum IGFBP-3 levels by RIA in normal children and adolescents,GHD children and short-stature children without GHD.Results.Serum level of IGFBP-3 in 129 children with untreated GHD and with no pubertal development was 1.6±0.9mg/L,which was less than that in normal group of the same age,but overlapped with the normal children in Tanner stage I.After six-month treatment with recombinant human growth hormone(rhGH),serum level of IGFBP-3 in 59 GHD significantly increased from 1.3±0.7mg/L to 2.7±0.9mg/L,accompanied by an increase of body heights,growth velocities and serum level of IGF-1.Serum level of IGFBP-3 in 55 shortstature children without GHD was 3.3±2.2mg/L,which was not significantly different from that in normal group.Conclusion:Serum IGFBP-3 level can reflect the status of GH secretion in children with GHD and is a useful marker for differential diagnosis of GHD.

  5. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF SERUM INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN-3 IN CHILDREN WITH OR WITHOUT GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃舒文; 史轶蘩; 邓洁英

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To study the value of serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels in differential diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Methods. To measure serum IGFBP-3 levels by RIA in normal children and adolescents, GHD children and short-stature children without GHD. Results. Serum level of IGFBP-3 in 129 children with untreated GHD and with no pubertal development was 1.6± 0.9 mg/L, which was less than that in normal group of the same age, but overlapped with the normal children in Tanner stage I. After six -month treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), serum level of IGFBP-3 in 59 GHD significantly increased from 1.3± 0.7 mg/L to 2.7± 0.9 mg/L, accompanied by an increase of body heights, growth velocities and serum level of IGF-1. Serum level of IGFBP-3 in 55 short-stature children without GHD was 3.3± 2.2 mg/L, which was not significantly different from that in normal group. Conclusion. Serum IGFBP-3 level can reflect the status of GH secretion in children with GHD and is a useful marker for differential diagnosis of GHD.

  6. A 4-deoxy analogue of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine inhibits heparan sulphate expression and growth factor binding in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heparan sulphate (HS) is a long, linear polysaccharide, which has a basic backbone of -β1-4GlcA-α1-4GlcNAc- units. The involvement of HS in many steps of tumourigenesis, including growth and angiogenesis, makes it an appealing target for cancer therapy. To target the biosynthesis of HS by interfering with its chain elongation, a 4-deoxy analogue of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (4-deoxy-GlcNAc) was synthesized. Using immunocytochemistry and agarose gel electrophoresis it was shown that incubation with the 4-deoxysugar resulted in a dose dependent reduction of HS expression of MV3 melanoma cells, 1 mM resulting in an almost nullified HS expression. The parent sugar GlcNAc had no effect. 4-deoxysugar treated cells were viable and proliferated at the same rate as control cells. Other glycan structures appeared to be only mildly affected, as staining by various lectins was generally not or only modestly inhibited. At 1 mM of the 4-deoxysugar, the capacity of cells to bind the HS-dependent pro-angiogenic growth factors FGF-2 and VEGF was greatly compromised. Using an in vitro angiogenesis assay, 4-deoxysugar treated endothelial cells showed a sharp reduction of FGF-2-induced sprout formation. Combined, these data indicate that an inexpensive, easily synthesized, water-soluble monosaccharide analogue can interfere with HS expression and pro-angiogenic growth factor binding.

  7. Expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 in gastric carcinoma and its relationship with cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Hui Shi; Xiao-Qun Zhu; Guo-Hai Zhao; Ya-Bin Xia; Yi-Sheng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) in gastric carcinoma and its clinical significance and to explore its relationship with cell proliferation.METHODS: Expressions of IGFBP-2 and Ki-67 in 118cases of gastric carcinoma and 40 cases of normal gastric mucosa were detected by EnVision immunohistochemical technique.RESULTS: Expression of IGFBP-2 in gastric carcinoma was higher than that in normal gastric mucosa (P 0.05). Fxpression of IGFBP-2 in aclvancecl gastric carcinoma was higher than that in early gastric carcinoma (P < 0.05). Expression of IGFBP-2 in gastric carcinoma with lymph node metastasis was higher than that without lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01).IGFBP-2 expression was a positively related to the clinical stage of gastric carcinoma (P < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between IGFBP-2 and Ki-67 (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: IGFBP-2 may be involved in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric carcinoma by promoting cell proliferation.

  8. Serum Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients: Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontogeorgis, Kostas; Nena, Evangelia; Papanas, Nikolaos; Xanthoudaki, Maria; Hatzizisi, Olga; Kyriazis, Georgios; Tsara, Venetia; Maltezos, Efstratios; Froudarakis, Marios; Steiropoulos, Paschalis

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Hypoxia, a major feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), modifies Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels, which contribute to atherogenesis and occurrence of cardiovascular (CV) events. We assessed and compared serum levels of VEGF and IGFBP-3 in newly diagnosed OSA patients and controls, to explore associations with anthropometric and sleep parameters and to study the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on these levels. Materials and Methods: Serum levels of VEGF and IGFBP-3 were measured in 65 OSA patients and 31 age- and body mass index- matched controls. In OSA patients, measurements were repeated after 6 months of CPAP therapy. All participants were non-smokers, without any comorbidities or systemic medication use. Results: At baseline, serum VEGF levels in OSA patients were higher compared with controls (p<0.001), while IGFBP-3 levels were lower (1.41±0.56 vs. 1.61±0.38 μg/ml, p=0.039). VEGF levels correlated with apnea-hypopnea index (r=0.336, p=0.001) and oxygen desaturation index (r=0.282, p=0.007). After 6 months on CPAP treatment, VEGF levels decreased in OSA patients (p<0.001), while IGFBP-3 levels increased (p<0.001). Conclusion: In newly diagnosed OSA patients, serum levels of VEGF are elevated, while IGFBP-3 levels are low. After 6 months of CPAP treatment these levels change. These results may reflect an increased CV risk in untreated OSA patients, which is ameliorated after CPAP therapy. PMID:27006717

  9. Chromatin structure near transcriptionally active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitive domains are the most prominent features of transcriptionally active chromatin. In the case of the β/sup A/-globin gene, it seems likely that two or more protein factors are capable of binding to the DNA so tightly that the nucleosome is prevented from binding. We have shown that nucleosomes, once bound in the assembly process in vitro, cannot be displaced. The interaction of the 5S gene transcription factor TFIIIA with its target DNA also is blocked by histones, and it has been suggested that the activation of the gene must occur during replication, before histones are reassembled on the DNA. We suppose that a similar mechanism may govern the binding of the hypersensitivity factors. It should be noted that nucleosomes are excluded not only from the sites to which the factors bind, but also from the regions between the two domains and at either side. 12 refs., 6 figs

  10. Rice osa-miR171c Mediates Phase Change from Vegetative to Reproductive Development and Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance by Repressing Four OsHAM Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Fan

    Full Text Available Phase change from vegetative to reproductive development is one of the critical developmental steps in plants, and it is regulated by both environmental and endogenous factors. The maintenance of shoot apical meristem (SAM identity, miRNAs and flowering integrators are involved in this phase change process. Here, we report that the miRNA osa-miR171c targets four GRAS (GAI-RGA-SCR plant-specific transcription factors (OsHAM1, OsHAM2, OsHAM3, and OsHAM4 to control the floral transition and maintenance of SAM indeterminacy in rice (Oryza sativa. We characterized a rice T-DNA insertion delayed heading (dh mutant, where the expression of OsMIR171c gene is up-regulated. This mutant showed pleiotropic phenotypic defects, including especially prolonged vegetative phase, delayed heading date, and bigger shoot apex. Parallel expression analysis showed that osa-miR171c controlled the expression change of four OsHAMs in the shoot apex during floral transition, and responded to light. In the dh mutant, the expression of the juvenile-adult phase change negative regulator osa-miR156 was up-regulated, expression of the flowering integrators Hd3a and RFT1 was inhibited, and expression of FON4 negative regulators involved in the maintenance of SAM indeterminacy was also inhibited. From these data, we propose that the inhibition of osa-miR171c-mediated OsHAM transcription factors regulates the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive development by maintaining SAM indeterminacy and inhibiting flowering integrators.

  11. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  12. Temperature dependent changes in cocaine- and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) peptide in the brain of tadpole, Sylvirana temporalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewale, Swapnil A; Gaupale, Tekchand C; Bhargava, Shobha

    2015-09-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CARTp) has emerged as a novel neurotransmitter in the brain. Although the physiological role of the peptide has been intensely investigated in mammals, its role in amphibians has not been investigated. In the present study, an attempt has been undertaken to study the expression of CART in the tadpole brain of frog Sylvirana temporalis, subjected to thermal stress. Cells with strong CART-immunoreactivity were observed in the nucleus preoptic area (NPO) of tadpoles exposed to high temperature (37±2°C) as compared to those in the tadpoles exposed to low (12±2°C) and normal (24±2°C) temperatures. In the ventromedial thalamic nucleus (VM) and nucleus posterocentralis thalami (NPC), moderate CART-ir cells were observed in the control groups while number of cells and intensity of immunoreactivity was increased in tadpoles at low and high temperatures. In the nucleus infundibularis ventralis (NIV) and raphe nucleus (RA), CART immunoreactivity increased in the low as well as high temperature treated groups. Intensely stained CART cells were observed in the pituitary of tadpoles exposed to high temperature as compared to low temperature and control groups. We suggest that CART system in the brain and pituitary of tadpole may play a very important role in mediating responses to temperature variations in the environment. PMID:24983774

  13. Transcriptional reprogramming and phenotypical changes associated with growth of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in cabbage xylem sap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Noël, Laurent D; SanCristobal, Magali; Danoun, Saida; Becker, Anke; Soreau, Paul; Arlat, Matthieu; Lauber, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Xylem sap (XS) is the first environment that xylem phytopathogens meet in planta during the early infection steps. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the causative agent of Brassicaceae black rot, colonizes the plant xylem vessels to ensure its multiplication and dissemination. Besides suppression of plant immunity, Xcc has to adapt its metabolism to exploit plant-derived nutrients present in XS. To study Xcc behaviour in the early infection steps, we used cabbage XS to analyse bacterial growth. Mineral and organic composition of XS were determined. Significant growth of Xcc in XS was allowed by the rapid catabolism of amino acids, sugars and organic acids, and it was accompanied by the formation of biofilm-like structures. Transcriptome analysis of Xcc cultivated in XS using cDNA microarrays revealed a XS-specific transcriptional reprogramming compared to minimal or rich media. More specifically, up-regulation of genes encoding transporters such as TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs), that could be associated with nutrient acquisition and detoxification, was observed. In agreement with the aggregation phenotype, expression of genes important for twitching motility and adhesion was up-regulated in XS. Taken together, our data show specific responses of Xcc to colonization of cabbage XS that could be important for the pathogenesis process and establish XS as a model medium to study mechanisms important for the early infection events. PMID:24784488

  14. Transcriptional and Bioinformatic Analysis Provide a Relationship between Host Response Changes to Marek’s Disease Viruses Infection and an Integrated Long Terminal Repeat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eCui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available GX0101, Marek’s disease virus (MDV strain with a long terminal repeat (LTR insert of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV, was isolated from CVI988/Rispens vaccinated birds showing tumors. We have constructed a LTR deleted strain GX0101∆LTR in our previous study. To compare the host responses to GX0101 and GX0101∆LTR, chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF cells were infected with two MDV strains and a gene-chip containing chicken genome was employed to examine gene transcription changes in host cells in the present study. Of the 42 368 chicken transcripts on the chip, there were 2199 genes that differentially expressed in CEF infected with GX0101 compared to GX0101∆LTR significantly. Differentially expressed genes were distributed to 25 possible gene networks according to their intermolecular connections and were annotated to 56 pathways. The insertion of REV LTR showed the greatest influence on cancer formation and metastasis, followed with immune changes, atherosclerosis and nervous system disorders in MDV-infected CEF cells. Based on these bio functions, GX0101 infection was predicated with a greater growth and survival inhibition but lower oncogenicity in chickens than GX0101∆LTR, at least in the acute phase of infection. In summary, the insertion of REV LTR altered the expression of host genes in response to MDV infection, possibly resulting in novel phenotypic properties in chickens. Our study has provided the evidence of retroviral insertional changes of host responses to herpesvirus infection for the first time, which will promote to elucidation of the possible relationship between the LTR insertion and the observed phenotypes.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 inhibition of prostate cancer growth involves suppression of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Lee, K-W; Anzo, M; Zhang, B; Zi, X; Tao, Y; Shiry, L; Pollak, M; Lin, S; Cohen, P

    2007-03-15

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a multifunctional protein that induces apoptosis utilizing both insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We investigated the effects of IGFBP-3 on tumor growth and angiogenesis utilizing a human CaP xenograft model in severe-combined immunodeficiency mice. A 16-day course of IGFBP-3 injections reduced tumor size and increased apoptosis and also led to a reduction in the number of vessels stained with CD31. In vitro, IGFBP-3 inhibited both vascular endothelial growth factor- and IGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells vascular network formation in a matrigel assay. This action is primarily IGF independent as shown by studies utilizing the non-IGFBP-binding IGF-1 analog Long-R3. Additionally, we used a fibroblast growth factor-enriched matrigel-plug assay and chick allantoic membrane assays to show that IGFBP-3 has potent antiangiogenic actions in vivo. Finally, overexpression of IGFBP-3 or the non-IGF-binding GGG-IGFBP-3 mutant in Zebrafish embryos confirmed that both IGFBP-3 and the non-IGF-binding mutant inhibited vessel formation in vivo, indicating that the antiangiogenic effect of IGFBP-3 is an IGF-independent phenomenon. Together, these studies provide the first evidence that IGFBP-3 has direct, IGF-independent inhibitory effects on angiogenesis providing an additional mechanism by which it exerts its tumor suppressive effects and further supporting its development for clinical use in the therapy of patients with prostate cancer. PMID:16983336

  16. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 affects osteogenic efficacy on dental implants in rat mandible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattarai, Govinda; Lee, Young-Hee [Department of Oral Biochemistry, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min-Ho [Department of Dental Materials, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Il-Song [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials, Development and Institute of Biodegradable Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun, E-mail: yihokn@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Oral Biochemistry, Institute of Oral Bioscience, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in bone cells and its utilization in dental implants have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the osteogenic efficacy of chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) conjugated with IGFBP-3 coated titanium (Ti) implants. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with IGFBP-3 plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over Ti surfaces, and cells were seeded on coated surfaces. For in vitro analysis the expression of different proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting. For in vivo analysis, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were installed in rat mandibles. Four weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (μCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase staining. In vitro overexpressed Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated Ti surfaces was associated with activation of extracellular signal related kinase (ERK), inhibition of the stress activated protein c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and 7 compared to control. Further, in vivo, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced osteoclastogenesis molecules, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules including BMP2/7 and osteopontin (OPN). The μCT analysis demonstrated that IGFBP-3 increased the volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 5; p < 0.05). These results support the view that IGFBP-3 overexpression diminishes osteoclastogenesis and enhances osteogenesis of Ti implants, and can serve as a potent molecule for the development of good implantation. - Highlights: • Chitosan gold nanoparticles were conjugated with IGFBP-3 and coated onto surface of the titanium implants for gene delivery to bone. • Implants were inserted in rat mandible for 4 weeks. • Parameters studied: histopathology and radiology.

  17. Assessing the clinical utility of measuring Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in tissues and sera of melanoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley Michael T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins (IGFBPs have been investigated as potential biomarkers in several types of tumors. In this study, we examined both IGFBP-3 and -4 levels in tissues and sera of melanoma patients representing different stages of melanoma progression. Methods The study cohort consisted of 132 melanoma patients (primary, n = 72; metastatic, n = 60; 64 Male, 68 Female; Median Age = 56 prospectively enrolled in the New York University School of Medicine Interdisciplinary Melanoma Cooperative Group (NYU IMCG between August 2002 and December 2006. We assessed tumor-expression and circulating sera levels of IGFBP-3 and -4 using immunohistochemistry and ELISA assays. Correlations with clinicopathologic parameters were examined using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and Spearman-rank correlation coefficients. Results Median IGFBP-4 tumor expression was significantly greater in primary versus metastatic patients (70% versus 10%, p = 0.01 A trend for greater median IGFBP-3 sera concentration was observed in metastatic versus primary patients (4.9 μg/ml vs. 3.4 μg/ml, respectively, p = 0.09. However, sera levels fell within a normal range for IGFBP-3. Neither IGFBP-3 nor -4 correlated with survival in this subset of patients. Conclusion Decreased IGFBP-4 tumor expression might be a step in the progression from primary to metastatic melanoma. Our data lend support to a recently-described novel tumor suppressor role of secreting IGFBPs in melanoma. However, data do not support the clinical utility of measuring levels of IGFBP-3 and -4 in sera of melanoma patients.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 affects osteogenic efficacy on dental implants in rat mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in bone cells and its utilization in dental implants have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the osteogenic efficacy of chitosan gold nanoparticles (Ch-GNPs) conjugated with IGFBP-3 coated titanium (Ti) implants. Ch-GNPs were conjugated with IGFBP-3 plasmid DNA through a coacervation process. Conjugation was cast over Ti surfaces, and cells were seeded on coated surfaces. For in vitro analysis the expression of different proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting. For in vivo analysis, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were installed in rat mandibles. Four weeks post-implantation, mandibles were examined by microcomputed tomography (μCT), immunohistochemistry, hematoxylin & eosin and tartrate resistance acid phosphatase staining. In vitro overexpressed Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated Ti surfaces was associated with activation of extracellular signal related kinase (ERK), inhibition of the stress activated protein c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and 7 compared to control. Further, in vivo, Ch-GNP/IGFBP-3 coated implants were associated with inhibition of implant induced osteoclastogenesis molecules, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and enhanced expression of osteogenic molecules including BMP2/7 and osteopontin (OPN). The μCT analysis demonstrated that IGFBP-3 increased the volume of newly formed bone surrounding the implants compared to control (n = 5; p < 0.05). These results support the view that IGFBP-3 overexpression diminishes osteoclastogenesis and enhances osteogenesis of Ti implants, and can serve as a potent molecule for the development of good implantation. - Highlights: • Chitosan gold nanoparticles were conjugated with IGFBP-3 and coated onto surface of the titanium implants for gene delivery to bone. • Implants were inserted in rat mandible for 4 weeks. • Parameters studied: histopathology and radiology.

  19. Zinc-finger transcription factors are associated with guanine quadruplex motifs in human, chimpanzee, mouse and rat promoters genome-wide

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, V. K.; Baral, A.; Kumar, P.; D. Saha; Chowdhury, S.

    2011-01-01

    Function of non-B DNA structures are poorly understood though several bioinformatics studies predict role of the G-quadruplex DNA structure in transcription. Earlier, using transcriptome profiling we found evidence of widespread G-quadruplex-mediated gene regulation. Herein, we asked whether potential G-quadruplex (PG4) motifs associate with transcription factors (TF). This was analyzed using 220 position weight matrices [designated as transcription factor binding sites (TFBS)], representing ...

  20. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  1. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Christopher A; Cannady, Kimberly R; Hoffman, Jackson A; Trotter, Kevin W; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Bennett, Brian D; Burkholder, Adam B; Burd, Craig J; Fargo, David C; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  2. Noncoding RNAs: Regulators of the Mammalian Transcription Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidem, Tess M; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2016-06-19

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is required to produce mRNAs and some noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) within mammalian cells. This coordinated process is precisely regulated by multiple factors, including many recently discovered ncRNAs. In this perspective, we will discuss newly identified ncRNAs that facilitate DNA looping, regulate transcription factor binding, mediate promoter-proximal pausing of Pol II, and/or interact with Pol II to modulate transcription. Moreover, we will discuss new roles for ncRNAs, as well as a novel Pol II RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that regulates an ncRNA inhibitor of transcription. As the multifaceted nature of ncRNAs continues to be revealed, we believe that many more ncRNA species and functions will be discovered. PMID:26920110

  3. β-Catenin transcriptional activity is minimal in canine osteosarcoma and its targeted inhibition results in minimal changes to cell line behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskun, Caroline M; Stein, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive malignancy associated with poor outcomes. Therapeutic improvements are likely to develop from an improved understanding of signalling pathways contributing to OS development and progression. The Wnt signalling pathway is of interest for its role in osteoblast differentiation, its dysregulation in numerous cancer types, and the relative frequency of cytoplasmic accumulation of β-catenin in canine OS. This study aimed to determine the biological impact of inhibiting canonical Wnt signalling in canine OS, by utilizing either β-catenin siRNA or a dominant-negative T-cell factor (TCF) construct. There were no consistent, significant changes in cell line behaviour with either method compared to parental cell lines. Interestingly, β-catenin transcriptional activity was three-fold higher in normal canine primary osteoblasts compared to canine OS cell lines. These results suggest canonical Wnt signalling is minimally active in canine OS and its targeted inhibition is not a relevant therapeutic strategy. PMID:24256430

  4. Prenatal exposure to dietary fat induces changes in the transcriptional factors, TEF and YAP, which may stimulate differentiation of peptide neurons in rat hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinning Poon

    Full Text Available Gestational exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD stimulates the differentiation of orexigenic peptide-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus of offspring. To examine possible mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon, this study investigated the transcriptional factor, transcription enhancer factor-1 (TEF, and co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP, which when inactivated stimulate neuronal differentiation. In rat embryos and postnatal offspring prenatally exposed to a HFD compared to chow, changes in hypothalamic TEF and YAP and their relationship to the orexigenic peptide, enkephalin (ENK, were measured. The HFD offspring at postnatal day 15 (P15 exhibited in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus a significant reduction in YAP mRNA and protein, and increased levels of inactive and total TEF protein, with no change in mRNA. Similarly, HFD-exposed embryos at embryonic day 19 (E19 showed in whole hypothalamus significantly decreased levels of YAP mRNA and protein and TEF mRNA, and increased levels of inactive TEF protein, suggesting that HFD inactivates TEF and YAP. This was accompanied by increased density and fluorescence intensity of ENK neurons. A close relationship between TEF and ENK was suggested by the finding that TEF co-localizes with this peptide in hypothalamic neurons and HFD reduced the density of TEF/ENK co-labeled neurons, even while the number and fluorescence intensity of single-labeled TEF neurons were increased. Increased YAP inactivity by HFD was further evidenced by a decrease in number and fluorescence intensity of YAP-containing neurons, although the density of YAP/ENK co-labeled neurons was unaltered. Genetic knockdown of TEF or YAP stimulated ENK expression in hypothalamic neurons, supporting a close relationship between these transcription factors and neuropeptide. These findings suggest that prenatal HFD exposure inactivates both hypothalamic TEF and YAP, by either decreasing their levels or increasing their inactive

  5. Genome-wide transcription analysis of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Clinal variation in quantitative traits is widespread, but its genetic basis awaits identification. Drosophila melanogaster shows adaptive, clinal variation in traits such as body size along latitudinal gradients on multiple continents. To investigate genome wide transcription differentiation between North and South that might contribute to the clinal phenotypic variation, we compared RNA expression patterns during development of D. melanogaster from tropical northern and temperate southern populations using whole genome tiling arrays. We found that genes that were differentially expressed between the cline ends were generally associated with metabolism and growth, and experimental alteration of expression of a sample of them generally resulted in altered body size in the predicted direction, sometimes significantly so. We further identified the serpent (srp transcription factor binding sites to be enriched near genes up-regulated in expression in the south. Analysis of clinal populations revealed a significant cline in the expression level of srp. Experimental over-expression of srp increased body size, as predicted from its clinal expression pattern, suggesting that it may be involved in regulating adaptive clinal variation in Drosophila. This study identified a handful of genes that contributed to clinal phenotypic variation through altered gene expression level, yet misexpression of individual gene led to modest body size change.

  6. In vivo delivery of transcription factors with multifunctional oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Rafi, Mohammad; Wang, Xiaojian; Aran, Kiana; Feng, Xuli; Lo Sterzo, Carlo; Tang, Richard; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Murthy, Niren

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutics based on transcription factors have the potential to revolutionize medicine but have had limited clinical success as a consequence of delivery problems. The delivery of transcription factors is challenging because it requires the development of a delivery vehicle that can complex transcription factors, target cells and stimulate endosomal disruption, with minimal toxicity. Here, we present a multifunctional oligonucleotide, termed DARTs (DNA assembled recombinant transcription factors), which can deliver transcription factors with high efficiency in vivo. DARTs are composed of an oligonucleotide that contains a transcription-factor-binding sequence and hydrophobic membrane-disruptive chains that are masked by acid-cleavable galactose residues. DARTs have a unique molecular architecture, which allows them to bind transcription factors, trigger endocytosis in hepatocytes, and stimulate endosomal disruption. The DARTs have enhanced uptake in hepatocytes as a result of their galactose residues and can disrupt endosomes efficiently with minimal toxicity, because unmasking of their hydrophobic domains selectively occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. We show that DARTs can deliver the transcription factor nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the liver, catalyse the transcription of Nrf2 downstream genes, and rescue mice from acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  7. Insulin resistance induced by physical inactivity is associated with multiple transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, A C; Sonne, M P; Højbjerre, L;

    2010-01-01

    of insulin resistance, bed rest resulted in a paradoxically increased response to acute insulin stimulation in the general expression of genes, particularly those involved in inflammation and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress. Furthermore, bed rest changed gene expressions of several insulin...... resistance and diabetes candidate genes. We also observed a trend toward increased PPARGC1A DNA methylation after bed rest. We conclude that impaired expression of PPARGC1A and other genes involved in mitochondrial function as well as a paradoxically increased response to insulin of genes involved in...

  8. Transcriptional and metabolic changes associated to the infection by Fusarium verticillioides in maize inbreds with contrasting ear rot resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A; Fauguel, Carolina M; Tronconi, Marcos A; Casati, Paula; Presello, Daniel A; Andreo, Carlos S

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot and grain mycotoxins in maize (Zea mays L.), which are harmful to human and animal health. Breeding and growing less susceptible plant genotypes is one alternative to reduce these detrimental effects. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms would facilitate the implementation of strategic molecular agriculture to breeding of resistant germplasm. Our aim was to identify genes and metabolites that may be related to the Fusarium reaction in a resistant (L4637) and a susceptible (L4674) inbred. Gene expression data were obtained from microarray hybridizations in inoculated and non-inoculated kernels from both inbreds. Fungal inoculation did not produce considerable changes in gene expression and metabolites in L4637. Defense-related genes changed in L4674 kernels, responding specifically to the pathogen infection. These results indicate that L4637 resistance may be mainly due to constitutive defense mechanisms preventing fungal infection. These mechanisms seem to be poorly expressed in L4674; and despite the inoculation activate a defense response; this is not enough to prevent the disease progress in this susceptible line. Through this study, a global view of differential genes expressed and metabolites accumulated during resistance and susceptibility to F. verticillioides inoculation has been obtained, giving additional information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease in maize. PMID:23637860

  9. Transcriptional and metabolic changes associated to the infection by Fusarium verticillioides in maize inbreds with contrasting ear rot resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria A Campos-Bermudez

    Full Text Available Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot and grain mycotoxins in maize (Zea mays L., which are harmful to human and animal health. Breeding and growing less susceptible plant genotypes is one alternative to reduce these detrimental effects. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms would facilitate the implementation of strategic molecular agriculture to breeding of resistant germplasm. Our aim was to identify genes and metabolites that may be related to the Fusarium reaction in a resistant (L4637 and a susceptible (L4674 inbred. Gene expression data were obtained from microarray hybridizations in inoculated and non-inoculated kernels from both inbreds. Fungal inoculation did not produce considerable changes in gene expression and metabolites in L4637. Defense-related genes changed in L4674 kernels, responding specifically to the pathogen infection. These results indicate that L4637 resistance may be mainly due to constitutive defense mechanisms preventing fungal infection. These mechanisms seem to be poorly expressed in L4674; and despite the inoculation activate a defense response; this is not enough to prevent the disease progress in this susceptible line. Through this study, a global view of differential genes expressed and metabolites accumulated during resistance and susceptibility to F. verticillioides inoculation has been obtained, giving additional information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease in maize.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in serum and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for serum level of human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and study serum IGFBP-3 levels in normal adults and some pathophysiological states. Methods: IGFBP-3 antibody was raised and iodinated IGFBP-3 was made with lactoperoxidase as a tracer, then set up the RIA for human serum IGFBP-3. Serum levels of normal adults, patients suffered from acromegaly, growth hormone deficiency (GHD), liver cirrhosis and chronic renal failure (CRF) were tested. Results: The minimal detectable range of this IGFBP-3 RIA was (16.9 +- 2.4) μg/L. The affinity constant is 7.9 x 1010 L/mol, without cross-reactivity with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and human growth hormone (hGH). The mean rate of recovery was 98.7%, and the mean coefficients of variation for intra- and inter batch-assay were (7.8 +- 3.5)% and (10.8 +- 3.1)% respectively. The mean serum levels of IGFBP-3 in 88 normal adults were (3.1+- 0.5) mg/L (range 2.0-4.0 mg/L), while that in 49 active acromegalics were (16.8 +- 9.9) mg/L (range 5.6-42.8 mg/L) and in 19 CRF were (13.2 +- 3.6) mg/L (range 9.8-25.0 mg/L), none of them was overlapping the normal adult levels. The mean serum IGFBP-3 levels of 129 GHD and 18 liver cirrhosis were (1.6 +-0.9) mg/L (range 0.4-3.7 mg/L) and (2.4+-0.7) mg/L (range 1.2-3.7 mg/L) respectively, all of them were overlapping the lower level of serum IGFBP-3 of normal adults. Conclusions: This RIA is easy to use, can detect wide range of serum IGFBP-3, has high specificity and good reproducibility. Serum IGFBP-3 assay is very useful in diagnosis of the hyper-, normal and hypo-secretory state of hGH

  11. Excessive gestational weight gain and obesity contribute to altered expression of maternal insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro ZM

    2013-10-01

    0.01. However, serum IGFBP-3 expression in the EXCEED mothers was greater than that in the ADHERE group (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: These findings provide preliminary evidence suggesting that small deviations in IGFBP-regulated IGF bioavailability arising from excessive GWG/positive energy balance may affect adipocyte differentiation through subclinical insulin resistance. Keywords: gestational weight gain, insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, pregnancy, insulin sensitivity

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 is required for the regulation of rat oval cell proliferation and differentiation in the 2AAF/PHX model

    OpenAIRE

    Steiger-Luther, Nicole C; Darwiche, Houda; Oh, Seh-Hoon; Williams, Jennifer M.; PETERSEN, BRYON E.

    2010-01-01

    Oval cell-mediated liver regeneration is a highly complex process that involves the coordination of several signaling factors, chemokines and cytokines to allow for proper maintenance of the liver architecture. When hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited, an hepatic stem cell population, often referred to as “oval cells”, is activated to aid in liver regeneration. The function of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) during this process of oval cell activation is of particular...

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in cervical secretions in women with symptoms of preterm delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Amra Habibović,; Mirela Kapidžić; Igor Hudić; Zlatan Fatušić; Devleta Balić; Anela Latifagić

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate a value ofinsulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in cervicalsecretion in women with symptoms of preterm delivery and correlatethis test to the Bishop Score in prediction of a preterm delivery.The study group included 30 pregnant women with singletonpregnancy between 24 – 34 gestational weeks who were hospitalizedbecause of a threatening preterm delivery with intact fetalmembranes. A positive Actim Partus test (concentration ...

  14. The Association between Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 Levels and Clinical Prognosis in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Yaşar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent studies report that the insulin-like growth factor system may be involved in stroke pathogenesis, and is reported to increase myelination, maturation, cell proliferation and neuronal sprouting of the central nervous system. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the role of insulin-like growth factor system in ischemic stroke pathogenesis and its association with the prognosis by investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 levels in patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: : Sixty-eight patients and 20 healthy individuals were included to this study. Clinical evaluation of the patients was performed according to National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and functional outcomes were graded according to Modified Rankin Scale. Bamford classification was used for the clinical classification of ischemic strokes, and the TOAST system for etiological classification. Each patient's levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 were measured on the first, fifth and thirtieth day of ischemic stroke. RESULTS: Only the levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 on the day of 5 were significantly decreased compared to the control group. The decrease in IGF-1 values was associated with an increased risk of death and was accompanied by clinical worsening and decreased functionality. CONCLUSION: It has been concluded that the levels of investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 may affect mortality risk, clinical condition and functionality outcomes in patients presenting with ischemic stroke, and further studies are needed for the investigation of different effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 in future.

  15. Immunohistochemical expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in invasive breast cancers and ductal carcinoma in situ: implications for clinicopathology and patient outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Vestey, Sarah B; Perks, Claire M.; Sen, Chandan; Calder, Caroline J; Holly, Jeff MP; Winters, Zoe E

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) differentially modulates breast epithelial cell growth through insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-dependent and IGF-independent pathways and is a direct (IGF-independent) growth inhibitor as well as a mitogen that potentiates EGF (epidermal growth factor) and interacts with HER-2. Previously, high IGFBP-3 levels in breast cancers have been determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoradiometric assay methods. In v...

  16. Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn. on insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) to prevent overtraining syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ermita I.I. Ilyas; Neng T. Kartinah; Trinovita Andraini; Roman A. Goenarjo; Donna N. Kahandjak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excessive physical exercises (overtraining) can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). One of the indicators of overtraining syndrome is a decrease in insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3). Administration of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn., a powerful antioxidant, is expected to boost endogenous antioxidants, and thus prevents overtraining. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of H. sabdariffa on IGFBP-3 levels in rats under ”overtraining ...

  17. Clonal mosaic analysis of EMPTY PERICARP2 reveals nonredundant functions of the duplicated HEAT SHOCK FACTOR BINDING PROTEINs during maize shoot development.

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Suneng; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The paralogous maize proteins EMPTY PERICARP2 (EMP2) and HEAT SHOCK FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN2 (HSBP2) each contain a single recognizable motif: the coiled-coil domain. EMP2 and HSBP2 accumulate differentially during maize development and heat stress. Previous analyses revealed that EMP2 is required for regulation of heat shock protein (hsp) gene expression and also for embryo morphogenesis. Developmentally abnormal emp2 mutant embryos are aborted during early embryogenesis. To analyze EMP2 func...

  18. Urinary Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) • Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 (IGFBP7) Predicts Adverse Outcome in Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Westhoff, Jens H.; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Waldherr, Sina; Pöschl, Johannes; Teufel, Ulrike; Westhoff, Timm H.; Fichtner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background The G1 cell cycle inhibitors tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) have been identified as promising biomarkers for the prediction of adverse outcomes including renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality in critically ill adult patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the prognostic value of urinary TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 in neonatal and pediatric AKI for adverse outcome has not been investigated yet...

  19. Change of function of the wheat stress-responsive transcriptional repressor TaRAP2.1L by repressor motif modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, Amritha; Luang, Sukanya; Kumar, Manoj Yadav; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Eini, Omid; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Bazanova, Natalia; Li, Yuan; Yang, Nannan; Eliby, Serik; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2016-02-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses by changes in gene regulation, including stress-inducible expression of transcriptional activators and repressors. One of the best characterized families of drought-related transcription factors are dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) proteins, known as C-repeat binding factors (CBF). The wheat DREB/CBF gene TaRAP2.1L was isolated from drought-affected tissues using a dehydration-responsive element (DRE) as bait in a yeast one-hybrid screen. TaRAP2.1L is induced by elevated abscisic acid, drought and cold. A C-terminal ethylene responsive factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, known to be responsible for active repression of target genes, was identified in the TaRAP2.1L protein. It was found that TaRAP2.1L has a unique selectivity of DNA-binding, which differs from that of DREB activators. This binding selectivity remains unchanged in a TaRAP2.1L variant with an inactivated EAR motif (TaRAP2.1Lmut). To study the role of the TaRAP2.1L repressor activity associated with the EAR motif in planta, transgenic wheat overexpressing native or mutated TaRAP2.1L was generated. Overexpression of TaRAP2.1L under constitutive and stress-inducible promoters in transgenic wheat and barley led to dwarfism and decreased frost tolerance. By contrast, constitutive overexpression of the TaRAP2.1Lmut gene had little or no negative influence on wheat development or grain yield. Transgenic lines with the TaRAP2.1Lmut transgene had an enhanced ability to survive frost and drought. The improved stress tolerance is attributed to up-regulation of several stress-related genes known to be downstream genes of DREB/CBF activators. PMID:26150199

  20. Expression of SANT/HTH Myb mRNA, a plant morphogenesis-regulating transcription factor, changes due to viroid infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušek, Jaroslav; Piernikarczyk, Rajen J J; Týcová, Anna; Duraisamy, Ganesh S; Kocábek, Tomáš; Steger, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) belongs to plant-pathogenic, circular, non-coding RNAs. Its propagation is accompanied by (mis)regulation of host genes and induction of pathogenesis symptoms including changes of leaf morphogenesis depending on the strength of viroid variant. We found strong genotype-dependent suppression of tomato morphogenesis-regulating transcription factor SANT/HTH-Myb (SlMyb) due to viroid pathogenesis. Its relative mRNA level was found to be significantly decreased in PSTVd-sensitive tomato (cvs Rutgers and Heinz 1706) due to degradation processes, but increased in PSTVd-tolerant (cv. Harzfeuer). In heterologous system of Nicotiana benthamiana, we observed a SlMyb-associated necrotic effect in agroinfiltrated leaf sectors during ectopic overexpression. Leaf sector necroses were accompanied by activation of nucleolytic enzymes but were suppressed by a strongly pathogenic PSTVd variant. Contrary to that, PSTVd's effect was inhibited by the silencing suppressor p19. It was found that in both, Solanum lycopersicum leaves and N. benthamiana leaf sectors, SlMyb mRNA degradation was significantly stronger in viroid-infected tissues. Necroses induction as well as gene silencing experiments using the SANT/HTH-Myb homologues revealed involvement of this Myb in physiological changes like distortions in flower morphogenesis and growth suppression. PMID:26118459

  1. Regulation of transcription of the human presenilin-1 gene by ets transcription factors and the p53 protooncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorcic, M; Das, H K

    2000-11-10

    The expression of the human presenilin-1 cellular gene is suppressed by the p53 protooncogene. The rapid kinetic of the down-regulation has suggested that it may result from a primary mechanism. We show here that p53 also suppresses the transcription of a presenilin-1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter synthetic gene in transient infection assays in neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) and hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines. Only a minimum promoter including sequences from -35 to + 6 from the transcription initiation is sufficient to confer down-regulation. We have previously defined a crucial DNA element controlling 90% of the expression of the gene within the same short area, and the identification of the transcription factors involved should also provide insights into the regulation of PS1 by p53. This region contains an Ets transcription factor binding motif, and a 2-base pair alteration within the core sequence (GGAA to TTAA) of the Ets consensus also reduced transcription by more than 90%. We now show that Ets1 and Ets2 indeed transactivate a PS1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter including the (-35 to +6) fragment. Furthermore, in vitro translated Ets2 binds specifically to the -10 Ets motif in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Therefore, Ets1/2 factors bind specifically to the -10 Ets element and activate PS1 transcription. We also show that the coactivator p300 enhances the activation by Ets1 and Ets2 as well as the repression by p53. p300 is known to interact with p53 as well as with Ets1 and Ets2. We show that p53 does not bind directly to the PS1 promoter. Hence the repression of PS1 transcription by p53 is likely to be mediated through protein-protein interactions. PMID:10942770

  2. Serum free and total insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 levels in healthy elderly individuals - Relation to self-reported duality of health and disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, JAMJL; Stolk, RP; Pols, HAP; Grobbee, DE; Lamberts, SWJ

    1998-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the influence of the free insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGF-I/IGFBP) system on the quality of health and on disability in the elderly population. Design: In a cross-sectional population based study of 218 healthy elderly su

  3. Current and emerging approaches to define intestinal epithelium-specific transcriptional networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Boyd, Mette; Danielsen, Erik Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    applied to analyze known transcription factors and their interacting regulatory DNA elements in the intestine. The intestine is an example of a dynamic tissue where stem cells in the crypt proliferate and undergo a differentiation process toward the villus. During this differentiation process, specific......Upon developmental or environmental cues, the composition of transcription factors in a transcriptional regulatory network is deeply implicated in controlling the signature of the gene expression and thereby specifies the cell or tissue type. Novel methods including ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq have been...... regulatory networks of transcription factors are activated to target specific genes, which determine the intestinal cell fate. The expanding genomewide mapping of transcription factor binding sites and construction of transcriptional regulatory networks provide new insight into how intestinal differentiation...

  4. Current and emerging approaches to define intestinal epithelium-specific transcriptional networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krûger; Boyd, Mette; Danielsen, Erik Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    been applied to analyse known transcription factors and their interacting regulatory DNA elements in the intestine. The intestine is an example of a dynamic tissue where stem cells in the crypt proliferate and undergo a differentiation process towards the villus. During this differentiation process......Upon developmental or environmental cues, the composition of transcription factors in a transcriptional regulatory network is deeply implicated in controlling the signature of the gene expression and thereby specifies the cell- or tissue-type. Novel methods including ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq have......, specific regulatory networks of transcription factors are activated to target specific genes, which determine the intestinal cell fate. The expanding genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding sites and construction of transcriptional regulatory networks provide new insight into how intestinal...

  5. Changes in Air CO₂ Concentration Differentially Alter Transcript Levels of NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 Aquaporin Genes in Tobacco Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Francesca; Schubert, Andrea; Lovisolo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin specific control on water versus carbon pathways in leaves is pivotal in controlling gas exchange and leaf hydraulics. We investigated whether Nicotiana tabacum aquaporin 1 (NtAQP1) and Nicotiana tabacum plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2;1 (NtPIP2;1) gene expression varies in tobacco leaves subjected to treatments with different CO₂ concentrations (ranging from 0 to 800 ppm), inducing changes in photosynthesis, stomatal regulation and water evaporation from the leaf. Changes in air CO₂ concentration ([CO₂]) affected net photosynthesis (Pn) and leaf substomatal [CO₂] (Ci). Pn was slightly negative at 0 ppm air CO₂; it was one-third that of ambient controls at 200 ppm, and not different from controls at 800 ppm. Leaves fed with 800 ppm [CO₂] showed one-third reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration (E), and their gs was in turn slightly lower than in 200 ppm- and in 0 ppm-treated leaves. The 800 ppm air [CO₂] strongly impaired both NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 gene expression, whereas 0 ppm air [CO₂], a concentration below any in vivo possible conditions and specifically chosen to maximize the gene expression alteration, increased only the NtAQP1 transcript level. We propose that NtAQP1 expression, an aquaporin devoted to CO₂ transport, positively responds to CO₂ scarcity in the air in the whole range 0-800 ppm. On the contrary, expression of NtPIP2;1, an aquaporin not devoted to CO₂ transport, is related to water balance in the leaf, and changes in parallel with gs. These observations fit in a model where upregulation of leaf aquaporins is activated at low Ci, while downregulation occurs when high Ci saturates photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. PMID:27089333

  6. Changes in Air CO2 Concentration Differentially Alter Transcript Levels of NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 Aquaporin Genes in Tobacco Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Francesca; Schubert, Andrea; Lovisolo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin specific control on water versus carbon pathways in leaves is pivotal in controlling gas exchange and leaf hydraulics. We investigated whether Nicotiana tabacum aquaporin 1 (NtAQP1) and Nicotiana tabacum plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2;1 (NtPIP2;1) gene expression varies in tobacco leaves subjected to treatments with different CO2 concentrations (ranging from 0 to 800 ppm), inducing changes in photosynthesis, stomatal regulation and water evaporation from the leaf. Changes in air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) affected net photosynthesis (Pn) and leaf substomatal [CO2] (Ci). Pn was slightly negative at 0 ppm air CO2; it was one-third that of ambient controls at 200 ppm, and not different from controls at 800 ppm. Leaves fed with 800 ppm [CO2] showed one-third reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration (E), and their gs was in turn slightly lower than in 200 ppm– and in 0 ppm–treated leaves. The 800 ppm air [CO2] strongly impaired both NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 gene expression, whereas 0 ppm air [CO2], a concentration below any in vivo possible conditions and specifically chosen to maximize the gene expression alteration, increased only the NtAQP1 transcript level. We propose that NtAQP1 expression, an aquaporin devoted to CO2 transport, positively responds to CO2 scarcity in the air in the whole range 0–800 ppm. On the contrary, expression of NtPIP2;1, an aquaporin not devoted to CO2 transport, is related to water balance in the leaf, and changes in parallel with gs. These observations fit in a model where upregulation of leaf aquaporins is activated at low Ci, while downregulation occurs when high Ci saturates photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. PMID:27089333

  7. Changes in High School Course-Taking, 1982-88: A Study of Transcript Data from Selected Schools and States. CPRE Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, William H.; And Others

    A major goal of state education reforms in the 1980s was to increase the number of courses students were required to complete for graduation. This document provides quantitative transcript data from high schools enrolling mostly lower achieving students in the 1980s. At 3 points in time, random samples of approximately 25 transcripts of graduating…

  8. Time series analysis of benzo[a]pyrene-induced transcriptome changes suggests that a network of transcription factors regulates the effects on functional gene sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Mathijs, K.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Herwijnen, M.H.M. van; Brauers, K.J.J.; Boorsma, A.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical carcinogens may cause a multitude of effects inside cells, thereby affecting transcript levels of genes by direct activation of transcription factors (TF) or indirectly through the formation of DNA damage. As the temporal profiles of these responses may be profoundly different, examining ti

  9. Bioinformatic detection of E47, E2F1 and SREBP1 transcription factors as potential regulators of genes associated to acquisition of endometrial receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croxatto Horacio B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endometrium is a dynamic tissue whose changes are driven by the ovarian steroidal hormones. Its main function is to provide an adequate substrate for embryo implantation. Using microarray technology, several reports have provided the gene expression patterns of human endometrial tissue during the window of implantation. However it is required that biological connections be made across these genomic datasets to take full advantage of them. The objective of this work was to perform a research synthesis of available gene expression profiles related to acquisition of endometrial receptivity for embryo implantation, in order to gain insights into its molecular basis and regulation. Methods Gene expression datasets were intersected to determine a consensus endometrial receptivity transcript list (CERTL. For this cluster of genes we determined their functional annotations using available web-based databases. In addition, promoter sequences were analyzed to identify putative transcription factor binding sites using bioinformatics tools and determined over-represented features. Results We found 40 up- and 21 down-regulated transcripts in the CERTL. Those more consistently increased were C4BPA, SPP1, APOD, CD55, CFD, CLDN4, DKK1, ID4, IL15 and MAP3K5 whereas the more consistently decreased were OLFM1, CCNB1, CRABP2, EDN3, FGFR1, MSX1 and MSX2. Functional annotation of CERTL showed it was enriched with transcripts related to the immune response, complement activation and cell cycle regulation. Promoter sequence analysis of genes revealed that DNA binding sites for E47, E2F1 and SREBP1 transcription factors were the most consistently over-represented and in both up- and down-regulated genes during the window of implantation. Conclusions Our research synthesis allowed organizing and mining high throughput data to explore endometrial receptivity and focus future research efforts on specific genes and pathways. The discovery of possible

  10. Cold acclimation induces distinctive changes in the chromatin state and transcript levels of COR genes in Cannabis sativa varieties with contrasting cold acclimation capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Boris F; Ali-Benali, Mohamed Ali; Demone, Jordan; Bertrand, Annick; Charron, Jean-Benoit

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the capacity of Cannabis sativa to cold-acclimate and develop freezing tolerance. This study investigates the cold acclimation (CA) capacity of nine C. sativa varieties and the underlying genetic and epigenetic responses. The varieties were divided into three groups based on their contrasting CA capacities by comparing the survival of non-acclimated and cold-acclimated plants in whole-plant freeze tests. In response to the CA treatment, all varieties accumulated soluble sugars but only the varieties with superior capacity for CA could maintain higher levels throughout the treatment. In addition, the varieties that acclimated most efficiently accumulated higher transcript levels of cold-regulated (COR) genes and genes involved in de novo DNA methylation while displaying locus- and variety-specific changes in the levels of H3K9ac, H3K27me3 and methylcytosine (MeC) during CA. Furthermore, these hardy C. sativa varieties displayed significant increases in MeC levels at COR gene loci when deacclimated, suggesting a role for locus-specific DNA methylation in deacclimation. This study uncovers the molecular mechanisms underlying CA in C. sativa and reveals higher levels of complexity regarding how genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors intertwine. PMID:25534661

  11. Capsella rubella TGA4, a bZIP transcription factor, causes delayed flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Li Maofu; Wang Hua; Yang Yuan; Jin Wanmei

    2016-01-01

    Flowering time is usually regulated by many environmental factors and endogenous signals. TGA family members are bZIP transcription factors that bind to the octopine synthase element, which has been closely linked to defense/stress responses. Most TGA factors interact with non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1) and plant defense responses are strengthened by this interaction. TGA1and TGA4factors bind to NPR1 only in salicylic acid (SA)-induced leaves, suggesting that ...

  12. MPTP’s Pathway of Toxicity Indicates Central Role of Transcription Factor SP1

    OpenAIRE

    Maertens, Alexandra; Luechtefeld, Thomas; KLEENSANG Andre; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Deriving a Pathway of Toxicity from transcriptomic data remains a challenging task. We explore the use of weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) to extract an initial network from a small microarray study of MPTP toxicity in mice. Five modules were statistically significant; each module was analyzed for gene signatures in the Chemical and Genetic Perturbation subset of the Molecular Signatures Database as well as for over-represented transcription factor binding sites and WGCNA cl...

  13. Transcriptional changes in response to X chromosome dosage in the mouse: implications for X inactivation and the molecular basis of Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargent Carole A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X monosomic mice (39,XO have a remarkably mild phenotype when compared to women with Turner syndrome (45,XO. The generally accepted hypothesis to explain this discrepancy is that the number of genes on the mouse X chromosome which escape X inactivation, and thus are expressed at higher levels in females, is very small. However this hypothesis has never been tested and only a small number of genes have been assayed for their X-inactivation status in the mouse. We performed a global expression analysis in four somatic tissues (brain, liver, kidney and muscle of adult 40,XX and 39,XO mice using the Illumina Mouse WG-6 v1_1 Expression BeadChip and an extensive validation by quantitative real time PCR, in order to identify which genes are expressed from both X chromosomes. Results We identified several genes on the X chromosome which are overexpressed in XX females, including those previously reported as escaping X inactivation, as well as new candidates. However, the results obtained by microarray and qPCR were not fully concordant, illustrating the difficulty in ascertaining modest fold changes, such as those expected for genes escaping X inactivation. Remarkably, considerable variation was observed between tissues, suggesting that inactivation patterns may be tissue-dependent. Our analysis also exposed several autosomal genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism and in protein translation which are differentially expressed between XX and XO mice, revealing secondary transcriptional changes to the alteration in X chromosome dosage. Conclusions Our results support the prediction that the mouse inactive X chromosome is largely silent, while providing a list of the genes potentially escaping X inactivation in rodents. Although the lower expression of X-linked genes in XO mice may not be relevant in the particular tissues/systems which are affected in human X chromosome monosomy, genes deregulated in XO mice are good candidates for

  14. Physical training and weight loss in dogs lead to transcriptional changes in genes involved in the glucose-transport pathway in muscle and adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Uribe, Juber; Vitger, Anne D; Ritz, Christian; Fredholm, Merete; Bjørnvad, Charlotte R; Cirera, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a worldwide problem in humans and domestic animals. Interventions, including a combination of dietary management and exercise, have proven to be effective for inducing weight loss in humans. In companion animals, the role of exercise in the management of obesity has received relatively little attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in the transcriptome of key energy metabolism genes in muscle and adipose tissues in response to diet-induced weight loss alone, or combined with exercise in dogs. Overweight pet dogs were enrolled on a weight loss programme, based on calorie restriction and physical training (FD group, n = 5) or calorie restriction alone (DO group, n = 7). mRNA expression of 12 genes and six microRNAs were investigated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). In the FD group, FOXO1 and RAC1 were expressed at lower levels in adipose tissue, whereas ESRRA and AKT2 were more highly expressed in muscle, when compared with the DO group. Comparing expression before and after the intervention, in the DO group, nine genes and three microRNAs showed significant altered expression in adipose tissue (PPARG, ADIPOQ and FOXO1; P muscle. Thus, calorie restriction causes regulation of several metabolic genes in both tissues. The mild exercise, incorporated into this study design, was sufficient to elicit transcriptional changes in adipose and muscle tissues, suggesting a positive effect on glucose metabolism. The study findings support inclusion of exercise in management of canine obesity. PMID:26701817

  15. Cloning, sequence analysis and expression of a cDNA encoding a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-2).

    OpenAIRE

    Binkert, C; Landwehr, J; Mary, J L; J. Schwander; Heinrich, G

    1989-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors bind with high affinity to specific binding proteins in extracellular fluids. To identify structural characteristics of IGF-binding proteins that might define their physiological roles, we determined the complete primary structure of a novel human IGF-binding protein (IGFBP-2) from a cloned cDNA. The cDNA encodes a 328 amino acid IGF-binding protein precursor which contains a 39-residue signal peptide. The mature 289 amino acid IGFBP-2 has a predicted Mr of 31,325....

  16. Interaction between the Alzheimer's survival peptide humanin and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 regulates cell survival and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, Maaria; LIU, BINGRONG; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ma, Liqun; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Niikura, Takako; Nishimoto, Ikuo; Cohen, Pinchas

    2003-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) regulates IGF bioactivity and also independently modulates cell growth and survival. By using a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify IGFBP-3-interacting proteins, we cloned humanin (HN) as an IGFBP-3-binding partner. HN is a 24-aa peptide that has been shown to specifically inhibit neuronal cell death induced by familial Alzheimer's disease mutant genes and amyloid-β (Aβ). The physical interaction of HN with IGFBP-3 was determined to be of...

  17. Posttranslational regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in normal and transformed human fibroblasts. Insulin-like growth factor dependence and biological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Conover, C A; Kiefer, M C; Zapf, J

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) is a 24-26-kD protein expressed by a variety of cell types in vivo and in vitro. Treatment of normal adult human fibroblasts with 10 nM insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) for 24 h resulted in an 85% decrease in endogenous IGFBP-4, as assessed by Western ligand blot analysis of the conditioned medium. Incubation of human fibroblast-conditioned medium (HFCM) with IGF-II under cell-free conditions led to a similar loss of IGFBP-4. This p...

  18. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 modulates muscle differentiation through an insulin-like growth factor-dependent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are a family of six secreted proteins which bind to and modulate the actions of insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and -II). IGFBP-5 is more conserved than other IGFBPs characterized to date, and is expressed in adult rodent muscle and in the developing myotome. We have shown previously that C2 myoblasts secrete IGFBP-5 as their sole IGFBP. Here we use these cells to study the function of IGFBP-5 during myogenesis, a process s...

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance the Apoptotic Activity of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 by Blocking PKC-Induced IGFBP-3 Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Seung Hyun; Whang, Young Mi; Min, Hye-Young; Han, Seung Ho; Kang, Ju-Hee; Song, Ki-Hoon; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kim, Yeul Hong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 induces apoptosis of cancer cells. However, preexisting resistance to IGFBP-3 could limit its antitumor activities. This study characterizes the efficacy and mechanism of the combination of recombinant IGFBP-3 (rIGFBP-3) and HDAC inhibitors to overcome IGFBP-3 resistance in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The effects of the combination of rIGFBP-3 and ...

  20. Decreased Expression of Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-related Protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) in Radiation-induced Mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Teishima, Jun

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) is a member of the IGFBP family, which was called IGFBP-7 or mac25 previously. Decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 has been shown in breast cancer and prostatic cancer, and tumor suppressive effects of IGFBP-rP1 have been reported in prostatic cancer and osteosarcoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated whether expression levels of IGFBP-rP1 were related to the development and the growth of radiation-induced h...

  1. Circulating salmon 28- and 22-kDa insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are co-orthologs of IGFBP-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Munetaka; Kishimoto, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Teppei; Nakano, Yusuke; Hara, Akihiko; Dickhoff, Walton W

    2011-01-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) play pivotal roles in stabilizing IGFs and regulating their availability to target tissues. In the teleost circulation, three major IGFBPs are typically detected by ligand blotting with molecular masses around 20-25, 28-32 and 40-45kDa. However, their identity is poorly established and often confused. We previously identified salmon 22- and 41-kDa forms as IGFBP-1 and -2b, respectively. In the present study, we cloned the cDNA o...

  2. Cloning and expression of full-length human insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) in the Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Emad Khodadadi; Mojtaba Panjepour; Mahdi Abbasian; Zahra Khalili Broujeni; Mohammad Reza Mofid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of the growth hormone on target cells is mediated by the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 binds to the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in blood and biological fluids. Considering the important application of IGBP3 as a drug component, in this research we cloned and expressed the full-length IGFBP3 in the pET-11a vector and BL21 (DE3) expression host. Materials and Methods: First the sequence encoding of IGFBP3 was designed based on th...

  3. Perturbations of PIP3 signalling trigger a global remodelling of mRNA landscape and reveal a transcriptional feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Juvin, Veronique; Malek, Mouhannad; Luscombe, Nicholas; Hawkins, Phillip; Le Novère, Nicolas; Stephens, Len

    2015-11-16

    PIP3 is synthesized by the Class I PI3Ks and regulates complex cell responses, such as growth and migration. Signals that drive long-term reshaping of cell phenotypes are difficult to resolve because of complex feedback networks that operate over extended times. PIP3-dependent modulation of mRNA accumulation is clearly important in this process but is poorly understood. We have quantified the genome-wide mRNA-landscape of non-transformed, breast epithelium-derived MCF10a cells and its response to acute regulation by EGF, in the presence or absence of a PI3Kα inhibitor, compare it to chronic activation of PI3K signalling by cancer-relevant mutations (isogenic cells expressing an oncomutant PI3Kα allele or lacking the PIP3-phosphatase/tumour-suppressor, PTEN). Our results show that whilst many mRNAs are changed by long-term genetic perturbation of PIP3 signalling ('butterfly effect'), a much smaller number do so in a coherent fashion with the different PIP3 perturbations. This suggests a subset of more directly regulated mRNAs. We show that mRNAs respond differently to given aspects of PIP3 regulation. Some PIP3-sensitive mRNAs encode PI3K pathway components, thus suggesting a transcriptional feedback loop. We identify the transcription factor binding motifs SRF and PRDM1 as important regulators of PIP3-sensitive mRNAs involved in cell movement. PMID:26464442

  4. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dennis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-valueFOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation.

  5. Supra-optimal expression of the cold-regulated OsMyb4 transcription factor in transgenic rice changes the complexity of transcriptional network with major effects on stress tolerance and panicle development

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Myoungryoul

    2010-09-28

    The R2R3-type OsMyb4 transcription factor of rice has been shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic adjustment in heterologous overexpression studies. However, the exact composition and organization of its underlying transcriptional network has not been established to be a robust tool for stress tolerance enhancement by regulon engineering. OsMyb4 network was dissected based on commonalities between the global chilling stress transcriptome and the transcriptome configured by OsMyb4 overexpression. OsMyb4 controls a hierarchical network comprised of several regulatory sub-clusters associated with cellular defense and rescue, metabolism and development. It regulates target genes either directly or indirectly through intermediary MYB, ERF, bZIP, NAC, ARF and CCAAT-HAP transcription factors. Regulatory sub-clusters have different combinations of MYB-like, GCC-box-like, ERD1-box-like, ABRE-like, G-box-like, as1/ocs/TGA-like, AuxRE-like, gibberellic acid response element (GARE)-like and JAre-like cis-elements. Cold-dependent network activity enhanced cellular antioxidant capacity through radical scavenging mechanisms and increased activities of phenylpropanoid and isoprenoid metabolic processes involving various abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), ethylene and reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsive genes. OsMyb4 network is independent of drought response element binding protein/C-repeat binding factor (DREB/CBF) and its sub-regulons operate with possible co-regulators including nuclear factor-Y. Because of its upstream position in the network hierarchy, OsMyb4 functions quantitatively and pleiotrophically. Supra-optimal expression causes misexpression of alternative targets with costly trade-offs to panicle development. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The capacity to form H-DNA cannot substitute for GAGA factor binding to a (CT)n*(GA)n regulatory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Quinn; Teare, John M; Granok, Howard; Swede, Marci J; Xu, Jenny; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2003-05-15

    Previous studies of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp26 gene promoter have demonstrated the importance of a homopurine*homopyrimidine segment [primarily (CT)n*(GA)n] for chromatin structure formation and gene activation. (CT)n regions are known to bind GAGA factor, a dominant enhancer of PEV thought to play a role in generating an accessible chromatin structure. The (CT)n region can also form an H-DNA structure in vitro under acidic pH and negative supercoiling; a detailed map of that structure is reported here. To test whether the (CT)n sequence can function through H-DNA in vivo, we have analyzed a series of hsp26-lacZ transgenes with altered sequences in this region. The results indicate that a 25 bp mirror repeat within the homopurine.homopyrimidine region, while adequate for H-DNA formation, is neither necessary nor sufficient for positive regulation of hsp26 when GAGA factor-binding sites have been eliminated. The ability to form H-DNA cannot substitute for GAGA factor binding to the (CT)n sequence. PMID:12736297

  7. Systematic identification of transcription factors associated with patient survival in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Pedro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant activation or expression of transcription factors has been implicated in the tumorigenesis of various types of cancer. In spite of the prevalent application of microarray experiments for profiling gene expression in cancer samples, they provide limited information regarding the activities of transcription factors. However, the association between transcription factors and cancers is largely dependent on the transcription regulatory activities rather than mRNA expression levels. Results In this paper, we propose a computational approach that integrates microarray expression data with the transcription factor binding site information to systematically identify transcription factors associated with patient survival given a specific cancer type. This approach was applied to two gene expression data sets for breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. We found that two transcription factor families, the steroid nuclear receptor family and the ATF/CREB family, are significantly correlated with the survival of patients with breast cancer; and that a transcription factor named T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 is significantly correlated with acute myeloid leukemia patient survival. Conclusion Our analysis identifies transcription factors associating with patient survival and provides insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying the breast cancer and leukemia. The transcription factors identified by our method are biologically meaningful and consistent with prior knowledge. As an insightful tool, this approach can also be applied to other microarray cancer data sets to help researchers better understand the intricate relationship between transcription factors and diseases.

  8. Transcriptional approaches to riboswitch studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mironov, Alexander; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nudler, Evgeny

    2009-01-01

    Natural RNA sensors of small molecules (a.k.a. riboswitches) regulate numerous metabolic genes. In bacteria, these RNA elements control transcription termination and translation initiation by changing the folding pathway of nascent RNA upon direct binding of a metabolite. To identify and study riboswitches we used in vitro reconstituted solid-phase transcription elongation/termination system. This approach allows for direct monitoring ligand binding and riboswitch functioning, establishing th...

  9. Changes in abundance of an abscisic acid-responsive, early cysteine-labeled metallothionein transcript during pollen embryogenesis in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T L; Crawford, R L

    1996-12-01

    A clone for an embryoid-abundant, early cysteine-labeled metallothionein (EcMt) gene has been isolated from a wheat pollen embryoid cDNA library. The transcript of this gene was only expressed in embryogenic microspores, pollen embryoids, and developing zygotic embryos of wheat. Accumulation of the EcMt mRNA showed a direct and positive correlation with an increase of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA) in developing pollen embryoids. Treating cultures with an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, fluridone, suppressed not only ABA accumulation but also the appearance of the EcMt gene transcript and the ability of microspores to form embryoids. These results suggest that the EcMt gene may act as a molecular marker for pollen embryogenesis because ABA biosynthesis is accompanied by the increased expression of the EcMt transcript that coincides with the differentiation of pollen embryoids in wheat anther cultures. PMID:8980534

  10. Demethylation of oligogalacturonides by FaPE1 in the fruits of the wild strawberry Fragaria vesca triggers metabolic and transcriptional changes associated with defence and development of the fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, S.; Bombarely, A.; Giavalisco, P; Usadel, B.; Stephens, C.; Araguez, I.; Medina-Escobar, N.; Botella, M.; Fernie, A.; Valpuesta, V.

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic expression of the strawberry (Fragariaxananassa) gene FaPE1 encoding pectin methyl esterase produced in the wild species Fragaria vesca partially demethylated oligogalacturonides (OGAs), which conferred partial resistance of ripe fruits to the fungus Botrytis cinerea. Analyses of metabolic and transcriptional changes in the receptacle of the transgenic fruits revealed channelling of metabolites to aspartate and aromatic amino acids as well as phenolics, flavanones, and sesquiterpenoid...

  11. Analysis of transcript changes in a heme-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli in response to CORM-3 [Ru(CO3Cl(glycinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Louise Wilson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes in extended detail the methodology applied for acquisition of transcriptomic data, and subsequent statistical data modelling, published by Wilson et al. (2015 in a study of the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3 [Ru(CO3Cl(glycinate] on heme-deficient bacteria. The objective was to identify non-heme targets of CORM action. Carbon monoxide (CO interacts with heme-containing proteins, in particular respiratory cytochromes; however, CORMs have been shown to elicit multifaceted effects in bacteria, suggesting that the compounds may have additional targets. We therefore sought to elucidate the activity of CORM-3, the first water-soluble CORM and one of the most characterised CORMs to date, in bacteria devoid of heme synthesis. Importantly, we also tested inactive CORM-3 (iCORM-3, a ruthenium co-ligand fragment that does not release CO, in order to differentiate between CO- and compound-related effects. A well-established hemA mutant of Escherichia coli was used for the study and, for comparison, parallel experiments were performed on the corresponding wild-type strain. Global transcriptomic changes induced by CORM-3 and iCORM-3 were evaluated using a Two-Color Microarray-Based Prokaryote Analysis (FairPlay III Labeling by Agilent Technologies (Inc. 2009. Data acquisition was carried out using Agilent Feature Extraction software (v6.5 and data normalisation, as well as information about gene products and their function was obtained from GeneSpring GX v7.3 (Agilent Technologies. Functional category lists were created using KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Relevant regulatory proteins for each gene were identified, where available, using regulonDB and EcoCyc (World Wide Web. Statistical data modelling was performed on the gene expression data to infer transcription factor activities. The transcriptomic data can be accessed through NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: series accession number GSE

  12. Changing a conserved amino acid in R2R3-MYB transcription repressors results in cytoplasmic accumulation and abolishes their repressive activity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiliang; Sun, Zhanmin; Wang, Chenglong; Zhang, Xinquan; Tang, Yixiong; Zhu, Xuemei; Shao, Jirong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-10-01

    Sub-group 4 R2R3-type MYB transcription factors, including MYB3, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32, act as repressors in phenylpropanoid metabolism. These proteins contain the conserved MYB domain and the ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) repression domain. Additionally, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32 possess a putative zinc-finger domain and a conserved GY/FDFLGL motif in their C-termini. The protein 'sensitive to ABA and drought 2' (SAD2) recognizes the nuclear pore complex, which then transports the SAD2-MYB4 complex into the nucleus. Here, we show that the conserved GY/FDFLGL motif contributes to the interaction between MYB factors and SAD2. The Asp → Asn mutation in the GY/FDFLGL motif abolishes the interaction between MYB transcription factors and SAD2, and therefore they cannot be transported into the nucleus and cannot repress their target genes. We found that MYB4(D261N) loses the capacity to repress expression of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) gene and biosynthesis of sinapoyl malate. Our results indicate conservation among MYB transcription factors in terms of their interaction with SAD2. Therefore, the Asp → Asn mutation may be used to engineer transcription factors. PMID:26332741

  13. Interrogating transcriptional regulatory sequences in Tol2-mediated Xenopus transgenics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela G Loots

    Full Text Available Identifying gene regulatory elements and their target genes in vertebrates remains a significant challenge. It is now recognized that transcriptional regulatory sequences are critical in orchestrating dynamic controls of tissue-specific gene expression during vertebrate development and in adult tissues, and that these elements can be positioned at great distances in relation to the promoters of the genes they control. While significant progress has been made in mapping DNA binding regions by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and next generation sequencing, functional validation remains a limiting step in improving our ability to correlate in silico predictions with biological function. We recently developed a computational method that synergistically combines genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to predict tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this method to 270 genes highly expressed in skeletal muscle and predicted 190 putative cis-regulatory modules. Furthermore, we optimized Tol2 transgenic constructs in Xenopus laevis to interrogate 20 of these elements for their ability to function as skeletal muscle-specific transcriptional enhancers during embryonic development. We found 45% of these elements expressed only in the fast muscle fibers that are oriented in highly organized chevrons in the Xenopus laevis tadpole. Transcription factor binding site analysis identified >2 Mef2/MyoD sites within ~200 bp regions in 6 of the validated enhancers, and systematic mutagenesis of these sites revealed that they are critical for the enhancer function. The data described herein introduces a new reporter system suitable for interrogating tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements which allows monitoring of enhancer activity in real time, throughout early stages of embryonic development, in Xenopus.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1 in cervical secretions in women with symptoms of preterm delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Habibović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to investigate a value ofinsulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1 in cervicalsecretion in women with symptoms of preterm delivery and correlatethis test to the Bishop Score in prediction of a preterm delivery.The study group included 30 pregnant women with singletonpregnancy between 24 – 34 gestational weeks who were hospitalizedbecause of a threatening preterm delivery with intact fetalmembranes. A positive Actim Partus test (concentration higherthan 10 µg/l and Bishop Score higher than 4 signify a risk of thepreterm delivery. The Bishop Score is a better predictor of the pretermdelivery in patients with symptoms of the preterm delivery.

  15. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M;

    2001-01-01

    insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease...... activity. Total IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS possess a higher PV(neg) for the clinical disease activity. None of the parameters can at present be claimed to be superior to the others and thus all the measured parameters are recommended to be part of the evaluation of acromegalic patients....

  16. Changes in the level of growth hormone, insulin like growth factor-1 and insulin like growth factor binding proteine-3 in young males 24 hours after submaximaltraining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı Çoknaz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The study was accomplished as a control study, under the question whether 6-weeks endurance training affects the growth hormone (GH, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and the IGF bindings protein-3 (IGFBP-3 levels. Sixty male subjects participated in the study. The subjects were separated into 2 groups as control (n=30; mean age=21,13±1,16 years and study (n=30; mean age=21,53±1,61 years randomly, prior to the runtest. Blood samples were drawn before breakfast and analyzed in the laboratory of the medical faculty of Abant Izzet Baysal University concerning GH, IGF-1and IGFBP-3. VO2max was measured in all individuals. The individuals experimental group trained 3 times a week (Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for 6 weeks, on the other hand the control group had rest/rested for 6 weeks. Trainings included 30-40 minutes submaximal run on the treadmill, per day. After the last session of training, blood samples were drawn from all subjects following day before breakfast, and were analyzed similar to the first measurements. Then, all subjects (experimental and control groups were subjected to VO2max measurement again. There were no differences within groups and between the groups in GH, IGF-1, IGFBP-3levels before (p>0.05 and after the test (p>0.05. VO2max was found to be significantly higher in the study group compare to controls (p<0.05. We conclude that submaximal training does not affect the production of growth hormones, although it may increase oxygen consumption. 

  17. Changes in the level of growth hormone, insulin like growth factor-1 and insulin like growth factor binding proteine-3 in young males 24 hours after submaximaltraining

    OpenAIRE

    ÇOKNAZ, Hakkı

    2011-01-01

    The study was accomplished as a control study, under the question whether 6-weeks endurance training affects the growth hormone (GH), insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and the IGF bindings protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels. Sixty male subjects participated in the study. The subjects were separated into 2 groups as control (n=30; mean age=21,13±1,16 years) and study (n=30; mean age=21,53±1,61 years) randomly, prior to the runtest. Blood samples were drawn before breakfast and analyzed in the labor...

  18. The identity of the transcription +1 position is crucial for changes in gene expression in response to amino acid starvation in Bacillus subtilis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krásný, Libor; Tišerová, Hana; Jonák, Jiří; Rejman, Dominik; Šanderová, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2008), s. 42-54. ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/05/P510; GA MŠk 2B06065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : RNA polymerase * transcription * start site identity * Bacillus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.213, year: 2008

  19. Effects of elongation delay in transcription dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Jin, Huiqin; Yang, Zhuoqin; Lei, Jinzhi

    2014-12-01

    In the transcription process, elongation delay is induced by the movement of RNA polymerases (RNAP) along the DNA sequence, and can result in changes in the transcription dynamics. This paper studies the transcription dynamics that involved the elongation delay and effects of cell division and DNA replication. The stochastic process of gene expression is modeled with delay chemical master equation with periodic coefficients, and is studied numerically through the stochastic simulation algorithm with delay. We show that the average transcription level approaches to a periodic dynamics over cell cycles at homeostasis, and the elongation delay can reduce the transcription level and increase the transcription noise. Moreover, the transcription elongation can induce bimodal distribution of mRNA levels that can be measured by the techniques of flow cytometry. PMID:25365608

  20. Transcriptome analysis of a human colorectal cancer cell line shows molecular targets of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-4 overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Daniela; Lahm, Harald; Wolf, Eckhard; Bauersachs, Stefan

    2005-02-10

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is expressed commonly in colorectal tumors. IGF-binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) counteracts the tumor promoting activities of IGF-II by binding this growth factor. We have shown previously that in LS1034 cells, which highly express IGF-II, overexpression of IGFBP-4 led to a strong reduction in proliferation, colony formation and invasive capacity. To investigate the effects of IGFBP-4 at the molecular level we analyzed growth parameters of LS1034 human colon cancer cells vs. cells expressing the murine IGFBP-4 (mIGFBP-4) and used a subtractive cDNA library approach in combination with cDNA array hybridization to detect changes in the mRNA expression profiles. The mRNA levels for several proteins that are known to affect important biological properties of neoplastic cells, such as proteolysis, proliferation and differentiation were altered by overexpression of IGFBP-4. Transcript levels for tumor markers, like the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM), were reduced by elevated mIGFBP-4. Changes at the mRNA level were confirmed by Western blotting for CST1 (proteolysis or protease inhibitor), COX-2 (cell motility) and CEACAM5 (tumor marker). Furthermore, the effect of mIGFBP-4 on apoptosis was investigated and no increase of apoptosis could be detected in the IGFBP-4 overexpressing LS1034 cells. Our data indicate that IGFBP-4 is involved in the regulation of gene products that are known or supposed to be important for the pathogenesis of colon cancer cells. PMID:15455346

  1. Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Heat Shock Factor Binding Protein 1%热休克因子结合蛋(HSBP1) 表达、纯化、结晶与初步晶体学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红彦; 刘学琦; 孙玉娜; 郝宁; 李雪梅; 娄智勇

    2010-01-01

    热休克反应(heat shock response,HSR)是细胞在缺氧、病毒感染等应激因素刺激下,为适应微环境的改变而发生的一种自身保护性反应,以暂时性下调细胞正常代谢和选择性上调热休克蛋白(heat shock protein,HSP)的表达为特点.HSR是通过热休克转录因子(heat shock transcription factor,HSF)与相应的启动子结合,启动转录过程,进而促使HSP的表达来实现,其中HSF1是最有代表性、研究最多的一种HSF.HSF1在无活性的单体及有活性的三聚体之间的转变和平衡是转录调控的关键.热休克因子结合蛋白(heat shock factor binding protein,HSBP1)是一个含有两个伸展的疏水重复区,与HSF1的三聚体区域相互作用,以其伴侣形式实现对HSF1的DNA结合活性有负调节作用,通过抑制HSF1与DNA结合活性,从而抑制HSF1的转录活性.为了深入研究HSBP1行使功能的结构基础,对HSBP1蛋白成功地进行了克隆表达和结晶,该晶体属于R3空间群,其晶胞参数为a=b=35.2(A),c=233.3(A).

  2. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases in the mesocarp of ripening fruit of Prunus persica genotypes with different flesh characteristics: changes in activity and protein and transcript levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabotti, Damiano; Negrini, Noemi; Morgutti, Silvia; Nocito, Fabio F; Cocucci, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    Development of fruit flesh texture quality traits may involve the metabolism of phenolic compounds. This study presents molecular and biochemical results on the possible role played by cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) during ripening [S3, S4 I (pre-climacteric) and S4 III (climacteric) stages] of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] fruit with different flesh firmness [non-melting flesh (NMF) 'Oro A'/melting flesh (MF) 'Springcrest' and 'Sanguinella'] and color (blood-flesh Sanguinella). A total of 24 putative full-length PRUPE_CAD genes were identified (in silico analysis) in the peach genome. The most abundant CAD isoforms, encoded by genes located on scaffolds 8 and 6, were probed by specifically developed anti-PRUPE_CAD sc8 and by anti-FaCAD (PRUPE_CAD sc6) polyclonal antibodies, respectively. PRUPE_CAD sc8 proteins (SDS-PAGE and native-PAGE/western blot) appeared responsible for the CAD activity (in vitro/in-gel assays) that increased with ripening (parallel to PRUPE_ACO1 transcripts accumulation and ethylene evolution) only in the mesocarp of Oro A and blood-flesh Sanguinella. Accumulation of PRUPE_CAD sc8 transcripts (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) occurred in all three cultivars, but in Oro A and Springcrest it was not always accompanied by that of the related proteins, suggesting possible post-transcriptional regulation. Flesh firmness, as well as levels of lignin, total phenolics and, where present (Sanguinella), anthocyanins, declined with ripening, suggesting that, at least in the studied peach cultivars, CAD activity is related to neither lignification nor differences in flesh firmness (NMF/MF). Further studies are necessary to clarify whether the high levels of CAD activity/expression in Sanguinella play a role in determining the characteristics of this blood-flesh fruit. PMID:25534876

  3. Transcriptional regulations of the genes of starch metabolism and physiological changes in response to salt stress rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Theerawitaya, Cattarin; Boriboonkaset, Thanapol; CHA-UM, Suriyan; Supaibulwatana, Kanyaratt; Kirdmanee, Chalermpol

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the transcriptional expression of starch metabolism, involving genes and physiological characters, in seedlings of two contrasting salt-tolerant rice genotypes, in response to salt-stress. The soluble sugar content in rice seedlings of both salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive genotypes was enriched, relating to starch degradation, in plants subjected to 200 mM NaCl. In the salt-tolerant cultivar Pokkali, a major source of carbon may be that derived fr...

  4. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  5. Transcriptional changes in steroidogenesis by perfluoroalkyl acids (PFOA and PFOS) regulate the synthesis of sex hormones in H295R cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jae Soon; Choi, Jin-Soo; Park, June-Woo

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are two of the most widely used perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). Because of their strong persistence, they have become widely distributed throughout the environment and human bodies. PFOA and PFOS are suspected to disrupt the endocrine system based upon many in vivo studies, but the underlying mechanisms are currently unclear. In this study, we investigated the endocrine-related effects of PFOA and PFOS using in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivation assays and steroidogenesis assay. The results showed that PFOA and PFOS exhibited weak antagonistic ER transactivation but did not exhibit agonistic ER or AR transactivation. In the steroidogenesis assay, PFOA and PFOS induced 17β-estradiol (E2) level and reduced testosterone level, which would be caused by the induction of aromatase activity. The qPCR analysis of genes involved in steroidogenesis indicates that PFOA and PFOS associate with sex hormone synthesis by the transcriptional induction of two genes, cyp19 and 3β-hsd2. Moreover, the transcriptional induction of cyp11b2 by PFOS suggests that this chemical may underlie the disruption of several physiological functions related to aldosterone. The results of the current study suggest that PFOA and PFOS are potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and provide information for further studies on the molecular events that initiate the adverse endocrine effects. PMID:27139122

  6. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M; Kristensen L, L Ø; Main, K M; Juul, A; Skakkebaek, N E; Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2001-01-01

    insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease...... the inactive and the active groups, we found that positive and negative predictive values (PV(pos), PV(neg)) for clinical disease activity of total and free insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) were 0.59, 0.90 and 1.00, 0.82 respectively. Acid-labile subunit (ALS) showed diagnostic merit similar to...... activity. Total IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS possess a higher PV(neg) for the clinical disease activity. None of the parameters can at present be claimed to be superior to the others and thus all the measured parameters are recommended to be part of the evaluation of acromegalic patients....

  7. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 is a marker for antiestrogen resistant human breast cancer cell lines but is not a major growth regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker-Jensen, A; Lykkesfeldt, A E; Worm, J;

    2006-01-01

    Antiestrogens target the estrogen receptor and counteract the growth stimulatory action of estrogen on human breast cancer. However, acquired resistance to antiestrogens is a major clinical problem in endocrine treatment of breast cancer patients. To mimic acquired resistance, we have used a mode...... resistant cell growth was observed. Thus, we were able to establish IGFBP-2 as a marker for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cell lines, although IGFBP-2 was not a major contributor to the resistant cell growth.......Antiestrogens target the estrogen receptor and counteract the growth stimulatory action of estrogen on human breast cancer. However, acquired resistance to antiestrogens is a major clinical problem in endocrine treatment of breast cancer patients. To mimic acquired resistance, we have used a model...... system with the antiestrogen sensitive human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and several antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from the parental MCF-7 cell line. This model system was used to study the expression and possible involvement in resistant cell growth of insulin-like growth factor binding...

  8. Phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, R A; Bereket, A; Wilson, T A; Wojnar, M M; Lang, C H; Gelato, M C

    1994-06-01

    We have determined the level of phosphorylated insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (pIGFBP-1) in serum during two catabolic states: diabetes mellitus and trauma. Human sera were incubated with [125I]IGF-I for 2 h followed by non-denaturing PAGE. [125I]IGF-I/IGFBP-1 complexes from serum co-migrated with a pure p4IGFBP-1 standard. Complex formation was specifically inhibited by unlabeled IGF-I. The migration of IGF-I/pIGFBP-1 complexes was retarded by IGFBP-1 antibodies, but not by antibodies against IGFBP-2 or IGFBP-3. Sera from three severely traumatized patients had up to 12-fold more pIGFBP-1 than sera from age-matched controls. The level of pIGFBP-1 was reduced in all three patients upon hospital discharge. Sera from three patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and severe ketoacidosis (DKA) had more pIGFBP-1 than controls. Administration of insulin to DKA patients lowered the level of pIGFBP-1. The present study shows that IGFBP-1 exists as a free, high affinity, phosphorylated form in vivo during two catabolic states. PMID:7515391

  9. Pregnane X Receptor Represses HNF4α Gene to Induce Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein IGFBP1 that Alters Morphology of and Migrates HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Susumu; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Negishi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    Upon treatment with the pregnane X receptor (PXR) activator rifampicin (RIF), human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2-derived ShP51 cells that stably express PXR showed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like morphological changes and migration. Our recent DNA microarrays have identified hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) 1 mRNAs to be downregulated and upregulated, respectively, in RIF-treated ShP51 cells, and these regulations were confirmed by the subsequent real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Using this cell system, we demonstrated here that the PXR-HNF4α-IGFBP1 pathway is an essential signal for PXR-induced morphological changes and migration. First, we characterized the molecular mechanism underlying the PXR-mediated repression of the HNF4α gene. Chromatin conformation capture and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that PXR activation by RIF disrupted enhancer-promoter communication and prompted deacetylation of histone H3 in the HNF4α P1 promoter. Cell-based reporter and ChIP assays showed that PXR targeted the distal enhancer of the HNF4α P1 promoter and stimulated dissociation of HNF3β from the distal enhancer. Subsequently, small interfering RNA knockdown of HNF4α connected PXR-mediated gene regulation with the PXR-induced cellular responses, showing that the knockdown resulted in the upregulation of IGFBP1 and EMT-like morphological changes without RIF treatment. Moreover, recombinant IGFBP1 augmented migration, whereas an anti-IGFBP1 antibody attenuated both PXR-induced morphological changes and migration in ShP51 cells. PXR indirectly activated the IGFBP1 gene by repressing the HNF4α gene, thus enabling upregulation of IGFBP1 to change the morphology of ShP51 cells and cause migration. These results provide new insights into PXR-mediated cellular responses toward xenobiotics including therapeutics. PMID:26232425

  10. Insulin-like growth factors and insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins in relation to disease status and incidence of hypoglycaemia in patients with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, B.; van Doorn, J.; Suurmeijer, A. J. H.; Rautenberg, M. W.; Groenen, P. J. T. A.; Verdijk, M. A. J.; Jager, P. L.; de Jong, S.; Gietema, J. A.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients were included. Plasma samples were collected before 1 week and median 5 months after start of treatment with imatinib, and levels of IGF-I, total IGF-II, pro-IGF-IIE[68-88], insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-2, -3 and -6 were determined. GI

  11. Ultraviolet light-induced crosslinking of two major phosphoproteins and poly(A)+RNA from free polyribosomes; changes in phosphorylation by inhibitors of transcription and translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyribosomes were isolated without the use of detergents, irradiated with ultraviolet light and labelled in the presence of (gamma-32P) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Poly(A)+RNA-protein structures separated by chromatography on oligo (dT)-cellulose contained up to 1o crosslinked proteins as shown by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These included a 71 kDa poly(A)-bound species and two major phosphoproteins of 66 and 13o kDa. Pretreatment of rats with inhibitors of transcription and translation caused different and significant alterations in the labelling of the two phosphoproteins, suggesting that phosphorylation of proteins closely associated with mRNA may be involved in the regulation of the stability of this RNA or its binding to structural elements in the cell

  12. The transcription factor ATF3 is upregulated during chondrocyte differentiation and represses cyclin D1 and A gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Claudine G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coordinated chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are required for normal endochondral bone growth. Transcription factors binding to the cyclicAMP response element (CRE are known to regulate these processes. One member of this family, Activating Tanscription Factor 3 (ATF3, is expressed during skeletogenesis and acts as a transcriptional repressor, but the function of this protein in chondrogenesis is unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that Atf3 mRNA levels increase during mouse chondrocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, Atf3 mRNA levels are increased in response to cytochalasin D treatment, an inducer of chondrocyte maturation. This is accompanied by increased Atf3 promoter activity in cytochalasin D-treated chondrocytes. We had shown earlier that transcription of the cell cycle genes cyclin D1 and cyclin A in chondrocytes is dependent on CREs. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of ATF3 in primary mouse chondrocytes results in reduced transcription of both genes, as well as decreased activity of a CRE reporter plasmid. Repression of cyclin A transcription by ATF3 required the CRE in the cyclin A promoter. In parallel, ATF3 overexpression reduces the activity of a SOX9-dependent promoter and increases the activity of a RUNX2-dependent promoter. Conclusion Our data suggest that transcriptional induction of the Atf3 gene in maturing chondrocytes results in down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin A expression as well as activation of RUNX2-dependent transcription. Therefore, ATF3 induction appears to facilitate cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation of chondrocytes.

  13. NKX3.1 activates expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 to mediate insulin-like growth factor-I signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlbradt, Erin; Asatiani, Ekaterina; Ortner, Elizabeth; Wang, Antai; Gelmann, Edward P

    2009-03-15

    NKX3.1 is a homeobox gene that codes for a haploinsufficient prostate cancer tumor suppressor. NKX3.1 protein levels are down-regulated in the majority of primary prostate cancer tissues. NKX3.1 expression in PC-3 cells increased insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) mRNA expression 10-fold as determined by expression microarray analysis. In both stably and transiently transfected PC-3 cells and in LNCaP cells, NKX3.1 expression increased IGFBP-3 mRNA and protein expression. In prostates of Nkx3.1 gene-targeted mice Igfbp-3 mRNA levels correlated with Nkx3.1 copy number. NKX3.1 expression in PC-3 cells attenuated the ability of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) to induce phosphorylation of type I IGF receptor (IGF-IR), insulin receptor substrate 1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and AKT. The effect of NKX3.1 on IGF-I signaling was not seen when cells were exposed to long-R3-IGF-I, an IGF-I variant peptide that does not bind to IGFBP-3. Additionally, small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of IGFBP-3 expression partially reversed the attenuation of IGF-IR signaling by NKX3.1 and abrogated NKX3.1 suppression of PC-3 cell proliferation. Thus, there is a close relationship in vitro and in vivo between NKX3.1 and IGFBP-3. The growth-suppressive effects of NKX3.1 in prostate cells are mediated, in part, by activation of IGFBP-3 expression. PMID:19258508

  14. Functional and Complementary Phosphorylation State Attributes of Human Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-1 (IGFBP-1) Isoforms Resolved by Free Flow Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissum, Mikkel; Shehab, Majida Abu; Sukop, Ute; Khosravi, Javad M.; Wildgruber, Robert; Eckerskorn, Christoph; Han, Victor K. M.; Gupta, Madhulika B.

    2009-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a common disorder in which a fetus is unable to achieve its genetically determined potential size. High concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) have been associated with FGR. Phosphorylation of IGFBP-1 is a mechanism by which insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) bioavailability can be modulated in FGR. In this study a novel strategy was designed to determine a link between IGF-I affinity and the concomitant phosphorylation state characteristics of IGFBP-1 phosphoisoforms. Using free flow electrophoresis (FFE), multiple IGFBP-1 phosphoisoforms in amniotic fluid were resolved within pH 4.43–5.09. The binding of IGFBP-1 for IGF-I in each FFE fraction was determined with BIAcore biosensor analysis. The IGF-I affinity (K) for different IGFBP-1 isoforms ranged between 1.12e−08 and 4.59e−07. LC-MS/MS characterization revealed four phosphorylation sites, Ser(P)98, Ser(P)101, Ser(P)119, and Ser(P)169, of which Ser(P)98 was new. Although the IGF-I binding affinity for IGFBP-1 phosphoisoforms across the FFE fractions did not correlate with phosphopeptide intensities for Ser(P)101, Ser(P)98, and Ser(P)169 sites, a clear association was recorded with Ser(P)119. Our data demonstrate that phosphorylation at Ser119 plays a significant role in modulating affinity of IGFBP-1 for IGF-I. In addition, an altered profile of IGFBP-1 phosphoisoforms was revealed between FGR and healthy pregnancies that may result from potential site-specific phosphorylation. This study provides a strong basis for use of this novel approach in establishing the linkage between phosphorylation of IGFBP-1 and FGR. This overall strategy will also be broadly applicable to other phosphoproteins with clinical and functional significance. PMID:19193607

  15. Decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) in radiation-induced mouse hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) is a member of the IGFBP family, which was called IGFBP-7 or mac25 previously. Decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 has been shown in breast cancer and prostatic cancer, and tumor suppressive effects of IGFBP-rP1 have been reported in prostatic cancer and osteosarcoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated whether expression levels of IGFBP-rP1 were related to the development and the growth of radiation-induced hepatomas of B6C3F1 mice. In northern blot analysis, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 gene were shown in radiation-induced mouse hepatomas compared to normal livers. In hepatoma cell lines established from these hepatomas, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 were strongly related to the grade of anchorage-independent growth. In cell lines which were transfected with IGFBP-rP1cDNA, the doubling time of cell growth was increased, and the number and the size of colony formation in soft agar culture were decreased. In tumor formation assay by injecting these cells to B6C3F1 mice subcutaneously, the volume of tumors were decreased. Furthermore, the decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 gene was observed in human hepatomas by northern blot analysis. These results may suggest that the suppression of IGFBP-rP1 is related to development and progression of mouse and human hepatomas. (author)

  16. Presence of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins Correlates With Tumor-Promoting Effects of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyun Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The stroma of breast cancer can promote the disease’s progression, but whether its composition and functions are shared among different subtypes is poorly explored. We compared stromal components of a luminal [mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV–Neu] and a triple-negative/basal-like [C3(1–Simian virus 40 large T antigen (Tag] genetically engineered breast cancer mouse model. The types of cytokines and their expression levels were very different in the two models, as was the extent of innate immune cell infiltration; however, both models showed infiltration of innate immune cells that expressed matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, an extracellular protease linked to the progression of many types of cancer. By intercrossing with Mmp9 null mice, we found that the absence of MMP9 delayed tumor onset in the C3(1-Tag model but had no effect on tumor onset in the MMTV-Neu model. We discovered that protein levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1, an MMP9 substrate, were increased in C3(1-Tag;Mmp9−/− compared to C3(1-Tag;Mmp9+/+ tumors. In contrast, IGFBP-1 protein expression was low in MMTV-Neu tumors regardless of Mmp9 status. IGFBP-1 binds and antagonizes IGFs, preventing them from activating their receptors to promote cell proliferation and survival. Tumors from C3(1-Tag;Mmp9−/− mice had reduced IGF-1 receptor phosphorylation, consistent with slower tumor onset. Finally, gene expression analysis of human breast tumors showed that high expression of IGFBP mRNA was strongly correlated with good prognosis but not when MMP9 mRNA was also highly expressed. In conclusion, MMP9 has different effects on breast cancer progression depending on whether IGFBPs are expressed.

  17. Lack of diurnal rhythm of low molecular weight insulin-like growth factor binding protein in patients with Cushing's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degerblad, M.; Povoa, G.; Thoren, M.; Wivall, I.-L.; Hall, K.

    1989-01-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay with antibodies raised against the 25 kD insulin-like growth factor binding protein (25 kD IGFBP) in amniotic fluid was used to measure levels of cross-reacting protein in human serum and plasma. Plasma samples collected continually at 20-min intervals during 24-h in 6 healthy adults revealed a distinct diurnal rhythm in the concentration of 25 kD IGFBP. The lowest levels (9-13 ..mu..g/l) were found between 13.00 and 24.00 h with a rise after midnight to maximum levels (23-71 ..mu..g/l) between 03.00 and 09.00 h. There was no relation between the patterns of GH and 25 kD IGFBP. In 3 patients with active Cushing's disease, the levels of 25 kD IGFBP in plasma samples collected during 12 h. 19.00-07.00 h, were generally low and without nocturnal variations. One of the patients studied after extirpation of a pituitary adenoma displayed a nocturnal rhythm with maximum levels of 25 kD IGFBP between 03.00 and 07.00 h. Eight patients treated with stereotactic pituitary irradiation owing to Cushing's disease also showed a distinct nocturnal increase of 25 kD IGFBP. The results indicate the existence of a diurnal rhythm of 25 kD IGFBP in adults. Further, low levels and lack of diurnal rhythm of 25 kD IGFBP are demonstrated in Cushing's disease.

  18. The joint effects of arsenic and risk diplotypes of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Ya-Li; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Jen; Chen, Shih-Shan; Lin, Ying-Chin; Su, Chien-Tien; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The association between renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and diabetes mellitus (DM), alcohol consumption, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) gene, and arsenic exposure, has been the subject of independent studies. However, few studies have examined the combined effect of these factors on RCC risk. The aim of this study was to examine the association between these risk factors and the odds ratio (OR) of RCC. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in 398 RCC patients and 756 age- and gender-matched non-cancer controls. Genomic DNA was used to examine the genotype of IRS-1 (Gly972Arg), PI3-K (Met362Ile), IGFBP-3 (A[-202]C), and IGFBP-3 (C[-1590]A) by PCR-RFLP. Profiles of urinary arsenic were measured by high performance liquid chromatography linked with hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Participants who had never consumed alcohol and who had high total levels of urinary arsenic and DM had a high OR of RCC. IGFBP-3 (A[-202]C) and IGFBP-3 (C[-1590]A) were in linkage disequilibrium. Participants carrying high-risk IGFBP-3 diplotypes A-C/C-C, A-A/A-C, and C-A/C-A had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (2.80, 1.91-4.12) of RCC compared to those carrying other IGFBP-3 diplotypes. This is the first study to show that borderline significant interaction of high total levels of urinary arsenic and IGFBP-3 high-risk diplotypes significantly enhanced the OR of RCC. Our data also provide evidence that subjects with more risk factors (e.g., high total levels of urinary arsenic, never consumed alcohol, IGFBP-3 high-risk diplotypes) may experience a higher OR of RCC. PMID:27038904

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in the bovine mammary gland: Receptors, endogenous secretion, and appearance in milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    This is the first study to characterize both insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in bovine milk, to characterize the IGF-I receptor in the dry and lactating mammary gland, and to report de novo synthesis and secretion of IGF-I and IGFBP from normal mammary tissue. Immunoreactive IGF-I was principally associated with 45 kDa IGFBP in milk. Multiparous cows had a higher IGF-I concentration of 307 ng/ml than primiparous cows at 147 ng/ml. IGF-I concentration on day 56 of lactation was 34 ng/ml for combined parity groups. At parturition, IGF-I mass in blood and milk pools was 1.4 and 1.2 mg, respectively. Binding of {sup 125}I-IGF-I was specific for IGF-I with anIC{sub 50} of 2.2 ng which was a 10- and 1273-fold greater affinity than IGF-II and insulin, respectively. Association constants, as determined by Scatchard analysis, were similar for both pregnant and lactating cows at 3.5 and 4.0 L/nM, respectively. In addition, estimated mean receptor concentration was 0.25 and 0.23 pM/mg protein for pregnant and lactating cows, respectively. In a survey of mammary microscomes prepared from 48 cows, {sup 125}I-IGF-I binding declined with progressing lactation and a similar trend was observed during pregnancy.

  20. Decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) in radiation-induced mouse hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teishima, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    2002-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) is a member of the IGFBP family, which was called IGFBP-7 or mac25 previously. Decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 has been shown in breast cancer and prostatic cancer, and tumor suppressive effects of IGFBP-rP1 have been reported in prostatic cancer and osteosarcoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated whether expression levels of IGFBP-rP1 were related to the development and the growth of radiation-induced hepatomas of B6C3F1 mice. In northern blot analysis, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 gene were shown in radiation-induced mouse hepatomas compared to normal livers. In hepatoma cell lines established from these hepatomas, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 were strongly related to the grade of anchorage-independent growth. In cell lines which were transfected with IGFBP-rP1cDNA, the doubling time of cell growth was increased, and the number and the size of colony formation in soft agar culture were decreased. In tumor formation assay by injecting these cells to B6C3F1 mice subcutaneously, the volume of tumors were decreased. Furthermore, the decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 gene was observed in human hepatomas by northern blot analysis. These results may suggest that the suppression of IGFBP-rP1 is related to development and progression of mouse and human hepatomas. (author)

  1. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein coding...... independent transcription from within the unit. In genomic regions separating those that encode proteins or highly abundant RNA molecules with known function, transcripts are generally of low abundance and short-lived. In most of these cases, it is unclear to what extent a function is related to transcription...

  2. Beta-casein gene promoter activity is regulated by the hormone-mediated relief of transcriptional repression and a mammary-gland-specific nuclear factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt-Ney, M; Doppler, W; Ball, R K; Groner, B

    1991-01-01

    Transcription from the beta-casein milk protein gene promoter is induced by the synergistic action of glucocorticoid and prolactin hormones in the murine mammary epithelial cell line, HC11. We analyzed the binding of nuclear proteins to the promoter and determined their binding sites. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the function of nuclear factor binding. During lactogenic hormone induction of HC11 cells, the binding of two nuclear factors increased. The binding of two other n...

  3. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (lepidoptera, sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. VI. Microarray analysis reveals that most herbivore-specific transcriptional changes are mediated by fatty acid-amino acid conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halitschke, Rayko; Gase, Klaus; Hui, Dequan; Schmidt, Dominik D; Baldwin, Ian T

    2003-04-01

    Evidence is accumulating that insect-specific plant responses are mediated by constituents in the oral secretions and regurgitants (R) of herbivores, however the relative importance of the different potentially active constituents remains unclear. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) are found in the R of many insect herbivores and have been shown to be necessary and sufficient to elicit a set of herbivore-specific responses when the native tobacco plant Nicotiana attenuata is attacked by the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Attack by this specialist herbivore results in a large transcriptional reorganization in N. attenuata, and 161 genes have been cloned from previous cDNA differential display-polymerase chain reaction and subtractive hybridization with magnetic beads analysis. cDNAs of these genes, in addition to those of 73 new R-responsive genes identified by cDNA-amplified fragment-length polymorphism display of R-elicited plants, were spotted on polyepoxide coated glass slides to create microarrays highly enriched in Manduca spp.- and R-induced genes. With these microarrays, we compare transcriptional responses in N. attenuata treated with R from the two most damaging lepidopteran herbivores of this plant in nature, M. sexta and Manduca quinquemaculata, which have very similar FAC compositions in their R, and with the two most abundant FACs in Manduca spp. R. More than 68% of the genes up- and down-regulated by M. sexta R were similarly regulated by M. quinquemaculata R. A majority of genes up-regulated (64%) and down-regulated (49%) by M. sexta R were similarly regulated by treatment with the two FACs. In contrast, few genes showed similar transcriptional changes after H(2)O(2)- and R-treatment. These results demonstrate that the two most abundant FACs in Manduca spp. R can account for the majority of Manduca spp.-induced alterations of the wound response of N. attenuata. PMID:12692348

  4. Regulation of Wheat Seed Dormancy by After-Ripening Is Mediated by Specific Transcriptional Switches That Induce Changes in Seed Hormone Metabolism and Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Aihua; Gao, Feng; Kanno, Yuri; Jordan, Mark C.; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori; Ayele, Belay T.

    2013-01-01

    Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage) in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum), temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA) metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were...

  5. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the brain of zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata: Organization, interaction with neuropeptide Y, and response to changes in energy status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Omprakash; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Uday; Kumar, Vinod; Lechan, Ronald M; Singru, Praful S

    2016-10-15

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has emerged as a potent anorectic agent. CART is widely distributed in the brain of mammals, amphibians, and teleosts, but the relevant information in avian brain is not available. In birds, CART inhibits food intake, whereas neuropeptide Y (NPY), a well-known orexigenic peptide, stimulates it. How these neuropeptides interact in the brain to regulate energy balance is not known. We studied the distribution of CART-immunoreactivity in the brain of zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, its interaction with NPY, and their response to dynamic energy states. CART-immunoreactive fibers were found in the subpallium, hypothalamus, midbrain, and brainstem. Conspicuous CART-immunoreactive cells were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, hypothalamic paraventricular, supraoptic, dorsomedial, infundibular (IN), lateral hypothalamic, Edinger-Westphal, and parabrachial nuclei. Hypothalamic sections of fed, fasted, and refed animals were immunostained with cFos, NPY, and CART antisera. Fasting dramatically increased cFos- and NPY-immunoreactivity in the IN, followed by rapid reduction by 2 hours and restoration to normal fed levels 6-10 hours after refeeding. CART-immunoreactive fibers in IN showed a significant reduction during fasting and upregulation with refeeding. Within the IN, double immunofluorescence revealed that 94 ± 2.1% of NPY-immunoreactive neurons were contacted by CART-immunoreactive fibers and 96 ± 2.8% NPY-immunoreactive neurons expressed cFos during fasting. Compared to controls, superfused hypothalamic slices of fasted birds treated with CART-peptide showed a significant reduction (P brain of T. guttata may perform several functions, and has a particularly important role in the hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3014-3041, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018984

  6. Ionizing radiation induced transcriptional changes in the developing mouse brain. Doctoral Thesis Prepared at SCK-CEN and Defended in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain damage induced by prenatal irradiation is of major concern in radioprotection. The brain is the final result of a series of well timed consecutive waves of cellular proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Acute irradiation during pregnancy could selectively disturb these events to result in various forms of malformations such as microencephaly, reduced cortical thickness, glioblastoma tumours and/or mental retardation. In this work we concentrated on the transcriptional alterations induced by ionising radiation in the mouse developing brain and its different cell-types. Using cDNA-microarrays and real-time PCR, we analysed the modulated gene expression profile after 50 cGy X-ray exposure in embryonic mouse total brains at three developmental stages. Functional grouping of the modulated mRNA transcripts revealed that the main activated pathways in irradiated wild type embryos are involved in the induction of Trp53 dependent programmed cell death and intracellular signalling cascades. The strong upregulation of Ccng1, Trp53inp1 and Cdkn1a suggested that the tumour suppressor P53 protein is an essential regulator of the radiation induced stress response. Moreover, a decreasing expression profile could be identified at later development, suggesting a reducing sensitivity to radiation. The information obtained lead to a subsequent experiment in which the ionising radiation response in P53 deficient embryonic brains at the same developmental stages was determined. Since both genotypes showed the strongest gene expression modulation at developmental stage E13, we concentrated our initial analysis on this developmental stage. In one hand, wild type embryos show a strong upregulation for Trp53inp1 and Ccng1 in the irradiated E13 mouse brain was observed. Considering the fact that they are involved in similar functions, and that Trp53inp1 is less strongly induced then Ccng1, let us suggest that P53 is tightly regulated through different mechanisms after

  7. Promoter-dependent and -independent activation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 gene expression by prostaglandin E2 in primary rat osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Casinghino, S.; Mittanck, D. W.; Ji, C. H.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) action is mediated by high affinity cell surface IGF receptors and modulated by a family of secreted IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). IGFBP-5, the most conserved of six IGFBPs characterized to date, uniquely potentiates the anabolic actions of IGF-I for skeletal cells. In osteoblasts, IGFBP-5 production is stimulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a local factor that mediates certain effects induced by parathyroid hormone, cytokines such as interleukin-1 and transforming growth factor-beta, and mechanical strain. In this study, we show that transcriptional and post-transcriptional events initiated by PGE2 collaborate to enhance IGFBP-5 gene expression in primary fetal rat osteoblast cultures. PGE2 treatment stimulated up to a 7-fold rise in steady-state levels of IGFBP-5 mRNA throughout 32 h of incubation. Analysis of nascent IGFBP-5 mRNA suggested that PGE2 had only a modest stimulatory effect on IGFBP-5 gene transcription, and transient transfection studies with IGFBP-5 promoter-reporter genes confirmed that PGE2 enhanced promoter activity by approximately 2-fold. Similar stimulatory effects were seen with forskolin. A DNA fragment with only 51 base pairs of the 5'-flanking sequence retained hormonal responsiveness, which may be mediated by a binding site for transcription factor AP-2 located at positions -44 to -36 in the proximal IGFBP-5 promoter. Incubation of osteoblasts with the mRNA transcriptional inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGFBP-5 mRNA stability by 2-fold, increasing the t1/2 from 9 to 18 h. The effects of PGE2 on steady-state IGFBP-5 transcripts were abrogated by preincubating cells with cycloheximide, indicating that the effects of PGE2 on both gene transcription and mRNA stability required ongoing protein synthesis. Therefore, both promoter-dependent and -independent pathways converge to enhance IGFBP-5 gene expression in response to PGE2 in osteoblasts.

  8. MycoperonDB: a database of computationally identified operons and transcriptional units in Mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Akash

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A key post genomics challenge is to identify how genes in an organism come together and perform physiological functions. An important first step in this direction is to identify transcriptional units, operons and regulons in a genome. Here we implement and report a strategy to computationally identify transcriptional units and operons of mycobacteria and construct a database-MycoperonDB. Description We have predicted transcriptional units and operons in mycobacteria and organized these predictions in the form of relational database called MycoperonDB. MycoperonDB database at present consists of 18053 genes organized as 8256 predicted operons and transcriptional units from five closely related species of mycobacteria. The database further provides literature links for experimentally characterized operons. All known promoters and related information is collected, analysed and stored. It provides a user friendly interface to allow a web based navigation of transcription units and operons. The web interface provides search tools to locate transcription factor binding DNA motif upstream to various genes. The reliability of operon prediction has been assessed by comparing the predicted operons with a set of known operons. Conclusion MycoperonDB is a publicly available structured relational database which has information about mycobacterial genes, transcriptional units and operons. We expect this database to assist molecular biologists/microbiologists in general, to hypothesize functional linkages between operonic genes of mycobacteria, their experimental characterization and validation. The database is freely available from our website http://www.cdfd.org.in/mycoperondb/index.html.

  9. Predicting Virulence of Aeromonas Isolates Based-on Changes in Transcription of c-jun and c-fos in Human Tissue Culture Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To assess virulence of Aeromonas isolates based on the change in regulation of c-jun and c-fos in the human intestinal tissue culture cell line Caco-2. Methods and Results: Aeromonas cells were added to Caco-2 cells at approximately a one to one ratio. After 1, 2 and 3 ...

  10. C/EBP transcription factors in human squamous cell carcinoma: selective changes in expression of isoforms correlate with the neoplastic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Anand

    Full Text Available The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Proteins (C/EBPs are a family of leucine-zipper transcription factors that regulate physiological processes such as energy metabolism, inflammation, cell cycle, and the development and differentiation of several tissues including skin. Recently, a role for C/EBPs in tumor cell proliferation and differentiation has been proposed, but the incomplete characterization in the literature of multiple translational isoforms of these proteins has made interpretation of these roles difficult. Therefore, we have carefully reexamined C/EBP isoform expression in human non-melanoma skin cancers. C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and C/EBPδ were analyzed histologically in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC. The individual isoforms of C/EBPα and C/EBPβ were examined by immunofluorescent digital imaging, western blotting and DNA binding activity (electrophoretic mobility shift analysis. Expression of all C/EBP family proteins was decreased in SCC tumors. Suppression was greatest for C/EBPα, less for C/EBPβ, and least for C/EBPδ. Western analyses confirmed that C/EBPα p42 and p30 isoforms were decreased. For C/EBPβ, only the abundant full-length isoform (C/EBPβ-1, LAP*, 55 kD was reduced, whereas the smaller isoforms, C/EBPβ-2 (LAP, 48 kD and C/EBPβ-3 (LIP, 20 kD, which are predominantly nuclear, were significantly increased in well- and moderately-differentiated SCC (up to 14-fold for C/EBPβ-3. These elevations correlated with increases in PCNA, a marker of proliferation. Although C/EBPβ displayed increased post-translational modifications in SCC, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ-1 (Thr 235 was not altered. C/EBP-specific DNA binding activity in nuclear and whole-cell extracts of cultured cells and tumors was predominantly attributable to C/EBPβ. In summary, two short C/EBPβ isoforms, C/EBPβ-2 and C/EBPβ-3, represent strong candidate markers for epithelial skin malignancy, due to their preferential expression in carcinoma versus normal skin, and

  11. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaichik, Yevgeny; Damienikan, Aliaksandr U

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a 'gene by gene' approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows) open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators) in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB) and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp.) and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn't fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci. PMID:27257541

  12. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damienikan, Aliaksandr U.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a ‘gene by gene’ approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows) open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators) in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB) and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp.) and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn’t fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci. PMID:27257541

  13. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 mediates the inhibition of DNA synthesis by transforming growth factor-beta in mink lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Wu, Hai-Bin; Hong, Jiang; Rechler, Matthew M

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has been proposed to mediate the growth inhibitory effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in breast and prostate cancer cells. Both TGF-beta and exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibit DNA synthesis in Mv1 mink lung epithelial cells (CCL64). The present study asks whether IGFBPs synthesized by CCL64 cells mediate growth inhibition by TGF-beta. CCL64 cells synthesize and secrete a single 34-kDa IGFBP that was identified as IGFBP-2 by immunoprecipitation and immunodepletion. Recombinant bovine IGFBP-2 inhibited CCL64 DNA synthesis in serum-free media in an IGF-independent manner. Coincubation with Leu(60)-IGF-I, an IGF-I analog that binds to IGFBPs with higher affinity than to IGF-I receptors, decreased the inhibition by bIGFBP-2. Leu(60)-IGF-I also decreased the inhibition of CCL64 DNA synthesis by TGF-beta by up to 70%, whereas Long-R3-IGF-I, an IGF-I analog with higher affinity for IGF-I receptors than for IGFBPs, did not decrease inhibition, suggesting that the effect of Leu(60)-IGF-I resulted from its forming complexes with endogenous IGFBPs. Leu(60)-IGF-I did not decrease TGF-beta stimulation of a Smad3-dependent reporter gene. Following incubation of intact CCL64 cells with bIGFBP-2 at 0 degrees C, bIGFBP-2 was recovered in membrane fractions; membrane association was abolished by coincubation with Leu(60)-IGF-I. If exogenous and secreted IGFBP-2 must bind to CCL64 cells to inhibit DNA synthesis, Leu(60)-IGF-I might reduce the inhibition of DNA synthesis by bIGFBP-2 or TGF-beta by inhibiting the association of IGFBP-2 in the media with CCL64 cells. Since TGF-beta does not increase IGFBP-2 abundance, we propose that TGF-beta sensitizes CCL64 cells to the latent growth inhibitory activity of endogenous IGFBP-2 by potentiating an intracellular IGFBP-2 signaling pathway or by promoting the association of secreted IGFBP-2 with the plasma membrane. PMID:11807812

  14. Urinary Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) • Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 (IGFBP7) Predicts Adverse Outcome in Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Jens H.; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Waldherr, Sina; Pöschl, Johannes; Teufel, Ulrike; Westhoff, Timm H.; Fichtner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background The G1 cell cycle inhibitors tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) have been identified as promising biomarkers for the prediction of adverse outcomes including renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality in critically ill adult patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the prognostic value of urinary TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 in neonatal and pediatric AKI for adverse outcome has not been investigated yet. Methods The product of the urinary concentration of TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 ([TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7]) was assessed by a commercially available immunoassay (NephroCheck™) in a prospective cohort study in 133 subjects aged 0–18 years including 46 patients with established AKI according to pRIFLE criteria, 27 patients without AKI (non-AKI group I) and 60 apparently healthy neonates and children (non-AKI group II). AKI etiologies were: dehydration/hypovolemia (n = 7), hemodynamic instability (n = 7), perinatal asphyxia (n = 9), septic shock (n = 7), typical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS; n = 5), interstitial nephritis (n = 5), vasculitis (n = 4), nephrotoxic injury (n = 1) and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). Results When AKI patients were classified into pRIFLE criteria, 6/46 (13%) patients fulfilled the criteria for the category “Risk”, 13/46 (28%) for “Injury”, 26/46 (57%) for “Failure” and 1/46 (2%) for “Loss”. Patients in the “Failure” stage had a median 3.7-fold higher urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] compared to non-AKI subjects (P<0.001). When analyzed for AKI etiology, highest [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] values were found in patients with septic shock (P<0.001 vs. non-AKI I+II). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses in the AKI group revealed good performance of [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] in predicting 30-day (area under the curve (AUC) 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61–0.97) and 3-month mortality (AUC 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67–0.99) and moderate performance in predicting RRT

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 is required for the regulation of rat oval cell proliferation and differentiation in the 2AAF/PHX model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C Steiger-Luther

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicole C Steiger-Luther1, Houda Darwiche1, Seh-Hoon Oh1, Jennifer M Williams1, Bryon E Petersen1,21Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Oval cell-mediated liver regeneration is a highly complex process that involves the coordination of several signaling factors, chemokines and cytokines to allow for proper maintenance of the liver architecture. When hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited, an hepatic stem cell population, often referred to as “oval cells”, is activated to aid in liver regeneration. The function of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 during this process of oval cell activation is of particular interest because it is produced in liver and has been shown to induce migration and differentiation of other stem cell populations both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, IGFBP-3 production has been linked to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, a pathway known to be induced during oval cell proliferation. In this study, we set out to determine whether IGFBP-3 plays a role in oval cell proliferation, migration and differentiation during this specific type of regeneration. Through activation of the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration in a rat model, we found that IGFBP-3 is elevated in the liver and serum of animals during peak days of oval cell activation and proliferation. Furthermore, in vitro assays found that WB-344 cells, a liver stem cell line similar to oval cells, were induced to migrate in the presence of IGFBP-3. When expression of IGFBP-3 was knocked down during oval cell activation in vivo, we found that oval cell proliferation was increased and observed the appearance of numerous atypical ductular structures, which were OV-6 and Ki67-positive. Finally, quantitative realtime PCR analysis of liver tissue from IGFBP-3 small interfering

  16. Comparative expression profiling of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 in milk of Bos indicus and Bubalus bubalis during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, S K; Singh, S; Kumar, S; Dang, A K; Datta, T K; Das, S K; Mohanty, T K; Kaushik, J K; Mohanty, A K

    2015-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) is a key molecule in mammary gland development, which facilitates the removal of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) by apoptosis that takes place during remodeling of the mammary gland during involution. IGFBP-5 binds with IGFs for their bioavailability. IGFBP-5 has been reported to perform pleiotropic roles such as cellular apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation. To understand the role of IGFBP-5 during lactation and clinical mastitis, expression profiling of IGFBP-5 at the protein level was performed in both indigenous cows (Bos indicus) and buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) belonging to two different breeds - Sahiwal cows and Murrah buffaloes. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) of IGFBP-5 mRNA confirmed its expression in milk somatic cells and MECs of Sahiwal cows. ELISA was performed for quantitative measurement of IGFBP-5 concentrations in milk during different days (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300) of lactation, during the involution period and in animals exhibiting short lactation and clinical mastitis. The highest concentration of IGFBP-5 in milk was observed during the involution period followed by colostrum, late and early lactation, respectively, in both cattle and buffaloes. No significant difference in the concentration of IGFBP-5 was observed during the first 150 days of lactation between cows and buffaloes. However, higher concentration of IGFBP-5 was observed in cows during late lactation (200 to 300 days) in comparison with buffaloes. To validate the ELISA data, quantitative real-time PCR was performed in MECs of Sahiwal cows. The relative mRNA abundance of IGFBP-5 was found to be significantly (Pcows. Highest mRNA expression of IGFBP-5 was observed around 300 days of lactation followed by 200 and 250 days (Pmilk as compared with Sahiwal cows during lactation in ELISA. Animals having history of short lactation length (short lactating animals) showed higher levels of IGFBP-5 expression (at

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in invasive breast cancers and ductal carcinoma in situ: implications for clinicopathology and patient outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) differentially modulates breast epithelial cell growth through insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-dependent and IGF-independent pathways and is a direct (IGF-independent) growth inhibitor as well as a mitogen that potentiates EGF (epidermal growth factor) and interacts with HER-2. Previously, high IGFBP-3 levels in breast cancers have been determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoradiometric assay methods. In vitro, IGFBP-3's mechanisms of action may involve cell membrane binding and nuclear translocation. To evaluate tumour-specific IGFBP-3 expression and its subcellular localisation, this study examined immunohistochemical IGFBP-3 expression in a series of invasive ductal breast cancers (IDCs) with synchronous ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) in relation to clinicopathological variables and patient outcome. Immunohistochemical expression of IGFBP-3 was evaluated with the sheep polyclonal antiserum (developed in house) with staining performed as described previously. IGFBP-3 was evaluable in 101 patients with a variable pattern of cytoplasmic expression (positivity of 1+/2+ score) in 85% of invasive and 90% of DCIS components. Strong (2+) IGFBP-3 expression was evident in 32 IDCs and 40 cases of DCIS. A minority of invasive tumours (15%) and DCIS (10%) lacked IGFBP-3 expression. Nuclear IGFBP-3 expression was not detectable in either invasive cancers or DCIS, with a consistent similarity in IGFBP-3 immunoreactivity in IDCs and DCIS. Positive IGFBP-3 expression showed a possible trend in association with increased proliferation (P = 0.096), oestrogen receptor (ER) negativity (P = 0.06) and HER-2 overexpression (P = 0.065) in invasive tumours and a strong association with ER negativity (P = 0.037) in DCIS. Although IGFBP-3 expression was not an independent prognosticator, IGFBP-3-positive breast cancers may have shorter disease-free and overall survivals, although these did not reach

  18. Genetic variants in insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 are associated with prostate cancer susceptibility in Eastern Chinese Han men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang G

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Guiming Zhang,1–3 Yao Zhu,1,2 Fang Liu,4,5 Chengyuan Gu,1,2 Haitao Chen,4,5 Jianfeng Xu,4–6 Dingwei Ye1,2 1Department of Urology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 3Department of Urology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong, 4Fudan Institute of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 5State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 6Center for Cancer Genomics, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Background: Growing evidence has indicated that insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 polymorphisms are associated with altered risk of prostate cancer (PCa. However, few studies have been conducted in Chinese population to validate this association. Materials and methods: Herein, we examined the association between genetic variants in the IGFBP-3 gene and PCa risk in the Chinese Han population based on a genome-wide association study (1,417 cases and 1,008 controls, and replicated three genetic variants loci in an independent case-control study (1,755 cases and 1,523 controls using Sequenom platform. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs. Results: We found that in the discovery stage, rs9691259 (OR =0.691, 95% CI: 0.587–0.814, P<0.001 and rs6950179 (OR =1.420, 95% CI: 1.201–1.677, P<0.001 were significantly associated with PCa risk, whereas rs2854744 showed a marginal association with PCa risk. In the replication stage, the association between rs9691259 and rs6950179 and PCa risk was not replicated, whereas rs2854744 conferred a significant association with PCa risk (OR =1.399, 95% CI: 1.010–1.937, P=0.043. After combining the two stages, we found that rs9691259, rs6950179, and rs2854744 were all significantly associated with PCa risk. Conclusion

  19. Plant transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1995-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression relies on the recognition of promoter elements by transcription factors. In the past several years, a considerable number of (putative) transcription factors have been identified in plants. Some genes coding for these factors were isolated by south-western screening with oligonucleotides as a probe or by homology-based screening, and others were initially isolated by genetic means and subsequently identified as the genes for transcription factors. These transcription factors often form families of structurally related proteins with similar DNA-binding specificities and in addition, they are sometimes involved in related phenomena. Some groups of factors homo- and/or heterodimerize to increase the length and variability of the target sequences. Transcriptional activators, in general, comprise a modular activation domain. The activities of the transcription factors are controlled by post-translational modification, like phosphorylation and glycosylation, as well as at the levels of nuclear transport, oligomerization, etc. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of plant transcription factors to help understand the mechanistic aspects of the transcriptional regulation of genes. PMID:8589926

  20. Der Zusammenhang zwischen den Blutplasmakonzentrationen des zirkulierenden Insulin-like-Growth-Factor-1 sowie des Insulin-like-Growth-Factor-Binding-Protein-3 und dem funktionell-neurologischen Outcome nach ischämischem Schlaganfall

    OpenAIRE

    Armbrust, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Potential neuroprotective effects of both Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) on hypoxically-ischemically injured brain tissue have been contradictorily described elsewhere. The aim of this study was to determine if plasma levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 assessed in stroke patients within the acute phase are indicative of three months functional outcome. Methods: IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 plasma levels were measured using a chemil...

  1. Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) Blocks the Effects of Asthma by Negatively Regulating NF-κB Signaling through IGFBP-3R-mediated Activation of Caspases*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Chul; Jogie-Brahim, Sherryline; Lee, Dae-Yeol; Han, Jinfeng; Harada, Aki; Murphy, Liam J.; Oh, Youngman

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a multifunctional protein known for modulating mitogenic and metabolic actions of IGFs as well as exerting a variety of biological actions not involving IGFs. Here, we show that IGFBP-3 blocks specific physiological consequences of asthma in an IGF-independent manner in vitro and in vivo. IGFBP-3 treatment effectively reduced all physiological manifestations of asthma examined in vivo (airway hyper-responsiveness, cellular and patholog...

  2. An interferon regulatory factor binding site in the U5 region of the bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeat stimulates Tax-independent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermer, V; Van Lint, C; Briclet, D; Vanhulle, C; Kettmann, R; Verdin, E; Burny, A; Droogmans, L

    1998-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) replication is controlled by both cis- and trans-acting elements. The virus-encoded transactivator, Tax, is necessary for efficient transcription from the BLV promoter, although it is not present during the early stages of infection. Therefore, sequences that control Tax-independent transcription must play an important role in the initiation of viral gene expression. This study demonstrates that the R-U5 sequence of BLV stimulates Tax-independent reporter gene expression directed by the BLV promoter. R-U5 was also stimulatory when inserted immediately downstream from the transcription initiation site of a heterologous promoter. Progressive deletion analysis of this region revealed that a 46-bp element corresponding to the 5' half of U5 is principally responsible for the stimulation. This element exhibited enhancer activity when inserted upstream or downstream from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. This enhancer contains a binding site for the interferon regulatory factors IRF-1 and IRF-2. A 3-bp mutation that destroys the IRF recognition site caused a twofold decrease in Tax-independent BLV long terminal repeat-driven gene expression. These observations suggest that the IRF binding site in the U5 region of BLV plays a role in the initiation of virus replication. PMID:9621009

  3. Physical training and weight loss in dogs lead to transcriptional changes in genes involved in the glucose-transport pathway in muscle and adipose tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrera Uribe, Juber; Vitger, Anne Désiré; Ritz, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    little attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in the transcriptome of key energy metabolism genes in muscle and adipose tissues in response to diet-induced weight loss alone, or combined with exercise in dogs. Overweight pet dogs were enrolled on a weight loss programme, based......Obesity is a worldwide problem in humans and domestic animals. Interventions, including a combination of dietary management and exercise, have proven to be effective for inducing weight loss in humans. In companion animals, the role of exercise in the management of obesity has received relatively...

  4. Transcriptional changes in epigenetic modifiers associated with gene silencing in the intestine of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka), during aestivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianming; Yang, Hongsheng; Zhao, Huan; Chen, Muyan; Wang, Bing

    2011-11-01

    The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, undergoes aestivation to improve survival during periods of high-temperature. During aestivation, the metabolic rate is depressed to reduce the consumption of reserved energy. We evaluated the role of epigenetic modification on global gene silencing during metabolic rate depression in the sea cucumber. We compared the expression of epigenetic modifiers in active and aestivating sea cucumbers. The expression of three genes involved in DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling (DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1, Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2), and Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 5) was significantly higher during aestivation (Days 20 and 40). Similarly, we observed an increase in the expression of genes involved in histone acetylation (Histone deacetylase 3) and Histone-binding protein RBBP4) during the early (Days 5 and 10) and late phases (Days 20 and 40) of aestivation. There was no change in the expression of KAT2B, a histone acetyltransferase. However, the expression of histone methylation associated modifiers (Histone-arginine methyltransferase CARMER and Histone-lysine N-methyltransferase MLL5) was significantly higher after 5 d in the aestivating group. The results suggest that the expression of epigenetic modifiers involved in DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone methylation is upregulated during aestivation. We hypothesize that these changes regulate global gene silencing during aestivation in A. japonicus.

  5. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  6. NFAT5 regulates transcription of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kotake, Yojiro; Yamashita, Makiko; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori, E-mail: katakura.yoshinori.528@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2010-12-10

    We aimed to clarify the transcription-regulation mechanisms of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (mTERT). First, we searched for the promoter region required for transcriptional activation of mTERT and identified an enhancer cis-element (named mTERT-EE) located between - 200 and - 179 bp of the mouse TERT gene (mTERT). EMSA results suggested that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) member proteins bind to mTERT-EE. We then identified NFAT5 as the factor binding to mTERT-EE and found that it activates the transcription of the mTERT core promoter. The results that siRNA directed against NFAT5 significantly reduced mTERT expression and mTERT core promoter activity and that the expressions of NFAT5 and mTERT were well correlated in various mouse tissues except liver suggest that NFAT5 dominantly and directly regulates mTERT expression. To clarify their functionality further, we investigated the effect of hypertonic stress, a known stimulus affecting the expression and transcriptional activity of NFAT5, on mTERT expression. The result indicated that hypertonic stress activates mTERT transcription via the activation and recruitment of NFAT5 to the mTERT promoter. These results provide useful information about the transcription-regulation mechanisms of mTERT.

  7. Novel Data Fusion Method and Exploration of Multiple Information Sources for Transcription Factor Target Gene Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Xiaofeng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Revealing protein-DNA interactions is a key problem in understanding transcriptional regulation at mechanistic level. Computational methods have an important role in predicting transcription factor target gene genomewide. Multiple data fusion provides a natural way to improve transcription factor target gene predictions because sequence specificities alone are not sufficient to accurately predict transcription factor binding sites. Methods. Here we develop a new data fusion method to combine multiple genome-level data sources and study the extent to which DNA duplex stability and nucleosome positioning information, either alone or in combination with other data sources, can improve the prediction of transcription factor target gene. Results. Results on a carefully constructed test set of verified binding sites in mouse genome demonstrate that our new multiple data fusion method can reduce false positive rates, and that DNA duplex stability and nucleosome occupation data can improve the accuracy of transcription factor target gene predictions, especially when combined with other genome-level data sources. Cross-validation and other randomization tests confirm the predictive performance of our method. Our results also show that nonredundant data sources provide the most efficient data fusion.

  8. [Avoidance of feudal taboo on emperors' names in perused versions of Yi jin jing (Classic of Changing Tendon) and the time of its transcription and blockprinting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Bin

    2013-11-01

    By studying the avoidance of feudal taboo on emperors' names in the perusal of 48 extant versions of Yi jin jing (Classic of Changing Tendon), together with their contents, it is found that these versions are of valuable editions and 15 of them can be viewed as the early representative works of Yi jin jing, including 8 hand copied versions, and 7 blockprinted versions. No version of the Ming Dynasty can be found. The earliest versions are all transcribed ones, while the earliest extant blockprinted version appeared until the Daoguang reign of the Qing Dynasty. The preface of Shen's checked version doesn't avoid the emperor's name, saying that it was written in the "xin chou" year of Shunzhi, hence, it should be copied in the early Kangxi reign, and is the earliest hand copied version. The hand copied version of Yongzheng reign avoids the word "xuan", yet doesn't avoid the word "hong", also with a preface written in Yongzheng reign, indicating that this one is the earliest next to the previous one. Since the Xidi version avoids both the words "xuan" and "hong", it should be copied during or after the Qianlong reign. The earliest extant blockprinted edition is the one checked and printed by Fu Jin-quan in the third year of Daoguang which might also be the earliest blockprinted edition. That collection by Zhu Wenlan and Laizhangshi might be all later editions. PMID:24524641

  9. Characterisation of Transcriptional Changes in the Spinal Cord of the Progressive Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Biozzi ABH Mouse Model by RNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David; Selwood, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating immune-mediated neurological disorder affecting young adults. MS is primarily relapsing-remitting, but neurodegeneration and disability accumulate from disease onset. The most commonly used mouse MS models exhibit a monophasic immune response with fast accumulation of neurological damage that does not allow the study of progressive neurodegeneration. The chronic relapsing and secondary progressive EAE (pEAE) Biozzi ABH mouse model of MS exhibits a reproducible relapsing-remitting disease course that slowly accumulates permanent neurological deficit and develops a post-relapsing progressive disease that permits the study of demyelination and neurodegeneration. RNA sequencing (RNAseq) was used to explore global gene expression in the pEAE Biozzi ABH mouse. Spinal cord tissue RNA from pEAE Biozzi ABH mice and healthy age-matched controls was sequenced. 2,072 genes were differentially expressed (q<0.05) from which 1,397 were significantly upregulated and 675 were significantly downregulated. This hypothesis-free investigation characterised the genomic changes that describe the pEAE mouse model. The differentially expressed genes revealed a persistent immunoreactant phenotype, combined with downregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis superpathway and the LXR/RXR activation pathway. Genes differentially expressed include the myelination genes Slc17a7, Ugt8A and Opalin, the neuroprotective genes Sprr1A, Osm and Wisp2, as well as genes identified as MS risk factors, including RGs14 and Scap2. Novel genes with unestablished roles in EAE or MS were also identified. The identification of differentially expressed novel genes and genes involved in MS pathology, opens the door to their functional study in the pEAE mouse model which recapitulates some of the important clinical features of progressive MS. PMID:27355629

  10. AthaMap web tools for the analysis of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    The AthaMap database provides a map of verified and predicted transcription factor (TF) and small RNA-binding sites for the A. thaliana genome. The database can be used for bioinformatic predictions of putative regulatory sites. Several online web tools are available that address specific questions. Starting with the identification of transcription factor-binding sites (TFBS) in any gene of interest, colocalizing TFBS can be identified as well as common TFBS in a set of user-provided genes. Furthermore, genes can be identified that are potentially targeted by specific transcription factors or small inhibitory RNAs. This chapter provides detailed information on how each AthaMap web tool can be used online. Examples on how this database is used to address questions in circadian and diurnal regulation are given. Furthermore, complementary databases and databases that go beyond questions addressed with AthaMap are discussed. PMID:24792049

  11. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  12. Two-dimensional electrophoretic mobility shift assay: identification and mapping of transcription factor CTCF target sequences within an FXYD5-COX7A1 region of human chromosome 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetchinova, Anna S; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-07-01

    An approach for fast identification and mapping of transcription factor binding sites within long genomic sequences is proposed. Using this approach, 10 CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding sites were identified within a 1-Mb FXYD5-COX7A1 human chromosome 19 region. In vivo binding of CTCF to these sites was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CTCF binding sites were mapped within gene introns and intergenic regions, and some of them contained Alu-like repeated elements. PMID:16701069

  13. Mecasermin rinfabate: insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, mecaserimin rinfibate, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Insmed is developing mecasermin rinfabate, a recombinant complex of insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I) and binding protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3) [insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3, SomatoKine], for a number of metabolic and endocrine indications. In the human body, IGF-I circulates in the blood bound to a binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which regulates the delivery of IGF-I to target tissues, and particular proteases clip them apart in response to stresses and release IGF-I as needed. IGF-I, a naturally occurring hormone, is necessary for normal growth and metabolism. For the treatment of IGF-I deficiency, it is desirable to administer IGF-I bound to IGFBP-3 to maintain the normal equilibrium of these proteins in the blood. Mecasermin rinfabate (rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3) mimics the effects of the natural protein complex in the bloodstream and would augment the natural supply of these linked compounds. The most advanced indication in development of mecasermin rinfabate is the treatment of severe growth disorders due to growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), also called Laron syndrome. GHIS is a genetic condition in which patients do not produce adequate quantities of IGF because of a failure to respond to the growth hormone signal. This results in a slower growth rate and short stature. Mecasermin rinfabate also has potential as replacement therapy for IGF-I, which may become depleted in indications such as major surgery, organ damage/failure, traumatic injury, cachexia and severe burn trauma. It also has potential for the treatment of osteoporosis. Mecasermin rinfabate was developed by Celtrix using its proprietary recombinant protein production technology. Subsequently, Celtrix was acquired by Insmed Pharmaceuticals on 1 June 2000. Insmed and Avecia of the UK have signed an agreement for manufacturing mecasermin rinfabate and its components, rhIGF-1 and rhIGFBP-3. CGMP clinical production of mecasermin rinfabate

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the VEGF gene in dependence of individual genomic variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Carmen S; Koutsimpelas, Dimitrios; Brieger, Juergen

    2015-12-01

    Overexpression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene has been associated with advanced stage and poor survival in several cancers. The majority of disease-associated VEGF-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) locate within regulatory regions. Therefore, an influence of SNPs located in the promoter/5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) on transcription factor binding (TFB) and gene expression seems feasible. We reviewed the literature investigating a potential connection of VEGF-SNPs and transcriptional regulation of the VEGF gene. In addition, we employed transcription factor databases to search for VEGF-SNPs which have already been associated with diseases. The objective of this review is to gain an overview about an association of VEGF-SNPs and the transcription factor dependent regulation of the VEGF gene. A decreasing binding specificity of the transcription factor MZF1 in presence of the VEGF-SNP +405 C-allele has been reported. TF databases indicated a potential HIF binding site for the -2578 C-allele representing an important potential inducer of VEGF expression. Additionally, linkage disequilibrium of the -2578 A-allele and an 18 bp insertion increases the number of potential TFB sites. For the VEGF promoter SNP -1154 A/G an interaction with the HRE under participation of the SNP +405 C/G was supposed. The comprehension of the association of specific SNPs and TFB could be an essential part in our understanding of individual differences of VEGF regulation and course of diseases. PMID:26209503

  15. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific 32P-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect

  16. Operator Sequence Alters Gene Expression Independently of Transcription Factor Occupancy in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan G. Garcia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A canonical quantitative view of transcriptional regulation holds that the only role of operator sequence is to set the probability of transcription factor binding, with operator occupancy determining the level of gene expression. In this work, we test this idea by characterizing repression in vivo and the binding of RNA polymerase in vitro in experiments where operators of various sequences were placed either upstream or downstream from the promoter in Escherichia coli. Surprisingly, we find that operators with a weaker binding affinity can yield higher repression levels than stronger operators. Repressor bound to upstream operators modulates promoter escape, and the magnitude of this modulation is not correlated with the repressor-operator binding affinity. This suggests that operator sequences may modulate transcription by altering the nature of the interaction of the bound transcription factor with the transcriptional machinery, implying a new layer of sequence dependence that must be confronted in the quantitative understanding of gene expression.

  17. Distinguishing the Transcription Regulation Patterns in Promoters of Human Genes with Different Function or Evolutionary Age

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2012-07-01

    Distinguishing transcription regulatory patterns of different gene groups is a common problem in various bioinformatics studies. In this work we developed a methodology to deal with such a problem based on machine learning techniques. We applied our method to two biologically important problems related to detecting a difference in transcription regulation of: a/ protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human, as well as b/ a difference between primate-specific and non-primate-specific long non-coding RNAs. Our method is capable to classify RNAs using various regulatory features of genes that transcribe into these RNAs, such as nucleotide frequencies, transcription factor binding sites, de novo sequence motifs, CpG islands, repetitive elements, histone modification marks, and others. Ten-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish protein-coding and non-coding RNAs with accuracy above 80%. Twenty-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish primate-specific from non-primate-specific promoters of lncRNAs with accuracy above 80%. Consequently, we can hypothesize that transcription of the groups of genes mentioned above are regulated by different mechanisms. Feature selection techniques allowed us to reduce the number of features significantly while keeping the accuracy around 80%. Consequently, we can conclude that selected features play significant role in transcription regulation of coding and non-coding genes, as well as primate-specific and non-primate-specific lncRNA genes.

  18. MPTP's pathway of toxicity indicates central role of transcription factor SP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, Alexandra; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Kleensang, Andre; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Deriving a Pathway of Toxicity from transcriptomic data remains a challenging task. We explore the use of weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) to extract an initial network from a small microarray study of MPTP toxicity in mice. Five modules were statistically significant; each module was analyzed for gene signatures in the Chemical and Genetic Perturbation subset of the Molecular Signatures Database as well as for over-represented transcription factor binding sites and WGCNA clustered probes by function and captured pathways relevant to neurodegenerative disorders. The resulting network was analyzed for transcription factor candidates, which were narrowed down via text-mining for relevance to the disease model, and then combined with the large-scale interaction FANTOM4 database to generate a genetic regulatory network. Modules were enriched for transcription factors relevant to Parkinson's disease. Transcription factors significantly improved the number of genes that could be connected in a given component. For each module, the transcription factor that had, by far, the highest number of interactions was SP1, and it also had substantial experimental evidence of interactions. This analysis both captures much of the known biology of MPTP toxicity and suggests several candidates for further study. Furthermore, the analysis strongly suggests that SP1 plays a central role in coordinating the cellular response to MPTP toxicity. PMID:25851821

  19. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Tejerina Pardo, Luis; Zamudio, María Sofía; Contreras, Carolina; Undurraga, Pedro; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2016-01-01

    Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. "Concha Lisa". Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH) and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27120592

  20. Protease-resistant form of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 is an inhibitor of insulin-like growth factor-I actions on porcine smooth muscle cells in culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Y; Busby, W H; Smith, C. E.; Clarke, J. B.; Garmong, A J; Horwitz, G D; Rees, C. van; Clemmons, D R

    1997-01-01

    IGFs are pleiotrophic mitogens for porcine smooth muscle cells (pSMC) in culture. The effects of IGFs on cells are modulated by various insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBP). IGFBP-5 is synthesized by pSMC and binds to the extracellular matrix. However, IGFBP-5 is also secreted into conditioned medium of cultured cells and is cleaved into fragments by a concomitantly produced protease. These fragments have reduced affinity for the IGFs and cleavage makes it difficult to assess t...

  1. 放射線誘発マウス肝癌におけるInsulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1(IGFBP-rP1)の発現低下 <原著>

    OpenAIRE

    亭島, 淳

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) is a member of the IGFBP family, which was called IGFBP-7 or mac25 previously. Decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 has been shown in breast cancer and prostatic cancer, and tumor suppressive effects of IGFBP-rP1 have been reported in prostatic cancer and osteosarcoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated whether expression levels of IGFBP-rP1 were related to the development and the growth of radiation-induced h...

  2. Characterization of Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) interaction with the Bovine Aortic Endothelial (BAE) cell surface : Examination of the Role of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans (HSPG).

    OpenAIRE

    Parghi, Nirav

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are known to be important modulators of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). However, their precise role is as yet unclear. Further, recent studies have indicated that IGFBP-3 has a receptor mediated growth inhibitory response of its own. In the present study, we quantified the binding characteristics of IGFBP-3 to bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells. Binding studies at 4 oC were conducted and a specific binding curve for IGFB...

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 promotes transforming growth factor-β1-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and motility in transformed human esophageal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Ohashi, Shinya; Wong, Gabrielle S; Ahmadi, Azal; Kalman, Ross A.; Budo, Daniela; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Herlyn, Meenhard; Diehl, J. Alan; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 is overexpressed frequently in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Yet, the role of IGFBP3 in esophageal tumor biology remains to be elucidated. We find that IGFBP3 facilitates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in transformed human esophageal epithelial cells, EPC2–hTERT–EGFR–p53R175H. In organotypic 3D culture, a form of human tissue engineering, laser-capture microdissection revealed c...

  4. Collective Properties of a Transcription Initiation Model Under Varying Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yucheng; Lowengrub, John S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of gene transcription is tightly regulated in eukaryotes. Recent experiments have revealed various kinds of transcriptional dynamics, such as RNA polymerase II pausing, that involves regulation at the transcription initiation stage, and the choice of different regulation pattern is closely related to the physiological functions of the target gene. Here we consider a simplified model of transcription initiation, a process including the assembly of transcription complex and the pausing and releasing of the RNA polymerase II. Focusing on the collective behaviors of a population level, we explore the potential regulatory functions this model can offer. These functions include fast and synchronized response to environmental change, or long-term memory about the transcriptional status. As a proof of concept we also show that, by selecting different control mechanisms cells can adapt to different environments. These findings may help us better understand the design principles of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26645781

  5. Hierarchical regulation of the genome: global changes in nucleosome organization potentiate genome response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Brittany S.; Druliner, Brooke R.; Vera, Daniel L.; Avey, Denis; Zhu, Fanxiu; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome occupancy is critically important in regulating access to the eukaryotic genome. Few studies in human cells have measured genome-wide nucleosome distributions at high temporal resolution during a response to a common stimulus. We measured nucleosome distributions at high temporal resolution following Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) reactivation using our newly developed mTSS-seq technology, which maps nucleosome distribution at the transcription start sites (TSS) of all human genes. Nucleosomes underwent widespread changes in organization 24 hours after KSHV reactivation and returned to their basal nucleosomal architecture 48 hours after KSHV reactivation. The widespread changes consisted of an indiscriminate remodeling event resulting in the loss of nucleosome rotational phasing signals. Additionally, one in six TSSs in the human genome possessed nucleosomes that are translationally remodeled. 72% of the loci with translationally remodeled nucleosomes have nucleosomes that moved to positions encoded by the underlying DNA sequence. Finally we demonstrated that these widespread alterations in nucleosomal architecture potentiated regulatory factor binding. These descriptions of nucleosomal architecture changes provide a new framework for understanding the role of chromatin in the genomic response, and have allowed us to propose a hierarchical model for chromatin-based regulation of genome response. PMID:26771136

  6. Genome-wide integration on transcription factors, histone acetylation and gene expression reveals genes co-regulated by histone modification patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Natsume-Kitatani

    Full Text Available N-terminal tails of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 histone families are subjected to posttranslational modifications that take part in transcriptional regulation mechanisms, such as transcription factor binding and gene expression. Regulation mechanisms under control of histone modification are important but remain largely unclear, despite of emerging datasets for comprehensive analysis of histone modification. In this paper, we focus on what we call genetic harmonious units (GHUs, which are co-occurring patterns among transcription factor binding, gene expression and histone modification. We present the first genome-wide approach that captures GHUs by combining ChIP-chip with microarray datasets from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our approach employs noise-robust soft clustering to select patterns which share the same preferences in transcription factor-binding, histone modification and gene expression, which are all currently implied to be closely correlated. The detected patterns are a well-studied acetylation of lysine 16 of H4 in glucose depletion as well as co-acetylation of five lysine residues of H3 with H4 Lys12 and H2A Lys7 responsible for ribosome biogenesis. Furthermore, our method further suggested the recognition of acetylated H4 Lys16 being crucial to histone acetyltransferase ESA1, whose essential role is still under controversy, from a microarray dataset on ESA1 and its bypass suppressor mutants. These results demonstrate that our approach allows us to provide clearer principles behind gene regulation mechanisms under histone modifications and detect GHUs further by applying to other microarray and ChIP-chip datasets. The source code of our method, which was implemented in MATLAB (http://www.mathworks.com/, is available from the supporting page for this paper: http://www.bic.kyoto-u.ac.jp/pathway/natsume/hm_detector.htm.

  7. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single

  8. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any a

  9. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb. PMID:27207833

  10. Gene-Silencing-Induced Changes in Carbohydrate Conformation in Relation to Bioenergy Value and Carbohydrate Subfractions in Modeled Plant (Medicago sativa) with Down-Regulation of HB12 and TT8 Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxin; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Zhang, Yonggen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing with RNA interference (RNAi) technology may be capable of modifying internal structure at a molecular level. This structural modification could affect biofunctions in terms of biodegradation, biochemical metabolism, and bioactive compound availability. The objectives of this study were to (1) Detect gene silencing-induced changes in carbohydrate molecular structure in an alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa spp. sativa: alfalfa) with down-regulation of genes that encode transcription factors TT8 and HB12; (2) Determine gene silencing-induced changes in nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa); and (3) Quantify the correlation between gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes and the nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in animals of ruminants. The experimental treatments included: T1 = Non-transgenic and no-gene silenced alfalfa forage (code “NT”); T2 = HB12-RNAi forage with HB12 gene down regulation (code “HB12”); T3 = TT8-RNAi forage with TT8 gene down regulation (code “TT8”). The HB12 and TT8 gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes were determined by non-invasive and non-destructive advanced molecular spectroscopy in a middle infrared radiation region that focused on structural, non-structural and total carbohydrate compounds. The nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability of the modified forage were determined using NRC-2001 system in terms of total digestive nutrient (TDN), truly digestible fiber (tdNDF), non-fiber carbohydrate (tdNDF), fatty acid (tdFA), crude protein (tdCP) and bioenergy profiles (digestible energy, metabolizable energy, net energy) for ruminants. The carbohydrate subfractions were evaluated using the updated CNCPS 6.0 system. The results showed that gene silencing significantly affected tdNFC (42.3 (NT) vs. 38.7 (HB12) vs. 37.4% Dry Matter (TT8); p = 0.016) and tdCP (20.8 (NT) vs. 19.4 (HB12) vs. 22.3% DM (TT8); p = 0.009). The gene-silencing also

  11. Gene-Silencing-Induced Changes in Carbohydrate Conformation in Relation to Bioenergy Value and Carbohydrate Subfractions in Modeled Plant (Medicago sativa) with Down-Regulation of HB12 and TT8 Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxin; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Zhang, Yonggen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gene silencing with RNA interference (RNAi) technology may be capable of modifying internal structure at a molecular level. This structural modification could affect biofunctions in terms of biodegradation, biochemical metabolism, and bioactive compound availability. The objectives of this study were to (1) Detect gene silencing-induced changes in carbohydrate molecular structure in an alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa spp. sativa: alfalfa) with down-regulation of genes that encode transcription factors TT8 and HB12; (2) Determine gene silencing-induced changes in nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa); and (3) Quantify the correlation between gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes and the nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability in animals of ruminants. The experimental treatments included: T1 = Non-transgenic and no-gene silenced alfalfa forage (code "NT"); T2 = HB12-RNAi forage with HB12 gene down regulation (code "HB12"); T3 = TT8-RNAi forage with TT8 gene down regulation (code "TT8"). The HB12 and TT8 gene silencing-induced molecular structure changes were determined by non-invasive and non-destructive advanced molecular spectroscopy in a middle infrared radiation region that focused on structural, non-structural and total carbohydrate compounds. The nutrient bioutilization and bioavailability of the modified forage were determined using NRC-2001 system in terms of total digestive nutrient (TDN), truly digestible fiber (tdNDF), non-fiber carbohydrate (tdNDF), fatty acid (tdFA), crude protein (tdCP) and bioenergy profiles (digestible energy, metabolizable energy, net energy) for ruminants. The carbohydrate subfractions were evaluated using the updated CNCPS 6.0 system. The results showed that gene silencing significantly affected tdNFC (42.3 (NT) vs. 38.7 (HB12) vs. 37.4% Dry Matter (TT8); p = 0.016) and tdCP (20.8 (NT) vs. 19.4 (HB12) vs. 22.3% DM (TT8); p = 0.009). The gene-silencing also affected

  12. Identification of a novel and unique transcription factor in the intraerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Komaki-Yasuda

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of stage-specific gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are largely unclear, with only a small number of specific regulatory transcription factors (AP2 family having been identified. In particular, the transcription factors that function in the intraerythrocytic stage remain to be elucidated. Previously, as a model case for stage-specific transcription in the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic stage, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of pf1-cys-prx, a trophozoite/schizont-specific gene, and suggested that some nuclear factors bind specifically to the cis-element of pf1-cys-prx and enhance transcription. In the present study, we purified nuclear factors from parasite nuclear extract by 5 steps of chromatography, and identified a factor termed PREBP. PREBP is not included in the AP2 family, and is a novel protein with four K-homology (KH domains. The KH domain is known to be found in RNA-binding or single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. PREBP is well conserved in Plasmodium species and partially conserved in phylum Apicomplexa. To evaluate the effects of PREBP overexpression, we used a transient overexpression and luciferase assay combined approach. Overexpression of PREBP markedly enhanced luciferase expression under the control of the pf1-cys-prx cis-element. These results provide the first evidence of a novel transcription factor that activates the gene expression in the malaria parasite intraerythrocytic stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the evolution of specific transcription machinery in Plasmodium and other eukaryotes.

  13. ANKRD1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of MMP13 via the AP-1 site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almodóvar-García, Karinna; Kwon, Minjae; Samaras, Susan E; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2014-04-01

    The transcriptional cofactor ANKRD1 is sharply induced during wound repair, and its overexpression enhances healing. We recently found that global deletion of murine Ankrd1 impairs wound contraction and enhances necrosis of ischemic wounds. A quantitative PCR array of Ankrd1(-/-) (KO) fibroblasts indicated that ANKRD1 regulates MMP genes. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analyses associated ANKRD1 with nucleolin, which represses AP-1 activation of MMP13. Ankrd1 deletion enhanced both basal and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced MMP13 promoter activity; conversely, Ankrd1 overexpression in control cells decreased PMA-induced MMP13 promoter activity. Ankrd1 reconstitution in KO fibroblasts decreased MMP13 mRNA, while Ankrd1 knockdown increased these levels. MMP13 mRNA and protein were elevated in intact skin and wounds of KO versus Ankrd1(fl/fl) (FLOX) mice. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay gel shift patterns suggested that additional transcription factors bind to the MMP13 AP-1 site in the absence of Ankrd1, and this concept was reinforced by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis as greater binding of c-Jun to the AP-1 site in extracts from FLOX versus KO fibroblasts. We propose that ANKRD1, in association with factors such as nucleolin, represses MMP13 transcription. Ankrd1 deletion additionally relieved MMP10 transcriptional repression. Nuclear ANKRD1 appears to modulate extracellular matrix remodeling by MMPs. PMID:24515436

  14. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  15. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.;

    2009-01-01

    Genome sequencing dramatically increased our ability to understand cellular response to perturbation. Integrating system-wide measurements such as gene expression with networks of protein protein interactions and transcription factor binding revealed critical insights into cellular behavior. Howe...... integrated approach focusing on metabolic measurements will facilitate construction of more realistic models of cellular regulation for understanding diseases and constructing strains for industrial applications....... regulator Gcn4p. Although mRNA expression alone did not directly predict metabolic response, this correlation improved through incorporating a network-based model of amino acid biosynthesis (from r = 0.07 to 0.80 for mRNA-flux agreement). The model provides evidence of general biological principles......: rewiring of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow...

  16. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  17. Respiratory gases and the regulation of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Eoin P; Keogh, Ciara E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights the transcriptional consequences for decreased cellular O2 levels (hypoxia) and increased cellular CO2 levels (hypercapnia). What advances does it highlight? We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia and consider the potential cross-talk between O2 - and CO2 -dependent transcriptional regulation. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are the substrate and product of aerobic metabolism, respectively. Thus, the levels of these physiological gases are inextricably linked in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Increased mitochondrial consumption of O2 (to produce ATP) will produce more CO2 . Furthermore, in lung pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and central hypoventilation syndrome, hypoxia and hypercapnia are co-incident. Acute responses to hypoxia involve carotid body-mediated changes in the rate and depth of breathing. Chronic adaptation to hypoxia involves a multitude of changes on a transcriptional level, which simultaneously increases oxygen utilization (via hypoxia-inducible factor and others), while suppressing superfluous energy-demanding processes. Acute responses to CO2 affect breathing primarily via central chemoreceptors. The nature of hypercapnia-dependent transcriptional regulation is an emerging area of research, but at present the mechanisms underpinning this response are not fully characterized and understood. Thus, given the juxtaposition of hypoxia and hypercapnia in health and disease, this manuscript reviews the current evidence for transcriptional responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, we discuss the potential cross-talk between hypoxia and hypercapnia on a transcriptional level. PMID:27474261

  18. Temperature-dependency of changes in the relaxation of electrochromic shifts, of chlorophyll fluorescence, and in the levels of mRNA transcripts in detached leaves from Pisum sativum exposed to supplementary UV-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detached Pisum sativum leaves were used to study temperature-dependent and temperature-independent effects of supplementary UV-B radiation on chloroplast-associated components and properties. Temperature-independent effects were considered to be due to direct physical damage by the UV-B radiation itself, whereas temperature-dependent damage was thought to be a result of UV-B-triggered chemical reactions. Supplementary UV-B radiation caused a lowering in chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv Fm) at both 2 and 22°C (by about 20 and 2%, respectively); it is likely to be caused by direct interaction of UV-B quanta with Photosystem II (PS II), since no additional decrease was seen in Fv Fm when leaves irradiated at 2°C were subsequently incubated in darkness for 4 h at 22°C. However, chilling made PS II more prone to UV-B damage. The development of the UV-B effect on the relaxation of the electrochromic shift (t1), caused by the trans-thylakoid membrane potential, showed a greater temperature dependency which indicates that UV-B induces chemical reactions that in turn cause the damage. Exposure for 4 h to supplementary UV-B radiation led to a 75% decrease in t1 at 22°C, whereas the effect at 2°C was much smaller (<50%), even smaller than the effect of the chilling itself. Leaves which were first exposed to UV-B at 2°C, and then left in the dark for 4 h, displayed an additional 37% drop in t1 if the leaves were held at 22°C during the dark period but only a 12% drop if they were held at 2°C in the darkness. This indicates that the UV-B exposure triggers changes in the thylakoid membrane at 2°C which are not fully manifested at this temperature. The lowering of lhc mRNA levels were 34% compared to the control in leaves UV-B-treated at 22°C for 4 h, but only 11% when exposed at 2°C. Interestingly, the mRNA levels of lhc transcripts were increased at 2°C compared with the corresponding sample held at 22°C under both control and UV-B-supplemented light regimes, e.g. a 2

  19. Transcription Factors Oct-1 and GATA-3 Cooperatively Regulate Th2 Cytokine Gene Expression via the RHS5 within the Th2 Locus Control Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwan Kim

    Full Text Available The T helper type 2 (Th2 locus control region (LCR regulates Th2 cell differentiation. Several transcription factors bind to the LCR to modulate the expression of Th2 cytokine genes, but the molecular mechanisms behind Th2 cytokine gene regulation are incompletely understood. Here, we used database analysis and an oligonucleotide competition/electrophoretic mobility shift assays to search for transcription factors binding to RHS5, a DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS within the Th2 LCR. Consequently, we demonstrated that GATA-binding protein-3 (GATA-3, E26 transformation-specific protein 1 (Ets-1, octamer transcription factor-1 (Oct-1, and Oct-2 selectively associate with RHS5. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays showed that Oct-1 and Oct-2 bound within the Il4 promoter region and the Th2 LCR, and that Oct-1 and GATA-3 or Oct-2 synergistically triggered the transactivational activity of the Il4 promoter through RHS5. These results suggest that Oct-1 and GATA-3/Oct-2 direct Th2 cytokine gene expression in a cooperative manner.

  20. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of metabolism by using metabolic network topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Cellular response to genetic and environmental perturbations is often reflected and/or mediated through changes in the metabolism, because the latter plays a key role in providing Gibbs free energy and precursors for biosynthesis. Such metabolic changes are often exerted through transcriptional...... changes induced by complex regulatory mechanisms coordinating the activity of different metabolic pathways. It is difficult to map such global transcriptional responses by using traditional methods, because many genes in the metabolic network have relatively small changes at their transcription level. We...... therefore developed an algorithm that is based on hypothesis-driven data analysis to uncover the transcriptional regulatory architecture of metabolic networks. By using information on the metabolic network topology from genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, we show that it is possible to reveal patterns in...

  1. Options in Education, Transcript for April 12, 1976: Review of "Simple Justice," Writing Seminars for Judges and Lawyers, The Teaching of Writing, Visual Literacy, Teacher Internships, System of Interactive Guidance, Changing Jobs, and PKU Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    "Options in Education" is a radio news program which focuses on issues and developments in education. This transcript contains discussions of the book "Simple Justice" by Richard Kluger; writing seminars for judges and lawyers, held by the American Academy of Judicial Education; the teaching of writing; visual literacy--picture words; teacher…

  2. Mechanisms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (mmp-2 transcriptional repression by progesterone in jar choriocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalev Eliezer

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the MMP-2 promoter lacks a canonical progesterone response element (PRE, the hormone inhibits MMP-2 expression and is part of treatment protocols in gynecological invasive pathologies, including endometriosis and endometrial hyperplasia. This study aimed to explore the mechanism by which progesterone inhibits MMP-2 expression. Methods The effect of progesterone on MMP-2 expression in the JAR human choriocarcinoma cell line was analyzed by gelatin zymography. MMP-2 transcript expression was studied using Northern blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Rat promoter deletion analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immuno-precipitation assays were performed in order to locate the DNA binding site and the transcription factors involved in MMP-2 regulation. Results Progesterone significantly decreased secretion of pro-MMP-2 and MMP-2 transcript expression level in a dose-dependent manner. Progesterone (1 microM significantly decreased both human and rat MMP-2 promoter activity (80.1% +/- 0.3 and 81.3% +/- 0.23, respectively. Progesterone acts through the SP1 family transcription factors-binding site, located between -1433 and -1342 bp region from the transcriptional start site of the rat MMP-2 promoter, which are present in the orthologous human MMP-2 promoter. Progesterone receptor (PR, SP2, SP3 and SP4 proteins are constitutively bound to this consensus sequence. Conclusion Progesterone reducesPR and SP4 binding to the MMP-2 promoter, thereby suppressing transcription. Progesterone also promotes SP4 degradation. These novel mechanisms of MMP-2 regulation by progesterone provide the biological rationale for the use of progesterone in clinical settings associated with increased MMP-2 expression.

  3. Reliable transfer of transcriptional gene regulatory networks between taxonomically related organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauch Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation of gene activity is essential for any living organism. Transcription factors therefore recognize specific binding sites within the DNA to regulate the expression of particular target genes. The genome-scale reconstruction of the emerging regulatory networks is important for biotechnology and human medicine but cost-intensive, time-consuming, and impossible to perform for any species separately. By using bioinformatics methods one can partially transfer networks from well-studied model organisms to closely related species. However, the prediction quality is limited by the low level of evolutionary conservation of the transcription factor binding sites, even within organisms of the same genus. Results Here we present an integrated bioinformatics workflow that assures the reliability of transferred gene regulatory networks. Our approach combines three methods that can be applied on a large-scale: re-assessment of annotated binding sites, subsequent binding site prediction, and homology detection. A gene regulatory interaction is considered to be conserved if (1 the transcription factor, (2 the adjusted binding site, and (3 the target gene are conserved. The power of the approach is demonstrated by transferring gene regulations from the model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum to the human pathogens C. diphtheriae, C. jeikeium, and the biotechnologically relevant C. efficiens. For these three organisms we identified reliable transcriptional regulations for ~40% of the common transcription factors, compared to ~5% for which knowledge was available before. Conclusion Our results suggest that trustworthy genome-scale transfer of gene regulatory networks between organisms is feasible in general but still limited by the level of evolutionary conservation.

  4. Ubiquitin and proteasomes in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription-from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus-is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system--from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome-are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  5. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte eCaarls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  6. Diterpenoid phytoalexin factor, a bHLH transcription factor, plays a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Chihiro; Mizutani, Emi; Okada, Kazunori; Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Setsuko; Tanaka, Atsunori; Maeda, Satoru; Kamakura, Takashi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) produces diterpenoid phytoalexins (DPs), momilactones and phytocassanes as major phytoalexins. Accumulation of DPs is induced in rice by blast fungus infection, copper chloride or UV light. Here, we describe a rice transcription factor named diterpenoid phytoalexin factor (DPF), which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. The gene encoding DPF is expressed mainly in roots and panicles, and is inducible in leaves by blast infection, copper chloride or UV. Expression of all DP biosynthetic genes and accumulation of momilactones and phytocassanes were remarkably increased and decreased in DPF over-expressing and DPF knockdown rice, respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that DPF positively regulates DP accumulation via transcriptional regulation of DP biosynthetic genes, and plays a central role in the biosynthesis of DPs in rice. Furthermore, DPF activated the promoters of COPALYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE2 (CPS2) and CYTOCHROME P450 MONOOXYGENASE 99A2 (CYP99A2), whose products are implicated in the biosynthesis of phytocassanes and momilactones, respectively. Mutations in the N-boxes in the CPS2 upstream region, to which several animal bHLH transcription factors bind, decreased CPS2 transcription, indicating that DPF positively regulates CPS2 transcription through the N-boxes. In addition, DPF partly regulates CYP99A2 through the N-box. This study demonstrates that DPF acts as a master transcription factor in DP biosynthesis. PMID:26506081

  7. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A; Larson, Jessica L; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Goldstein, Leonard D; Appling, Laurie L; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S; Hansen, David V

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  8. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A.; Larson, Jessica L.; Lauffer, Benjamin E.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Appling, Laurie L.; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Hansen, David V.

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  9. AthaMap-assisted transcription factor target gene identification in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Lorenz; Brill, Yuri; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and small RNA target sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The database contains sites for 115 different transcription factors (TFs). TFBS were identified with positional weight matrices (PWMs) or with single binding sites. With the new web tool 'Gene Identification', it is possible to identify potential target genes for selected TFs. For these analyses, the user can define a region of interest of up to 6000 bp in all annotated genes. For TFBS determined with PWMs, the search can be restricted to high-quality TFBS. The results are displayed in tables that identify the gene, position of the TFBS and, if applicable, individual score of the TFBS. In addition, data files can be downloaded that harbour positional information of TFBS of all TFs in a region between -2000 and +2000 bp relative to the transcription or translation start site. Also, data content of AthaMap was increased and the database was updated to the TAIR8 genome release. Database URL: http://www.athamap.de/gene_ident.php. PMID:21177332

  10. Autopalmitoylation of TEAD proteins regulates transcriptional output of the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, PuiYee; Han, Xiao; Zheng, Baohui; DeRan, Michael; Yu, Jianzhong; Jarugumilli, Gopala K; Deng, Hua; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian; Wu, Xu

    2016-04-01

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors bind to the coactivators YAP and TAZ and regulate the transcriptional output of the Hippo pathway, playing critical roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Protein S-palmitoylation attaches a fatty acid, palmitate, to cysteine residues and regulates protein trafficking, membrane localization and signaling activities. Using activity-based chemical probes, we discovered that human TEADs possess intrinsic palmitoylating enzyme-like activities and undergo autopalmitoylation at evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues under physiological conditions. We determined the crystal structures of lipid-bound TEADs and found that the lipid chain of palmitate inserts into a conserved deep hydrophobic pocket. Strikingly, palmitoylation did not alter TEAD's localization, but it was required for TEAD's binding to YAP and TAZ and was dispensable for its binding to the Vgll4 tumor suppressor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient TEAD mutants impaired TAZ-mediated muscle differentiation in vitro and tissue overgrowth mediated by the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie in vivo. Our study directly links autopalmitoylation to the transcriptional regulation of the Hippo pathway. PMID:26900866

  11. Beyond microarrays: Finding key transcription factors controlling signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kel, Alexdander; Voss, Nico; Jauregui, Ruy; Kel-Margoulis, Olga; Wingender, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Background Massive gene expression changes in different cellular states measured by microarrays, in fact, reflect just an "echo" of real molecular processes in the cells. Transcription factors constitute a class of the regulatory molecules that typically require posttranscriptional modifications or ligand binding in order to exert their function. Therefore, such important functional changes of transcription factors are not directly visible in the microarray experiments. Results We developed a novel approach to find key transcription factors that may explain concerted expression changes of specific components of the signal transduction network. The approach aims at revealing evidence of positive feedback loops in the signal transduction circuits through activation of pathway-specific transcription factors. We demonstrate that promoters of genes encoding components of many known signal transduction pathways are enriched by binding sites of those transcription factors that are endpoints of the considered pathways. Application of the approach to the microarray gene expression data on TNF-alpha stimulated primary human endothelial cells helped to reveal novel key transcription factors potentially involved in the regulation of the signal transduction pathways of the cells. Conclusion We developed a novel computational approach for revealing key transcription factors by knowledge-based analysis of gene expression data with the help of databases on gene regulatory networks (TRANSFAC® and TRANSPATH®). The corresponding software and databases are available at . PMID:17118134

  12. Comprehensive transcriptional landscape of aging mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    White, Ryan R.; Milholland, Brandon; MacRae, Sheila L.; Lin, Mingyan; Zheng, Deyou; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammalian aging is a highly complex process, a full mechanistic understanding of which is still lacking. One way to help understand the molecular changes underlying aging is through a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, the primary determinant of age-related phenotypic diversity. Previous studies have relied on microarray analysis to examine gene expression profiles in different tissues of aging organisms. However, studies have shown microarray-based transcriptional profil...

  13. Orally applied doxazosin disturbed testosterone homeostasis and changed the transcriptional profile of steroidogenic machinery, cAMP/cGMP signalling and adrenergic receptors in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkov, N J; Janjic, M M; Kostic, T S; Andric, S A

    2013-03-01

    Doxazosin (Doxa) is an α1-selective adrenergic receptor (ADR) antagonist widely used, alone or in combination, to treat high blood pressure, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and recently has been suggested as a potential drug for prostate cancer prevention/treatment. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of in vivo Doxa po-application, in clinically relevant dose, on: (i) steroidogenic machinery homeostasis; (ii) cAMP/cGMP signalling; (iii) transcription profile of ADR in Leydig cells of adult rats. The results showed that po-application of Doxa for once (1×Doxa), or for two (2×Doxa) or 10 (10×Doxa) consecutive days significantly disturbed steroidogenic machinery homeostasis in Leydig cells. Doxa po-application significantly decreased circulating luteinizing hormone and androgens levels. The level of androgens in testicular interstitial fluid and that extracted from testes obtained from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats decreased, although it remained unchanged in 10×Doxa rats. Similarly, the ex vivo basal androgen production followed in testes isolated from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats decreased, while remained unchanged in 10×Doxa rats. Differently, ex vivo testosterone production and steroidogenic capacity of Leydig cells isolated from 1×Doxa/2×Doxa rats was stimulated, while 10×Doxa had opposite effect. In the same cells, cAMP content/release showed similar stimulatory effect, but back to control level in Leydig cells of 10×Doxa. 1×Doxa/2×Doxa decreased transcripts for cAMP specific phosphodiesterases Pde7b/Pde8b, whereas 10×Doxa increased Pde4d. All types of treatment reduced the expression of genes encoding protein kinase A (PRKA) regulatory subunit (Prkar2b), whereas only 10×Doxa stimulated catalytic subunit (Prkaca). Doxa application more affected cGMP signalling: stimulated transcription of constitutive nitric oxide synthases (Nos1, Nos3) in time-dependent manner, whereas reduced inducible Nos2. 10×Doxa increased guanylyl cyclase 1 transcript and

  14. Initiation of HIV Reverse Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Marquet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes into double stranded DNA is a key event for viral replication. The very first stage of HIV reverse transcription, the initiation step, involves viral and cellular partners that are selectively packaged into the viral particle, leading to an RNA/protein complex with very specific structural and functional features, some of which being, in the case of HIV-1, linked to particular isolates. Recent understanding of the tight spatio-temporal regulation of reverse transcription and its importance for viral infectivity further points toward reverse transcription and potentially its initiation step as an important drug target.

  15. Transcriptional activation of REST by Sp1 in Huntington's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ravache

    Full Text Available In Huntington's disease (HD, mutant huntingtin (mHtt disrupts the normal transcriptional program of disease neurons by altering the function of several gene expression regulators such as Sp1. REST (Repressor Element-1 Silencing Transcription Factor, a key regulator of neuronal differentiation, is also aberrantly activated in HD by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that the level of REST mRNA is increased in HD mice and in NG108 cells differentiated into neuronal-like cells and expressing a toxic mHtt fragment. Using luciferase reporter gene assay, we delimited the REST promoter regions essential for mHtt-mediated REST upregulation and found that they contain Sp factor binding sites. We provide evidence that Sp1 and Sp3 bind REST promoter and interplay to fine-tune REST transcription. In undifferentiated NG108 cells, Sp1 and Sp3 have antagonistic effect, Sp1 acting as an activator and Sp3 as a repressor. Upon neuronal differentiation, we show that the amount and ratio of Sp1/Sp3 proteins decline, as does REST expression, and that the transcriptional role of Sp3 shifts toward a weak activator. Therefore, our results provide new molecular information to the transcriptional regulation of REST during neuronal differentiation. Importantly, specific knockdown of Sp1 abolishes REST upregulation in NG108 neuronal-like cells expressing mHtt. Our data together with earlier reports suggest that mHtt triggers a pathogenic cascade involving Sp1 activation, which leads to REST upregulation and repression of neuronal genes.

  16. The functional significance of common polymorphisms in zinc finger transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Sarah H; Guan, Anna; Yu, Abigail S; Zhang, Chi; Zykovich, Artem; Korf, Ian; Rannala, Bruce; Segal, David J

    2014-09-01

    Variants that alter the DNA-binding specificity of transcription factors could affect the specificity for and expression of potentially many target genes, as has been observed in several tumor-derived mutations. Here we examined if such trans expression quantitative trait loci (trans-eQTLs) could similarly result from common genetic variants. We chose to focus on the Cys2-His2 class of zinc finger transcription factors because they are the most abundant superfamily of transcription factors in human and have well-characterized DNA binding interactions. We identified 430 SNPs that cause missense substitutions in the DNA-contacting residues. Fewer common missense SNPs were found at DNA-contacting residues compared with non-DNA-contacting residues (P = 0.00006), consistent with possible functional selection against SNPs at DNA-contacting positions. Functional predictions based on zinc finger transcription factor (ZNF) DNA binding preferences also suggested that many common substitutions could potentially alter binding specificity. However, Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium analysis and examination of seven orthologs within the primate lineage failed to find evidence of trans-eQTLs associated with the DNA-contacting positions or evidence of a different selection pressure on a contemporary and evolutionary timescales. The overall conclusion was that common SNPs that alter the DNA-contacting residues of these factors are unlikely to produce strong trans-eQTLs, consistent with the observations by others that trans-eQTLs in humans tend to be few and weak. Some rare SNPs might alter specificity and remained rare due to purifying selection. The study also underscores the need for large-scale eQTLs mapping efforts that might provide experimental evidence for SNPs that alter the choice of transcription factor binding sites. PMID:24970883

  17. Is gene transcription involved in seed dry after-ripening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Meimoun

    Full Text Available Orthodox seeds are living organisms that survive anhydrobiosis and may display dormancy, an inability to germinate at harvest. Seed germination potential can be acquired during a prolonged period of dry storage called after-ripening. The aim of this work was to determine if gene transcription is an underlying regulatory mechanism for dormancy alleviation during after-ripening. To identify changes in gene transcription strictly associated with the acquisition of germination potential but not with storage, we used seed storage at low relative humidity that maintains dormancy as control. Transcriptome profiling was performed using DNA microarray to compare change in gene transcript abundance between dormant (D, after-ripened non-dormant (ND and after-ripened dormant seeds (control, C. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to confirm gene expression. Comparison between D and ND showed the differential expression of 115 probesets at cut-off values of two-fold change (p<0.05. Comparisons between both D and C with ND in transcript abundance showed that only 13 transcripts, among 115, could be specific to dormancy alleviation. qPCR confirms the expression pattern of these transcripts but without significant variation between conditions. Here we show that sunflower seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state is not related to regulated changes in gene expression.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and IGFBP-5 mediate TGF-beta- and myostatin-induced suppression of proliferation in porcine embryonic myogenic cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamanga-Sollo, E; Pampusch, M S; White, M E; Hathaway, M R; Dayton, W R

    2005-11-15

    We have previously shown that cultured porcine embryonic myogenic cells (PEMC) produce both insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and IGFBP-5 and secrete these proteins into their media. Exogenously added recombinant porcine (rp) IGFBP-3 and rpIGFBP-5 act via IGF-dependent and IGF-independent mechanisms to suppress proliferation of PEMC cultures. Furthermore, immunoneutralization of endogenous IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 in the PEMC culture medium results in increased DNA synthesis rate suggesting that endogenous IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 suppress PEMC proliferation. TGF-beta superfamily members myostatin and TGF-beta1 have also been shown to suppress proliferation of myogenic cells, and treatment of cultured PEMC with either TGF-beta1 or myostatin significantly (P Long-R3-IGF-I-stimulated DNA synthesis rates to 90% of the levels observed in control cultures receiving no TGF-beta1 or myostatin treatment (P < 0.05). Even though immunoneutralization of IGFBP-3 and -5 increased DNA synthesis rates in TGF-beta1 or myostatin-treated PEMC cultures, phosphosmad2 levels in these cultures were not affected. These findings strongly suggest that IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 affect processes downstream from receptor-mediated Smad phosphorylation that facilitate the ability of TGF-beta and myostatin to suppress proliferation of PEMC. PMID:16214131

  19. The human insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 gene maps to chromosome region 17q12-q21. 1 and is close to the gene for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonin, P.; Vivier, A.; Morgan, K.; Narod, S.; Pollack, M. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)); Ehrenborg, E.; Zazzi, H.; Luthman, H.; Larsson, C. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)); Lenoir, G. (International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)) (and others)

    1993-11-01

    The gene for insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP4) codes for a serum protein that binds to the family of insulin-like growth factors and modulates their activity. It has been mapped by in situ hybridization to chromosome region 17q12-q21.1. The authors have developed a CA-repeat polymorphism from a cosmid clone containing IGFBP4. By linkage analysis, IGFBP4 maps to the chromosome 17q interval THRA1-D17S579. This interval also contains the gene for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, BRCA1. Genetic recombination between IGFBP4 and BRCA1 places IGFBP4 centromeric to the cancer susceptibility gene and effectively excludes it as a candidate gene for BRCA1. IGFBP4 is, however, one of the closest known centromeric markers for BRCA1; the estimated recombination fraction is 0.015. IGFBP4 and D17S579 together define a 2.8-cM interval that contains BRCA1. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Nonparallel changes of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein, after craniospinal irradiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied the GH-insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis serially over 24-36 months in six patients with medulloblastoma who underwent surgical removal of the tumor followed by craniospinal irradiation therapy for 6 weeks and then chemotherapy for 42 weeks. Eighteen and 24 months after beginning irradiation there was a decline in the peak GH secretory response to acute stimulation with arginine/insulin hypoglycemia. Six months after irradiation and during chemotherapy there was a transient decline in IGF-I, IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and GH-BP values (respective mean values of 56.1 ± 9.0 ng/mL, 1.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL, and 7.6 ± 3.3% of radioactivity as compared to time 0 values: 139 ± 15 ng/mL, 2.2 ± 0.2 μg/mL, and 20.0 ± 4.0%, P < 0.001), although provoked GH secretion was normal at this time. The IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and GH-BP returned to pretreatment ranges by 12-36 months after initiation of the study. There was also a decline in body mass index and serum protein values at 6 months after irradiation in ligand and immunoblot analysis there was a decline in IGFBP-3 and an abnormal electrophoretic mobility of IGFBP-2 that were both normalized at 36 months. In one patient they observed a high level of IGFBP-3 proteolysis at this time. This study demonstrates that before the decrease of GH secretion in patients receiving cranial irradiation there is a transient phase of GH insensitivity that may be characteristic of the acute therapeutic phase including the chemotherapy. This partial insensitivity may explain the early growth retardation observed in these patients. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Nonparallel changes of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein, after craniospinal irradiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivot, S.; Adan, L.; Souberbielle, J.; Rappaport, R.; Brauner, R.; Benelli, C.; Clot, J.P.; Saucet, C. [Hopital des Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Zucker, J.M. [Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    1994-03-01

    The authors studied the GH-insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis serially over 24-36 months in six patients with medulloblastoma who underwent surgical removal of the tumor followed by craniospinal irradiation therapy for 6 weeks and then chemotherapy for 42 weeks. Eighteen and 24 months after beginning irradiation there was a decline in the peak GH secretory response to acute stimulation with arginine/insulin hypoglycemia. Six months after irradiation and during chemotherapy there was a transient decline in IGF-I, IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and GH-BP values (respective mean values of 56.1 {+-} 9.0 ng/mL, 1.1 {+-} 0.2 {mu}g/mL, and 7.6 {+-} 3.3% of radioactivity as compared to time 0 values: 139 {+-} 15 ng/mL, 2.2 {+-} 0.2 {mu}g/mL, and 20.0 {+-} 4.0%, P < 0.001), although provoked GH secretion was normal at this time. The IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and GH-BP returned to pretreatment ranges by 12-36 months after initiation of the study. There was also a decline in body mass index and serum protein values at 6 months after irradiation in ligand and immunoblot analysis there was a decline in IGFBP-3 and an abnormal electrophoretic mobility of IGFBP-2 that were both normalized at 36 months. In one patient they observed a high level of IGFBP-3 proteolysis at this time. This study demonstrates that before the decrease of GH secretion in patients receiving cranial irradiation there is a transient phase of GH insensitivity that may be characteristic of the acute therapeutic phase including the chemotherapy. This partial insensitivity may explain the early growth retardation observed in these patients. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J.C. Gosline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq, we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  3. [Transcript assembly and quality assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Feilong; Jia, Xianbo; Lai, Songjia; Liu, Yiping; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-09-01

    The transcript assembly is essential for transcriptome studies trom next-generation sequencing data. However, there are still many faults of algorithms in the present assemblers, which should be largely improved in the future. According to the requirement of reference genome or not, the transcript assembly could be classified into the genome-guided and de novo methods. The two methods have different algorithms and implementation processes. The quality of assembled transcripts depends on a large number of factors, such as the PCR amplification, sequencing techniques, assembly algorithm and genome character. Here, we reviewed the present tools of transcript assembly and various indexes for assessing the quality of assembled transcripts, which would help biologists to determine which assembler should be used in their studies. PMID:26955705

  4. Biophysics and bioinformatics of transcription regulation in bacteria and bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko

    2005-11-01

    Due to rapid accumulation of biological data, bioinformatics has become a very important branch of biological research. In this thesis, we develop novel bioinformatic approaches and aid design of biological experiments by using ideas and methods from statistical physics. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of the regulatory circuits that control expression of genes. We propose a novel, biophysics based algorithm, for the supervised detection of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. The method classifies potential binding sites by explicitly estimating the sequence-specific binding energy and the chemical potential of a given TF. In contrast with the widely used information theory based weight matrix method, our approach correctly incorporates saturation in the transcription factor/DNA binding probability. This results in a significant reduction in the number of expected false positives, and in the explicit appearance---and determination---of a binding threshold. The new method was used to identify likely genomic binding sites for the Escherichia coli TFs, and to examine the relationship between TF binding specificity and degree of pleiotropy (number of regulatory targets). We next address how parameters of protein-DNA interactions can be obtained from data on protein binding to random oligos under controlled conditions (SELEX experiment data). We show that 'robust' generation of an appropriate data set is achieved by a suitable modification of the standard SELEX procedure, and propose a novel bioinformatic algorithm for analysis of such data. Finally, we use quantitative data analysis, bioinformatic methods and kinetic modeling to analyze gene expression strategies of bacterial viruses. We study bacteriophage Xp10 that infects rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. Xp10 is an unusual bacteriophage, which has morphology and genome organization that most closely

  5. Niche adaptation by expansion and reprogramming of general transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J; Gibbins, Goodwin; Su, Wan Lin; Pan, Min; Bare, J Christopher; Plaisier, Christopher L.; Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary success of an organism depends on its ability to continually adapt to changes in the patterns of constant, periodic, and transient challenges within its environment. This process of ‘niche adaptation' requires reprogramming of the organism's environmental response networks by reorganizing interactions among diverse parts including environmental sensors, signal transducers, and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators. Gene duplications have been discovered to be on...

  6. 草鱼胰岛素样生长因子结合蛋白IGFBP-1基因的全长cDNA克隆及表达%cDNA cloning and expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein gene IGFBP-1 in Ctenopharyngodon idellus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶洋; 邹曙明

    2011-01-01

    克隆了草鱼(Ctenopharyngodon idellus)胰岛素样生长因子结合蛋白1(IGFBP-1)基因的全长cDNA,并对草鱼不同时期的胚胎和成鱼不同组织进行了RT-PCR分析,以探索草鱼IGFBP-1基因的生物学功能.结果显示:(1)草鱼IGFBP-1基因cDNA全长为1 135bp,包含一个789 bp阅读框,编码262个氨基酸残基;草鱼与鲤、斑马鱼、沟鲶、大鳞大麻哈鱼、虹鳟、五条(蛳)、小鼠和人的IGFBP-1氨基酸序列相似度分别为94%、93%、69%、60%、58%、56%、40%和38%;草鱼IGFBP-1蛋白的N端和C端序列负责与胰岛素样生长因子(IGF)结合,其保守性较高.(2)RT-PCR分析结果表明,草鱼胚胎期IGFBP-1 mRNA的表达水平很低,在受精后4 hrs和8 hrs胚胎未能检测到转录本,受精12 hrs后,仅能检测到微量表达;草鱼IGFBP-1mRNA在肝脏、肾脏、肠和心脏组织中具有表达活性.鉴于IGFBP-1基因在IGF信号通路中的重要作用,又是一个低氧诱导基因,上述结果可为进一步探索IGFBP-1基因的功能奠定基础.%In this study, the complete cDNA of a insulin-like growth factor binding gene IGFBP-1 was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) in grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus. And mRNA transcripts during embryogenesis and in adult tissues were studied by RT-PCR. The results showed that: ( 1 )The complete cDNA of C. idellus IGFBP-1 is 1 135 bp and its ORF includes 789 bp which coding 262 aminoacid residue. The deduced amino acid analysis showed that the sequence similarities between C. idellus and Cyprinus carpio , Danio rerio , Ictalurus punctatus, Salmo salar , Oncorhynchus mykiss , Seriola quinqueradiata,Mus musculus and Homo sapiens are 94%, 93%, 69%, 60%, 58%, 56%, 40% and 38%, respectively.Its functional N-terminal and C-terminal domains, which are involved in binding with IGF ligand, are very conservative. (2) RT-PCR results demonstrated that IGFBP-1 gene had a iow expression in embryos at different stages in C. idellus

  7. Site-specific phosphorylation regulates the transcriptive activity of vesicular stomatitis virus NS protein.

    OpenAIRE

    C. H. Hsu; Morgan, E M; Kingsbury, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    In vitro transcription by vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsids is inhibited by enzymatic dephosphorylation of the NS protein. We provide evidence that specific, partial dephosphorylation of NS molecules is the only detectable change in nucleocapsids treated with bacterial alkaline phosphatase under conditions that prevent the action of adventitious protease. Dephosphorylation appeared to affect only the rate of transcription; there were no changes in sedimentation rates of transcripts. To...

  8. Overexpression of the Transcription Factors GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 Differentially Regulates Wax and Cutin Biosynthesis, Alters Cuticle Properties, and Changes Leaf Phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangyang; Wu, Hanying; Zhao, Mingming; Wu, Wang; Xu, Yinong; Gu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    SHINE (SHN/WIN) clade proteins, transcription factors of the plant-specific APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element binding factor (AP2/ERF) family, have been proven to be involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Glycine max is an important economic crop, but its molecular mechanism of wax biosynthesis is rarely characterized. In this study, 10 homologs of Arabidopsis SHN genes were identified from soybean. These homologs were different in gene structures and organ expression patterns. Constitutive expression of each of the soybean SHN genes in Arabidopsis led to different leaf phenotypes, as well as different levels of glossiness on leaf surfaces. Overexpression of GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 in Arabidopsis exhibited 7.8-fold and 9.9-fold up-regulation of leaf cuticle wax productions, respectively. C31 and C29 alkanes contributed most to the increased wax contents. Total cutin contents of leaves were increased 11.4-fold in GmSHN1 overexpressors and 5.7-fold in GmSHN9 overexpressors, mainly through increasing C16:0 di-OH and dioic acids. GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 also altered leaf cuticle membrane ultrastructure and increased water loss rate in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Transcript levels of many wax and cutin biosynthesis and leaf development related genes were altered in GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 overexpressors. Overall, these results suggest that GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 may differentially regulate the leaf development process as well as wax and cutin biosynthesis. PMID:27110768

  9. Overexpression of the Transcription Factors GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 Differentially Regulates Wax and Cutin Biosynthesis, Alters Cuticle Properties, and Changes Leaf Phenotypes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available SHINE (SHN/WIN clade proteins, transcription factors of the plant-specific APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element binding factor (AP2/ERF family, have been proven to be involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Glycine max is an important economic crop, but its molecular mechanism of wax biosynthesis is rarely characterized. In this study, 10 homologs of Arabidopsis SHN genes were identified from soybean. These homologs were different in gene structures and organ expression patterns. Constitutive expression of each of the soybean SHN genes in Arabidopsis led to different leaf phenotypes, as well as different levels of glossiness on leaf surfaces. Overexpression of GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 in Arabidopsis exhibited 7.8-fold and 9.9-fold up-regulation of leaf cuticle wax productions, respectively. C31 and C29 alkanes contributed most to the increased wax contents. Total cutin contents of leaves were increased 11.4-fold in GmSHN1 overexpressors and 5.7-fold in GmSHN9 overexpressors, mainly through increasing C16:0 di-OH and dioic acids. GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 also altered leaf cuticle membrane ultrastructure and increased water loss rate in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Transcript levels of many wax and cutin biosynthesis and leaf development related genes were altered in GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 overexpressors. Overall, these results suggest that GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 may differentially regulate the leaf development process as well as wax and cutin biosynthesis.

  10. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousuke Imamura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation.

  11. Multimodal interactive handwritten text transcription

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Veronica; Vidal, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    This book presents an interactive multimodal approach for efficient transcription of handwritten text images. This approach, rather than full automation, assists the expert in the recognition and transcription process.Until now, handwritten text recognition (HTR) systems are far from being perfect and heavy human intervention is often required to check and correct the results of such systems. The interactive scenario studied in this book combines the efficiency of automatic handwriting recognition systems with the accuracy of the experts, leading to a cost-effective perfect transcription of th

  12. Corticotropin-releasing factor type-2 receptor and corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein coexist in rat ventral tegmental area nerve terminals originated in the lateral hypothalamic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Paula G; Noches, Veronica; Gysling, Katia

    2016-01-01

    There is significant functional evidence showing that corticotropin-releasing factor type-2 receptor (CRF2 R) and corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein (CRF-BP) regulate glutamatergic synapses onto ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons. It has been shown that CRF requires CRF-BP to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in dopaminergic neurons through CRF2 R, and that increases glutamate release in cocaine-treated rats through the activation of CRF2 R only by agonists with high affinity to CRF-BP. Furthermore, this CRF-mediated increase in VTA glutamate is responsible for stress-induced relapse to cocaine-seeking behaviour. However, there is a lack of anatomical evidence to explain the mechanisms of CRF actions in VTA. Thus, it was studied whether CRF2 R and CRF-BP are expressed in VTA nerve terminals, using a synaptosomal preparation devoid of postsynaptic elements. The current results show that both proteins are co-expressed in glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic VTA synaptosomes. A main glutamatergic input to the VTA that has been associated to addictive behaviour is originated in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). Thus, this study was focused in the LHA-VTA input using orexin as a marker of this input. The results show that CRF2 R and CRF-BP mRNA and protein are expressed in the LHA, and that both proteins are present in orexin-positive VTA synaptosomes. The results showing that CRF2 R and CRF-BP are expressed in the LHA-VTA input give anatomical support to suggest that this input plays a role in stress-induced relapse to cocaine-seeking behaviour. PMID:26503565

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-independent insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 promotes cell migration and lymph node metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by requirement of integrin β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yi-Chen; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chang, Jeffrey S; Wang, Ssu-Han; Shen, Ying-Ying; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Frequent metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes leads to poor survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). To understand the underlying mechanisms of lymph node metastasis, two sublines were successfully isolated from cervical lymph nodes of nude mice through in vivo selection, and identified as originating from poorly metastatic parental cells. These two sublines specifically metastasized to cervical lymph nodes in 83% of mice, whereas OEC-M1 cells did not metastasize after injection into the oral cavity. After gene expression analysis, we identified insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as one of the significantly up-regulated genes in the sublines in comparison with their parental cells. Consistently, meta-analysis of the public microarray datasets and IGFBP3 immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased both levels of IGFBP3 mRNA and protein in human OSCC tissues when compared to normal oral or adjacent nontumorous tissues. Interestingly, the up-regulated IGFBP3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with OSCC patients with lymph node metastasis. IGFBP3 knockdown in the sublines impaired and ectopic IGFBP3 expression in the parental cells promoted migration, transendothelial migration and lymph node metastasis of orthotopic transplantation. Additionally, ectopic expression of IGFBP3 with an IGF-binding defect sustained the IGFBP3-enhanced biological functions. Results indicated that IGFBP3 regulates metastasis-related functions of OSCC cells through an IGF-independent mechanism. Furthermore, exogenous IGFBP3 was sufficient to induce cell motility and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. The silencing of integrin β1 was able to impair exogenous IGFBP3-mediated migration and ERK phosphorylation, suggesting a critical role of integrin β1 in IGFBP3-enchanced functions. PMID:26540630

  14. Research progress on structure and function of insulin-like growth factor binding protein7%IGFBP7基因的结构与功能的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娜; 王国栋; 王艺磊

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7(IGFBP7) is a new member of the IGFBPs superfamily. Apart from the structural similarity of the N terminus Cys-rich IB domain between IGFBP7 and other IGFBPs, IGFBP7 has specific Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor domain and Immunoglobulin-like C2 domain. Furthermore, besides combining IGFs, IGFBP7 also has IGF-independent functions such as regulation of cell proliferation, cell survival and cell metaptosis. So far basic knowledge of the IGFBP7 in aquatic invertebrates is unavailable. In this article, combined data collected in our laboratory, we review the research advance on the structure and function of IGFBP7 to date and propose future development to the field.%胰岛素样生长因子结合蛋白7 (IGFBP7)是IGFBPs超家族的新成员,结构上除具有与IGFBPs相似的保守N端结构域外,还有特异的Kazal型丝氨酸蛋白酶抑制结构域和免疫球蛋白样C2结构域.除与IGFs结合发挥作用外,还能独立调控细胞凋亡、增殖和迁移等.而至今尚无对水生无脊椎动物IGFBP7的研究报道,结合本实验室的研究综述了目前IGFBP7基因结构和功能上的研究进展,并对今后的研究工作进行了展望.

  15. Connectivity in the yeast cell cycle transcription network: inferences from neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Hart

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A current challenge is to develop computational approaches to infer gene network regulatory relationships based on multiple types of large-scale functional genomic data. We find that single-layer feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN models can effectively discover gene network structure by integrating global in vivo protein:DNA interaction data (ChIP/Array with genome-wide microarray RNA data. We test this on the yeast cell cycle transcription network, which is composed of several hundred genes with phase-specific RNA outputs. These ANNs were robust to noise in data and to a variety of perturbations. They reliably identified and ranked 10 of 12 known major cell cycle factors at the top of a set of 204, based on a sum-of-squared weights metric. Comparative analysis of motif occurrences among multiple yeast species independently confirmed relationships inferred from ANN weights analysis. ANN models can capitalize on properties of biological gene networks that other kinds of models do not. ANNs naturally take advantage of patterns of absence, as well as presence, of factor binding associated with specific expression output; they are easily subjected to in silico "mutation" to uncover biological redundancies; and they can use the full range of factor binding values. A prominent feature of cell cycle ANNs suggested an analogous property might exist in the biological network. This postulated that "network-local discrimination" occurs when regulatory connections (here between MBF and target genes are explicitly disfavored in one network module (G2, relative to others and to the class of genes outside the mitotic network. If correct, this predicts that MBF motifs will be significantly depleted from the discriminated class and that the discrimination will persist through evolution. Analysis of distantly related Schizosaccharomyces pombe confirmed this, suggesting that network-local discrimination is real and complements well-known enrichment of

  16. Transcriptional (ChIP-Chip) Analysis of ELF1, ETS2, RUNX1 and STAT5 in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Matthew C; Erdman, Robert; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Lillvis, John H; Elmore, James R; Tromp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    We investigated transcriptional control of gene expression in human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We previously identified 3274 differentially expressed genes in human AAA tissue compared to non-aneurysmal controls. Four expressed transcription factors (ELF1, ETS2, STAT5 and RUNX1) were selected for genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation. Transcription factor binding was enriched in 4760 distinct genes (FDR < 0.05), of which 713 were differentially expressed in AAA. Functional classification using Gene Ontology (GO), KEGG, and Network Analysis revealed enrichment in several biological processes including "leukocyte migration" (FDR = 3.09 × 10-05) and "intracellular protein kinase cascade" (FDR = 6.48 × 10-05). In the control aorta, the most significant GO categories differed from those in the AAA samples and included "cytoskeleton organization" (FDR = 1.24 × 10-06) and "small GTPase mediated signal transduction" (FDR = 1.24 × 10-06). Genes up-regulated in AAA tissue showed a highly significant enrichment for GO categories "leukocyte migration" (FDR = 1.62 × 10-11), "activation of immune response" (FDR = 8.44 × 10-11), "T cell activation" (FDR = 4.14 × 10-10) and "regulation of lymphocyte activation" (FDR = 2.45 × 10-09), whereas the down-regulated genes were enriched in GO categories "cytoskeleton organization" (FDR = 7.84 × 10-05), "muscle cell development" (FDR = 1.00 × 10-04), and "organ morphogenesis" (FDR = 3.00 × 10-04). Quantitative PCR assays confirmed a sub-set of the transcription factor binding sites including those in MTMR11, DUSP10, ITGAM, MARCH1, HDAC8, MMP14, MAGI1, THBD and SPOCK1. PMID:25993293

  17. Transcriptional (ChIP-Chip Analysis of ELF1, ETS2, RUNX1 and STAT5 in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Pahl

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated transcriptional control of gene expression in human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. We previously identified 3274 differentially expressed genes in human AAA tissue compared to non-aneurysmal controls. Four expressed transcription factors (ELF1, ETS2, STAT5 and RUNX1 were selected for genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation. Transcription factor binding was enriched in 4760 distinct genes (FDR < 0.05, of which 713 were differentially expressed in AAA. Functional classification using Gene Ontology (GO, KEGG, and Network Analysis revealed enrichment in several biological processes including “leukocyte migration” (FDR = 3.09 × 10−05 and “intracellular protein kinase cascade” (FDR = 6.48 × 10−05. In the control aorta, the most significant GO categories differed from those in the AAA samples and included “cytoskeleton organization” (FDR = 1.24 × 10−06 and “small GTPase mediated signal transduction” (FDR = 1.24 × 10−06. Genes up-regulated in AAA tissue showed a highly significant enrichment for GO categories “leukocyte migration” (FDR = 1.62 × 10−11, “activation of immune response” (FDR = 8.44 × 10−11, “T cell activation” (FDR = 4.14 × 10−10 and “regulation of lymphocyte activation” (FDR = 2.45 × 10−09, whereas the down-regulated genes were enriched in GO categories “cytoskeleton organization” (FDR = 7.84 × 10−05, “muscle cell development” (FDR = 1.00 × 10−04, and “organ morphogenesis” (FDR = 3.00 × 10−04. Quantitative PCR assays confirmed a sub-set of the transcription factor binding sites including those in MTMR11, DUSP10, ITGAM, MARCH1, HDAC8, MMP14, MAGI1, THBD and SPOCK1.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of rod photoreceptor homeostasis revealed by in vivo NRL targetome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Hao

    Full Text Available A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP-Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP-Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis.

  19. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  20. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Although retroviral vector systems have been found to efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vitro, the use of vectors based on murine leukemia virus in preclinical models of somatic gene therapy has led to the identification of transcriptional silencing in vivo as an important problem....... Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t...

  1. Zooming in on Transcription Preinitiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kapil; Sari-Ak, Duygu; Haffke, Matthias; Trowitzsch, Simon; Berger, Imre

    2016-06-19

    Class II gene transcription commences with the assembly of the Preinitiation Complex (PIC) from a plethora of proteins and protein assemblies in the nucleus, including the General Transcription Factors (GTFs), RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II), co-activators, co-repressors, and more. TFIID, a megadalton-sized multiprotein complex comprising 20 subunits, is among the first GTFs to bind the core promoter. TFIID assists in nucleating PIC formation, completed by binding of further factors in a highly regulated stepwise fashion. Recent results indicate that TFIID itself is built from distinct preformed submodules, which reside in the nucleus but also in the cytosol of cells. Here, we highlight recent insights in transcription factor assembly and the regulation of transcription preinitiation. PMID:27067110

  2. Coordinated Evolution of Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation for Mitochondrial Functions in Yeast Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuepeng; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Xiaoxian; Li, Hongye; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation has been proposed to play an important role in environmental adaptation. Exploring mechanisms underlying coordinated evolutionary changes at various levels of gene regulation could shed new light on how organism adapt in nature. In this study, we focused on regulatory differences between a laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742 and a pathogenic S. cerevisiae strain, YJM789. The two strains diverge in many features, including growth rate, morphology, high temperature tolerance, and pathogenicity. Our RNA-Seq and ribosomal footprint profiling data showed that gene expression differences are pervasive, and genes functioning in mitochondria are mostly divergent between the two strains at both transcriptional and translational levels. Combining functional genomics data from other yeast strains, we further demonstrated that significant divergence of expression for genes functioning in the electron transport chain (ETC) was likely caused by differential expression of a transcriptional factor, HAP4, and that post-transcriptional regulation mediated by an RNA-binding protein, PUF3, likely led to expression divergence for genes involved in mitochondrial translation. We also explored mito-nuclear interactions via mitochondrial DNA replacement between strains. Although the two mitochondrial genomes harbor substantial sequence divergence, neither growth nor gene expression were affected by mitochondrial DNA replacement in both fermentative and respiratory growth media, indicating compatible mitochondrial and nuclear genomes between these two strains in the tested conditions. Collectively, we used mitochondrial functions as an example to demonstrate for the first time that evolution at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels could lead to coordinated regulatory changes underlying strain specific functional variations. PMID:27077367

  3. Discrimination between thermodynamic models of cis-regulation using transcription factor occupancy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Robert D; Cohen, Barak A

    2014-02-01

    Many studies have identified binding preferences for transcription factors (TFs), but few have yielded predictive models of how combinations of transcription factor binding sites generate specific levels of gene expression. Synthetic promoters have emerged as powerful tools for generating quantitative data to parameterize models of combinatorial cis-regulation. We sought to improve the accuracy of such models by quantifying the occupancy of TFs on synthetic promoters in vivo and incorporating these data into statistical thermodynamic models of cis-regulation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we measured the occupancy of Gcn4 and Cbf1 in synthetic promoter libraries composed of binding sites for Gcn4, Cbf1, Met31/Met32 and Nrg1. We measured the occupancy of these two TFs and the expression levels of all promoters in two growth conditions. Models parameterized using only expression data predicted expression but failed to identify several interactions between TFs. In contrast, models parameterized with occupancy and expression data predicted expression data, and also revealed Gcn4 self-cooperativity and a negative interaction between Gcn4 and Nrg1. Occupancy data also allowed us to distinguish between competing regulatory mechanisms for the factor Gcn4. Our framework for combining occupancy and expression data produces predictive models that better reflect the mechanisms underlying combinatorial cis-regulation of gene expression. PMID:24288374

  4. An improved systematic approach to predicting transcription factor target genes using support vector machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cui

    Full Text Available Biological prediction of transcription factor binding sites and their corresponding transcription factor target genes (TFTGs makes great contribution to understanding the gene regulatory networks. However, these approaches are based on laborious and time-consuming biological experiments. Numerous computational approaches have shown great potential to circumvent laborious biological methods. However, the majority of these algorithms provide limited performances and fail to consider the structural property of the datasets. We proposed a refined systematic computational approach for predicting TFTGs. Based on previous work done on identifying auxin response factor target genes from Arabidopsis thaliana co-expression data, we adopted a novel reverse-complementary distance-sensitive n-gram profile algorithm. This algorithm converts each upstream sub-sequence into a high-dimensional vector data point and transforms the prediction task into a classification problem using support vector machine-based classifier. Our approach showed significant improvement compared to other computational methods based on the area under curve value of the receiver operating characteristic curve using 10-fold cross validation. In addition, in the light of the highly skewed structure of the dataset, we also evaluated other metrics and their associated curves, such as precision-recall curves and cost curves, which provided highly satisfactory results.

  5. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions...

  6. GATA Transcription Factors and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Rena; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been almost a quarter century since it was first appreciated that a class of oncogenes contained in rapidly transforming avian retroviruses encoded DNA-binding transcription factors. As with other oncogenes, genetic recombination with the viral genome led to their overexpression or functional alteration. In the years that followed, alterations of numerous transcription factors were shown to be causatively involved in various cancers in human patients and model organisms. Depending on t...

  7. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is considered a plausible mechanism of drug addiction given the stability of behavioral abnormalities that define an addicted state. Numerous transcription factors, proteins that bind to regulatory regions of specific genes and thereby control levels of their expression, have been implicated in the addiction process over the past decade or two. Here we review the growing evidence for the role played by several prominent transcription factors, including a Fos fami...

  8. The ROS Wheel: Refining ROS Transcriptional Footprints1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, microarray studies have delivered extensive inventories of transcriptome-wide changes in messenger RNA levels provoked by various types of oxidative stress in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Previous cross-study comparisons indicated how different types of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their subcellular accumulation sites are able to reshape the transcriptome in specific manners. However, these analyses often employed simplistic statistical frameworks that are not compatible with large-scale analyses. Here, we reanalyzed a total of 79 Affymetrix ATH1 microarray studies of redox homeostasis perturbation experiments. To create hierarchy in such a high number of transcriptomic data sets, all transcriptional profiles were clustered on the overlap extent of their differentially expressed transcripts. Subsequently, meta-analysis determined a single magnitude of differential expression across studies and identified common transcriptional footprints per cluster. The resulting transcriptional footprints revealed the regulation of various metabolic pathways and gene families. The RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG F-mediated respiratory burst had a major impact and was a converging point among several studies. Conversely, the timing of the oxidative stress response was a determining factor in shaping different transcriptome footprints. Our study emphasizes the need to interpret transcriptomic data sets in a systematic context, where initial, specific stress triggers can converge to common, aspecific transcriptional changes. We believe that these refined transcriptional footprints provide a valuable resource for assessing the involvement of ROS in biological processes in plants. PMID:27246095

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Cytosolic Sulfotransferase 1C2 by Vitamin D Receptor in LS180 Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kathleen G; Fang, Hailin; Kocarek, Thomas A; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2016-08-01

    The factors that regulate expression of genes in the 1C family of human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULT1C) are not well understood. In a recent study evaluating the effects of a panel of transcription factor activators on SULT1C family member expression in LS180 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, we found that SULT1C2 expression was significantly increased by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VitD3) treatment. The objective of our current study was to identify the mechanism responsible for VitD3-mediated activation of SULT1C2 transcription. VitD3 treatment of LS180 cells activated transcription of a transfected luciferase reporter plasmid that contained ∼5 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the SULT1C2 gene, which included 402 nucleotides (nt) of the noncoding exon 1, all of intron 1, and 21 nt of exon 2. Although computational analysis of the VitD3-responsive region of the SULT1C2 gene identified a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-binding site within exon 1, the transfected 5 kbp SULT1C2 reporter was not activated by treatment with rifampicin, a prototypical PXR agonist. However, deletion or mutation of the predicted PXR-binding site abolished VitD3-mediated SULT1C2 transcriptional activation, identifying the site as a functional vitamin D response element (VDRE). We further demonstrated that vitamin D receptor (VDR) can interact directly with the SULT1C2 VDRE sequence using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based transcription factor binding assay. In conclusion, VitD3-inducible SULT1C2 transcription is mediated through a VDRE in exon 1. These results suggest a role for SULT1C2 in VitD3-regulated physiologic processes in human intestine. PMID:27130351

  10. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath, E-mail: csab@bio.psgtech.ac.in [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India); Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar [Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne (Germany); Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  11. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  12. Polymorphic rs9471643 and rs6458238 upregulate PGC transcription and protein expression in overdominant or dominant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Caiyun; Xu, Qian; Tu, Huakang; Sun, Liping; Gong, Yuehua; Liu, Jingwei; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The pepsinogen C (PGC) gene encodes a major differentiation biomarker for gastric mucosa and has two single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs9471643 G>C and rs6458238 G>A, within its 5' upstream region that are involved in gastric carcinogenesis. However, in what genetic models the two polymorphisms modulate disease risk and how they relate to gastric carcinogenesis needs further study. We fitted the most appropriate genetic models to the PGC polymorphisms and validated their robustness; then with knowledge of the genetic model, we investigated the influence of functional variant alleles or genotypes on gene expression in vitro and in vivo. We confirmed that rs9471643 CG genotype was stably associated with reduced gastric cancer risk in complete overdominant model. This favorable CG genotype was also associated with reduced atrophic gastritis risk in subjects carrying rs6458238 AG/AA genotype. The G>C transition at rs9471643 enhanced promoter activity and transcription factor binding ability, and the CG genotype was consistently associated with elevated levels of PGC mRNA, in situ protein and serum protein in complete overdominant model based-analyses. Additionally, rs6458238 AG/AA genotype was associated with reduced atrophic gastritis risk in dominant model. Its favorable A allele was related to higher promoter activity and lower transcription factor binding ability, and the AG/AA genotype showed association with elevated levels of serum PGC protein in dominant model based-analyses. Our results suggest that rs9471643 CG and rs6458238 AG/AA genotypes have important roles in up-regulating PGC expression, which may partially explain why individuals with these favorable genotypes have decreased risks of getting gastric cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25857852

  13. 二(噁)英对成骨肉瘤细胞的凋亡及胰岛素样生长因子结合蛋白6表达的影响%Effect of dioxin on apoptosis of osteogenic sarcoma cells and regulation on gene expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭磊; 赵玉岩; 张世亮; 刘魁; 高晓宇

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the environmental carcinogenic factor-TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) on cell apoptosis and gene regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP-6) in osteogenic sarcoma (SaOS-2) cells.Methods The SaOS-2 cells were cultured with TCDD (1×10-9,1×10-8,1×10-7 mol/L) for 24 hours.The MTT reduction assay and flow cytometry were used to measure the cell proliferation and the cell apoptosis in TCDD-treated SaOS-2 cells.The Nitrophenol phosphate salt method was used to measure activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in SaOS-2 cells.The IGFBP-6 mRNA and protein in SaOS-2 cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting analysis.Results SaOS-2 cell proliferation was up-regulated with TCDD(1×10-9,1×10-8,and 1×10-7 mol/L)about 20%,47% and 93%(18.4±4.5,22.5±3.6 and 29.4±4.2),respectively.The synthesis of ALP was up-regulated about 28%,95%,and 142%(1.12±0.28,1.58±0.14 and 1.96±0.17),respectively(P<0.05).The cell apoptosis was down-regulated in dose-dependent biological manner about 5%,26% and 52%,respectively(P<0.05).The expression of IGFBP-6 mRNA and protein was decreased in 1×10-7 mol/L TCDD-treated SaOS-2 cells about 76% and 72%(P<0.05).Conclusion TCDD at low concentration may have the negative effect on cell apoptosis and down-regulation on gene expression of IGFBP-6 in SaOS-2 cells.%目的 探讨二(噁)英(TCDD)对调控成骨肉瘤细胞(SaOS-2)凋亡和胰岛素样生长因子结合蛋白6(