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Sample records for change phytoplankton community

  1. Bacterial and protist community changes during a phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to characterize the change in the composition and structure of the bacterial and microzooplankton planktonic communities in relation to the phytoplankton community composition during a bloom. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of regions of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene was undertaken on samples collected during a 20 day (d) mesocosm experiment incorporating two different nutrient addition treatments [Nitrate and Phosphate (NPc) and Nitrate, Phosphate and Silicate (NPSc)] as well as a control. This approach allowed us to discriminate the changes in species composition across a broad range of phylogenetic groups using a common taxonomic level. Diatoms dominated the bloom in the NPSc treatment while dinoflagellates were the dominant phytoplankton in the control and NPc treatment. Network correlations highlighted significant interactions between OTUs within each treatment including changes in the composition of Paraphysomonas OTUs when the dominant Chaetoceros OTU switched. The microzooplankton community composition responded to changes in the phytoplankton composition while the prokaryotic community responded more to changes in ammonia concentration.

  2. [Yearly Changes of Phytoplankton Community in the Ecology-monitoring Area of Changli, Hebei in Summer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-lin; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yu-liang; Zhang, Yue-ming; Zhao, Zhi-nan; Han, Xiao-qing; Zhang, Jian-da; Gao, Wei-ming

    2015-04-01

    Based on the investigation of phytoplankton and water body nutrient concentration in the ecology-monitoring area of Changli in summer from 2005 to 2013, the phytoplankton community structure was analyzed. The result showed that in recent 9 years, 3 phyla including 23 families, 39 genera and 105 species of phytoplankton were identified, in which 85.7% were diatoms and 13.3% were dinoflagellate. Only one species was found belonging to golden algae. There was great difference in dominant species among different years. According to the value of dominance, there were Coscinodiscus radiatus, Coscinodiscus debilis, Rhizosolenia styliformis, Cerataulina bergoni, Coscinodiscus wailesii, Thalassiosira sp., Ceratium tripos, Chaetoceros lorenzianus, Skeletonema costatum. The cell abundance was decreased yearly. The Shannon-Wiener index of phytoplankton community ranged from 0.015 to 3.889, and the evenness index ranged from 0.009 to 1, which showed little yearly change. And phytoplankton species were unevenly distributed among the 19 sites, there were relatively low amount of dominant species, but the dominance was relatively high. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) results of the phytoplankton community and its environmental factors showed that the environmental factors influencing the change of phytoplankton community structure in summer included water temperature, nutrients (TP, TN and NO3(-) -N, NH4(+)-N) and salinity, and the structural change was the result of the interactions of different environmental factors. PMID:26164906

  3. Global change impacts on phytoplankton communities in nutrient-poor lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Bloch, Ina

    2010-01-01

    Phytoplankton communities are recognized as important indicators for environmental changes since they usually respond rapidly to a changing environment in aquatic systems. To evaluate how changes in the climate and atmospheric deposition might impact phytoplankton communities, we examined a complete 14-year time series of different physical, chemical and biological variables from 13 nutrient-poor Swedish reference lakes along a latitudinal gradient. We found numerous significant changes in ph...

  4. Using bio-optical parameters as a tool for detecting changes in the phytoplankton community (SW Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goela, Priscila C.; Icely, John; Cristina, Sónia; Danchenko, Sergei; Angel DelValls, T.; Newton, Alice

    2015-12-01

    Upwelling events off the Southwest coast of Portugal can trigger phytoplankton blooms that are important for the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in this region. However, climate change scenarios forecast fluctuations in the intensity and frequency of upwelling events, thereby potentially impacting these sectors. Shifts in the phytoplankton community were analysed from the end of 2008 until the beginning of 2012 by examining the bio-optical properties of the water column, namely the absorption coefficients for phytoplankton, non-algal particles and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The phytoplankton community was assessed by microscopy, with counts from an inverted microscope, and by chemotaxonomic methodologies, using pigment concentrations determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Results both from microscopy and from chemotaxonomic methods showed a shift from diatom dominance related to bloom conditions matching upwelling events, to small flagellate dominance related to no-bloom conditions matching relaxation of upwelling. During bloom conditions, light absorption from phytoplankton increased markedly, while non-algal particles and CDOM absorption remained relatively constant. The dynamics of CDOM in the study area was attributed to coastal influences rather than from phytoplankton origin. Changes in phytoplankton biomass and consequent alterations in phytoplankton absorption coefficients were attributed to upwelling regimes in the area. Bio-optical parameters can contribute to environmental monitoring of coastal and oceanic waters, which in the case of the European Union, involves the implementation of the Water Framework, Marine Strategy Framework and Marine Spatial Planning Directives.

  5. Temporal Succession of Ancient Phytoplankton Community in Qinghai Lake and Implication for Paleo-environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Hou, Weiguo; Wang, Shang; Jiang, Hongchen; Yang, Jian; Wu, Geng

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan lake sediments in NW China are sensitive recorders of climate change. However, many important plankton members do not leave any microscopic features in sedimentary records. Here we used ancient DNA preserved in Qinghai Lake sediments to reconstruct the temporal succession of plankton communities in the past 18,500 years. Our results showed that seven classes and sixteen genera of phytoplankton in the lake underwent major temporal changes, in correlation with known climatic events. Trebouxiophyceae and Eustigmatophyceae were predominant during the cold periods, whereas Chlorophyceae, Phaeophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, and Cyanophyceae were abundant during the warm periods. The inferred changes in temperature, nutrients, precipitation, and salinity, as driven by the Westerlies and summer Monsoon strength, likely contributed to these observed temporal changes. Based on these correlations, we propose the phytoplankton index as a proxy to reconstruct the stadial versus interstadial climate change history in Qinghai Lake. This taxon-specific index is free of terrestrial contamination, sensitive to short-term climatic oscillations, and continuous in recording all climatic events in the lake. The validity of this index and its applicability to other lakes is demonstrated by its good correlations with multiple climate records of Qinghai Lake and another lake on the Tibetan Plateau, Kusai Lake.

  6. The effects of temperature increases on a temperate phytoplankton community - A mesocosm climate change scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Majbritt Kjeldahl; Nielsen, Kathryn Dewar; Richardson, Katherine;

    2010-01-01

    Prior to the spring bloom in 2003 and 2004, batch temperature experiments of approximately 3 weeks' duration were carried out in land-based mesocosms in at the Espeland field station (Norway), with temperatures on average increased ~ 2.7-3 °C (T1) and ~ 5.2-5.6 °C (T2) above in situ fjord...... temperature (RM). The development in the chlorophyll concentrations showed an earlier bloom as a response to increased temperatures but the carbon biomass showed that the warmest treatment yielded the lowest biomass. This study indicates that a part of the relationship between temperature and spring bloom...... timing stems from a temperature-induced change in phytoplankton algal physiology (the efficiency of photosystem II, Fv/Fm, and growth rates, µmax), i.e. a direct temperature effect. Data analysis performed on microscope identified and quantified species did not show a significant temperature influence on...

  7. Seasonal changes in temperature and nutrient control of photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, P. A.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    1. To investigate the influence of elevated temperatures and nutrients on photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton assemblages, water was collected from a eutrophic lake in spring, summer, autumn, winter and the following spring and exposed to ambient temperature and ambient...... an increase in global temperature will influence production and degradation of organic material in lakes, the documented importance of ambient temperatures and nutrient conditions suggests that effects will be most pronounced during winter and early spring, while the remaining part of the growth...... +2, +4 and +6 °C for 2 weeks with and without addition of extra inorganic nutrients. 2. Rates of photosynthesis, respiration and growth generally increased with temperature, but this effect was strongly enhanced by high nutrient availability, and therefore was most evident for nutrient amended...

  8. Upwelling and anthropogenic forcing on phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes in the Zhejiang coastal area over the last 100 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shanshan; XING Lei; ZHANG Hailong; FENG Xuwen; YANG Haili; ZHAO Meixun

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton productivity and community structure in marginal seas have been altered significantly dur-ing the past three decades, but it is still a challenge to distinguish the forcing mechanisms between climate change and anthropogenic activities. High time-resolution biomarker records of two 210Pb-dated sediment cores (#34:28.5°N, 122.272°E;CJ12-1269:28.861 9°N, 122.515 3°E) from the Min-Zhe coastal mud area were compared to reveal changes of phytoplankton productivity and community structure over the past 100 years. Phytoplankton productivity started to increase gradually from the 1970s and increased rapidly after the late 1990s at Site #34;and it started to increase gradually from the middle 1960s and increased rapidly after the late 1980s at Site CJ12-1269. Productivity of Core CJ12-1269 was higher than that of Core #34. Phy-toplankton community structure variations displayed opposite patterns in the two cores. The decreasing D/B (dinosterol/brassicasterol) ratio of Core #34 since the 1960s revealed increased diatom contribution to total productivity. In contrast, the increasing D/B ratio of Core CJ12-1269 since the 1950s indicated in-creased dinoflagellate contribution to total productivity. Both the productivity increase and the increased dinoflagellate contribution in Core CJ12-1269 since the 1950-1960s were mainly caused by anthropogenic activities, as the location was closer to the Changjiang River Estuary with higher nutrient concentration and decreasing Si/N ratios. However, increased diatom contribution in Core #34 is proposed to be caused by increased coastal upwelling, with higher nutrient concentration and higher Si/N ratios.

  9. A glimpse into the future composition of marine phytoplankton communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban eAcevedo-Trejos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that climate change will have significant impacts on ecosystems. Most model projections agree that the ocean will experience stronger stratification and less nutrient supply from deep waters. These changes will likely affect marine phytoplankton communities and will thus impact on the higher trophic levels of the oceanic food web. The potential consequences of future climate change on marine microbial communities can be investigated and predicted only with the help of mathematical models. Here we present the application of a model that describes aggregate properties of marine phytoplankton communities and captures the effects of a changing environment on their composition and adaptive capacity. Specifically, the model describes the phytoplankton community in terms of total biomass, mean cell size, and functional diversity. The model is applied to two contrasting regions of the Atlantic Ocean (tropical and temperate and is tested under two emission scenarios: SRES A2 or ``business as usual'' and SRES B1 or ``local utopia''. We find that all three macroecological properties will decline during the next century in both regions, although this effect will be more pronounced in the temperate region. Being consistent with previous model predictions, our results show that a simple trait-based modelling framework represents a valuable tool for investigating how phytoplankton communities may reorganize under a changing climate.

  10. Spatial and long-term changes in the functional and structural phytoplankton communities along the French Atlantic coast

    OpenAIRE

    David, Valerie; Ryckaert, Mireille; Karpytchev, Mikhail; Bacher, Cedric; Arnaudeau, Vanessa; Vidal, Nadia; Maurer, Daniele; Niquil, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and interannual variations of phytoplankton diversity were characterized along the French Atlantic Coast in relation to physical factors and large-scale climatic indices using phytoplankton surveys conducted from 1993 to 2010 in four geographical areas. This study relates phytoplankton diversity to oyster recruitment success by comparing a 'specific' versus a 'functional' diversity approach. Functional diversity was represented by functional groups of different phytoplanktonic functio...

  11. Seasonal changes in phytoplankton community structure in relation to physico-chemical factors in Bukan dam reservoir (northwest Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Azari, Ali Mohsenpour; MOHEBBI, Fereidun; ASEM, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between phytoplankton population and some important physicochemical variables in the Bukan Dam Reservoir. The sampling was performed monthly from 8 sampling sites from April 2008 to February 2009. Phytoplankton counts were made by inverted microscope. Totally, 55 phytoplankton taxa were identified and included Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Cyanobacteria, Euglenophyta, Chrysophyta and Cryptophyta. Correlations between some important physicochemic...

  12. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  13. Temperature influence on phytoplankton community growth rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Elliot; Moore, J. Keith; Primeau, Francois; Tanouye, David

    2016-04-01

    A large database of field estimates of phytoplankton community growth rates in natural populations was compiled and analyzed to determine the apparent temperature effect on phytoplankton community growth rate. We conducted an ordinary least squares regression to optimize the parameters in two commonly used growth-temperature relations (Arrhenius and Q10 models). Both equations fit the observational data equally with the optimized parameter values. The optimum apparent Q10 value was 1.47 ± 0.08 (95% confidence interval, CI). Microzooplankton grazing rates closely matched the temperature trends for phytoplankton growth. This likely reflects a dynamic adjustment of biomass and grazing rates by the microzooplankton to match their available food source, illustrating tight coupling of phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates. The field-measured temperature effect and growth rates were compared with estimates from the satellite Carbon-based Productivity Model (CbPM) and three Earth System Models (ESMs), with model output extracted at the same month and sampling locations as the observations. The optimized, apparent Q10 value calculated for the CbPM was 1.51, with overestimation of growth rates. The apparent Q10 value in the Community Earth System Model (V1.0) was 1.65, with modest underestimation of growth rates. The GFDL-ESM2M and GFDL-ESM2G models produced apparent Q10 values of 1.52 and 1.39, respectively. Models with an apparent Q10 that is significantly greater than ~1.5 will overestimate the phytoplankton community growth response to the ongoing climate warming and will have spatial biases in estimated growth rates for the current era.

  14. Spatial and long-term changes in the functional and structural phytoplankton communities along the French Atlantic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Valérie; Ryckaert, Mireille; Karpytchev, Mikhail; Bacher, Cédric; Arnaudeau, Vanessa; Vidal, Nadia; Maurer, Danièle; Niquil, Nathalie

    2012-08-01

    Spatial and interannual variations of phytoplankton diversity were characterized along the French Atlantic Coast in relation to physical factors and large-scale climatic indices using phytoplankton surveys conducted from 1993 to 2010 in four geographical areas. This study relates phytoplankton diversity to oyster recruitment success by comparing a 'specific'versus a 'functional' diversity approach. Functional diversity was represented by functional groups of different phytoplanktonic functional traits (size, shape, toxicity), relevant for oyster feeding during growth, reproduction and larval development. Phytoplankton diversity patterns along the French Atlantic coast corresponded to a geographical distribution mainly driven by a latitudinal gradient and hydrodynamic features as confirmed by the functional characteristics of the indicator species recorded for each geographical area (C-S-R strategies of Reynolds, specific habitat). This geographical typology was less clear for functional diversity. Only few functional groups were explained by physical factors: the non-toxic small and solitary cells were in particular related to temperature, with high densities observed in the southern areas. Even if temporal variation was less important in explaining the phytoplankton diversity patterns, the main drivers explaining the interannual pattern were the large-scale climatic indices, mainly the Atlantic Multidecennal Oscillation. Functional groups were readily explained by climatic indices than species even if the relationships cannot be applied generally because of the non-linearity of the correlations (local and temporal variations). However, the potentially toxic, small and linear phytoplankton were anticorrelated to NAO. The functional approach thus brings constructive elements concerning the relationships between the prey assemblage of oysters and their physical drivers. Redundancy and co-inertia analyses appeared as complementary analyses in investigating

  15. Interannual and cyclone-driven variability in phytoplankton communities of a tropical coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichandan, Suchismita; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kumar, Abhishek; Mishra, Deepak R; Bhadury, Punyasloke; Muduli, Pradipta R; Pattnaik, Ajit K; Rastogi, Gurdeep

    2015-12-15

    One of the main challenges in phytoplankton ecology is to understand their variability at different spatiotemporal scales. We investigated the interannual and cyclone-derived variability in phytoplankton communities of Chilika, the largest tropical coastal lagoon in Asia and the underlying mechanisms in relation to environmental forcing. Between July 2012 and June 2013, Cyanophyta were most prolific in freshwater northern region of the lagoon. A category-5 very severe cyclonic storm (VSCS) Phailin struck the lagoon on 12th October 2013 and introduced additional variability into the hydrology and phytoplankton communities. Freshwater Cyanophyta further expanded their territory and occupied the northern as well as central region of the lagoon. Satellite remote sensing imagery revealed that the phytoplankton biomass did not change much due to high turbidity prevailing in the lagoon after Phailin. Modeling analysis of species-salinity relationship identified specific responses of phytoplankton taxa to the different salinity regime of lagoon. PMID:26611863

  16. Community structure characteristics of phytoplankton in zhalong wetland, china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In autumn 2010, the phytoplankton samples were collected in Zhalong Wetland. A total of 347 species belonging to 78 genera,6 phyla were identified, Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta were dominated phytoplankton communities, including 143 species of Chlorophyta, 116 species of Bacillariophyta, 45 species of Cyanophyta, 39 species of Euglenophyta, 3 species of Pyrrophyta, 1 species of Chrysophyta. In the core area 66 genera, 222 species were identified, in the buffer area 63 genera, 210 species were identified, in the experiment area 63 genera, 167 species were identified. The dominant species in Zhalong Wetland included Cyclotella meneghiniana, Chlorella vulgaris, Trachelomonas volvocina, Nitzschia sp.. The average phytoplankton density was 12.13*10/sup 6/ in Zhalong Wetland, the phytoplankton density of Bacillariophyta was highest (32.82*10/sup 6/ ind L/sup -1/), and then Chlorophyta (23.73*10/sup 6/ ind L/sup -1/) and Cyanophyta (11.43*106 ind L-1), respectively. The results of cluster analysis showed that phytoplankton community structure could be divided into three types, and within-group similarities of phytoplankton community structure was not high, but inter-group non-similarity was high. Based on the species composition, phytoplankton density, phytoplankton pollution indicator, it suggested that Zhalong Wetland was mesotrophic state. (author)

  17. Comparative effects of carbon dioxide enrichment and pH change on phytoplankton communities in SRS Carolina bay restoration efforts. Progress report, April 1994--March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impacts of land-use activities on wetland ecosystems are important issues for environmental planners, conservation groups, and government agencies. This project at DOE's Savannah River Site focused its year one efforts on population changes produced by effects of changes in pH and CO2 resulting from simulated aquatic ecosystem successional processes. Results are being compared with phytoplankton changes induce by added nutrients

  18. Poor correlation between phytoplankton community growth rates and nutrient concentration in the sea

    OpenAIRE

    Regaudie-de-gioux, A.; Sal, S; Á. López-Urrutia

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient availability is one of the major factors regulating marine productivity and phytoplankton community structure. While the response of phytoplankton species to nutrient variation is relatively well known, that of phytoplankton community remains unclear. We question whether phytoplankton community growth rates respond to nutrient concentration in a similar manner to phytoplankton species composing the community, that is, following Monod's model. Data on in situ marine community growth r...

  19. 石油污染对海洋浮游植物群落生长的影响%The impact of oil pollution on marine phytoplankton community growth change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄逸君; 陈全震; 曾江宁; 江志兵

    2011-01-01

    (EC50) of certain kinds of microalgae exposed to oil were measured and the toxicities of different oil components and oil products were compared. Field researchers investigated the changes in phytoplankton after oil spillage in certain sea areas. Some researchers focused on the gene or protein levels of certain types of microalgae exposed to oil contamination, and others discussed whether the environmental factors such as ultraviolet radiation (UV) in natural sunlight enhanced the oil toxicity or not. However, the responses of phytoplankton community under the stress of oil contamination have not been highlighted yet. Our work is to simulate oil contamination on the natural phytoplankton community and study the community growth. The objectives of this paper are to study the influences of oil pollution on the.ecological effects of marine phytoplankton, and provide the basis data for the loss assessment of marine living resources and marine ecosystems caused by oil spills and oil pollution.In four seasons from November 2008 to July 2009, the experimental phytoplankton was collected from the Yueqing Bay in Zhejiang Province. Eight groups of crude oil water accommodated fraction (WAF) were set to perform the 15-day culture experiments of phytoplankton. The chlorophyll a and cell density of phytoplankton were measured at every 24 h to reflect the growth change of phytoplankton community.It is indicated that crude oil pollution of high concentration ( ≥ 2.28 mg/L) would greatly restrain the growth of phytoplankton (P <0.001 ) shown by decreased chlorophyll a content and cell density, while crude oil pollution of low concentration ( ≤ 1.21 mg/L) would promote the growth of phytoplankton instead. The chronic toxicity of crude oil to phytoplankton have seasonal differences due to different natural water temperatures, e.g. phytoplankton is less tolerant to pollution in summer than in winter because of higher temperature. There is a close relationship with positive

  20. Impact of ocean acidification on the structure of future phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Morris, J. Jeffrey; Follows, Michael J.; Scott, Jeffery; Levitan, Orly; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2015-11-01

    Phytoplankton form the foundation of the marine food web and regulate key biogeochemical processes. These organisms face multiple environmental changes, including the decline in ocean pH (ocean acidification) caused by rising atmospheric pCO2 (ref. ). A meta-analysis of published experimental data assessing growth rates of different phytoplankton taxa under both ambient and elevated pCO2 conditions revealed a significant range of responses. This effect of ocean acidification was incorporated into a global marine ecosystem model to explore how marine phytoplankton communities might be impacted over the course of a hypothetical twenty-first century. Results emphasized that the differing responses to elevated pCO2 caused sufficient changes in competitive fitness between phytoplankton types to significantly alter community structure. At the level of ecological function of the phytoplankton community, acidification had a greater impact than warming or reduced nutrient supply. The model suggested that longer timescales of competition- and transport-mediated adjustments are essential for predicting changes to phytoplankton community structure.

  1. Recognition of key regions for restoration of phytoplankton communities in the Huai River basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changsen; Liu, Changming; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Yongyong; Yu, Qiang; Eamus, Derek

    2012-02-01

    SummaryHealthy phytoplankton communities are the basis of healthy water ecosystems, and form the foundation of many freshwater food webs. Globally many freshwater ecosystems are degraded because of intensive human activities, so water ecosystem restoration is a burning issue worldwide. Selection of key regions for phytoplankton-related restoration is crucial for an effective aquatic eco-restoration. This paper presents a practical method for identification of key regions for phytoplankton-related restoration, using random forests (RFs) method to cluster sites based on dominance, biodiversity, water chemistry and ecological niche. We sampled phytoplankton for species richness and relative abundance and water quality in the Huai River basin (HRB), China to determine the phytoplankton communities' composition and structure and characterize of their ecological niches. A wider mean niche breadth of a species usually leads to a greater overlap with the niche of other species. Using these data and water quality indices, we identified the key regions for phytoplankton-related river restoration activities. Results indicate that our method for recognition of key regions is effective and practical and its application to the HRB identified the Northern Plain area as the key region for restoration. This area is severely polluted and contributes significantly to the HRB phytoplankton communities. Phytoplankton in this region is highly adaptable to environmental change and therefore will be relatively unharmed by environmental instability induced by restoration measures. During restoration, indices of water temperature, total phosphorus and chemical oxygen demand can be altered with little negative influence on phytoplankton communities, but measures that increase ammonia-nitrogen concentration would be highly detrimental. These results will provide valuable information for policy makers and stakeholders in water ecosystem restoration and sustainable basin management in the HRB.

  2. Effect of intensive epilimnetic withdrawal on phytoplankton community in a (subtropical deep reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Withdrawal is an important process in reservoir hydrodynamics, removing phytoplankton with flushed water. Zooplankton,the grazers of phytoplankton, having longer generation times, are even more susceptible than phytoplankton to flushing loss. Therefore phytoplankton are affected not only by abiotic conditions linked to hydrodynamics but also by zooplankton due to weakened grazing pressure. During the Asian Games (November 12-27, 2010 in Guangzhou, China, two intensive epilimnetic withdrawals were conducted in Liuxihe, a deep canyon-shaped reservoir. To examine the influence of the intensive epilimnetic withdrawals on the phytoplankton community, a seven-week field observation and a hydrodynamic simulation were carried out. The observation was divided in two stages: stage 1 represented partial surface vertical mixing period, and stage 2 represented intensive epilimnetic withdrawal period. It was found that phytoplankton abundance and biomass declined with water temperature and partial surface vertical mixing in stage 1. However, the intensive epilimnetic withdrawal reversed this decreasing trend and increased phytoplankton biomass and abundance in stage 2. Phytoplankton showed a higher rate of composition change in stage 2. A numerical model (DYRESM-CAEDYM simulated scenarios with and without epilimnetic withdrawal to test their effects on abiotic factors (water temperature, suspended sediment and soluble reactive phosphorus for phytoplankton. The results showed no obvious difference in the abiotic factors between the two scenarios during stage 2. We therefore suggested that the abiotic factors in the water column were probably driven by a seasonal pattern, not by epilimnetic withdrawal. It is likely that the intensive epilimnetic withdrawal could remove large crustaceans. The reduced grazing pressure probably explained the increase of phytoplankton biomass and abundance after the withdrawal. Thus, we suggest that reservoir operation should pay

  3. Phytoplankton niches, traits and eco-evolutionary responses to global environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litchman, Elena; Edwards, Kyle F.; Klausmeier, Christopher A.;

    2012-01-01

    and theoretical ways to predict different phytoplankton responses to global change. Using phytoplankton ecological niches to predict their responses to multiple environmental stressors is a promising new approach. Functional traits of phytoplankton, such as resource utilization traits and tolerance curves...... for various environmental factors like temperature, can be used to define niches along major axes. Characterization of pairwise and higher dimension trade-offs among traits should help predict possible niche changes along multiple dimensions simultaneously. The potential for evolutionary responses to global...... be investigated simultaneously. Novel models of trait evolution in a community context should provide additional insights into potential adaptation trajectories under diverse global change scenarios...

  4. Fluctuations of Phytoplankton Community in the Coastal Waters of Caspian Sea in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Bagheri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Caspian Sea ecosystem has been suffered with many problems since 1980s. Aanthropogenic pollution from heavy metals, hydrocarbons, pesticides, changes in the quantity of nutrient inputs by rivers, are significant threats to biodiversity and biological resources such as plankton structure in the Caspian Sea. According to the significant of phytoplankton community in marine system. The state of the fluctuations of phytoplankton communities of the southwestern Caspian Sea was investigated and compared with the findings of before 2006. Approach: Phytoplankton abundance and species composition of the Caspian Sea were evaluated by using samples collected at 12 stations along three transects. Samplings were conducted seasonal in 2006 at 5, 10, 20 and 50 m depth were fixed for each transect in the southwestern Caspian Sea. Results: A total of 39 species phytoplankton species were distinguished during 2006, the annual phytoplankton abundance were calculated as 57, 300±15,550 cells.l-1, which ranged from 89, 250±35, 062 cells.l-1 in September to 16, 200±6,664 cells.l-1 in February. The diatoms formed more than half of the total abundance (61% while cyanophytes were the second important group in view of contribution to total phytoplankton (26% in 2006. The study showed that diatoms Thalassionema nitzschioides, Cyclotella meneghiniana and cyanophyte Osillatoria sp. numerically dominated in this area. Conclusion: The study revealed that diatoms were higher than other groups of phytoplankton in 2006. The hydrology variation, increased fresh water inflow via rivers and a rise in nutrients concentrations have played important roles in blooming of phytoplankton species, e.g., the diatoms in this study, which is also known from other marines. Similar studies on determination of the effects of environmental degradation on phytoplankton and hydrological processes should be taken into account in near future.

  5. Phytoplankton Communities in Green Bay, Lake Michigan after Invasion by Dreissenid Mussels: Increased Dominance by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart T. De Stasio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological invasions of aquatic systems disrupt ecological communities, and cause major changes in diversity and ecosystem function. The Laurentian Great Lakes of North America have been dramatically altered by such invasions, especially zebra (Dreissena polymorpha and quagga (D. rostriformis bugensis mussels. Responses to mussel invasions have included increased water clarity, and decreased chlorophyll and phytoplankton abundance. Although not all systems have responded similarly, in general, mussels have changed nutrient dynamics and physical habitat conditions. Therefore examination of different impacts can help us further understand mechanisms that underlie ecosystem responses to biological invasions. To aid our understanding of ecosystem impacts, we sampled established locations along a well-studied trophic gradient in Green Bay, Lake Michigan, after the 1993 zebra mussel invasion. A strong trophic gradient remained during the period sampled after the mussel invasion (2000–2012. However, mean summer chlorophyll increased and other measures of phytoplankton biomass (microscope and electronic cell counting did not change significantly. Multivariate analyses of phytoplankton community structure demonstrate a significant community shift after the invasion. Cyanobacteria increased in dominance, with Microcystis becoming the major summer taxon in lower Green Bay. Diatom diversity and abundance also increased and Chlorophyta became rare. Phytoplankton responses along the trophic gradient of Green Bay to zebra mussel invasion highlight the importance of mussel effects on nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton diversity and function.

  6. Simulated terrestrial runoff triggered a phytoplankton succession and changed seston stoichiometry in coastal lagoon mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, A; Faithfull, C L; Lange, K; Bayer, T; Vidussi, F; Liess, A

    2016-08-01

    Climate change scenarios predict intensified terrestrial storm runoff, providing coastal ecosystems with large nutrient pulses and increased turbidity, with unknown consequences for the phytoplankton community. We conducted a 12-day mesocosm experiment in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), adding soil (simulated runoff) and fish (different food webs) in a 2 × 2 full factorial design and monitored phytoplankton composition, shade adaptation and stoichiometry. Diatoms (Chaetoceros) increased four-fold immediately after soil addition, prymnesiophytes and dinoflagellates peaked after six- and 12 days, respectively. Soil induced no phytoplankton shade adaptation. Fish reduced the positive soil effect on dinoflagellates (Scripsiella, Glenodinium), and diatom abundance in general. Phytoplankton community composition drove seston stoichiometry. In conclusion, pulsed terrestrial runoff can cause rapid, low quality (high carbon: nutrient) diatom blooms. However, bloom duration may be short and reduced in magnitude by fish. Thus, climate change may shift shallow coastal ecosystems towards famine or feast dynamics. PMID:27209121

  7. Development of phytoplankton communities: Implications of nutrient injections on phytoplankton composition, pH and ecosystem production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans; Blanda, Elisa; Stæhr, Peter Anton;

    2015-01-01

    The development of a marine phytoplankton community was studied in a series of mesocosm tanks exposed to different levels of nutrient inputs. Key ecosystem variables such as phytoplankton species development, ecosystem net production (NEP), pH and bacteria production were measured. The overall aim...

  8. Structure of the Phytoplankton Community and Its Relationship to Water Quality in Donghu Lake, Wuhan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-Ping LEI; Zhang-Li HU; Jian WANG; Zhi-Xin SHI; Fung-Yee Nora TAM

    2005-01-01

    The phytoplankton community structure, in terms of species composition, total standing crop,and abundance of the dominant algal species, at four stations in Donghu Lake, Wuhan, China, was investigated monthly from January 1994 to December 1996. A total of 260 taxa was observed, of which Chlorophyta (106 taxa) contributed the highest portion of the total number of taxa, followed by Bacillariophyta (82 taxa)and Cyanophyta (32 taxa). The total standing crop measured by means of chlorophyll a content, cell density,and cell biovolume, as well as the abundance of the dominant species, declined in the order of Station I to Station Ⅳ. Seasonal changes of the standing crop varied greatly among the four stations. Although the cell density at the four stations showed a single peak within a year, the peak density varied from July to November, dependent on the sampling year and the station. For chlorophyll a content and cell biovolume,multiple peaks were observed at Stations Ⅰ and Ⅱ, but a single peak was found at Stations Ⅲ and Ⅳ. The phytoplankton community structure indicated that the trophic status was the highest at Station Ⅰ (most eutrophic), followed by Station Ⅱ; Stations Ⅲ and Ⅳ were the least trophic areas. The long-term changes in phytoplankton community structure further suggested that changes in phytoplankton community structure were correlated with water quality, and eutrophication of Donghu Lake had been aggravated since the 1950s.

  9. Direct Effect of Carbon Dioxide Concentration on Phytoplankton Community Structure in the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesselman, C. R.; Tortell, P. D.; Payne, C. D.; Dunbar, R. B.; Ditullio, G. R.

    2006-12-01

    As the largest high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region on the planet, the Southern Ocean plays a critical role in global biogeochemical cycling and climate modulation. Primary productivity and phytoplankton community structure in the waters surrounding Antarctica have demonstrated unique sensitivity to small changes in major and trace element availability and vertical mixing. However, the capacity of changing atmospheric CO2 to restructure Antarctic phytoplankton communities has only recently been proposed. During the austral summer of 2005-2006, the "Controls on Ross Sea Algal Community Structure" (CORSACS) project performed an integrated series of shipboard incubations coupled with polynya water column sampling designed to investigate the interplay of iron, light, and CO2 levels as determinants of primary production and phytoplankton community structure. Results from the CORSACS CO2 manipulation incubation experiment demonstrate substantial shifts in the taxonomic distribution of phytoplankton exposed to an experimental CO2 gradient. Triplicate semi-continuous culture bottles were bubbled with air mixtures containing 100, 370, and 800 ppm CO2, designed to approximate bloom conditions under glacial, modern, and projected future levels of carbon dioxide. At the conclusion of the 18-day incubation, the 100 ppm community was dominated by the small, finely silicified pennate diatom Pseudonitzschia subcurvata, while the abundance of larger, colonial Chaetoceros species increased significantly in the 800 ppm community. These results represent the first evidence that perturbations in atmospheric CO2 have the potential to reorganize phytoplankton community structure in the Southern Ocean, and have implications for both the glacial productivity paradox and the future of polar trophic structure.

  10. Impacts of Mnemiopsis Leydyi on phytoplankton communities in a Mediterranean lagoon : preliminary observations

    OpenAIRE

    Gavini, A.; Garrido, M; Cecchi, Philippe; Bec, B; Orsoni, V.; Malet, N.; Pasqualini, V

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton communities were studied in the Biguglia lagoon between May 2012 and March 2013. A massive invasion of Mnemiopsis leidyi occurred during the same period. We discuss the potential interactions between ctenophores and phytoplankton.

  11. A 150-year record of phytoplankton community succession controlled by hydroclimatic variability in a tropical lake

    OpenAIRE

    Yamoah, Kweku Afrifa; Callac, Nolwenn; Chi Fru, Ernest; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Wiech, Alan; Chabangborn, Akkaneewut; Smittenberg, Rienk H

    2016-01-01

    Climate and human-induced environmental change promote biological regime shifts between alternate stable states, with implications for ecosystem resilience, function, and services. While these effects have been shown for present-day ecosystems, the long-term response of microbial communities has not been investigated in detail. This study assessed the decadal variations in phytoplankton communities in a ca. 150 year long sedimentary archive of Lake Nong Thale Prong (NTP), so...

  12. Assessment of phytoplankton community dynamics using bead array technology

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Asako

    2010-01-01

    Molecular methods are becoming increasingly popular in the field of microbial ecology for the characterization of phytoplankton communities at the taxonomic level. However, many techniques lack the potential for large scale spatiotemporal studies due to limitations in their methodology. In this study, a high-throughput, rapid and cost effective hybridization-based bead assay was applied to two sets of samples : (1) a yearlong time series (March 2009-2010) of surface seawater samples taken off...

  13. Phytoplankton community structure and its succession in Dianshan Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Liqing Wang; Rong Shi; Gaohua Ji; Zhifeng Fan; Jinglei Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankon samples were collected monthly in Dianshan Lake, the largest natural freshwater lake in Shanghai during 2004–2006, to assay the phytoplankton community structure and ascertain the rela-tionship between its succession and the eutrophication for the lake. Two hundred and five species from 84 genera were identified in Dianshan Lake, with Chlorophyta (50%), Bacillariophyta (20%), Cyanophyta (13%) and Euglenophyta (13%) being the main phyla. The monthly similarity index of species was...

  14. The influence of climate on phytoplankton communities in the upper San Francisco estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Lehman, Peggy W

    1997-01-01

    EXTRACT (SEE PDF FOR FULL ABSTRACT): The 1977 climate shift was characterized by low chlorophyll a concentrations and a shift in phytoplankton community composition throughout the upper San Francisco Bay estuary. ... For climate to be a driving force in phytoplankton communities, it must affect mechanisms that control biomass and community composition. The influence of climate on environmental conditions and phytoplankton community composition among water-year types was examined using 19 ...

  15. Seasonal changes of phytoplankton community structure in Jinshuitan Reservoir, Zhejiang, China%浙江紧水滩水库浮游植物群落结构季节变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 胡鸿钧; 晁爱敏; 谢慰法; 岑竞仪; 吕颂辉

    2013-01-01

    were identified and their contribution to the total abundance was analyzed. The seasonal variation of phytoplankton community structure was significant. The relationship between phytoplankton and environmental factors were discussed. By using Pearson correlation analysis, nutrients and temperature were the essential factors to determine the seasonal changes of phytoplankton species biodiversity and cell abundance. The nutrients were the key factor to affect the horizontal distribution and cell abundance of phytoplankton. Cell abundance is postively correlated with total phosphorus(TP) and Chlorophyll-a(r = 0. 292 and 0.143, respectively, P< 0.01). It is negatively correlated with temperature, total nitrogen(TN) and transparency(r = -0. 605, -0.384 and -0. 18 respectively, P< 0.01). The number of species exhibited a negative correlation with temperature, TN and TP(r=-0.187, -0.3 and -0.466 respectively, P< 0.01). TSI(Σ) , dominant species, Shannon-Weaver diversity index, Margalef index and Pielou evenness index were integrated to assess the water quality. The result indicated that the water quality of Jinshuitan Reservoir was medium-eutrophicated.%于2010年1、3、5、7、9、11月6次对紧水滩水库采样调查,并对浮游植物种类鉴定与数量统计,分析了浮游植物的优势种、多样性和群落结构季节变化特征.其结果为:共鉴定浮游植物284种,隶属7门105属.绿藻门最多,共51属139种,其次是硅藻门19属67种,蓝藻门22属52种,金藻门4属9种,甲藻门5属8种,裸藻门2属5种,隐藻门2属4种.浮游植物细胞丰度在1.04× 105-3.70×106个/L之间,平均丰度9.63×105个/L.多样性指数H'值为1.76-4.64,平均值3.09,丰富度指数D为0.48-2.80,平均值1.62,均匀度指数.J为0.51-1.26,平均值0.91.根据TSI(∑)并结合浮游植物群落结构对水质评价,紧水滩水库水质属于中-富营养状态.

  16. The relationship between phytoplankton diversity and community function in a coastal lagoon

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Pedro; Macedo, M. F.; Cancela da Fonseca, L.

    2006-01-01

    The decrease of biodiversity related to the phenomena of global climate change is stimulating the scientific community towards a better understanding of the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In ecosystems where marked biodiversity changes occur at seasonal time scales, it is easier to relate them with ecosystem functioning. The objective of this work is to analyse the relationship between phytoplankton diversity and primary production in St. André coast...

  17. Species- and community-level responses combine to drive phenology of lake phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Annika; Sagrario, María de los Ángeles González; Schindler, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Global change is leading to shifts in the seasonal timing of growth and maturation for primary producers. Remote sensing is increasingly used to measure the timing of primary production in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, but there is often a poor correlation between these results and direct observations of life-history responses of individual species. One explanation may be that in addition to phenological shifts, global change is also causing shifts in community composition among species with different seasonal timing of growth and maturation. We quantified how shifts in species phenology and in community composition translated into phenological change in a diverse phytoplankton community from 1962-2000. During this time the aggregate community spring-summer phytoplankton peak has shifted 63 days earlier. The mean taxon shift was only 3 days earlier and shifts in taxa phenology explained only 40% of the observed community phenological shift. The remaining community shift was attributed to dominant early season taxa increasing in abundance while a dominant late season taxon decreased in abundance. In diverse producer communities experiencing multiple stressors, changes in species composition must be considered to fully understand and predict shifts in the seasonal timing of primary production.

  18. Biodiversity increases the productivity and stability of phytoplankton communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina A Corcoran

    Full Text Available Global biodiversity losses provide an immediate impetus to elucidate the relationships between biodiversity, productivity and stability. In this study, we quantified the effects of species richness and species combination on the productivity and stability of phytoplankton communities subject to predation by a single rotifer species. We also tested one mechanism of the insurance hypothesis: whether large, slow-growing, potentially-defended cells would compensate for the loss of small, fast-growing, poorly-defended cells after predation. There were significant effects of species richness and species combination on the productivity, relative yield, and stability of phytoplankton cultures, but the relative importance of species richness and combination varied with the response variables. Species combination drove patterns of productivity, whereas species richness was more important for stability. Polycultures containing the most productive single species, Dunaliella, were consistently the most productive. Yet, the most species rich cultures were the most stable, having low temporal variability in measures of biomass. Polycultures recovered from short-term negative grazing effects, but this recovery was not due to the compensation of large, slow-growing cells for the loss of small, fast-growing cells. Instead, polyculture recovery was the result of reduced rotifer grazing rates and persisting small species within the polycultures. Therefore, although an insurance effect in polycultures was found, this effect was indirect and unrelated to grazing tolerance. We hypothesize that diverse phytoplankton assemblages interfered with efficient rotifer grazing and that this "interference effect" facilitated the recovery of the most productive species, Dunaliella. In summary, we demonstrate that both species composition and species richness are important in driving patterns of productivity and stability, respectively, and that stability in biodiverse

  19. Preliminary study on seasonal succession and development pathway of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Phytoplankton species composition and species succession were determined in 1998~1999 based on 2 nestle investigation cruises in the Bohai Sea and two monthly monitoring stations at Penglai and Changdao for 15 months. The seasonal succession and pathway of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea were discussed complementarily with history data. The main process of phytoplankton community development in the Bohai Sea was controlled by temperature and nutrient replenishes. There were two cell abundance peaks in an annual variation, the main peak in April and the secondary peak in September. In winter, the cell abundance was low due to the low temperature, the phytoplankton community was mainly made up of small-crled diatoms. In spring, the phytoplankton community was developed very quickly by small-celled diatom in suitable conditions of temperature and nutrients. In summer, the cell abundance decreased and big-celled diatoms became predominated. In autumn, because of the replenish of nutrient, big-celled diatoms and dinoflagellates formed another cell abundance peak.During the annual variation of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea, species succession was the main process of community development, the species sequence just occur at special areas and special periods. The evolution of phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea accords with the hypothesis of Margalef's phytoplankton community of four stages. But the size feature is contrary to the hypothesis,which may be caused by nutrient replenish in autumn in Bohai Sea and the top to down control.

  20. Nutrient ratios and the complex structure of phytoplankton communities in a highly turbid estuary of Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Thuoc Van; Torréton, Jean-Pascal; Mari, Xavier; Nguyen, Huyen Minh Thi; Pham, Kha Thi; Pham, Thu The; Bouvier, Thierry; Bettarel, Yvan; Pringault, Olivier; Bouvier, Corinne; Rochelle-Newall, Emma

    2014-12-01

    Phytoplankton diversity and abundance in estuarine systems are controlled by many factors. Salinity, turbidity, and inorganic nutrient concentrations and their respective ratios have all been proposed as principal factors that structure phytoplankton diversity and influence the emergence of potentially toxic species. Although much work has been conducted on temperate estuaries, less is known about how phytoplankton diversity is controlled in tropical, monsoonal systems that are subject to large, seasonal shifts in hydrology and to rapidly changing land use. Here, we present the results of an investigation into the factors controlling phytoplankton species composition and distribution in a tropical, monsoonal estuary (Bach Dang estuary, North Vietnam). A total of 245 taxa, 89 genera from six algal divisions were observed. Bacillariophyceae were the most diverse group contributing to 51.4 % of the microalgal assemblage, followed by Dinophyceae (29.8 %), Chlorophyceae (10.2 %), Cyanophyceae (3.7 %), Euglenophyceae (3.7 %) and Dictyochophyceae (1.2 %). The phytoplankton community was structured by inorganic nutrient ratios (DSi:DIP and DIN:DIP) as well as by salinity and turbidity. Evidence of a decrease in phytoplankton diversity concomitant with an increase in abundance and dominance of certain species (e.g., Skeletonema costatum) and the appearance of some potentially toxic species over the last two decades was also found. These changes in phytoplankton diversity are probably due to a combination of land use change resulting in changes in nutrient ratios and concentrations and global change as both rainfall and temperature have increased over the last two decades. It is therefore probable in the future that phytoplankton diversity will continue to change, potentially favoring the emergence of toxic species in this system. PMID:25200992

  1. Impact of salinity and pH on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system: An investigation with pigment analysis by HPLC

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Acharyya, T.; Babu, P.V.R.; Bandyopadhyay, D.

    , and variations in, phytoplankton communities were assessed by quantitative determination of their class specific marker pigments, using HPLC. Subtle changes in salinity of the freshwater by one practical salinity unit (PSU) completely removed green algae from...

  2. Phytoplankton community and limnology of Chatla floodplain wetland of Barak valley, Assam, North-East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Laskar H.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton diversity was investigated over a period of two years (2006 to 2008 in Chatla floodplain wetland in Barak valley, Assam, North-East India. Site 1 and site 2 are two inlets and site 3 is a lentic system associated with vegetation cover of Calamus tenuis and Baringtonia acutangula. The floodplain has a unique hydrology because of the presence of different types of habitats (inlets, fisheries, beels and outlets which maintains a network among the floodplains, rivers and streams. Phytoplankton community composition, density and diversity were studied in relation to environmental variables. All the variables were estimated by following standard methods. Phytoplankton was collected by plankton net and quantitative estimation was made by using Sedgwick Rafter counting cell. Phytoplankton community comprised 53 taxa represented by Chlorophyceae (31, Cyanophyceae (11, Bacillariophyceae (7, Euglenophyceae (1 and Dinophyceae (3. Phytoplankton taxa was dominated by Volvox sp., Nostoc sp., Eunotia sp., Navicula sp., Euglena spp. and density was found highest in site 3 and lowest in site 1. Shannon diversity index (H′ for phytoplankton community varied between 2.4 to 2.65 indicating fairly high species diversity. The varying magnitude of correlationship among environmental variables and phytoplankton species density as shown by Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA indicated that some of the environmental variables (water temperature, transparency, rainfall, nitrate and ammonia are the driving factors for governing the phytoplankton species assemblages in Chatla floodplain wetland. Fluctuation of phytoplankton density and community composition in different habitats indicated various niche apportionment as well as anthropogenic influences.

  3. Responses of phytoplankton community to the input of different aerosols in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X.; Chen, Y.; Wang, B.; Ma, Q. W.; Wang, F. J.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric deposition can affect marine phytoplankton by supplying macronutrients and trace elements. We conducted mesocosm experiments by adding aerosols with different composition (dominated by mineral dust, biomass burning and high Cu, and secondary aerosol, respectively) to the surface seawater of the East China Sea. Chlorophyll a concentrations were found to be the highest and lowest after adding aerosols containing the highest Fe and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), respectively. The relative abundance of Haptophyceae increased significantly after adding mineral dust, whereas diatom, Dinophyceae and Cryptophyceae reached the maximum accompanied with the highest DIN. Our results suggest that Fe may be more important than DIN in promoting primary productivity in the sampled seawater. The input of mineral dust and anthropogenic aerosols may result in distinct changes of phytoplankton community structure.

  4. Annual Change of Environmental Factors and Phytoplankton Community Characteristics in Maowei Sea of Qinzhou Bay%钦州湾茅尾海周年环境因子及浮游植物群落特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄军莲; 姜发军; 许铭本; 张荣灿; 王一兵; 柯珂; 雷富; 何碧娟

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors,phytoplankton species composition, dominant species, amount of distribution and community structure were investigated in January,March,June and September of 2010 in Maowei Sea of Qinzhou Bay. The results showed that,in the survey area,the concentration of PO3r-P was 0.01 — 0.07 mg/dm3,DIN was 0. 16 — 0. 78 mg/dm3,and both values of PO^-P and DIN had scaled over Type IV water quality standards at some stations. 262 species belonged to 82 genera of phytoplankton were identified, and there were 16 kinds of dominant species among them. The phytoplankton abundance average was 6. 29 X 104 cells/L,and the annual average index of biodiversity was 3. 87. The species number of phytoplankton had a decreasing trend from winter to autumn. There was an obvious seasonal change in the cell a--bundance,being the lowest(3. 28X 104 cells/L) in spring(March) and highestO. 25X 10" cells/ L) in summer (June).%2010年1月、3月、6月及9月,共设14个调查站位对钦州湾茅尾海海域的环境因子及浮游植物的种类组成、优势种类、数量分布和群落多样性进行调查分析.结果茅尾海海区营养盐中PO34-P值为0.01~0.07 mg/dm3,DIN值为0.16~0.78 mg/dm3,PO34 -P值和DIN值均有超4类海水水质标准现象.浮游植物共鉴定出82属,262种,优势种类16种,年平均丰度为6.29×104 cells/L,生物多样性指数的年平均值为3.87.2010年茅尾海浮游植物种类和数量都比较丰富,种类的季节变化呈现由冬至秋减少的趋势,数量的季节变化比较明显,春季最低,平均密度仅为3.28×104 cells/L,夏季最高,平均密度为9.25×104 cells/L.

  5. Phytoplankton community of Lake Baskandi anua, Cachar District, Assam, North East India – An ecological study

    OpenAIRE

    Devi M.B.; Gupta S; Das T

    2016-01-01

    Diversity, relative abundance and dominance of phytoplankton community of the Lake Baskandi anua, an oxbow lake of Assam, North east India were studied during December 2009 to November 2010. Chlorophyll content and biomass of phytoplankton along with physico-chemical properties of water of the lake were also estimated. The lake is covered with Hydrilla and other macrophytes like Eichhornia, Trapa, Altrnenthera, Polygonum, Ludw...

  6. The impact of climate change on phytoplankton - bacterioplankton interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Breithaupt, Petra

    2009-01-01

    Global warming has already and is continuing to impact the global oceans. Half of the global primary production is performed by phytoplankton in the oceans and heterotrophic marine bacteria channel a substantial amount of primary organic carbon through the microbial loop. Understanding the influence of climate change on these important processes is therefore essential for an assessment of the vulnerability of the carbon cycle and possible feedbacks. This thesis reports results from investigat...

  7. A unimodal species response model relating traits to environment with application to phytoplankton communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahira Jamil

    Full Text Available In this paper we attempt to explain observed niche differences among species (i.e. differences in their distribution along environmental gradients by differences in trait values (e.g. volume in phytoplankton communities. For this, we propose the trait-modulated Gaussian logistic model in which the niche parameters (optimum, tolerance and maximum are made linearly dependent on species traits. The model is fitted to data in the Bayesian framework using OpenBUGS (Bayesian inference Using Gibbs Sampling to identify according to which environmental variables there is niche differentiation among species and traits. We illustrate the method with phytoplankton community data of 203 lakes located within four climate zones and associated measurements on 11 environmental variables and six morphological species traits of 60 species. Temperature and chlorophyll-a (with opposite signs described well the niche structure of all species. Results showed that about 25% of the variance in the niche centres with respect to chlorophyll-a were accounted for by traits, whereas niche width and maximum could not be predicted by traits. Volume, mucilage, flagella and siliceous exoskeleton are found to be the most important traits to explain the niche centres. Species were clustered in two groups with different niches structures, group 1 high temperature-low chlorophyll-a species and group 2 low temperature-high chlorophyll-a species. Compared to group 2, species in group 1 had larger volume but lower surface area, had more often flagella but neither mucilage nor siliceous exoskeleton. These results might help in understanding the effect of environmental changes on phytoplankton community. The proposed method, therefore, can also apply to other aquatic or terrestrial communities for which individual traits and environmental conditioning factors are available.

  8. Development of a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy for analysis of the marine phytoplankton community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kang, Hye-Eun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang Heon; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy to analyze phytoplankton community structure using the Illumina MiSeq system. The amplicons (404-411 bp) obtained by end-pairing of two reads were sufficiently long to distinguish algal species and provided barcode data equivalent to those generated with the Roche 454 system, but at less than 1/20th of the cost. The original universal primer sequences targeting the 23S rDNA region and the PCR strategy were both modified, and this resulted in higher numbers of eukaryotic algal sequences by excluding non-photosynthetic proteobacterial sequences supporting effectiveness of this strategy. The novel strategy was used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure of six water samples from the East/Japan Sea: surface and 50 m depths at coastal and open-sea sites, with collections in May and July 2014. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified, which covered most of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic algal phyla, including Dinophyta, Rhodophyta, Ochrophyta, Chlorophyta, Streptophyta, Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, and Cyanophyta. This highlights the importance of plastid 23S primers, which perform better than the currently used 16S primers for phytoplankton community surveys. The findings also revealed that more efforts should be made to update 23S rDNA sequences as well as those of 16S in the databases. Analysis of algal proportions in the six samples showed that community structure differed depending on location, depth and season. Across the six samples evaluated, the numbers of OTUs in each phylum were similar but their relative proportions varied. This novel strategy would allow laboratories to analyze large numbers of samples at reasonable expense, whereas this has not been possible to date due to cost and time. In addition, we expect that this strategy will generate a large amount of novel data that could potentially change established methods and tools that are currently used in the realms of

  9. Development of a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy for analysis of the marine phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kang, Hye-Eun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang Heon; Ahn, Do-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy to analyze phytoplankton community structure using the Illumina MiSeq system. The amplicons (404–411 bp) obtained by end-pairing of two reads were sufficiently long to distinguish algal species and provided barcode data equivalent to those generated with the Roche 454 system, but at less than 1/20th of the cost. The original universal primer sequences targeting the 23S rDNA region and the PCR strategy were both modified, and this resulted in higher numbers of eukaryotic algal sequences by excluding non-photosynthetic proteobacterial sequences supporting effectiveness of this strategy. The novel strategy was used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure of six water samples from the East/Japan Sea: surface and 50 m depths at coastal and open-sea sites, with collections in May and July 2014. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified, which covered most of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic algal phyla, including Dinophyta, Rhodophyta, Ochrophyta, Chlorophyta, Streptophyta, Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, and Cyanophyta. This highlights the importance of plastid 23S primers, which perform better than the currently used 16S primers for phytoplankton community surveys. The findings also revealed that more efforts should be made to update 23S rDNA sequences as well as those of 16S in the databases. Analysis of algal proportions in the six samples showed that community structure differed depending on location, depth and season. Across the six samples evaluated, the numbers of OTUs in each phylum were similar but their relative proportions varied. This novel strategy would allow laboratories to analyze large numbers of samples at reasonable expense, whereas this has not been possible to date due to cost and time. In addition, we expect that this strategy will generate a large amount of novel data that could potentially change established methods and tools that are currently used in the realms of

  10. Variations in phytoplankton community in a monsoon-influenced tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    . The break period in monsoon altered the phytoplankton community leading to mixed species bloom of large-sized diatoms and harmful dinoflagellates (Gymnodinium catenatum and Cochlodinium polykrikoides) under high-saline, nutrient-poor, non...

  11. Community structure and spatial-temporal variation of netz-phytoplankton in the Bering Sea in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu; XIANG Peng; YE Youyin; LIN Gengming; YANG Qingliang; LIN Heshan; LIN Mao

    2016-01-01

    Marine biodiversity is changing in response to altered physical environment, subsequent ecological changes as well as anthropogenic disturbances. In this study, phytoplankton samplesin situ collected in the Bering Sea in July of 1999 and 2010 were analyzed to obtain phytoplankton community structure and spatial-temporal variation between the beginning and end of this decade, and the correlation of phytoplankton community dynamics and environmental factors was investigated. A total of 5 divisions, 58 genera and 153 species of phytoplankton belonging to 3 ecological groups were identified. The vast majority of phytoplankton consisted of diatoms accounting for 66.7% of the total species and 95.2% of the total abundance. Considering differentiation in spatial extent and phytoplankton sample types, there were subtle changes in species composition, large altering in abundance and significant variation in spatial distribution between two surveys. The abundance peak area was located at the Bering Strait while sub peak was found at the Bering Sea Basin. The boreal-temperate diatom was the dominant flora, which was subsequently replaced by eurythermal and frigid-water diatom. Phytoplankton community in the Bering Sea was not a simplex uniform community but composed of deep-ocean assemblage and neritic assemblage. The deep-ocean assemblage was located in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea Basin, dominated by boreal-temperate species (Neodenticula seminae,Thalassiothrix longissima,Amphiprora hyperborean,Chaetoceros atlanticus,Thalassiosira trifulta, etc.) and eurychoric species (Thalassionema nitzschioides,Ch. compressus,Rhizosolenia styliformis, etc.), and characterized by low abundance, even inter-species abundance allocations, diverse dominant species and high species diversity. The neritic assemblage was distributed on the continental shelf and slope of Bering Sea and was mainly composed of frigid-water species (Th. nordenskiöldii,Ch. furcellatus,Ch. socialis

  12. Phytoplankton abundance and community structure in the Antarctic polar frontal region during austral summer of 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHRAMIK Patil; RAHUL Mohan; SUHAS Shetye; SAHINA Gazi

    2013-01-01

    The Antarctic polar front region in the Southern Ocean is known to be most productive.We studied the phytoplankton community structure in the Indian sector at this frontal location during late austral summer (February,2009) onboard R/V Akademic Boris Petrov.We used the phytoplankton and microheterotrophs abundance,as also the associated physico-chemical parameters to explain the low phytoplankton abundance in the study region.This study emphasizes the shift of phytoplankton,from large (>10 μm) to small (<10 μm) size.The phytoplankton abundance appears to be controlled by physical parameters and by nutrient concentrations and also by the microheterotrophs (ciliates and dinoflagellates) which exert a strong grazing pressure.This probably reduces small (<10 μm) and large (>10 μm)phytoplankton abundance during the late austral summer.This study highlights the highly productive polar front nevertheless becomes a region of low phytoplankton abundance,due to community shifts towards pico-phytoplankton (<10 μm) during late austral summer.

  13. Photophysiological state of natural phytoplankton communities in the South China Sea and Sulu Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Cheah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, an increasing number of studies on phytoplankton in the tropical South China Sea (SCS and Sulu Sea (SS have been conducted. However, still little is known about the photophysiological state of natural phytoplankton communities under varying environmental conditions. This study investigates the photophysiological state of natural phytoplankton communities in the southern SCS and SS based on high horizontal and vertical resolution field observations collected during the SHIVA (Stratosphere ozone: Halogens in a Varying Atmosphere cruise (SO 218 in November 2011 on board RV Sonne. At the surface, pigment results revealed that total chlorophyll a (TChl a concentrations at all offshore stations were low at the surface and were generally dominated by cyanobacteria. Enhanced concentrations of TChl a were only observed below the upper mixed layer and above the euphotic depth with haptophytes, prochlorophytes and prasinophytes contributing most of the biomass. At stations close to the coast and river outflows, surface phytoplankton blooms (between 1 to 2.2 mg m−3 dominated by diatoms were observed. Overall, the study region exhibited strong nitrate + nitrite (NOx, −1, and phosphate (PO4, −1 depletion from surface down to about 50–60 m. Silicate (Si exhibited similar trends with the exception of some near shore stations in which high Si concentrations (> 2 μmol L−1 were observed in conjunction with increased TChl a and diatoms concentrations. Surface NOx concentrations were observed to correlate positively with temperature (τ = 0.22, p n = 108, whereas negative correlations were reported between surface NOx (τ = −0.27, p n = 108, Si (τ = −0.68, p n = 108 and salinity indicating that the enhancement in nutrients at the surface was probably supplied through fresher and warmer river waters near the coast. In contrast, the opposite was observed between temperature, salinity and all nutrients in the water column suggesting

  14. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton community structure in the Sanggou, Ailian, and Lidao Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mingli; Zhang, Cuixia; Jiang, Zengjie; Guo, Shujin; Sun, Jun

    2014-12-01

    The seasonal variations in phytoplankton community structure were investigated for the Sanggou Bay (SGB) and the adjacent Ailian Bay (ALB) and Lidao Bay (LDB) in Shandong Peninsula, eastern China. The species composition and cell abundance of phytoplankton in the bay waters in spring (April 2011), summer (August 2011), autumn (October 2011), and winter (January 2012) were examined using the Utermöhl method. A total of 80 taxa of phytoplankton that belong to 39 genera of 3 phyla were identified. These included 64 species of 30 genera in the Phylum Bacillariophyta, 13 species of 8 genera in the Phylum Dinophyta, and 3 species of 1 genus in the Phylum Chrysophyta. During the four seasons, the number of phytoplankton species (43) was the highest in spring, followed by summer and autumn (40), and the lowest number of phytoplankton species (35) was found in winter. Diatoms, especially Paralia sulcata (Ehrenberg) Cleve and Coscinodiscus oculus-iridis Ehrenberg, were predominant in the phytoplankton community throughout the study period, whereas the dominance of dinoflagellate appeared in summer only. The maximum cell abundance of phytoplankton was detected in summer (average 8.08 × 103 cells L-1) whereas their minimum abundance was found in autumn (average 2.60 × 103 cells L-1). The phytoplankton abundance was generally higher in the outer bay than in the inner bay in spring and autumn. In summer, the phytoplankton cells were mainly concentrated in the south of inner SGB, with peak abundance observed along the western coast. In winter, the distribution of phytoplankton cells showed 3 patches, with peak abundance along the western coast as well. On seasonal average, the Shannon-Wiener diversity indices of phytoplankton community ranged from 1.17 to 1.78 (autumn > summer > spring > winter), and the Pielou's evenness indices of phytoplankton ranged from 0.45 to 0.65 (autumn > spring > summer > winter). According to the results of canonical correspondence analysis

  15. Species diversity of phytoplankton communities in the Western Arctic Ocean during summer 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengming Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton assemblages in the Arctic Ocean, particularly in the Western Arctic Ocean, remain unclear due to limited long-term ecological investigation caused by the existing harsh environment. In the present study, we characterized summer phytoplankton assemblages in surface water in terms of species composition and spatial distribution in the Western Arctic Ocean in 2010. Phytoplankton samples were collected at 50 stations in the survey area (67.0o–86.1o N, 152.5 o–169.0 o W from 20 July to 30 August 2010 during the CHINARE 2010 cruise aboard the Chinese icebreaker R/V “Xuelong”. Results showed that high species diversity was present in the surface water phytoplankton community. A total of 154 phytoplankton taxa (>5 μm distributed among 67 genera of 10 phyla (or class were identified in the study, which could be divided into four ecological groups, namely Arctic species, Arctic-boreal species, Warm-temperate species and Cosmopolitan species. Phytoplankton diversity exhibited a significant spatial difference with regard to taxonomic composition and abundance during the investigation period. Two phytoplankton assemblages were present in the surface water comprising a shelf community and an open sea community. Average abundance and species richness of the shelf community were 892.6×102 cells/dm3 and 1.81, respectively, and the dominant species were Navicula pelagica, Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii, Chaetoceros diadema, Pseudo-nitzschia seriata, Leptocylindrus danicus, Nitzschia longissima and N. grunowii. A succession from pennate to centric diatoms was evident. The open sea community contained a far lower abundance and species richness (27.7×102 cells/dm3 and 1.28 than the community in the abysmal area and was mainly dominated by Thalassionema nitzschioides. The relationship between the distribution of surface water phytoplankton and several environmental factors were discussed.

  16. Phytoplankton communities and its controlling factors in summer and autumn in the southern Yellow Sea, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Haijiao; HUANG Yajie; ZHAI Weidong; GUO Shujin; JIN Hualong; SUN Jun

    2015-01-01

    The phytoplankton water samples were collected in two multidisciplinary investigations which were carried out during summer (June) and autumn (November to December) of 2011. Phytoplankton species composition and abun-dance data were accomplished by Utermöhl method. The phytoplankton community was dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates in the southern Yellow Sea (YS) in summer and autumn. In summer, Paralia sulcata and Prorocen-trum dentatum were the predominated species, the cell abundance ranged from 0.074 to 107.733×103 cells/L with an average of 9.057×103 cells/L. Two phytoplankton high abundance appeared in northwest part of the survey area and the Changjiang River Estuary, respectively. In autumn, Par. sulcata became the predominant species, and the phyto-plankton cell abundance ranged from 1.035×103 to 8.985×103 cells/L, the average was 3.263×103 cells/L. The phytopl-ankton abundance in surface layer presented the homogeneous distributions. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) method was applied for discovering the relationship between environmental factors and the common found phytoplankton species. The responses of phytoplankton to nutrients were varied between summer and autumn. The abundance of most predominant species, Par. sulcata was strongly correlated to temperature and salinity in autumn, but not the case in summer.

  17. Seasonal Changes in Mycosporine-Like Amino Acid Production Rate with Respect to Natural Phytoplankton Species Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Yong Ha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available After in situ incubation at the site for a year, phytoplanktons in surface water were exposed to natural light in temperate lakes (every month; thereafter, the net production rate of photoprotective compounds (mycosporine-like amino acids, MAAs was calculated using 13C labeled tracer. This is the first report describing seasonal variation in the net production rate of individual MAAs in temperate lakes using a compound-specific stable isotope method. In the mid-latitude region of the Korean Peninsula, UV radiation (UVR usually peaks from July to August. In Lake Paldang and Lake Cheongpyeong, diatoms dominated among the phytoplankton throughout the year. The relative abundance of Cyanophyceae (Anabaena spiroides reached over 80% during July in Lake Cheongpyeong. Changes in phytoplankton abundance indicate that the phytoplankton community structure is influenced by seasonal changes in the net production rate and concentration of MAAs. Notably, particulate organic matter (POM showed a remarkable change based on the UV intensity occurring during that period; this was because of the fact that cyanobacteria that are highly sensitive to UV irradiance dominated the community. POM cultured in Lake Paldang had the greatest shinorine (SH production rate during October, i.e., 83.83 ± 10.47 fgC·L−1·h−1. The dominance of diatoms indicated that they had a long-term response to UVR. Evaluation of POM cultured in Lake Cheongpyeong revealed that there was an increase in the net MAA production in July (when UVR reached the maximum; a substantial amount of SH, i.e., 17.62 ± 18.34 fgC·L−1·h−1, was recorded during this period. Our results demonstrate that both the net production rate as well as the concentration of MAAs related to photoinduction depended on the phytoplankton community structure. In addition, seasonal changes in UVR also influenced the quantity and production of MAAs in phytoplanktons (especially Cyanophyceae.

  18. Structure and dynamics of the phytoplankton community within a maturation pond in a semiarid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastich, E A; Gavazza, S; Casé, M C C; Florencio, L; Kato, M T

    2016-02-01

    In northeastern Brazil, stabilization ponds are very suitable for wastewater treatment because of the relative great land availability and environmental conditions (e.g., high temperature) favorable for microorganism optimal development. However, blooms of potentially toxic cyanobacteria may affect the use of these treatment ponds due to resulting effluent poor quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and the occurrence of cyanobacteria in a maturation pond located immediately after a series of two ponds. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, BOD, N, and P were measured during a period of four months when samples were collected from the surface and the bottom of 7 sampling points distributed inside the pond. The phytoplankton of collected samples was also identified and classified using a conventional optical microscopy. Analysis of variance and Tukey test were used to evaluate the results. The three phytoplankton divisions found (Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta) did not change considerably through surface and bottom. However, they changed greatly over the sampled months; great dominance of Cyanophyta was found at April and October, while Chlorophyta dominated the lagoon in September. Low superficial organic loads (between 78 and 109 kg BOD.ha-1.d-1) and N:P ≤ 10 were the determinant factors that favored the predominance of Cyanophyta. The presence of two potentially toxic species of Cyanophyta, Oscillatoria sp. and Microcystis aeruginosa, indicates that caution is required when considering the final destination of treated effluent and suggests a need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the use of the treatment technology. PMID:26909632

  19. Phytoplankton community structure and environmental parameters in aquaculture areas of Daya Bay, South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Jiangang; Zhang, Yujuan; Cao, Yu

    2009-01-01

    Environmental characteristics and phytoplankton community structure were investigated in two aquaculture areas in Dapeng Cove of Daya Bay, South China Sea, between April 2005 and June 2006. Phytoplankton abundance ranged between 5.0 and 8877.5 cells/mL, with an average of 751.8 cells/mL. The seasonal cycle of phytoplankton were demonstrated by frequent oscillations, with recurrent high abundances from late spring to autumn and a peak stage in late winter. Diatoms were the predominant phytoplankton group, accounting for 93.21% of the total abundance. The next most abundant group was the dinoflagellates, which made up only 1.24% of total abundance. High concentrations of Alexandrium tamarense (Lebour) Balech with a maximum of 603.0 cells/mL were firstly recorded in this area known for high rates of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) contamination. Temperatures and salinities were within the suitable values for the growth of phytoplankton, and were important in phytoplankton seasonal fluctuations. The operation of the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (DNPS) exerts influences on the phytoplankton community and resulted in the high abundances of toxic dinoflagellate species during the winter months. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved silicate (DSi) were sufficient, and rarely limited for the growth of phytoplankton. Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) was the most necessary element for phytoplankton growth. The enriched environments accelerated the growth of small diatoms, and made for the shift in predominant species from large diatom Rhizosolenia spp. to chain-forming diatoms such as Skeletonema costatum, Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and Thalassiosira subtilis. PMID:19999976

  20. Phytoplankton community and limnochemistry of Piburger See (Tyrol, Austria 28 years after lake restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansjörg THIES

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton community and limnochemistry of Piburger See, a small soft-water, meromictic lake situated at 913 m a.s.l. in a crystalline area of the Central Eastern Alps of Tyrol (Austria, were investigated 28 years after the beginning of lake restoration. Although long-term data of the lake show a declining trend in total phosphorus concentrations and phytoplankton biovolume, the response of Piburger See to the restoration measures carried out in 1970 was delayed by about 20 years. At present the lake is approaching its former oligotrophic level. The most evident difference between the past and present phytoplankton species composition of Piburger See is the actual absence of the Cyanophycean Oscillatoria limosa C. A. Agardh, which markedly increased during the first two decades after the lake restoration (1970-1987. The phytoplankton biovolume recorded in 1998 was lower than in the 1970s and 1980s, while seasonal patterns were similar to those recorded before and later on in the lake restoration. The lowest annual phytoplankton biovolume in 1998 occurred in early winter, while the absolute maximum was observed in metalimnetic water layers in late spring. In 1998 the intra-annual patterns of phytoplankton biovolume and chlorophyll-a compare well. Phytoplankton succession started in early 1998 under ice with coccal green algae followed by flagellated Chrysophyceae during spring. The mid-summer phytoplankton community was dominated by centric Bacillariophyceae, which were later replaced by coccal Cyanophyceae. During autumn, Dinophyceae and Chrysophyceae prevailed. Epilimnetic dominance of centric diatoms during mid summer appears to be a new feature, which in 1998 was related to a strong depletion of dissolved silica and nitrate. Long-term water chemistry and phytoplankton data were checked against local weather data in order to explain the delay in the re-oligotrophication process of Piburger See. However, no clear relationship could be

  1. Marine Phytoplankton Temperature versus Growth Responses from Polar to Tropical Waters – Outcome of a Scientific Community-Wide Study

    OpenAIRE

    Philip W Boyd; Rynearson, Tatiana A.; Armstrong, Evelyn A.; Feixue Fu; Kendra Hayashi; Zhangxi Hu; Hutchins, David A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Elena Litchman; Mulholland, Margaret R.; Uta Passow; Strzepek, Robert F.; Whittaker, Kerry A.; Elizabeth Yu; Mridul K Thomas

    2013-01-01

    "It takes a village to finish (marine) science these days" Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project) The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth...

  2. Phytoplankton Community Dynamics in West Lake After Drawing Water from the Qiantang River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏印心; 李瑾; 虞左明

    2004-01-01

    Seventeen phytoplankton dominant species of 218 taxa were found to have contributed to more than 80% of the biomass after analysis of the January, 1955 to December, 1996 phytoplankton population at five stations in West Lake after Qiantang River water had been drawn into the lake for a decade. The seasonal fluctuations were obvious; the maximum cell density of 90.91×107-93.58×107 cells/L and biomass of 57.41-58.61 mg/L occurred mainly in summer of 1996,largely as a result of the development of Lyngbya contorta, Merismopedia tenuissima, Oscillatoria limnetica, Spirulina laxissima and Scenedesmus quadricauda, etc. at Stations 2 and 4. At Station 1 located near the inlet for drawing water from the Qiantang River, the species number, cell density, biomass, chlorophyll a concentration and physico-chemical parameters (except for total nitrogen) were obviously greater than those at the other four stations, also greater than the corresponding parameters before the drawing of water from the Qiantang River into the lake.Compared with the results of study on the phytoplankton community in 1980 before the drawing of Qiantang River into the lake, the species number and the total individual density were increased, the dominant species changed somewhat, the biomass was decreased. The water quality was improved (especially at Station 1) after the drawing of river water into the lake.Based on criteria for evaluating trophic status, the biological and chemical indicators such as species composition and dominant species, and other parameters such as annual mean value cell densities (36.06×107-51.27×107 cells/L), biomass (29.03-39.74 mg/L), chl a concentrations (41.29-67.67μg/L), total nitrigen (1.72-2.89 mg/L), total phosphorus (0.12-0.16 mg/L) obtained at Stations 2, 3, 4 and 5, showed that West Lake is still at eutrophic lake.

  3. Dynamics of phytoplankton communities in the Jiangdong Reservoir of Jiulong River, Fujian, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongqiang; Huang, Bangqin; Yu, Chaochao; Chen, Nengwang; Hong, Huasheng

    2014-03-01

    Phytoplankton blooms occurring in the Jiangdong Reservoir of Jiulong River, Fujian Province, South China, are a potential source of contamination of the drinking water of Xiamen (Amoy) City. To understand the main factors governing phytoplankton composition and succession, we sampled phytoplankton and measured environmental parameters in the reservoir, weekly or biweekly from Jan. 2010 to Feb. 2012. We identified 123 species of phytoplankton from 7 phyla and 74 genera. The major phyla were Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyta, Cryptophyta, Cyanophyta, and Dinophyta. The main trend in the succession of phytoplankton was from prevalence of Cryptophyta-Bacillariophyta communities to those of Chlorophyta-Cyanophyta. High cell concentrations of Cryptophyta, predominantly Komma caudate, Cryptomonas marssonii, and Cryptomonas erosa, were present in winter, associated with low river discharge and cold water. Bacillariophyta, primarily Cyclotella meneghiniana, Aulacoseira granulata, and Aulacoseira granulata var. angustissima, dominated in early spring, coinciding with high turbulence and low irradiance. During early summer and autumn, Chlorophyta, comprising Scenedesmus quadricauda, Dictyosphaerium ehrenbergianum, and Pandorina sp. were prevalent during conditions of warmer water temperatures and low turbulence. Cyanophyta, with dominance of Pseudanabaena mucicola, Merismopedia tenuissima and Raphidiopsis sp. increased throughout the summer, coinciding with higher water temperatures and lower nutrient concentrations. Dinophyta content was occasionally high during winter and summer. Peridiniopsis penardii (Dinophyta) bloomed during winter 2009, with a persistently high biomass recorded into early spring. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that phytoplankton communities were influenced by river discharge, irradiance, water temperature, and nutrient concentrations.

  4. [Phytoplankton Community Structure and Water Quality Assessment in Jialing River After the Impoundment of Caojie Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Zhang, Sheng; Liu, Shuo-ru

    2015-07-01

    The variation of phytoplankton community and the water quality in Jialing River after the impoundment of Caojie Reservoir was studied in this paper. There were 145 species of phytoplankton under the membership of 8 divisions and 74 genera. Bacillariophyta was the first dominant division, with a total of 57 species of 23 genera, accounted for 39. 3% of total phytoplankton species, followed by Chlorophyta, with 53 species of 28 genera and accounted for 36. 6%. Only 35 species of 23 genera belonged to Euglenphyta, Cryptophyta, Pyrrophyta, Chrysophyta, and Cyanophyta. The average phytoplankton abundance was 1. 82 x 10(5)cell . L-1, and the top three taxon of most abundant were Bacillariophyta, Cryptophyta and Pyrrophyta, accounted for 39. 2%, 29. 9%, and 24. 5% of total abundance, respectively. The cell abundance in spring was significantly higher than those in other seasons. The dominant species included Aulacoseria granulata, Melosira varians, Peridiniopsis niei, Komma caudata, Cryptomonas erosa etc., indicated by the dominant index. Excluded by cluster analysis, the influence on phytoplankton had initially emerged after the impoundment of Caojie Reservoir. The reservoir area could be divided into different ecological regions longitudinally after Caojie Reservoir impoundment, which had an important impact on the phytoplankton. Meanwhile, the phytoplankton and flow velocity between upstream and downstream of the dam significantly varied. Shannon-Wiener species diversity index, Margalef species richness index and Pielous evenness index ranged 2. 06 - 3. 55, 0. 76 - 1. 90 and 0. 50 - 0. 78, respectively. The evaluation results of phytoplankton community structure showed that the eutrophic state was at medium eutrophication level, while diversity analysis results indicated light to moderate pollution. PMID:26489315

  5. Decoding size distribution patterns in marine and transitional water phytoplankton: from community to species level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonilde Roselli

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of phytoplankton community assembly is a fundamental issue of aquatic ecology. Here, we use field data from transitional (e.g. coastal lagoons and coastal water environments to decode patterns of phytoplankton size distribution into organization and adaptive mechanisms. Transitional waters are characterized by higher resource availability and shallower well-mixed water column than coastal marine environments. Differences in physico-chemical regime between the two environments have been hypothesized to exert contrasting selective pressures on phytoplankton cell morphology (size and shape. We tested the hypothesis focusing on resource availability (nutrients and light and mixed layer depth as ecological axes that define ecological niches of phytoplankton. We report fundamental differences in size distributions of marine and freshwater diatoms, with transitional water phytoplankton significantly smaller and with higher surface to volume ratio than marine species. Here, we hypothesize that mixing condition affecting size-dependent sinking may drive phytoplankton size and shape distributions. The interplay between shallow mixed layer depth and frequent and complete mixing of transitional waters may likely increase the competitive advantage of small phytoplankton limiting large cell fitness. The nutrient regime appears to explain the size distribution within both marine and transitional water environments, while it seem does not explain the pattern observed across the two environments. In addition, difference in light availability across the two environments appear do not explain the occurrence of asymmetric size distribution at each hierarchical level. We hypothesize that such competitive equilibria and adaptive strategies in resource exploitation may drive by organism's behavior which exploring patch resources in transitional and marine phytoplankton communities.

  6. The combined influence of two agricultural contaminants on natural communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Thompson, Dean G; Houlahan, Jeff E; Kidd, Karen A

    2016-07-01

    Concentrations of glyphosate observed in the environment are generally lower than those found to exert toxicity on aquatic organisms in the laboratory. Toxicity is often tested in the absence of other expected co-occurring contaminants. By examining changes in the phytoplankton and zooplankton communities of shallow, partitioned wetlands over a 5 month period, we assessed the potential for direct and indirect effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide, Roundup WeatherMax(©) applied at the maximum label rate, both in isolation and in a mixture with nutrients (from fertilizers). The co-application of herbicide and nutrients resulted in an immediate but transient decline in dietary quality of phytoplankton (8.3 % decline in edible carbon content/L) and zooplankton community similarity (27 % decline in similarity and loss of three taxa), whereas these effects were not evident in wetlands treated only with the herbicide. Thus, even at a worst-case exposure, this herbicide in isolation, did not produce the acutely toxic effects on plankton communities suggested by laboratory or mesocosm studies. Indirect effects of the herbicide-nutrient mixture were evident in mid-summer, when glyphosate residues were no longer detectable in surface water. Zooplankton abundance tripled, and zooplankton taxa richness increased by an average of four taxa in the herbicide and nutrient treated wetlands. The lack of significant toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax alone, as well as the observation of delayed interactive or indirect effects of the mixture of herbicide and nutrients attest to the value of manipulative field experiments as part of a comprehensive, tiered approach to risk assessments in ecotoxicology. PMID:27112456

  7. Diurnal variation of phytoplankton community in a high frequency area of HABs: Daya Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaxue; Song, Xingyu; Huang, Liangmin; Zhong, Yu; Shen, Pingping; Qin, Geng

    2011-07-01

    Phytoplankton community was investigated in the cage culture area of Daya Bay during a diurnal cycle. Two rainfalls occurred during the course of the experiment and decreased the surface seawater salinity in the aquaculture area. A total of 38 species were identified, of which the dominant species included Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and Skeletonema costatum. Water stratification obstructed the vertical migration of dinoflagellates. Statistical analysis indicated that Synechococcus showed negative relationship with silicate and ammonia, which indicated that Synechococcus adapted to grow at oligotrophic environment. Phytoplankton community structure implied the risk of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. blooms in the aquaculture area of Daya Bay.

  8. Composition, abundance and ecology of phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake, Manipur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Sharma

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake (a Ramsar site, studied during November 2002-October 2004, reveal the occurrence of 75 and 71 species, indicate monthly richness ranging between 47� plus or minus 6 and 49� plus or minus 3 species and record 50.0-83.2 and 64.5-84.0 % community similarities during two annual cycles respectively. Chlorophyta (33� plus or minus 5 and 35� plus or minus 5 species show qualitative dominance and importance of Closterium > Cosmarium > Staurastrum > Micrasterias > Gonatozygon species. Phytoplankton (206� plus or minus 58 and 220� plus or minus 53 n/l comprise between 45.1� plus or minus 6.5 and 42.9� plus or minus 5.8 % of net plankton abundance, indicate trimodal annual patterns and record peak abundance during winter. Chlorophyta (111� plus or minus 20 and 119� plus or minus 15 n/l, the dominant quantitative component, indicate winter peaks; Closterium > Staurastrum > Gonatozygon > Micrasterias species contribute significantly to their abundance. Ceratium hirudinella (43� plus or minus 52 and 39� plus or minus 37 n/l is the sole important individual species of phytoplankton. Dinophyta > Bacillariophyta are sub-dominant groups and Euglenophyta > Cyanophyta > Chrysophyta show very low densities. Phytoplankton communities are characterized by higher species diversity, higher evenness and lower dominance. Abiotic factors register limited influence on richness and abundance of phytoplankton and on abundance of constituent groups. Multiple regression indicates relatively lower influence of fifteen abiotic factors on richness of phytoplankton and higher cumulative influence on abundance of phytoplankton, Chlorophyta, Dinophyta and Bacillariophyta.

  9. [Seasonal variations of community structures phytoplankton in groundwater discharge areas along the Northern Yucatán Peninsula coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Góngora, Cynthia Catalina; Liceaga-Correa, Maria de los Angeles; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge Alfredo

    2012-03-01

    The highly touristic Yucatán Peninsula is principally constituted with coastal marine environments. Like other coastal areas, this has been affected by the increase of waste water discharge, hydrological modifications and land use changes in the area. The phytoplankton community structure is one of the main components of coastal ecosystems and the most affected in hydrological processes. In order to follow the seasonal variations, the phytoplankton was characterized to follow the hydrological variability in two sites (Dzilam and Progreso) of the Northern Yucatán Peninsula. For this, cruises were carried out monthly during one year, from April 2004 to March 2005, with two samplings per season (dry, rainy and "nortes"). Hydrological variability was associated with seasonality and directly linked to groundwater discharges in the Dzilam area, and waste water discharges in the Progreso area. The highest nutrient concentrations occurred mainly during the rainy season. The phytoplankton community changes observed throughout the year suggested that the hydrological and chemical variability associated with seasonality and anthropogenic impacts have a strong influence. The substitution of diatoms by dinoflagellates as the dominant group in Progreso was the result of seasonal variability itself, but also could have been caused by eutrophic processes; while in Dzilam, the major presence of diatoms could have been favored by groundwater discharges. The results of this study can be used to understand the linkages between stressors from the anthropogenic activities and coastal water quality and changes. PMID:22458216

  10. Effect of ultraviolet radiation on marine phytoplankton community in Akkeshi Bay, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of ultraviolet radiation on marine phytoplankton community was determined during a spring and fall bloom in a boreal embayment, Akkeshi Bay, Japan, which was located at 43 degrees N, 144 degrees 50'E. A time-series of observation was made every 6 h for 24 hours. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation always caused a depression of photosynthetic activity was observed at the end of day light period in both blooms. During a nigh period a degree of depression was decreased by 50% at least. The results of the present study may suggest that the effect of ultraviolet radiation on photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton is significantly large even in the boreal sea region and marine phytoplankton community has a capability to recover more than 40% from a damage by ultraviolet radiation during a night period

  11. Short-term variations of phytoplankton communities in response to anthropogenic stressors in a highly altered temperate estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongsik; Jeong, Byungkwan

    2015-04-01

    Data for phytoplankton size classes, taxonomy, and water properties were collected through an episodic freshwater discharge event (4 days) in the temperate Youngsan River estuary, which is highly disturbed by manually regulated inputs of freshwater from a sea dike, to investigate the effects of an acute change in anthropogenic stressors on the short-term dynamics of phytoplankton and their surrounding environments. The salinity of the well-mixed saline water (33.2-33.5) decreased to as low as 4.0 and water temperature increased to 24.0 °C during the freshwater discharge, resulting in a stratified water column in the upper region of the estuary. During the discharge, chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations increased to as much as 15.66 μg L-1 with micro-sized phytoplankton being dominant due to the presence of micro-sized freshwater phytoplankton, mostly Aulacoseira ambigua (98% in cell abundance), transported from the reservoir. Primary production decreased to as little as 87.9 mg C m-2 d-1, although nutrients such as NO2- + NO3- were supplied by the freshwater inputs of the discharge. Following the discharge, dinoflagellate blooms, dominated by Heterocapsa sp. (>88%), a nano-sized red tide species, developed in the upper regions of the estuary with peaks in chl a concentrations reaching as high as 30.33 μg L-1. Another red tide species, Prorocentrum micans, was also dominant in the estuary, suggesting that harmful algal blooms (HABs) are associated with anthropogenic stressors related to the freshwater inputs. The Shannon diversity index decreased to 0.18 while the Simpson dominance index increased to 0.94 during the discharge, but the diversity increased again following the discharge. The phytoplankton communities and diversity changed along the salinity gradient, corresponding to an "ecocline" pattern. The results of multivariate statistical analysis suggested that phytoplankton species and size structure were controlled mainly by salinity, water temperature

  12. Variations of summer phytoplankton community related to environmental factors in a macro-tidal estuarine embayment, Hangzhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuexia; Yu, Jun; Jiang, Zhibing; Wang, Qin; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    To explore the distribution and composition of phytoplankton community and their responses to environmental changes, summer net-collected phytoplankton and physicochemical parameters in the Hangzhou Bay during 2004-2010 were investigated. A total of four phyla and 84 species were identified, including 67 diatom and 12 dinoflagellate species. The dominant species constantly consisted of the diatoms, although the dominance of dinoflagellate and cyanobacteria increased recently. Due to great spatio-temporal variations in environmental factors (salinity, suspended solids, and nutrient concentration), significant heterogeneities in community compositions among different years and subregions (inner and middle sections, and bay mouth) were found based on the analyses of multidimensional scaling and similarity. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that salinity and Si/N were the main variables associated with algal assemblage. Compared with the historical data since the 1980s, eutrophication (N, P, and N/P increased with decreasing Si/N) was exacerbated drastically. Moreover, climatic forcing and human activities resulted in a series of physical alterations, including sediment retention, temperature increase, and salinity decrease as well as reduction in water exchanges. All these changes induced obvious increases in cell density and Chl- a while decreases in species diversity and diatom-dinoflagellate ratio as well as the shifting of dominant species. Therefore, the long-term phytoplankton variations were closely related to anthropogenic and climatic perturbations in the Hangzhou Bay.

  13. Phytoplankton community dynamics in an intermittently open hypereutrophic coastal lagoon in southern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Susana; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Gamito, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    Phytoplankton community' dynamics were studied in Salgados coastal lagoon in order to evaluate the effects of excessive organic loads and also physical stress caused by the irregular opening of the lagoon. Salgados is a hypereutrophic intermittently open coastal lagoon, which received freshwater inputs from small rivers and from a wastewater treatment plant. Cyanophyceae dominated the phytoplankton communities most of the time; Bacillariophyceae became the main taxonomic group in winter when the lagoon was closed; Chlorophyceae was the major class in early summer; pico-nano flagellate algae accounted for a high percentage of total phytoplankton during spring. Potentially harmful taxa were observed during most of the sampling periods, forming blooms and accounting for a considerable percentage of total phytoplankton abundance. A strong differentiation among dry and wet seasons could be noticed. The dry season was dominated by Microsystis aeruginosa, Rhodomonas sp., pico-nano flagellate algae, Cyclotella spp. and Planktothrix sp., while the wet season, although still with the presence of Microsystis aeruginosa, was dominated by Dolichospermum spiroides. The best environmental variables explaining stations patterns and based on phytoplankton taxa were days of isolation, pH, and salinity. Temperature, cumulative rain and total phosphorus were also related with species and stations patterns. The high nutrient load in Salgados lagoon promoted the development and persistence of harmful algae blooms. Proper management of coastal lagoons involves not only the control of direct discharges of nutrients, but also of other factors, including water level and communication with the sea.

  14. [Annual change of phytoplankton ecological features in Fangchenggang Bay of Guangxi, South China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jun-Lian; Xu, Ming-Ben; Zhang, Rong-Can; Chen, Bo

    2011-05-01

    In March, June, September, and December 2007, investigations were conducted on the species composition, dominant species, community structure, and abundance distribution of phytoplankton in the Fangchenggang Bay of Guangxi. Based on the investigation data, the phytoplankton abundance, biotic index, and their correlations with environmental factors were analyzed. A total of 138 species of 54 genera were identified, among which, 112 species belonged to 37 genera of diatoms, 21 species belonged to 12 genera of dinoflagellates, 2 species belonged to chrysophyta, 2 species belonged to chlorophyta, and 1 species belonged to cyanophyta. In whole year, the dominant species was Skeletonema costatum. The species number had a trend decreasing from the outer to the inner of the Bay and from spring to winter, while the cell abundance was decreased from the inner to the outer of the Bay. There was an obvious annual change in the cell abundance, being the highest (151.39 x 10(4) cells x dm(-3)) in summer (June) and the lowest (0.35 x 10(4) cells x dm(-3)) in winter (December). In spring, both the diversity and the species number were higher. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the distribution of phytoplankton community had definite correlations with water nutrient content, temperature and salinity. At the observation stations 1 and 2 in west Bay, due to the effects of Fangcheng River runoff and hydrodynamic forces such as tide, water salinity was lower and nutrient content was higher, and accordingly, S. costatum cells in summer could greatly reproduce, even result in high probability of red tide. PMID:21812311

  15. A 150-year record of phytoplankton community succession controlled by hydroclimatic variability in a tropical lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrifa Yamoah, Kweku; Callac, Nolwenn; Fru, Ernest Chi; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Wiech, Alan; Chabangborn, Akkaneewut; Smittenberg, Rienk H.

    2016-07-01

    Climate and human-induced environmental change promote biological regime shifts between alternate stable states, with implications for ecosystem resilience, function, and services. While these effects have been shown for present-day ecosystems, the long-term response of microbial communities has not been investigated in detail. This study assessed the decadal variations in phytoplankton communities in a ca. 150 year long sedimentary archive of Lake Nong Thale Prong (NTP), southern Thailand using a combination of bulk geochemical analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and lipid biomarkers techniques including compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis as a proxy for precipitation. Relatively drier and by inference warmer conditions from ca. 1857 to 1916 Common Era (CE) coincided with a dominance of the green algae Botryococcus braunii, indicating lower nutrient levels in the oxic lake surface waters, possibly related to lake water stratification. A change to higher silica (Si) input around 1916 CE was linked to increased rainfall and concurs with an abrupt takeover by diatom blooms lasting for 50 years. These were increasingly outcompeted by cyanobacteria from the 1970s onwards, most likely because of increased levels of anthropogenic phosphate and a reduction in rainfall. Our results showcase that the multi-proxy approach applied here provides an efficient way to track centennial-scale limnological, geochemical and microbial change, as influenced by hydroclimatic and anthropogenic forcing.

  16. Synergistic effects of pCO2 and iron availability on nutrient consumption ratio of the Bering Sea phytoplankton community

    OpenAIRE

    Sugie, K.; Endo, H.; Suzuki, K.; Nishioka, J; Kiyosawa, H; Yoshimura, T.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known concerning the effect of CO2 on phytoplankton ecophysiological processes under nutrient and trace element-limited conditions, because most CO2 manipulation experiments have been conducted under elements-replete conditions. To investigate the effects of CO2 and iron availability on phytoplankton ecophysiology, we conducted an experiment in September 2009 using a phytoplankton community in the iron limited, high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the Be...

  17. Mesoscale and sub-mesoscale variability in phytoplankton community composition in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti-Rausch, Bridget E.; Lomas, Michael W.; Lachenmyer, Eric M.; Goldman, Emily A.; Bell, Douglas W.; Goldberg, Stacey R.; Richardson, Tammi L.

    2016-04-01

    The Sargasso Sea is a dynamic physical environment in which strong seasonal variability combines with forcing by mesoscale (~100 km) eddies. These drivers determine nutrient, light, and temperature regimes and, ultimately, the composition and productivity of the phytoplankton community. On four cruises (2011 and 2012; one eddy per cruise), we investigated links between water column structure and phytoplankton community composition in the Sargasso at a range of time and space scales. On all cruises, cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus) dominated the phytoplankton numerically, while haptophytes were the dominant eukaryotes (up to 60% of total chl-a). There were substantial effects of mesoscale and sub-mesoscale forcing on phytoplankton community composition in both spring and summer. Downwelling (in anticyclones) resulted in Prochlorococcus abundances that were 22-66% higher than at 'outside' stations. Upwelling (in cyclones) was associated with significantly higher abundances and POC biomass of nanoeukaryotes. In general, however, each eddy had its own unique characteristics. The center of anticyclone AC1 (spring 2011) had the lowest phytoplankton biomass (chl-a) of any eddy we studied and had lower nitrate+nitrite (N+N deep mixed layer, yet had relatively low nutrient concentrations. We observed a shift in the taxonomic composition of haptophytes between a coccolithophore-dominated community in C2 (98% of total haptophyte chl-a) and a non-coccolithophore community at BATS. In summer 2012, downwelling associated with anticyclone AC2 occurred at the edge of the eddy (not at the center), where AC2 interacted with a nearby cyclone. At the edge, we found significantly lower Synechococcus abundances and higher eukaryote chl-a compared to the center of AC2 and BATS. These along-transect nuances demonstrate the significance of small-scale perturbations that substantially alter phytoplankton community structure. Therefore, while seasonality in the North

  18. Phytoplankton community and environmental correlates in a coastal upwelling zone along western Taiwan Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Jian-hua; Ye, You-yin; Lin, Geng-ming; Yang, Qing-liang; Lin, Mao

    2016-02-01

    Upwelling system in western Taiwan Strait is important for facilitating the fishery production. This study investigated hydro-chemical properties, phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton species composition, three-dimensional (horizontal, vertical and transect) distribution of phytoplankton abundance, as well as phytoplankton annual variation and the correlation of phytoplankton community with the upwelling of underlying current and nutrients according to samples of Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling zone in western Taiwan Strait from August 27 to September 8, 2009. The results manifest that the nutrient-rich cold and high salinity current on the continental shelf of South China Sea upwells to the Fujian-Guangdong coastal waters through Taiwan Bank and the surging strength to surface is weak while strong at 30-m layer. The thermohaline center of coastal upwelling shifts to the east of Dongshan Island and expanded to offshore waters in comparison with previous records. A total of 137 phytoplankton species belonging to 59 genera in 4 phyla are identified excluding the unidentified species. Diatom is the first major group and followed by dinoflagellate. Cyanobacteria mainly composed by three Trichodesmium species account for a certain proportions, while Chrysophyta are only found in offshore waters. The dominant species include Thalassionema nitzschioides, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Thalassionema frauenfeldii, Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima, Rhizosolenia styliformis, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Diplopsalis lenticula and Trichodesmium thiebautii. Phytoplankton community mainly consists of eurythermal and eurytopic species, followed by warm-water species, tropic high-salinity species and oceanic eurythermic species in order. Phytoplankton abundance ranges from 1.00 × 102 ind./L ~ 437.22 × 102 ind./L with an average of 47.36 × 102 ind./L. For vertical distribution, maximum abundance is found at 30 m-depth and the surface comes second. Besides, the abundance below 30 m

  19. Shifts in bacterial community composition associated with increased carbon cycling in a mosaic of phytoplankton blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Marine; Blain, Stéphane; Christaki, Urania; Monchy, Sébastien; Obernosterer, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Marine microbes have a pivotal role in the marine biogeochemical cycle of carbon, because they regulate the turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM), one of the largest carbon reservoirs on Earth. Microbial communities and DOM are both highly diverse components of the ocean system, yet the role of microbial diversity for carbon processing remains thus far poorly understood. We report here results from an exploration of a mosaic of phytoplankton blooms induced by large-scale natural iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean. We show that in this unique ecosystem where concentrations of DOM are lowest in the global ocean, a patchwork of blooms is associated with diverse and distinct bacterial communities. By using on-board continuous cultures, we identify preferences in the degradation of DOM of different reactivity for taxa associated with contrasting blooms. We used the spatial and temporal variability provided by this natural laboratory to demonstrate that the magnitude of bacterial production is linked to the extent of compositional changes. Our results suggest that partitioning of the DOM resource could be a mechanism that structures bacterial communities with a positive feedback on carbon cycling. Our study, focused on bacterial carbon processing, highlights the potential role of diversity as a driving force for the cycling of biogeochemical elements. PMID:26196334

  20. Maixi River estuary to the Baihua Reservoir in the Maotiao River catchment: phytoplankton community and environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiuhua; CHEN Lili; CHEN Fengfeng; GAO Tingjin; LI Xiaofeng; LIU Songping; LI Cunxiong

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton and environmental variables were measured monthly from July 2009 to August 2011 in the Maixi River from the estuary to Baihua Reservoir in the Maotiao River catchment,southwestern China,to understand phytoplankton community structure and environmental factors.The relationship between phytoplankton community structure and environmental factors including hydrological,meteorological,physical,and chemical variables were explored using multivariate analysis.A total of 81taxa of phytoplankton were identified,which were mainly composed of chlorophyta,bacillariophyta,and cyanobacteria.The phytoplankton community was dominated by Pseudanabaena limnetica during summer and fall and by Cyclotella meneghiniana during winter and spring.The abundance of phytoplankton ranged from 0.24×104 cells/L to 33.45×i06 cells/L,with the minimum occurring during February 2010 and the maximum during July 2009.The phytoplankton community was dominated mainly by cyanobacteria from April to September,and by bacillariophyta and pyrrophyta from October to March.Canonical correspondence analysis showed that temperature,pH values,and orthophosphate were the most important driving factors regulating the composition and dynamics of the phytoplankton community in the estuary.Cyanobacteria and euglenophyta abundance and biomass were affected mainly by temperature and pH values,while most chlorophyta and bacillariophyta were influenced by the concentrations of nutrients.

  1. Abundance, biomass and composition of spring ice algal and phytoplankton communities of the Laptev Sea (Arctic)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Abundance, biomass and composition of the ice algal and phytoplankton communities were investigated in the southeastern Laptev Sea in spring 1999.Diatoms dominated the algal communities and pennate diatoms dominated the diatom population. 12 dominant algal species occurred within sea ice and underlying water column, including Fragilariopsis oceanica, F. cylindrus, Nitzschia frigida , N. promare, Achnanthes taeniata , Nitzschia neofrigida , Navicula pelagica , N. vanhoef fenii, N. septentrionalis, Melosira arctica , Clindrotheca closterium and Pyramimonas sp. The algal abundance of bottom 10 cm sea ice varied between 14.6 and 1562.2 × 104 cells l-1 with an average of 639.0 × 104cells l-1 , and the algal biomass ranged from 7.89 to 2093.5 μg C l-1 with an average of 886.9 μg C l-1 , which were generally one order of magnitude higher than those of sub-bottom ice and two orders of magnitude higher than those of underlying surface water. The integrated algal abundance and biomass of lowermost 20 cm ice column were averagely 7.7 and 12.2 times as those of upper 20 m water column, respectively, suggesting that the ice algae might play an important role in maintaining the coastal marine ecosystem before the thawing of sea ice. Ice algae influenced the phytoplankton community of the underlying water column.However, the "seeding" of ice algae for phytoplankton bloom was negligible because of the low phytoplankton biomass within the underlying water column.

  2. Phytoplankton community of Lake Baskandi anua, Cachar District, Assam, North East India – An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity, relative abundance and dominance of phytoplankton community of the Lake Baskandi anua, an oxbow lake of Assam, North east India were studied during December 2009 to November 2010. Chlorophyll content and biomass of phytoplankton along with physico-chemical properties of water of the lake were also estimated. The lake is covered with Hydrilla and other macrophytes like Eichhornia, Trapa, Altrnenthera, Polygonum, Ludwizia sp., etc. Seasonal fluctuations of 41 genera of phytoplankton, belonging to 5 groups (Chlorophyceae, Cyanobacteria, Bacillariophyceae, Euglenophyceae and Dinophyceae were encountered in the lake. Chlorophyceae was found to be highest in winter, Cyanobacteria and Euglena in monsoon and Bacillariophyceae in pre monsoon. According to Engelmann’s scale, Spirogyra indica was found eudominant followed by 10 dominant, 24 subdominant and 20 recedent species. Chlorophyll- a content of phytoplankton varied from 14.18 to 33.89 μg·L-1, during the study period. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed significant seasonal variation in physico-chemical properties of water like Water temperature, pH, Conductivity, Dissolved oxygen, Free CO2, Total alkalinity, Calcium, Chloride, Nitrate and Ammonia. Relationship between phytoplankton group assemblage and environmental variables were explored by the ordination method CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis.

  3. Studies on variations in phytoplankton community structure at three locations near MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the spatial and seasonal variation in phytoplankton community structure was carried out in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam in the vicinity of Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Seawater samples were collected from intake, forebay and outfall of MAPS cooling water system for phytoplankton enumeration. A decrease in population density was noticed from coastal water to outfall water (coastal water, 1.5 x 106 cells l-1; forebay, 9.5 x 105 cells l-1 and outfall, 8.6 x 105 cells l-1). A total of 235 phytoplankton species were recorded during the study period. Asterionellopsis glacialis emerged as the most dominant species throughout the study period contributing 2.9 - 49.3 %, 1.6 - 44% and 2.7 - 46 % of the total cell counts of coastal water, forebay and outfall respectively. A visible dominance of pennate diatoms over the centric population was observed. The increase in pennate to centric ratio in the order of coastal water < forebay < outfall with respect to species composition indicated an increase in the benthic forms of phytoplankton from intake to outfall. Furthermore, as compared to the earlier findings, the present results showed a distinct reduction in numerical abundance of phytoplankton with an elevation of species composition. (author)

  4. Marine phytoplankton temperature versus growth responses from polar to tropical waters--outcome of a scientific community-wide study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W Boyd

    Full Text Available "It takes a village to finish (marine science these days" Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth rates to temperature. While physiological experiments are not new, our experiments were conducted in many laboratories using agreed upon protocols and 25 strains of eukaryotic and prokaryotic phytoplankton isolated across a wide range of marine environments from polar to tropical, and from nearshore waters to the open ocean. This community-wide approach provides both comprehensive and internally consistent datasets produced over considerably shorter time scales than conventional individual and often uncoordinated lab efforts. Such datasets can be used to parameterise global ocean model projections of environmental change and to provide initial insights into the magnitude of regional biogeographic change in ocean biota in the coming decades. Here, we compare our datasets with a compilation of literature data on phytoplankton growth responses to temperature. A comparison with prior published data suggests that the optimal temperatures of individual species and, to a lesser degree, thermal niches were similar across studies. However, a comparison of the maximum growth rate across studies revealed significant departures between this and previously collected datasets, which may be due to differences in the cultured isolates, temporal changes in the clonal isolates in cultures, and/or differences in culture conditions. Such methodological differences mean that using particular trait measurements from the prior literature might introduce unknown errors and bias into

  5. Marine phytoplankton temperature versus growth responses from polar to tropical waters--outcome of a scientific community-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W; Rynearson, Tatiana A; Armstrong, Evelyn A; Fu, Feixue; Hayashi, Kendra; Hu, Zhangxi; Hutchins, David A; Kudela, Raphael M; Litchman, Elena; Mulholland, Margaret R; Passow, Uta; Strzepek, Robert F; Whittaker, Kerry A; Yu, Elizabeth; Thomas, Mridul K

    2013-01-01

    "It takes a village to finish (marine) science these days" Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project) The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth rates to temperature. While physiological experiments are not new, our experiments were conducted in many laboratories using agreed upon protocols and 25 strains of eukaryotic and prokaryotic phytoplankton isolated across a wide range of marine environments from polar to tropical, and from nearshore waters to the open ocean. This community-wide approach provides both comprehensive and internally consistent datasets produced over considerably shorter time scales than conventional individual and often uncoordinated lab efforts. Such datasets can be used to parameterise global ocean model projections of environmental change and to provide initial insights into the magnitude of regional biogeographic change in ocean biota in the coming decades. Here, we compare our datasets with a compilation of literature data on phytoplankton growth responses to temperature. A comparison with prior published data suggests that the optimal temperatures of individual species and, to a lesser degree, thermal niches were similar across studies. However, a comparison of the maximum growth rate across studies revealed significant departures between this and previously collected datasets, which may be due to differences in the cultured isolates, temporal changes in the clonal isolates in cultures, and/or differences in culture conditions. Such methodological differences mean that using particular trait measurements from the prior literature might introduce unknown errors and bias into modelling

  6. Monsoon driven changes in phytoplankton populations in the eastern Arabian Sea as revealed by microscopy and HPLC pigment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Sushma G.; Prabhu Matondkar, S. G.; Gomes, H. do R.; Goes, J. I.

    2006-12-01

    Like the rest of the Arabian Sea, the west coast of India is subject to semi-annual wind reversals associated with the monsoon cycle that result in two periods of elevated phytoplankton productivity, one during the northeast (NE) monsoon (November-February) and the other during the southwest (SW) monsoon (June-September). Although the seasonality of phytoplankton biomass in these coastal waters is well known, the abundance and composition of phytoplankton populations associated with this distinct and predictable seasonal cycle is poorly known. Here we present for the first time, the results of a study on the community structure of phytoplankton for this region, derived from HPLC pigment analysis and microscopic cell counts. Our sampling strategy allowed for large spatial and temporal coverage over regions representative of the coastal and offshore waters, and over seasons that included the NE and the SW monsoon. Monthly observations at a fixed coastal station in particular, allowed us to follow changes in phytoplankton community structure associated with the development of anoxia. Together these measurements helped establish a pattern of seasonal change of three major groups of phytoplankton: diatoms, dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria that appeared to be tightly coupled with hydrographic and chemical changes associated with the monsoonal cycle. During the SW monsoon when nitrate concentrations were high, diatoms were dominant but prymnesiophytes were present as well. By October, as nitrate fell to below detection levels and anoxic conditions began to develop on the shelf below the shallow pycnocline, both diatom and prymensiophytes declined sharply giving way to dinoflagellates. In the well oxygenated surface waters, where both nitrate and ammonium were below detection limits, pico-cyanobacterial populations became dominant. During the NE monsoon, a mixed diatom-dinoflagellate population was quickly replaced by blooms of Trichodesmium erythraeum and Noctiluca

  7. Temperature affects the size-structure of phytoplankton communities in the ocean

    KAUST Repository

    López-Urrutia, Ángel

    2015-03-05

    The strong inverse correlation between resource availability and temperature in the ocean poses a challenge to determine the relative effect of these two variables on the size-structure of natural phytoplankton communities. Maranon et al (2012) compiled a dataset of concurrent temperature and resource level proxies that they claim disentangled the effect of temperature from that of resource supply. They concluded that the hypothesis that temperature per se plays a direct role in controlling phytoplankton size structure should be rejected. But our reanalysis of their data reaches a very different conclusion and suggests that they failed to separate the effects of temperature from the effects of resources. Although we obviously concur with Maranon et al (2012) in the long-known predominance of small phytoplankton cells under oligotrophic conditions, from our point of view this should not deter us from considering temperature as an important explanatory variable at a global scale since we show that, for the vast oligotrophic areas of the world\\'s oceans where chlorophyll concentrations are below <1 g L-1 temperature explains a high proportion of the variability in the size distribution of phytoplankton communities, a variability that can not be explained on the basis of the resource level proxies advocated by Maranon et al. (2012).

  8. Phytoplankton community structure in reservoirs of different trophic status, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chengxue; YU Hongxian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the phytoplankton community structures of reservoirs of different trophic status,located in a cold region.Physical and chemical variables and the phytoplankton communities were investigated in two reservoirs (Xiquanyan Reservoir and Taoshan Reservoir) in Northeast China in 2009.The two reservoirs showed strong seasonal fluctuations in their physical and chemical composition.Results of the trophic status index indicated that Xiaquanyan Reservoir was mesotrophic,whilst Taoshan Reservoir was eutrophic.Diatoms were the dominant phytoplankton group in Xiquanyan Reservoir throughout all seasons of the study,while in Taoshan Reservoir,diatoms dominated in spring,and cyanobacteria dominated in summer and autumn.This difference was resulted from differences in local environmental factors,including nutrients and hydrology.This study suggests that in mesotrophic reservoirs,nutrients played a key role in controlling seasonal phytoplankton successions,whereas in eutrophic reservoirs water temperature was the key factor in a cold region.Notably,the dominant species in summer in the Taoshan Reservoir was Microcystis,which may produce toxins depending on the ambient conditions,and presenting a risk of local toxin contamination.

  9. [Relationships between the Biomass and Production of Bacterio- and Phytoplanktonic Communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponasenko, A D; Shchur, L A

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative ratios of the biomasses of bacterio- and phytoplankton, interrelation of their production characteristics, and association of the functional characteristics with environmental factors were studied for Lake Khanka, the Yenisei River and the Krasnoyarsk Reservoir. The ratio between the biomasses of bacterioplankton (Bb) and phytoplankton (Bp) in these water bodies was shown to vary within the range exceeding three orders of magnitude. Bacterioplankton biomass was relatively stable and varied from sample to sample by an order of magnitude. In more than 50% of the samples (total sample number, 495), bacterioplankton biomass exceeded that of the phytoplankton. The average Bb/Bp ratios for Lake Khanka, Yenisei River, and Krasnoyarsk Reservoir were 5.1, 2, and 1.4, respectively. Increased Bb/Bp ratios were found to correlate with elevated specific (per unit biomass) phytoplankton production. This finding indicated additional supply of biogenic elements to phytoplankton due to their recycling by bacterial communities. The ratio between bacterioplankton and phytoplankton production for Lake Khanka varied from year to year (0.07 to 0.76). For the Yenisei River and the Krasnoyarsk Reservoir these ratios were on average 0.19 and 0.27, respectively. According to the literature data for other water bodies, bacterial production may reach from 10 to over 100% of the primary production. The equilibrium density of bacterioplankton (maximal density of the population) in Lake Khanka was ~1.5 times higher than in the Yenisei River and the Krasnoyarsk Reservoir due to higher content of suspended mineral matter and associated organo-mineral detritus in the lake. The interaction between dissolved organic compounds sorbed of the surface of mineral particles results in chemical alteration of biochemically stable substrate into compounds which may be assimilated by aquatic micoorganisms. PMID:27476209

  10. Identification of ecological thresholds from variations in phytoplankton communities among lakes: contribution to the definition of environmental standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubeix, Vincent; Danis, Pierre-Alain; Feret, Thibaut; Baudoin, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, the identification of ecological thresholds may be useful for managers as it can help to diagnose ecosystem health and to identify key levers to enable the success of preservation and restoration measures. A recent statistical method, gradient forest, based on random forests, was used to detect thresholds of phytoplankton community change in lakes along different environmental gradients. It performs exploratory analyses of multivariate biological and environmental data to estimate the location and importance of community thresholds along gradients. The method was applied to a data set of 224 French lakes which were characterized by 29 environmental variables and the mean abundances of 196 phytoplankton species. Results showed the high importance of geographic variables for the prediction of species abundances at the scale of the study. A second analysis was performed on a subset of lakes defined by geographic thresholds and presenting a higher biological homogeneity. Community thresholds were identified for the most important physico-chemical variables including water transparency, total phosphorus, ammonia, nitrates, and dissolved organic carbon. Gradient forest appeared as a powerful method at a first exploratory step, to detect ecological thresholds at large spatial scale. The thresholds that were identified here must be reinforced by the separate analysis of other aquatic communities and may be used then to set protective environmental standards after consideration of natural variability among lakes. PMID:27010711

  11. Climate Variability and Phytoplankton in the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    The effect of climate variability on phytoplankton communities was assessed for the tropical and sub-tropical Pacific Ocean between 1998 and 2005 using an established biogeochemical assimilation model. The phytoplankton communities exhibited wide range of responses to climate variability, from radical shifts in the Equatorial Pacific, to changes of only a couple of phytoplankton groups in the North Central Pacific, to no significant changes in the South Pacific. In the Equatorial Pacific, climate variability dominated the variability of phytoplankton. Here, nitrate, chlorophyll and all but one of the 4 phytoplankton types (diatoms, cyanobacteria and coccolithophores) were strongly correlated (pclimate variability can play in ocean biology.

  12. Phytoplankton community in abu-qir bay as a hot spot on the southeastern mediterranean coast

    OpenAIRE

    Shams El-Din, N.G.; Dorgham, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The phytoplankton community in the stressed part of Abu Qir Bay was studied monthly relative to the prevailing ecological conditions from April 1998 to March 1999 at eight stations. The study recorded a total of 182 species of both fresh and marine origins, belonging to diatoms (89 species), chlorophytes (34 species), dinoflagellates (26 species), cyanophytes (18 species), euglenophytes (12 species), silicoflagellates (2 species), and cryptophyte (one species). Most of the recorded species oc...

  13. Initial size structure of natural phytoplankton communities determines the response to Daphnia diel vertical migration

    OpenAIRE

    Maarten Boersma; Florian Haupt; Maria Stockenreiter; Herwig Stibor

    2012-01-01

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) is a common behavior of many pelagic herbivorous zooplankton species in response to predation pressure. It is characterized by a twice daily habitat shift of the zooplankton species: staying in the epilimnion only during night time and migrating down in the crack of dawn in deeper water layers, staying there during the day time. This causes a discontinuous grazing regime and previous studies have shown that the direction and strength of phytoplankton community re...

  14. Effects of warming on the phytoplankton succession and trophic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M.

    2011-01-01

    There is now a good evidence of ecological impacts of recent climate change on ecosystems worldwide. A major challenge in climate change research on phytoplankton succession is to understand the multiple factors, which drive ecological changes in phytoplankton communities. Increasing sea surface temperature is likely to alter phytoplankton bloom dynamic, phenology and community structure. Recent studies on the global primary production showed decline in size and productivity of marine phytopl...

  15. Impact of atmospheric wet deposition on phytoplankton community structure in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Dong-Yang; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Tan, Li-Ju; Dong, Ze-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The South China Sea (SCS), which is the largest marginal sea in East Asia, plays a significant role in regional climate change. However, research on the phytoplankton community structure (PCS) response to atmospheric wet deposition remains inadequate. In this study, field incubation experiments were performed to survey the impact of atmospheric wet deposition on the PCS in the SCS in December 2013. Results indicate that the mean dissolved inorganic nitrogen/dissolved inorganic phosphorous (DIN/DIP) ratio in rainwater was 136, which was higher than that in seawater. Under low initial nutrient concentrations, rainwater inputs not only significantly increased total chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations but also potentially altered the PCS. The total Chl a concentration increased 1.7-, 1.9-, and 1.6-fold; microphytoplankton increased 2.6-, 3.2-, and 1.7-fold with respect to their initial values in the 5%, 10% addition, and 10% addition (filtered) treatment samples, respectively. Finally, microphytoplankton contributed 61% to the total Chl a concentration in 10% addition treatment samples. Differences in the nutrients induced by atmospheric wet deposition resulted in a shift in the advantage from picophytoplankton to microphytoplankton. Diatoms became the predominant species, accounting for 55% of the total abundance after rainwater addition.

  16. Biogeographical patterns and environmental controls of phytoplankton communities from contrasting hydrographical zones of the Labrador Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Glaucia M.; Poulton, Alex J.; Yashayaev, Igor M.; Head, Erica J. H.; Stinchcombe, Mark C.; Purdie, Duncan A.

    2016-02-01

    The Labrador Sea is an important oceanic sink for atmospheric CO2 because of intensive convective mixing during winter and extensive phytoplankton blooms that occur during spring and summer. Therefore, a broad-scale investigation of the responses of phytoplankton community composition to environmental forcing is essential for understanding planktonic food-web organisation and biogeochemical functioning in the Labrador Sea. Here, we investigated the phytoplankton community structure (>4 μm) from near surface blooms (1.2 mg chla m-3) occurred on and near the shelves in May and in offshore waters of the central Labrador Sea in June due to haline- and thermal-stratification, respectively. Sea ice-related (Fragilariopsis cylindrus and F. oceanica) and Arctic diatoms (Fossula arctica, Bacterosira bathyomphala and Thalassiosira hyalina) dominated the relatively cold (<0 °C) and fresh (salinity < 33) waters over the Labrador shelf (e.g., on the southwestern side of the Labrador Sea), where sea-ice melt and Arctic outflow predominates. On the northeastern side of the Labrador Sea, intense blooms of the colonial prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis pouchetii and diatoms, such as Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii, Pseudo-nitzschia granii and Chaetoceros socialis, occurred in the lower nutrient waters (nitrate < 3.6 μM) of the West Greenland Current. The central Labrador Sea bloom occurred later in the season (June) and was dominated by Atlantic diatoms, such as Ephemera planamembranacea and Fragilariopsis atlantica. The data presented here demonstrate that the Labrador Sea spring and early summer blooms are composed of contrasting phytoplankton communities, for which taxonomic segregation appears to be controlled by the physical and biogeochemical characteristics of the dominant water masses.

  17. Phytoplanktonic Community of Organically Polluted Tropical Reservoirs in Eastern India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANJIB; Kumar; Das; DIBYENDU; Biswas; SUDIPTO; Roy

    2007-01-01

    Plankton communities of three reservoirs of India reflect the direct relationship with organic pollution. The assessment of water quality as highly or lowly organically polluted for the three water bodies has been achieved with help of algal community, which can be used as an indicator of organic pollution. Algal pollution indices according to Palmer[1] and Watanabe[2]and based on genus and species were used in rating water samples for high or low organic pollution. Among 26 genera of algae found in India, 20 most frequent and common genera were taken into account for indexing pollution status. Water quality index (WQI) on the basis of weighting and rating of the chemical parameter was also used to correlate the Palmer index with physicochemical parameters of the three reservoirs. Fig 5, Tab 3, Ref 29

  18. Composition, abundance and ecology of phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake, Manipur, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Phytoplankton communities of Loktak Lake (a Ramsar site), studied during November 2002-October 2004, reveal the occurrence of 75 and 71 species, indicate monthly richness ranging between 47� plus or minus 6 and 49� plus or minus 3 species and record 50.0-83.2 and 64.5-84.0 % community similarities during two annual cycles respectively. Chlorophyta (33� plus or minus 5 and 35� plus or minus 5 species) show qualitative dominance and importance of Closterium > Cosmarium > Staurastrum > Micraster...

  19. Phytoplankton pigment patterns and community composition in the northern South China Sea during winter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Hongchang; NING Xiuren; TANG Xuexi; HAO Qiang; LE Fengfeng; QIAO Jing

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton pigment patterns and community composition were investigated in the northern South China Sea using high-performance liquid chromatography and the CHEMTAX software from February 11 to 23, 2009. We recognized four different vertical distribution patterns of pigments: chlorophyll a (Chl a)-like type, divinyl chlorophyll a (DV Chl a) type, even distribution type, and surface type. The average value of ratios of accessory photo-protective pigments (APP) to accessory photo-synthetic pigments was 0.89±0.63 in the upper 50 m and 0.16±0.06 below 50 m depth. With increasing depth, APP decreased and photo-synthetically active radiation was attenuated. There was an obvious succession in the phytoplankton community from inshore to the open sea. Diatoms were dominant in the inshore region, while pelagophytes, Prochlorococcus,cyanobacteria and prymnesiophytes were dominant in the open sea. The vertical distribution of phytoplankton also differed greatly from inshore to the open sea. In the coastal and shelf region,diatoms were important components in the whole water column. Cyanobacteria also had a high abundance at the Subsurface Chlorophyll a Maxima (SCM) in the shelf region. In the slope and open sea, Prochlorococcus and cyanobacteria were important groups above the SCM, while pelagophytes dominated below the SCM.

  20. Effect of acidification on an Arctic phytoplankton community from Disko Bay, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoisen, Christina; Riisgaard, Karen; Lundholm, Nina;

    2015-01-01

    show that coastal phytoplankton from Disko Bay is naturally exposed to pH fluctuations exceeding the experimental pH range used in most ocean acidification studies. We emphasize that studies on ocean acidification should include in situ pH before assumptions on the effect of acidification on marine......Long-term measurements (i.e. months) of in situ pH have not previously been reported from the Arctic; this study shows fluctuations between pH 7.5 and 8.3 during the spring bloom 2012 in a coastal area of Disko Bay, West Greenland. The effect of acidification on phytoplankton from this area was...... studied at both the community and species level in experimental pH treatments within (pH 8.0, 7.7 and 7.4) and outside (pH 7.1) in situ pH. The growth rate of the phytoplankton community decreased during the experimental acidification from 0.50 ± 0.01 d-1 (SD) at pH 8.0 to 0.22 ± 0.01 d-1 at pH 7...

  1. Modelling climate change, land-use change and phosphorus reduction impacts on phytoplankton in the River Thames (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussi, Gianbattista; Whitehead, Paul; Dadson, Simon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we assess the impact of changes in precipitation and temperature on the phytoplankton concentration of the River Thames (UK) by means of a physically-based model. A scenario-neutral approach was employed to evaluate the effects of climate variability on flow, phosphorus concentration and phytoplankton concentration. In particular, the impact of uniform changes in precipitation and temperature on five groups of phytoplankton (diatoms and large chlorophytes, other chlorophytes, picoalgae, Microcystis-like cyanobacteria and other cyanobacteria) was assessed under three different land-use/land-management scenarios (1 - current land use and phosphorus reduction practices; 2 - expansion of agricultural land and current phosphorus reduction practices; 3 - expansion of agricultural land and optimal phosphorus reduction practices). The model results were assessed within the framework of future climate projections, using the UK Climate Projections 09 (UKCP09) for the 2030s. The results of the model demonstrate that an increase in average phytoplankton concentration due to climate change is highly likely to occur, and its magnitude varies depending on the river reach. Cyanobacteria show significant increases under future climate change and land-use change. An expansion of intensive agriculture accentuates the growth in phytoplankton, especially in the upper reaches of the River Thames. However, an optimal phosphorus removal mitigation strategy, which combines reduction of fertiliser application and phosphorus removal from wastewater, can help to reduce this increase in phytoplankton concentration, and in some cases, compensate for the effect of rising temperature.

  2. Temporal dynamics of phytoplankton communities in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and their responses to environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许恒龙; MIN; Gi-Sik; CHOI; Joong-Ki; AL-RASHEID; Khaled; A.; S.; 林晓凤; 朱明壮

    2010-01-01

    Variations in physical-chemical factors, species composition, abundance and biomass of nano-and micro-phytoplankton assemblages, as well as their responses to environmental factors, were investigated over a complete cycle (6 months) in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao, northern China. The aim was to establish the temporal patterns of phytoplankton communities and to evaluate protists as suitable bioindicators to water quality in mariculture systems. A total of 34 taxa with nine dominant spec...

  3. Seasonal change of phytoplankton (spring vs. summer) in the southern Patagonian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Araujo, Rafael; de Souza, Márcio Silva; Mendes, Carlos Rafael Borges; Tavano, Virginia Maria; Garcia, Carlos A. E.

    2016-08-01

    As part of the Patagonian Experiment (PATEX) project two sequential seasons (spring/summer 2007-2008) were sampled in the southern Patagonian shelf, when physical-chemical-biological (phytoplankton) data were collected. Phytoplankton biomass and community composition were assessed through both microscopic and high-performance liquid chromatography/chemical taxonomy (HPLC/CHEMTAX) techniques and related to both in situ and satellite data at spatial and seasonal scales. Phytoplankton seasonal variation was clearly modulated by water column thermohaline structure and nutrient dynamics [mainly dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and silicate]. The spring phytoplankton community showed elevated biomass and was dominated by diatoms [mainly Corethron pennatum and small (cells of Thalassiosira spp.], associated with a deeper and more weakly stratified upper mixed layer depth (UMLD) and relatively low nutrient concentrations, which were probably a result of consumption by the diatom bloom. In contrast, the phytoplankton community in summer presented lower biomass and was mainly dominated by haptophytes (primarily Emiliania huxleyi and Phaeocystis antarctica) and dinoflagellates, associated with shallower and well-stratified upper mixed layers with higher nutrient concentrations, likely due to lateral advection of nutrient-rich waters from the Malvinas Current. The gradual establishment of a strongly stratified and shallow UMLD as season progressed, was an important factor leading to the replacement of the spring diatom community by a dominance of calcifying organisms, as shown in remote sensing imagery and confirmed by microscopic examination. Furthermore, in spring, phaeopigments a (degradation products of chlorophyll a) relative to chlorophyll a, were twice that of summer, indicating the diatom bloom was under higher grazing pressure.

  4. Synergistic effects of pCO2 and iron availability on nutrient consumption ratio of the Bering Sea phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugie, K.; Endo, H.; Suzuki, K.; Nishioka, J.; Kiyosawa, H.; Yoshimura, T.

    2013-10-01

    Little is known concerning the effect of CO2 on phytoplankton ecophysiological processes under nutrient and trace element-limited conditions, because most CO2 manipulation experiments have been conducted under elements-replete conditions. To investigate the effects of CO2 and iron availability on phytoplankton ecophysiology, we conducted an experiment in September 2009 using a phytoplankton community in the iron limited, high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the Bering Sea basin . Carbonate chemistry was controlled by the bubbling of the several levels of CO2 concentration (180, 380, 600, and 1000 ppm) controlled air, and two iron conditions were established, one with and one without the addition of inorganic iron. We demonstrated that in the iron-limited control conditions, the specific growth rate and the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm) of photosystem (PS) II decreased with increasing CO2 levels, suggesting a further decrease in iron bioavailability under the high-CO2 conditions. In addition, biogenic silica to particulate nitrogen and biogenic silica to particulate organic carbon ratios increased from 2.65 to 3.75 and 0.39 to 0.50, respectively, with an increase in the CO2 level in the iron-limited controls. By contrast, the specific growth rate, Fv/Fm values and elemental compositions in the iron-added treatments did not change in response to the CO2 variations, indicating that the addition of iron canceled out the effect of the modulation of iron bioavailability due to the change in carbonate chemistry. Our results suggest that high-CO2 conditions can alter the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients through decreasing iron bioavailability in the iron-limited HNLC regions in the future.

  5. The effects of spring-neap tide on the phytoplankton community development in the Jiaozhou Bay,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dongyan; SUN Jun; LIU Zhe; CHEN Hongtao; WEI Hao; ZHANG Jing

    2004-01-01

    The development of the phytoplankton community was studied in the Jiaozhou Bay during the spring to neap tide in August 2001, through three cruises and a 15 d continuous observation. This investigation indicates that diatom cell abundance increased sharply following the end of a spring tide, from 9 cells/cm3 to a peak of 94 cells/cm3. The dominant species composition and abundance show a quick species sequence from spring to neap tide, and the dominant species at the start phase is Skeletomena costatum, then changes to Chaetoceros curvisetus, finally it changes to Eucampia zodiacus. Silicate concentration increases during spring tide, as a result of nutrient replenishment from the water-sediment interface, its initial average concentration in neap tide is 1.39 μmol/dm3 and reached the peak average concentration of 8.40 μmol/dm3 in spring tide. But the nitrogen concentration dropped due to dilution by the low nitrogen seawater from the Huanghai Sea, its initial average concentration in neap tide is 67 μmol/dm3 and decreased to the average concentration of 54 μmol/dm3 in spring tide. The degree of silicon limitation was decreased and phytoplankton, especially diatoms, responds immediately after nutrient replenishment in the water column. Skeletonmea costatum, as one of the dominant species in the Jiaozhou Bay, shows a quicker response to nutrient availability than Eucampia zodiacus and Chaetoceros curvisetus. It is proposed that dominant species composition and water column stability synchronously determine the development of phytoplankton summer blooms in the Jiaozhou bay.

  6. Synergistic effects of pCO2 and iron availability on nutrient consumption ratio of the Bering Sea phytoplankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known concerning the effect of CO2 on phytoplankton ecophysiological processes under nutrient and trace element-limited conditions, because most CO2 manipulation experiments have been conducted under elements-replete conditions. To investigate the effects of CO2 and iron availability on phytoplankton ecophysiology, we conducted an experiment in September 2009 using a phytoplankton community in the iron limited, high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC region of the Bering Sea basin . Carbonate chemistry was controlled by the bubbling of the several levels of CO2 concentration (180, 380, 600, and 1000 ppm controlled air, and two iron conditions were established, one with and one without the addition of inorganic iron. We demonstrated that in the iron-limited control conditions, the specific growth rate and the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm of photosystem (PS II decreased with increasing CO2 levels, suggesting a further decrease in iron bioavailability under the high-CO2 conditions. In addition, biogenic silica to particulate nitrogen and biogenic silica to particulate organic carbon ratios increased from 2.65 to 3.75 and 0.39 to 0.50, respectively, with an increase in the CO2 level in the iron-limited controls. By contrast, the specific growth rate, Fv/Fm values and elemental compositions in the iron-added treatments did not change in response to the CO2 variations, indicating that the addition of iron canceled out the effect of the modulation of iron bioavailability due to the change in carbonate chemistry. Our results suggest that high-CO2 conditions can alter the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients through decreasing iron bioavailability in the iron-limited HNLC regions in the future.

  7. Contrasting summer phytoplankton communities in stratified and mixed waters of the white sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyash, L. V.; Radchenko, I. G.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Zdorovennov, R. E.; Pantyulin, A. N.

    2014-11-01

    The species composition and biomass of the phytoplankton, as well as the hydrophysical characteristics of the water masses have been analyzed in different regions of the White Sea at 37 stations during the period from June 20 to July 3, 2008. Three communities with different structures have been identified, each associated with water masses with specific structures and dynamics. The community dominated by Skeletonema costatum has been growing in Dvina Bay in stratified waters with the highest temperature and the lowest salinity compared with the other areas of the sea. The community dominated by Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii has been associated with mixed waters of Onega Bay and adjacent areas of the Basin with low temperatures and high salinity. The community dominated by dinoflagellates has been growing in different areas of the sea: both in stratified and mixed waters. The average phytoplankton biomass in the surface water layer and the total biomass under 1 m2 in the studied areas have been 134 ± 157 mg C/m3 ( n = 37) and 1157 ± 874 mg C/m2 ( n = 18), respectively.

  8. Contrasting phytoplankton community structure and associated light absorption characteristics of the western Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandi, Sudarsana Rao; Kiran, Rayaprolu; Sarma, Nittala S.; Srikanth, A. S.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Krishna, M. S.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Prasad, V. R.; Acharyya, T.; Reddy, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption spectra, particulate pigments, and hydrochemical constituents were measured in the western Bay of Bengal (BoB) during July-August 2010 when influence of river discharge is at peak. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption coefficient (aCDOM(440)) displayed a significant inverse linear relationship with salinity in the surface waters implying conservative mixing of marine and terrestrial end members. The northern part of the study area is influenced by discharge from the river Ganga and a dominant terrestrial CDOM signal is seen. The southern part receives discharge from peninsular rivers with corresponding signals of higher CDOM than the linear model would indicate and higher UV-specific absorption coefficient (SUVA) indicating more aged and humified DOM. Lower contribution of CDOM to total non-water absorption and higher phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a absorption coefficient, aph(440)) but lower chlorophyll a specific phytoplankton absorption coefficient (a{ph/*}(440)) characterize the northern part, compared to the southern part. Chlorophyll b had a distinct linear relationship with chlorophyll a in the latter. The size index (SI) indicated dominance of microphytoplankton in the northern and nano and picophytoplankton in the southern parts. Chlorophyll a is significantly related to a{ph/*}(440) by an inverse power model in the northern part but by an inverse linear model in the southern part. Our study suggests that knowledge of the phytoplankton community structure is essential to improve chlorophyll a algorithm in the coastal Bay of Bengal.

  9. Phytoplankton community responses in a shallow lake following lanthanum-bentonite application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, P; Meis, S; Procházková, L; Carvalho, L; Mackay, E B; Woods, H J; Pottie, J; Milne, I; Taylor, C; Maberly, S C; Spears, B M

    2016-06-15

    The release of phosphorus (P) from bed sediments to the overlying water can delay the recovery of lakes for decades following reductions in catchment contributions, preventing water quality targets being met within timeframes set out by environmental legislation (e.g. EU Water Framework Directive: WFD). Therefore supplementary solutions for restoring lakes have been explored, including the capping of sediment P sources using a lanthanum (La)-modified bentonite clay to reduce internal P loading and enhance the recovery process. Here we present results from Loch Flemington where the first long-term field trial documenting responses of phytoplankton community structure and abundance, and the UK WFD phytoplankton metric to a La-bentonite application was performed. A Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) analysis was used to distinguish natural variability from treatment effect and confirmed significant reductions in the magnitude of summer cyanobacterial blooms in Loch Flemington, relative to the control site, following La-bentonite application. However this initial cyanobacterial response was not sustained beyond two years after application, which implied that the reduction in internal P loading was short-lived; several possible explanations for this are discussed. One reason is that this ecological quality indicator is sensitive to inter-annual variability in weather patterns, particularly summer rainfall and water temperature. Over the monitoring period, the phytoplankton community structure of Loch Flemington became less dominated by cyanobacteria and more functionally diverse. This resulted in continual improvements in the phytoplankton compositional and abundance metrics, which were not observed at the control site, and may suggest an ecological response to the sustained reduction in filterable reactive phosphorus (FRP) concentration following La-bentonite application. Overall, phytoplankton classification indicated that the lake moved from poor to moderate

  10. Analysis of phytoplankton distribution and community structure in the German Bight with respect to the different size classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschläger, Jochen; Wiltshire, Karen Helen; Petersen, Wilhelm; Metfies, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Investigation of phytoplankton biodiversity, ecology, and biogeography is crucial for understanding marine ecosystems. Research is often carried out on the basis of microscopic observations, but due to the limitations of this approach regarding detection and identification of picophytoplankton (0.2-2 μm) and nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm), these investigations are mainly focused on the microphytoplankton (20-200 μm). In the last decades, various methods based on optical and molecular biological approaches have evolved which enable a more rapid and convenient analysis of phytoplankton samples and a more detailed assessment of small phytoplankton. In this study, a selection of these methods (in situ fluorescence, flow cytometry, genetic fingerprinting, and DNA microarray) was placed in complement to light microscopy and HPLC-based pigment analysis to investigate both biomass distribution and community structure of phytoplankton. As far as possible, the size classes were analyzed separately. Investigations were carried out on six cruises in the German Bight in 2010 and 2011 to analyze both spatial and seasonal variability. Microphytoplankton was identified as the major contributor to biomass in all seasons, followed by the nanophytoplankton. Generally, biomass distribution was patchy, but the overall contribution of small phytoplankton was higher in offshore areas and also in areas exhibiting higher turbidity. Regarding temporal development of the community, differences between the small phytoplankton community and the microphytoplankton were found. The latter exhibited a seasonal pattern regarding number of taxa present, alpha- and beta-diversity, and community structure, while for the nano- and especially the picophytoplankton, a general shift in the community between both years was observable without seasonality. Although the reason for this shift remains unclear, the results imply a different response of large and small phytoplankton to environmental influences.

  11. Development of a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy for analysis of the marine phytoplankton community

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kang, Hye-Eun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang Heon; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy to analyze phytoplankton community structure using the Illumina MiSeq system. The amplicons (404–411 bp) obtained by end-pairing of two reads were sufficiently long to distinguish algal species and provided barcode data equivalent to those generated with the Roche 454 system, but at less than 1/20th of the cost. The original universal primer sequences targeting the 23S rDNA region and the PCR strategy were both modified, and this resulted i...

  12. Phytoplankton Community Structure in the Bay of Bandar Khyran, Sea of Oman with Special Reference to Harmful Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Hashmi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and community structure of the net phytoplankton at two locations in Bandar Khyran Bay were investigated for a period of one complete year. The study region hosts diverse assemblages of net phytoplankton and a total of 248 taxa were identified during the present study. The differences in the species composition of the phytoplankton communities at two locations are not significant while a large spatial and seasonal fluctuation of phytoplankton abundance was observed. These fluctuations are apparently driven by temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentration. A minimum abundance of 96 cells/L was observed at OUT station during winter while during the same period it was 138 cells/L at IN station. The maximum counts of phytoplankton occurred in August (17 495 cells/L at OUT but the maximum was observed at IN station in October (33 230 cells/L. In general, the dinoflagellates dominated the net phytoplankton during summer when the water temperature was above 28℃ while diatoms dominated during winter when the water temperature was below 26℃. Amongst the 248 taxa, 27 species (4 diatoms, 21 dinoflagellates, 1 cyanobacteria, 1 dictyochophyte could be considered to be toxic or harmful in high concentrations. Blooms of the dinoflagellate, Noctiluca scintillans were observed during the months of January and September. The increase in optimum biological and hydrographic factors play major role in the bloom formation of Noctiluca scintillans and its spatial distribution.

  13. Impact of salinity and pH on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system: An investigation with pigment analysis by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Acharyya, Tamoghna; Raghunadh Babu, P V; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita

    2011-03-01

    An in vitro study was carried out to understand the effects of salinity shock and variation in pH on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system of the Godavari River (a major peninsular river in India). The distributions of, and variations in, phytoplankton communities were assessed by quantitative determination of their class specific marker pigments, using HPLC. Subtle changes in salinity of the freshwater by one practical salinity unit (PSU) completely removed green algae from the system and allowed the cyanobacteria to come into dominance. The cyanobacteria were found to tolerate higher osmotic stress until the salinity reached a PSU of 16. The higher salinity tolerance range of the cyanobacteria was attributed to the enhanced synthesis of zeaxanthin as protective xanthophylls against the osmotic stress. However, the effects of changing pH were not as dramatic as salinity where the green algae and the cyanobacteria from the same freshwater system showed a considerable acclimation towards the fluctuating pH. These findings are environmentally relevant to understand the likely impact of salt water intrusion and pH variation on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system. PMID:21246149

  14. Effect evaluation of uranium mining effluents on the density and composition of the phytoplankton community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Located in the region of the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, the Osamu Utsumi mine is the first uranium extraction and production mine to have its deposits explored in Brazil and it is situated on the premises of the Brazilian Nuclear Industries Ore Treatment Unit (UTM/INB). Within the UTM/INB installations, water samplings were carried out every three months (from October 2008 to July 2009) in three points (P1, P2 and P3): P1 (pit mine), P2 (Tailings Management Facility/TMF) and P3 (environment). The objective of the current study was to evaluate density and composition of the phytoplankton community, as well as chemical characteristics of water samples from UTM/INB effluents, which present different pH levels (ranging from acidic to alkaline). In the current study, values of pH, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, silicate, sulfate (SO4-2), fluoride, uranium, thorium and chlorophyll a were determined, as well as composition and density of the phytoplankton community. After comparing the three sampling points, it was verified that Cyanophyceae presented greater tolerance to chemical conditions of the water such as elevated concentrations of sulfate, fluoride, uranium and thorium, as well as pH variations, since this class was detected in all studied environments. (author)

  15. Seasonal variations in the phytoplankton community and the relationship between environmental factors of the sea around Xiaoheishan Island in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Tang, Xuexi; Tang, Haitian; Song, Jingjing; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Qixiang

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal variations in the phytoplankton community and the relationship between environmental factors of the sea area around Xiaoheishan Island are investigated in the present study. Xiaoheishan Island is located at 37°58'14″N and 120°38'46″E in Shandong Province, China. A total of 65 species of phytoplankton belonging to three phyla and 27 genera were identified, with Bacillariophyta having the largest number of species. The annual average chlorophyll a concentration for this area was 3.11 μg/L, and there occurs a Skeletonema costatum bloom in winter. The Shannon-Weaver indexes (log2) of the phytoplankton from all stations were higher than 1, and the Pielou indexes were all higher than 0.3. The results of the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that water temperature, PO{4/3-} and Cu were the environmental factors that had the greatest influence on the distribution of the phytoplankton community throughout the entire year. Although the concentration of heavy metal is well up to the state standards of the first grade of China (GB 3097-1997), these metals still have an impact on the phytoplankton community from this area.

  16. Interactive Effect of UVR and Phosphorus on the Coastal Phytoplankton Community of the Western Mediterranean Sea: Unravelling Eco-Physiological Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presentación Carrillo

    Full Text Available Some of the most important effects of global change on coastal marine systems include increasing nutrient inputs and higher levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm, which could affect primary producers, a key trophic link to the functioning of marine food webs. However, interactive effects of both factors on the phytoplankton community have not been assessed for the Mediterranean Sea. An in situ factorial experiment, with two levels of ultraviolet solar radiation (UVR+PAR vs. PAR and nutrients (control vs. P-enriched, was performed to evaluate single and UVR×P effects on metabolic, enzymatic, stoichiometric and structural phytoplanktonic variables. While most phytoplankton variables were not affected by UVR, dissolved phosphatase (APAEX and algal P content increased in the presence of UVR, which was interpreted as an acclimation mechanism of algae to oligotrophic marine waters. Synergistic UVR×P interactive effects were positive on photosynthetic variables (i.e., maximal electron transport rate, ETRmax, but negative on primary production and phytoplankton biomass because the pulse of P unmasked the inhibitory effect of UVR. This unmasking effect might be related to greater photodamage caused by an excess of electron flux after a P pulse (higher ETRmax without an efficient release of carbon as the mechanism to dissipate the reducing power of photosynthetic electron transport.

  17. Distribution of phytoplankton community in relation to environmental parameters in cage culture area of Sepanggar Bay, Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Madihah Jaffar; Rashed-Un-Nabi, Md.; Azharul Hoque, Md.

    2008-11-01

    This paper covers spatial and temporal variation in phytoplankton communities and physico-chemical water properties in the cage culture area of Sepanggar Bay, Sabah, Malaysia based on field measurement conducted during July 2005 to January 2006 to study the spatial and temporal variation in phytoplankton communities and physico-chemical water properties of the bay. Phytoplankton samples and water parameters data were collected from five different stations located inside the bay during Southwest, Interseasonal and Northeast monsoons. Forty phytoplankton genera, representatives of 23 families, were found in the study area with a mean abundance of 1.55 ± 1.19 × 10 6 cells L -1. Most of these genera belong to diatoms (82.17%), Dinoflagellates (17.55%) and cyanobacteria (0.29%). Three genera were found to be dominant (>10%) in phytoplankton abundance and these were Coscinodiscus spp. (36.38%), Chaetoceros spp (17.65%) and Bacteriastrum spp. (10.98%). The most dominant genus was Coscinodiscus spp. which showed high abundance during all monsoons and stations (except Station 3). Among the seven environmental parameters tested in this study, water temperature, pH and suspended sediment concentration were found to be significantly different between monsoons. On the other hand, no significant differences were found between stations for the studied physico-chemical parameters. A clear differences in phytoplankton densities were observed between monsoons and stations with higher mean abundances during interseasonal monsoon (2.40 ± 1.37 × 10 6 cells L -1) and at station five (2.05 ± 0.74 × 10 6 cells L -1), respectively. Conversely, the diversity indices, both Shannon-Wiener (H) and Pielou (J), showed no significant difference throughout stations and monsoons (except (H) for monsoons). Analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) results demonstrated temporal differences in phytoplankton community structure with highly diverse phytoplankton assemblage. Through cluster analysis five

  18. Hydrobiological aspects of Paraibuna and Paraitinga dams. Sao Paulo, with emphasis on phytoplankton community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inland waters are less on the Earth's surface and are extremely important for the survival of living things, why the concern for quality increases daily. The dams Paraibuna and Paraitinga, located in Paraibuna city, state of Sao Paulo, totaling 224 km2 of extension of water surface, with the current function of generating electricity. In order to analyze the water quality of these dams, this paper presents a diagnostic physical, chemical, and biological, which was used in the phytoplankton community and calculation of quality indexes. Four samples were taken at nine sampling points distributed along the dams. The physical and chemical analysis of water showed low concentrations of nutrients such as nitrate (mean 0,42 ± 0,23 mg.L-1 and phosphate (-1). Most metals and trace elements analyzed were within the limit established by federal law. The element phosphorus (mean 0,0293 ± 0,0153 mg.L-1) is presented above the values established by CONAMA Resolution 357/05 (0,020 mg.L-1) on all sampling points in the month of May, but this fact did not seem to influence the phytoplankton amount. High levels of dissolved oxygen and transparency, low levels of turbidity, conductivity and dissolved solids, pH close to neutrality, together with high diversity and low dominance of phytoplankton, with a predominance of green algae, showed that the dams still retain features of aquatic environment preserved, which suffer little influence of anthropogenic factors. However, the presence, even at low densities, of cyanobacteria and the existence of plantations and livestock activities in the borders of these dams deserve special attention in terms of their correct management to not become harmful factors to the quality of those waters. (author)

  19. Variação temporal da comunidade fitoplanctônica em lagos urbanos eutróficos = Temporal variation of the phytoplankton community in eutrophic urban lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Nabout

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi averiguar a mudança sazonal e o sincronismo temporal de atributos da comunidade fitoplanctônica (diversidade e a densidade de quatro reservatórios urbanos eutróficos (lago do Jardim Botânico, lago do parque Vaca Brava, lago das Rosas e lago do bosque dos Buritis do município de Goiânia, Estado de Goiás. A diversidade foi estimada pelo índice de Shannon-Winner (H’ e a densidade foi pelo método de Utermöhl. Todos os quatrolagos apresentaram elevada diversidade fitoplanctônica, variando de H’ = 0,97 (bosque dos Buritis a H’ = 4,29 (lago do Jardim Botânico, além disso, a diversidade foi significativamente distinta entre os quatro lagos estudados (F = 4,74; p The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal changes and temporal synchrony of phytoplankton community attributes (diversity and density at four eutrophic urban reservoirs (Jardim Botânico lake, Vaca Brava Park lake, Rosas lake and Bosque dos Buritis lake in the city of Goiânia, Goiás State. Phytoplankton diversity was estimated by the Shannon- Winner (H’ index and phytoplankton density by the Utermöhl method. All lakes presented high phytoplankton diversity, ranging from H’ = 0.97 (Bosque dos Buritis to H’ =4.29 (Jardim Botânico. The phytoplankton diversity of the four lakes was significantly different (F = 4.74; p < 0,001. n=4, and phytoplankton density was high, with bloom of Cyanophyceae (Bosque dos Buritis and Chrysophyceae (Jardim Botânico. The four lakes presented low or absent synchronic phytoplankton communities (density and diversity attributes; moreover, Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA also showed that the lakes presented different phytoplankton community structures, especially Jardim Botanico, which evidenced most differentphytoplankton community structure. Furthermore, the other lakes presented different phytoplankton communities over at least one sampling period. These results demonstrated the importance

  20. Phytoplankton community characteristics in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea Phytoplankton community characteristics in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINU P; SHAJU S S; MUHAMED ASHRAF P; MEENAKUMARI B

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing applications are important in the fisheries sector and efforts were on to improve the predic-tions of potential fishing zones using ocean color. The present study was aimed to investigate the phyto-plankton dynamics and their absorption properties in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea in different seasons during the year 2010 to 2011. The region exhibited 73 genera of phytoplankton from 19 orders and 41 families. The numerical abundance of phytoplankton varied from 14.235×103 to 55.075×106 cells/L. Centric diatoms dominated in the region and the largest family identified was Thalassiosiraceae with main genera asSkeletonemaspp.,Planktionellaspp.andThalassiosiraspp. Annual variations in abun-dance of phytoplankton showed a typical one-peak cycle, with the highest recorded during premonsoon season and the lowest during monsoon season. The species diversity index of phytoplankton exhibited low diversity during monsoon season. Phytoplankton with pigments Chlorophylla, Chlorophyllb, Chlorophyll c, peridinin, diadinoxanthin, fucoxanthin,β-carotene and phycoerythrobilin dominated in these waters. The knowledge on phytoplankton dynamics in coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea forms a key parameter in bio-optical models of pigments and productivity and for the interpretation of remotely sensed ocean color data.

  1. Spatio-temporal changes in the distribution of phytopigments and phytoplanktonic groups at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP) site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe-Wright, Denise; Boswell, Stephen; Kim, Young-Nam; Kemp, Alan

    2010-08-01

    We have made a comprehensive study of pigment distributions and microscopically determined phytoplankton abundances within the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP) location in the North Atlantic to better understand phytoplankton variability, and make some suggestions regarding the composition of the material falling to the sea bed and its impacts on benthic organisms such as Amperima rosea. The area has been the focus of many studies of ocean fluxes and benthic communities over recent years, but little attention has been given to the spatio-temporal variability in the surface waters. Dawn casts over a 12-day period at the PAP mooring site (48.83°N 16.5°W) revealed the presence of only one species, the diatom Actinocyclus exiguus, at bloom concentrations for just 5 days. Smaller populations of other diatoms and the dinoflagellates Gymnodinium and Gyrodinium were also present at this time. Following this 5-day interval, a mixed population of small-sized dinoflagellates, prymnesiophytes, prasinophytes, chrysophytes and cyanobacteria occurred. It is clear from concomitant CTD/bottle surveys that rapid changes in phytoplankton community structure at a fixed time series position do not necessarily reflect a degradation or manifestation of one particular species but rather represent the movement of eddies and other water masses within very short timescales. These cause substantial variability in the species class and size fraction that may explain the variability in carbon export that has been seen at the PAP site. We also make some suggestions on the variable composition of the material falling to the seabed and its impact on benthic organisms such as Amperima rosea.

  2. Iron released from ilmenite mineral sustains a phytoplankton community in microcosms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, C.E.G.; Velip, D.; Mourya, B.S.; Shaikh, S.; Das, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    ilmenite had significantly higher phytoplankton growth compared with controls containing no ilmenite or those containing only ferrous sulfate. Phytoplankton cell numbers in the ilmenite-supplemented treatment were 20X higher than in controls. The later...

  3. Phytoplankton community structure in local water types at a coastal site in north-western Bay of Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliarsingh, S K; Srichandan, Suchismita; Lotliker, Aneesh A; Sahu, K C; Srinivasa Kumar, T

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive analysis on seasonal distribution of phytoplankton community structure and their interaction with environmental variables was carried out in two local water types (type 1  30 m isobath) at a coastal site in north-western Bay of Bengal. Phytoplankton community was represented by 211 taxa (146 marine, 37 fresh, 2 brackish, 20 marine-fresh, and 6 marine-brackish-fresh) belonging to seven major groups including 45 potential bloom forming and 22 potential toxin producing species. The seasonal variability depicted enrichment of phytoplankton during pre-monsoon in both water types. Total phytoplankton abundance pattern observed with inter-annual shift during monsoon and post-monsoon period at both water types. In both water types, diatom predominance was observed in terms of species richness and abundance comprising of centric (82 sp.) and pennate (58 sp.) forms. Pennate diatoms, Thalassiothrix longissima and Skeletonema costatum preponderated in both the water types. The diatom abundance was higher in type 1 in comparison to type 2. In general, SiO4 found to fuel growth of the dominant phytoplankton group, diatom in both the water types despite comparative lower concentration of other macronutrients in type 2. PMID:27334343

  4. Spatial variability in phytoplankton community structure along the eastern Arabian Sea during the onset of south-west monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Kurian, Siby; Gauns, Mangesh; Chndrasekhararao, A. V.; Mulla, Amara; Naik, Bhagyashri; Naik, Hema; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Arabian Sea experiences moderate to weak upwelling along the south-west coast of India, which subsequently propagates towards the north. This causes variation in plankton community composition, which is addressed in the present study. Here we report the spatial variations in distribution of phytoplankton groups along the north-south transect in the eastern Arabian Sea based on marker pigments supported with flow-cytometric and microscopic analyses. 15 phytoplankton pigments were identified using High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the chemotaxonomic software (CHEMTAX) analysis associated these to seven major group of phytoplankton. The phytoplankton biomass, chlorophyll a (Chl a) was higher in southern stations with dominance of fucoxanthin whereas, divinyl chlorophyll a (divinyl Chl a), marker pigment of Prochlorococcus was present only in the northern region. Microscopic observation revealed the dominance of larger forms; diatoms (Chaetoceros coarctatum and Nitzschia sp.) and dinoflagellates (Scrippsiella sp., Oxytoxum nanum and Oxytoxum sp.) in the southern region. Furthermore, a study of plankton size distribution showed dominance of picoplankton (fpico) followed by nanoplankton (fnano) along the northern stations with comparatively higher microplankton (fmicro) in the south. This study clearly showed the influence of different environmental conditions on the phytoplankton community as reflected in dominance of diatoms in the southern (south of 12 °N) and that of picoplankton in the northern (north of 12 °N) region.

  5. Seasonal effects of the low-grade heat on a phytoplankton community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field studies, carried out over the period 1976 March to December, examined the effects of heat-enriched cooling waters on a natural phytoplankton community. Algal concentrations, composition, species succession and carbon fixation rates were determined twice-weekly in heated and unheated (control) polyethylene enclosures located in a northern oligotrophic lake. Results were compared with data collected from the open lake. Of 31 species quantitatively studied, eleven dominant species were examined in detail. A marked response to heat enrichment by the phytoplankton occurred in the spring and was attributed to a single species of Bacillariophyceae - Synedra ulna. Species composition and seasonal succession patterns were similar in the experimental column, the control column and the lake. The relationship between production biomass quotients (P/B) and water temperature in the lake and experimental enclosure is discussed. It is suggested that thermal enrichment might be used beneficially in cold waters for enhancing biomass production of unicellular aquatic organisms. This increased availability of food, in conjuction with increased water temperatures, might then accelerate productivity of filter-feeding zooplankton and other herbivores. (auth)

  6. Seasonal changes in phytoplankton biomass and dominant species in the Changjiang River Estuary and adjacent seas: General trends based on field survey data 1959-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu; Han, Xiurong; Zhang, Chuansong; Sun, Baiye; Wang, Xiulin; Shi, Xiaoyong

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of seasonal variation in phytoplankton biomass and dominant species in the Changjiang River Estuary and adjacent seas were discussed based on field investigation data from 1959 to 2009. The field data from 1981 to 2004 showed that the Chlorophyll- a concentration in surface seawater was between 0.4 and 8.5 μg dm-3. The seasonal changes generally presented a bimodal trend, with the biomass peaks occurring in May and August, and Chlorophyll-a concentration was the lowest in winter. Seasonal biomass changes were mainly controlled by temperature and nutrient levels. From the end of autumn to the next early spring, phytoplankton biomass was mainly influenced by temperature, and in other seasons, nutrient level (including the nutrient supply from the terrestrial runoffs) was the major influence factor. Field investigation data from 1959 to 2009 demonstrated that diatoms were the main phytoplankton in this area, and Skeletonema costatum, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Coscinodiscus oculus-iridis, Thalassinoema nitzschioides, Paralia sulcata, Chaetoceros lorenzianus, Chaetoceros curvisetus, and Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu were common dominant species. The seasonal variations in major dominant phytoplankton species presented the following trends: 1) Skeletonema (mainly S. costatum) was dominant throughout the year; and 2) seasonal succession trends were Coscinodiscus (spring) → Chaetoceros (summer and autumn) → Coscinodiscus (winter). The annual dominance of S. costatum was attributed to its environmental eurytopicity and long standing time in surface waters. The seasonal succession of Coscinodiscus and Chaetoceros was associated with the seasonal variation in water stability and nutrient level in this area. On the other hand, long-term field data also indicated obvious interannual variation of phytoplankton biomass and community structure in the Changjiang River Estuary and adjacent seas: average annual phytoplankton biomass and dinoflagellate

  7. Macroecological patterns in the distribution of marine phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Erik Askov

    predicting future ocean function. This PhD thesis investigates and describes macroecological patterns in the distribution and diversity of marine phytoplankton. The primary focus has been to describe macroecological patterns in phytoplankton total biomass and community structure and relate these patterns to......Marine phytoplankton are responsible for approximately half of the global total primary production. The photosynthesis they carry out sustains higher trophic levels in the marine ecosystem. Changes in phytoplankton community composition can have cascading effects on food web dynamics, total...... presented as five research chapters shaped as manuscripts. In Manuscript I, the macroecological patterns in phytoplankton community size structure were investigated in relation to temperature and inorganic nutrient concentrations. Although temperature has been shown to directly affect phytoplankton size at...

  8. Water age – a major factor controlling phytoplankton community structure in a reconnected dynamic floodplain (Danube, Regelsbrunn, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan PREINER

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out during four years that span a gradient in hydrological connectivity between the Danube and its sidearm system at Regelsbrunn (Austria. We evaluated the influences of distinct periods of hydrological connectivity on the phytoplankton community structure itself, but also interferences with biotic processes (including community succession, competition and zooplankton grazing that may take place within the constraints set by the hydrological disturbance regime. Algal biomass was highly related to the hydrological regime: lowest amounts were detected either during flood events or at long-lasting periods of isolation; on the other hand intermediate connection led to maximum concentrations. During floods and throughout the cold season, Bacillariophyceae were dominating the algal community. Summer and elongated periods of isolation favoured Chlorophyta. Cryptophyta occurred in early autumn after two months disconnection from the main channel, Dinophyta and Cyanoprokaryota were only of minor importance. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that water age was the primary determinant of phytoplankton community structure in the side-arm system. Cluster analyses revealed 7 groups that were characterized by 169 indicator taxa. Groups were dominated by Bacillariophyceae (Nitzschia, Navicula, Cymbella, Fragilaria and Diatoma, while species belonging to the Chloro-, Eugleno- and Dinophyta were less abundant. Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling was used for a comparison of community similarity between the main channel and the side-arm system. During high connectivity temporal trends of phytoplankton similarity in the side-arm tracked closely the community patterns of the Danube which indicated a major influence of the main channel on phytoplankton community structure. During low connectivity the temporal trends of the communities from both sampling stations were less coupled. A Canonical Correspondence Analysis explained 89.7% of the

  9. Spatial and temporal variability of the phytoplankton community structure in the North Water Polynya, investigated using pigment biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidussi, F.; Roy, S.; Lovejoy, C.; Gammelgaard, Marie; Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Booth, B.; Tremblay, J.E.; Mostajir, B.

    2004-01-01

    contribution of the different phytoplankton groups to Chl a inferred using a factorization program (CHEMTAX) indicated that the bloom was diatom-dominated (maximum 94% diatoms). The phytoplankton community structure was influenced by the water mass characteristics and the surface circulation pattern....... Autotrophic flagellates dominated in April and May along the Canadian coast, where cold Arctic waters with relatively deep mixed layers were found. In contrast, diatoms dominated in May along the Greenland coast in warmer water masses of Atlantic origin and during June in the whole polynya, except in the...

  10. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  11. Physical-Biological Coupling in the Western South China Sea: The Response of Phytoplankton Community to a Mesoscale Cyclonic Eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Bangqin; Chiang, Kuo-Ping; Liu, Xin; Chen, Bingzhang; Xie, Yuyuan; Xu, Yanping; Hu, Jianyu; Dai, Minhan

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the mesoscale eddies play an important part in the biogeochemical cycle in ocean ecosystem, especially in the oligotrophic tropical zones. So here a heterogeneous cyclonic eddy in its flourishing stage was detected using remote sensing and in situ biogeochemical observation in the western South China Sea (SCS) in early September, 2007. The high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to identify the photosynthetic pigments. And the CHEMical TAXonomy (CHEMTAX) was applied to calculate the contribution of nine phytoplankton groups to the total chlorophyll a (TChl a) biomass. The deep chlorophyll a maximum layer (DCML) was raised to form a dome structure in the eddy center while there was no distinct enhancement for TChl a biomass. The integrated TChl a concentration in the upper 100 m water column was also constant from the eddy center to the surrounding water outside the eddy. However the TChl a biomass in the surface layer (at 5 m) in the eddy center was promoted 2.6-fold compared to the biomass outside the eddy (p < 0.001). Thus, the slight enhancement of TChl a biomass of euphotic zone integration within the eddy was mainly from the phytoplankton in the upper mixed zone rather than the DCML. The phytoplankton community was primarily contributed by diatoms, prasinophytes, and Synechococcus at the DCML within the eddy, while less was contributed by haptophytes_8 and Prochlorococcus. The TChl a biomass for most of the phytoplankton groups increased at the surface layer in the eddy center under the effect of nutrient pumping. The doming isopycnal within the eddy supplied nutrients gently into the upper mixing layer, and there was remarkable enhancement in phytoplankton biomass at the surface layer with 10.5% TChl a biomass of water column in eddy center and 3.7% at reference stations. So the slight increasing in the water column integrated phytoplankton biomass might be attributed to the stimulated phytoplankton biomass at the

  12. Repercussions of salinity changes and osmotic stress in marine phytoplankton species

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'ors, A.; Bartolomé, M. C.; Sánchez-Fortún, S.

    2016-06-01

    The short-term effect of low salinity was studied using laboratory protocols on some coastal phytoplankton species such as chlorophycea Tetraselmis suecica, among diatom the strain Nitzschia N1c1 and dinoflagellates Alexandrium minutum and Prorocentrum lima. All of cultures were exposed to low salinities, and cell growth rate, photosynthetic quantum yield (ΦPSII), and gross photosynthesis (Pg) were analyzed. Growth rate inhibition was similar in all species, and all of them also tolerate short-term exposures to salinities in the range 5-35. There were no significant differences between ΦPSII and Pg endpoints from Tetraselmis suecica and Nitzschia sp., while Alexandrium minutum and Prorocentrum lima displayed a higher affectation rate on Pg than on ΦPSII activity. The influence of low salinity was higher on respiration in T. suecica, while both dinoflagellates had higher net photosynthesis. Nitzschia sp. exhibited similar involvement of the two photosynthetic parameters. Therefore, although the four phytoplankton monocultures studied are able to survive in internal areas of estuaries under low salinity conditions, the photosynthetic activity is more affected than the growth rate in all phytoplankton communities studied except in chlorophycea T. suecica, which has increased tolerance for this salinity decrease.

  13. Water age – a major factor controlling phytoplankton community structure in a reconnected dynamic floodplain (Danube, Regelsbrunn, Austria)

    OpenAIRE

    Preiner, Stefan; Schagerl, Michael; Hein, Thomas; Angeler, David G.; Irene DROZDOWSKI

    2009-01-01

    The study was carried out during four years that span a gradient in hydrological connectivity between the Danube and its sidearm system at Regelsbrunn (Austria). We evaluated the influences of distinct periods of hydrological connectivity on the phytoplankton community structure itself, but also interferences with biotic processes (including community succession, competition and zooplankton grazing) that may take place within the constraints set by the hydrological disturbance regime. Algal b...

  14. A universal driver of macroevolutionary change in the size of marine phytoplankton over the Cenozoic

    OpenAIRE

    Finkel, Z. V.; Sebbo, J.; Feist-Burkhardt, S.; Irwin, A. J.; Katz, M. E.; Schofield, O. M. E.; Young, J. R.; Falkowski, P G

    2007-01-01

    The size structure of phytoplankton assemblages strongly influences energy transfer through the food web and carbon cycling in the ocean. We determined the macroevolutionary trajectory in the median size of dinoflagellate cysts to compare with the macroevolutionary size change in other plankton groups. We found the median size of the dinoflagellate cysts generally decreases through the Cenozoic. Diatoms exhibit an extremely similar pattern in their median size over time, even though species d...

  15. Characteristics of Phytoplankton Community Structure During and After a Bloom of the Dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea by HPLC Pigment Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG Chun-kwan; WONG Chong-kim

    2009-01-01

    A bloom of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea was detected for the first time in inner Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong in 2000. Water samples were collected at eight stations along a transect passing through a red tide patch for microscopic analysis of phytoplankton composition and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of phytoplankton pigments. During the bloom, the density of dinoflagellates was 1.1×106 cells L-1 within the patch and 8.6×105 cells L-1 outside the patch where the phyto-plankton community was dominated by diatoms. After the bloom the S. trochoidea began to decrease in density and was replaced by diatoms as the dominating bloom-causing organisms at all stations, and the density of dinoflagellates at most stations was less than 1.0×106 cells L-1. The status of S. trochoidea as the causative species of the bloom was indicated by the presence of peridinin, the marker pigment for dinoflagellates. The shift from dinoflagellates to diatoms was marked by the decline of peridinin and the preva-lence of fucoxanthin. Phytoplankton pigment markers also revealed the presence of other minor phytoplankton assemblages such as cryptomonads and blue-green algal.

  16. Icecolors '93: Beginnings of an antarctic phytoplankton and bacterial DNA library from southern ocean natural communities exposed to ultraviolet-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springtime ozone depletion and the resultant increase in ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation [280-320 nanometers (nm)] have deleterious effects on primary productivity. To assess damage to cellular components other than the photosynthetic apparatus, we isolated total community DNA from samples in the field before, during, and after the 1993 springtime depletion in stratospheric ozone. The effort was motivated by the concern that the ozone-dependent increases in UV-B radiation may increase DNA damage within primary producers. This increase in damage could result in changes of species composition as well as hereditary changes within species that can influence the competitiveness of these organisms in their natural community. Previous studies have focused on DNA damage in isolated cultures of antarctic phytoplankton that were irradiated with UV-B under lab conditions. These studies clearly indicate variable species sensitivities to the increase in UV-B flux. These studies, however, did not resolve the question of whether such damage occurred in field samples collected from actively mixing, polyphyletic phytoplankton communities. Potential species composition changes and the resultant changes in the trophic dynamics cannot be interpreted in terms of DNA damage unless this damage can be documented in samples isolated under these dynamic natural conditions. 7 refs., 2 figs

  17. Effects of uranium mine effluents (Caldas, Southeastern Brazil) on the aquatic biota: preliminary study on the phytoplankton community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study assessed the composition of the phytoplankton community and the physicochemical variables in an area located within the ore treatment unit - Brazilian Nuclear Industries, in Caldas and also in 'Antas' dam, which is under the influence of the treatment unit. Water samples were taken from three sites; one located within the treatment unit (site CM), which receives non-treated effluents generated during the mining process; and the other sites are located in 'Antas' dam (sites Cab and 41). We determined the values of dissolved oxygen, pH, chlorophyll a, hardness, thorium, uranium, sulfate and total organic nitrogen in water samples, and identified the phytoplankton community in October 2008 and January 2009. Water samples from the site CM exhibited lower pH medium values (3.9) than from the site 41 (6.9). The highest medium value of chlorophyll a was detected in water samples at site CM (5 μg L-1), whereas the lowest value was recorded at site 41 (0.47 μg L-1). Higher medium values of sulfate were detected in water samples from site CM (1743 mg L-1) compared to site Cab (110.11 mg L-1). We identified six classes in the phytoplankton community at site CM and eight classes at sites Cab and 41. Total average density of phytoplankton were 444 ind mL-1, 316 ind mL-1 and 303 ind mL-1 at points Cab, 41 and CM, respectively. The results obtained show that the environmental conditions at site CM are not favorable to the maintenance of a high density in the phytoplankton community. (author)

  18. Trophic state and seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton communities in two sand-pit lakes at different successional stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi VIAROLI

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of phytoplankton in two Italian sand-pit lakes have been analysed over three years (2004-2006. The studied lakes, Ca' Morta (CM and Ca' Stanga (CS, have a common origin and are contiguous, but are of different ages and have been managed in different ways. CM was created in 2002 and was still being dredged during the study period, while sand quarrying in CS began in 1998 and ended at the beginning of the study period. These conditions were thought to be of particular interest in assessing the influence of dredging activities on algal assemblages. Physical and chemical water parameters were also analysed to characterise the two lakes and investigate the effects of hydro-chemical features on phytoplankton. CS was stratified from April to October each year during the study period, while CM showed weaker thermal stratification. Conductivity, dissolved nitrate and dissolved reactive silica concentrations were greater in CM than in CS. The mixing depth/euphotic depth ratio was also higher in CM, probably because of water column mixing induced by hydraulic dredging. Overall, 185 phytoplankton taxa were found, of which ca 50% were present in both lakes. No significant differences in species richness were observed between lakes, but the decreasing trend of Simpson index values measured in CS showed a reduction in biodiversity after the excavation phase. Phytoplankton biomass was higher in CS than in CM, the latter being oligo-mesotrophic and the former mesotrophic. Diatoms and dinoflagellates were the dominant taxa in both lakes. The main differences in phytoplankton assemblages were related to the persistence of chryptophytes and chlorophytes in CM. Multivariate analyses support the hypothesis that different thermal patterns induced by dredging activities, along with certain physico-chemical parameters of the water, were the major factors shaping phytoplankton communities.

  19. Effects of a surfacing effluent plume on a coastal phytoplankton community

    KAUST Repository

    Reifel, Kristen M.

    2013-06-01

    Urban runoff and effluent discharge from heavily populated coastal areas can negatively impact water quality, beneficial uses, and coastal ecosystems. The planned release of treated wastewater (i.e. effluent) from the City of Los Angeles Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, located in Playa del Rey, California, provided an opportunity to study the effects of an effluent discharge plume from its initial release until it could no longer be detected in the coastal ocean. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of phytoplankton community structure revealed distinct community groups based on salinity, temperature, and CDOM concentration. Three dinoflagellates (Lingulodinium polyedrum, Cochlodinium sp., Akashiwo sanguinea) were dominant (together >50% abundance) prior to the diversion. Cochlodinium sp. became dominant (65-90% abundance) within newly surfaced wastewater, and A. sanguinea became dominant or co-dominant as the effluent plume aged and mixed with ambient coastal water. Localized blooms of Cochlodinium sp. and A. sanguinea (chlorophyll a up to 100mgm-3 and densities between 100 and 2000cellsmL-1) occurred 4-7 days after the diversion within the effluent plume. Although both Cochlodinium sp. and A. sanguinea have been occasionally reported from California waters, blooms of these species have only recently been observed along the California coast. Our work supports the hypothesis that effluent and urban runoff discharge can stimulate certain dinoflagellate blooms. All three dinoflagellates have similar ecophysiological characteristics; however, small differences in morphology, nutrient preferences, and environmental requirements may explain the shift in dinoflagellate composition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Effects of a surfacing effluent plume on a coastal phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifel, Kristen M.; Corcoran, Alina A.; Cash, Curtis; Shipe, Rebecca; Jones, Burton H.

    2013-06-01

    Urban runoff and effluent discharge from heavily populated coastal areas can negatively impact water quality, beneficial uses, and coastal ecosystems. The planned release of treated wastewater (i.e. effluent) from the City of Los Angeles Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant, located in Playa del Rey, California, provided an opportunity to study the effects of an effluent discharge plume from its initial release until it could no longer be detected in the coastal ocean. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of phytoplankton community structure revealed distinct community groups based on salinity, temperature, and CDOM concentration. Three dinoflagellates (Lingulodinium polyedrum, Cochlodinium sp., Akashiwo sanguinea) were dominant (together >50% abundance) prior to the diversion. Cochlodinium sp. became dominant (65-90% abundance) within newly surfaced wastewater, and A. sanguinea became dominant or co-dominant as the effluent plume aged and mixed with ambient coastal water. Localized blooms of Cochlodinium sp. and A. sanguinea (chlorophyll a up to 100 mg m-3 and densities between 100 and 2000 cells mL-1) occurred 4-7 days after the diversion within the effluent plume. Although both Cochlodinium sp. and A. sanguinea have been occasionally reported from California waters, blooms of these species have only recently been observed along the California coast. Our work supports the hypothesis that effluent and urban runoff discharge can stimulate certain dinoflagellate blooms. All three dinoflagellates have similar ecophysiological characteristics; however, small differences in morphology, nutrient preferences, and environmental requirements may explain the shift in dinoflagellate composition.

  1. Comparison of spring-time phytoplankton community composition in two cold years from the western Gulf of Alaska into the southeastern Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Beth A.; Goes, Joaquim I.; McKee, Kali T.; do Rosario Gomes, Helga; Stabeno, Phyllis J.

    2014-11-01

    large diatoms of the genera Thalassiosira, Thalassiothrix, and Chaetoceros in 2012. The current study shows that within-regime differences in phytoplankton community composition between years can be almost as great as that between locations with vastly different oceanographic settings. High between- and multi-year variability may combine with a potential overall decline in sea ice in the Bering Sea to produce significant changes in the productive base of the food web with potential cascading effects on higher, economically and ecologically important trophic levels.

  2. Climate-mediated changes to mixed-layer properties in the Southern Ocean: assessing the phytoplankton response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Boyd

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent changes in ocean chemical and physical properties influence phytoplankton dynamics via alterations in carbonate chemistry, nutrient and trace metal inventories and upper ocean light environment. Using a fully coupled, global carbon-climate model (Climate System Model 1.4-carbon, we quantify anthropogenic climate change relative to the background natural interannual variability for the Southern Ocean over the period 2000 and 2100. Model results are interpreted using our understanding of the environmental control of phytoplankton growth rates – leading to two major findings. Firstly, comparison with results from phytoplankton perturbation experiments, in which environmental properties have been altered for key species (e.g., bloom formers, indicates that the predicted rates of change in oceanic properties over the next few decades are too subtle to be represented experimentally at present. Secondly, the rate of secular climate change will not exceed background natural variability, on seasonal to interannual time-scales, for at least several decades – which may not provide the prevailing conditions of change, i.e. constancy, needed for phytoplankton adaptation. Taken together, the relatively subtle environmental changes, due to climate change, may result in adaptation by resident phytoplankton, but not for several decades due to the confounding effects of climate variability. This presents major challenges for the detection and attribution of climate change effects on Southern Ocean phytoplankton. We advocate the development of multi-faceted tests/metrics that will reflect the relative plasticity of different phytoplankton functional groups and/or species to respond to changing ocean conditions.

  3. Climate-mediated changes to mixed-layer properties in the Southern Ocean: assessing the phytoplankton response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Boyd

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent changes in ocean chemical and physical properties influence phytoplankton dynamics via alterations in carbonate chemistry, nutrient and trace metal inventories and upper ocean light environment. Using a fully coupled, global carbon-climate model (Climate System Model 1.4-carbon, we quantify anthropogenic climate change relative to the background natural interannual variability for the Southern Ocean over the period 2000 and 2100. Model results are interpreted using our understanding of the environmental control of phytoplankton growth rates – leading to two major findings. Firstly, comparison with results from phytoplankton perturbation experiments, in which environmental properties have been altered for key species (e.g., bloom formers, indicates that the predicted rates of change in oceanic properties over the next few decades are too subtle to be represented experimentally at present. Secondly, the rate of secular climate change will not exceed background natural variability, on seasonal to interannual time-scales, for at least several decades – which may not provide the prevailing conditions of change, i.e. constancy, needed for phytoplankton adaptation. Taken together, the relatively subtle environmental changes, due to climate change, may result in adaptation by resident phytoplankton, but not for several decades due to the confounding effects of climate variability. This presents major challenges for the detection and attribution of climate change effects on Southern Ocean phytoplankton. We advocate the development of multi-faceted tests/metrics that will reflect the relative plasticity of different phytoplankton functional groups and/or species to respond to changing ocean conditions.

  4. Response of a natural Phytoplankton community from the Qingdao coast (Yellow Sea, China) to variable CO2 levels over a short-term incubation experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Biswas, H.; Jie, J.; Li, Y.; Zhang, G.; Zhu, Z.-Y.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, G.-L.; Li, Y.-W.; Liu, S.M.; Zhang, J.

    , prasinophytes, cryptophytes and cyanophytes were also present. δ13CPOM values indicated that the phytoplankton community probably utilized bicarbonate ions as dissolved inorganic carbon source through a carbon concentration mechanism (CCM...

  5. Water flux management and phytoplankton communities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon. Part I: How to promote dinoflagellate dominance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, M; Cecchi, P; Collos, Y; Agostini, S; Pasqualini, V

    2016-03-15

    The Biguglia lagoon is a shallow Mediterranean coastal ecosystem where eutrophication is increasing for years. A channel supplying freshwater was cleared in 2009 to enhance lagoon water circulation and alleviate dystrophic crises. Monthly monitoring was started in 2010 to document the impacts of this action on abiotic characteristics and phytoplankton communities. Three stations were surveyed (by microscopy and HPLC). Evidence suggests that this operation had an unexpected outcome. Salinity footprints indicated the succession of three main hydrological sequences that depended on rainfall and circulation pattern. Diatoms and dinoflagellates dominated the first sequence, characterized by heavy rainfall, while Prorocentrum minimum became progressively the dominant species in the second period (increasing salinities) with extensive bloom over the whole lagoon (5.93×10-(5)cells·L(-1)) during the third period. These phytoplankton successions and community structures underline the risk of pernicious effects arising from remediation efforts, in the present case based on increasing freshwater inputs. PMID:26869094

  6. Communities under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogues, David Bravo; Rahbek, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of species on Earth and the interactions among them are tightly linked to historical and contemporary climate, so that global climate change will transform the world in which we live. Biological models can now credibly link recent decadal trends in field data to climate change......, but predicting future impacts on biological communities is a major challenge. Attempts to move beyond general macroecological predictions of climate change impact on one hand, and observations from specific, local-scale cases, small-scale experiments, or studies of a few species on the other, raise a plethora...... of unanswered questions. On page 1124 of this issue, Harley (1) reports results that cast new light on how biodiversity, across different trophic levels, responds to climate change....

  7. Water quality and phytoplankton communities in Lake Pontchartrain during and after the Bonnet Carré Spillway opening, April to October 2008, in Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mize, Scott V.; Demcheck, Dennis K.

    2009-12-01

    of blue-green algae, particularly the harmful algae bloom taxa. Cell densities and biovolume of the phytoplankton lake indicator taxa Skeletonema costatum, Anabaena sp., and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii were highest and dominated the diatom and blue-green algae communities during the period of most river water influence on the lake and immediately following the freshwater inflows. The dominance and recession of these indictor taxa reflect the dramatic changes that occurred in the phytoplankton community in response to an increase in nutrient-rich freshwater from the diversion into the lake, and not normal seasonal phytoplankton compositional differences. Water-quality data indicated a gradual reversion to pre-diversion lake conditions by June to July, but shifts in the phytoplankton composition were still evident through August 2008. Observations from this study were similar to results from previous studies of Mississippi River/Bonnet Carré Spillway diversion opening in 1997.

  8. Adaptation of phytoplankton-degrading microbial communities to thermal reactor effluent in a new cooling reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In water column and sediment inocula from a nuclear reactor cooling reservoir, natural phytoplankton substrate labeled with 14C was used to determine aerobic and anaerobic mineralization rates for a range of temperatures (25, 40, 55, and 700C) expected during reactor operation. For experiments that were begun during reactor shutdown, aerobic decomposition occurred at temperatures of 0C. After two months of reactor operation, aerobic rates increased substantially at 55 and 700C, although maximum rates were observed at temperatures of ≤ 400C. The temperature range for which maximum anaerobic mineralization (i.e., the sum of CH4 and CO2) was observed was 25 to 400C when the reactor was off, expanding to 25 to 550C during reactor operation. Increased rates of 550C, but not 700C, correlated with an increase in the ratio of cumulative methane to carbon dioxide produced over 21 days. When reduced reactor power lowered the maximum temperature of the reservoir to 420C, aerobic decomposition at 700C was negligible, but remained substantial at 550C. Selection for thermophilic decomposers occurred rapidly in this system in both aerobic and anaerobic communities and did not require prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures

  9. Species diversity of phytoplankton communities in the Western Arctic Ocean during summer 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Gengming Lin; Yu Wang; Qingliang Yang

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton assemblages in the Arctic Ocean, particularly in the Western Arctic Ocean, remain unclear due to limited long-term ecological investigation caused by the existing harsh environment. In the present study, we characterized summer phytoplankton assemblages in surface water in terms of species composition and spatial distribution in the Western Arctic Ocean in 2010. Phytoplankton samples were collected at 50 stations in the survey area (67.0o–86.1o N, 152.5 o–169.0 o W) from 20 July...

  10. An unusually large phytoplankton spring bloom drives rapid changes in benthic diversity and ecosystem function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingtian; Warwick, Richard M.; McNeill, Caroline L.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Sheehan, Aaron; Widdicombe, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, the Western English Channel experienced an unusually large and long-lived phytoplankton spring bloom. When compared with data from the past 20 years, average phytoplankton biomass at Station L4 (part of the Western Channel Observatory) was approximately 3× greater and lasted 50% longer than any previous year. Regular (mostly weekly) box core samples were collected from this site before, during and after the bloom to determine its impact on macrofaunal abundance, diversity, biomass, community structure and function. The spring bloom of 2012 was shown to support a large and rapid response in the majority of benthic taxa and functional groups. However, key differences in the precise nature of this response, as well as in its timing, was observed between different macrofauna feeding groups. Deposit feeders responded almost instantly at the start of the bloom, primarily thorough an increase in abundance. Suspension feeders and opportunistic/predatory/carnivorous taxa responded slightly more slowly and primarily with an increase in biomass. At the end of the bloom a rapid decline in macrobenthic abundance, diversity and biomass closely followed the decline in phytoplankton biomass. With suspension feeders showing evidence of this decline a few weeks before deposit feeders, it was concluded that this collapse in benthic communities was driven primarily by food availability and competition. However, it is possible that environmental hypoxia and the presence of toxic benthic cyanobacteria could also have contributed to this decline. This study shows evidence for strong benthic-pelagic coupling at L4; a shallow (50 m), coastal, fine-sand habitat. It also demonstrates that in such habitats, it is not just planktonic organisms that demonstrate clear community phenology. Different functional groups within the benthic assemblage will respond to the spring bloom in specific manner, with implications for key ecosystem functions and processes, such as secondary production

  11. Impact of oil shale mine water discharges on phytoplankton community of Purtse catchment rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multivariate relationship between phytoplankton abundance and different factors both natural and generated by oil shale mining in the Purtse catchment rivers (Purtse, Kohtla, and Ojamaa) in Augusts 1996-2000 was studied. Impact of oil shale mine water discharges, causing the input of sulfates and chlorides into the rivers, on phytoplankton abundance in river water was characterized by significant negative linear correlation. The amount of annual precipitation influenced positively the characteristics of phytoplankton abundance in river water. The complex of linear regression formulas was derived for characterising phytoplankton abundance in the lower course of the Purtse River using meteorological, hydrological and hydrogeological as well as geochemical data of water circulation. Closing the Sompa, Tammiku and Kohtla mines in 2000-2001 decreased essentially anthropogenic stress on ecological condition of the Purtse catchment rivers. (author)

  12. Fluorescence signatures of an iron-enriched phytoplankton community in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wayne Wright, C.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Berry, Richard E.; Mitchell, Richard

    Laser-induced fluorescence profiles of chlorophyll and phycoerythrin pigments and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence acquired over an iron-enriched phytoplankton patch are compared to profiles made over adjacent, naturally occurring phytoplankton patches. A total of four airborne missions were flown during an 8 day period following the release of the iron-rich fertilizer. Analyses of the airborne laser-induced fluorescence profiles from the upper-ocean layer reveal: (1) Ship-dispersed iron enhances localized phytoplankton production in high-nutrient/low-chlorophyll regions such as found in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. (2) The chlorophyll concentration within the iron-enriched phytoplankton patch exceeded levels of chlorophyll found in naturally occurring phytoplankton patches located outside the enriched region. (3) An increase in phycoerythrin fluorescence was observed within the enriched region in correspondence with the elevated chlorophyll fluorescence. However, the phycoerythrin/chlorophyll fluorescence ratio was lower within the enriched patch than in naturally occurring phytoplankton patches outside of the enriched region. (4) No above-background chromorophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence was observed in the enriched patch. Elevated CDOM fluorescence was associated with some of the naturally occurring phytoplankton patches outside the enriched region, while other such phytoplankton patches showed no measurable increase in CDOM over background levels. (5) The surface layer manifestation of the patch was observed to be transported to the north and west in close agreement with the drogue positions. No elevated surface layer chlorophyll fluorescence was seen in the vicinity of the ship as it sampled the submerged fraction at the time of the 30 October and 1 November overflights. The phycoerythrin pigment fluorescence emission was insensitive to ambient cloud-induced downwelling irradiance variability, while at the

  13. Structure and dynamics of phytoplankton community in the Botafogo reservoir-Pernambuco-Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Giulliari Alan da Silva Tavares de Lira; Maria do Carmo Bittencourt-Oliveira; Ariadne do Nascimento Moura

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the structure and dynamics of the phytoplankton in the Botafogo reservoir-PE-Brazil. Phytoplankton assemblages were identified from current literature and density was estimated using an inverted microscope. Concurrently to the sampling of biotic variables, measurements of abiotic parameters, such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH, were determined using field probes and transparency was determined with a Secchi disk. Total phosphorus ...

  14. Comparative study of three analysis methods (TTGE, flow cytometry and HPLC) for xenobiotic impact assessment on phytoplankton communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski-Haberkorn, Sabine; Quiniou, Louis; Beker, Beatriz; Haberkorn, Hansy; Marie, Dominique; de la Broise, Denis

    2009-04-01

    The impacts of the fungicide Opus (epoxiconazole) on marine phytoplankton communities were assessed in a 12-day field experiment using in situ microcosms maintained underwater at 6 m depth. Three community analysis methods were compared for their sensitivity threshold in fungicide impact detection. When phytoplankton communities were exposed to 1 microg l(-1) of epoxiconazole, no effects could be demonstrated using TTGE (Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis), flow cytometry or HPLC. When exposed to 10 microg l(-1), TTGE fingerprints from PCR amplified 18S rDNA of communities exhibited significant differences compared with controls (ANOSIM, P = 0.028). Neither flow cytometry counts, nor HPLC pigment profiles allowed to show significant differences in microcosms exposed to 10 microg l(-1) of epoxiconazole. When exposed to 100 microg l(-1), all three methods allowed to detect significant differences in treated microcosms, as compared to controls. The TTGE analysis appears in this study as the most sensitive method for fungicide impact assessment on eukaryote microbial communities. PMID:19096934

  15. Changes in nutrient uptake of phytoplankton under the interaction between sunlight and phosphate in the Changjiang(Yangtze)River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Tao; LI Daoji; YU Lihua; LI Yun

    2008-01-01

    We conducted ship-board incubation experiments to investigate changes in nutrient uptake of phytoplankton under different phosphate concentrations and irradiances in the Changjiang River Estuary and its adjacent waters in China.Under 100% natural irradiance the uptake rates of phosphate,silicate,and nitrate were accelerated at high phosphate levels(1.84 μM),while under low irradiance(about 50%natural irradiance)their uptake rates were restrained at the high but stimulated greatly at the intermediate phosphate concentrations(1.26μM),as the growth of phytoplankton,changes in nitrite and ammonium uptake didn't follow an obvious pattern.Our results alSO showed that there were linear relationships between nitrate,silicate and phosphate uptake at different phosphate concentrations under low and high irradiances,and the growth period of phytuplankton was prolonged both at the high phosphate concentrations under high irradiance and at the intermediate concentrations under low irradiance,suggesting that the limitation of phytoplankton growth mainly reflected changes in its growth period,and because no such environment(low-irradiance and low phosphate concentrations)actually existed in a high turbidity zone,phytoplankton blooms hardly occurred there.In the absence of irradiance,denitrification occurred readily and phytoplankton was kept decreasing,which resulted in phOSphate regeneratton.

  16. Phytoplankton pigments and functional community structure in relation to environmental factors in the Pearl River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two cruises were undertaken in the Pearl River Estuary in November 2011 and March 2012 to analyze the distribution of phytoplankton pigments and to define the relationships of pigment indices and functional community structure with environmental factors. Among 22 pigments, 17 were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. Chlorophyll a was found in all samples, with a maximum of 7.712 μg L−1 in spring. Fucoxanthin was the most abundant accessory pigment, with mean concentrations of 2.914 μg L−1 and 0.207 μg L−1 in spring and autumn, respectively. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c2, fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, and diatoxanthin were high in the northern or northwest estuary in spring and in the middle-eastern and northeast estuary in autumn. Chlorophyll b, chlorophyll c3, prasinoxanthin, and peridinin were similarly distributed during the two cruises. Chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin positively correlated with nutrients in spring, whereas 19′-hex-fucoxanthin and 19′-but-fucoxanthin negatively correlated. The biomass proportion of microphytoplankton (BPm was higher in spring, whereas that of picophytoplankton (BPp was higher in autumn. BPm in spring was high in areas with salinity 30. BPm increased but BPn reduced with the increase in nutrient contents. By comparison, BPp reduced with the increase in nutrient contents in spring, but no relationship was found between BPp and nutrient contents in autumn. The ratios of photosynthetic carotenoids to photoprotective carotenoids in the southern estuary approached unity linear relationship in spring and were under the unity line in autumn.

  17. PCO2 effects on species composition and growth of an estuarine phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocean and coastal waters are undergoing changes in carbonate chemistry, including pH, in response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and the microbial degradation of organic matter associated with nutrient enrichment. The effects of this change on plankton communities ha...

  18. Phytoplankton community response to carbon dioxide enrichment in winter incubation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal waters are experiencing changes in carbonate chemistry, including pH, in response to increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration and the microbial degradation of surplus organic matter associated with nutrient enrichment. The effects of this change on plankton communities ...

  19. Silicate:nitrate ratios of upwelled waters control the phytoplankton community sustained by mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    T. S. Bibby; Moore, C M

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical gyres physically perturb the water column and can introduce macronutrients to the euphotic zone, stimulating a biological response by which phytoplankton communities can become dominated by large phytoplankton. Mesoscale eddies are therefore important in driving export in oligotrophic regions of the modern ocean. The character and magnitude of the biological response sustained by eddies are, however, variable. Here we present data from mesoscale eddies ...

  20. Silicate:nitrate ratios of upwelled waters control the phytoplankton community sustained by mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    T. S. Bibby; Moore, C M

    2011-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical gyres physically perturb the water column and can introduce macronutrients to the euphotic zone, stimulating a biological response in which phytoplankton communities can become dominated by large phytoplankton. Mesoscale eddies may therefore be important in driving export in oligotrophic regions of the modern ocean. However, the character and magnitude of the biological response sustained by eddies is variable. Here we present data from mesoscale eddies in the...

  1. Phytoplankton community from Lake Taihu,China,has dissimilar responses to inorganic and organic nutrients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Wang; Boqiang Qin; Guang Gao; Yongping Wang; Xiangming Tang; Timothy Otten

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the response of phytoplankton from Lake Taihu to different types of nutrients,the phytoplankton responses were measured after adding inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) or decomposed algal scum (Microcystis spp.) into the lake water.Both types of nutrients promoted an increase in phytoplankton biomass as determined by chlorophyll a and algal wet weight.The addition of decomposed algal scum resulted in a significantly greater phytoplankton response than the addition of inorganic N and P alone.The dissolved inorganic N and P in the inorganic nutrient treatment were found not limit phytoplankton growth.The higher algal biomass obtained in the treatment with decomposed algal scum indicated the importance of other organic nutrients besides N and P such as trace elements,as well as the importance of the form of N since the levels of ammonia nitrogen (NH4+-N) from the decomposed algal treatment were actually higher than that of the inorganic N and P addition.Microcystis spp.(Cyanobacteria),Scenedesmus spp.(Chlorophyta) and Synechocystis spp.(Cyanobacteria) were the dominant taxa in the control,inorganic N and P treatment,and the decomposed algal scum treatment,respectively.Microcystis never bloomed in response to both types of nutrient additions indicating that the bloom propagation is not solely related to nutrient additions,but may be related to the absence of selective grazing from zooplankton.

  2. Phytoplankton community of a polymictic reservoir, La Plata River basin, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PÉREZ M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analysis of phytoplankton composition and abundance from four sampling stations at the polymictic system, Rincón del Bonete water reservoir in Uruguay. Sampling data were obtained in 4 seasonal periods between February and November 1993. A hundred and twenty-four taxa were identified, where Aulacoseira granulata (Ehrenb. Simon., A. granulata var. angustissima (Muller Simon., A. granulata var. angustissima f. spiralis, (Muller Simon., A. cf. ambigua, (Grun. Simon., A. cf.. distans (Ehrenb. Simon., Cryptomonas spp. and Synedra ulna (Nitzsch Ehrenberg, were always present. Phytoplankton abundance fluctuated between 29 (autumn and 2129 (summer ind/ml. The general dominance of Aulacoseira spp. could be related to the polymictic condition of the system. In cold months phytoplankton distribution was homogeneous among sampling stations, while in warm months, spatial heterogeneity was detected, suggesting that sampling stations can behave as independent compartments.

  3. Phytoplankton community of a polymictic reservoir, La Plata River basin, Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M C; Bonilla, S; Martínez, G

    1999-11-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of phytoplankton composition and abundance from four sampling stations at the polymictic system, Rinc6n del Bonete water reservoir in Uruguay. Sampling data were obtained in 4 seasonal periods between February and November 1993. A hundred and twenty-four taxa were identified, where Aulacoseira granulata (Ehrenb.) Simon., A. granulata var. angustissima (Muller) Simon., A. granulata var. angustissima f. spiralis, (Muller) Simon., A. cf. ambigua, (Grun.) Simon., A. cf. distans (Ehrenb.) Simon., Cryptomonas spp. and Synedra ulna (Nitzsch) Ehrenberg, were always present. Phytoplankton abundance fluctuated between 29 (autumn) and 2129 (summer) ind/ml. The general dominance of Aulacoseira spp. could be related to the polymictic condition of the system. In cold months phytoplankton distribution was homogeneous among sampling stations, while in warm months, spatial heterogeneity was detected, suggesting that sampling stations can behave as independent compartments. PMID:23505641

  4. Spatiotemporal distribution in phytoplankton community with distinct salinity regimes along the Mandovi estuary, Goa, India

    OpenAIRE

    PEDNEKAR, Suraksha Mohan; KERKAR, Vijaya; MATONDKAR, Shivprasad Ganesh Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the composition and abundance of phytoplankton were investigated fortnightly at 3 different regions along the Mandovi estuary from June 2007 to May 2008 in relation to salinity and nutrients. A total of 209 species belonging to 7 divisions were identified during the study period. The highest phytoplankton cell density (5.17 × 104 cells L-1) and biomass (7.68 mg m-3 chlorophyll a) were observed in the upper sections during the nonmonsoon period, while the highest diversi...

  5. Phytoplankton communities from San Francisco Bay Delta respond differently to oxidized and reduced nitrogen substrates - even under conditions that would otherwise suggest nitrogen sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Glibert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of equivalent additions of nitrogen (N, 30-40 μM-N in different forms (ammonium, NH4+, and nitrate, NO3- under conditions of different light exposure on phytoplankton community composition was studied in a series of four, 5-day enclosure experiments on water collected from the nutrient-rich San Francisco Bay Delta over two years. Overall, proportionately more chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin (generally indicative of diatoms was produced per unit N taken up in enclosures enriched with NO3- and incubated at reduced (~15% of ambient light intensity than in treatments with NO3- with high (~60% of ambient light exposure or with NH4+ under either light condition. In contrast, proportionately more chlorophyll b (generally indicative of chlorophytes and zeaxanthin (generally indicative of cyanobacteria was produced in enclosures enriched with NH4+ and incubated under high light intensity than in treatments with low light or with added NO3- at either light level. Rates of maximal velocities (Vmax of uptake of N substrates, measured using 15N tracer techniques, in all enclosures enriched with NO3- were higher than those enriched with NH4+. Directionality of trends in enclosures were similar to phytoplankton community shifts observed in transects of the Sacramento River to Suisun Bay, a region in which large changes in total N quantity and form occur. These data substantiate the growing body of experimental evidence that dichotomous microbial communities develop when enriched with the same absolute concentration of oxidized vs. reduced N forms, even when sufficient N nutrient was available to the community prior to the N inoculations.

  6. Phytoplankton diversity, biomass, and production

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madondkar, S.G.P.; Gomes, H.; Parab, S.G.; Pednekar, S.; Goes, J.I.

    -Z system is also subjected to human influence through alterations in catchment area and ore mining activities, and the consequent land runoff. These aspects had prompted us to examine changes in phytoplankton diversity during last two decades. Phytoplankton...

  7. Solar irradiance changes and phytoplankton productivity in Earth's ocean following astrophysical ionizing radiation events

    CERN Document Server

    Neale, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Two atmospheric responses to simulated astrophysical ionizing radiation events significant to life on Earth are production of odd-nitrogen species, especially NO2, and subsequent depletion of stratospheric ozone. Ozone depletion increases incident short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVB, 280-315 nm) and longer ( > 600 nm) wavelengths of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR, 400 -700 nm). On the other hand, the NO2 haze decreases atmospheric transmission in the long-wavelength UVA (315-400 nm) and short wavelength PAR. Here we use the results of previous simulations of incident spectral irradiance following an ionizing radiation event to predict changes in Terran productivity focusing on photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton. The prediction is based on a spectral model of photosynthetic response developed for the dominant genera in central regions of the ocean (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), and remote-sensing based observations of spectral water transparency, temperature, wind speed and mixed...

  8. PHYTOPLANKTON PIGMENT ANALYSIS BY HPLC FOR ASSESSING COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A technique to rapidly assess phytoplankton dynamics is being evaluated for its utility in the Great Lakes. Comparison to traditional microscopic techniques and to more recent in-situ FluoroProbe technology will allow us to determine if HPLC pigment analysis can provide unique a...

  9. Spatiotemporal distribution in phytoplankton community with distinct salinity regimes along the Mandovi estuary, Goa, India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pednekar, S.M.; Kerkar, V.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    to 7 divisions were identified during the study period. The highest phytoplankton cell density (5.17 × 104 cells L–1) and biomass (7.68 mg m–3 chlorophyll a) were observed in the upper sections during the nonmonsoon...

  10. Does temperature structure phytoplankton community composition in the Ross Sea, Antarctica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ross Sea polynya experiences one of the largest phytoplankton blooms in the Southern Ocean. Energy flow potential within the Ross Sea food web is primarily set by diatoms and prymnesiophytes, the latter dominated by Phaeocystis antarctica. We investigated physical, chemical,...

  11. The role of deep convection on the dynamics of the North Atlantic phytoplankton community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, Christian

    convective regimes. To investigate this discrepancy between observations and model studies, a modeling approach commonly used in population models was applied to a spatial grid, where the advective flow was explicit represented. The result shows that indeed phytoplankton can persists in highly turbulent deep...

  12. Effects of chemical ecological adjustment and control experiment on phytoplankton community in the Aoshan Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈碧鹃; 赵俊; 辛福言; 崔毅; 过锋

    2002-01-01

    There is a low nutrient level in the Aoshan Bay. In June 1999, the chemical adjustment and control experiment was made in the Aoshan Bay. Following tracts investigation was carried out before the experiment and on the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 45th day/after the experiment. While the variance of amount of phytoplankton, the replacement of superior species and the species composition of phytoplankton were researched. The results show that the amount of phytoplankton in the Aoshan Bay rises gradually after the experiment. Ceratium macroceros Cleve of pyrophyta was the dominant species before the experiment, its dominant index was 37.7%. Six days after the experiment, its dominant index dropped to 17.6%. Meanwhile the dominant index of Asterionella japonics Cleve rose from 7.1% to 39.2%, it became the first dominant species. Forty-five days after the experiment, the amount of phytoplankton in the Aoshan Bay was 5.15 to 137.32 times more than that in 1997.

  13. Trends of phytoplankton characteristics and their communities in pre- and post-liming time in Lake Orta (1984-1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierisa PANZANI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an assessment of the changing properties of Lake Orta phytoplankton in the period 1984-1998, which includes the large-scale liming carried out in the lake in 1989 and 1990. The phytoplankton is analysed first in its general properties (abundance, biovolume, chlorophyll-a concentration, average cell size, diversity by means of time courses of the mentioned variables based on monthly data through the entire period, and by correlations between the same variables. Moreover, through clustering techniques, the evolution of the species composition has been studied, showing the gradual decrease of chlorophytes after the liming and the noticeable increase of the diatom population, both as biovolume and diversity. Although the assemblage of the dominant species still mirrors the presence of some residual toxic compounds into the lake water, in the most recent period the evolution of the algal populations showed a clear trend towards a species assemblage more similar to those observed in the other deep italian subalpine lakes. After the improving of the chemical environment, the main abiotic factor that in the next years could play a major role in modifying the species assemblage is probably the phosphorus supply, whose in-lake concentration is low, despite the high annual load from the basin. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the phosphorus dynamics represent the basis to make reliable hypotheses about the future evolution of the phytoplankton assemblage.

  14. Community Response to Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Donald G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes three trends--downsizing, reduction of government funding, and shift of decision making from federal to state and state to local agencies. Suggests that community response to these trends requires leadership, a role for adult educators. (SK)

  15. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea

    OpenAIRE

    KatherineRose MarieMackey; KristenNBuck; JohnRCasey; AbigailCid

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, copper, ir...

  16. In situ study on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in summer 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junlei; Sun, Xiaoxia; Zheng, Shan

    2016-08-01

    In situ studies on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton were important for the analysis of changes in community structure and for the prediction and control of algal blooms, but such studies of phytoplankton in offshore China were few. In this study, the detailed distribution of photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the summer of 2013 in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea was measured using Phyto-PAM (Pulse Amplitude Modulation). The phytoplankton community structure and the environmental parameters were also investigated to estimate the relationship between the distribution of the photochemical competence of phytoplankton and ecological factors. The total average Fv/Fm (the potential maximum quantum yield) value of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in summer 2013 was less than 0.5, reflecting that the photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton was relatively low. Fv/Fm of phytoplankton in summer was significantly positively associated with nitrate content (NO2-), which reflects relationship between metabolism and photosynthesis of phytoplankton: accompanied by NO2- metabolism, photosynthesis and photosynthetic capacity may be enhanced simultaneously, so the Fv/Fm value would increase with the NO2- released by phytoplankton. Through the in situ study on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea, we come to the conclusion that photosynthetic characteristics and activity of phytoplankton are influenced by its biological characteristics and surrounding ecological factors, such as irradiance, nutrients and phytoplankton community. Meanwhile, the thermally stratified structure and the movement of water masses, such as the Yangtze River diluted water, the Yellow Sea cold water mass and other different water system, also have an important impact on phytoplankton photosynthetic activity and characteristics. Greater understanding of the detailed photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton

  17. Comunidade fitoplanctônica de um pesqueiro na cidade de São Paulo Phytoplankton community in a recreational fishing lake, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayla Matsuzaki

    2004-10-01

    management programs aiming at preventing potential harm to human health. The purpose of the present study was to describe phytoplankton seasonal changes in a freshwater system and their relation to water quality. METHODS: The recreational fishing lake is located in the southern area of the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were collected in three previously selected sites in the lake throughout a year and analyzed regarding floristic composition and physical and chemical parameters. RESULTS: The phytoplankton qualitative analysis revealed 91 taxa distributed among eight classes: Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Euglenophyceae, Zygnemaphyceae, Bacillariophyceae, Xantophyceae, Dinophyceae, and Chrysophyceae. Some physical and chemical parameters seemed to influence phytoplankton community behavior. Chlorophyceae development was favored by local conditions. Among the species of cyanobacteria identified, Microcystis paniformis, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, and Anabaena species were the most important due to their ability to produce toxins, posing a high risk to public health. CONCLUSIONS: Some physical and chemical parameters had an impact on the structure of phytoplankton community. The presence of Microcystis paniformis, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Anabaena species indicates toxic potential and likelihood of public health problems unless there is constant monitoring. Further studies are recommended to prevent hazardous effects to the environment and public health.

  18. Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton community in the bitter lakes and temsah lake

    OpenAIRE

    Nassar, M.Z.; Shams El-Din, N.G.

    2006-01-01

    Water and phytoplankton samples were sampled on a seasonally basis, from autumn 2002 to summer 2003 at five stations located in Bitter Lakes and four at Temsah Lake. A total of 116 taxa were identified, among which 72 taxa of diatoms, 16 dinoflagellates, 14 chlorphytes, 11 cyanophytes, two euglenophytes and one silicoflagellate species. Bitter Lakes were more diversified than Temsah Lake, although the highest population density was recorded at Temsah Lake. A total of 108 taxa were identified ...

  19. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton communities in Zayandeh-Rood Dam Lake (Isfahan, Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    SHAMS, Masoumeh; AFSHARZADEH, Saeed; Atici, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Variations in the phytoplankton of Zayandeh-Rood Dam Lake were studied seasonally from September 2005 to August 2006 at 4 different stations. A total of 112 species and 53 genera belonging to 6 divisions were identified. The species belonging to Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta, Euglenophyta, and Dinophyta were found frequently. Chrysophyta species were found in low numbers. Cyclotella meneghinina Kütz., a centric diatom, was the dominant species at all stations. The density of the ph...

  20. Seasonal changes of phytoplankton community and its indication of environment in Sishili Bay, Yantai%烟台四十里湾浮游植物群落的季节变化及其对环境的指示意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋金杰; 刘东艳; 邸宝平; 董志军; 王玉珏; 王跃启; 石雅君

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton surveys were conducted at 12 stations in Sishili Bay during August, October, December 2009 and March 2010. Three classes including 45 genera and 73 species were identified from the samples. Among them, 46 species were Bacillariphyta; 24 species were Dinophyta; 3 species were Heterokontophyta. Diatoms dominated the phytoplankton community in species richness and biomass. Results presented significant seasonal variations in terms of species richness and cell abundance: species richness was 57 in summer, 40 in autumn, 36 in spring and 21 in winter, respectively; and the cell abundance gradient was summer (8. 14×104cells/dm3) > spring (2. 45×104cells/dm3) > autum (0. 46×104cells/dm3) > winter (0. 28 × 104 cells/dm3). Species including Chattonella marina, P seudo-nitzschia delicatissima and Paralia sulcata etc. Dominated the Sishili Bay in our study. The phytoplankton community had a low biodiversity index in this research. The cell abundance of Chattonella marina was at the threshold value of harmful algal blooming in summer of 2009. Moreover, the eutrophic indicator species Paralia sulcata had a high cell abundance in most stations during the surveys, which indicated that the bay was in a worsening status of water quality.%2009年8,10,12月及2010年3月分别对烟台四十里湾的12个站位开展了四个航次的季节调查.研究发现浮游植物3门45属73种,其中硅藻46种,甲藻24种,褐胞藻3种.硅藻是构成调查区域浮游植物群落的主要类群.浮游植物种类与数量呈现出明显的季节变化特征.夏季(8月)物种数最多(57种),秋季(10月)次之(40种),再次是早春(3月,36种),冬季(12月)最少(21种);细胞数量的季节变化从大到小的特征是:夏季(8.14×104个/dm3),早春(2.45×104个/dm3),秋季(0.46×104个/dm3),冬季(0.28×104个/dm3).浮游植物优势种主要是海洋卡盾藻(Chattonella marina)、柔弱伪菱形藻(Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima)、具槽帕拉藻(Paralia sulcata

  1. 淀山湖浮游植物群落特征及其演替规律%Phytoplankton community structure and its succession in Dianshan Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽卿; 施荣; 季高华; 范志锋; 程婧蕾

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankon samples were collected monthly in Dianshan Lake, the largest natural freshwater lake in Shanghai during 2004-2006, to assay the phytoplankton community structure and ascertain the relationship between its succession and the eutrophication for the lake.Two hundred and five species from 84 genera were identified in Dianshan Lake, with Chlorophyta (50%), Bacillariophyta (20%), Cyanophyta (13%) and Euglenophyta (13%) being the main phyla.The monthly similarity index of species was high in winter and spring, while low in summer and autumn.The dominant species were Merismopedia glauca, Phormidium tenus,Microcystis aeruginosa, M.marginata, Lyngbya limnetica, Chroococcus minutus, Melosira granulata var.angustissima, Cryptomonas erosa, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus quadricauda.The total phytoplankton abundance was mainly composed of Cyanophyta (36.75%), Chlorophyta (16.78%), Bacillariophyta (16.36%) and Cryptophyta (13.53%).The total phytoplankton biomass was dominantly made up of Bacillariophyta (36.75%),Cyanophyta (16.78%), Chlorophyta (16.36%) and Cryptophyta (13.53%).The seasonal succession of phytoplankton community structure in Dianshan Lake was different from the PEG Model, with Cyanophyta of great abundance occurring at the end of spring, then dominating in summer and the early autumn.In the past five decades, the succession pattern of phytoplankton community in the Dianshan Lake showed a decrease in the proportion of such oligotrophic species as Chrysophyta and Dinophyta and an increase in such eutrophic species as Cyanophyta, Cryptophyta and Chlorophyta.The abundance increased from 103 ind./L in 1959 to l.ll×107cells/L during 2004-2006.The phytoplankton community structure changed from Bacillariophyta-Chrysophyta type in 1959, Bacillariophyta-Cryptophyta type during 1987-1988 to Cyanophyta-Chlorophyta type during 2004-2006.The changes in the abundance and structure of phytoplankton community and its seasonal succession

  2. Silicate:nitrate ratios of upwelled waters control the phytoplankton community sustained by mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibby, T. S.; Moore, C. M.

    2011-03-01

    Mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical gyres physically perturb the water column and can introduce macronutrients to the euphotic zone, stimulating a biological response in which phytoplankton communities can become dominated by large phytoplankton. Mesoscale eddies may therefore be important in driving export in oligotrophic regions of the modern ocean. However, the character and magnitude of the biological response sustained by eddies is variable. Here we present data from mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea (Atlantic) and the waters off Hawai'i (Pacific), alongside mesoscale events that affected the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study (BATS) over the past decade. From this analysis, we suggest that the phytoplankton community structure sustained by mesoscale eddies is predetermined by the relative abundance of silicate over nitrate (Si*) in the upwelled waters. We present data that demonstrate that mode-water eddies (MWE) in the Sargasso Sea upwell locally formed waters with relatively high Si* to the euphotic zone, and that cyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea introduce waters with relatively low Si*, a signature that originated in the iron-limited Southern Ocean. We propose that this phenomenon can explain the observed dominance of the phytoplankton community by large-diatom species in MWE and by small prokaryotic phytoplankton in cyclonic features. In contrast to the Atlantic, North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) with high Si* may influence the cyclonic eddies in waters off Hawai'i, which also appear capable of sustaining diatom populations. These observations suggest that the structure of phytoplankton communities sustained by eddies may be related to the chemical composition of the upwelled waters in addition to the physical nature of the eddy.

  3. Silicate:nitrate ratios of upwelled waters control the phytoplankton community sustained by mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Bibby

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical gyres physically perturb the water column and can introduce macronutrients to the euphotic zone, stimulating a biological response in which phytoplankton communities can become dominated by large phytoplankton. Mesoscale eddies may therefore be important in driving export in oligotrophic regions of the modern ocean. However, the character and magnitude of the biological response sustained by eddies is variable. Here we present data from mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea (Atlantic and the waters off Hawai'i (Pacific, alongside mesoscale events that affected the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study (BATS over the past decade. From this analysis, we suggest that the phytoplankton community structure sustained by mesoscale eddies is predetermined by the relative abundance of silicate over nitrate (Si* in the upwelled waters. We present data that demonstrate that mode-water eddies (MWE in the Sargasso Sea upwell locally formed waters with relatively high Si* to the euphotic zone, and that cyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea introduce waters with relatively low Si*, a signature that originated in the iron-limited Southern Ocean. We propose that this phenomenon can explain the observed dominance of the phytoplankton community by large-diatom species in MWE and by small prokaryotic phytoplankton in cyclonic features. In contrast to the Atlantic, North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW with high Si* may influence the cyclonic eddies in waters off Hawai'i, which also appear capable of sustaining diatom populations. These observations suggest that the structure of phytoplankton communities sustained by eddies may be related to the chemical composition of the upwelled waters in addition to the physical nature of the eddy.

  4. 浙江三门湾沉积记录:U k37表层海水温度和浮游植物群落变化与El Niño/La Niña的关联%The sediment records in the Core H30 from the Sanmen Bay, Zhejiang:the relationship between Uk37 sea surface temperature, the changes in phytoplankton community and El Niño/La Niña events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵庆英; 陈荣华; 卢冰; 叶新荣; 胡锡钢

    2013-01-01

    Historical sea surface temperature (SST) record during the past~180 years was reconstructed using the unsaturation index of long-chain Alkenones (Uk37) in the sediment sampled from the Sanmen Bay. Simultaneously, changes of single-diatom, single-dinoflagellate and single-coccolithophores were recovered using three biomarkers, brassicasterol, dinoflagellate sterol and long-chain Alkenones. The results show that the reconstructed SST varies between 15.19~17.61 ℃, which is closed to the observation SST values in fall, and its secular trend is consistent with the global warming. The SST fluctuation may be related to the El Niño/La Niña oscillations. The gross primary productivities range from 710.7 to 6 998.5 ng/g and also show upward trend in the past 180 years. The most abundant phytoplankton in the sediment is diatom and the secondary dinoflagellate. Diatom/Dinoflagellate ratio fluctuated in the range of 2.6~7.2, which indicate sensitivity of the coastal phytoplankton in response to the changes in the marine environment. The abundance of phytoplankton cell and the community structure can be dramatically influenced by El Niño events, when the abundance of phytoplankton cell increases, but the number of the species and population diversity decrease significantly. As no regular seasonal pattern in the change of the abundance of phytoplankton cell, we conclude that the El Niño condition should be the primary influcencing factor to that change.%  应用三门湾沉积柱样中长链烯酮不饱和指数(U k37)与表层海水温度SST的关系重建历史上的El Niño/La Niña事件;利用3种浮游植物标志物菜子甾醇(brassicasterol)、甲藻甾醇(dinosterol)和长链烯酮C37(alkenones)来恢复单一种硅藻Diatom、甲藻Dinoflagellates和颗石藻Emiliania huxleyi变化。研究结果表明:(1)U k37估算温度在15.19~17.61℃波动,与当地秋季海水实测温度接近。U k37估算的温度清晰地再现了全球

  5. Novel communities from climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Lurgi, Miguel; López, Bernat C.; Montoya, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is generating novel communities composed of new combinations of species. These result from different degrees of species adaptations to changing biotic and abiotic conditions, and from differential range shifts of species. To determine whether the responses of organisms are determined by particular species traits and how species interactions and community dynamics are likely to be disrupted is a challenge. Here, we focus on two key traits: body size and ecological specialization...

  6. Effect of stocking biomass on solids, phytoplankton communities, common off-flavors, and production parameters in a channel catfish biofloc technology production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of initial channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, Rafinesque, 1818) fingerling biomass (1.4, 1.8, or 2.3 kg m-3) on phytoplankton communities, common off-flavors, and stocker catfish production parameters was evaluated in biofloc technology production tanks. Stocker catfish size (145.5 – 1...

  7. Linking phytoplankton community size composition with temperature, plankton food web structure and sea–air CO2 flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Jørgen;

    2011-01-01

    Data collected at open water stations (depth>400m) in all major ocean basins in 2006–2008 are used to examine the relationship between the size structure of the phytoplankton community (determined by size fractionated chlorophyll filtration), temperature and inorganic nutrient availability. A sig...

  8. CHEMTAX-derived phytoplankton community structure associated with temperature fronts in the northeastern Arabian Sea..

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Roy, R.; Chitari, R.; Kulkarni, V.; Krishna, M.S.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Anil, A.C.

    and filaments) have chemical and biological manifestations (Brink et al., 1998; Belkin et al., 2009; Read et al., 2000) and are thought to be hotspots for phytoplankton blooms (Hesse et al., 1989, Franks et al., 1992). The Indian National Centre for Ocean... composition: Significance of the Arabian Sea. Current Sci. 78, 289-299. 14    Nayak, S., Solanki, HU., Dwivedi, R M., 2003. Utilization of IRS P4 ocean colour data for potential fishing zone-A cost benefit analysis. Indian. J. Mar. Sci. 32, 244-248. Olson...

  9. Seasonal succession of phytoplankton community and its relationship with environmental factors of North Temperate Zone water of the Zhalong Wetland, in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun; Li, Guibai; Li, Jing; Zhou, Hao; Jiang, Bing

    2014-05-01

    A data set of phytoplankton community and environmental parameters in a hydrological integrity period, i.e. a poor water term, a medium term and a rich water term of North Temperate Zone climate, was analyzed in order to describe seasonal variation of phytoplankton community and its relationship with environmental variables in the Zhalong Wetland of China. The algal population of the Zhalong Wetland was not abundant, with a mean density of 5.08 × 10(7) cell/L (ranged from 4.54 × 10(7) cell/L in a poor term to 5.56 × 10(7) cell/L a medium term). However, its diversity was essentially limited to Cryptophyta, Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, Euglenophyta being the group with highest densities. There were considerable seasonal variations in phytoplankton composition. In general, the dominance of Bacillariophyceae was found in a medium term, which was higher than the other period (p < 0.05). The rich water period also showed Bacillariophyceae and Chlorophyta dominance while the phytoplankton was dominated by Cryptophyta erosa in a poor water term. 10 environmental variables, which were significant (p < 0.05) during the studied periods in one-way analysis of covariance, were selected to explore the relationship between phytoplankton structure and environmental factors by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). The results of the CCA applied to the environmental factors indicated that water temperature (WT) and ammonia (NH3-N) significantly influenced the phytoplankton community (p < 0.05; Monte Carlo test of first constrained axis). Besides WT and NH3-N, the most discriminate physic-chemical variables were nitrite (NO2-N), suspend solid, nitrate (NO3-N), silicon dioxide (SiO2) and all the 10 physical-chemical parameters had a higher marginal effect and λA in the series of constrained CCAs though they were not significant. PMID:24756328

  10. Water flux management and phytoplankton communities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon. Part II: Mixotrophy of dinoflagellates as an adaptive strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, P; Garrido, M; Collos, Y; Pasqualini, V

    2016-07-15

    Dinoflagellate proliferation is common in coastal waters, and trophic strategies are often advanced to explain the success of these organisms. The Biguglia lagoon is a Mediterranean brackish ecosystem where eutrophication has long been an issue, and where dominance of dinoflagellates has persisted for several years. Monthly monitoring of fluorescence-based properties of phytoplankton communities carried out in 2010 suggested that photosynthesis alone could not support the observed situation all year round. Contrasting food webs developed depending on the hydrological season, with a gradual shift from autotrophy to heterotrophy. Progressively, microphytoplankton assemblages became unequivocally dominated by a Prorocentrum minimum bloom, which exhibited very weak effective photosynthetic performance, whereas paradoxically its theoretical capacities remained fully operational. Different environmental hypotheses explaining this discrepancy were examined, but rejected. We conclude that P. minimum bloom persistence is sustained by mixotrophic strategies, with complex compromises between phototrophy and phagotrophy, as evidenced by fluorescence-based observations. PMID:27126183

  11. Spatio-temporal patterns of bacterioplankton production and community composition related to phytoplankton composition and protistan bacterivory in a dam reservoir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Karel; Horňák, Karel; Jezbera, Jan; Nedoma, Jiří; Znachor, Petr; Hejzlar, Josef; Seďa, Jaromír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2008), s. 249-262. ISSN 0948-3055 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/08/0015; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/05/0007; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS600170504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : bacterioplankton composition and production * algal-bacterial relationships * extracellular phytoplankton production * protistan bacterivory * phytoplankton community * reservoir * betaproteobacterial groups Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.190, year: 2008

  12. Pronounced daily succession of phytoplankton, archaea and bacteria following a spring bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, David M; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2016-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton perform approximately half of global carbon fixation, with their blooms contributing disproportionately to carbon sequestration(1), and most phytoplankton production is ultimately consumed by heterotrophic prokaryotes(2). Therefore, phytoplankton and heterotrophic community dynamics are important in modelling carbon cycling and the impacts of global change(3). In a typical bloom, diatoms dominate initially, transitioning over several weeks to smaller and motile phytoplankton(4). Here, we show unexpected, rapid community variation from daily rRNA analysis of phytoplankton and prokaryotic community members following a bloom off southern California. Analysis of phytoplankton chloroplast 16S rRNA demonstrated ten different dominant phytoplankton over 18 days alone, including four taxa with animal toxin-producing strains. The dominant diatoms, flagellates and picophytoplankton varied dramatically in carbon export potential. Dominant prokaryotes also varied rapidly. Euryarchaea briefly became the most abundant organism, peaking over a few days to account for about 40% of prokaryotes. Phytoplankton and prokaryotic communities correlated better with each other than with environmental parameters. Extending beyond the traditional view of blooms being controlled primarily by physics and inorganic nutrients, these dynamics imply highly heterogeneous, continually changing conditions over time and/or space and suggest that interactions among microorganisms are critical in controlling plankton diversity, dynamics and fates. PMID:27572439

  13. Emergence of Algal Blooms: The Effects of Short-Term Variability in Water Quality on Phytoplankton Abundance, Diversity, and Community Composition in a Tidal Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A. Egerton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms are dynamic phenomena, often attributed to environmental parameters that vary on short timescales (e.g., hours to days. Phytoplankton monitoring programs are largely designed to examine long-term trends and interannual variability. In order to better understand and evaluate the relationships between water quality variables and the genesis of algal blooms, daily samples were collected over a 34 day period in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a tidal tributary within Chesapeake Bay’s estuarine complex, during spring 2006. During this period two distinct algal blooms occurred; the first was a cryptomonad bloom and this was followed by a bloom of the mixotrophic dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium instriatum. Chlorophyll a, nutrient concentrations, and physical and chemical parameters were measured daily along with phytoplankton abundance and community composition. While 65 phytoplankton species from eight major taxonomic groups were identified in samples and total micro- and nano-phytoplankton cell densities ranged from 5.8 × 106 to 7.8 × 107 cells L−1, during blooms, cryptomonads and G. instriatum were 91.6% and 99.0%, respectively, of the total phytoplankton biomass during blooms. The cryptomonad bloom developed following a period of rainfall and concomitant increases in inorganic nitrogen concentrations. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium concentrations 0 to 5 days prior were positively lag-correlated with cryptomonad abundance. In contrast, the G. insriatum bloom developed during periods of low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and their abundance was negatively correlated with inorganic nitrogen concentrations.

  14. Factors governing phytoplankton biomass and production in tropical estuaries of western Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ching-Wen; Chuang, Yi-Li; Chou, Lien-Siang; Chen, Meng-Hsien; Lin, Hsing-Juh

    2016-04-01

    Factors governing phytoplankton community composition and production in tropical estuaries remain mostly unknown. We aimed to quantify phytoplankton biomass, production, and community composition seasonally in 2 tropical estuaries with different levels of nutrient concentrations and turbidity, and we compared them with an offshore control site on the western coast of central Taiwan for two years. Phytoplankton biomass and production varied with season and site. Annual integrated primary production showed that these three sites were mesotrophic systems. Spearman rank correlations showed that phytoplankton biomass and production were positively correlated with water temperature, but negatively correlated with turbidity. The threshold of turbidity was 12 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU), above which phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations were biomass and production, whereas water temperature and SiO2 concentration had both a direct effect on production and an indirect effect by changing community composition.

  15. Novel communities from climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurgi, Miguel; López, Bernat C; Montoya, José M

    2012-11-01

    Climate change is generating novel communities composed of new combinations of species. These result from different degrees of species adaptations to changing biotic and abiotic conditions, and from differential range shifts of species. To determine whether the responses of organisms are determined by particular species traits and how species interactions and community dynamics are likely to be disrupted is a challenge. Here, we focus on two key traits: body size and ecological specialization. We present theoretical expectations and empirical evidence on how climate change affects these traits within communities. We then explore how these traits predispose species to shift or expand their distribution ranges, and associated changes on community size structure, food web organization and dynamics. We identify three major broad changes: (i) Shift in the distribution of body sizes towards smaller sizes, (ii) dominance of generalized interactions and the loss of specialized interactions, and (iii) changes in the balance of strong and weak interaction strengths in the short term. We finally identify two major uncertainties: (i) whether large-bodied species tend to preferentially shift their ranges more than small-bodied ones, and (ii) how interaction strengths will change in the long term and in the case of newly interacting species. PMID:23007079

  16. The influence of hydrological conditions on phytoplankton community structure and cyanopeptide concentration in dammed lowland river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Magdalena; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    Study results show continuous summer-autumn dominance of toxic cyanobacteria in plankton not only in the strongly eutrophicated lowland Siemianówka reservoir, but also along 130 km of Narew river below the lake. The negative effects of eutrophication of the reservoir reach far outside its boundaries. One of the symptoms of eutrophication was a mass development of cyanobacteria, including the toxin-producing Planktothrix agardhii. In the reservoir, the biomass of the species strongly correlated with the concentration of microcystins. Redundancy analysis (RDA) identified seven environmental variables as significantly influencing phytoplankton composition in the Narew river: discharge, conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, orthophosphates, silicate ions, and total phosphorous. Higher discharge in the river and higher rates of flushing induced faster dilution of limnoplankton in downstream river and had positive effects on the decrease of cyanobacterial biomass and microcystin concentration. PMID:27468846

  17. Phytoplankton communities of polar regions--Diversity depending on environmental conditions and chemical anthropopressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Klaudia; Polkowska, Żaneta; Żyszka, Beata; Lipok, Jacek

    2016-04-15

    The polar regions (Arctic and Antarctic) constitute up to 14% of the biosphere and offer some of the coldest and most arid Earth's environments. Nevertheless several oxygenic phototrophs including some higher plants, mosses, lichens, various algal groups and cyanobacteria, survive that harsh climate and create the base of the trophic relationships in fragile ecosystems of polar environments. Ecosystems in polar regions are characterized by low primary productivity and slow growth rates, therefore they are more vulnerable to disturbance, than those in temperate regions. From this reason, chemical contaminants influencing the growth of photoautotrophic producers might induce serious disorders in the integrity of polar ecosystems. However, for a long time these areas were believed to be free of chemical contamination, and relatively protected from widespread anthropogenic pressure, due their remoteness and extreme climate conditions. Nowadays, there is a growing amount of data that prove that xenobiotics are transported thousands of kilometers by the air and ocean currents and then they are deposed in colder regions and accumulate in many environments, including the habitats of marine and freshwater cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria (blue green algae), as a natural part of phytoplankton assemblages, are globally distributed, but in high polar ecosystems they represent the dominant primary producers. These microorganisms are continuously exposed to various concentration levels of the compounds that are present in their habitats and act as nourishment or the factors influencing the growth and development of cyanobacteria in other way. The most common group of contaminants in Arctic and Antarctic are persistent organic pollutants (POPs), characterized by durability and resistance to degradation. It is important to determine their concentrations in all phytoplankton species cells and in their environment to get to know the possibility of contaminants to transfer to higher

  18. Phytoplankton niche generation by interspecific stoichiometric variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    GöThlich, L.; Oschlies, A.

    2012-06-01

    For marine biogeochemical models used in simulations of climate change scenarios, the ability to account for adaptability of marine ecosystems to environmental change becomes a concern. The potential for adaptation is expected to be larger for a diverse ecosystem compared to a monoculture of a single type of (model) algae, such as typically included in biogeochemical models. Recent attempts to simulate phytoplankton diversity in global marine ecosystem models display remarkable qualitative agreement with observed patterns of species distributions. However, modeled species diversity tends to be systematically lower than observed and, in many regions, is smaller than the number of potentially limiting nutrients. According to resource competition theory, the maximum number of coexisting species at equilibrium equals the number of limiting resources. By simulating phytoplankton communities in a chemostat model and in a global circulation model, we show here that a systematic underestimate of phytoplankton diversity may result from the standard modeling assumption of identical stoichiometry for the different phytoplankton types. Implementing stoichiometric variation among the different marine algae types in the models allows species to generate different resource supply niches via their own ecological impact. This is shown to increase the level of phytoplankton coexistence both in a chemostat model and in a global self-assembling ecosystem model.

  19. Phytoplankton response to winter warming modified by large-bodied zooplankton: an experimental microcosm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu He

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While several field investigations have demonstrated significant effects of cool season (winter or spring warming on phytoplankton development, the role played by large-bodied zooplankton grazers for the responses of phytoplankton to winter warming is ambiguous. We conducted an outdoor experiment to compare the effect of winter warming (heating by 3°C in combination with presence and absence of Daphnia grazing (D. similis on phytoplankton standing crops and community structure under eutrophic conditions. When Daphnia were absent, warming was associated with significant increases in phytoplankton biomass and cyanobacterial dominance. In contrast, when Daphnia were present, warming effects on phytoplankton dynamics were offset by warming-enhanced grazing, resulting in no significant change in biomass or taxonomic dominance. These results emphasize that large-bodied zooplankton like Daphnia spp. may play an important role in modulating the interactions between climate warming and phytoplankton dynamics in nutrient rich lake ecosystems.

  20. Silicate:nitrate ratios of upwelled waters control the phytoplankton community sustained by mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Bibby

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale eddies in sub-tropical gyres physically perturb the water column and can introduce macronutrients to the euphotic zone, stimulating a biological response by which phytoplankton communities can become dominated by large phytoplankton. Mesoscale eddies are therefore important in driving export in oligotrophic regions of the modern ocean. The character and magnitude of the biological response sustained by eddies are, however, variable. Here we present data from mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea (Atlantic and the waters off Hawai'i (Pacific, alongside mesoscale events that affected the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS over the past decade. From this analysis, we suggest that the phytoplankton community structure sustained by mesoscale eddies is predetermined by the relative abundance of silicate over nitrate (Si* in the upwelled waters. We present data that demonstrate that mode-water eddies (MWE in the Sargasso Sea upwell locally formed waters with high Si* to the euphotic zone, and that cyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea introduce waters with low Si*, a signature that originated in the iron-limited Southern Ocean. We propose that this phenomenon can explain the observed abundance of large-diatom species in MWE and small prokaryotic phytoplankton in cyclonic features. In contrast to the Atlantic, cyclonic eddies in waters off Hawai'i induce North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW that has high Si* and therefore also appears capable of establishing diatom populations. These observations suggest that the structure of phytoplankton communities sustained by eddies may not be directly related to the physical nature of the eddy but rather to the chemical composition of the upwelled waters. This paper links the biological production and export efficiency of mesoscale eddies to events in spatially and temporally disparate locations.

  1. Structure and dynamics of phytoplankton community in the Botafogo reservoir-Pernambuco-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulliari Alan da Silva Tavares de Lira

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the structure and dynamics of the phytoplankton in the Botafogo reservoir-PE-Brazil. Phytoplankton assemblages were identified from current literature and density was estimated using an inverted microscope. Concurrently to the sampling of biotic variables, measurements of abiotic parameters, such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH, were determined using field probes and transparency was determined with a Secchi disk. Total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations were determined in laboratory. A total of 24 taxa were identified. Chlorophyta presented the greatest number of species. Species diversity in the reservoir was low throughout the study period. Principal component analysis revealed that Trachelomonas volvocina, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena sp. and Peridinium gatunense were directly correlated with oxygen, turbidity and total nitrogen; Planktosphaeria gelatinosa, P. gatunense and Euglena sp. were directed correlated with total nitrogen; rainfall explained the occurrence of Monoraphidium arcuatum and Chlorella vulgaris.O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar a estrutura e dinâmica do fitoplâncton no reservatório de Botafogo-PE-Brasil. A comunidade fitoplanctônica foi identificada com literatura atualizada e a densidade estimada usando microscópio invertido. Concomitantemente as coletas das variáveis bióticas, foram medidos alguns parâmetros abióticos como temperatura da água, oxigênio dissolvido, condutividade e pH usando sondas de campo e transparência com disco de Secchi. Concentrações de fósforo total e nitrogênio total foram determinados em laboratório. Vinte e quatro táxons foram identificados tendo Chlorophyta apresentado maior número de espécie. A diversidade de espécie no reservatório foi baixa durante todo o período de estudo. A análise de componentes principais mostrou que Trachelomonas volvocina, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena sp. e

  2. Seasonal and Inter-Annual Patterns of Phytoplankton Community Structure in Monterey Bay, CA Derived from AVIRIS Data During the 2013-2015 HyspIRI Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, S. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Kudela, R. M.; Negrey, K.; Guild, L. S.; Gao, B. C.; Green, R. O.; Torres-Perez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    There is a need in the ocean color community to discriminate among phytoplankton groups within the bulk chlorophyll pool to understand ocean biodiversity, to track energy flow through ecosystems, and to identify and monitor for harmful algal blooms. Imaging spectrometer measurements enable use of sophisticated spectroscopic algorithms for applications such as differentiating among coral species, evaluating iron stress of phytoplankton, and discriminating phytoplankton taxa. These advanced algorithms rely on the fine scale, subtle spectral shape of the atmospherically corrected remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) spectrum of the ocean surface. As a consequence, these algorithms are sensitive to inaccuracies in the retrieved Rrs spectrum that may be related to the presence of nearby clouds, inadequate sensor calibration, low sensor signal-to-noise ratio, glint correction, and atmospheric correction. For the HyspIRI Airborne Campaign, flight planning considered optimal weather conditions to avoid flights with significant cloud/fog cover. Although best suited for terrestrial targets, the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has enough signal for some coastal chlorophyll algorithms and meets sufficient calibration requirements for most channels. However, the coastal marine environment has special atmospheric correction needs due to error that may be introduced by aerosols and terrestrially sourced atmospheric dust and riverine sediment plumes. For this HyspIRI campaign, careful attention has been given to the correction of AVIRIS imagery of the Monterey Bay to optimize ocean Rrs retrievals for use in estimating chlorophyll (OC3 algorithm) and phytoplankton functional type (PHYDOTax algorithm) data products. This new correction method has been applied to several image collection dates during two oceanographic seasons - upwelling and the warm, stratified oceanic period for 2013 and 2014. These two periods are dominated by either diatom blooms (occasionally

  3. Vertical distribution of chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition from in situ fluorescence profiles: a first database for the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauzède, R.; Lavigne, H.; Claustre, H.; Uitz, J.; Schmechtig, C.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Guinet, C.; Pesant, S.

    2015-10-01

    In vivo chlorophyll a fluorescence is a proxy of chlorophyll a concentration, and is one of the most frequently measured biogeochemical properties in the ocean. Thousands of profiles are available from historical databases and the integration of fluorescence sensors to autonomous platforms has led to a significant increase of chlorophyll fluorescence profile acquisition. To our knowledge, this important source of environmental data has not yet been included in global analyses. A total of 268 127 chlorophyll fluorescence profiles from several databases as well as published and unpublished individual sources were compiled. Following a robust quality control procedure detailed in the present paper, about 49 000 chlorophyll fluorescence profiles were converted into phytoplankton biomass (i.e., chlorophyll a concentration) and size-based community composition (i.e., microphytoplankton, nanophytoplankton and picophytoplankton), using a method specifically developed to harmonize fluorescence profiles from diverse sources. The data span over 5 decades from 1958 to 2015, including observations from all major oceanic basins and all seasons, and depths ranging from the surface to a median maximum sampling depth of around 700 m. Global maps of chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition are presented here for the first time. Monthly climatologies were computed for three of Longhurst's ecological provinces in order to exemplify the potential use of the data product. Original data sets (raw fluorescence profiles) as well as calibrated profiles of phytoplankton biomass and community composition are available on open access at PANGAEA, Data Publisher for Earth and Environmental Science. Raw fluorescence profiles: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.844212 and Phytoplankton biomass and community composition: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.844485

  4. Effects of light and nutrient gradients on the taxonomic composition, size structure and physiological status of the phytoplankton community within a temperate eutrophic estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Altisan, I.A.R.

    2006-01-01

    Estuaries are important ecosystems which are affected by a large range of environmental factors. It is important to measure, characterise and monitor the ecological status of estuaries, and this is the contribution of this thesis for phytoplankton communities in Southampton Water. The size structure and species composition were investigated during 2002 and 2003, with special attention to nanophytoplankton (cells < 5µm in diameter). The main sampling stations were Empress Dock and NW Netley in...

  5. Effects of enhanced UV-B on pigment-based phytoplankton biomass and composition of mesocosm-enclosed natural marine communities from three latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Suzanne; Mohovic, Bruna; Gianesella, Sônia M F; Schloss, Irene; Ferrario, Martha; Demers, Serge

    2006-01-01

    (which were the lowest of the three sites), high irradiances (which were the highest noon incident photosynthetically available radiation and UV of the three sites) and UV-B penetration down to the bottom of the mesocosms. In Ushuaia a small bloom took place over the first 5 days. The RM-ANOVA showed no overall effect of the UV-B treatments for any of the pigments examined but on the last 3 days of the experiment several green algae-type pigments, such as Chl b and siphonein, showed increased concentrations under the HUVB treatment. UV-B enhancement hence favored green algae, as seen from the stronger increase over time in the ratio of Chl b to Chl a associated with the HUVB treatment. UV-B enhancement also seemed to cause a slight decrease in physiological condition, because the relative concentration of chlorophyllide a and some pheophorbides that may be the product of dying algae increased during the HUVB treatments in Ubatuba and particularly in Ushuaia (where UV-B also penetrated to the bottom of mesocosms). For all three sites changes in phytoplankton biomass due to the UV-B treatments were minor, even though UV-B enhancement was important. This study indicates that effects of enhanced UV-B on the community structure of both phytoplankton and their grazers are potentially more important than effects on overall algal biomass. PMID:17205624

  6. Revaluating ocean warming impacts on global phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; O'Malley, Robert T.; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Westberry, Toby K.; Graff, Jason R.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Milligan, Allen J.; Siegel, David A.; Brown, Matthew B.

    2016-03-01

    Global satellite observations document expansions of the low-chlorophyll central ocean gyres and an overall inverse relationship between anomalies in sea surface temperature and phytoplankton chlorophyll concentrations. These findings can provide an invaluable glimpse into potential future ocean changes, but only if the story they tell is accurately interpreted. Chlorophyll is not simply a measure of phytoplankton biomass, but also registers changes in intracellular pigmentation arising from light-driven (photoacclimation) and nutrient-driven physiological responses. Here, we show that the photoacclimation response is an important component of temporal chlorophyll variability across the global ocean. This attribution implies that contemporary relationships between chlorophyll changes and ocean warming are not indicative of proportional changes in productivity, as light-driven decreases in chlorophyll can be associated with constant or even increased photosynthesis. Extension of these results to future change, however, requires further evaluation of how the multifaceted stressors of a warmer, higher-CO2 world will impact plankton communities.

  7. How mutualisms arise in phytoplankton communities: building eco-evolutionary principles for aquatic microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazamia, Elena; Helliwell, Katherine Emma; Purton, Saul; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-07-01

    Extensive sampling and metagenomics analyses of plankton communities across all aquatic environments are beginning to provide insights into the ecology of microbial communities. In particular, the importance of metabolic exchanges that provide a foundation for ecological interactions between microorganisms has emerged as a key factor in forging such communities. Here we show how both studies of environmental samples and physiological experimentation in the laboratory with defined microbial co-cultures are being used to decipher the metabolic and molecular underpinnings of such exchanges. In addition, we explain how metabolic modelling may be used to conduct investigations in reverse, deducing novel molecular exchanges from analysis of large-scale data sets, which can identify persistently co-occurring species. Finally, we consider how knowledge of microbial community ecology can be built into evolutionary theories tailored to these species' unique lifestyles. We propose a novel model for the evolution of metabolic auxotrophy in microorganisms that arises as a result of symbiosis, termed the Foraging-to-Farming hypothesis. The model has testable predictions, fits several known examples of mutualism in the aquatic world, and sheds light on how interactions, which cement dependencies within communities of microorganisms, might be initiated. PMID:27282316

  8. Phytoplankton and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean phytoplankton supply about half of the oxygen that humans utilize to sustain life. In this lecture, we will explore how phytoplankton plays a critical role in modulating the Earth's climate. These tiny organisms are the base of the Ocean's food web. They can modulate the rate at which solar heat is absorbed by the ocean, either through direct absorption or through production of highly scattering cellular coverings. They take up and help sequester carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas that modulated the Earth's climate. They are the source of cloud nucleation gases that are key to cloud formation/processes. They are also able to modify the nutrient budgets of the ocean through active uptake of inert atmospheric nitrogen. Climate variations have a pronounced impact on phytoplankton dynamics. Long term variations in the climate have been studied through geological interpretations on its influence on phytoplankton populations. The presentation will focus on presenting the numerous linkages that have been observed between climate and phytoplankton and further discuss how present climate change scenarios are likely to impact phytoplankton populations as well as present findings from several studies that have tried to understand how the climate might react to the feedbacks from these numerous climate-phytop|ankton linkages.

  9. The community structure and the seasonal changes of phytoplankton in Dayao Bay in Dalian Coast from 2006 to 2007%2006-2007年大连大窑湾海区浮游植物的群落结构及其季节变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文; 魏洪祥; 郭凯

    2011-01-01

    于2006年10月至2007年10月,逐月采样研究了大窑湾海区浮游植物的种类组成、密度以及物种多样性.调查结果表明:共发现浮游植物5门42属75种,其中硅藻31属59种,甲藻8属13种,金藻1属1种,蓝藻1属1种,黄藻门1属1种;大窑湾海区浮游植物的生态类型几乎都为温带近岸性物种,个别为暖海性物种或大洋性物种;硅藻在种数和密度上均占优势,主要优势种为旋链角毛藻Chaetoceros curvisetus、中心圆筛藻Coscinodiscus centralis、星脐圆筛藻Coscinodiscus asteromphalus、浮动弯角藻Eucampia zoodicacus、波氏直链藻Melosira borreri、具毒冈比甲藻Gambierdiscus toxicus、刚毛根管藻Rhizosolenia setigera、尖刺拟菱形藻Nitzschia pungens、柔弱角毛藻Chaetoceros debilis;浮游植物密度在2007年的3月和7月出现春、秋两个高峰期,多样性指数为0.36-3.17,平均值为1.65,表明该海区属于中度污染.%The abundance, species composition and biodiversity of phytoplankton were studied in Dayao Bay in Dalian coast from October 2006 to October 2007. A total of 75 species (excluding unidentified ones) , 42 genera and 5 phyla were found in the survey area, including59 species, and 31 genera belonging to Bacillariophyta,8 genera and 13 species belonging to Dinophyta, 1 species and 1 genera belong to Chrysophyta, 1 species belonging to Cyanophyta, and 1 species belonging to Xanthophyta. The dominant species were found in bacillariophyta including Chaetoceros curvisetus, Coscinodiscus centralis, Coscinodiscus asteromphalus, Eucampia zoodkacus, Melosira borreri, Gambierdiscus toxicus, Rhizosolenia, Nitzschia pungens, and Chaetoceros debilis. The cell abundance peaks were observed in March and July of 2007, and the species diversity index was changed from 0.36 to 3.17 with an average of 1.65, indicating that the water quality in this area is meso-pollution.

  10. Threadfin shad impacts phytoplankton and zooplankton community structures in channel catfish ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plankton community structure and chlorophyll a concentration were compared in 12 0.1-ha earthen ponds co-stocked with channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) in multiple-batch culture (initial biomass = 5,458 kg ha-1) and a planktivore, threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense Güther, 1867;...

  11. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  12. Microscopic examination on cytological changes in Allium cepa and shift in phytoplankton population at different doses of Atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Finger, Kristen; Usnick, Samantha; Rogers, William J.; Das, A. B.; Smith, Don W.

    2010-06-01

    Atrazine is a wide-range herbicide. For over 50 years, atrazine has been used as a selective broadleaf herbicide in many capacities, from pre-plant to pre-emergence to post-emergence, depending on the crop and application. Currently, 96% of all atrazine used is for commercial applications in fields for the control of broadleaf and grassy weeds in crops such as sorghum, corn, sugarcane, pineapple and for the control of undesirable weeds in rangeland. Many panhandle wells have also detected atrazine in samples taken. The concern for the public is the long-term effect of atrazine with its increasing popularity, and the impact on public health. We investigated the effect of different concentrations of atrazine on Allium cepa (onion), a standard plant test system. We established a control with the Allium bulbs grown on hydroponics culture. Varying concentrations of atrazine was used on the standard plant test system, Allium cepa grown hydroponically. The mitotic indices varied and with higher doses, we observed various chromosomal abnormalities including sticky bridges, early and late separations, and lag chromosomes with higher doses of treatments. In the second part of the experiment, 0.1ppb, 1ppb, 10ppb, and 100ppb concentrations of atrazine were applied to established phytoplankton cultures from the Lake Tanglewood, Texas. Study with a Sedgwick-Rafter counter, a BX-40 Olympus microscope with DP-70 camera revealed a gradual shift in the phytoplankton community from obligatory to facultative autotroph and finally to a parasitic planktonic community. This explains the periodic fish kill in the lakes after applications of atrazine in crop fields.

  13. The effects of climate variability on the structure of the phytoplankton community in Tumaco Bay, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkala, Ingrid Garcia-Hansen

    2009-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the diatom and dinoflagellate community structure and chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations in Tumaco Bay during the 1993--2005 period was related clearly to seasonal and interannual variability in environmental conditions due to the migration of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the influence of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. A total of 134 species of diatoms that belong to 57 genera, and 78 species of dinoflagellates that belong to 25 genera were identified during the survey. The diatom community was the dominant group in the waters of the bay, being the most abundant with the greatest number of species observed. The most important species was the centric diatom Skeletonema costatum (Cleve 1878). It was found that the migration of the ITCZ on the region caused a strong annual cycle. With the migration of the ITCZ to the south, Northeasterly Trade Winds dominated the area from about December to April producing oceanic and coastal upwelling. Colder sea surface temperatures (SST), the rising of the thermocline and halocline to the surface, increased nutrients and abundant rainfall were detected. This time of the year was described as the rainy season (RS)/cold phase. Opposite conditions were observed the rest of the year, defined as the dry season (DS)/warm phase. Southeasterly Trade Winds dominated at this time of the year due to the migration of the ITCZ back to the north. This seasonal cycle was affected by interannual variability due to ENSO. Five El Nino and four La Nina events were identified. In general, La Nina episodes were characterized by a shallow thermocline, cold SST, higher salinities, and the highest concentrations of nutrients. Opposite characteristics were observed during El Nino events. However, during the highest precipitations observed in every El Nino event, nutrient concentrations increased significantly. Important environmental correlates of community structure were identified using

  14. Graptolite community responses to global climate change and the Late Ordovician mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, H. David; Mitchell, Charles E.; Melchin, Michael J.; Loxton, Jason; Štorch, Petr; Carlucci, Kristi L.; Hawkins, Andrew D.

    2016-07-01

    Mass extinctions disrupt ecological communities. Although climate changes produce stress in ecological communities, few paleobiological studies have systematically addressed the impact of global climate changes on the fine details of community structure with a view to understanding how changes in community structure presage, or even cause, biodiversity decline during mass extinctions. Based on a novel Bayesian approach to biotope assessment, we present a study of changes in species abundance distribution patterns of macroplanktonic graptolite faunas (˜447–444 Ma) leading into the Late Ordovician mass extinction. Communities at two contrasting sites exhibit significant decreases in complexity and evenness as a consequence of the preferential decline in abundance of dysaerobic zone specialist species. The observed changes in community complexity and evenness commenced well before the dramatic population depletions that mark the tipping point of the extinction event. Initially, community changes tracked changes in the oceanic water masses, but these relations broke down during the onset of mass extinction. Environmental isotope and biomarker data suggest that sea surface temperature and nutrient cycling in the paleotropical oceans changed sharply during the latest Katian time, with consequent changes in the extent of the oxygen minimum zone and phytoplankton community composition. Although many impacted species persisted in ephemeral populations, increased extinction risk selectively depleted the diversity of paleotropical graptolite species during the latest Katian and early Hirnantian. The effects of long-term climate change on habitats can thus degrade populations in ways that cascade through communities, with effects that culminate in mass extinction.

  15. Bacterial survival governed by organic carbon release from senescent oceanic phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasternas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria recycle vast amounts of organic carbon, playing key biogeochemical and ecological roles in the ocean. Bacterioplankton dynamics are expected to be dependent on phytoplankton primary production, but there is a high diversity of processes (e.g. sloppy feeding, cell exudation, viral lysis involved in the transference of primary production to dissolved organic carbon available to bacteria. Here we show cell survival of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean to be determined by phytoplankton extracellular carbon release (PER. PER represents the fraction of primary production released as dissolved organic carbon, and changes in the PER variability was explained by phytoplankton cell death, with the communities experiencing the highest phytoplankton cell mortality showing a larger proportion of extracellular carbon release. Both PER and the percent of dead phytoplankton cells increased from eutrophic to oligotrophic waters, while heterotrophic bacteria communities, including 60 to 95% of living cells (%LC, increased from the productive to the most oligotrophic waters. The percentage of living heterotrophic bacterial cells increased with increasing phytoplankton extracellular carbon release, across oligotrophic to productive waters in the NE Atlantic, where lower PER have resulted in a decrease in the flux of phytoplankton DOC per bacterial cell. The results highlight phytoplankton cell death as a process influencing the flow of dissolved photosynthetic carbon in the NE Atlantic Ocean, and demonstrated a close coupling between the fraction of primary production released and heterotrophic bacteria survival.

  16. Response of polar front phytoplankton and bacterial community to micronutrient amendments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, R.K.; Gomes, J.; Bandekar, M.; Bhat, M.; Mesquita, A.; Ramaiah, N.

    in very low concentrations in the open ocean (Ellwood, 2004, 2008; Ellwood et al. 2005; Croot et al. 2011; Hassler et al. 2012). They readily react with organic compounds and organic ligands (Ellwood, 2004, 2008; Ellwood et al. 2005; Lohan et al. 2005...; Morel et al. 1994; Sunda and Huntsman, 1995; Coale et al. 1996; Boyd et al. 2000; Buitenhuis et al. 2003; Saito and Goepfert, 2008; Saito et al. 2008). However, the impact of these dynamics on bacterial community (BC) structure is not that well...

  17. Spring bloom community change modifies carbon pathways and C : N : P : Chl a stoichiometry of coastal material fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Spilling

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms and dinoflagellates are major bloom-forming phytoplankton groups competing for resources in the oceans and coastal seas. Recent evidence suggests that their competition is significantly affected by climatic factors under ongoing change, modifying especially the conditions for cold-water, spring bloom communities in temperate and arctic regions. We investigated the effects of phytoplankton community composition on spring bloom carbon flows and nutrient stoichiometry in multi-year mesocosm experiments. Comparison of differing communities showed that community structure significantly affected C accumulation parameters, with highest particulate organic carbon (POC build-up and dissolved organic carbon (DOC release in diatom-dominated communities. In terms of inorganic nutrient drawdown and bloom accumulation phase, the dominating groups behaved as functional surrogates. Dominance patterns, however, significantly affected C : N : P : Chl a ratios over the whole bloom event: when diatoms were dominant, these ratios increased compared to dinoflagellate dominance or mixed communities. Diatom-dominated communities sequestered carbon up to 3.6-fold higher than the expectation based on the Redfield ratio, and 2-fold higher compared to dinoflagellate dominance. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental report of consequences of climatically driven shifts in phytoplankton dominance patterns for carbon sequestration and related biogeochemical cycles in coastal seas. Our results also highlight the need for remote sensing technologies with taxonomical resolution, as the C : Chl a ratio was strongly dependent on community composition and bloom stage. Climate-driven changes in phytoplankton dominance patterns will have far-reaching consequences for major biogeochemical cycles and need to be considered in climate change scenarios for marine systems.

  18. Monsoon-induced changes in the size-fractionated phytoplankton biomass and production rate in the estuarine and coastal waters of southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhu, N.V.; Jyothibabu, R.; Balachandran, K.K.

    . R, Balachandran. K. K National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, Kochi -18, India Abstract Changes in the autotrophic pico- (0.2-2µm), nano- (2-20µm) and micro- (>20µm) plankton biomass (chlorophyll a) and primary production were... phytoplankton (Chisholm, 1992), while the production of small phytoplankton (nano-) are mainly controlled by microzooplankton (cilites and flagellates) grazing (Riegman et al., 1993, Jyothibabu et al., 2006). The Cochin estuary (9° 40’ & 10° 12’N and 76° 10...

  19. Resolving Changing Chemical and Physical Properties of SSA Particle Types during Laboratory Phytoplankton Blooms using Online Single Particle Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, C. M.; Prather, K. A.; Richardson, R.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) can modify their climate-relevant properties. Recent studies have shown a diverse set of distinct SSA particle types, however there are conflicting reports on how and whether biological activity controls the organic fraction and mixing state of SSA. This study leverages an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer to give an accounting of the temporally resolved mixing state of primary SSA (0.4 - 3 µm vacuum aerodynamic diameter), encompassing 97% of particles detected over the course of laboratory phytoplankton blooms. The influence of biological activity on the climate relevant properties of defined particle types is also investigated. Spatial chemical particle heterogeneity and particularly the surface chemical composition of particles are described along with particle type specific water-particle interactions. These online measurements in tandem with chemical composition could give new insight on the link between seawater chemistry, marine aerosols, and climate properties.

  20. Community Organizing and Educational Change: A Reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Ten years ago community organizing as a form of educational change had only begun to challenge traditional models of school reform. Yet a decade later, community organizing has led to important changes in school and community relationships that have been documented by scholars in the areas of education, sociology, social work, and political…

  1. Size related processes in phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Sandow, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    Growth, death, respiration, excretion and sedimentation describe the major rate processes of phytoplankton. These rates often scale allometrically (rate=a*mass^b). The allometric coefficient (b) describes the deviation from a linear reltionship. Literature values derived from experiments showed allometric coefficients of -0.48 to -0.1. Experiments with natural phytoplankton communities from the baltic and the subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic ocean showed an allometric coeffcient range o...

  2. [Community composition of phytoplankton in Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling region in summer and related affecting factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Lin, Mao; Lin, Geng-Ming; Xiang, Peng

    2011-02-01

    Based on the investigation data of 133 samples from 30 grid stations in the Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling region (21.6 degrees - 24.3 degrees N,115.7 degrees -118.7 degrees E) in 11-16 June 2009, this paper studied the phytoplankton species composition and cell abundance in the region in three dimensions (vertical, horizontal, and sectional), and approached their relations with major environmental factors. A total of 159 taxa belonging to 85 genera of 4 phyla were identified, among which, diatom was predominant, followed by dinoflagellate. Cyanophyceae mainly composed of Trichodesmium also occupied a greater proportion, but Chrysophyceae was only checked out in the upper 10 m water layer at coastal stations. The dominant species were Rhizosolenia alata f. gracillma, Thalassionema nitzschioides, Pseudonitzschia pungens, Skeletonema costatum, Thalassionema frauenfeldii, Paralia sulcata, Guinadia striata, Trichodesmium thiebautii, Ceratium fusus, and Gyrodinium spirale. Most of the phytoplankton taxa were cosmopolitan species, followed by warm-water species, while tropic high-salinity or oceanic eurythermal species were lesser. The cell abundance of the phytoplankton was average of 67.59 x10(2) ind x L(-1). In vertical profile, the cell abundance of the phytoplankton was the highest in surface water, and decreased with water depth. In horizontal and sectional profiles, the cell abundance had no definite patterns, but the high abundance region was in Nanao Island water area, being anastomosed with the center of upwelling region, which indicated that the weak and small intensity of deep-sea water upwelling caused lesser phytoplankton cell abundance and superposition. The comparatively high phytoplankton cell abundance in the four sections (B, C, D, E) along Nanao-Zhangpu was resulted from the upwelling from Taiwan Bank. The phytoplankton cell abundance had a significant positive correlation with the PO4(3-) concentration in the upper 10 m water layer, but no

  3. Phytoplankton in Coqueiro Lake (Pantanal de Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Francisca Marçal; Simoni Maria Loverde-Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Studies on floristic composition are key to understand qualiquantitative changes on phytoplankton assemblages over the year. Spatial-temporal variation in composition, richness, frequency of occurrence, and abundance (semi-quantitative) of the phytoplankton community was analyzed monthly (from April 2002 to May 2003), at 3 stations, in Coqueiro Lake (Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil). We registered 256 taxa, mainly represented by Zygnematophyceae (36%), Chlorophyceae (21%), and Euglenophyceae (1...

  4. The role of light for fish-zooplankton-phytoplankton interactions during winter in shallow lakes - a climate change perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramm, Mette Elisabeth; Lassen, Majbritt Kjeldahl; Liboriussen, Lone;

    2009-01-01

    changes in winter light conditions are needed in order to have a significant effect on the plankton community. The change in light occurring when such plankton communities move northwards in response to global warming will mostly be of modest importance for this lake type, at least for the rest of this...

  5. Phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the equatorial Pacific: Community and taxon-specific rate assessments from pigment and flow cytometric analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michael R.; Brown, Susan L.; Neveux, Jacques; Dupouy, CéCile; Blanchot, Jean; Christensen, Stephanie; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2003-12-01

    Phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates were investigated using the seawater dilution technique during a French Joint Global Ocean Flux Study cruise focusing on grazing processes in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll equatorial Pacific at 180° (Etude du Broutage en Zone Equatoriale, October-November, 1996). Raw rate estimates based on spectrofluorometric and high-performance liquid chromatography pigment analyses were typically in close agreement, but most showed substantial imbalances in growth and grazing. Flow cytometric (FCM) analyses were used both as an alternate approach for distinguishing populations and as a means for adjusting pigment-based growth estimates for changes in cellular chlorophyll content and biovolume. Total chlorophyll a (Tchl a) gave mean community growth rates of 0.76 d-1 at 30 m and 0.27 d-1 at 60 m. Grazing rates averaged 0.56 and 0.15 d-1 at the two depths, respectively, and 69% of phytoplankton growth overall. For the prokaryotic picophytoplankter, Prochlorococcus (PRO), rate estimates from dv-chl a and FCM cell counts generally indicated balanced growth and grazing and therefore close grazing control by microzooplankton. At the equator, rate estimates from dv-chl a averaged 0.6-0.7 d-1 at 30 m and 0.25-0.26 at 60 m and were consistent with inferences based on diel pigment variations in the 30-70 m depth range. Phytoplankton production estimates from experimentally determined rates and microscopical assessments of autotrophic carbon at 30 m (mean = 19 mg C m-3 d-1) agreed well with contemporaneous measurements by 14C uptake. Diatom growth rate estimates (1.0-1.6 d-1), constrained by contemporaneous measurements of silicate uptake, implied a relatively small biomass (10-45 nmol C L-1) with high rates of turnover and recycling.

  6. Global patterns of phytoplankton dynamics in coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H.; Yin, Kedong; Cloern, J.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific Committee on Ocean Research Working Group 137 Meeting; Hangzhou, China, 17-21 October 2010; Phytoplankton biomass and community structure have undergone dramatic changes in coastal ecosystems over the past several decades in response to climate variability and human disturbance. These changes have short- and long-term impacts on global carbon and nutrient cycling, food web structure and productivity, and coastal ecosystem services. There is a need to identify the underlying processes and measure the rates at which they alter coastal ecosystems on a global scale. Hence, the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) formed Working Group 137 (WG 137), "Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems: A Comparative Analysis of Time Series Observations" (http://wg137.net/). This group evolved from a 2007 AGU-sponsored Chapman Conference entitled "Long Time-Series Observations in Coastal Ecosystems: Comparative Analyses of Phytoplankton Dynamics on Regional to Global Scales.".

  7. Phytoplankton Community Structure in the Tianjin Nearshore Waters during the Summer and Autumn of 2013%2013年春夏季天津近岸海域浮游植物的群落结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞少伟; 孙韧; 梅鹏蔚; 张震; 刘宪斌

    2015-01-01

    Tianjin is a coastal city of the western Bohai Sea.Rapid economic growth,especially in the port area, has increased pollutant loads discharged to nearshore waters and led to more severe environmental deterioration in recent years.Bohai Bay is a typical semi-closed bay,and low exchange with the open waters has caused the accu-mulation of nutrients and resulted in the frequent occurrence of red tides.The phytoplankton community is sensitive to the environmental change and widely used to assess the status of coastal aquatic ecosystems.In June and August of 2013,phytoplankton and water samples were collected in the Tianjin nearshore waters at 15 sites.The phyto-plankton community structure was analyzed and the physical-chemical parameters of the water were determined to provide basic data on the coastal ecosystem.Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA)was used to analyze the re-lationship between the phytoplankton community and environmental variables in order to predict community succes-sion and establish the level of pollution control necessary to protect the environment of this region.Phytoplankton was collected with a type III plankton net towed vertically from the bottom to the surface at each sampling site,fixed with 1 .5% Lugol′s solution and preserved with 5% formaldehyde.The identification and counting of the phyto-plankton was conducted under an Olympus BX5 1 microscope.Water temperature,pH,dissolved oxygen and salini-ty were measured in situ with a multifunctional water quality analyzer,transparency was measured with a secchi disk,and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP),nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N),nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N),ammonia ni-trogen (NH4-N)and silicates(SiO3 )were measured in the laboratory.A total of 72 phytoplankton species were re-corded in the two seasons,39 in summer and 63 in autumn.The phytoplankton community was composed primarily of Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta,with Bacillariophyta dominating,and fewer species of Cyanophyta and Eugleno

  8. Structure of late summer phytoplankton community in the Firth of Lorn (Scotland) using microscopy and HPLC-CHEMTAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Ana C.; Sá, Carolina; Mendes, Carlos R.; Brand, Tim; Dias, Ana M.; Brotas, Vanda; Davidson, Keith

    2015-12-01

    The Firth of Lorn is at the mouth of one of Scotland's largest fjordic sea lochs, Loch Linnhe. This sea loch, which is fed by a number of other inner lochs, supplies a significant flow of freshwater, which frequently causes the stratification of the water column. To investigate how environmental conditions influence the spatial distribution of phytoplankton in this region water samples were collected for phytoplankton (pigments and microscopy), and other environmental variables including nutrients. Chemotaxonomy was used to estimate the contribution of different taxonomic groups to total chlorophyll a (phytoplankton biomass index). Good agreement was obtained between chemotaxonomy and microscopy data. The highest levels of chlorophyll a (˜2.6 mg m-3) were found in the vicinity of Oban Bay, where cryptophytes, the most abundant group, dinoflagellates and other flagellates thrived in the stratified water column. Centric diatoms, mainly Chaetoceros sp. and Skeletonema costatum, were associated with NH4 and SiO2 concentrations and stratification, while pennate diatoms, mainly Cylindrotheca sp. and Nitzchia sp., were found to be associated with NO3 + NO2 and high surface mixed layer depths. Four diatom groups were identified in accordance to their surface to volume ratios, as well as their affinity to environmental parameters (nutrients) and turbulence. This study used a combination of physico-chemical data, classical microscopy methods (appropriate for large cells > 20 μm) and HPLC-CHEMTAX approaches (for large and small cells) to evaluate the distribution of phytoplankton functional groups in a fjordic coastal area.

  9. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for roughly half the net primary production (NPP) on Earth, fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels global ocean ecosystems and drives the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. Phytoplankton growth is highly sensitive to variations in ocean physical properties, such as upper ocean stratification and light availability within this mixed layer. Satellite ocean color sensors, such as the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS; McClain 2009) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Esaias 1998), provide observations of sufficient frequency and geographic coverage to globally monitor physically-driven changes in phytoplankton distributions. In practice, ocean color sensors retrieve the spectral distribution of visible solar radiation reflected upward from beneath the ocean surface, which can then be related to changes in the photosynthetic phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll- a (Chla; measured in mg m-3). Here, global Chla data for 2013 are evaluated within the context of the 16-year continuous record provided through the combined observations of SeaWiFS (1997-2010) and MODIS on Aqua (MODISA; 2002-present). Ocean color measurements from the recently launched Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS; 2011-present) are also considered, but results suggest that the temporal calibration of the VIIRS sensor is not yet sufficiently stable for quantitative global change studies. All MODISA (version 2013.1), SeaWiFS (version 2010.0), and VIIRS (version 2013.1) data presented here were produced by NASA using consistent Chla algorithms.

  10. Nitrogen and phosphorus intake by phytoplankton in the Xiamen Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林彩; 林辉; 贺青; 许焜灿; 吴省三; 张元标; 陈金民; 陈宝红; 林力斌; 卢美鸾; 陈维芬; 汤荣坤; 暨卫东

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a time series experiment examining the nitrogen and phosphorus intake of natural phytoplankton communities by a microcosms approach.Seawater samples containing natural phytoplankton communities were collected from waters around Baozhu Islet in inner Xiamen Bay and around Qingyu Islet in the outer bay.The goal was to elucidate the relationship between phytoplankton population enhancement,the biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the seawater,and the phytoplankton nitrogen an...

  11. A cold phase of the East Pacific triggers new phytoplankton blooms in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, J.E.; Jassby, A.D.; Thompson, J.K.; Hieb, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ecological observations sustained over decades often reveal abrupt changes in biological communities that signal altered ecosystem states. We report a large shift in the biological communities of San Francisco Bay, first detected as increasing phytoplankton biomass and occurrences of new seasonal blooms that began in 1999. This phytoplankton increase is paradoxical because it occurred in an era of decreasing wastewater nutrient inputs and reduced nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, contrary to the guiding paradigm that algal biomass in estuaries increases in proportion to nutrient inputs from their watersheds. Coincidental changes included sharp declines in the abundance of bivalve mollusks, the key phytoplankton consumers in this estuary, and record high abundances of several bivalve predators: Bay shrimp, English sole, and Dungeness crab. The phytoplankton increase is consistent with a trophic cascade resulting from heightened predation on bivalves and suppression of their filtration control on phytoplankton growth. These community changes in San Francisco Bay across three trophic levels followed a state change in the California Current System characterized by increased upwelling intensity, amplified primary production, and strengthened southerly flows. These diagnostic features of the East Pacific "cold phase" lead to strong recruitment and immigration of juvenile flatfish and crustaceans into estuaries where they feed and develop. This study, built from three decades of observation, reveals a previously unrecognized mechanism of ocean-estuary connectivity. Interdecadal oceanic regime changes can propagate into estuaries, altering their community structure and efficiency of transforming land-derived nutrients into algal biomass. ?? 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  12. Techniques for Quantifying Phytoplankton Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Zackary I.; Martiny, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    The biodiversity of phytoplankton is a core measurement of the state and activity of marine ecosystems. In the context of historical approaches, we review recent major advances in the technologies that have enabled deeper characterization of the biodiversity of phytoplankton. In particular, high-throughput sequencing of single loci/genes, genomes, and communities (metagenomics) has revealed exceptional phylogenetic and genomic diversity whose breadth is not fully constrained. Other molecular tools—such as fingerprinting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization—have provided additional insight into the dynamics of this diversity in the context of environmental variability. Techniques for characterizing the functional diversity of community structure through targeted or untargeted approaches based on RNA or protein have also greatly advanced. A wide range of techniques is now available for characterizing phytoplankton communities, and these tools will continue to advance through ongoing improvements in both technology and data interpretation.

  13. 2009年莱州湾近岸海域浮游植物群落的结构特征%PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITY IN THE NEARSHORE WATERS OF LAIZHOU BAY IN 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁璇璇; 纪灵; 王刚; 夏炳训

    2011-01-01

    根据2009年5、8、10月莱州湾近岸海域的调查数据,对浮游植物的群落结构进行了初步研究.共鉴定浮游植物3门30属58种,主要为温带近岸性和广布性种.其中,硅藻门占总种教的87.9%,以角毛藻属(Chaetoceros)和圆筛藻属(Coscinodiscus)的种类最多;甲藻门占总种数的10.3%,以角藻属(Ceratium)为主.全藻门只有小等刺硅鞭藻(Dictyocha fibula)一种.群落优势种组成存在季节性演替的现象.细胞数量上,硅藻占浮游植物总量的99.8%.经Shannon-Winner 指教、Margalef指教、均匀度指数分析,该海城浮游植物多样性和种丰富度总体较好,群落结构较为稳定.本年度调查共发现赤潮生物38种,建议在夏季加强海域赤潮防范.%Based on the survey of Laizhou Bay in 2009, a preliminary study on the phyto plankton community was carried out. The results showed that 58 phytoplankton species were identified altogether, belonging to 3 phyla with 30 genera, in which 87. 9% were Bacillario phyta and 10. 3% were Dinophyta. In Bacillariophyta, Chaetoceros, and Coscinodiscus were the dominant groups in terms of species number while Ceratium was in Dinophyta. In Chry sophta, only Dictyocha fibula was identified. It was also found that the dominant species changed with different seasons. The average abundance of phytoplankton was 6623. 22×104 cells/m3. In which Bacillariophyta accounted for 99. 8%. Three indices were used to analyze the characteristics of community structure of phytoplankton in the surveyed area. The re sults showed that the diversity and abundance indices were well and the community structure was stable. During the survey, 38 red tide species were identified, and therefore routine mo .nitoring in summer should be strengthened.

  14. The Effects of Climate Variability on Phytoplankton Composition in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean using a Model and a Satellite-Derived Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, C. S.; Gregg, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Compared the interannual variation in diatoms, cyanobacteria, coccolithophores and chlorophytes from the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model with those derived from satellite data (Hirata et al. 2011) between 1998 and 2006 in the Equatorial Pacific. Using NOBM, La Ni a events were characterized by an increase in diatoms (correlation with MEI, r=-0.81, Pclimate variability. However, satellite-derived phytoplankton groups were all negatively correlated with climate variability (r ranged from -0.39 for diatoms to -0.64 for coccolithophores, P<0.05). Spatially, the satellite-derived approach was closer to an independent in situ dataset for all phytoplankton groups except diatoms than NOBM. However, the different responses of phytoplankton to intense interannual events in the Equatorial Pacific raises questions about the representation of phytoplankton dynamics in models and algorithms: is a phytoplankton community shift as in the model or an across-the-board change in abundances of all phytoplankton as in the satellite-derived approach.

  15. ENSO and anthropogenic impacts on phytoplankton diversity in tropical coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan-Nhu, Hai; Nguyen-Ngoc, Lam; Nguyen, Chi-Thoi

    2016-01-01

    16-year phytoplankton data were analysed to assess ENSO and anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity and community structure at 3 locations (Nha-Trang and Phan-Thiet Bays and near Phu-Qui Island) in South Centre Viet Nam to understand (1) the primary scales of change in phytoplankton community structure, and traditional and taxonomic diversity indices; (2) the significance of environmental changes and/or climate variability on phytoplankton diversity; and (3) the usefulness of these long-term data for analysing future impacts of anthropogenic and climate changes. Traditional and taxonomic diversity indices were compared and tested in linkage with environmental conditions and ENSO. Nutrient data indicated stronger environmental impacts in Phan-Thiet Bay, milder in Nha-Trang Bay and less noticeable near Phu-Qui Island. There were measurable impacts of both anthropogenic and ENSO on phytoplankton at different locations in various parameters, e.g. species number, diversity and community structures. The lowest diversity was recorded in the most anthropogenically impacted site, Phan-Thiet Bay. Although a stronger impact on phytoplankton was recorded in ENSO year in Phan Thiet Bay, quantitative separation between anthropogenic and ENSO impacts using phytoplankton biodiversity indices was impossible. In the waters with less anthropogenic impacts, ENSO effects on taxonomic diversity was better indicated by negative phytoplankton responses to the ONI index (Nha-Trang Bay) and recovery of phytoplankton after the ENSO events (near Phu-Qui Island). Among the diversity indices, the taxonomic diversity indices (e.g. Δ+ and Λ+) better described impacts of ENSO than the traditional ones.

  16. SEASONAL ASSESSMENT OF HYDROGRAPHIC VARIABLES AND PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITY IN THE ARABIAN SEA WATERS OF KERALA, SOUTHWEST COAST OF INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushanth Vishwanath Rai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variation of the hydrographic variables and phytoplankton species in the Arabian Sea waters of the Kerala coast, Southern India was investigated during different seasons. The variables such as pH, temperature, salinity, turbidity and chlorophyll-a contents of water were found to be high during pre-monsoon season and the dissolved oxygen content was minimal. The concentration of nutrients viz., nitrate, phosphate, silicate varied independently. In the study a total of 53 species of phytoplankton were recorded. Their density was higher during the post-monsoon season than during other seasons and the diatoms were found to be the dominant species. The major phytoplankton in terms of frequency and abundance were the species namely, Biddulphia mobiliensis, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Licmophora abbreviata, Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum micans and Oscillatoria sp. They showed significant positive correlation with pH, temperature, salinity, nitrate, phosphate and chlorophyll-a contents, whereas turbidity, dissolved oxygen and silicate exhibited significant negative correlation. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA developed two principal components with 84.74% of total variability in the water quality which separated pre- and post-monsoon periods from the monsoon season on axis I, and pre-monsoon and monsoon periods from post-monsoon on axis II.

  17. Lagrangian studies of phytoplankton growth and grazing relationships in a coastal upwelling ecosystem off Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Stukel, Michael R.; Tsyrklevich, Kate

    2009-12-01

    Experimental studies of phytoplankton growth and grazing processes were conducted in the coastal upwelling system off Point Conception, California to test the hypothesis that phytoplankton growth and grazing losses determine, to first order, the local dynamics of phytoplankton in the upwelling circulation. Eight experiments of 3-5 days each were conducted over the course of two cruises in May-June 2006 and April 2007 following the trajectories of satellite-tracked drifters. Rates of phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing were determined by daily in situ dilution incubations at 8 depths spanning the euphotic zone. Mesozooplankton grazing was assessed by gut fluorescence analysis of animals collected from net tows through the euphotic zone. We compared directly the net rates of change observed for the ambient phytoplankton community to the net growth rates predicted from experimental determinations of each process rate. The resulting relationship accounted for 91% of the variability observed, providing strong support for the growth-grazing hypothesis. In addition, grazing by mesozooplankton was unexpectedly high and variable, driving a substantial positive to negative shift in phytoplankton net rate of change between years despite comparable environmental conditions and similar high growth rates and suggesting strong top-down control potential. The demonstrated agreement between net ambient and experimental community changes is an important point of validation for using field data to parameterize models. Data sets of this type may provide an important source of new information and rate constraints for developing better coupled biological-physical models of upwelling system dynamics.

  18. Global change and terrestrial plant community dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Janet; Serra-Diaz, Josep M.; Syphard, Alexandra D.; Regan, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic drivers of global change include rising atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses and resulting changes in the climate, as well as nitrogen deposition, biotic invasions, altered disturbance regimes, and land-use change. Predicting the effects of global change on terrestrial plant communities is crucial because of the ecosystem services vegetation provides, from climate regulation to forest products. In this paper, we present a framework for detecting vegetation changes and attributing them to global change drivers that incorporates multiple lines of evidence from spatially extensive monitoring networks, distributed experiments, remotely sensed data, and historical records. Based on a literature review, we summarize observed changes and then describe modeling tools that can forecast the impacts of multiple drivers on plant communities in an era of rapid change. Observed responses to changes in temperature, water, nutrients, land use, and disturbance show strong sensitivity of ecosystem productivity and plant population dynamics to water balance and long-lasting effects of disturbance on plant community dynamics. Persistent effects of land-use change and human-altered fire regimes on vegetation can overshadow or interact with climate change impacts. Models forecasting plant community responses to global change incorporate shifting ecological niches, population dynamics, species interactions, spatially explicit disturbance, ecosystem processes, and plant functional responses. Monitoring, experiments, and models evaluating multiple change drivers are needed to detect and predict vegetation changes in response to 21st century global change. PMID:26929338

  19. Community structure and its seasonal variation of phytoplankton in adjacent waters of Yangjiang Nuclear Power Plant%阳江核电站邻近水域浮游植物群落结构及其季节变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雨; 林茂; 陈兴群; 林更铭

    2012-01-01

    Based on three cruise surveys in 2009 and 2010, an investigation was carried out on the community structure and its seasonal variation of phytoplankton in the adjacent waters of the nuclear plant being constructed at the second stage in Yangjiang City of Guangdong Province. The water range affected by the thermal effluent and the effects of the nuclear plant on the phytoplankton were predicted. In 78 samples, a total of 125 species (including 2 varieties) were identified , belonging 50 genera of 6 classes, among which, diatoms were predominant in the species composition. Dinoflagellates contributed the second major group. Chromophyta abundance increased sharply in November but not reached the algae bloom threshold of cell abundance. The dominant species were Leptocylindrus danicus, Guinaridia striata, Skeletonema costatum, Pseud-onitzchia pungens, Melosira moniliformis, Phaeocystis globosa, Ceratium furca, and Chaetoceros densus. The species composition and phytoplankton cell abundance showed significant seasonal changes, with different high abundance regions. The seasonal average cell abundance of phytoplankton was (111.8±120.6)×103 cells ? L-1. The overall horizontal distribution of phytoplankton cell abundance had a trend of decreased from nearshore in east to offshore in southwest. The Shannon diversity index was coincident with Pielou evenness index. The low values of the two indices in November suggested that in the survey areas, phytoplankton community was unstable,and water quality was unhealthy. The potential water range affected by the thermal effluent was within 10 km. The seasonal variation of phytoplankton species composition indicated its flexibility to temperature. The occurrence of high abundance of Phaeocystis globosa should be paid attention. The high velocity of flow and the widen water area around Yangjiang Nuclear Power Plant benefited water exchange, and thus, the second-stage project of the Yangjiang Nuclear Power Plant would not make a

  20. Relationship between phytoplankton community succession and environmental factors after Enteromorpha prolifra bloom%浒苔过量繁殖后海区环境因子与浮游植物群落演替规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋秀凯; 张秀珍; 刘爱英; 秦华伟; 靳洋; 王文杰; 王建勇

    2011-01-01

    The paper is to present the results from eight surveys about the phytoplankton and water quality conducted near the Haiyang and Rizhao after the bloom of Enteromorpha prolifra from July to September 2008. The results include the identification of 62 phytoplankton species, belonging to 4 phyla, 31 genera. 72.58% of the identified phytoplankton species belong to Bacillariophyceae (20 genera, 45 species), whereas 22.58% to Dinophyta (8 genera, 14 species),with 3.23% being Xanthophyta (2 genera, 2 species), and 1.61% Chrysophyta (1 genera, 1 species). The average density of phytoplankton was 3.52 × l06 ind·m-3, and the greatest percentage, that is, 92.02% is diatom (3.24 × 106 ind·m-3), with dinoflagellate and other species of phytoplankton accounting for 6.70% (2.36 × 105 ind·m-3) and 1.28% (4.5 × 104 ind·m-3), respectively. In addition, the average community abundance, diversity index and homogeneity were 1.266 (0.96- 1.89), 3.012 (2.06- 4.17) and 0.638 (0.43 -0.79), respectively. It was also found that the density of phytoplankton gradually decreased from the inshore area to the offshore area. The phytoplankton community successions of Haiyang and Rizhao were similar. The first dominant species were succeeded from Chaetoceros curvisetus, Ceratium tripos, Chaetoceros affinis,Skeletonema costatum to Thalassionema nitzschioides. The average eutrophication index were 0.115 (0.022 - 0.203 ) and 0.150 (0.059 -0.349) of Haiyang and Rizhao, respectively, and the seawater were poorly eutrophicated. The green tide of Enteromorpha prolifra had an impact on seawater quantity and phytoplankton community. When the nutrient was decreased, the dominant species changed from the diatom to the dinoflagellate. After Enteromorpha prolifra was dead and decomposed, the activated phosphate in the bottom seawater was higher than that in the surface seawater in Haiyang.%为了解浒苔绿潮对周边海域环境影响,在海阳和日照海域进行了8个航次的水

  1. Trophic state and seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton communities in two sand-pit lakes at different successional stages

    OpenAIRE

    Pierluigi VIAROLI; Rossetti, Giampaolo; Daniele NIZZOLI; Silvia TAVERNINI

    2009-01-01

    The seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of phytoplankton in two Italian sand-pit lakes have been analysed over three years (2004-2006). The studied lakes, Ca' Morta (CM) and Ca' Stanga (CS), have a common origin and are contiguous, but are of different ages and have been managed in different ways. CM was created in 2002 and was still being dredged during the study period, while sand quarrying in CS began in 1998 and ended at the beginning of the study period. These conditions were thought to b...

  2. Remote sensing of phytoplankton using laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of remote laser sensing of brackish-water phytoplankton on board a research vessel are presented. Field data of laser-induced fluorescence of phytoplankton obtained during the several cruises in the mouth of tile Gulf of Finland are compared with the results of standard chlorophyll a analysis of water samples and phytoplankton species determination by microscopy. The approach of fluorescence excitation by tunable laser radiation is applied to study the spatial distribution of a natural phytoplankton community. The remote analysis of the pigment composition of a phytoplankton community using the method of selective pigment excitation is described. The possibility of elaborating methods of quantitative laser remote biomonitoring is discussed

  3. The phytoplankton chip - development and assessment of a DNA microarray as a reliable tool for monitoring of phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Gescher, Christine

    2007-01-01

    One microarray, the Phytoplankton Chip was developed . Phytoplankton field samples were taken at the island of Helgoland in the North Sea from 2004 to 2006 at regular intervals. For the phytoplankton community, only the > 20 mikrometer size fraction is identified on a daily basis. For picoplanktonic groups, light microscopy can not differentiate taxa or species. The phyto- and especially picoplanktonic dynamics were successfully analyzed with the Phytoplankton Chip in these three annual cycle...

  4. Diel responses of phytoplankton of an Amazon floodplain lake at the two main hydrological phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Nere Passarinho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study examines the short-term changes of phytoplankton in an oxbow lake on the floodplain of the Acre River, Amazonia, Brazil. METHODS: Samples were taken with a Van Dorn bottle, at three depths (surface, middle and bottom, in two periods (low waters and high waters, for seven consecutive days in two schedules, night and morning. RESULTS: Phytoplankton was represented by 198 taxa and the Class Euglenophyceae, with 62 taxa, was the best-represented group in both periods. There were abrupt changes in the community during the high waters (potamophase. During this period, in conditions of partial atelomixis, we recorded higher values of phytoplankton biovolume and dominance of Gonyostomum semen (Ehr. Dies. (Raphidophyceae. CONCLUSIONS: In the low waters (limnophase, conditions in the lake were more stable, the diversity and rate of change in the community were lower, and the frequent periods of stratification and mixing were responsible for the dominance of Geitlerinema sp. (Cyanobacteria.

  5. Phytoplankton of the Tisa River

    OpenAIRE

    Ržaničanin Ana M.; Cvijan Mirko V.; Krizmanić Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of the Tisa River phytoplankton community was carried out directly after the cyanide spill in 2000. The investigation took place near Bečej from February of 2000 to January of 2001. We observed 374 taxa from eight algal divisions. The highest biodiversity was recorded among the divisions Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta.

  6. Phytoplankton of the Tisa River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ržaničanin Ana M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the Tisa River phytoplankton community was carried out directly after the cyanide spill in 2000. The investigation took place near Bečej from February of 2000 to January of 2001. We observed 374 taxa from eight algal divisions. The highest biodiversity was recorded among the divisions Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta.

  7. 渤海浮游植物群落结构及与环境因子的相关性分析%Phytoplankton community in the Bohai Sea and its relationship with environmental factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭术津; 李彦翘; 张翠霞; 翟惟东; 黄韬; 王丽芳; 马威; 谨华龙; 孙军

    2014-01-01

    mainly composed of Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta,and there were also a few species belonging to Chrysophyta. Most of the ecotypes of phytoplankton species were neritic,and preponderant species were Paralia sulcata (Ehrenberg) Cleve, Coscinodiscus excentricus Ehrenberg, Ceratium fusus(Ehrenberg)Dujardin,Pleurosigma affine Grunow, Coscinodiscus asteromphalus Ehrenberg and Nitzschia sp., etc. Cell abundance ranged from 0.89í103 to 16.4í103 cells/L with an average of 4.36í103 cells/L. Horizontally, the surface distribution of cell abundance in the survey area was dominated by diatoms, and the high value appeared in the areas to the south of the Liaodong Bay and to the west of the Bohai Strait. The high cell abundance of dinoflagellates mainly appeared in western and northwestern part of the survey area. In the vertical direction, phytoplankton cell abundance increased in the upper water, and then decreased in the bottom water. Both of Shannon-wiener diversity index and Pielou’s evenness index were higher in the central part of the survey area. By comparing the results with historical data, it can be inferred that the shift phytoplankton community of from diatom dominated community to diatom-dinoflagellate dominated community occurred in central Bohai Sea during the last 30 years. PCA and CCA analysis revealed that the change of nutrient structure in central Bohai Sea might be responsible for this community shift.

  8. DIVERSITY OF PLANKTON IN BIRNAL RESERVIOR WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO PHYTOPLANKTON

    OpenAIRE

    Deshmukh. S. B; Gonjare. G. R

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton's are microscopic autotrophs forming communities and Remain suspended in water up to the effective light penetration. Planktons are found in fresh; Marine and brackish water.Planktons are divided in phytoplankton and zooplankton. Phytoplankton constitute the basic food sourceof any aquatic ecosystem; which supports Aquatic animals such as fish's .The zooplanktons are the major mode of energy between Phytoplankton and fish.

  9. 高公岛近岸海域浮游植物群落特征%Community characteritics of phytoplankton near Gaogong Island Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐加涛; 吴建新; 阎斌伦; 冯志华; 陈松茂; 李玉

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton is the primary producer of the ocean.The variation of its variety and quantity will control the secondary productivity as well as the biomass of fish and other marine animal resources.It plays an important role in the food web of the sea.In August of 2009,the species composition,quantitative distribution,dominant species and community structural characteristics of the phytoplankton were studied at 14 stations near Gaogong Island area(34.62°~34.76°N,119.46°~119.66°E).81 species of 36 genera were identified in the studied water,which belong to 4 phylums including 63 species of 25 genera of Bacillariophyceae,16 species of 9 genera of Pyrroptata,1 species of 1 genera of Cyanophyta and 1 species of 1 genera belong to Chrysophyta.The abundance of phytoplanton varied from 0.458×105 to 3.134×105ind./L with an average value of 1.180×105 ind./L.In this investigation,it was found that diatoms had the most contribution to the main abundance,followed by Pyrroptata.They were the main groups of the phytoplankton.There were 4 species with dominance 0.02 in the zone.among which Cuinardia striata(Stolterfoth) Hasle,Eucampia zoodiacus Ehrenberg,Chaetoceros pseudo-curvisetus Mangin,Chaetoceros tortissimus Gran were the main dominant species,with dominance index of 0.688,0.207,0.142 and 0.103 respectively.The indexes amplitude varied greatly(the species from 19 to 43,the richness 1.064~2.364,the diversity index 2.069~3.428,the evenness index 0.485~0.677),which indicates the instability of community structure.The mean diversity index of phytoplankton was 2.926,the mean richness index was 1.753,the mean evenness index was 0.592.The analysis of correlations showed that water temperature and the evenness index were significantly correlated(P0.05) with correlation coefficient of 0.544,and no significant relation was observed between multivariate analysis of phytoplankton community and environmental factors in the study area.Phytoplankton diversity index

  10. Studies on phytoplankton-bacterial interactions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.

    bacteria fit in the suite of factors regulating phytoplankton community structure? To answer this question, the phytoplankton community in a tropical monsoon-influenced environment (Mumbai and Jawaharlal Nehru ports), along the west coast of India.... Coscinodiscus, Cyclotella, Triceratium, Pleurosigma and Surirella were the most dominant genera. Both the post-monsoon periods, following dissimilar monsoon events, were dominated by Skeletonema costatum, a blooming diatom. The vegetative dinoflagellate...

  11. Determination of phytoplankton composition using absorption spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Guijarro, Mª Remedios; Romero Gil, Inmaculada; Paches Giner, Maria Aguas Vivas; González del Rio Rams, Julio; Martí Insa, Carmen Mª; GIL SEGUÍ, GERMA; Ferrer, Alberto; FERRER, J.

    2009-01-01

    Characterisation of phytoplankton communities in aquatic ecosystems is a costly task in terms of time, material and human resources. The general objective of this paper is not to replace microscopic counts but to complement them, by fine-tuning a technique using absorption spectra measurements that reduces the above-mentioned costs. Therefore, the objective proposed in this paper is to assess the possibility of achieving a qualitative determination of phytoplankton communities by ...

  12. 乌梁素海春季浮游植物群落结构特征分析%Structural Characteristics of Phytoplankton Community in the Spring in Wuliangsuhai Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建茹; 李畅游; 张生; 李兴; 史小红; 裴国霞

    2013-01-01

    寒区湿地经过冬季冰封期后,春季浮游植物群落结构特征对湿地生态环境质量有一定的指示性作用.对乌梁素海2012年5月浮游植物群落调查分析的结果表明,乌梁素海春季浮游植物共有7门59属96种,其中绿藻种类最多为29属54种,占56.25%,其次为硅藻11属18种,占18.75%;湖区优势种为湖生束球藻、色球藻、卵囊藻、四尾栅藻、小球藻、胶网藻以及梅尼小环藻;浮游植物平均密度为8.895×107 cell· L-1,且空间分布极不均匀,变异系数为0.94,Shannon-Wiener指数为1.34~2.66,Pielou指数为0.30~0.52.结合浮游植物密度、优势种及多样性指数等结果,乌梁素海属于绿藻-蓝藻-硅藻型,且水体已处于富营养化状态.聚类和多维尺度分析显示:春季乌梁素海浮游植物群落可分为进水流水型群落、南部深度净化型群落、北部沿岸静水型群落及中部滞留型群落.%After the period of frozen in the winter,the community structure of phytoplankton in spring may indicate the environment quality of wetlands to some extent in the cold region.The community structure of phytoplankton in Wuliangsuhai in May of 2012 was analyzed.The results showed that there were 59 genera,7 phyla and 96 species of phytoplankton with dominated chlorophyta including 54 species of 29 genera accounting for 56.25% of the whole phytoplankton at Wuliangsuhai.We also found 11 genera and 18 species of bacillariophyta accounting for 18.75% of phytoplankton.The dominant species were Gomphosphaeria lacustris,Chroococcus,Oocystis,Scenedesmus quadricauda,Chlorella vulgaris,Dictyosphaerium pulchellum,Cyclotella meneghiniana.The average density of phytoplankton was 8.895×107 cell·L-1.The phytoplankton abundance was unevenly spatially-distributed with a variation coefficient of 0.94.The phytoplankton Shannon index was 1.34 to 2.66 and Pielou index varied from 0.30 to 0.52.Based on the information about the abundance of

  13. State of Climate 2011 - Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D. A.; Antoine, D.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; d'Andon, O. H. Fanton; Fields, E.; Franz, B. A.; Goryl, P.; Maritorena, S.; McClain, C. R.; Wang, M.; Yoder, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthesis in the sun lit upper layer of the global ocean is the overwhelmingly dominant source of organic matter that fuels marine ecosystems. Phytoplankton contribute roughly half of the global (land and ocean) net primary production (NPP; gross photosynthesis minus plant respiration) and phytoplankton carbon fixation is the primary conduit through which atmospheric CO2 concentrations interact with the ocean s carbon cycle. Phytoplankton productivity depends on the availability of sunlight, macronutrients (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorous), and micronutrients (e.g., iron), and thus is sensitive to climate-driven changes in the delivery of these resources to the euphotic zone

  14. Motivation Change in Therapeutic Community Residential Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, Keith; Kressel, David

    2010-01-01

    Latent growth curve analysis was used to assess motivation change across 3 time points for 120 therapeutic community residents. Models included the time-invariant predictor of readiness for treatment, which significantly predicted initial treatment motivation but not the rate of motivation change over time. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  15. 广西钦州湾浮游植物群落结构特征%Phytoplankton Community in Coastal Waters of Qinzhou Bay in Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜发军; 陈波; 何碧娟; 许铭本; 庄军莲; 张荣灿; 雷富

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton composition, abundance, community structure, dominant species and diversity in coastal waters of Qinzhou Bay in Guangxi were investigated in each season in 2010. The results showed that a total of 79 genera and 193 species of phytoplankton were identified, belonging to six phyla. The cells abundance of phytoplankton varied from 0. 49X10" to 67. 74X l04cells/L with an average of 11. 94X lC'cells/L. The largest component was Diatoms(the average of 10. 47X 104cells/L) containing 48 genera and 149 species,occupied 77. 2% of species. DinoflagellateCthe average of 0. 46 X 104cells/L) was the next most common with 17genera and 28 species,occupied 14. 5% of species. Annual variations of the phytoplankton community in Qinzhou Bay showed a typical two-peak cycle, with the highest cell abundance peak appeared in Spring and Autumn,the lowest recorded in Summer and Winter. There were 10 kinds of dominant species during the investigation,common species and dominant species were euryhalinous, eurythermic and eurytopic species,There was succession of species in different seasons, nevertheless, some species revealed seasonal cross. Shannon-Wiener index peaked in Winter and minimized in Spring.%在广西钦州湾海域设置15个调查站位,分别于2010年5月(春季)、8月(夏季)、11月(秋季)和2011年2月(冬季)采集表层海水,用Shannon-Wiener多样性指数和Pielou均匀度指数分析该海域浮游植物种类组成、优势种类、丰度的变化以及群落多样性等群落结构特征.共鉴定浮游植物79属193种(包括变型和变种),隶属于6个门,硅藻种类最多,共48属149种,占总种类的77.2%,其种数和丰度都占绝对优势,平均丰度为10.47×104 cells/L;其次为甲藻,16属28种,占总种类的14.5%,平均丰度为0.46×104 cells/L.浮游植物丰度0.49×104~67.74×104 cells/L,平均值为11.94×104 cells/L,丰度变化为典型双峰型,春秋季高,夏冬季低.调查期间共出现10种优势种,不同季节

  16. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...... storage in both a shorter and longer term global change experiment. Extended drought at the dry, temperate heath showed that soil fungi were well adapted to dry conditions. Furthermore, soil fungal communities responded significantly to seasonal fluctuations at the temperate heath, but despite large...... composition of fungi, but the effects were generally limited to the litter layer and the uppermost humus layer (0-5 cm), which was unexpected considering the ecosystem had been manipulated for 18 years. Taken together the global change experiments altered the soil fungal communities and thereby highlight...

  17. Phytoplankton assemblage of a solar saltern in Port Fouad, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Fedekar Fadel Madkour; Mona Mohamed Gaballah

    2012-01-01

    The present study is the first investigation of the phytoplankton community inone of Egypt's saltworks. The phytoplankton composition and distribution infive ponds of increasing salinity were investigated in the solar saltern of Port Fouad.The phytoplankton community consisted of 42 species belonging to cyanobacteria(16), diatoms (12), dinoflagellates (11), Euglenophyceae (2) and Chlorophyceae (1).The number of species decreased significantly and rapidly with increasing salinity,varying betw...

  18. Dynamics of phytoplankton pigments in water and surface sediments of a large shallow lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilmar Tõnno

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to find out to which extent fossil phytoplankton pigments in the large shallow and turbid Lake Võrtsjärv carry information on the history of phytoplankton communities. For this purpose we examined how the changes in the pigment composition of surface sediments follow their changes in the water column. Depth-integrated lake water and surface sediment samples were collected weekly in May–October 2007. Considering cyanobacterial and diatom dominance in phytoplankton, we analysed fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin as marker pigments for diatoms, zeaxanthin as a marker pigment for total cyanobacteria and canthaxanthin as a marker pigment for colonial cyanobacteria. Chlorophyll a and its derivative pheophytin a were applied as indicators for total phytoplankton. The dynamics of phytoplankton pigments in surface sediments generally did not follow their dynamics in the water column, possibly due to intensive resuspension and a high sedimentation rate in a large and shallow lake. It was noticed that the surface sediment carries information on pigment degradation intensity and on weight and size characteristics of phytoplankton cells, which affect their sinking and floating velocities. Higher pigment contents of sediment in spring were presumably caused by lower resuspension due to high water level and slower degradation in cold water. Pheophytin a and the marker pigments of cyanobacteria were found to be persistent against degradation in upper sediment layers, which makes them useful indicators for tracking the historical changes in phytoplankton communities also in a shallow lake. Sharp decrease in chemically unstable pigment contents between the sediment surface and deeper layers indicates that only the uppermost sediment surface is resuspended in Lake Võrtsjärv. The transformation of the diatom marker carotenoid diadinoxanthin to diatoxanthin was found to occur mainly in sediments and not in the water column, and the

  19. Phytoplankton succession explains size-partitioning of new production following upwelling-induced blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oostende, N.; Dunne, J. P.; Fawcett, S. E.; Ward, B. B.

    2015-08-01

    Large and chain-forming diatoms typically dominate the phytoplankton biomass after initiation of coastal upwelling. The ability of these diatoms to accelerate and maintain elevated nitrate uptake rates has been proposed to explain the dominance of diatoms over all other phytoplankton groups. Moreover, the observed delay in biomass accumulation following nitrate supply after initiation of upwelling events has been hypothesised to result from changes in the diatom community structure or from physiological acclimation. To investigate these mechanisms, we used both numerical modelling and experimental incubations that reproduced the characteristic succession from small to large species in phytoplankton community composition and size structure. Using the Tracers Of Phytoplankton with Allometric Zooplankton (TOPAZ) ecosystem model as a framework, we find that variations in functional group-specific traits must be taken into account, through adjustments of group-dependent maximum production rates (PCmax, s- 1), in order to accurately reproduce the observed patterns and timescales of size-partitioned new production in a non-steady state environment. Representation of neither nutrient acclimation, nor diatom diversity in the model was necessary as long as lower than theoretical maximum production rates were implemented. We conclude that this physiological feature, PCmax, is critical in representing the early, relatively higher specific nitrate uptake rate of large diatoms, and explains the differential success of small and large phytoplankton communities in response to nitrate supply during upwelling.

  20. Seasonal change of ice algal and phytoplankton assemblages in the Nella Fjord near Zhongshan Station, East Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The ice algal and phytoplankton assemblages were studied from Nella Fjord near Zhongshan Station, East Antarctica from April 12 to December 30, 1992. Algal blooms occurred about 3 cm thick on the bottom of sea ice in late April and mid November to early December respectively, and a phytoplankton bloom appeared in the underlying surface water in mid December following the spring ice algal bloom. The biomass in ice bottom was 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of surface water. Amphiprora kjellmanii, Berkeleya sp., Navicula glaciei, Nitzschia barkelyi, N. cylindrus /N. curta, N. lecointei and Nitzschia sp. were common in the sea ice temporarily or throughout the study period. The biomass in a certain ice segment was decreased gradually and the dominant species were usually succeeded as the season went on. Nitzschia sublineata and Dactyliosolen antarctica were two seasonal dominant species only observed in underlying water column. The assemblages between bottom of ice and underlying surface water were different except when spring ice algae bloomed. The evidence shows that the ice algal blooms occurred mainly by in situ growth of ice algae, and the phytoplankton bloom was mostly caused by the release of ice algae.

  1. Suitability of phytosterols alongside fatty acids as chemotaxonomic biomarkers for phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Johan Taipale

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available e composition and abundance of phytoplankton is important factor defining ecological status of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Chemotaxonomic markers (e.g., pigments and fatty acids are needed for monitoring changes in phytoplankton community and to know nutritional quality of seston for herbivorous zooplankton. Here we investigated the suitability of sterols along with fatty acids as chemotaxonomic markers by analyzing sterol and fatty acid composition of 10 different phytoplankton classes including altogether 37 strains isolated from freshwater lakes and by using multivariate statistics. We were able to detect totally 47 fatty acids and 29 sterols in our phytoplankton samples, which both differed statistically significantly between phytoplankton classes. Due to the high variation of fatty acid composition among cyanobacteria, taxonomical differentiation increased, when cyanobacteria were excluded from statistical analysis. Sterol composition was more heterogeneous within class than fatty acids and did not improve separation of phytoplankton classes when used alongside with fatty acids. However, we conclude that sterols can provide additional information on the abundance of specific genera within a class which can be generated by using fatty acids. For example, whereas high 16 ω-3 PUFAs (polyunsaturated fatty acid indicates the presence of Chlorophyceae, simultaneous high amount of ergosterol could specify the presence of Chlamydomonas spp. (Chlorophyceae. Additionally, we found specific 4α-methyl sterols for distinct Dinophyceae genus, suggesting that 4α-methyl sterols can potentially separate freshwater dinoflagellates from each other.

  2. The impact of terrigeneous inputs on the Bay of Ouinné (New Caledonia) phytoplankton communities: A spectrofluorometric and microscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, M. M. B.; Le Borgne, R.; Rodier, M.; Neveux, J.

    2005-08-01

    The impact of terrigeneous inputs on the phytoplankton composition was studied during a 2.5 months daily survey in the Bay of Ouinné, a deep cove on the south-eastern coast of New Caledonia. Surface waters benefited from nutrients originating from nearby land drainage and the Ouinné river outflow during periods of heavy rain. The nutrient composition mirrored the composition of the drained soils, with concentrations reaching 3-4 μM for nitrate and 0.13 μM for phosphate at the river mouth. In addition to nutrient inputs, significant quantities of particulate matter (inorganic and organic compounds) were discharged into the lagoon during heavy rain periods, resulting in transitory decreases of the photic layer depth and enrichments of the water column through remineralization processes. Changes in contributions of the main phytoplankton groups in response to terrigeneous inputs were shown by chlorophyll and phycobiliprotein spectrofluorometric analyses. While dry periods were marked by the dominance of pico- ( Prochlorococcus, and high-phycourobilin (PUB) Synechococcus) and microcyanobacteria ( Trichodesmium spp.), developments of various eukaryote populations resulted from land drainage occurring during the wet periods. This was indicated by the increase of accessory chlorophyll pigments that doubled at a depth of 15 m: chlorophyll b (chlorophytes), chlorophyll c1+ c2 (associated with diatoms and dinoflagellates), chlorophyll c3 (associated with c1 and/or c2 in prymnesiophytes, chrysophytes and/or pelagophytes). In addition, Synechococcus with a high phycoerythrobilin (PEB) content also appeared to be stimulated by river outputs. Finally, microscopic observations of the >35 μm net plankton confirmed the greater presence of diatoms and dinoflagellates during periods of rain compared to Trichodesmium, particularly in the surface layer.

  3. Marine bacterial community structure resilience to changes in protist predation under phytoplankton bloom conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baltar, F.; Palovaara, J.; Unrein, F.; Catala, P.; Horňák, Karel; Šimek, Karel; Vaque, D.; Massana, R.; Gasol, J.M.; Pinhassi, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2016), s. 568-581. ISSN 1751-7362 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : nucleic-acid content * mediterranean coastal waters * natural planktonic bacteria * flow-cytometry * fresh-water * eutrophic reservoir Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.302, year: 2014

  4. Supporting Community-Oriented Educational Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Mabry

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of a federally funded program to develop and implement community-oriented social studies curricula and curriculum-based assessments grounds cautions for educational change initiatives. In this case, despite the project director's stated intent to support teachers' desire for instruction regarding local culture and history, top-down support for classroom-level change evidenced insensitivity. Production and implementation of the planned curricula and assessments was obstructed by teacher's lack of cultural identification with the targeted community groups, workload, competing instructional priorities, inadequate communication, and organizational politics. Professional development was sometimes beneficial but more often ineffective—either perfunctory, unnecessary, or disregarded. The findings offer insight regarding educational change and a systemic analysis.

  5. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP accumulation and dinitrogen fixation - a mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Neulinger, S. C.; Reichel, A. F.; Loginova, A.; Borchard, C.; Schmitz, R. A.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) deoxygenates further and microbially driven nitrogen (N) loss processes are promoted. Consequently, water masses with a low nitrogen to phosphorus (N : P) ratio could reach the euphotic layer, possibly influencing primary production in those waters. Previous mesocosm studies in the oligotrophic Atlantic Ocean identified nitrate availability as a control of primary production, while a possible co-limitation of nitrate and phosphate could not be ruled out. To better understand the impact of changing N : P ratios on primary production and N2 fixation in the ETNA surface ocean, we conducted land-based mesocosm experiments with natural plankton communities and applied a broad range of N : P ratios (2.67-48). Silicic acid was supplied at 15 µmol L-1 in all mesocosms. We monitored nutrient drawdown, biomass accumulation and nitrogen fixation in response to variable nutrient stoichiometry. Our results confirmed nitrate to be the key factor determining primary production. We found that excess phosphate was channeled through particulate organic matter (POP) into the dissolved organic matter (DOP) pool. In mesocosms with low inorganic phosphate availability, DOP was utilized while N2 fixation increased, suggesting a link between those two processes. Interestingly this observation was most pronounced in mesocosms where nitrate was still available, indicating that bioavailable N does not necessarily suppress N2 fixation. We observed a shift from a mixed cyanobacteria-proteobacteria dominated active diazotrophic community towards a diatom-diazotrophic association of the Richelia-Rhizosolenia symbiosis. We hypothesize that a potential change in nutrient stoichiometry in the ETNA might lead to a general shift within

  6. Photoacclimation of four marine phytoplankton species to irradiance and nutrient availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter Anton; Henriksen, P.; Markager, S.

    2002-01-01

    Photoacclimation to different light and nutrient regimes was studied in 4 common marine phytoplankton species from northern European coastal waters. Significant changes were observed for all species in their cellular nutrient content, pigment packaging and composition, and chl a-specific in vivo...... interspecies differences in a*chla were still apparent. The interspecies differences were primarily due to differences in cell size, which covaried with pigment packaging and composition. On this basis, we suggest that optical acclimation (i.e. changes in pigment composition and packaging) to the prevailing...... growth conditions (light, temperature and nutrient availability) is less important than differences in phytoplankton composition (dominant cell size and pigment composition) for the variation in a*chla(¿) of natural phytoplankton communities....

  7. Effect of environmental forcing on the biomass, production and growth rate of size-fractionated phytoplankton in the central Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete-Ortega, María; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Graña, Rocío; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Marañón, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    To ascertain the response of phytoplankton size classes to changes in environmental forcing, we determined size-fractionated biomass, carbon fixation and growth (production/biomass) rates in surface waters along the central Atlantic Ocean (26°N-5°S). As a result of the enhanced input of nutrients into the euphotic layer and the higher water column stability found at the equatorial upwelling, we observed increases not only in phytoplankton biomass and primary production, but also in turnover rates, suggesting nutrient limitation of phytoplankton physiology in the oligotrophic central Atlantic. The phytoplankton groups analysed (pico-, small nano-, large nano- and micro-phytoplankton) showed different responses to the equatorial environmental forcing, in terms of carbon biomass, primary production and growth rate. Large nano- and micro-phytoplankton consistently showed higher growth rates and carbon fixation to chl a ratios than smaller phytoplankton. We observed a higher stimulating effect of increased nitrate supply on the small phytoplankton growth rates. This observation can be explained by the dynamics of the equatorial upwelling, where the continuous but small nutrient input into the euphotic layer provide a competitive advantage for smaller cells adapted to oligotrophic conditions. The size-fractionated approach shown here reveals important group-specific differences in the response to environmental forcing, which cannot be appreciated in bulk measurements of the whole community.

  8. Soil bacterial community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmark, Lasse

    Soil bacteria and archaea are essential for ecosystem functioning and plant growth through their degradation of organic matter and turnover of nutrients. But since the majority of soil bacteria and archaea are unclassified and “nonculturable” the functionality of the microbial community and its o...... different fertilizer treatments were found, demonstrating a high robustness of the soil microbiota.......Soil bacteria and archaea are essential for ecosystem functioning and plant growth through their degradation of organic matter and turnover of nutrients. But since the majority of soil bacteria and archaea are unclassified and “nonculturable” the functionality of the microbial community and its...... overall importance for ecosystem function in soil is poorly understood. Global change factors may affect the diversity and functioning of soil prokaryotes and thereby ecosystem functioning. To gain a better understanding of the effects of global changes it is of fundamental importance to classify the...

  9. Phytoplankton diversity in relation to different weather conditions in two urban made lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munay Abdulqadir Omar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many scientists have reported that global warming have significant impact on phytoplankton community, however, the impact of global warming on phytoplankton communities in suburban made lake is less understood. Therefor the objective of this study are to observe the effect of variable weather conditions on the diversity and succession of phytoplankton in mesotrophic lake (Seri Serdang and oligotrophic lake (Engineering Faculty Lake. Samples were collected from surface water and species diversity (Shannon Weaver Diversity Index was calculated. Daily weather and rain fall were recorded. A total of 65 species from five divisions (Chlorophyta, Euglenophyta, Cyanophyta, Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta and 52 species belonging to six divisions (Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta, Bacillariophyta, Euglenophyta, Cryptophyta & Charophyta were recorded from Engineering Faculty Lake and Seri Serdang Lake respectively. Division of Chlorophyta was found most dominant in both lakes during all the weeks (67%. The most dominant species in Faculty Engineering Lake was Microcystis aeruginosa during all weather conditions. Whereas, the most dominant species in Seri Serdang Lake during all weather conditions were Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Planktothrix agardhii. The phytoplankton density was low during dry weather conditions for both lakes. The present finding suggested noticeable correlation between weather changes to the alteration of population density of phytoplankton.

  10. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín;

    2016-01-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global...... Ocean zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean....

  11. Seasonal variations of phytoplankton dynamics in Nunatsiavut fjords (Labrador, Canada) and their relationships with environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo-Matchim, Armelle-Galine; Gosselin, Michel; Blais, Marjolaine; Gratton, Yves; Tremblay, Jean-Éric

    2016-04-01

    We assessed phytoplankton dynamics and its environmental control in four Labrador fjords (Nachvak, Saglek, Okak, and Anaktalak) during summer, early fall and late fall. Primary production and chlorophyll a (chl a) biomass were measured at seven optical depths, including the depth of subsurface chl a maximum (SCM). Phytoplankton abundance, size structure and taxonomy were determined at the SCM. Principal component analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling were used to analyze relationships between production, biomass and community composition in relation to environmental variables. We observed a marked seasonal variability, with significant differences in phytoplankton structure and function between summer and fall. Surprisingly, primary production and chl a biomass were not significantly different from one fjord to another. The highest values of primary production (1730 mg C m- 2 day- 1) and chl a biomass (96 mg chl a m- 2) were measured during the summer bloom, and those high values indicate that Labrador fjords are highly productive ecosystems. The summer community showed relatively high abundance of nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm) while the fall community was characterized by low primary production and chl a biomass as well as relatively high abundance of picophytoplankton (< 2 μm). The low value of carbon potentially exported out of the euphotic zone throughout the study (≤ 31% of total primary production) suggests that phytoplankton production was mainly grazed by microzooplankton rather than being exported to greater depths. We observed a mixed assemblage of diatoms and flagellates in summer, whereas the fall community was largely dominated by flagellates. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton dynamics were mainly controlled by the strength of the vertical stratification and by the large differences in day length due to the northerly location of Labrador fjords. This study documents for the very first time phytoplankton structure and function in

  12. Stoichiometry is crucial for modelling phytoplankton coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göthlich, Lena; Oschlies, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Owing to global warming, conditions in the pelagial are expected to change significantly. Rising temperatures will trigger shoaling of mixed layer depths, leading to increased light intensity and decreased nutrient supply. Adaptations of the pelagic ecosystems may include shifts in phytoplankton community composition, such as shifting dominance towards species tolerating more light and heat and/or lower nutrient concentrations, as well as changes in the extents of biogeochemical provinces and corresponding distributions of species abundances. Modelling adaptive responses to climate change requires representing phytoplankton biodiversity in global biogeochemical models. Modelling several species over longer time scales has proven to be difficult, since one species will usually outcompete all others, especially in oligotrophic areas, where the system is almost in equilibrium, resembling a chemostat. The R* concept as part of Tilman's resource competition theory (D Tilman, Am. Nat. 1980, Vol 116(3) pp. 362-393) predicts that for any given limiting resource, only the species with the lowest requirement for that resource will survive: In equilibrium, a monoculture of any species will reduce the concentration of its limiting resource to the lowest concentration allowing for its survival (R*), such that growth rate equals losses. In a multi-species assemblage, the species requiring the lowest resource concentration to survive will set the equilibrium resource concentration to its R*, which however is too low to allow for any other species to survive. The R* concept implies that in equilibrium, there can be at maximum one species for every given limiting resource. Thus, including several potentially limiting resources and parameterising the phytoplankton species such that each species is limited by a different resource, i.e. each species has the highest requirement for one resource among all species, is a necessary condition for the existence of an equilibrium including

  13. Community structure characteristics of phytoplankton in argun River Drainage Area in autumn%额尔古纳河流域秋季浮游植物群落结构特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞科; 姚锦仙; 王昊; 刘松涛; 李翀; 吕植

    2011-01-01

    Argun River drainage area locates on the northeast of Inner Mongolia, adjacent to Mongolia and Russia. It has very limited biodiversity information. In recent years, with the rapid regional economic development and climate change,its aquatic ecosystem faces many serious challenges, such as water quality degradation, eutrophication and decrease of wetland size. Phytoplankton is a major contributor to primary productivity in aquatic ecosystem. Species, density and biomass of phytoplankton have been widely used to evaluate and monitor ecosystem health. In August-September 2008, the phytoplankton samples were collected from 26 locations in Argun River drainage area , which includes Hulun Lake , Wulan Lake, Erka Wetland, Yimin River and Hawuer River. A total of 177 species belonging to 82 genera in 8 phyla were identified , Chlorophyta (77 species of 36 genera) , Bacillariophyta(54 species of 21 genera) , and Cyanophyta ( 26 species of 13 genera) dominated the phytoplankton communities, and 20 other species were also identified from Euglenophyta,Cryptophyta , Dinophyta , Chrysophyta and Xanthophyta. 121 species of 64 genera were found in Hulun Lake , 88 species of 47 genera in Wulan Lake ,116 species of 62 genera in Erka Wetland , 59 species of 41 genera in Yimin River and 54 species of 32 genera in Hawuer River. The dominant species in Hulun Lake and Wulan Lake belonged to Cyanophyta and Chlorophyta, while Bacillariophyta had an apparent dominance in Erka Wetland, Yimin River and Hawuer River.Cryptophyta also had an important role in Erka Wetland. It had high cyanobacterial density in Wulan Lake ( 5.17×106 ind. /L) and Hulun Lake (4. Ol×106 ind. /L) . while high density diatoms in Erka Wetland( 1. 40×106 ind. /L) , Yimin River (1.84 × 105 ind. /L) and Hawuer River ( 4. 89 x 105 ind./L). Result from hierarchical cluster analysis showed that community structures of phytoplankton in lakes and wetland , rivers were different. Moreover, compared to a former study in the

  14. Further Studies on the Physical and Biogeochemical Causes for Large Interannual Changes in the Patagonian Shelf Spring-Summer Phytoplankton Bloom Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; Garcia, Virginia M.T.; Piola, Alberto R.; Evangelista, Heitor; McClain, Charles R.; Garcia, Carlos A.E.; Mata, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A very strong and persistent phytoplankton bloom was observed by ocean color satellites during September - December 2003 along the northern Patagonian shelf. The 2003 bloom had the highest extent and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentrations of the entire Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) period (1997 to present). SeaWiFS-derived Chl-a exceeded 20 mg/cu m in November at the bloom center. The bloom was most extensive in December when it spanned more than 300 km across the shelf and nearly 900 km north-south (35degS to 43degS). The northward reach and the deep penetration on the shelf of the 2003 bloom were quite anomalous when compared with other years, which showed the bloom more confined to the Patagonian shelf break (PSB). The PSB bloom is a conspicuous austral spring-summer feature detected by ocean color satellites and its timing can be explained using the Sverdrup critical depth theory. Based on high-resolution numerical simulations, in situ and remote sensing data, we provide some suggestions for the probable mechanisms responsible for that large interannual change of biomass as seen by ocean color satellites. Potential sources of macro and micro (e.g., Fe) nutrients that sustain the high phytoplankton productivity of the Patagonian shelf waters are identified, and the most likely physical processes that maintain the nutrient balance in the region are discussed.

  15. Distributions of particulate Heme b in the Atlantic and Southern Oceans—Implications for electron transport in phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Martha; Achterberg, Eric P.; Honey, David J.; Nielsdottir, Maria C.; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations of heme b, the iron-containing component of b-type hemoproteins, ranged from 500). High chl a:heme b ratios resulted from relative decreases in heme b, suggesting proteins such as cytochrome b6f, the core complex of photosystem II, and eukaryotic nitrate reductase were depleted relative to proteins containing chlorophyll such as the eukaryotic light-harvesting antenna. Relative variations in heme b, particulate organic carbon, and chl a can thus be indicative of a physiological response of the phytoplankton community to the prevailing growth conditions, within the context of large-scale changes in phytoplankton community composition.

  16. Species-Specific Variations in the Nutritional Quality of Southern Ocean Phytoplankton in Response to Elevated pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathryn Wynn-Edwards

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased seawater pCO2 has the potential to alter phytoplankton biochemistry, which in turn may negatively affect the nutritional quality of phytoplankton as food for grazers. Our aim was to identify how Antarctic phytoplankton, Pyramimonas gelidicola, Phaeocystis antarctica, and Gymnodinium sp., respond to increased pCO2. Cultures were maintained in a continuous culture setup to ensure stable CO2 concentrations. Cells were subjected to a range of pCO2 from ambient to 993 µatm. We measured phytoplankton response in terms of cell size, cellular carbohydrate content, and elemental, pigment and fatty acid composition and content. We observed few changes in phytoplankton biochemistry with increasing CO2 concentration which were species-specific and predominantly included differences in the fatty acid composition. The C:N ratio was unaffected by CO2 concentration in the three species, while carbohydrate content decreased in Pyramimonas gelidicola, but increased in Phaeocystis antarctica. We found a significant reduction in the content of nutritionally important polyunsaturated fatty acids in Pyramimonas gelidicola cultures under high CO2 treatment, while cellular levels of the polyunsaturated fatty acid 20:5ω3, EPA, in Gymnodinium sp. increased. These changes in fatty acid profile could affect the nutritional quality of phytoplankton as food for grazers, however, further research is needed to identify the mechanisms for the observed species-specific changes and to improve our ability to extrapolate laboratory-based experiments on individual species to natural communities.

  17. A Taxonomic Study on the Phytoplankton of Lake Uluabat (Bursa)

    OpenAIRE

    KARACAOĞLU, Didem; DERE, Şükran; DALKIRAN, Nurhayat

    2004-01-01

    The phytoplanktonic algal flora of Lake Uluabat was studied during July 1998- June 1999 by analysing samples taken each month from 5 sampling stations. Identified taxa (331) of the phytoplanktonic community are as follows: 152 Bacillariophyta, 89 Chlorophyta, 42 Cyanophyta, 31 Euglenophyta, 11 Dinophyta, 4 Cryptophyta and 2 Chrysophyta. Algal species which live in eutrophic water are dominant in the phytoplankton. Most of the species are characterised by their widespread presence, although it...

  18. Characterization of phytoplankton pigments and functional community structure in the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay using HPLC–CHEMTAX analysis.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhu, N.V.; Ullas, N.; Ashwini, R.; Meenu, P.; Rehitha, T.V.; Lallu, K.R.

    ., 2012). The diagnostic pigment (DP) criteria derived from different combinations of marker pigments (Table 1), roughly corresponds to the biomass proportions of various size groups (pico-, nano- and micro-) of phytoplankton (Vidussi et al., 2001... different combinations of diagnostic pigments (Vidussi et al., 2001; Uitz et al., 2006), where the pigment indices roughly correspond to the biomass proportion factors of pico- (pPF), nano- (nPF) and micro-(mPF) phytoplankton (see Table 1), respectively...

  19. Determination of phytoplankton composition using absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Guijarro, R; Romero, I; Pachés, M; Del Río, J G; Martí, C M; Gil, G; Ferrer-Riquelme, A; Ferrer, J

    2009-05-15

    Characterisation of phytoplankton communities in aquatic ecosystems is a costly task in terms of time, material and human resources. The general objective of this paper is not to replace microscopic counts but to complement them, by fine-tuning a technique using absorption spectra measurements that reduces the above-mentioned costs. Therefore, the objective proposed in this paper is to assess the possibility of achieving a qualitative determination of phytoplankton communities by classes, and also a quantitative estimation of the number of phytoplankton cells within each of these classes, using spectrophotometric determination. Samples were taken in three areas of the Spanish Mediterranean coast. These areas correspond to estuary systems that are influenced by both continental waters and Mediterranean Sea waters. 139 Samples were taken in 7-8 stations per area, at different depths in each station. In each sample, the absorption spectrum and the phytoplankton classes (Bacyllariophyceae (diatoms), Cryptophyceae, Clorophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Prasynophyceae, Prymnesophyceae, Euglenophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Dynophyceae and the Synechococcus sp.) were determined. Data were analysed by means of the Partial Least Squares (PLS) multivariate statistical technique. The absorbances obtained between 400 and 750 nm were used as the independent variable and the cell/l of each phytoplankton class was used as the dependent variable, thereby obtaining models which relate the absorbance of the sample extract to the phytoplankton present in it. Good results were obtained for diatoms (Bacillarophyceae), Chlorophyceae and Cryptophyceae. PMID:19269434

  20. Contrasting Patterns of Phytoplankton Assemblages in Two Coastal Ecosystems in Relation to Environmental Factors (Corsica, NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Garrido

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Corsica Island is a sub-basin of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, with hydrological features typical of both oligotrophic systems and eutrophic coastal zones. Phytoplankton assemblages in two coastal ecosystems of Corsica (the deep Bay of Calvi and the shallow littoral of Bastia show contrasting patterns over a one-year cycle. In order to determine what drives these variations, seasonal changes in littoral phytoplankton are considered together with environmental parameters. Our methodology combined a survey of the physico-chemical structure of the subsurface water with a characterization of the phytoplankton community structure. Sampling provided a detailed record of the seasonal changes and successions that occur in these two areas. Results showed that the two sampled stations presented different phytoplankton abundance and distribution patterns, notably during the winter–spring bloom period. Successions in pico-, nano-, and microphytoplankton communities appeared mainly driven by differences in the ability to acquire nutrients, and in community-specific growth rates. Phytoplankton structure and dynamics are discussed in relation to available data on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. These results confirm that integrated monitoring of coastal areas is a requisite for gaining a proper understanding of marine ecosystems.

  1. Why marine phytoplankton calcify.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Fanny M; Bach, Lennart T; Brownlee, Colin; Bown, Paul; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Poulton, Alex J; Tyrrell, Toby; Beaufort, Luc; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Gibbs, Samantha; Gutowska, Magdalena A; Lee, Renee; Riebesell, Ulf; Young, Jeremy; Ridgwell, Andy

    2016-07-01

    Calcifying marine phytoplankton-coccolithophores- are some of the most successful yet enigmatic organisms in the ocean and are at risk from global change. To better understand how they will be affected, we need to know "why" coccolithophores calcify. We review coccolithophorid evolutionary history and cell biology as well as insights from recent experiments to provide a critical assessment of the costs and benefits of calcification. We conclude that calcification has high energy demands and that coccolithophores might have calcified initially to reduce grazing pressure but that additional benefits such as protection from photodamage and viral/bacterial attack further explain their high diversity and broad spectrum ecology. The cost-benefit aspect of these traits is illustrated by novel ecosystem modeling, although conclusive observations remain limited. In the future ocean, the trade-off between changing ecological and physiological costs of calcification and their benefits will ultimately decide how this important group is affected by ocean acidification and global warming. PMID:27453937

  2. Synoptic relationships between surface Chlorophyll-a and diagnostic pigments specific to phytoplankton functional types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Noguchi-Aita

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Error-quantified, synoptic-scale relationships between chlorophyll-a (Chl-a and phytoplankton pigment groups at the sea surface are presented. A total of ten pigment groups were considered to represent three Phytoplankton Size Classes (PSCs, micro-, nano- and picoplankton and seven Phytoplankton Functional Types (PFTs, i.e. diatoms, dinoflagellates, green algae, prymnesiophytes (haptophytes, pico-eukaryotes, prokaryotes and Prochlorococcus sp.. The observed relationships between Chl-a and PSCs/PFTs were well-defined at the global scale to show that a community shift of phytoplankton at the basin and global scales is reflected by a change in Chl-a of the total community. Thus, Chl-a of the total community can be used as an index of not only phytoplankton biomass but also of their community structure. Within these relationships, we also found non-monotonic variations with Chl-a for certain pico-sized phytoplankton (pico-eukaryotes, Prokaryotes and Prochlorococcus sp. and nano-sized phytoplankton (Green algae, prymnesiophytes. The relationships were quantified with a least-square fitting approach in order to enable an estimation of the PFTs from Chl-a where PFTs are expressed as a percentage of the total Chl-a. The estimated uncertainty of the relationships depends on both PFT and Chl-a concentration. Maximum uncertainty of 31.8% was found for diatoms at Chl-a = 0.49 mg m−3. However, the mean uncertainty of the relationships over all PFTs was 5.9% over the entire Chl-a range observed in situ (0.02 < Chl-a < 4.26 mg m−3. The relationships were applied to SeaWiFS satellite Chl-a data from 1998 to 2009 to show the global climatological fields of the surface distribution of PFTs. Results show that microplankton are present in the mid and high latitudes, constituting only ~10.9% of the entire phytoplankton community in the mean field for 1998–2009, in which diatoms explain ~7.5%. Nanoplankton are ubiquitous throughout the global surface oceans

  3. Astaxanthin production in marine pelagic copepods grazing on two different phytoplankton diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nieuwerburgh, Lies; Wänstrand, Ingrid; Liu, Jianguo; Snoeijs, Pauli

    2005-02-01

    The red carotenoid astaxanthin is a powerful natural antioxidant of great importance in aquatic food webs where it is abundant in eggs and body tissues of fish and crustaceans. Little is known about the impact of the phytoplankton diet on astaxanthin production in copepods, its major pelagic producers. We followed the transfer of carotenoids from phytoplankton to copepods in a mesocosm experiment on the northern Atlantic coast (Norway) and recorded the astaxanthin production in copepods. Wild copepods grazed on nutrient-manipulated phytoplankton blooms, which differed in community composition and nutrient status (nitrogen or silicate limitation). The copepod pigments consisted mainly of free astaxanthin and mono- and diesters of astaxanthin. We found no significant difference in astaxanthin production per copepod individual or per unit C depending on the phytoplankton community. However, in the mesocosms astaxanthin per unit C decreased compared with natural levels, probably through a lower demand for photoprotection by the copepods in the dense phytoplankton blooms. The total astaxanthin production per litre was higher in the silicate-limited mesocosms through increased copepod density. Pigment ratio comparisons suggested that the copepod diet here consisted more of diatoms than in the nitrogen-limited mesocosms. Silicate-saturated diatoms were less grazed, possibly because they could invest more in defence mechanisms against their predators. Our study suggests that the production of astaxanthin in aquatic systems can be affected by changes in nutrient dynamics mediated by phytoplankton community composition and copepod population growth. This bottom-up force may have implications for antioxidant protection at higher trophic levels in the food web.

  4. 澜沧江干流(中国境内)2011年夏季浮游植物群落结构特征%Phytoplankton Community Structure in the Main Channel of Lancang River (Territory of China) in Summer, 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷欢; 憨雪莹; 谢文星; 黄道明; 常秀岭

    2014-01-01

    for subsequent identification and counting under a microscope.A total of 104 species belonging to 7 phyla were identified.Among them, Bacillariophyta dominated, with 72 species and accounting for 69.23% of the total phytoplankton species, followed by Chlorophyta ( 15 ) and Cyanophyta (11), accounting for 14.43%and 10.58%, respectively.However, only two species in each phylum of Pyrrophy-ta and Chrysophyta, one species of Euglenophyta and Rhodophyta were observed during the survey.The species composition of the phytoplankton community in the Lancang River reflected the characteristics of a natural river′s phytoplankton community, dominated by Bacillariophyta which prefer flowing water.Phytoplankton density and bio-mass were in the range of 202 800 -950 640 ind./L and 0.33 -0.87 mg/L, with average values of 415 171 ind./L and 0.59 mg/L, respectively.The highest density and biomass were both in Bacillariophyta, ac-counting for 90.77%and 68.86%of the total density and biomass.With respect to spatial distribution, the highest density was found in the Xiaowan Reservoir area and the lowest in Jiuzhou; the highest biomass was recorded in Manwan Reservoir area and the lowest in Ganlanba.The density and biomass of the phytoplankton community were higher in reservoir areas as a result of environmental changes caused by the construction of reservoirs on the middle and lower reaches of the Lancang River.During summer, the diversity index, evenness index and the richness in-dex of the phytoplankton community in the Lancang River varied, respectively, from 0.59 to 3.31, from 0.12 to 0.65 and from 0.48 to 3.18.The highest diversity index and evenness index were both observed in Nuozadu and the lowest were both observed in Xiaowan Reservoir.The highest richness index was found in Jiuzhou and the low-est in Nuozhadu.Statistical analysis, carried out using SPSS 17.0, indicate significant differences between the up-per, middle and lower reaches of Lancang River in terms of species

  5. PHYTOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN THE VRANA LAKE (CRES ISLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Tomec

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The Vrana Lake is a cryptodepression filled with water of about 76 m maximum depth, approximately 5 km long and 1.5 km large, having an area of 5.5 km2. It is situated in the central part of the Cres Island, spreading in the north–south direction. The lake is oligotrophic, of monomictic character, with winter water circulation and summer thermal stratification. Investigations of phytoplankton dynamics were performed in September and December 2008 as well as in June 2009. Samples of net phytoplankton were collected at five locations in the lake at the depths of 0.5 m, 10 m, 20 m, 30 m, 40 m, 50 m and 70 m, respectively. For determination of phytoplankton species diversity the flora identity quotient (K was used. The following basic physico–chemical parameters of the sampled phytoplankton were determined: transparence of lake water, water temperature, pH–values and dissolved oxygen content. The transparence of water was between 6 m in September and 15 m in December 2008. Water temperature was changing conformingly with air temperature changes, and ranged from 9.3ºC in December (at 70 m depth to 25.0ºC in September (at 0.5 m depth. pH–values ranged between 7.74 in the lower, deep water layer, and 8.73 in the upper water layer, at 10 m depth to be exact (V2. Dissolved oxygen concentration (mg/L O2 in the Vrana Lake was between 6.5 mg/L O2 in September and 13.9 mg/L O2 in December. Qualitative net phytoplankton composition included 132 phytoplankton species in September and 111 species in December 2008, respectively. In June 2009 were determined 88 microphytic species. Quantitative analyses determined the density of specimens, which has always been lower (< than 104 cells/L, the indication of an oligotrophic lake with low productivity. The phytoplanktonic species found belonged to the taxonomic groups: Cyanobacteria/Cyanophyta, Dinophyta, Chrysophyta (Chrysophyceae and Bacillariophyceae and Chlorophyta. The species of the genera Ceratium

  6. Preliminary Study on Phytoplankton Distribution Changes Monitoring for the Intensive Study Area of the Ariake Sea, Japan Based on Remote Sensing Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton distribution changes in the Ariake Sea areas, Japan based on remote sensing satellite data is studied. Through experiments with Terra and AQUA MODIS data derived chlorophyll-a concentration and suspended solid as well as truth data of chlorophyll-a concentration together with meteorological data and tidal data which are acquired 7 months from October 2012 to April 2013, it is found that strong correlation between the truth data of chlorophyll-a and MODIS derived chlorophyll-a concentrations with R square value ranges from 0.677 to 0.791. Also it is found that the relations between ocean wind speed and chlorophyll-a concentration as well as between tidal effects and chlorophyll-a concentration. Meanwhile, there is a relatively high correlation between sunshine duration a day and chlorophyll-a concentration.

  7. Environmental flow assessments in estuaries related to preference of phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Z. F. Yang; Sun, T; Zhao, R.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to assess estuarine environmental flow based on phytoplankton preference, including the complex relationships between hydrological modifications and ecosystem biomass, was developed in this study. We initially established a relationship between biomass requirements for primary and higher nutritional level organisms based on the ecosystem nutritional energy flow principles. Subsequently, diagnostic pigments were employed to represent phytoplankton community biomas...

  8. [Seasonal variation of phytoplankton community in Xiaojiang backwater area during the preliminary operation stage of the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-song; Sheng, Jin-ping; Li, Zhe; Gao, Xu; Fang, Fang; Zhou, Hong

    2010-07-01

    According to one year's continuous observation on algae in the Xiaojiang backwater area in Three Gorges Reservoir, our group analyzed algae community and its succession in the Xiaojiang backwater area at the beginning of the function of the reservoir. The algae cell density and biomass are the highest in spring and the lowest in winter. The maximal value of cell density is 421.64 x 10(3) cells x L(-1), and the minimal value is 2.06 x 10(5) cells x L(-1); and maximal value of biomass is 39,231.84 microg x L(-1), and the minimal value is 226.17 microg x L(-1). From May 2007 to May 2008, there are 7 phylum, 101 category, 262 genus appeared in the Xiaojiang backwater area, in which 51 categories are Chlorophyta accounting for 50.5%, 22 categories are Bacillariophyta accounting for 21.8%, 18 categories are Cyanophyta accounting for 17.8%, and 4 categories are Dinophyta, 2 categories are Cryptophyta, 3 categories are Euglenophyta, 1 category is Xanthophyta and others. Cryptomonas, Chlorella, Cyclotella, Scenedesmus, Oocystis, Chlamydomonas, Schroederia, Aulacoseira, Stephanodiscus and Fragilaria are familiar categories in the Xiaojiang backwater area. Asterionnella, Aulacoseira, Coelastrunm, Chlorella, Scenedesmus, Aclinastnrum, Dictyosphaerium, Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Merismopedia, Ceratium, Peridinium and Cryptomonas are the preponderant categories in the Xiaojiang backwater area. PMID:20825015

  9. A database of marine phytoplankton abundance, biomass and species composition in Australian waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Claire H.; Coughlan, Alex; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Ajani, Penelope; Armbrecht, Linda; Atkins, Natalia; Bonham, Prudence; Brett, Steve; Brinkman, Richard; Burford, Michele; Clementson, Lesley; Coad, Peter; Coman, Frank; Davies, Diana; Dela-Cruz, Jocelyn; Devlin, Michelle; Edgar, Steven; Eriksen, Ruth; Furnas, Miles; Hassler, Christel; Hill, David; Holmes, Michael; Ingleton, Tim; Jameson, Ian; Leterme, Sophie C.; Lønborg, Christian; McLaughlin, James; McEnnulty, Felicity; McKinnon, A. David; Miller, Margaret; Murray, Shauna; Nayar, Sasi; Patten, Renee; Pritchard, Tim; Proctor, Roger; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Raes, Eric; Rissik, David; Ruszczyk, Jason; Slotwinski, Anita; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Tattersall, Katherine; Thompson, Peter; Thomson, Paul; Tonks, Mark; Trull, Thomas W.; Uribe-Palomino, Julian; Waite, Anya M.; Yauwenas, Rouna; Zammit, Anthony; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    There have been many individual phytoplankton datasets collected across Australia since the mid 1900s, but most are unavailable to the research community. We have searched archives, contacted researchers, and scanned the primary and grey literature to collate 3,621,847 records of marine phytoplankton species from Australian waters from 1844 to the present. Many of these are small datasets collected for local questions, but combined they provide over 170 years of data on phytoplankton communities in Australian waters. Units and taxonomy have been standardised, obviously erroneous data removed, and all metadata included. We have lodged this dataset with the Australian Ocean Data Network (http://portal.aodn.org.au/) allowing public access. The Australian Phytoplankton Database will be invaluable for global change studies, as it allows analysis of ecological indicators of climate change and eutrophication (e.g., changes in distribution; diatom:dinoflagellate ratios). In addition, the standardised conversion of abundance records to biomass provides modellers with quantifiable data to initialise and validate ecosystem models of lower marine trophic levels. PMID:27328409

  10. A database of marine phytoplankton abundance, biomass and species composition in Australian waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Claire H; Coughlan, Alex; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Ajani, Penelope; Armbrecht, Linda; Atkins, Natalia; Bonham, Prudence; Brett, Steve; Brinkman, Richard; Burford, Michele; Clementson, Lesley; Coad, Peter; Coman, Frank; Davies, Diana; Dela-Cruz, Jocelyn; Devlin, Michelle; Edgar, Steven; Eriksen, Ruth; Furnas, Miles; Hassler, Christel; Hill, David; Holmes, Michael; Ingleton, Tim; Jameson, Ian; Leterme, Sophie C; Lønborg, Christian; McLaughlin, James; McEnnulty, Felicity; McKinnon, A David; Miller, Margaret; Murray, Shauna; Nayar, Sasi; Patten, Renee; Pritchard, Tim; Proctor, Roger; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Raes, Eric; Rissik, David; Ruszczyk, Jason; Slotwinski, Anita; Swadling, Kerrie M; Tattersall, Katherine; Thompson, Peter; Thomson, Paul; Tonks, Mark; Trull, Thomas W; Uribe-Palomino, Julian; Waite, Anya M; Yauwenas, Rouna; Zammit, Anthony; Richardson, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    There have been many individual phytoplankton datasets collected across Australia since the mid 1900s, but most are unavailable to the research community. We have searched archives, contacted researchers, and scanned the primary and grey literature to collate 3,621,847 records of marine phytoplankton species from Australian waters from 1844 to the present. Many of these are small datasets collected for local questions, but combined they provide over 170 years of data on phytoplankton communities in Australian waters. Units and taxonomy have been standardised, obviously erroneous data removed, and all metadata included. We have lodged this dataset with the Australian Ocean Data Network (http://portal.aodn.org.au/) allowing public access. The Australian Phytoplankton Database will be invaluable for global change studies, as it allows analysis of ecological indicators of climate change and eutrophication (e.g., changes in distribution; diatom:dinoflagellate ratios). In addition, the standardised conversion of abundance records to biomass provides modellers with quantifiable data to initialise and validate ecosystem models of lower marine trophic levels. PMID:27328409

  11. Co-occurrence patterns in aquatic bacterial communities across changing permafrost landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Comte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost thaw ponds and lakes are widespread across the northern landscape and may play a central role in global biogeochemical cycles, yet knowledge about their microbial ecology is limited. We sampled a set of thaw ponds and lakes as well as shallow rock-basin lakes that are located in distinct valleys along a North–South permafrost degradation gradient. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to determine co-occurrence patterns among bacterial taxa, and then analyzed these results relative to environmental variables to identify factors controlling bacterial community structure. Network analysis was applied to identify possible ecological linkages among the bacterial taxa and with abiotic and biotic variables. The results showed an overall high level of shared taxa among bacterial communities within each valley, however the bacterial co-occurrence patterns were non-random, with evidence of habitat preferences. There were taxonomic differences in bacterial assemblages among the different valleys that were statistically related to dissolved organic carbon concentration, conductivity and phytoplankton biomass. Co-occurrence networks revealed complex interdependencies within the bacterioplankton communities and showed contrasting linkages to environmental conditions among the main bacterial phyla. The thaw pond networks were composed of a limited number of highly connected taxa. This "small world network" property would render the communities more robust to environmental change but vulnerable to the loss of microbial keystone species.

  12. In the other 90%: phytoplankton responses to enhanced nutrient availability in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our view of how water quality effects ecosystems of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is largely framed by observed or expected responses of large benthic organisms (corals, algae, seagrasses) to enhanced levels of dissolved nutrients, sediments and other pollutants in reef waters. In the case of nutrients, however, benthic organisms and communities are largely responding to materials which have cycled through and been transformed by pelagic communities dominated by micro-algae (phytoplankton), protozoa, flagellates and bacteria. Because GBR waters are characterised by high ambient light intensities and water temperatures, inputs of nutrients from both internal and external sources are rapidly taken up and converted to organic matter in inter-reefal waters. Phytoplankton growth, pelagic grazing and remineralisation rates are very rapid. Dominant phytoplankton species in GBR waters have in situ growth rates which range from ∼1 to several doublings per day. To a first approximation, phytoplankton communities and their constituent nutrient content turn over on a daily basis. Relative abundances of dissolved nutrient species strongly indicate N limitation of new biomass formation. Direct (15N) and indirect (14C) estimates of N demand by phytoplankton indicate dissolved inorganic N pools have turnover times on the order of hours to days. Turnover times for inorganic phosphorus in the water column range from hours to weeks. Because of the rapid assimilation of nutrients by plankton communities, biological responses in benthic communities to changed water quality are more likely driven (at several ecological levels) by organic matter derived from pelagic primary production than by dissolved nutrient stocks alone

  13. In the other 90%: phytoplankton responses to enhanced nutrient availability in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnas, Miles [Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville 4810 (Australia)]. E-mail: m.furnas@aims.gov.au; Mitchell, Alan [Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville 4810 (Australia); Skuza, Michele [Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsville 4810 (Australia); Brodie, Jon [Australian Centre for Tropical Freshwater Research, James Cook University, Townsville 4814 (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    Our view of how water quality effects ecosystems of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is largely framed by observed or expected responses of large benthic organisms (corals, algae, seagrasses) to enhanced levels of dissolved nutrients, sediments and other pollutants in reef waters. In the case of nutrients, however, benthic organisms and communities are largely responding to materials which have cycled through and been transformed by pelagic communities dominated by micro-algae (phytoplankton), protozoa, flagellates and bacteria. Because GBR waters are characterised by high ambient light intensities and water temperatures, inputs of nutrients from both internal and external sources are rapidly taken up and converted to organic matter in inter-reefal waters. Phytoplankton growth, pelagic grazing and remineralisation rates are very rapid. Dominant phytoplankton species in GBR waters have in situ growth rates which range from {approx}1 to several doublings per day. To a first approximation, phytoplankton communities and their constituent nutrient content turn over on a daily basis. Relative abundances of dissolved nutrient species strongly indicate N limitation of new biomass formation. Direct ({sup 15}N) and indirect ({sup 14}C) estimates of N demand by phytoplankton indicate dissolved inorganic N pools have turnover times on the order of hours to days. Turnover times for inorganic phosphorus in the water column range from hours to weeks. Because of the rapid assimilation of nutrients by plankton communities, biological responses in benthic communities to changed water quality are more likely driven (at several ecological levels) by organic matter derived from pelagic primary production than by dissolved nutrient stocks alone.

  14. Potential support vector machines for phytoplankton fluorescence spectra classification: comparison with self-organizing maps.

    OpenAIRE

    Aymerich, Ismael F.; Piera, Jaume; Mohr, Johannes; SORIA-FRISCH, Aureli; Obermayer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of phytoplankton communities is an important task to characterize marine environments. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful technique usually used for this goal. This study presents a comparison between two different techniques for fast phytoplankton discrimination: Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) and Potential Support Vector Machines (P-SVM), evaluating its capability to achieve phytoplankton classification from its fluorescence spectra. Peer Reviewed

  15. Phytoplankton biovolume is independent from the slope of the size spectrum in the oligotrophic atlantic ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno-Ostos, Enrique

    2015-08-06

    Modelling the size-abundance spectrum of phytoplankton has proven to be a very useful tool for the analysis of physical-biological coupling and the vertical flux of carbon in oceanic ecosystems at different scales. A frequent observation relates high phytoplankton biovolume in productive regions with flatter spectrum slope and the opposite in oligotrophic ecosystems. Rather than this, the relationship between high biovolume phytoplankton assemblages and flatter size-abundance spectra does not correspond with measurements of the phytoplankton community in the Atlantic Ocean open waters. As part of the Malaspina Circunnavegation Expedition, sixty seven sampling stations within the Atlantic Ocean covering six oceanographic provinces, at different seasons, produced a complete set of phytoplankton size-spectra whose slope and biovolume did not show any obvious interrelation. In these oligotrophic sites, small (procaryotes) and medium-size (nanoplankton) cells are responsible for the most part of biovolume, and their response to environmental conditions does not apply to changes in the size-abundance spectrum slope as expected in richer, large-cell dominated ecosystems.

  16. Characteristics of community structures of phytoplankton in the Jiuduansha inshore waters of the Yangtze River estuary%长江口九段沙湿地近岸水域浮游植物群落结构的特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立婧; 蒋琰; 龚小玲

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted on the community structure of phytoplankton and the annual variation of species diversity quarterly from October 2010 to July 2011 at 18 stations in the Jiuduansha inshore waters of the Yangtze River estuary. A total of 133 phytoplankton species were identified, which belonged to 55 genera of 6 phyla. Diatom was the major phytoplankton group and its species number accounted for 61.65% of all species. The annually average cell abundance of phytoplankton was (92. 33 ±29. 86) x 104 cell/L. The phytoplankton, according to its ecotype and habitat, can be grouped into freshwater, coastal and eurysalinity and oceanic species. The main dominant species was Skeletonema costatum, of which average cell abundance was (87. 95 ± 30. 96) x 104 cell/L. It was the absolute superiority in cell abundance and frequency occurrence of Skeletonema costatum that resulted in the prominence of the single dominant species, lower diversity, uneven distribution and community simplification of the waters.%2010年10月至2011年7月按季度对长江口九段沙湿地近岸水域18个站点的浮游植物群落结构和物种多样性的周年季节变化进行了初步研究.共鉴定出浮游植物133种,隶属于6门55属,主要类群为硅藻,其种类数占总种类数的61.65%.浮游植物的年平均细胞丰度为(92.33±29.86)×104细胞/L.根据浮游植物的生态类型及其生境特征基本上可分为3大类群:淡水类群、近岸广盐类群、高盐性外海类群.中肋骨条藻(Skeletonema costatum)为第一优势种,年平均细胞丰度为(87.95±30.96)×104细胞/L.正是由于其细胞丰度和出现频率上的绝对优势,导致研究水域单一优势种突出,多样性低,种间分布不均匀,群落结构简单化.

  17. Spatio-temporal variability of phytoplankton dimensional classes in the Mediterranean Sea from satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammartino, Michela; Di Cicco, Annalisa; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton contributes to fix half of the carbon dioxide released on Earth, becoming a key component not only in the carbon cycle, but also in several biogeochemical cycles. It is involved in the control of greenhouse gases and, consequently, in the effect of climate change on marine system. Therefore, phytoplankton is often considered one of the most common bio-indicator for any environmental changes, which, in turn, can affect the algal community composition and structure. The alteration of the biological, physical and chemical conditions in the ocean can be reflected in the algal assemblage structure, in terms of variation of dominant size class and taxonomic composition. In this work, the seasonal and year-to-year variability of the phytoplankton size class (PSC) spatial distribution has been examined in the Mediterranean Sea using ten year of satellite observations. The estimation of PSCs from space is based on relationship between chlorophyll a (Chl a) and diagnostic pigments that should be verified at regional scales. Our analysis shows that the Mediterranean pigments ratios differs from the global ones; therefore, we regionalized the mathematical relation existing between the Chl a and the diagnostic pigments, used in the in situ PSC identification. This regionally tuned relation allowed to improve the estimation of PSCs from space by reducing the observed bias between modelled and measured PSCs. The analysis of PSC satellite time series allowed, for the first time, to have a quantitative description of the seasonal and inter-annual variability of the spatial distribution of the algal community in the Mediterranean Sea. The results demonstrated that the pico-phytoplankton contributes with high values to the total Chl a, especially in summer and in ultra-oligotrophic environments, such as the Levantine basin. Micro-phytoplankton contribution results high during spring bloom period in offshore areas, characterized by a strong water mixing; while, in

  18. Sea Soup: Phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Mary M.

    This guide, designed for students in grades 3-7, answers intriguing questions about phytoplankton, tiny drifters that have shaped our world. Invisible to the naked eye, phytoplankton are the source of our atmosphere, our climate, our ocean food chain, much of our oil supply, and more. They're also food for zooplankton. Photomicroscopy serves up…

  19. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing in a temperate coastal embayment, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunju; Park, Myung Gil; Moon, Changho; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Chang, Man

    2007-01-01

    Microzooplankton grazing on coastal phytoplankton was determined by the dilution method from May 2002 to April 2003 at a fixed site located in the Jinhae Bay, Korea. During the dilution experiments, our study site exhibited a wide range of chlorophyll a concentrations (0.29-127.42 μg l -1), and the species composition of the phytoplankton community changed dramatically over a year, shifting from the predominance of chain-forming diatoms, particularly Chaetoceros spp., Leptocylindrus danicus, Pseudonitzschia pungens, and Skeletonema costatum, between May and September 2002, to a massive bloom of the dinoflagellates, Alexandrium spp. in October 2002, to a dominance of cryptophytes ( Chroomonas sp.) between November 2002 and March 2003, and then again to a prevalence of diatoms toward the end of the experiment. Both nutrients enriched ( μ n) and in situ phytoplankton growth rates ( μ0) showed pronounced seasonal variations, ranging from 0.11 to 2.87 d -1 and from -0.63 to 2.08 d -1, respectively. With regard to both variables, the lowest values were obtained during the fall and winter seasons. The average ratio of μ0/ μ n was 0.96 (SE = 0.08), thereby indicating that phytoplankton growth in the study site was not nutrient-limited. Microzooplankton grazing rates showed the large fluctuations (0-3.86 d -1) over an annual cycle, with non-significant and/or negative grazing frequently (62% of 29 measurements) detected. Relatively high grazing rates did occur frequently at the times during which a large phytoplankton biomass and/or large-sized phytoplankton dominance were observed. Our results contribute to the growing body of evidence suggesting that microzooplankton are important phytoplankton consumers in communities dominated by large phytoplankton, and also bolster the notion that size-based models of food web relationships may be of limited predictive value. The observed large fluctuations in grazing rates over a year, coupled with frequent non-significant and

  20. Response of rotifer functional groups to changing trophic state and crustacean community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina MANCA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Information based on taxon-based indices is species-specific while information gained from function-based research can give a comprehensive view of ecosystem processes. We applied the guild-ratio, an index based on the proportion of functional groups of rotifers (i.e. microphagous and raptorial species, on a long-term data set of Lago Maggiore. By applying seasonal trend decomposition based on smoothing techniques and non-metrical multidimensional scaling, we assessed the response of rotifer functional groups to changes in trophic state and climate. While the taxon-based indices showed smooth changes, the function-based index showed a dramatic shift from a raptorial to a microphagous dominance, with a back-shift to raptorial dominance starting in 2000. The seasonal peak of microphagous and raptorial dry weight was clearly separated in the pre-eutrophication period. When mesotrophic conditions prevailed both peaks overlapped, only to be separated again with re-oligotrophication. We attributed these alterations of rotifer functional groups to changes in competition with crustacean zooplankton and to decreased phytoplankton algal abundance and size while altered seasonality in functional groups could be related to inter-group competition for food. We hypothesise that the effects of trophic state (i.e. altered phytoplankton and climate (i.e. altered cladoceran community were transferred across trophic levels to rotifer functional groups. Our study highlights that functional groups are valid instruments for illustrating unifying principles in ecology through a better understanding of ecosystem processes and the interrelationship between trophic levels.

  1. Importance of Allelopathy as Peudo-Mixotrophy for the Dynamics and Diversity of Phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Shovonlal, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and diversity of marine phytoplankton is essential for predicting oceanic primary production, oxygen generation and carbon sequestration. Several top-down and bottom-up factors lead to complex phytoplankton dynamics. Complexities further arise from inter-species interactions within phytoplankton communities. Consequently, some of the basic questions on phytoplankton diversity, identified long ago, still puzzle the ecologists: for example, what regulates the diver...

  2. Synergistic effects of iron and temperature on Antarctic phytoplankton and microzooplankton assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Rose

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron availability and temperature are important limiting factors for the biota in many areas of the world ocean, and both have been predicted to change in future climate scenarios. However, the impacts of combined changes in these two key factors on microbial trophic dynamics and nutrient cycling are unknown. We examined the relative effects of iron addition (+1 nM and increased temperature (+4°C on plankton assemblages of the Ross Sea, Antarctica, a region characterized by annual algal blooms and an active microbial community. Increased iron and temperature individually had consistently significant but relatively minor positive effects on total phytoplankton abundance, phytoplankton and microzooplankton community composition, as well as photosynthetic parameters and nutrient drawdown. Unexpectedly, increased iron had a consistently negative impact on microzooplankton abundance, most likely a secondary response to changes in phytoplankton community composition. When iron and temperature were increased in concert, the resulting interactive effects were greatly magnified. This synergy between iron and temperature increases would not have been predictable by examining the effects of each variable individually. Our results suggest the possibility that if iron availability increases under future climate regimes, the impacts of predicted temperature increases on plankton assemblages in polar regions could be significantly enhanced. Such synergistic and antagonistic interactions between individual climate change variables highlight the importance of multivariate studies for marine global change experiments.

  3. Seasonal variations of group-specific phytoplankton cell death in Xiamen Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xin; Chen, Jixin; Xiao, Wupeng; Cao, Zhen; Huang, Bangqin

    2016-05-01

    The importance of phytoplankton cell death is being increasingly recognized, however, there are still no published reports on this in Xiamen Bay. In this study, the proportion of dead phytoplankton cells associated with environmental factors was assessed at a station in Xiamen Bay from December 2012 to December 2013, using a cell digestion assay, which is an eff ective method to analyze dead/ living cells in complex natural phytoplankton communities. The percentages of dead cells (% DC) in the total phytoplankton in summer (16%±6%) were lower than those in winter (27%±16%). Six groups of phytoplankton (G1-G6) were categorized by flow cytometry. These phytoplankton communities with diverse seasonal variations in % DC had different responses to environmental constraints. The main factors aff ecting mortality were temperature and salinity, while nutrient concentration showed little influence on phytoplankton death. Additionally, our results provide evidence that chlorophyll a concentrations had an inverse relationship with total phytoplankton % DC and viable cell abundance was more meaningful than total cells to explain variations in environmental parameters (such as Chl a ). Moreover, the lowest mean % DC in total phytoplankton was 16%±6% at our sample site, which is in a subtropical area with high water temperatures, full solar radiation, and rich nutrients. This indicates that phytoplankton cell death is a process that cannot be ignored. In summary, phytoplankton cell death is important in understanding the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and the functioning of subtropical ecosystems.

  4. Resilience of estuarine phytoplankton and their temporal variability along salinity gradients during drought and hypersalinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nche-Fambo, F. A.; Scharler, U. M.; Tirok, K.

    2015-06-01

    In South African estuaries, there is no knowledge on the resilience and variability in phytoplankton communities under conditions of hypersalinity, extended droughts and reverse salinity gradients. Phytoplankton composition, abundance and biomass vary with changes in environmental variables and taxa richness declines specifically under hypersaline conditions. This research thus investigated the phytoplankton community composition, its resilience and variability under highly variable and extreme environmental conditions in an estuarine lake system (Lake St. Lucia, South Africa) over one year. The lake system was characterised by a reverse salinity gradient with hypersalinity furthest from the estuarine inlet during the study period. During this study, 78 taxa were recorded: 56 diatoms, eight green algae, one cryptophyte, seven cyanobacteria and six dinoflagellates. Taxon variability and resilience depended on their ability to tolerate high salinities. Consequently, the phytoplankton communities as well as total abundance and biomass differed along the salinity gradient and over time with salinity as the main determinant. Cyanobacteria were dominant in hypersaline conditions, dinoflagellates in marine-brackish salinities, green algae and cryptophytes in lower salinities (brackish) and diatoms were abundant in marine-brackish salinities but survived in hypersaline conditions. Total abundance and biomass ranged from 3.66 × 103 to 1.11 × 109 Cells/L and 1.21 × 106 to 1.46 × 1010 pgC/L respectively, with the highest values observed under hypersaline conditions. Therefore, even under highly variable, extreme environmental conditions and hypersalinity the phytoplankton community as a whole was resilient enough to maintain a relatively high biomass throughout the study period. The resilience of few dominant taxa, such as Cyanothece, Spirulina, Protoperidinium and Nitzschia and the dominance of other common genera such as Chlamydomonas, Chroomonas, Navicula, Gyrosigma

  5. Regime shift from phytoplankton to macrophyte dominance in a large river: Top-down versus bottom-up effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, Carles, E-mail: carles.ibanez@irta.cat [IRTA Aquatic Ecosystems, Carretera Poble Nou, Km 5.5, 43540 St. Carles de la Rapita, Catalonia (Spain); Alcaraz, Carles; Caiola, Nuno; Rovira, Albert; Trobajo, Rosa [IRTA Aquatic Ecosystems, Carretera Poble Nou, Km 5.5, 43540 St. Carles de la Rapita, Catalonia (Spain); Alonso, Miguel [United Research Services S.L., Urgell 143, 08036 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Duran, Concha [Confederacion Hidrografica del Ebro, Sagasta 24-26, 50071 Zaragoza, Aragon (Spain); Jimenez, Pere J. [Grup Natura Freixe, Major 56, 43750 Flix, Catalonia (Spain); Munne, Antoni [Agencia Catalana de l' Aigua, Provenca 204-208, 08036 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Prat, Narcis [Departament d' Ecologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona Catalonia (Spain)

    2012-02-01

    The lower Ebro River (Catalonia, Spain) has recently undergone a regime shift from a phytoplankton-dominated to a macrophyte-dominated system. This shift is well known in shallow lakes but apparently it has never been documented in rivers. Two initial hypotheses to explain the collapse of the phytoplankton were considered: a) the diminution of nutrients (bottom-up); b) the filtering effect due to the colonization of the zebra mussel (top-down). Data on water quality, hydrology and biological communities (phytoplankton, macrophytes and zebra mussel) was obtained both from existing data sets and new surveys. Results clearly indicate that the decrease in phosphorus is the main cause of a dramatic decrease in chlorophyll and large increase in water transparency, triggering the subsequent colonization of macrophytes in the river bed. A Generalized Linear Model analysis showed that the decrease in dissolved phosphorus had a relative importance 14 times higher than the increase in zebra mussel density to explain the variation of total chlorophyll. We suggest that the described changes in the lower Ebro River can be considered a novel ecosystem shift. This shift is triggering remarkable changes in the biological communities beyond the decrease of phytoplankton and the proliferation of macrophytes, such as massive colonization of Simulidae (black fly) and other changes in the benthic invertebrate communities that are currently investigated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show a regime shift in a large river from phytoplankton to macrophyte dominance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two main hypotheses are considered: nutrient decrease and zebra mussel grazing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorus depletion is found to be the main cause of the phytoplankton decline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We conclude that oligotrophication triggered the colonization of macrophytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This new regime shift in a river is similar to that described

  6. Phytoplankton community composition and its relationships with the environment in Shanton Harbor of South China%汕头港浮游植物组成特征及其与环境的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜虹; 王亮根; 曹会彬; 陈伟洲

    2011-01-01

    于2009年3月-2010年3月对汕头港生态环境进行连续监测,研究了浮游植物组成及其对环境条件的敏感程度.结果表明:研究区共鉴定出322种浮游植物,包含了234种硅藻,141种淡水和半咸水种以及64种赤潮生物;浮游植物丰度、Shannon指数和均匀度指数分别是3127.6×104cells·m-3、2.53和0.57;中肋骨条藻(Skeletonema costatum)和颤藻( Oscillatoria sp.)是全年优势种,优势度分别是0.066和0.038;浮游生物数量组成结构与温度明显相关(r=0.699,P<0.01).浮游植物与环境因子之间的相关性分析显示,透明度是汕头港浮游植物生长主要限制因子.比较浮游植物数量组成与环境因子间的相关程度发现,上游输入是汕头港污染物的重要来源之一.多维尺度与Pearson相关性分析显示,汕头港浮游植物群落结构变化主要受温度、盐度与pH影响.%Based on the monitoring data of the eco-environment in Shantou Harbor from March 2009 to March 2010, this paper studied the composition of phytoplankton community and its sensitivity to the environment in the Harbor. A total of 322 phytoplankton species were identified, including 234 diatom species, 141 fresh-water and brackish water species, and 64 red tide species. The average abundance, Shannon index, and evenness index of the community were 3127. 6×104 cells · m-3 , 2. 53 , and 0. 57 , respectively , and Skeletonema costatum and Oscillatoria sp. were the dominant species throughout the year, with the dominance index being 0. 066 and 0. 038, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between phytoplankton community composition and water temperature ( r= -0. 699 , P<0. 01 ) , and the phytoplankton growth was mainly limited by water transparence. The relevance degree of phytoplankton composition and environmental factors showed that upstream input was an important source of Shantou Port pollutants, and the multi-scale and Pearson correlation analyses indicated

  7. Phytoplankton composition of Sazlidere Dam lake, Istanbul, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Yilmaz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The phytoplankton composition of Sazlidere Dam lake was studied at 5 sampling sites between December 2003 - November 2005. A total of 67 taxa were recorded, representing Bacillariophyta (31, Chlorophyta (18, Cyanophyta (9, Chrysophyta (1, Cryptophyta (1, Dinophyta (3 and Euglenophyta (4. Bacillariophyta members constituted the dominant phytoplankton group in terms of species number. Nygaard’s compound index value and composition of phytoplankton indicate that the trophic state of Sazlidere Dam lake was changing from oligotrophic to mesotrophic.

  8. 伊河龙门段浮游植物群落及水质评价%Assessment on Phytoplankton Community Structure and Water Quality of Yihe River Longmen Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀武; 蔡冰; 陈万光; 杜莹; 李博

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the phytoplankton community structure and water quality, the sampling sites in Yihe River Longmen section were sampled 4 times in 2013 March, July, October, and December.The results indicate that 105 species of 7 phyla of phytoplankton were identified, including 52 species of Chlorphyceae, 23 spe-cies of Bacillariophyte, 21 species of Cyanophyta, 4 species of Euglenophyta, 2 species of Dinophyta, 2 species of Xanthophyceae, 2 species of Cryptophyta.Results from combining the phytoplankton community structure, physico-chemical index and biodiversity index show the water quality of Yihe River Longmen section is medium nutrient type, which reaches the water quality standard of class III surface water.%分别于2013年3月、7月、10月、12月对伊河龙门段进行4次采样,调查浮游植物的群落结构,并对水质进行评价。结果表明,在伊河龙门段中共鉴定出浮游植物7门、105种(属)。其中,绿藻门为52(属)种,硅藻门有23(属)种,蓝藻门21(属)种,裸藻门4(属)种,甲藻门、黄藻门和隐藻门各2(属)种。利用浮游植物群落结构和理化指标,结合生物多样性指数,判定伊河龙门段水质处于中营养型,达到地表水Ⅲ类水质标准。

  9. Nitrogen and phosphorus intake by phytoplankton in the Xiamen Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cai; Li, Hui; He, Qing; Xu, Kuncan; Wu, Shengsan; Zhang, Yuanbiao; Chen, Jinmin; Chen, Baohong; Lin, Libin; Lu, Meiluan; Chen, Weifen; Tang, Rongkun; Ji, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a time series experiment examining the nitrogen and phosphorus intake of natural phytoplankton communities by a microcosms approach. Seawater samples containing natural phytoplankton communities were collected from waters around Baozhu Islet in inner Xiamen Bay and around Qingyu Islet in the outer bay. The goal was to elucidate the relationship between phytoplankton population enhancement, the biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the seawater, and the phytoplankton nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratio based on nitrogen and phosphorus removal from seawater by phytoplankton, to provide a basis for detecting prewarning conditions for red tide and the assessment of red tide events. Two key results were obtained: 1. During the experiment, the nitrogen and phosphorus seawater concentrations in samples from these two sites were negatively and closely correlated to the logarithm of the phytoplankton cell concentration and to the value of the apparent oxygen increment. The ratio of the intake coefficients was 3.5:1 for phosphorus and 1.1:1 for nitrogen for the phytoplankton between these samples from around Baozhu Islet and Qingyu Islet, respectively. This indicates that the intake capabilities of phytoplankton for nitrogen in the two waters are essentially identical. However, for phosphorus, the capability was much higher in the Baozhu Islet waters than the Qingyu Islet waters. In other words, the phytoplankton in Qingyu Islet waters produced more biomass while consuming the same amount of phosphorus as the other waters; 2. The phytoplankton nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratio from the Baozhu Islet and Qingyu Islet waters was 20:1 and 36:1, respectively. The latter waters had a significantly higher ratio than the former and both were higher than the Redfield Ratio. These results indicate that nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratios by phytoplankton can vary significantly from region to region.

  10. A compositional analysis approach to phytoplankton composition in coastal Mediterranean wetlands: Influence of salinity and nutrient availability

    OpenAIRE

    LÓPEZ-FLORES Rocio; Quintana, Xavier D.; Romami, Anna M.; Bañeras, Lluís; Ruiz-Rueda, Olaya; Compte, Jordi; Green, Andy J.; Egozcue, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean wetland communities are strongly constrained by hydrological perturbations and the water flow regime. Salinity and nutrient availability have often been considered the most important variables determining changes in the phytoplankton community of coastal wetlands. Ratios between the main environmental variables often have more relevance than the absolute values of each variable; however, in most cases ratios are not suitable for use in multivariate models commonly used by limnol...

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF FUNCTIONAL GROUPS AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN THE GANJIANG RIVER%赣江流域浮游植物群落结构与功能类群划分

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘足根; 张柱; 张萌; 方红亚; 弓晓峰

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater ecological investigations on the community structure of phytoplankton in the Ganjiang River Basin were conducted three times during the year of 2009~2010.A total of 312 species(including varietas and modifications) were identified,belonging to 109 genera of 8 phyla,i.e.Chlorophyta,Bacillariophyta,Cyanophyta,Euglenophyta,Dinophyta,Cryptophyta,Xanthophyta and Chrysophyta.Bacillariophyta and Chlorophyta were the dominant phyla according to both index of species numbers and population density in the Ganjiang River Basin.All phytoplankton species identified were classified into 32 functional groups in the Ganjiang River Basin and finally a feature table of functional groups was built based on the phytoplankton habitat,tolerances and sensitivities.Groups F(Hormidium sp.),J(Scenedesmus quadricauda),LO(Merismopedia tenuissima),MP(Navicula sp.) S1(Phormidium tenue) dominated the phytoplankton community during high-water period in the Ganjiang River Basin.Groups LO(Merismopedia tenuissima),S1(Phormidium tenue) X2(Chroomonas caudata) dominated the low-water period.Groups C(Cyclotella meneghiniana),J(Scenedesmus quadricauda) MP(Navicula simples) dominated the normal-water period.This work is conducted firstly to classify the phytoplankton functional groups in large rivers of China,according to the classification method.Results showed that the functional groups,dominant in species numbers and population density in the Ganjiang River Basin,always live in mesotrophic-eutrophic waterbody,suggesting that the aquatic surroundings of the Ganjiang River has been artificially interrupted at certain degree and the river is on eutrophication.Classification of the functional groups is a useful tool for understanding the phytoplankton community.However,it is necessary to check whether the grouping of species reflected the autoecological features of organisms.%2009~2010年3次对赣江流域浮游植物群落特征进行淡水生

  12. Interactions of anthropogenic stress factors on phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donat P. Häder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton are the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Their biomass production and CO2 sequestration equals that of all terrestrial plants taken together. Phytoplankton productivity is controlled by a number of environmental factors, many of which currently undergo substantial changes due to anthropogenic global climate change. Light availability is an absolute requirement for photosynthesis, but excessive visible and UV radiation impair productivity. Increasing temperatures enhance stratification, decrease the depth of the upper mixing layer exposing the cells to higher solar radiation, and reduce nutrient upward transport from deeper layers. At the same time, stratospheric ozone depletion exposes phytoplankton to higher solar UV-B radiation especially in polar and mid latitudes. Terrestrial runoff carrying sediments and dissolved organic matter into coastal waters leads to eutrophication while reducing UV penetration. All these environmental forcings are known to affect physiological and ecological processes of primary producers. Ocean acidification due to increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations changes the seawater chemistry; it reduces calcification in phytoplankton, macroalgae and many zoological taxa and enhances UV-induced damage. Ocean warming results in changing species composition and favors blooms of toxic prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton; it moderates UV-induced damage of the photosynthetic apparatus because of higher repair rates. Increasing pollution from crude oil spills, persistent organic pollutants, heavy metal as well as industrial and household wastewaters affect phytoplankton, which is augmented by solar UV radiation. In view of the fact that extensive analyses of the impacts of multiple stressors are scarce, here we review reported findings on the impacts of anthropogenic stressors on phytoplankton with an emphasis on their interactive effects and a prospect for future studies.

  13. Genetic diversity and temporal dynamics of phytoplankton viruses in East Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Niang; Wang; Xing-Yi; Ge; Yong-Quan; Wu; Xing-Lou; Yang; Bing; Tan; Yu-Ji; Zhang; Zheng-Li; Shi

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton viruses are important components of aquatic ecosystems. However, their prevalence and genetic diversity in marine and freshwater systems are largely under estimated owing to the immense size of water bodies and limitations in virus discovery techniques. In this study, we conducted a 1-year survey of phytoplankton virus communities by collecting surface water monthly from an inland lake(East Lake) in China between May 2012 and April 2013. We examined four phytoplankton viruses, i.e., myoviruses, podoviruses, siphoviruses, and phycodnaviruses, and seven sets of primers were used to target conserved genes within these four species. In this year-long investigation, a total of 358 different virus-related sequences from four virus families were obtained. All virus families were detected in all months, except for cyanopodoviruses, which were only identified during eight of the 12 months surveyed. Moreover, virus abundance and diversity changed dynamically over time. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of viral sequences from East Lake, China displayed distinct clustering patterns compared with published sequences. These results supported the existence of a highly diverse and unique phytoplankton virus community in East Lake, China.

  14. Phytoplankton recovery from acid and metal contamination : a comparison of limed and unmanipulated lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess biological recovery from acidification, as well as differences in community composition between manipulated and un-manipulated lakes, a study was conducted to investigate the long-term changes in the phytoplankton communities of four lakes (Clearwater Lake, Middle Lake, Hannah Lake, and Lohi Lake) located within 15 km of Sudbury, Ontario, an area significantly damaged by sulphur dioxide and metals from local smelter emissions. The study compared changes in the phytoplankton communities in the lakes over the last two to three decades, and evaluated them against data collected since 1980 from reference lakes within the same biogeographic region but beyond the influence of the Sudbury smelters. The paper provided background on emissions and biological recovery in the area as well as on the results of the study. It was concluded that there was evidence of recovery in the composition of phytoplankton communities of the acidified lakes over the last 30 years given the shift in their composition towards those of the reference lakes. In addition, the recovery of the un-limed lakes was more gradual than in the limed lakes, occurring over a period of 25 years. 2 refs., 1 fig

  15. Satellite-detected fluorescence reveals global physiology of ocean phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Behrenfeld

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton photosynthesis links global ocean biology and climate-driven fluctuations in the physical environment. These interactions are largely expressed through changes in phytoplankton physiology, but physiological status has proven extremely challenging to characterize globally. Phytoplankton fluorescence does provide a rich source of physiological information long exploited in laboratory and field studies, and is now observed from space. Here we use satellite-based fluorescence measurements to evaluate light-absorption and energy-dissipation processes influencing phytoplankton light use efficiency and demonstrate its utility as a global physiological indicator of iron-limited growth conditions. This new tool provides a path for monitoring climate-phytoplankton physiology interactions, improving descriptions of light use efficiency in ocean productivity models, evaluating nutrient-stress predictions in ocean ecosystem models, and appraising phytoplankton responses to natural iron enrichments or purposeful iron fertilizations activities.

  16. Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) is a part of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). The PMN was created as an outreach program to...

  17. Study of seasonal plankton communities changes in the Karoun dam reservoir and their relationship with water quality parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Mousavi, Seyed Abdolmajid

    2014-01-01

    This study was under taken at Karoun Lake Dam No.4. (Southwest of Iran). Water samples were collected from March 2012 to February 2013 in three selected silts. Environmental parameters and chlorophyll a concentration were measured, as well as identification and abundance of Phytoplankton communities were studied. According to this study, 30 species of Phytoplankton were identified at four seasons. Most abundance was related to the phyla Bcillariphyta (17 species), Chlorophyta (6 species), Cry...

  18. Phytoplankton of Lake Kivu

    OpenAIRE

    Sarmento, Hugo; Darchambeau, François; Descy, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews taxonomic composition, biomass, production and nutrient limitation of the phytoplankton of Lake Kivu. Present Lake Kivu phytoplankton is dominated by cyanobacteria – mainly Synechococcus spp. and thin filaments of Planktolyngbya limnetica – and by pennate diatoms, among which Nitzschia bacata and Fragilaria danica are dominant. Seasonal shifts occur, with cyanobacteria developing more in the rainy season, and the diatoms in the dry season. Other groups present are cryptop...

  19. Coupling of heterotrophic bacteria to phytoplankton bloom development at different pCO2 levels: a mesocosm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thyrhaug

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The predicted rise in anthropogenic CO2 emissions will increase CO2 concentrations and decrease seawater pH in the upper ocean. Recent studies have revealed effects of pCO2 induced changes in seawater chemistry on a variety of marine life forms, in particular calcifying organisms. To test whether the predicted increase in pCO2 will directly or indirectly (via changes in phytoplankton dynamics affect abundance, activities, and community composition of heterotrophic bacteria during phytoplankton bloom development, we have aerated mesocosms with CO2 to obtain triplicates with three different partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2: 350 μatm (1×CO2, 700 μatm (2×CO2 and 1050 μatm (3×CO2. The development of a phytoplankton bloom was initiated by the addition of nitrate and phosphate. In accordance to an elevated carbon to nitrogen drawdown at increasing pCO2, bacterial production (BPP of free-living and attached bacteria as well as cell-specific BPP (csBPP of attached bacteria were related to the C:N ratio of suspended matter. These relationships significantly differed among treatments. However, bacterial abundance and activities were not statistically different among treatments. Solely community structure of free-living bacteria changed with pCO2 whereas that of attached bacteria seemed to be independent of pCO2 but tightly coupled to phytoplankton bloom development. Our findings imply that changes in pCO2, although reflected by changes in community structure of free-living bacteria, do not directly affect bacterial activity. Furthermore, bacterial activity and dynamics of heterotrophic bacteria, especially of attached bacteria, were tightly correlated to phytoplankton development and, hence, may also potentially depend on changes in pCO2.

  20. Emergence of Algal Blooms: The Effects of Short-Term Variability in Water Quality on Phytoplankton Abundance, Diversity, and Community Composition in a Tidal Estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Todd A. Egerton; Ryan E. Morse; Marshall, Harold G; Mulholland, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    Algal blooms are dynamic phenomena, often attributed to environmental parameters that vary on short timescales (e.g., hours to days). Phytoplankton monitoring programs are largely designed to examine long-term trends and interannual variability. In order to better understand and evaluate the relationships between water quality variables and the genesis of algal blooms, daily samples were collected over a 34 day period in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a tidal tributary within Chesapeake Bay’s...

  1. Investigation of Net-Phytoplankton Community Structure in Liaodong Bay in Spring of 2009%2009年春季辽东湾网采浮游植物群落结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾莎; 宫相忠; 双秀芝; 高伟; 尹宝树; 邢永泽

    2012-01-01

    The species composition, distribution of cell abundance, community diversity and similarity of net-phytoplankon in Liaodong Bay in spring (May) of 2009 were analyzed. A total of 32 taxa which belong to 23 genera of 3 phyla were identified in the survey area. The majority of species were neritic and cosmopolitan in tem- perate coastal seas, while the minority were oceanic warm water or oceanic species. The phytoplankton community was mainly composed of Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta. The dominant species include Noctiluca scientillans, Proboscia alata, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Coscinodiscus gigas and Pseudo-nitzschia pungens etc. The cell abun- dance of net-phytoplankton was nonuniform and the horizontal distribution showed a decline trend from the coastal areas to the center of the bay. The Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou evenness index were low and the community structure was unsteady. The result of cluster analysis indicated that the phytoplankton community similarity was relatively high.%分析了2009年春季(5月)渤海辽东湾网采浮游植物物种组成,丰度分布,生物多样性指数及群落相似性。春季共鉴定出浮游植物3门23属32种,主要隶属硅藻门和甲藻门,生态类型多为温带近岸型和广布型种类,少部分为暖海性物种或大洋性物种。优势种有夜光藻(Noctilucascientillans)、翼鼻状藻(Probosciaalata)、旋链角毛藻(Chaetoceroscurvisetus)、巨圆筛藻(Coscinodiscusgigas)和尖刺伪菱形藻(Pseudo—nitzsehiapungens)等。浮游植物在各站位的细胞丰度分布不均匀,其平面分布呈现由沿岸海域向海湾中部海域递减的趋势。Shannon—Wiener指数、Pielou指数较低,群落结构简单,稳定性较差。聚类分析结果表明群落之间的相似性较高。

  2. Influence of Vitamin B Auxotrophy on Nitrogen Metabolism in Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Bertrand

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While nitrogen availability is known to limit primary production in large parts of the ocean, vitamin starvation amongst eukaryotic phytoplankton is becoming increasingly recognized as an oceanographically relevant phenomenon. Cobalamin (B12 and thiamine (B1 auxotrophy are widespread throughout eukaryotic phytoplankton, with over 50% of cultured isolates requiring B12 and 20% requiring B1. The frequency of vitamin auxotrophy in harmful algal bloom species is even higher. Instances of colimitation between nitrogen and B vitamins have been observed in marine environments, and interactions between these nutrients have been shown to impact phytoplankton species composition. This review evaluates the potential for interactive effects of nitrogen and vitamin B12 and B1 starvation in eukaryotic phytoplankton. B12 plays essential roles in amino acid and one-carbon metabolism, while B1 is important for primary carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and likely useful as an anti-oxidant. Here we will focus on three potential metabolic interconnections between vitamin, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism that may have ramifications for the role of vitamin and nitrogen scarcities in driving ocean productivity and species composition. These include: (1 B12, B1, and N starvation impacts on osmolyte and antioxidant production, (2 B12 and B1 starvation impacts on polyamine biosynthesis, and (3 influence of B12 and B1 starvation on the diatom urea cycle and amino acid recycling through impacts on the citric acid cycle. We evaluate evidence for these interconnections and identify oceanographic contexts in which each may impact rates of primary production and phytoplankton community composition. Major implications include that B12 and B1 deprivation may impair the ability of phytoplankton to recover from nitrogen starvation and that changes in vitamin and nitrogen availability may synergistically impact harmful algal bloom formation.

  3. Risk associated with toxic blooms of marine phytoplankton functional groups on Artemia franciscana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana D’ors

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study mortality of copepod Artemia franciscana against the occurrence of harmful marine algae and possible toxicological changes exhibited by binary and tertiary combinations of these harmful algae toxins. Methods: Tweenty four hours acute toxicity assays were performed with selected concentrations of Alexandrium minutum, Prorocentrum lima and Nitzschia N1c1 living cells. Additionally, the results were analyzed using the median-effect/combination index (CI-isobologram equation to assess possible changes in the toxic effect induced by phytoplankton functional groups. Results: Biotoxin equivalent values obtained by immunodetection were (2.12±0.10, (8.60±1.30 and (4.32±1.67 pg/cell for saxitoxin, okadaic acid and domoic acid, respectively. The 24-h LC50 values estimated to saxitoxin and okadaic acid equivalents were 4.06 and 6.27 µg/L, significantly below the value obtained for Nitzschia N1c1, which was established at 467.33 µg/L. CI analysis applied on phytoplankton assemblages showed that both ternary mixture as the binary combinations exhibited antagonic action on toxic effects in Artemia nauplii, which were significantly lower than the toxic effect exhibited by each species studied. Conclusions: These results show that, although these harmful algae represent a serious risk to estuarine zooplankton community, the presence of phytoplankton functional groups within the same bloom can reduce the potential risk compared to the expected risk when each of the phytoplankton groups are evaluated individually.

  4. Population dynamics of light-limited phytoplankton : Microcosm experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Jef

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which the predictions of an elementary model for light-limited growth are matched by laboratory experiments with light-limited phytoplankton. The model and experiments link the population dynamics of phytoplankton species with changes in the light gradient cause

  5. A database of marine phytoplankton abundance, biomass and species composition in Australian waters

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Claire H.; Coughlan, Alex; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Ajani, Penelope; Armbrecht, Linda; Atkins, Natalia; Bonham, Prudence; Brett, Steve; Brinkman, Richard; Burford, Michele; Clementson, Lesley; Coad, Peter; Coman, Frank; Davies, Diana; Dela-Cruz, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    There have been many individual phytoplankton datasets collected across Australia since the mid 1900s,but most are unavailable to the research community. We have searched archives, contacted researchers, and scanned the primary and grey literature to collate 3,621,847 records of marine phytoplankton species from Australian waters from 1844 to the present. Many of these are small datasets collected for local questions, but combined they provide over 170 years of data on phytoplankton communiti...

  6. Phytoplankton diversity in relation to different weather conditions in two urban made lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Munay Abdulqadir Omar; Mohamed Amar Naqqiuddin; Shamarina Shohaimi; Hishamuddin Omar; Ahmad Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Many scientists have reported that global warming have significant impact on phytoplankton community, however, the impact of global warming on phytoplankton communities in suburban made lake is less understood. Therefor the objective of this study are to observe the effect of variable weather conditions on the diversity and succession of phytoplankton in mesotrophic lake (Seri Serdang) and oligotrophic lake (Engineering Faculty Lake). Samples were collected from surface water and species dive...

  7. Changes in production and respiration during a spring phytoplankton bloom in San Francisco Bay, California, USA: Implications for net ecosystem metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, J.M.; Cloern, J.E.; Grenz, C.

    1998-01-01

    We present results of an intensive sampling program designed to measure weekly changes in ecosystem respiration (oxygen consumption in the water column and sediments) around the 1996 spring bloom in South San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Measurements were made at a shallow site (2 m, where mean photic depth was 60% of the water column height) and a deep site (15 m, mean photic depth was only 20% of the water column). We also estimated phytoplankton primary production weekly at both sites to develop estimates of net oxygen flux as the sum of pelagic production (PP), pelagic respiration (PR) and benthic respiration (BR). Over the 14 wk period from February 5 to May 14, PP ranged from 2 to 210, PR from 9 to 289, and BR from 0.1 to 48 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, illustrating large variability of estuarine oxygen fluxes at the weekly time scale. Pelagic production exceeded total respiration at the shallow site, but not at the deep site, demonstrating that the shallow domains are net autotrophic but the deep domains are net heterotrophic, even during the period of the spring bloom. If we take into account the potential primary production by benthic microalgae, the estuary as a whole is net autotrophic during spring, net heterotrophic during the nonbloom seasons, and has a balanced net metabolism over a full annual period. The seasonal shift from net autotrophy to heterotrophy during the transition from spring to summer was accompanied by a large shift from dominance by pelagic respiration to dominance by benthic respiration. This suggests that changes in net ecosystem metabolism can reflect changes in the pathways of energy flow in shallow coastal ecosystems.

  8. Phytoplankton and the Macondo oil spill: A comparison of the 2010 phytoplankton assemblage to baseline conditions on the Louisiana shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M L; Morrison, W; Rabalais, N N; Turner, R E; Tyre, K N

    2015-12-01

    The Macondo oil spill was likely the largest oil spill to ever occur in United States territorial waters. We report herein our findings comparing the available baseline phytoplankton data from coastal waters west of the Mississippi River, and samples collected monthly from the same sampling stations, during and after the oil spill (May-October, 2010). Our results indicate that overall, the phytoplankton abundance was 85% lower in 2010 versus the baseline, and that the species composition of the phytoplankton community moved towards diatoms and cyanobacteria and away from ciliates and phytoflagellates. The results of this study reaffirm the view that phytoplankton responses will vary by the seasonal timing of the oil spill and the specific composition of the spilled oil. The trophic impacts of the purported lower abundance of phytoplankton in 2010 coupled with the observed assemblage shift remain unknown. PMID:26378966

  9. What a Community Will Bear: Leadership and the Change Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Barbara; Lowery, Lillian M.; Loftus, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore the dynamics between innovators and the communities they attempt to change. Design/methodology/approach: The paper offers brief case studies/vignettes that demonstrate the theoretical construct: "what communities will always negotiate to what they can bear during the change process." Findings: Experiences of…

  10. 2012年秋季渤海和北黄海浮游植物群落%Phytoplankton Community in Bohai Sea and the North Yellow Sea in Autumn 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑明莉; 孙军; 翟惟东

    2014-01-01

    应用Utermöhl方法对2012年秋季渤海和北黄海浮游植物的物种组成、细胞丰度和群落结构特征等进行了分析,并应用典范对应分析(CCA)对调查海域浮游植物和环境因子进行了相关性分析.本次调查共鉴定出浮游植物3门38属94种,其中硅藻门29属62种,甲藻门8属31种,金藻门1属1种,物种生态习性以温带种和广布种为主.调查海域浮游植物细胞丰度介于0.30×103~10.48×103 L-1,平均值为2.79×103 L-1,硅藻主要优势物种为具槽帕拉藻(Paralia sulcata)和圆筛藻(Coscinodiscus sp.);甲藻主要优势种为梭状角藻(Ceratium fusus)和三角角藻(Ceratium tripos).浮游植物群落 Shannon-Wiener 多样性指数介于0.32~2.95,平均值为1.49;Pielou 均匀度指数介于0.16~0.89,平均值为0.55.CCA 分析结果显示,调查海域优势种主要受磷酸盐限制.与历史资料比较发现,该海域浮游植物群落由早期的硅藻占绝对优势向硅藻甲藻联合占优转变.%The species composition,cell abundance and community structure of phytoplankton in Bohai Sea and the North Yellow Sea were studied with Utermöhl method in Autumn(November)2012. Canonical correspondence analy-sis(CCA)was used to analyze the correlation between phytoplankton and environmental factors in the surveyed area. A total of 94 taxa which belong to 38 genera of 3 phyla were identified,among which 62 species of 29 genera were Baciallariophyta,31 species of 8 genera were Dinophyta,and 1 species of 1,genera was Chrysophyta. The species composition of phytoplankton community were mainly temperate and widely distributed regimes. The cell abundance of the phytoplankton ranged from 0.30×103 to 10.48×103 L-1,and the average value was 2.79×103 L-1. Paralia sul-cata and Coscinodiscus sp. were the main dominant species of Baciallariophyta. Ceratium fusus and Ceratium tripos were the dominant species of Dinophyta. Shannon-Winener diversity index

  11. Phytoplankton' s community structure and its relationships with environmental factors in an aquaculture lake, Datong Lake of China%大通湖浮游植物群落结构及其与环境因子关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德亮; 张婷; 肖调义; 余建波; 王红权; 陈开健; 刘安民; 李祖军

    2012-01-01

    From December 2008 to October 2009, a seasonal investigation was conducted on the phytoplankton' s community structure and its relationships with environmental factors in Datong Lake. With the comparison of the historical data in 1960, the potential effects of intensive aquaculture on the aquatic environment were analyzed, aimed to provide theoretical support for the sustainable fishery of freshwater lakes. A total of 98 phytoplankton species belonging to 7 phyla and 54 genera were collected, among which, Peridinium bipes, Chroomonas acuta, Chlorella vulgaris, Cry-tomonas ovate, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Crytomonas erosa, Anabaena circinalis, Microcystis aerugi-nosa, and Anabaena azotica were the dominant species, and had obvious seasonal variations. The mean annual cell density of the phytoplankton was 1. 84×106 cells · L-1, being the highest in summer (16.4×l06 cells · L-1) and ranged from 1.71×l06 to 1.98×l06 cells · L-1 in the other three seasons. The values of the abundance index, Shannon index, and Pielou index of the phytoplankton community were 2. 01-4. 55 , 1.26-2.69, and 0. 69-1. 27, respectively. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) showed that water depth, water temperature, transparency, and water total phosphorus content, oxidation-reduction potential, and electrical conductivity were the main environmental factors affecting the phytoplankton community structure in the Lake.%2008年12月至2009年10月按季度对养殖湖泊大通湖浮游植物群落结构及与环境因子关系进行了初步研究,并通过与1960年数据的纵向比较,探讨了集约化养殖对大通湖水域环境的影响,为其渔业可持续发展提供理论依据.调查期间,共发现浮游植物98种,隶属于7门54属.优势种类包括二角多甲藻、尖尾蓝隐藻、小球藻、卵形隐藻、梅尼小环藻、啮蚀隐藻、卷曲鱼腥藻、铜绿微囊藻和固氮鱼腥藻,优势种的季节更替明显.浮游植物细胞密度的年平均值为1.84

  12. 衢山岛海域秋季浮游植物群落组成及影响因素%Community composition of phytoplankton in Qushan Island in autumn and related affecting factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高瑜; 江志兵; 朱旭宇; 周青松; 陈全震; 曾江宁

    2012-01-01

    根据2010年10月的调查数据,对衢山岛海域浮游植物的种类组成、优势种、丰度、多样性及其环境因子进行了分析.在本次调查期闻,共采集到浮游植物7门181种,其中硅藻133种,占总种数的73.9%.为调查海域浮游植物群落的主要类群,且中肋骨条藻为绝对优势种;甲藻38种,占总种数的21.1%该海域浮游植物的种类组成和细胞丰度具有明显的潮周期特性,体现为大潮期浮游植物种类数和细胞丰度明显高于小潮期;大、小潮期间浮游植物平均H’分别为0.65和1.10;由聚类分析发现,浮游植物不同群落间组成差异显著.衢山岛海域富营养化现象较为严重,大潮期间,无机氮及活性磷酸盐的平均浓度分别为0.81 mg/L和0.04 mg/L;小潮期间,无机氮及活性磷酸盐的平均浓度分别为1.04 mg/L和0.04 mg/L.%The species composition, dominant species, and the abundance of phytoplankton were investigated in Qushan Island in October, 2010. Total 181 species of phytoplankton were commonly found in the survey area, belonging to 7 phyla. The phytoplankton community was mainly composed of Bacillariophyta (133 species, 73.9 %), followed by Dinophyta (38 species, 21.1 %). The Skeletonema costatum was the most dominant species in this area. The species and cell abundances of phytoplankton took on the obvious tidal-cycle characteristics. It showed that phytoplankton species and cell abundance in spring tide were larger than those in neap tide. The average diversity indices (H') of phytoplankton during spring tide and neap tide were 0.65 and 1.10, respectively. The cluster analysis showed that each group had significant differences. The eutrophication was serious in Qushan Island, During the spring tide, the contents of DIN and DIP were 0.81 mg/L and 0.04 mg/L, and during the neap tide, the contents of DIN and DIP were 1.04 mg/L and 0.04 mg/L, respectively.

  13. Short-term dynamics of cladocerans in a eutrophic shallow lake during a shift in the phytoplankton dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Abrantes, N.; Nogueira, A.; Goncalves, F.

    2009-01-01

    The changes in the dynamics of cladocerans in Lake Vela (Portugal), as well as the morphologic and life history traits of the small-bodied cladoceran Ceriodaphnia pulchella, were studied intensively during one month characterized by deep and fast changes in the phytoplankton community: the beginning of the cyanobacteria dominance. Lake Vela, located in the Mediterranean region, is a polymictic shallow lake exhibiting characteristics typical of an advanced trophic status, namely the permanentl...

  14. Co-occurrence patterns in aquatic bacterial communities across changing permafrost landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comte, J.; Lovejoy, C.; Crevecoeur, S.; Vincent, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Permafrost thaw ponds and lakes are widespread across the northern landscape and may play a central role in global biogeochemical cycles, yet knowledge about their microbial ecology is limited. We sampled a set of thaw ponds and lakes as well as shallow rock-basin lakes that are located in distinct valleys along a north-south permafrost degradation gradient. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to determine co-occurrence patterns among bacterial taxa (operational taxonomic units, OTUs), and then analyzed these results relative to environmental variables to identify variables controlling bacterial community structure. Network analysis was applied to identify possible ecological linkages among the bacterial taxa and with abiotic and biotic variables. The results showed an overall high level of shared taxa among bacterial communities within each valley; however, the bacterial co-occurrence patterns were non-random, with evidence of habitat preferences. There were taxonomic differences in bacterial assemblages among the different valleys that were statistically related to dissolved organic carbon concentration, conductivity and phytoplankton biomass. Co-occurrence networks revealed complex interdependencies within the bacterioplankton communities and showed contrasting linkages to environmental conditions among the main bacterial phyla. The thaw pond networks were composed of a limited number of highly connected taxa. This "small world network" property would render the communities more robust to environmental change but vulnerable to the loss of microbial "keystone species". These highly connected nodes (OTUs) in the network were not merely the numerically dominant taxa, and their loss would alter the organization of microbial consortia and ultimately the food web structure and functioning of these aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Studies on the phytoplankton of the deep subalpine Lake Iseo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario MOSELLO

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of investigations carried out on the chemical characteristics and phytoplankton community of Lake Iseo. Samplings were performed on a monthly basis from 1998 to 2000. At least three main algal groups dominated the community throughout the study period. The large Bacillariophyceae were dominant mainly during late winter and early spring (Aulacoseira spp., Melosira varians, Asterionella formosa, with few species able to maintain occasional positive growth also during mid summer and/or autumn (Fragilaria crotonensis and Diatoma elongatum. The thermal stability of the water column and silica depletion were the main factors responsible for the decline of the large spring diatoms. The subsequent growth of Mougeotia sp. (Conjugatophyceae was favoured by its lower sinking rate and resistance to increasing grazing pressure by the dominant copepods (Copidodiaptomus steueri and cladocerans (Daphnia hyalina × galeata. Among the cyanobacteria, the greater development of Planktothrix rubescens in the autumn months, with conditions of vertical homogenisation and decreasing Zeu/Zmix ratios, was favoured by its ability to survive at low light irradiances. The temporal replacement of these three groups constitutes the main sequence of the annual phytoplankton succession in Lake Iseo. A large development of other algal groups was recorded only in one or two of the three study years (e.g. Dinophyceae and Chlorococcales. The changes observed in the annual phytoplankton development are discussed in the light of differences in the spring fertilisation of the waters, caused by differences in the depth of the layer involved in the late winter and spring vertical mixing.

  16. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP accumulation and dinitrogen fixation - A mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Neulinger, S. C.;

    2016-01-01

    Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) deoxygenates further and...

  17. Regulation of phytoplankton dynamics by vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Gobler, C. J.; Okbamichael, M.; Taylor, G. T.

    2006-02-01

    Despite the biological necessity of vitamin B12 (cobalamin), its importance in phytoplankton ecology has been ignored for nearly three decades. Here we report strong and selective responses of phytoplankton communities to varying low levels (5-87 pM) of dissolved B12 in several coastal embayments. The ecological importance of this vitamin is inferred from observed declines in dissolved B12 levels as field populations of large (>5 μm) phytoplankton increased. In contrast, biomass of small (cobalamin, and implicates B12 as an important organic regulator of photoautotrophic fertility in marine systems.

  18. Critical conditions for phytoplankton blooms

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, Ute; Arrayás, M.; Temme, Nico; Sommeijer, Ben; Huisman, J.

    2001-01-01

    We motivate and analyze a reaction-advection-diffusion model for the dynamics of a phytoplankton species. The reproductive rate of the phytoplankton is determined by the local light intensity. The light intensity decreases with depth due to absorption by water and phytoplankton. Phytoplankton is transported by turbulent diffusion in a water column of given depth. Furthermore, it might be sinking or buoyant depending on its specific density. Dimensional analysis allows the reduction of the ful...

  19. A comparative analysis of baltic phytoplankton pigments in 1999 and 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ston, J.

    2003-04-01

    Composition of pigments is resulted from interaction of numerous environmental factors: biotic (phytoplankton communities structure) and abiotic (such as temperature, salinity and nutrients). They are only one underwater VIS light absorber and are important in environmental analysis because of process of light absorption and their utilisation in photosynthesis. The aim of this work is to present a changes in phytoplankton pigment composition in terms of regional and seasonal variability. The samples from different regions of Southern Baltic: gulfs with rivers mouth and open waters, coming from 1999 and 2000 years of measuring were subjected an analysis. Chlorophylls and carotenoids present in samples of naturally existing phytoplankton population were separated by use of RP-HPLC technique. Qualification and quantification of pigments was confirmed by co-injection with reference standards and on-line diode array spectra. The differentiation in concentration of chlorophylls (chlorophyll a, b, c1+c2 and c3), photosynthetic carotenoids (peridinin, fucoxanthin, 19'hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin, a-carotene) and photoprotectant carotenoids (diadinoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, lutein, neoxanthin, violaxanthin, b-carotene) were noted in both year. Spatial variability emphasised the influence of Vistula and Odra water masses on pigment abundance. Also, different pigments were noted as markers of phytoplankton population, which was confirmed by microscopic taxonomic enumeration.

  20. Winter Phytoplankton Assemblages of Coastal Yellow Sea Connected to Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Lixia; SUN Jun; HE Qing; WANG Dan; WANG Min

    2007-01-01

    The daily species variation of phytoplankton assemblage of coastal Yellow Sea connected to Jiaozhou Bay in the seawater around the Xiaoqingdao Island was studied for the three months of winter, 2003. A total of 79 taxa from four phyla, Bacillariophyta (52 species), Pyrrophyta (25 species), Chrysophyta (1 species), and Cyanophyta (1 species) were determined. In general,the most important groups were Bacillariophyta and Pyrrophyta on cell abundance and species richness. In January, the dominant species was mainly composed of cosmopolitan species such as Skeletonema costatum, then it changed to cosmopolitan species Thalassiosira nordenskiodii in February, and finally, it recovered to Skeletonema costatum again in March. Cell abundance ranged from 1.02 to 130.71 ×103 cells L-1 with a single peak on 6th Feb., and the average abundance was 28.11 ± 26.01 × 103 cells L-1 (n= 90) during the winter time. The trends of Shannon-Weiner diversity index and Pielou's evenness index were contrary to cell abundance, whereas the species diversity and evenness were the lowest in February. Temperature and salinity were closely correlated to phytoplankton species composition and cell abundance. According to the variations of temperature and salinity, species sequence was obvious at the studied site. This implies that the phytoplankton community of inner Jiaozhou Bay would be influenced heavily by the coastal Yellow Sea phytoplankton assemblages.

  1. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, C.; Buitenhuis, E. T.; Moriarty, R.; Alvain, S.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Chollet, S.; Enright, C.; Franklin, D. J.; Geider, R. J.; Harrison, S. P.; Hirst, A.; Larsen, S.; Legendre, L.; Platt, T.; Prentice, I. C.; Rivkin, R. B.; Sathyendranath, S.; Stephens, N.; Vogt, M.; Sailley, S.; Vallina, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global biogeochemical model which incorporates ecosystem dynamics based on the representation of ten plankton functional types (PFTs); six types of phytoplankton, three types of zooplankton, and heterotrophic bacteria. We improved the representation of zooplankton dynamics in our model through (a) the explicit inclusion of large, slow-growing zooplankton, and (b) the introduction of trophic cascades among the three zooplankton types. We use the model to quantitatively assess the relative roles of iron vs. grazing in determining phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) region during summer. When model simulations do not represent crustacean macrozooplankton grazing, they systematically overestimate Southern Ocean chlorophyll biomass during the summer, even when there was no iron deposition from dust. When model simulations included the developments of the zooplankton component, the simulation of phytoplankton biomass improved and the high chlorophyll summer bias in the Southern Ocean HNLC region largely disappeared. Our model results suggest that the observed low phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean during summer is primarily explained by the dynamics of the Southern Ocean zooplankton community rather than iron limitation. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean.

  2. Phytoplankton Bloom in North Sea off Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The northern and western highlands of Scotland were still winter-brown and even dusted with snow in places, but the waters of the North Sea were blooming with phytoplankton on May 8, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this image. The tiny, plant-like organisms swirled in the waters off the country's east coast, coloring the shallow coastal waters shades of bright blue and green. Phytoplankton are tiny organisms--many are just a single cell--that use chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light for photosynthesis. Because these pigments absorb sunlight, they change the color of the light reflected from the sea surface back to the satellite. Scientists have used observations of 'ocean color' from satellites for more than 20 years to track worldwide patterns in phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton are important to the Earth system for a host of reasons, including their status as the base of the ocean food web. In the North Sea, they are the base of the food web that supports Scotland's commercial fisheries, including monkfish and herring. As photosynthesizers, they also play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Some oceanographers are concerned that rising ocean temperatures will slow phytoplankton growth rates, harming marine ecosystems and causing carbon dioxide to accumulate more rapidly in the atmosphere.

  3. Effects of fish farming on phytoplankton community under the thermal stress caused by a power plant in a eutrophic, semi-enclosed bay: induce toxic dinoflagellate (Prorocentrum minimum) blooms in cold seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhibing; Liao, Yibo; Liu, Jingjing; Shou, Lu; Chen, Quanzhen; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhu, Genhai; Zeng, Jiangning

    2013-11-15

    Six cruises were conducted in a fish farm adjacent to the Ninghai Power Plant in Xiangshan Bay, East China Sea. Fish farming significantly increased NH4(+), DIP, and TOC concentrations, while it significantly decreased the DO level. These increase/decrease trends were more pronounced in warmer seasons. Although culture practices did not significantly increase phytoplankton density, it drastically enhanced dinoflagellate abundance and domination. Significant differences in species diversity and community composition between the cages and the control area were also observed. Temperature elevation caused by thermal discharge associated with eutrophication resulted in a dominant species shift from diatoms alone to dinoflagellates and diatoms. This is the first report of stress-induced toxic dinoflagellate (Prorocentrum minimum) blooms in winter and the winter-spring transition in this bay. Therefore, the effects of aquaculture activity and power plant construction in such a eutrophic, semi-enclosed bay require further attention. PMID:24070454

  4. A compositional analysis approach to phytoplankton composition in coastal Mediterranean wetlands: Influence of salinity and nutrient availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Flores, Rocío; Quintana, Xavier D.; Romaní, Anna M.; Bañeras, Lluís; Ruiz-Rueda, Olaya; Compte, Jordi; Green, Andy J.; Egozcue, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean wetland communities are strongly constrained by hydrological perturbations and the water flow regime. Salinity and nutrient availability have often been considered the most important variables determining changes in the phytoplankton community of coastal wetlands. Ratios between the main environmental variables often have more relevance than the absolute values of each variable; however, in most cases ratios are not suitable for use in multivariate models commonly used by limnologists. The main objective of the present work was to identify the main variables or variable ratios that are the driving forces of the major phytoplankton taxonomic groups in Mediterranean coastal wetlands, using compositional data analysis techniques (CoDa). With this aim, eleven shallow wetlands (6 in Empordà, 5 in Doñana, NE and SW of Spain respectively) were sampled in winter and spring 2007. Two approaches were used: the first one using raw data and the second one using CoDa techniques to transform data. Our results show that differences in hydrological patterns led to three main community assemblages, ranging from communities dominated by typical marine taxa (diatoms and dinoflagellates) when the marine influence was high, to communities dominated by cyanobacteria during confinement and when inorganic nitrogen was scarce. In freshwaters with a high turnover rate, the community was dominated by opportunistic chlorophytes and cryptophytes that need inorganic nitrogen availability. When the raw data and CoDa approaches were compared, the CoDa approach permitted a better ecological interpretation of the phytoplankton community and the main ecological processes. Salinity was the main environmental determinant with both approaches, while the second CoDa RDA axis was related with the balance between the peptidase and phosphatase enzyme activities, confirming the relevance of nutrient retrieval processes in determining phytoplankton composition. We recommend the use of Co

  5. A preliminary study on phytoplankton community of Yantai Taozi Bay in autumn%烟台套子湾海域秋季浮游植物群落的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁璇璇; 纪灵; 王刚; 夏炳训; 丁琳

    2011-01-01

    根据2010年11月的调查数据,对套子湾海域浮游植物的群落结构进行了初步研究.共鉴定浮游植物3门24属43种,主要为温带近岸性和广布性种.其中,硅藻门20属35种,占总种数的81.40%,以圆筛藻属(Coscinodiscus)和角毛藻属(Chaetoceros)的种类为主;甲藻类3属7种,占总种数的16.28%,由角藻属(Ceratium)、多甲藻属(Peridinium)及夜光藻(Noctiluca scintillans)组成;金藻门只有小等刺硅鞭藻(Dictyocha fibula)1种.浮游植物细胞丰度的平面分布主要由浮游硅藻的分布决定,其高值区位于套子湾北部湾口和西北部区域.多样性分析表明,该海域浮游植物群落结构比较稳定.聚类分析发现浮游植物基本可归为4大类群,不同群落类型间的组成呈显著性差异.%Features of phytoplankton community were studied, based on the survey data of Taozi Bay in autumn, 2010. The results showed that 43 phytoplankton species were identified altogether, belonging to 3 phyla with 24 genera, in which 81.40% were Bacillariophyta and 16.28% were Dinophyta. In Bacillariophyta, Coscinodiscus and Chaetoceros were the dominant groups in terms of species number while Dinophyta was composed of Ceratium, Peridinium and Noctiluca scintillans. In Chrysophta, only Dictyocha fibula was identified. The horizontal distribution of phytoplankton was mainly determined by the diatom distribution pattern. It was high in the north and northwest of Taozi Bay. Analysis of Shannon-Wiener index, Margalef index and Pielou index showed the community structure was stable. The species at 14 stations were grouped into four ecotypes with cluster analysis, and One-Way ANOSIM test of four cruises revealed significant differences in both global and for pairwise test.

  6. Influence of timing of sea ice retreat on phytoplankton size during marginal ice zone bloom period on the Chukchi and Bering shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, A.; Hirawake, T.; Suzuki, K.; Eisner, L.; Imai, I.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Saitoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    The size structure and biomass of a phytoplankton community during the spring bloom period can affect the energy use of higher-trophic-level organisms through the predator-prey body size relationships. The timing of the sea ice retreat (TSR) also plays a crucial role in the seasonally ice-covered marine ecosystem, because it is tightly coupled with the timing of the spring bloom. Thus, it is important to monitor the temporal and spatial distributions of a phytoplankton community size structure. Prior to this study, an ocean colour algorithm was developed to derive phytoplankton size index FL, which is defined as the ratio of chlorophyll a (chl a) derived from cells larger than 5 µm to the total chl a, using satellite remote sensing for the Chukchi and Bering shelves. Using this method, we analysed the pixel-by-pixel relationships between FL during the marginal ice zone (MIZ) bloom period and TSR over the period of 1998-2013. The influences of the TSR on the sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in ocean heat content (ΔOHC) during the MIZ bloom period were also investigated. A significant negative relationship between FL and the TSR was widely found in the shelf region during the MIZ bloom season. However, we found a significant positive (negative) relationship between the SST (ΔOHC) and TSR. Specifically, an earlier sea ice retreat was associated with the dominance of larger phytoplankton during a colder and weakly stratified MIZ bloom season, suggesting that the duration of the nitrate supply, which is important for the growth of large-sized phytoplankton in this region (i.e. diatoms), can change according to the TSR. In addition, under-ice phytoplankton blooms are likely to occur in years with late ice retreat, because sufficient light for phytoplankton growth can pass through the ice and penetrate into the water columns as a result of an increase in solar radiation toward the summer solstice. Moreover, we found that both the length of the ice-free season

  7. Bioavailability of riverine dissolved organic matter to phytoplankton in the marine coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgensone, Iveta; Aigars, Juris

    2012-07-01

    Nutrient inputs from catchments with intensive agriculture are mostly dominated by inorganic nutrients, whereas the contribution of organic nutrients from catchments with natural forests can be considerable but there is a pooere understanding of this nutrient source. Consequently this study investigated spring, summer and autumn phytoplankton community responses to enrichment by riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM). Dissolved organic substances were extracted from the Daugava River, fractionated into three molecular size classes: 1) 5-100 kDa, 2) 100-1000 kDa, and 3) >1000 kDa, and added to a microcosm with natural assemblages from the Gulf of Riga. During the spring the phytoplankton community was dominated (97%) by diatoms and the species composition did not change over the course of the experiment. Specific species and functional groups of the summer and autumn phytoplankton communities responded positively to these treatments. Small-celled cyanobacteria and Monoraphidium contortum responded to almost all size fractions of DOM for the summer and autumn experiments. Oocystis spp. characteristic for the summer and Chaetoceros wighamii, Cyclotella spp., Thalassiosira baltica for the autumn responded to treatment by two and three size classes of organic substances, respectively, while Merismopedia spp. shifted from one food source to another during the summer experiment.

  8. Community Changes Address Common Health Threat

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-30

    This podcast helps residents living in multiunit housing, like apartments and condos, understand the threat of secondhand smoke. It also helps residents understand what steps they can take to breathe a little easier if involuntarily exposed to secondhand smoke.  Created: 9/30/2013 by Division of Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 9/30/2013.

  9. [Ecological characteristics of phytoplankton in Suining tributary under bio-remediation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyan; Zhao, Jianfu; Zhang, Yalei; Ma, Limin

    2005-04-01

    Based on the analyses of phytoplankton community in the treated and untreated reaches of Suining tributary of Suzhou River, this paper studied the effects of bio-remediation on phytoplankton. As the result of the remediation, the density and Chl-a content of phytoplankton in treated reach were greatly declined, while the species number and Shannon-Wiener diversity index ascended obviously. The percentage of Chlorophyta and Baeillariophyta ascended, and some species indicating medium-and oligo-pollution were found. All of these illustrated that bio-remediation engineering might significantly benefit to the improvement of phytoplankton community structure and water quality. PMID:16011171

  10. Variation of phytoplankton absorption coefficients in the northern South China Sea during spring and autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the temporal and spatial variabilities of phytoplankton absorption coefficients (αphλ and their relationships with physical processes in the northern South China Sea from two cruise surveys during spring (May 2001 and late autumn (November 2002. A large river plume induced by heavy precipitation in May stimulated a phytoplankton bloom on the inner shelf, causing significant changes in the surface water in αph values and B/R ratios (αph(440/αph(675. This was consistent with the observed one order of magnitude elevation of chlorophyll α and a shift from a pico/nano dominated phytoplankton community to one dominated by micro-algae. At the seasonal level, enhanced vertical mixing due to strengthened northeast monsoon in November has been observed to result in higher surface αph(675 (0.002–0.006 m−1 higher and less pronounced subsurface maximum on the outer shelf/slope in November as compared that in May. Measurements of αph and B/R ratios from three transects in November revealed a highest surface αph(675 immediately outside the mouth of the Pearl River Estuary, whereas lower αph(675 and higher B/R ratios were featured in the outer shelf/slope waters, demonstrating the respective influence of the Pearl River plume and the oligotrophic nature of South China Sea water. The difference in spectral shapes of phytoplankton absorption (measured by B/R ratios and bathochromic shifts on these three transects infers that picoprocaryotes are the major component of the phytoplankton community on the outer shelf/slope rather than on the inner shelf. In addition, a regional tuning of the phytoplankton absorption spectral model (Carder et al., 1999 demonstrated a greater spatial variation than seasonal variation in the lead parameter a0(λ. These results suggest that phytoplankton

  11. Short-term changes of the mesozooplankton community and copepod gut pigment in the Chukchi Sea in autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Matsuno

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Chukchi Sea, due to the recent drastic reduction of sea-ice during the summer, an increasing formation of atmospheric turbulence has been reported. However, the importance and effects of atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem are not fully understood in this region. To evaluate the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem, high-frequent sampling (two to four times per day on the mesozooplankton community and the gut pigment of dominant copepods were made at a fixed station in the Chukchi Sea from 10 to 25 September 2013. During the study period, a strong wind event (SWE was observed on 18 September. After the SWE, the standing stock of chlorophyll a (chl a was increased, especially for micro-size (> 10 μm fractions. Zooplankton abundance ranged 23 610–56 809 ind. m−2 and exhibited no clear changes with SWE. In terms of abundance, calanoid copepods constituted the most dominated taxa (mean: 57%, followed by barnacle larvae (31%. Within the calanoid copepods, small-sized Pseudocalanus spp. (65% and large-sized Calanus glacialis (30% dominated. In the population structure of C. glacialis, copepodid stage 5 (C5 dominated, and the mean copepodid stage did not vary with SWE. The dominance of accumulated lipids in C5 and C6 females with immature gonads indicated that they were preparing for seasonal diapause. The gut pigment of C. glacialis C5 was higher at night and was correlated with ambient chl a, and a significant increase was observed after SWE (2.6 vs. 4.5 ng pigment ind.−1. Assuming C : Chl a ratio, the grazing impact by C. glacialis C5 was estimated to be 4.14 mg C m−2 day−1, which corresponded to 0.5–4.6% of the standing stock of micro-size phytoplankton. Compared with the metabolic food requirement, their feeding on phytoplankton accounted for 12.6% of their total food requirement. These facts suggest that C. glacialis could not maintain their population on solely phytoplankton food, and other food

  12. Change in School and Community Attitudes in an Athapaskan Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovando, Carlos J.

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the attitudes of students, parents, and teachers toward school and community issues in Nulato, a remote Athapaskan village, noting changes in attitude between 1983 and 1992. Results suggested the community valued the maintenance of cultural heritage, and cultural and language restoration were becoming high priorities…

  13. Seymour Sarason in Memorial: Prospects for Community and Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Kenneth I.

    2012-01-01

    Seymour Sarason passed away on January 10, 2010 at the age of 91. He was the author of more than 40 books, including The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change (1971), The Creation of Settings and the Future Societies (1972), and The Psychological Sense of Community: Prospects for a Community Psychology (1974). His groundbreaking ideas…

  14. Using Education to Bring Climate Change Adaptation to Pacific Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vize, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Traditional communities remain a dominant feature in the Pacific and are key players in land and sea management. Fostering improved climate literacy is therefore essential to equip communities to respond to the current and future challenges posed by climate change in the region. Increased understanding and development of skills to respond to the…

  15. Changes in adaptive capacity of Kenyan fishing communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinner, Joshua E.; Huchery, Cindy; Hicks, Christina C.; Daw, Tim M.; Marshall, Nadine; Wamukota, Andrew; Allison, Edward H.

    2015-09-01

    Coastal communities are particularly at risk from the impacts of a changing climate. Building the capacity of coastal communities to cope with and recover from a changing environment is a critical means to reducing their vulnerability. Yet, few studies have quantitatively examined adaptive capacity in such communities. Here, we build on an emerging body of research examining adaptive capacity in natural resource-dependent communities in two important ways. We examine how nine indicators of adaptive capacity vary: among segments of Kenyan fishing communities; and over time. Socially disaggregated analyses found that the young, those who had migrated, and those who do not participate in decision-making seemed least prepared for adapting to change in these resource-dependent communities. These results highlight the most vulnerable segments of society when it comes to preparing for and adapting to change in resource-dependent communities. Comparisons through time showed that aspects of adaptive capacity seemed to have increased between 2008 and 2012 owing to higher observed community infrastructure and perceived availability of credit.

  16. How to Make a Healthy Change in Your Community Today

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-15

    In this podcast, the speakers will discuss how to create healthy changes that benefit residents and businesses in local communities, as well as provide inspiration for other communities to make healthy living a priority.  Created: 4/15/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  17. Developmental Education Students in Texas Community Colleges: Changes over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, D. Patrick; Slate, John R.

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, we analyzed student enrollment data from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board accountability website for all Texas community colleges from 2000 through 2011. The numbers and percentages of community college students who were developmental education students were calculated and analyzed to determine changes over…

  18. Behavioural change in an urban smart-grid community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milovanovic, Marko; Steg, Emmalina; Spears, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Achieving long term behavioral change is a challenging task, especially when it comes to changing energy use habits. In our research we explore the social route to behavioral change, and examine how people influence each other in urban communities. We explore the conditions under which individuals a

  19. Variation of spatial and temporal distributions of phytoplankton community in coastal waters of Yantai%烟台近海浮游植物的时空变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王妍; 董志军; 刘东艳; 邸宝平

    2013-01-01

    2010年4月-2011年3月对烟台近海(四十里湾和套子湾)浮游植物群落结构时空变化特征展开了为期1年的双月调查.在28个站位的调查研究中,共发现浮游植物78属187种,其中硅藻50属103种,甲藻21属73种,褐胞藻5属7种,绿藻1属3种,未定类1种.硅藻在数量与物种组成上为主要类群,分别占浮游植物总量的97.3%与55.3%,其次为甲藻.浮游植物细胞丰度、多样性指数(H')和均匀度指数(J)呈现明显的季节特征:细胞丰度周年变动范围为0.6×104~156.7× 104 cells/L,最高峰出现在夏季(8月),次高峰出现在春季(3,4月);多样性指数(H')的周年变动范围是1.23~2.55,均匀度指数(J)的周年变动范围是0.28~0.68,两者在夏初(6月)和秋季(10月)较高.浮游植物优势种在夏季以硅藻-甲藻-褐胞藻联合为主,其余调查季节主要以硅藻为主.应用聚类分析分析了6个航次浮游植物群落结构的平面分布格局.四十里湾和套子湾细胞丰度在整个调查期间无显著差异,而在秋季(10月)和冬季(12月)存在显著差异.春初(3月),四十里湾与套子湾浮游植物群落结构差异显著,其他调查季节两湾浮游植物并无显著差异.%The research on the variation of temporal and spatial distributions of phytoplankton community in the coastal waters of Yantai (Sishili Bay and Taozi Bay) was bimonthly conducted during April 2010 to March 2011 in two bays.A total of 187 phytoplankton species belonging to 78 genera was identified from the samples of 28 sites.Among them,50 genera and 103 species were Bacillariphyta; 21 genera and 73 species were Dinophyta; 5 genera and 7 species were Heterokontophyta;1 genera and 3 species were Chlorophyta; there was one incertae sedis.Diatoms dominated in the abundance (97.3 %) and species richness (55.3 %),followed by Dinoflagellates.There existed significant temporal variations in terms of cell abundance,Shannon-Weaver index (H') and evenness (J

  20. Large-scale changes in community composition: determining land use and climate change signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kampichler

    Full Text Available Human land use and climate change are regarded as the main driving forces of present-day and future species extinction. They may potentially lead to a profound reorganisation of the composition and structure of natural communities throughout the world. However, studies that explicitly investigate both forms of impact--land use and climate change--are uncommon. Here, we quantify community change of Dutch breeding bird communities over the past 25 years using time lag analysis. We evaluate the chronological sequence of the community temperature index (CTI which reflects community response to temperature increase (increasing CTI indicates an increase in relative abundance of more southerly species, and the temporal trend of the community specialisation index (CSI which reflects community response to land use change (declining CSI indicates an increase of generalist species. We show that the breeding bird fauna underwent distinct directional change accompanied by significant changes both in CTI and CSI which suggests a causal connection between climate and land use change and bird community change. The assemblages of particular breeding habitats neither changed at the same speed and nor were they equally affected by climate versus land use changes. In the rapidly changing farmland community, CTI and CSI both declined slightly. In contrast, CTI increased in the more slowly changing forest and heath communities, while CSI remained stable. Coastal assemblages experienced both an increase in CTI and a decline in CSI. Wetland birds experienced the fastest community change of all breeding habitat assemblages but neither CTI nor CSI showed a significant trend. Overall, our results suggest that the interaction between climate and land use changes differs between habitats, and that comparing trends in CSI and CTI may be useful in tracking the impact of each determinant.

  1. Stormwater runoff drives viral community composition changes in inland freshwaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt E. Williamson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Storm events impact freshwater microbial communities by transporting terrestrial viruses and other microbes to freshwater systems, and by potentially resuspending microbes from bottom sediments. The magnitude of these impacts on freshwater ecosystems is unknown and largely unexplored. Field studies carried out at two discrete sites in coastal Virginia (USA were used to characterize the viral load carried by runoff and to test the hypothesis that terrestrial viruses introduced through stormwater runoff change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Field data gathered from an agricultural watershed indicated that primary runoff can contain viral densities approximating those of receiving waters. Furthermore, viruses attached to suspended colloids made up a large fraction of the total load, particularly in early stages of the storm. At a second field site (stormwater retention pond, RAPD-PCR profiling showed that the viral community of the pond changed dramatically over the course of two intense storms while relatively little change was observed over similar time scales in the absence of disturbance. Comparisons of planktonic and particle-associated viral communities revealed two completely distinct communities, suggesting that particle-associated viruses represent a potentially large and overlooked portion of aquatic viral abundance and diversity. Our findings show that stormwater runoff can quickly change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Based on these findings, increased storms in the coastal mid-Atlantic region predicted by most climate change models will likely have important impacts on the structure and function of local freshwater microbial communities.

  2. Sisters at Work: Career and Community Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briody, Elizabeth K.; Sullivan, Teresa A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examine occupational differentiation of U.S. Catholic nuns before and since the Second Vatican Council. Data were collected from interviews with 30 sisters representing 11 congregations. The analysis relates the diversification of their careers to changes in ideology and life-style and to the changing demographic and financial status…

  3. Satellite-detected fluorescence reveals global physiology of ocean phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Behrenfeld

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton photosynthesis links global ocean biology and climate-driven fluctuations in the physical environment. These interactions are largely expressed through changes in phytoplankton physiology, but physiological status has proven extremely challenging to characterize globally. Phytoplankton fluorescence does provide a rich source of physiological information long exploited in laboratory and field studies, and is now observed from space. Here we evaluate the physiological underpinnings of global variations in satellite-based phytoplankton chlorophyll fluorescence. The three dominant factors influencing fluorescence distributions are chlorophyll concentration, pigment packaging effects on light absorption, and light-dependent energy-quenching processes. After accounting for these three factors, resultant global distributions of quenching-corrected fluorescence quantum yields reveal a striking consistency with anticipated patterns of iron availability. High fluorescence quantum yields are typically found in low iron waters, while low quantum yields dominate regions where other environmental factors are most limiting to phytoplankton growth. Specific properties of photosynthetic membranes are discussed that provide a mechanistic view linking iron stress to satellite-detected fluorescence. Our results present satellite-based fluorescence as a valuable tool for evaluating nutrient stress predictions in ocean ecosystem models and give the first synoptic observational evidence that iron plays an important role in seasonal phytoplankton dynamics of the Indian Ocean. Satellite fluorescence may also provide a path for monitoring climate-phytoplankton physiology interactions and improving descriptions of phytoplankton light use efficiencies in ocean productivity models.

  4. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, James S.; Cody, Rosie D.; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R.

    2016-06-01

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate “baseline” variability on glacial–interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations.

  5. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, James S; Cody, Rosie D; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R

    2016-06-21

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate "baseline" variability on glacial-interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations. PMID:27274061

  6. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  7. The annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, M.; Cloern, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial plants are powerful climate sentinels because their annual cycles of growth, reproduction and senescence are finely tuned to the annual climate cycle having a period of one year. Consistency in the seasonal phasing of terrestrial plant activity provides a relatively low-noise background from which phenological shifts can be detected and attributed to climate change. Here, we ask whether phytoplankton biomass also fluctuates over a consistent annual cycle in lake, estuarine-coastal and ocean ecosystems and whether there is a characteristic phenology of phytoplankton as a consistent phase and amplitude of variability. We compiled 125 time series of phytoplankton biomass (chloro-phyll a concentration) from temperate and subtropical zones and used wavelet analysis to extract their dominant periods of variability and the recurrence strength at those periods. Fewer than half (48%) of the series had a dominant 12-month period of variability, commonly expressed as the canonical spring-bloom pattern. About 20 per cent had a dominant six-month period of variability, commonly expressed as the spring and autumn or winter and summer blooms of temperate lakes and oceans. These annual patterns varied in recurrence strength across sites, and did not persist over the full series duration at some sites. About a third of the series had no component of variability at either the six-or 12-month period, reflecting a series of irregular pulses of biomass. These findings show that there is high variability of annual phytoplankton cycles across ecosystems, and that climate-driven annual cycles can be obscured by other drivers of population variability, including human disturbance, aperiodic weather events and strong trophic coupling between phytoplankton and their consumers. Regulation of phytoplankton biomass by multiple processes operating at multiple time scales adds complexity to the challenge of detecting climate-driven trends in aquatic ecosystems where the noise to

  8. Bacterioplankton communities of Crater Lake, OR: Dynamic changes with euphotic zone food web structure and stable deep water populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, E.; Vergin, K.L.; Larson, G.L.; Giovannoni, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of bacterial and archaeal species in Crater Lake plankton varies dramatically over depth and with time, as assessed by hybridization of group-specific oligonucleotides to RNA extracted from lakewater. Nonmetric, multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of relative bacterial phylotype densities revealed complex relationships among assemblages sampled from depth profiles in July, August and September of 1997 through 1999. CL500-11 green nonsulfur bacteria (Phylum Chloroflexi) and marine Group I crenarchaeota are consistently dominant groups in the oxygenated deep waters at 300 and 500 m. Other phylotypes found in the deep waters are similar to surface and mid-depth populations and vary with time. Euphotic zone assemblages are dominated either by ??-proteobacteria or CL120-10 verrucomicrobia, and ACK4 actinomycetes. MDS analyses of euphotic zone populations in relation to environmental variables and phytoplankton and zooplankton population structures reveal apparent links between Daphnia pulicaria zooplankton population densities and microbial community structure. These patterns may reflect food web interactions that link kokanee salmon population densities to community structure of the bacterioplankton, via fish predation on Daphnia with cascading consequences to Daphnia bacterivory and predation on bacterivorous protists. These results demonstrate a stable bottom-water microbial community. They also extend previous observations of food web-driven changes in euphotic zone bacterioplankton community structure to an oligotrophic setting. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. 浙闽沿岸流消退时期的浮游植物群落结构特征%Community structure of phytoplankton during the fading period of Zhemin coastal water in Taiwan Strait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雨; 林茂; 林更铭; 项鹏

    2011-01-01

    浙闽沿岸流对台湾海峡的水文环境意义重大.依据国家海洋局"908"补充调查专项,通过对覆盖浙闽沿岸流海洋锋面过程的海洋生物调查研究,于2008年4月实施针对浙闽沿岸流消退时期(春季)台湾海峡锋面海域的浮游植物取样分析.结果共记录3门41属86种,其中硅藻35属76种.甲藻5属9种,蓝藻1属1种.种类组成以暖水性种类和广布性种类为主,分别占总种类的50.29%和34.17%.主要优势种为琼氏圆筛藻(Coscinodiscus jonesianus)、辐射圆筛藻(Coscinodiscus radiatus)、密联角毛藻(Chaetoceros densus)、三角角藻(Ceratium tripos).浮游植物丰度平均为137.89×104 cells/m3,与盐度存在极显著正相关关系,暖水高盐性种类有高丰度.丰度的平面分布呈现从近岸往外海、从北部向南部递增的态势.浮游植物物种多样性较为丰富,种间比例较为均匀.浮游植物群落结构反映了浙闽沿岸流与南海暖流的水文消长动态.%Zhemin Coastal Water plays an important role in marine dynamics of Taiwan Strait. According to a complemental investigation of "908" from State Oceanic Administrration, halobios were conducted in Taiwan Strait Front of Zhemin Coastal Water in April, 2009. The community structure, the abundance, the composition and distribution of phytoplankton were analysed based on investigation data. The results showed 86 species belonging to 41 genera were identified. including diatoms of 76 species in 35 genera, pyrrophyta of 9 species in 5 genera,cyanobacteria of 1 species in 1 genera. Warm water species were accounting for 50.29% while eurythermy species were accounting for 34.17%. The main dominant species included Coscinodiscus jonesianus, Coscinodiscus radiatus,Chaetoceros densus and Ceratium tripos. The average of phytoplankton abundance was 137.89×104 cells/m3. which had significantly positive correlation with salinity. Abundance distribution of phytoplankton was higher in the southern

  10. Influence of timing of sea ice retreat on phytoplankton size during marginal ice zone bloom period in the Chukchi and Bering shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, A.; Hirawake, T.; Suzuki, K.; Eisner, L.; Imai, I.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Saitoh, S. I.

    2015-08-01

    Timing of sea ice retreat (TSR) as well as cell size of primary producers (i.e., phytoplankton) plays crucial roles in seasonally ice-covered marine ecosystem. Thus, it is important to monitor the temporal and spatial distribution of phytoplankton community size structure. Prior to this study, an ocean color algorithm has been developed to derive phytoplankton size index FL, which is defined as the ratio of chlorophyll a derived from the cells larger than 5 μm to the total chl a using satellite remote sensing for the Chukchi and Bering shelves. Using this method, we analyzed pixel-by-pixel relationships between FL during marginal ice zone (MIZ) bloom period and TSR over a period of 1998-2013. The influence of TSR on sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in ocean heat content (ΔOHC) during the MIZ bloom period were also investigated. A significant negative relationship between FL and TSR was widely found in the shelf region during MIZ bloom season. On the other hand, we found a significant positive (negative) relationship between SST (ΔOHC) and TSR. That is, earlier sea-ice retreat was associated with a dominance of larger phytoplankton during a colder and weakly stratified MIZ bloom season, suggesting that duration of nitrate supply, which is important for large-sized phytoplankton growth in this region (i.e., diatoms), can change according to TSR. In addition, under-ice phytoplankton blooms are likely to occur in years with late ice retreat, because sufficient light for phytoplankton growth can pass through the ice and penetrate into the water columns due to an increase in solar radiation toward the summer solstice. Moreover, we found not only the length of ice-free season but also annual median of FL positively correlated with annual net primary production (APP). Thus, both phytoplankton community composition and growing season are important for APP in the study area. Our findings showed quantitative relationship between the inter-annual variability of FL

  11. Influence of timing of sea ice retreat on phytoplankton size during marginal ice zone bloom period in the Chukchi and Bering shelves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fujiwara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Timing of sea ice retreat (TSR as well as cell size of primary producers (i.e., phytoplankton plays crucial roles in seasonally ice-covered marine ecosystem. Thus, it is important to monitor the temporal and spatial distribution of phytoplankton community size structure. Prior to this study, an ocean color algorithm has been developed to derive phytoplankton size index FL, which is defined as the ratio of chlorophyll a derived from the cells larger than 5 μm to the total chl a using satellite remote sensing for the Chukchi and Bering shelves. Using this method, we analyzed pixel-by-pixel relationships between FL during marginal ice zone (MIZ bloom period and TSR over a period of 1998–2013. The influence of TSR on sea surface temperature (SST and changes in ocean heat content (ΔOHC during the MIZ bloom period were also investigated. A significant negative relationship between FL and TSR was widely found in the shelf region during MIZ bloom season. On the other hand, we found a significant positive (negative relationship between SST (ΔOHC and TSR. That is, earlier sea-ice retreat was associated with a dominance of larger phytoplankton during a colder and weakly stratified MIZ bloom season, suggesting that duration of nitrate supply, which is important for large-sized phytoplankton growth in this region (i.e., diatoms, can change according to TSR. In addition, under-ice phytoplankton blooms are likely to occur in years with late ice retreat, because sufficient light for phytoplankton growth can pass through the ice and penetrate into the water columns due to an increase in solar radiation toward the summer solstice. Moreover, we found not only the length of ice-free season but also annual median of FL positively correlated with annual net primary production (APP. Thus, both phytoplankton community composition and growing season are important for APP in the study area. Our findings showed quantitative relationship between the inter

  12. 庐山西海夏秋季浮游植物群落结构及多样性分析%Phytoplankton Community Structure and Biodiversity at Lushanxihai Reservoir in Summer and Autumn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁娜; 周彦锋; 周游; 尤洋

    2014-01-01

    为了解庐山西海生态系统结构,维护水库生态系统平衡,于2012年夏季(8月)和秋季(10月)在庐山西海均匀设置18个采样点,对浮游植物进行采样调查。结果表明,浮游植物共计8门、86种;其中,绿藻门种类最多,共43种,占总种类的59.43%;其次是硅藻门和蓝藻门,为17种和14种,分别占19.54%和16.09%。优势种共4门、14种,主要有莱哈衣藻(Chlamydomonas reinhardi)、黏四集藻(Palmellaceae mucosa)、类颤藻鱼腥藻(Anabaena oscillarioides)、卵形隐藻(Cryptomonas ovate)和尖尾蓝隐藻(Chroomonas acuta)。浮游植物密度为4.28×105~5.17×106个/L,平均为2.20×106个/L;生物量为1.24~7.01 mg/L,平均为2.90 mg/L;其中,夏季平均密度为3.15×106个/L,生物量平均为3.90 mg/L;而秋季平均密度为1.25×106个/L,生物量平均为1.89 mg/L。Shan-non-Wiener多样性指数为2.84~4.45,Pielous 均匀度指数为0.63~0.89,Margalef丰富度指数为1.46~3.69。庐山西海浮游植物的季节性变化明显,藻类种数、数量和生物量均表现为夏季高于秋季,生物多样性指数表现为秋季大于夏季;空间分布上,夏、秋季各采样点浮游植物的种类丰富程度、群体结构稳定程度及水质清洁程度总体较好,其中夏季过渡区较好,而秋季湖泊区较好。%The study of phytoplankton community structure is one of the core areas of lake ecological research,pro-viding important information on biological resources and the ecological status of lakes.In this study,we investigated the community structure of phytoplankton in Lushanxihai Reservoir,analyzed seasonal and spatial variations,as well as the biodiversity of the phytoplankton community.The data collected were used to evaluate the water quality of Lushanxihai Reservoir.Lushanxihai,a large reservoir (308 km2 )located in the northwest of

  13. Phytoplankton response to winter warming modified by large-bodied zooplankton: an experimental microcosm study

    OpenAIRE

    Hu He; Xiaolong Zhu; Xiaolan Song; Erik Jeppesen; Zhengwen Liu

    2015-01-01

    While several field investigations have demonstrated significant effects of cool season (winter or spring) warming on phytoplankton development, the role played by large-bodied zooplankton grazers for the responses of phytoplankton to winter warming is ambiguous. We conducted an outdoor experiment to compare the effect of winter warming (heating by 3°C) in combination with presence and absence of Daphnia grazing (D. similis) on phytoplankton standing crops and community structure under eutrop...

  14. IMPACT OF JUTE RETTING ON PHYTOPLANKTON DIVERSITY AND AQUATIC HEALTH: BIOMONITORING IN A TROPICAL OXBOW LAKE

    OpenAIRE

    Dipankar Ghosh; Jayanta Kumar Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton acts as a primary producer and biological filter of aquatic ecosystem. Jute retting during monsoon is a common anthropological activity in the rural Bengal. Quantitative seasonal bio-monitoring of phytoplankton community composition with relative abundance and its diversity indices was carried out in this study from April 2013 to March 2014 to assess water quality and the impact of jute retting on phytoplankton diversity of a tropical fresh water oxbow lake in Nadia district of ...

  15. A Quantitative and Qualitative Study on the Phytoplankton of Palandöken Pond

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan GÜRBÜZ

    2000-01-01

    In this research, the phytoplankton community of Palandöken pond was investigated quantitatively and qualitatively in samples taken vertically from the surface to 10 m depth between October 1990 and October 1992. The physical and chemical properties of the pond water were also determined. 99 taxa were determined in the phytoplankton and the proportions of them were as follows: Bacillariophyta 79%, Chlorophyta 10%, Cynophyta 6%, Euglenophyta 5%. The phytoplankton generally increased in t...

  16. Zooplankton community structure, biomass and role in carbon fluxes during the second half of a phytoplankton bloom in the eastern sector of the Kerguelen Shelf (January February 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, François; Thibault-Botha, Delphine; Nowaczyk, Antoine; Lefèvre, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    During the KEOPS survey, zooplankton was sampled with vertical tows to estimate zooplankton stock and to study its composition and size structure both using traditional taxonomic identification and Optical Plankton Counter (OPC). Mesozooplankton OPC-biomass derived from OPC size spectra and integrated over 200 m was variable with average values about 10 g C m -2 along transects A and B and at the fixed station KERFIX, and only ˜5 g C m -2 along transect C. Stations in the most oceanic area (A11, B11, and C11) presented biomass values 3 times lower than the mean value of their respective transects, highlighting a clear decrease of the biomass beyond the shelf. The mesozooplankton community was dominated by copepods, particularly by large- and medium-size calanoids and small Oithonidae. Large numbers of different copepodites stages and nauplii were found, as well as exuviae, indicating that individuals were in active growing phase over the whole area. Euphausiids, chaetognaths, appendicularians, amphipods, polychaetes, ostracods and salps were found as well. Two reference stations, A3 located in the middle of the bloom on the shelf and C11 in the oceanic waters, were visited several times during the cruise. No particular temporal variations, neither in biomass nor in community structure, were observed, but differences in integrated biomass (average biomass at A3: 10.6 g C m -2; at C11: 2.8 g C m -2) between oceanic and shelf stations clearly show an enhanced secondary production on the shelf. Additional measurements at some stations were performed in order to quantify ingestion (gut contents) and respiration rates on key species and size groups. Gut pigment contents were higher during the first half of the survey at both stations, showing clear temporal changes probably linked to the prey field, with lower values always reported in the oceanic waters compared to the shelf. Values of respiration and ingestion rates extrapolated from OPC size spectra using published

  17. Spring phytoplankton and periphyton composition: case study from a thermally abnormal lakes in Western Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burchardt Lubomira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Getting to know the response of different groups of aquatic organisms tested in altered thermal environments to environmental conditions makes it possible to understand processes of adaptation and limitation factors such as temperature and light. Field sites were located in three thermally abnormal lakes (cooling system of power plants, in eastern part of Wielkopolska region (western Poland: Pątnowskie, Wąsosko-Mikorzyńskie and Licheńskie. Water temperatures of these lakes do not fall below 10°C throughout the year, and the surface water temperature in spring is about 20˚C. In this study, we investigated the species structure of the spring phytoplankton community in a temperature gradient and analyzed diversity of periphyton collected from alien species (Vallisneria spiralis and stones. 94 taxa belonging to 56 genera of algae (including phytoplankton and periphyton were determined. The highest number of algae species were observed among Chlorophyta (49, Bacillariophyceae (34 and Cyanobacteria (6. In spite of important differences in temperature in the investigated lakes, taxonomic composition of phytoplankton was comparable. Thermophilic species: Glochidinium penardiforme and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii were found in the species structure (blooms were not observed. The obtained data also showed that the biotic surface of Vallisneria spiralis was a better substrate for Bacillariophyceae colonization than stones. The examination in the spring season of these thermally altered lakes, indicated the taxonomic composition of phytoplankton typical for eutrophic reservoirs (not heated. There was no replacement of any phytoplankton groups which are characteristic for spring conditions, even if there were changes in the competition dynamics.

  18. Distribution patterns of phytoplankton in the Changjiang River estuary and adjacent waters in spring 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanzhou; Xu, Zijun; Yu, Rencheng; Yuan, Yongquan; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2016-09-01

    The Changjiang River estuary and adjacent waters are one of the most notable regions for red tides/harmful algal blooms in China's coastal waters. In this study, phytoplankton samples were collected and analyzed during the outbreak stage of red tides in May 2009. It was found that dinoflagellates, Prorocentrum donghaiense and Karenia mikimotoi, and diatoms, Skeletonema spp. and Paralia sulcata, were the major taxa dominating the phytoplankton community. Cluster analysis, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) and analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) was conducted on a data matrix including taxa composition and cell abundance of the phytoplankton samples. The analyses categorized the samples into three groups at a similarity level of 30%. Group I was characterized by estuarine diatoms and distributed mainly in the highly turbid estuarine region. Group II, which was dominated by the diatom Skeletonema spp. and represented the red tide of Skeletonema spp., was situated around Group I in the sea area west of 122°50'E. Group III was characterized by a high proportion of dinoflagellates and was found further offshore compared with Groups I and II. Group III was further divided into two subgroups (III-S1 and III-S2) at a similarity level of 40%. Group III-S1 was characterized by the presence of the benthic diatom P. sulcata, representing phytoplankton samples collected either from the bottom or from the sea area affected by upwelling. Group III-S2 was dominated by dinoflagellates and represented red tides formed by P. donghaiense and K. mikimotoi. A gradual change of red-tide causative species was observed from the estuary to the offshore sea area, from diatoms to armored dinoflagellates and then unarmored dinoflagellates. Environmental factors associated with each group, and thus affecting the distribution of phytoplankton and red tides, are discussed.

  19. Dynamic modelling of five different phytoplankton groups in the River Thames (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussi, Gianbattista; Whitehead, Paul; Bowes, Michael; Read, Daniel; Dadson, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Phytoplankton play a vital role in fluvial ecosystems, being a major producer of organic carbon, a food source for primary consumers and a relevant source of oxygen for many low-gradient rivers, but also a producer of potentially harmful toxins (e.g. cyanobacteria). For these reasons, the forecast and prevention of algal blooms is fundamental for the safe management of river systems. In this study, we developed a new process-based phytoplankton model for operational management and forecast of algal and cyanobacteria blooms subject to environmental change. The model is based on a mass-balance and it reproduces phytoplankton growth and death, taking into account the controlling effect played by water temperature, solar radiation, self-shading and dissolved phosphorus and silicon concentrations. The model was implemented in five reaches of the River Thames (UK) with a daily time step over a period of three years, and its results were compared to a novel dataset of cytometric data which includes community cell abundance of chlorophytes, diatoms, cyanobacteria, microcystis-like cyanobacteria and picoalgae. The model results were satisfactory in terms of fitting the observed data. A Multi-Objective General Sensitivity Analysis was also carried out in order to quantify model sensitivity to its parameters. It showed that the most influential parameters are phytoplankton growth and death rates, while phosphorus concentration showed little influence on phytoplankton growth, due to the high levels of phosphorus in the River Thames. The model was demonstrated to be a reliable tool to be used in algal bloom forecasting and management.

  20. Microbial community functional change during vertebrate carrion decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Pechal

    Full Text Available Microorganisms play a critical role in the decomposition of organic matter, which contributes to energy and nutrient transformation in every ecosystem. Yet, little is known about the functional activity of epinecrotic microbial communities associated with carrion. The objective of this study was to provide a description of the carrion associated microbial community functional activity using differential carbon source use throughout decomposition over seasons, between years and when microbial communities were isolated from eukaryotic colonizers (e.g., necrophagous insects. Additionally, microbial communities were identified at the phyletic level using high throughput sequencing during a single study. We hypothesized that carrion microbial community functional profiles would change over the duration of decomposition, and that this change would depend on season, year and presence of necrophagous insect colonization. Biolog EcoPlates™ were used to measure the variation in epinecrotic microbial community function by the differential use of 29 carbon sources throughout vertebrate carrion decomposition. Pyrosequencing was used to describe the bacterial community composition in one experiment to identify key phyla associated with community functional changes. Overall, microbial functional activity increased throughout decomposition in spring, summer and winter while it decreased in autumn. Additionally, microbial functional activity was higher in 2011 when necrophagous arthropod colonizer effects were tested. There were inconsistent trends in the microbial function of communities isolated from remains colonized by necrophagous insects between 2010 and 2011, suggesting a greater need for a mechanistic understanding of the process. These data indicate that functional analyses can be implemented in carrion studies and will be important in understanding the influence of microbial communities on an essential ecosystem process, carrion decomposition.

  1. Interactions of anthropogenic stress factors on marine phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Häder, Donat-P.; Gao, Kunshan

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton are the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Their biomass production and CO2 sequestration equals that of all terrestrial plants taken together. Phytoplankton productivity is controlled by a number of environmental factors, many of which currently undergo substantial changes due to anthropogenic global climate change. Most of these factors interact either additively or synergistically. Light availability is an absolute requirement for photosynthesis, but excessive visi...

  2. Large-scale changes in community composition: Determining land use and climate change signals

    OpenAIRE

    Kampichler, C.; Turnhout, C.A.M. van; Devictor, V; Van der Jeugd, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Human land use and climate change are regarded as the main driving forces of present-day and future species extinction. They may potentially lead to a profound reorganisation of the composition and structure of natural communities throughout the world. However, studies that explicitly investigate both forms of impact—land use and climate change—are uncommon. Here, we quantify community change of Dutch breeding bird communities over the past 25 years using time lag analysis. We evaluate the ch...

  3. Signs of the Land: Reaching Arctic Communities Facing Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Chase, M. J.; Demientieff, S.; Pfirman, S. L.; Brunacini, J.

    2014-12-01

    In July 2014, a diverse and intergenerational group of Alaskan Natives came together on Howard Luke's Galee'ya Camp by the Tanana River in Fairbanks, Alaska to talk about climate change and it's impacts on local communities. Over a period of four days, the Signs of the Land Climate Change Camp wove together traditional knowledge, local observations, Native language, and climate science through a mix of storytelling, presentations, dialogue, and hands-on, community-building activities. This camp adapted the model developed several years ago under the Association for Interior Native Educators (AINE)'s Elder Academy. Part of the Polar Learning and Responding Climate Change Education Partnership, the Signs of the Land Climate Change Camp was developed and conducted collaboratively with multiple partners to test a model for engaging indigenous communities in the co-production of climate change knowledge, communication tools, and solutions-building. Native Alaskans have strong subsistence and cultural connections to the land and its resources, and, in addition to being keen observers of their environment, have a long history of adapting to changing conditions. Participants in the camp included Elders, classroom teachers, local resource managers and planners, community members, and climate scientists. Based on their experiences during the camp, participants designed individualized outreach plans for bringing culturally-responsive climate learning to their communities and classrooms throughout the upcoming year. Plans included small group discussions, student projects, teacher training, and conference presentations.

  4. Generating Social Change through Community-Campus Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Naomi; Gaetz, Stephen; Phipps, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a qualitative case study approach was used to explore the changes that community-campus collaborations stimulate. The authors document the "processes of interaction" (Spaapen & van Drooge, 2011) through which collaborations seek to contribute to positive social change, highlighting the outputs, outcomes, and…

  5. Large-scale shifts in phytoplankton groups in the Equatorial Pacific during ENSO cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Masotti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO drives important changes in the marine productivity of the Equatorial Pacific, in particular during major El Niño/La Niña transitions. Changes in environmental conditions associated with these climatic events also likely impact phytoplankton composition. In this work, the distribution of four major phytoplankton groups (nanoeucaryotes, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and diatoms was examined between 1996 and 2007 by applying the PHYSAT algorithm to the ocean color data archive from the Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS. Coincident with the decrease in chlorophyll concentrations, a large-scale shift in the phytoplankton composition of the Equatorial Pacific, that was characterized by a decrease in Synechococcus and an increase in nanoeucaryote dominance, was observed during the early stages of both the strong El Niño of 1997 and the moderate El Niño of 2006. A significant increase in diatoms dominance was observed in the Equatorial Pacific during the 1998 La Niña and was associated with elevated marine productivity. An analysis of the environmental variables using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model (NEMO-PISCES suggests that the Synechococcus dominance decrease during the two El Niño events was associated with an abrupt decline in nutrient availability (−0.9 to −2.5 μM NO3 month−1. Alternatively, increased nutrient availability (3 μM NO3 month−1 during the 1998 La Niña resulted in Equatorial Pacific dominance diatom increase. Despite these phytoplankton community shifts, the mean composition is restored after a few months, which suggests resilience in community structure.

  6. Warming accelerates termination of a phytoplankton spring bloom by fungal parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenken, Thijs; Velthuis, Mandy; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette N; Stephan, Susanne; Aben, Ralf; Kosten, Sarian; van Donk, Ellen; Van de Waal, Dedmer B

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is expected to favour infectious diseases across ecosystems worldwide. In freshwater and marine environments, parasites play a crucial role in controlling plankton population dynamics. Infection of phytoplankton populations will cause a transfer of carbon and nutrients into parasites, which may change the type of food available for higher trophic levels. Some phytoplankton species are inedible to zooplankton, and the termination of their population by parasites may liberate otherwise unavailable carbon and nutrients. Phytoplankton spring blooms often consist of large diatoms inedible for zooplankton, but the zoospores of their fungal parasites may serve as a food source for this higher trophic level. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on the fungal infection of a natural phytoplankton spring bloom and followed the response of a zooplankton community. Experiments were performed in ca. 1000 L indoor mesocosms exposed to a controlled seasonal temperature cycle and a warm (+4 °C) treatment in the period from March to June 2014. The spring bloom was dominated by the diatom Synedra. At the peak of infection over 40% of the Synedra population was infected by a fungal parasite (i.e. a chytrid) in both treatments. Warming did not affect the onset of the Synedra bloom, but accelerated its termination. Peak population density of Synedra tended to be lower in the warm treatments. Furthermore, Synedra carbon: phosphorus stoichiometry increased during the bloom, particularly in the control treatments. This indicates enhanced phosphorus limitation in the control treatments, which may have constrained chytrid development. Timing of the rotifer Keratella advanced in the warm treatments and closely followed chytrid infections. The chytrids' zoospores may thus have served as an alternative food source to Keratella. Our study thus emphasizes the importance of incorporating not only nutrient limitation and grazing, but also parasitism in understanding the

  7. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Buck, Kristen N; Casey, John R; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu(2+) concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity

  8. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese and nickel in the incubation water. Over the three-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon (POC increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived cobalt (Co, manganese, and nickel were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Copper (Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu2+ concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1 atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2 these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3 growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic

  9. Phytoplankton distribution in three thermally distinct reactor cooling reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytoplankton community structure was studied in relation to physicochemical characteristics of three South Carolina reservoirs in close proximity and of similar age and bottom type. Thermal alteration, resulting from the input of cooling water from a nuclear reactor, was substantially different in each reservoir. This provided an opportunity to compare water temperature effects separated from season. Water temperature (when examined independently in statistical models) appeared to be less important than other environmental variables in determining phytoplankton community structure. Pond C, a reservoir receiving intensely heated effluent (> 200C ΔT), displayed low species diversity (Shannon-Weaver H 0C in summer. Par Pond, having a maximum ΔT of 50C, displayed no temperature-induced alteration of phytoplankton community structure

  10. Global change and marine communities: Alien species and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropogenic influences on the biosphere since the advent of the industrial age are increasingly causing global changes. Climatic change and the rising concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are ranking high in scientific and public agendas, and other components of global change are also frequently addressed, among which are the introductions of non indigenous species (NIS) in biogeographic regions well separated from the donor region, often followed by spectacular invasions. In the marine environment, both climatic change and spread of alien species have been studied extensively; this review is aimed at examining the main responses of ecosystems to climatic change, taking into account the increasing importance of biological invasions. Some general principles on NIS introductions in the marine environment are recalled, such as the importance of propagule pressure and of development stages during the time course of an invasion. Climatic change is known to affect many ecological properties; it interacts also with NIS in many possible ways. Direct (proximate) effects on individuals and populations of altered physical-chemical conditions are distinguished from indirect effects on emergent properties (species distribution, diversity, and production). Climatically driven changes may affect both local dispersal mechanisms, due to the alteration of current patterns, and competitive interactions between NIS and native species, due to the onset of new thermal optima and/or different carbonate chemistry. As well as latitudinal range expansions of species correlated with changing temperature conditions, and effects on species richness and the correlated extinction of native species, some invasions may provoke multiple effects which involve overall ecosystem functioning (material flow between trophic groups, primary production, relative extent of organic material decomposition, extent of benthic-pelagic coupling). Some examples are given, including a special

  11. Effects of increasing nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on phytoplankton community growth and toxicity during Planktothrix blooms in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Timothy W; Bullerjahn, George S; Tuttle, Taylor; McKay, Robert Michael; Watson, Susan B

    2015-06-16

    Sandusky Bay experiences annual toxic cyanobacterial blooms dominated by Planktothrix agardhii/suspensa. To further understand the environmental drivers of these events, we evaluated changes in the growth response and toxicity of the Planktothrix-dominated blooms to nutrient amendments with orthophosphate (PO4) and inorganic and organic forms of dissolved nitrogen (N; ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3) and urea) over the bloom season (June - October). We complemented these with a metagenomic analysis of the planktonic microbial community. Our results showed that bloom growth and microcystin (MC) concentrations responded more frequently to additions of dissolved N than PO4, and that the dual addition of NH4 + PO4 and Urea + PO4 yielded the highest MC concentrations in 54% of experiments. Metagenomic analysis confirmed that P. agardhii/suspensa was the primary MC producer. The phylogenetic distribution of nifH revealed that both heterocystous cyanobacteria and heterotrophic proteobacteria had the genetic potential for N2 fixation in Sandusky Bay. These results suggest that as best management practices are developed for P reductions in Sandusky Bay, managers must be aware of the negative implications of not managing N loading into this system as N may significantly impact cyanobacterial bloom size and toxicity. PMID:25992592

  12. Improving dynamic phytoplankton reserve-utilization models with an indirect proxy for internal nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Martino E; Heimann, Kirsten; Connolly, Sean R

    2016-09-01

    Ecologists have often used indirect proxies to represent variables that are difficult or impossible to measure directly. In phytoplankton, the internal concentration of the most limiting nutrient in a cell determines its growth rate. However, directly measuring the concentration of nutrients within cells is inaccurate, expensive, destructive, and time-consuming, substantially impairing our ability to model growth rates in nutrient-limited phytoplankton populations. The red chlorophyll autofluorescence (hereafter "red fluorescence") signal emitted by a cell is highly correlated with nitrogen quota in nitrogen-limited phytoplankton species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of including flow cytometric red fluorescence as a proxy for internal nitrogen status to model phytoplankton growth rates. To this end, we used the classic Quota model and designed three approaches to calibrate its model parameters to data: where empirical observations on cell internal nitrogen quota were used to fit the model ("Nitrogen-Quota approach"), where quota dynamics were inferred only from changes in medium nutrient depletion and population density ("Virtual-Quota approach"), or where red fluorescence emission of a cell was used as an indirect proxy for its internal nitrogen quota ("Fluorescence-Quota approach"). Two separate analyses were carried out. In the first analysis, stochastic model simulations were parameterized from published empirical relationships and used to generate dynamics of phytoplankton communities reared under nitrogen-limited conditions. Quota models were fitted to the dynamics of each simulated species with the three different approaches and the performance of each model was compared. In the second analysis, we fit Quota models to laboratory time-series and we calculate the ability of each calibration approach to describe the observed trajectories of internal nitrogen quota in the culture. Results from both analyses concluded that the

  13. Changing values, changing communities: A guide to the development of healthy, sustainable communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This guide examines four alternative planning approaches which have emerged in response to concerns about the livability and sustainability of communities: Neo-traditional planning, the pedestrian pocket, cohousing, and the eco-village concept. The guide is intended to aid in evaluating these and other approaches in terms of how they contribute to the development of healthy, sustainable communities. It provides an evaluative framework which defines the essential attributes of a healthy, sustainable community, identifies related planning goals, and identifies some of the tools which communities may use to meet their goals. The guide also presents eight case studies which exemplify the four approaches and reviews these studies to illustrate how the evaluative framework may be applied. The case studies are from British Columbia, Oregon, Alberta, and Ontario, and range in size from a 17-unit housing project to a community for 27,000 people.

  14. Seasonality, phytoplankton succession and the biogeochemical impacts of an autumn storm in the northeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Stuart C.; Finlay, Madelaine; Hemsley, Victoria S.; Martin, Adrian P.

    2016-03-01

    Phytoplankton chemotaxonomic distributions are examined in conjunction with taxon specific particulate biomass concentrations and phytoplankton abundances to investigate the biogeochemical consequences of the passage of an autumn storm in the northeast Atlantic Ocean. Chemotaxonomy indicated that the phytoplankton community was dominated by nanoplankton (2-20 μm), which on average represented 75 ± 8% of the community. Microplankton (20-200 μm) and picoplankton (chlorophyll-a (TCHLa = CHLa + Divinyl CHLa) concentrations ranged from 22 to 677 ng L-1, with DvCHLa making minor contributions of between chlorophyll concentrations. Picoplankton were rapid initial respondents to the changing conditions with pigment markers showing an abrupt 4-fold increase in proportion but this increase was not sustained post-storm. 19‧-HEX, a chemotaxonomic marker for prymnesiophytes, was the dominant accessory pigment pre- and post-storm with concentrations of 48-435 ng L-1, and represented 44% of total carotenoid concentrations. Accompanying scanning electron microscopy results support the pigment-based analysis but also provide detailed insight into the nano- and microplankton communities, which proved to be highly variable between pre-storm and post-storm sampling periods. Nanoplankton remained the dominant size class pre- and post-storm but the microplankton proportion peaked during the period of maximum nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations. Classic descriptions of autumn blooms resulting from storm driven eutrophication events promoting phytoplankton growth in surface waters should be tempered with greater understanding of the role of storm driven vertical reorganization of the water column and of resident phytoplankton communities. Crucially, in this case we observed no change in integrated chlorophyll, particulate organic carbon or biogenic silica concentrations despite also observing a ∼50% increase in surface chlorophyll concentrations which indicated that the surface

  15. Community attitudes to waterfront change in Canadian port cities

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyle, Brian

    1997-01-01

    This paper is a preliminary, working report on research designed to apply an established method of enquiry in an innovative way to a range of community groups in a series of contrasted Canadian port cities. Community groups are a critical element in Canadian society in general, and in the process of urban waterfront change. Building on earlier work on other 'actors' such as port authorities, urban planners and real-estate developers, this report explores the attitudes and influence of such gr...

  16. Dynamic Changes of Microbial Community for Degradation of Lignocellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wenzhe; LIU Shuang; WANG Chunying; ZHENG Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic changes of a microbial community for lignocellulose degradation were explored in details.Community composition and development were investigated by the means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE),and results showed that the microbial community was constituted of 14 kinds of bacteria and presented the fluctuation in some degrees with fermentation.Furthmore,the result of cluster analysis of DGGE pattern was accordant with growth curve,and the degradation process was divided into three stages: initial stage(0-12 h),intermediate stage(24-144 h)and end stage(144-216 h).

  17. Assessment of awareness regarding climate change in an urban community

    OpenAIRE

    Pandve, Harshal T; Chawla, P. S.; Kevin Fernandez; Samir A.Singru; Deepak Khismatrao; Sangita Pawar

    2011-01-01

    Background : Climate change has emerged as one of the most devastating environmental threats. It is essential to assess the awareness regarding climate change in the general population for framing the mitigation activities. Aim: To assess the awareness regarding climate change in an urban community. Settings and Design: Urban field practice area of a medical college in the Pune city. Observational study. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional survey was conducted in the urban adult popula...

  18. Detecting changes in insect herbivore communities along a pollution gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forests surrounding the urban areas of the Los Angeles basin are impacted by ozone and nitrogen pollutants arising from urban areas. We examined changes in the herbivore communities of three prominent plant species (ponderosa pine, California black oak and bracken fern) at six sites along an air pollution gradient. Insects were extracted from foliage samples collected in spring, as foliage reached full expansion. Community differences were evaluated using total herbivore abundance, richness, Shannon-Weiner diversity, and discriminant function analysis. Even without conspicuous changes in total numbers, diversity or richness of herbivores, herbivore groups showed patterns of change that followed the air pollution gradient that were apparent through discriminant function analysis. For bracken fern and oak, chewing insects were more dominant at high pollution sites. Oak herbivore communities showed the strongest effect. These changes in herbivore communities may affect nutrient cycling in forest systems. - Differences in insect herbivore communities were associated with an ambient air pollution gradient in the mixed conifer forest outside the Los Angeles area

  19. Trophic condition of the volcanic Lake Nemi (Central Italy: environmental factors and planktonic communities in a changing environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenza G. MARGARITORA

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Lake Nemi is an interesting case of anthropogenic overexploitation which has caused its progressive environmental deterioration in the past decades. On this lake historical data about the trophic situation are available from 1975 to 1984. The research performed in 2002-03, about ten years after the diversion of urban waste waters, concerned a biological investigation on the phyto- and zooplanktonic communities, integrated with a physico-chemical analysis. The aims of our study are to evaluate the current water quality of the lake and compare it with the water quality observed in 1982-1983, when all biotic and abiotic components indicated a heavily compromised hypereutrophic condition. The water quality data and the comparison with a previous study point out that the biological aspects have partially changed (increased number of Cyanobacteria and phytoplanktonic taxa, particularly Clorophyta and Dinophyta; zooplankton composition changed at a species level, with the appearance of taxa associated to light trophic conditions, and the physico-chemical conditions significantly improved. The mean transparency, dissolved oxygen, nutrients and chlorophyll-a concentrations have all improved. Mean annual temperature at different depths increased, probably due to differences in climatic period and the lowering of the lake surface level (from 32.5 to 27.5 m in 1982 and 2002, respectively. Our results indicate a general improving trend in water quality is taking place since the diversion of waste water discharges. The present abiotic characteristics of the lake allow the phytoplankton to distribute itself in the whole epilimnion, and the zooplankton in the whole water column. A possible further improvement is hypothesized, and the constraints represented by excessive water level lowering and water temperature increasing are also discussed.

  20. A FIVE YEAR RECORD OF PHYTOPLANKTON PIGMENT PATTERNS IN ESCAMBIA/PENSACOLA BAY, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoplankton pigments were monitored quarterly at over 50 stations in Escambia/Pensacola Bay System (Pensacola, FL) from spring of 1996 to fall 2000. HPLC accessory pigments were used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure. HPLC data suggest a dominance of blue-green a...

  1. Spatio-temporal patterns and predictions of phytoplankton assemblages in a subtropical river delta system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xinhui; Wang, Xiangxiu;

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and seasonal sampling within a subtropical river delta system, the Pearl River Delta (China), provided data to determine seasonal phytoplankton patterns and develop prediction models. The high nutrient levels and frequent water exchanges resulted in a phytoplankton community with greatest...

  2. Phytoplankton Pigment Degradation Patterns in the Oxic and Hypoxic Regions of a Lake Water-Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degradation of senescent phytoplankton occurs as cells sink through the water-column. Once below the photic zone or buried in the sediments, pigment degradation products may be used in paleolimnological studies to elucidate past phytoplankton community composition. Interpretation of the sediment pig...

  3. Environment Changes of Lampao Dam Communities in Northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winyoo Sata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of this research was to study the environment change of Lampao Dam communities in Northeast Thailand, being a case study of the Sa-Adnathom community, Lamklong sub-district, Muang, Kalasin province, adjacent to the Lampao Dam. Approach: A qualitative research, it started with a review of literature and related researches. Field data were collected by way of interviews and both participant and non-participant observations, involving 15 informants including senior-villagers, who had lived in the village some 10-20 years. The research data were descriptively analyzed and presented. Results: As a result its was found that the Lampao Dam communities date back 200 years to the era of Chiangsom Kingdom. Deserted due to deadly epidemics, the area was later on repopulated by migrants from Yang Talad district, Kalasin province. A new community, called Sa-Adnathom, was born. Prior to the inception of the National Plan for Social and Economic Development in 1961, the environment of this community was complete with fertile land and natural resource abundance. People lived in harmony with nature and relied on resources from it for their livelihood, especially from Nong Waeng reservoir, Phan and Yang streams and Khoke Ngoo forest. But with the implementation of the first Plan for Social and Economic Development in 1961-1966 the Thai government started the construction of the Lampao Dam in 1963. Completed in 1968, the Dam took land from the villagers, part of which were simply flooded. This forced the village farmers to change their means of livelihood from relying on forest and rivers to production methods which by necessity involved purchase of machines and usage of chemical fertilizers. In short, a change from farming to fishing in Lampao Dam. Their values also changed from local exchanges of goods to money economy, which only led to household debts, increasing with rising degree of consumerism. Eventually people in the

  4. Effect of ocean acidification and elevated fCO2 on trace gas production by a Baltic Sea summer phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alison L.; Leedham-Elvidge, Emma; Hughes, Claire; Hopkins, Frances E.; Malin, Gill; Bach, Lennart T.; Schulz, Kai; Crawfurd, Kate; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf; Liss, Peter S.

    2016-08-01

    The Baltic Sea is a unique environment as the largest body of brackish water in the world. Acidification of the surface oceans due to absorption of anthropogenic CO2 emissions is an additional stressor facing the pelagic community of the already challenging Baltic Sea. To investigate its impact on trace gas biogeochemistry, a large-scale mesocosm experiment was performed off Tvärminne Research Station, Finland, in summer 2012. During the second half of the experiment, dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations in the highest-fCO2 mesocosms (1075-1333 µatm) were 34 % lower than at ambient CO2 (350 µatm). However, the net production (as measured by concentration change) of seven halocarbons analysed was not significantly affected by even the highest CO2 levels after 5 weeks' exposure. Methyl iodide (CH3I) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) showed 15 and 57 % increases in mean mesocosm concentration (3.8 ± 0.6 increasing to 4.3 ± 0.4 pmol L-1 and 87.4 ± 14.9 increasing to 134.4 ± 24.1 pmol L-1 respectively) during Phase II of the experiment, which were unrelated to CO2 and corresponded to 30 % lower Chl a concentrations compared to Phase I. No other iodocarbons increased or showed a peak, with mean chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI) concentrations measured at 5.3 (±0.9) pmol L-1 and iodoethane (C2H5I) at 0.5 (±0.1) pmol L-1. Of the concentrations of bromoform (CHBr3; mean 88.1 ± 13.2 pmol L-1), dibromomethane (CH2Br2; mean 5.3 ± 0.8 pmol L-1), and dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl, mean 3.0 ± 0.5 pmol L-1), only CH2Br2 showed a decrease of 17 % between Phases I and II, with CHBr3 and CHBr2Cl showing similar mean concentrations in both phases. Outside the mesocosms, an upwelling event was responsible for bringing colder, high-CO2, low-pH water to the surface starting on day t16 of the experiment; this variable CO2 system with frequent upwelling events implies that the community of the Baltic Sea is acclimated to regular significant declines in pH caused by up to 800 µatm fCO2. After

  5. Dinâmica da comunidade fitoplanctônica e variáveis físicas e químicas em tanques experimentais submetidos a diferentes adubações orgânicas Dynamics of the phytoplankton community and physical and chemical variables in experimental tanks with different organic manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudemir Martins Soares

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando-se determinar a influência de diferentes adubos orgânicos na comunidade fitoplanctônica, realizou-se este experimento, com duração de 40 dias, em tanques de cimento amianto com capacidade para 1000l. Os tanques foram adubados com estercos de aves (EA, suínos (ES, bovinos (EB e coelhos (EC, em um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com quatro tratamentos e cinco repetições. A primeira adubação foi de 50 g de esterco, sendo realizadas novas adubações com 25 g, em intervalos de sete dias. O plâncton foi coletado a cada três dias, filtrando-se 250 ml de água em rede de 20µm e fixados em 10mL de formalina 2%. A análise qualitativa e quantitativa foi realizada em microscópio óptico. Ao mesmo tempo, foram monitoradas algumas variáveis físicas e químicas. A densidade média mais elevada do fitoplâncton foi observada com o uso de EA no 40º dia (26.842 org./l, seguido de ES (17.164 org./L, no 22º dia, EC (8.880 org./L, no 28º dia e EB (5.564 org./l, no 22º dia. Houve predominância dos gêneros Scenedesmus, Cyclotella e Acanthosphaera. Os valores de pH e condutividade elétrica oscilaram conforme ocorriam alterações nas densidades do fitoplâncton. O uso de EA levou a maiores valores destes parâmetros na maioria das coletas. Conclui-se que os diferentes tratamentos exerceram influência na densidade dos grupos fitoplanctônicos; entretanto estercos de aves levaram à maior densidade de algas, seguidos por esterco de suínos, coelhos e bovinosThe influence of different types of organic manure in the phytoplankton community is provided. Experiment was undertaken during 40 days in 1000L asbestos tanks. Tanks were fertilized with poultry (PO, pig (PI, cattle (CA and rabbit (RA manure, in a randomized design, with four treatments and five replications. First fertilization consisted of 50 g of manure, with 25 g fertilizations at seven-day intervals. Plankton was collected every three days by filtering 250 mL of water

  6. Individual Cell Based Traits Obtained by Scanning Flow-Cytometry Show Selection by Biotic and Abiotic Environmental Factors during a Phytoplankton Spring Bloom

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Pomati; Kraft, Nathan J. B.; Thomas Posch; Bettina Eugster; Jukka Jokela; Bas W Ibelings

    2013-01-01

    In ecology and evolution, the primary challenge in understanding the processes that shape biodiversity is to assess the relationship between the phenotypic traits of organisms and the environment. Here we tested for selection on physio-morphological traits measured by scanning flow-cytometry at the individual level in phytoplankton communities under a temporally changing biotic and abiotic environment. Our aim was to study how high-frequency temporal changes in the environment influence biodi...

  7. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP build up and dinitrogen fixation – a mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ deoxygenates further and microbially-driven nitrogen (N loss processes are promoted. Consequently, water masses with a low N : P ratio could reach the euphotic layer, possibly influencing primary production in those waters. Previous mesocosm studies in the oligotrophic Atlantic Ocean identified N availability as controlling of primary production, while a possible co-limitation of nitrate and phosphate (P could not be ruled out. To better understand the impact of changing N : P ratios on primary production and on N2 fixation in the ETNA surface ocean, we conducted land-based mesocosm experiments with natural plankton communities and applied a broad range of N : P ratios (2.67–48. Silicate was supplied at 15 μmol L−1 in all mesocosms. We monitored nutrient drawdown, bloom formation, biomass build up and diazotrophic feedback in response to variable nutrient stoichiometry. Our results confirmed N to be limiting to primary production. We found that excess P was channeled through particulate organic matter (POP into the dissolved organic matter (DOP pool. In mesocosms with low P availability, DOP was utilized while N2 fixation increased, suggesting a link between those two processes. Interestingly this observation was most pronounced in mesocosms where inorganic N was still available, indicating that bioavailable N does not necessarily has to have a negative impact on N2 fixation. We observed a shift from a mixed cyanobacterial/proteobacterial dominated active diazotrophic community towards diazotrophic diatom symbionts of the Richelia-Rhizosolenia symbiosis. We hypothesize that a potential change in nutrient stoichiometry in the ETNA might lead to a general shift within the

  8. Identification of overlapping communities and their hierarchy by locally calculating community-changing resolution levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havemann, Frank; Heinz, Michael; Struck, Alexander; Gläser, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new local, deterministic and parameter-free algorithm that detects fuzzy and crisp overlapping communities in a weighted network and simultaneously reveals their hierarchy. Using a local fitness function, the algorithm greedily expands natural communities of seeds until the whole graph is covered. The hierarchy of communities is obtained analytically by calculating resolution levels at which communities grow rather than numerically by testing different resolution levels. This analytic procedure is not only more exact than its numerical alternatives such as LFM and GCE but also much faster. Critical resolution levels can be identified by searching for intervals in which large changes of the resolution do not lead to growth of communities. We tested our algorithm on benchmark graphs and on a network of 492 papers in information science. Combined with a specific post-processing, the algorithm gives much more precise results on LFR benchmarks with high overlap compared to other algorithms and performs very similarly to GCE.

  9. Identification of overlapping communities and their hierarchy by locally calculating community-changing resolution levels

    CERN Document Server

    Havemann, Frank; Struck, Alexander; Gläser, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new local, deterministic and parameter-free algorithm that detects fuzzy and crisp overlapping communities in a weighted network and simultaneously reveals their hierarchy. Using a local fitness function, the algorithm greedily expands natural communities of seeds until the whole graph is covered. The hierarchy of communities is obtained analytically by calculating resolution levels at which communities grow rather than numerically by testing different resolution levels. This analytic procedure is not only more exact than its numerical alternatives such as LFM and GCE but also much faster. Critical resolution levels can be identified by searching for intervals in which large changes of the resolution do not lead to growth of communities. We tested our algorithm on benchmark graphs and on a network of 492 papers in information science. Combined with a specific post-processing, the algorithm gives much more precise results on LFR benchmarks with high overlap compared to other algorithms and perform...

  10. Identification of overlapping communities and their hierarchy by locally calculating community-changing resolution levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new local, deterministic and parameter-free algorithm that detects fuzzy and crisp overlapping communities in a weighted network and simultaneously reveals their hierarchy. Using a local fitness function, the algorithm greedily expands natural communities of seeds until the whole graph is covered. The hierarchy of communities is obtained analytically by calculating resolution levels at which communities grow rather than numerically by testing different resolution levels. This analytic procedure is not only more exact than its numerical alternatives such as LFM and GCE but also much faster. Critical resolution levels can be identified by searching for intervals in which large changes of the resolution do not lead to growth of communities. We tested our algorithm on benchmark graphs and on a network of 492 papers in information science. Combined with a specific post-processing, the algorithm gives much more precise results on LFR benchmarks with high overlap compared to other algorithms and performs very similarly to GCE

  11. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín; Alvain, Séverine; Aumont, Olivier; Bopp, Laurent; Chollet, Sophie; Enright, Clare; Franklin, Daniel J.; Geider, Richard J.; Harrison, Sandy P.; Hirst, Andrew G.; Larsen, Stuart; Legendre, Louis; Platt, Trevor; Prentice, I. Colin; Rivkin, Richard B.; Sailley, Sévrine; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Stephens, Nick; Vogt, Meike; Vallina, Sergio M.

    2016-07-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global biogeochemical model which incorporates ecosystem dynamics based on the representation of ten plankton functional types (PFTs): six types of phytoplankton, three types of zooplankton, and heterotrophic procaryotes. We improved the representation of zooplankton dynamics in our model through (a) the explicit inclusion of large, slow-growing macrozooplankton (e.g. krill), and (b) the introduction of trophic cascades among the three zooplankton types. We use the model to quantitatively assess the relative roles of iron vs. grazing in determining phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region during summer. When model simulations do not include macrozooplankton grazing explicitly, they systematically overestimate Southern Ocean chlorophyll biomass during the summer, even when there is no iron deposition from dust. When model simulations include a slow-growing macrozooplankton and trophic cascades among three zooplankton types, the high-chlorophyll summer bias in the Southern Ocean HNLC region largely disappears. Our model results suggest that the observed low phytoplankton biomass in the Southern Ocean during summer is primarily explained by the dynamics of the Southern Ocean zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean.

  12. Sinking rates of phytoplankton in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary: A comparative study between Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shujin; Sun, Jun; Zhao, Qibiao; Feng, Yuanyuan; Huang, Daji; Liu, Sumei

    2016-02-01

    Sinking rates of phytoplankton community with variable taxonomic composition in the offshore Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary were measured during two cruises in spring and summer, 2011. A homogenous-sample method SETCOL was used to determine the sinking rates. Phytoplankton community was dominated by dinoflagellates in spring and diatoms in summer, and two species Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii formed algal blooms in the survey area during the two cruises, respectively. Phytoplankton sinking rates ranged from 0.13 to 1.04 m day- 1 (average = 0.61 ± 0.24 m day- 1) in spring and 0.28 to 1.71 m day- 1 (average = 0.80 ± 0.34 m day- 1) in summer. In the surface layer, phytoplankton sinking rates at the P. dentatum bloom stations in spring were lower than that at the S. dorhnii bloom stations in summer. No significant correlation was found between phytoplankton sinking rates and most of the environmental parameters during the two cruises, except for temperature and nitrite concentration in summer. A significant correlation was observed between phytoplankton sinking rates and phytoplankton community structure in the surface layers: the higher dominance of diatom in the phytoplankton community corresponded to higher phytoplankton sinking rate. Therefore, the phytoplankton community structure other than the environmental parameters, is the important factor to affect the sinking rates greatly. The consequent carbon flux caused by phytoplankton sinking was estimated, and results suggested that the carbon flux to bottom water during the S. dorhnii bloom (average = 63.13 ± 48.16 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in summer was about 2.4 fold of that during the P. dentatum bloom (average = 26.10 ± 26.25 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in spring. These findings provide us some insight in understanding the carbon export contributed by marine phytoplankton in the coastal sea, where frequent phytoplankton blooms and high following carbon export occur.

  13. Latitudinal phytoplankton distribution and the neutral theory of biodiversity

    KAUST Repository

    Chust, Guillem

    2012-11-16

    Recent studies have suggested that global diatom distributions are not limited by dispersal, in the case of both extant species and fossil species, but rather that environmental filtering explains their spatial patterns. Hubbell\\'s neutral theory of biodiversity provides a framework in which to test these alternatives. Our aim is to test whether the structure of marine phytoplankton (diatoms, dinoflagellates and coccolithophores) assemblages across the Atlantic agrees with neutral theory predictions. We asked: (1) whether intersite variance in phytoplankton diversity is explained predominantly by dispersal limitation or by environmental conditions; and (2) whether species abundance distributions are consistent with those expected by the neutral model. Location: Meridional transect of the Atlantic (50° N-50° S). Methods: We estimated the relative contributions of environmental factors and geographic distance to phytoplankton composition using similarity matrices, Mantel tests and variation partitioning of the species composition based upon canonical ordination methods. We compared the species abundance distribution of phytoplankton with the neutral model using Etienne\\'s maximum-likelihood inference method. Results: Phytoplankton communities are slightly more determined by niche segregation (24%), than by dispersal limitation and ecological drift (17%). In 60% of communities, the assumption of neutrality in species\\' abundance distributions could not be rejected. In tropical zones, where oceanic gyres enclose large stable water masses, most communities showed low species immigration rates; in contrast, we infer that communities in temperate areas, out of oligotrophic gyres, have higher rates of species immigration. Conclusions: Phytoplankton community structure is consistent with partial niche assembly and partial dispersal and drift assembly (neutral processes). The role of dispersal limitation is almost as important as habitat filtering, a fact that has been

  14. A comparative study of the N metabolism of phytoplankton and periphyton communities in oligotrophic lakes. Part of a coordinated programme on isotopic-tracer-aided research and monitoring on agricultural residue - biological interactions in aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limnological research at Castle Lake, CA, and Lake Tahoe, CA-NEV, USA, during the period 1977-1982 has emphasized the effects of nutrient enrichment and deficiency on primary producers. The low ambient pools of nitrogenous nutrients and their low rates of transformation have necessitated the use of isotope tracer methods (14C, 15N, 13N). These techniques have been used in concert with physiological assays, growth bio-assays, and whole-ecosystem nitrogen enrichments. Our most significant results, to date, include: (1) Delineation of 5 algal communities which are spatially distinct yet occur in the same lake and which differ with regard to their principal sources of N; (2) Determination of the relative affinities of the above communities for the various sources of N; (3) Demonstration of the importance of internally regenerated N to phytoplankton productivity; (4) Development of sensitive methodology to utilize the short-lived radioisotope 13N (t1/2=10 mins) for studies of denitrification and nitrate uptake in aquatic ecosystems; (5) Comparisons of a variety of physiological assays for N-deficiency in aquatic microorganisms, involving short-term and long-term experiments in containers and in an N-enriched lake. The controlled ecosystem manipulations were intended to simulate the effects of watershed disturbance on nitrogen loading in order to more accurately evaluate their potential impacts on inorganic carbon and nitrogen assimilation by natural algal communities. Our research is an experimental approach for contrasting the strategies of planktonic and benthic algae living in the same lake but differing with regard to their principal sources of nitrogen

  15. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-01-01

    One of the important impacts of marine phytoplankton on climate systems is the geophysical feedback by which chlorophyll and the related pigments in phytoplankton absorb solar radiation and then change sea surface temperature. Yet such biogeophysical impact is still not considered in many climate projections by state-of-the-art climate models, nor is its impact on the future climate quantified. This study shows that, by conducting global warming simulations with and without an active marine e...

  16. Short- and Long-Term Response of Phytoplankton to ENSO in Prydz Bay, Antarctica:Evidences from Field Measurements, Remote Sensing Data and Stratigraphic Biomarker Records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jun; Hans-Ulrich Peter; ZHANG Haisheng; HAN Zhengbing; HU Chuanyu; YU Peisong; LU Bing; Thomas S.Bianchi

    2014-01-01

    The study provides one of the first lines of evidence showing linkages between Antarctic phytoplankton abundance and composition in response to ENSO, based on historical reconstruction of sediment biomarkers. In addition to sediment biomarkers, field measured and remote sensing data of phytoplankton abundance were also recorded from Prydz Bay, Eastern Antarctica. Com-munity structure of field measured phytoplankton showed significant El Niño/La Niña-related succession during 1990 to 2002. In general, the number of algae species decreased during El Niño and La Niña years compared to normal years. Austral summer monthly variation of remotely sensed chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), particulate organic carbon (POC), and sea surface temperature (SST) indicated that ENSO impacted the timing of phytoplankton blooms during 2007 to 2011. Phytoplankton blooms (indicated by Chl-a and POC) preceded the increases in SST during El Niño years, and lagged behind the SST increases during La Niña years. Stratigraphic record of marine sedimentary lipid (brassicasterol, dinosterol and alkenones) biomarkers inferred that the proportions of different algae (diatoms, dinoflagellates and haptophytes) changed significantly between El Niño and La Niña events. The relative proportion of diatoms increased, with that of dinoflagellates being decreased during El Niño years, while it was reversed during La Niña years.

  17. The Rape Prevention and Education (RPE) Theory Model of Community Change: Connecting Individual and Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Pamela J.; Lang, Karen S.; Townsend, Stephanie M.; Campbell, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Social work practice has long focused on the connections between an individual and the social environment that affect the individual's social functioning. The Rape Prevention and Education (RPE) Program's theory model, Creating Safer Communities: The Rape Prevention and Education Model of Community Change, provides family social workers with a…

  18. Forcing of dissolved organic carbon release by phytoplankton by anticyclonic mesoscale eddies in the subtropical NE Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasternas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic carbon fluxes mediated by planktonic communities in two cyclonic eddies (CEs and two anticyclonic eddies (AEs at the Canary Eddy Corridor were studied and compared with the dynamics in two far-field (FF stations located outside the eddies. We observed favorable conditions and signs for upwelling at the center of CEs and for downwelling and mixing at the centers of AEs. CEs were characterized by a higher concentration of nutrients and the highest concentration of chlorophyll a (chl a, associated with the highest abundance of microphytoplankton and diatoms. AEs displayed concentrations of chl a values and nutrients similar to those at the FF stations, except for the highest ammonium concentration occurring at AE and a very low concentration of phosphorus at FF stations. AEs were transient systems characterized by an increasing abundance of picophytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria. While primary production was similar between the systems, the production of dissolved organic carbon (PDOC was significantly higher in the AEs. Phytoplankton cell mortality was lowest in the CEs, and we found higher cell mortality rates at AE than at FF stations, despite similar chl a concentration. Environmental changes in the AEs have been significantly prejudicial to phytoplankton as indicated by higher phytoplankton cell mortality (60% of diatoms cells were dead and higher cell lysis rates. The adverse conditions for phytoplankton associated with the early-stage anticyclonic systems, mainly triggered by active downwelling, resulted in higher cell mortality, forcing photosynthesized carbon to fuel the dissolved pool.

  19. A Decade of Complete Change in a Muslim Community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI YI

    2007-01-01

    @@ Talking about changes in the Muslim-inhabited Niu Jie Street of Beijing, every member of the community would be all smiles. "Everything has changed; the mosque, the streetscape and the people, too" they would say. Niu Jie or Ox Street is situated in the Xuanwu District in the southern part of Beijing. The 1.44 square kilometer area is inhabited by 54,000 people, mostly of Muslims.

  20. Optical determination of phytoplankton floristic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. S. D.; Bowers, D. G.; Mitchelson-Jacob, E. G.

    1997-02-01

    Radiance and irradiance measurements are collected using a seven channel profiling radiometer and a four channel moored irradiance sensor which both use Sea-viewing Wide Field-of- View Sensor (SeaWiFS) wavebands. The instruments were deployed as part of the Land-Ocean Interaction Study, shelf edge study on the Malin Shelf, off the west coast of Scotland, during spring and simmer 1995 and 1996. Changes in in-situ reflectance ratios, calculated from the blue, cyan and green wavebands of the moored color sensors, suggest a diatom-dominated spring bloom, followed by an early summer coccolithophore bloom, with a flagellate-dominated phytoplankton population during the summer. Similar changes are also seen in attenuance ratios and specific attenuation coefficients calculated from the profiling radiometer data. The use of these optical properties to determine phytoplankton floristic composition is discussed.

  1. Changes in Age Structure and Rural Community Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, David A.

    1985-01-01

    Whatever migration patterns evolve, changes in the age structure mean that rural communities in general can expect fairly stable elementary school population, reduced high school population, slower growth in new business and employment, and continued increase in the elderly population. (JHZ)

  2. Common Belief. Australia's Faith Communities on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixteen Australian faith communities representing the world's great religious traditions have united to speak out on climate change: Aboriginal people, the Australian Christian lobby, Baha'i believers, Baptists, Buddhists, Catholics, Evangelical Christians, Greek Orthodox, Hindus, Jewish people, Lutherans, Muslims, The Salvation Army, Sikhs, The United Church

  3. Contrasting patterns of free-living bacterioplankton diversity in macrophyte-dominated versus phytoplankton blooming regimes in Dianchi Lake, a shallow lake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujing; Li, Huabing; Xing, Peng; Wu, Qinglong

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater shallow lakes typically exhibit two alternative stable states under certain nutrient loadings: macrophyte-dominated and phytoplankton-dominated water regimes. An ecosystem regime shift from macrophytes to phytoplankton blooming typically reduces the number of species of invertebrates and fishes and results in the homogenization of communities in freshwater lakes. We investigated how microbial biodiversity has responded to a shift of the ecosystem regime in Dianchi Lake, which was previously fully covered with submerged macrophytes but currently harbors both ecological states. We observed marked divergence in the diversity and community composition of bacterioplankton between the two regimes. Although species richness, estimated as the number of operational taxonomic units and phylogenetic diversity (PD), was higher in the phytoplankton dominated ecosystem after this shift, the dissimilarity of bacterioplankton community across space decreased. This decrease in beta diversity was accompanied by loss of planktonic bacteria unique to the macrophyte-dominated ecosystem. Mantel tests between bacterioplankton community distances and Euclidian distance of environmental parameters indicated that this reduced bacterial community diff erentiation primarily reflected the loss of environmental niches, particularly in the macrophyte regime. The loss of this small-scale heterogeneity in bacterial communities should be considered when assessing long-term biodiversity changes in response to ecosystem regime conversions in freshwater lakes.

  4. Are Gay Communities Dying or Just in Transition? Results from an International Consultation Examining Structural Change in Gay Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Rosser, B. R.; West, William; Weinmeyer, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to identify how urban gay communities are undergoing structural change, reasons for that change, and implications for HIV prevention planning. Key informants (N=29) at the AIDS Impact Conference from 17 cities in 14 countries completed surveys and participated in a facilitated structured dialog about how gay communities are changing. In all cities, the virtual gay community was identified as now larger than the offline physical community. Most cities identified that while th...

  5. Effects of entrainment through Oconee Nuclear Station on carbon-14 assimilation rates of phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon assimilation rates of phytoplankton communities entrained through Oconee Nuclear Station were measured on six dates during 1974. Thermal, mechanical, condenser, and multiple entrainment effects on uptake rates were compared by incubating samples in vitro in controlled-temperature water baths. Duplicate light and dark bottles containing water from four cooling-system locations were exposed to temperatures approximating intake and discharge temperatures. The relationships were variable, but exposure of the hypolimnetic intake water at near-discharge temperatures (thermal effect) stimulated primary productivity in four of six experiments. Multiple entrainment and mechanical effects caused no consistent change in assimilation rates

  6. Risk associated with toxic blooms of marine phytoplankton functional groups on Artemia franciscana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Dors; Mara Carmen Bartolom; Sebastin Snchez-Fortn

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study mortality of copepod Artemia franciscana against the occurrence of harmful marine algae and possible toxicological changes exhibited by binary and tertiary combinations of these harmful algae toxins. Methods:Tweenty four hours acute toxicity assays were performed with selected concentrations of Alexandrium minutum, Prorocentrum lima and Nitzschia N1c1 living cells. Additionally, the results were analyzed using the median-effect/combination index (CI)-isobologram equation to assess possible changes in the toxic effect induced by phytoplankton functional groups. Results:Biotoxin equivalent values obtained by immunodetection were (2.12±0.10), (8.60±1.30) and (4.32±1.67) pg/cell for saxitoxin, okadaic acid and domoic acid, respectively. The 24-h LC50 values estimated to saxitoxin and okadaic acid equivalents were 4.06 and 6.27 µg/L, significantly below the value obtained for Nitzschia N1c1, which was established at 467.33 µg/L. CI analysis applied on phytoplankton assemblages showed that both ternary mixture as the binary combinations exhibited antagonic action on toxic effects in Artemia nauplii, which were significantly lower than the toxic effect exhibited by each species studied. Conclusions:These results show that, although these harmful algae represent a serious risk to estuarine zooplankton community, the presence of phytoplankton functional groups within the same bloom can reduce the potential risk compared to the expected risk when each of the phytoplankton groups are evaluated individually.

  7. Large-scale shifts in phytoplankton groups in the Equatorial Pacific during ENSO cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Masotti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO drives important changes in the marine productivity of the Equatorial Pacific, in particular during major El Niño/La Niña transitions. Changes in environmental conditions associated with these climatic events also likely impact phytoplankton composition. In this work, the distribution of four major phytoplankton groups (nanoeucaryotes, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and diatoms was examined between 1996 and 2007 by applying the PHYSAT algorithm to the ocean color data archive from the Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS. Coincident with the decrease in chlorophyll concentrations, a large-scale shift in the phytoplankton composition of the Equatorial Pacific, that was characterized by a decrease in Synechococcus and an increase in nanoeucaryotes dominance, was observed during the early stages of both the strong El Niño of 1997 and the moderate El Niño of 2006. A significant increase in diatoms dominance was observed in the Equatorial Pacific during the 1998 La Niña and was associated with elevated marine productivity. An analysis of the environmental variables using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model (NEMO-PISCES suggests that the Synechococcus dominance decrease during the two El Niño events was associated with an abrupt decline in nutrient availability (−0.9 to −2.5 μM NO3 month−1. Alternatively, increased nutrient availability (3 μM NO3 month−1 during the 1998 La Niña resulted in Equatorial Pacific dominance diatom increase. Despite these phytoplankton community shifts, the mean composition is restored after a few months, which suggests resilience in community structure. Such rapid changes to the composition of phytoplankton groups should be considered in future modeling approaches to represent variability of the marine productivity in the Equatorial Pacific and to quantify its

  8. Phytoplankton distribution in the Western Arctic Ocean during a summer of exceptional ice retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Coupel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A drastic ice decline in the Arctic Ocean, triggered by global warming, could generate rapid changes in the upper ocean layers. The ice retreat is particularly intense over the Canadian Basin where large ice free areas were observed since 2007. The CHINARE 2008 expedition was conducted in the Western Arctic (WA ocean during a year of exceptional ice retreat (August–September 2008. This study investigates whether a significant reorganization of the primary producers in terms of species, biomass and productivity has to be observed in the WA as a result of the intense ice melting. Both pigments (HPLC and taxonomy (microscopy acquired in 2008 allowed to determine the phytoplanktonic distribution from Bering Strait (65° N to extreme high latitudes over the Alpha Ridge (86° N encompassing the Chukchi shelf, the Chukchi Borderland and the Canadian Basin.

    Two different types of phytoplankton communities were observed. Over the ice-free Chukchi shelf, relatively high chl-a concentrations (1–5 mg m−3 dominated by 80 % of diatoms. In the Canadian Basin, surface waters are oligotrophic (<0.1 mg m−3 and algal assemblages were dominated by haptophytes and diatoms while higher biomasses (~0.4 mg m−3 related to a deep Subsurface Chlorophyll Maximum (SCM are associated to small-sized (nano and pico phytoplankton. The ice melting onset allows to point out three different zones over the open basin: (i the ice free condition characterized by deep and unproductive phytoplankton communities dominated by nanoplankton, (ii an extended (78°–83° N Active Melting Zone (AMZ where light penetration associated to the stratification start off and enough nutrient availability drives to the highest biomass and primary production due to both diatoms and large flagellates, (iii heavy ice conditions found north to 83° N allowing light limitation and consequently low biomass and primary production associated to pico

  9. Phytoplankton assemblage of a solar saltern in Port Fouad, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedekar Fadel Madkour

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is the first investigation of the phytoplankton community inone of Egypt's saltworks. The phytoplankton composition and distribution infive ponds of increasing salinity were investigated in the solar saltern of Port Fouad.The phytoplankton community consisted of 42 species belonging to cyanobacteria(16, diatoms (12, dinoflagellates (11, Euglenophyceae (2 and Chlorophyceae (1.The number of species decreased significantly and rapidly with increasing salinity,varying between 33 species in the first pond (P1 and one species in the crystallizerpond (P5. Conversely, the total phytoplankton density, except that recordedin P1, increased significantly with rising salinity, fluctuating between 8.7 and56 × 105 individuals l-1 in P2 and P5 respectively. In spiteof the local variations in climate and nutrient availability, the phytoplankton composition, density and spatialvariations along the salinity gradient were, in many respects, very similar towhat has been observed in other solar saltworks. The pond with the lowest salinity(P1 - -1 was characterized by a significant diversity andblooming of diatoms and dinoflagellates. Intermediate salinity ponds (P2 andP3 with salinity ∼ 112-180 g l-1 exhibited a decline in bothspecies richness and density, but the stenohaline blue green algae (Synechocystis salina did flourish. The highly saline concentrating ponds andcrystallizers (P4 and P5 with salinity ∼ 223-340 g l-1 werecharacterized by few species, the disappearance of blue green algae and thethriving of the halotolerant green alga Dunaliella salina.

  10. Climate change adaptation strategy for the Folk Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul-Al-Pavel, Muha.; Khan, Mohammed Abu Sayed Arfin; Rahman, Syed Ajijur;

    2013-01-01

    In Bangladesh, impacts on agriculture from extreme climate are increasingly vulnerable. On the other hand, folk communities are intensely depending on agriculture for their livelihoods. Climate change has already negatively affected the vegetable production by annual recurrent flood in Bangladesh....... This study is an assessment of the new vegetable production system that could adopt in a changing climatic condition. With the popular eight vegetable species, the field experiment consisted of four treatments which were conducted in the bags. However, treatment (TD) which consisted of Coriander (Coriander...... of this study might be helpful for the flood affected folk communities produce vegetables for their own consumption and income. Likewise, new experiments with altered technique and vegetable species are recommended to conclusively develop climate change adaptation strategies for flood prone areas....

  11. 新疆阿克达拉水库浮游植物群落生态特征%Ecological characteristics of phytoplankton community of Akedala Reservoir in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴惠仙; 王琼; 蔡桢; 朱新英; 李周永; 薛俊增

    2011-01-01

    Akedala Reservoir locates in Altay Prefecture, Xinjiang. The water of the reservoir is supplemented from Ulungur River and Ulungur Lake. The reservoir is an important water resource for fishers. Phytoplankton community structure was investigated and analyzed to explain the ecological characters of Akedala Reservoir in July 2008, October 2008 and May 2009. A total of 101 phytoplankton species, belonging to 8 phylums was identified. There are 40 species of diatom, 38 species of green algae, 7 species of blue green algae, 6 species of euglenids, 4 species of yellow green algae, 3 species of chrysophyceae, 2 species of cryptomonads, 1 species of fire algae. Green algae and diatoms are dominance in the species composition. Phytoplankton species composition in different periods shows significant differences(P<0.01): the wet season's(57 species) > the normal-water season's(42 species) > the dry season's(31 species). Anabaena oscillarioides, Scenedesmus quadricauda, Ankistrodemus angustus, Ankistrodesmus acicularis, Chlorella vulgaris as well as Tribonema. Sp are the dominant species. Cell density for different categories of phytoplankton is significantly difference (P < 0. 01): Xanthophyta has the largest cell density, followed by Cyanophyta and Chlorophyta. The cell density in different periods is also significant difference (F =49. 58, P<0.001): the normal-water season's[ (7. 89 ±1.48) ×106ind/L] > the wet season's( (5.17 ±0. 59) × 106 ind/L] > the dry season's[ (0.49 ±0.09)× 106 ind/L]. Moreover.the phytoplankton composition, cell density and diversity are closely related to the water temperature and the water level of Akedala Reservoir.%为了解其水生生物生态现状,于2008年7月(平水期)、10月(枯水期)和次年5月(丰水期)对阿克达拉水库内浮游植物群落生态特征进行了研究.共采集到浮游植物8门101种,其中硅藻40种、绿藻38种、蓝藻7种、裸藻6种、黄藻4种、金藻3种、隐藻2种和甲藻1

  12. Phytoplankton diversity and productivity in a highly turbid, tropical coastal system (Bach Dang Estuary, Vietnam)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle-Newall, E. J.; Chu, V. T.; Pringault, O.; Amouroux, D.; Arfi, R.; Bettarel, Y.; Bouvier, T.; Bouvier, C.; Got, P.; Nguyen, T. M. H.; Mari, X.; Navarro, P.; Duong, T. N.; Cao, T. T. T.; Pham, T. T.; Ouillon, S.; Torréton, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    The factors controlling estuarine phytoplankton diversity and production are relatively well known in temperate systems. Less however is known about the factors affecting phytoplankton community distribution in tropical estuaries. This is surprising given the economic and ecological importance of these large, deltaic ecosystems, such as are found in South East Asia. Here we present the results from an investigation into the factors controlling phytoplankton distribution and phytoplankton-bacterial coupling in the Bach Dang Estuary, a sub-estuary of the Red River system, in Northern Vietnam. Phytoplankton diversity and primary and bacterial production, nutrients and metallic contaminants (mercury and organotin) were measured during two seasons: wet (July 2008) and dry (March 2009). Phytoplankton community composition differed between the two seasons with only a 2% similarity between July and March. The large spatial extent and complexity of defining the freshwater sources meant that simple mixing diagrams could not be used in this system. We therefore employed multivariate analyses to determine the factors influencing phytoplankton community structure. Salinity and suspended particulate matter were important factors in determining phytoplankton distribution, particularly during the wet season. We also show that phytoplankton community structure is probably influenced by the concentrations of mercury species (inorganic mercury and methyl mercury in both the particulate and dissolved phases) and of tri-, di, and mono-butyl tin species found in this system. Freshwater phytoplankton community composition was associated with dissolved methyl mercury and particulate inorganic mercury concentrations during the wet season, whereas, during the dry season, dissolved methyl mercury and particulate butyl tin species were important factors for the discrimination of the phytoplankton community structure. Phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling was also investigated during both

  13. Phytoplankton diversity and productivity in a highly turbid, tropical coastal system (Bach Dang Estuary, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Rochelle-Newall

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The factors controlling estuarine phytoplankton diversity and production are relatively well known in temperate systems. Less however is known about the factors affecting phytoplankton community distribution in tropical estuaries. This is surprising given the economic and ecological importance of these large, deltaic ecosystems, such as are found in South East Asia. Here we present the results from an investigation into the factors controlling phytoplankton distribution and phytoplankton-bacterial coupling in the Bach Dang Estuary, a sub-estuary of the Red River system, in Northern Vietnam. Phytoplankton diversity and primary and bacterial production, nutrients and metallic contaminants (mercury and organotin were measured during two seasons: wet (July 2008 and dry (March 2009. Phytoplankton community composition differed between the two seasons with only a 2% similarity between July and March. The large spatial extent and complexity of defining the freshwater sources meant that simple mixing diagrams could not be used in this system. We therefore employed multivariate analyses to determine the factors influencing phytoplankton community structure. Salinity and suspended particulate matter were important factors in determining phytoplankton distribution, particularly during the wet season. We also show that phytoplankton community structure is probably influenced by the concentrations of mercury species (inorganic mercury and methyl mercury in both the particulate and dissolved phases and of tri-, di, and mono-butyl tin species found in this system. Freshwater phytoplankton community composition was associated with dissolved methyl mercury and particulate inorganic mercury concentrations during the wet season, whereas, during the dry season, dissolved methyl mercury and particulate butyl tin species were important factors for the discrimination of the phytoplankton community structure. Phytoplankton-bacterioplankton coupling was also

  14. Seasonal variation in functional phytoplankton groups in Xiangxi Bay, Three Gorges Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; BI Yonghong; HU Jianlin; ZHU Kongxian; ZHOU Guangjie; HU Zhengyu

    2011-01-01

    We describe the phytoplankton dynamics and structure in Xiangxi Bay,Three Gorges Reservoir.Samples were collected monthly in the surface waters between August 2007 and July 2008.We identified 10 principle functional groups.C-strategists and S/R-strategists with a wide range of tolerance dominated the phytoplankton assemblage.Seasonal variation was related to water column stability because of changes in hydraulic operation in October,January,and May.Functional group C (Asterionellaformosa)and P (Aulacoseria granulata) dominated in August and September,whereas group Lo (Peridiniopsis niei)was the most abundant between February and April,forming a dinoflagellate bloom.Group B (Stephanodiscus hantzschii),X2 (Komma acudata),and Y ( Cryptomonas erosa) were present throughout most of the year but were most abundant in late spring.A cyanobacterial bloom occurred from June to July,during which group M ( Microcystis aeruginosa,M.wesenbergii) and H1 (Anabaena flos-aquae) were dominant.Green algae,characterized by group G (Eudorina sp.,Pandorina sp.,Pyramidomonas sp.) and J (Pediastrum spp.,Coelastrum spp.,Scenedesums spp.),were abundant after the bloom degraded.This sequence was corroborated by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA).The summary sequence of functional groups resulting from CCA was:C/P→ Lo→H1/M/J/G.The dynamics of the phytoplankton community may be explained by the stability of water column,irradiance,water temperature,and nutrient structure.

  15. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  16. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing. PMID:26274279

  17. Study on variation trend of marine phytoplankton diversity in the ecology-monitoring area of Changli in Hebei%河北昌黎生态监控区海洋浮游植物多样性变化趋势研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳; 苏艺; 韩晓庆; 高伟明

    2012-01-01

    根据2006-2010年,每年8月河北昌黎生态监控区采集到的浮游植物种类和细胞数量等调查数据,以Simpson优势度为指标分析其物种组成及群落结构的年际变化情况.运用3种多样性指标,即Pielou均匀度指数(J)、Margalef丰富度指数(dMa)和Shannon-Wiener物种多样性指数(H’)分别进行站位分析及均值分析,深入探究浮游植物多样性的年际变化趋势及规律.利用水质综合污染指数(P)对海水环境污染程度进行指标评价.结果显示:5年中浮游植物大都隶属于硅藻和甲藻类,且前者占绝对优势,群落结构较单一,物种数目逐年减少;站位分析中,除个别站位外3种指标的变化趋势均呈逐年波动性减少;均值分析中,J值均处于中等水平,dMa值为波动性下降,H’值则呈逐年降低之趋势,表明浮游植物多样性总体水平逐年下降.同时,P值呈逐年波动性上升趋势,前4年为中度污染,第5年为严重污染.因此,监控区海域生态环境状况每况愈下.针对上述结果,探讨了浮游植物多样性变化的主要原因.对全面掌握海洋浮游植物物种演变,改善海域生态环境现状,实现海洋资源可持续利用和海洋生态系统可持续发展,具有重要的现实意义.%Based on the species' type and cells' number of phytoplankton monitoring results in ecology-monitoring area of Changli in Hebei Province in August each year from 2006 to 2010, this paper analyzed the species composition and community structure of annual variation through statistical calculation by using the index of Simpson dominance. In order to explore the annual variation trends and rules of phytoplankton diversity, station analysis and average value analysis were conducted to the biodiversity indices, such as Peilou's evenness index J, Margalef's richness index dMa and Shannon-Wiener's index H'. This paper used comprehensive pollution index of water quality (P) to synthetically evaluate the seawater

  18. Creating a Learning Community for Solutions to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. J.; Benedict, B. A.; Blockstein, D. E.; Hassenzahl, D. M.; Hunter, A.; Jorgensen, A. D.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    The rapidly evolving and interdisciplinary nature of climate change presents a challenge to colleges and universities as they seek to educate undergraduate students. To address this challenge, the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) with NSF funding is creating a nationwide cyber-enabled learning community called CAMEL (Climate, Adaptation, and Mitigation e-Learning). CAMEL engages experts in science, policy and decision-making, education, and assessment in the production of a virtual toolbox of curricular resources designed for teaching climate change causes, consequences, and solutions. CAMEL is: ? Developing cyberinfrastructure that supports and promotes the creation of materials and community; ? Generating materials for the Encyclopedia of Earth, a site averaging 50,000 views per day; ? Ensuring that materials developed and shared are founded on the best available scientific information and follow the most appropriate educational practices; ? Assisting faculty at institutions of higher education across the United States as they create, improve, test, and share resources for teaching students not only how to diagnose climate change problems, but also to identify and effect solutions; ? Evaluating the determinants of successful community building using cybermedia. The community and resultant content range from general education to upper division courses for students in a variety of majors. At the center of the community are the 160 colleges and universities represented in NCSE's Council of Environmental Deans and Directors. Members of this group represent recognized expertise in virtually all areas of this project. A team with substantial experience with evaluating innovative initiatives in STEM education is administering the evaluation component.

  19. Drivers of climate change impacts on bird communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce-Higgins, James W; Eglington, Sarah M; Martay, Blaise; Chamberlain, Dan E

    2015-07-01

    Climate change is reported to have caused widespread changes to species' populations and ecological communities. Warming has been associated with population declines in long-distance migrants and habitat specialists, and increases in southerly distributed species. However, the specific climatic drivers behind these changes remain undescribed. We analysed annual fluctuations in the abundance of 59 breeding bird species in England over 45 years to test the effect of monthly temperature and precipitation means upon population trends. Strong positive correlations between population growth and both winter and breeding season temperature were identified for resident and short-distance migrants. Lagged correlations between population growth and summer temperature and precipitation identified for the first time a widespread negative impact of hot, dry summer weather. Resident populations appeared to increase following wet autumns. Populations of long-distance migrants were negatively affected by May temperature, consistent with a potential negative effect of phenological mismatch upon breeding success. There was evidence for some nonlinear relationships between monthly weather variables and population growth. Habitat specialists and cold-associated species showed consistently more negative effects of higher temperatures than habitat generalists and southerly distributed species associated with warm temperatures. Results suggest that previously reported changes in community composition represent the accumulated effects of spring and summer warming. Long-term population trends were more significantly correlated with species' sensitivity to temperature than precipitation, suggesting that warming has had a greater impact on population trends than changes in precipitation. Months where there had been the greatest warming were the most influential drivers of long-term change. There was also evidence that species with the greatest sensitivity to extremes of precipitation have

  20. Assessment of awareness regarding climate change in an urban community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal T Pandve

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Climate change has emerged as one of the most devastating environmental threats. It is essential to assess the awareness regarding climate change in the general population for framing the mitigation activities. Aim: To assess the awareness regarding climate change in an urban community. Settings and Design: Urban field practice area of a medical college in the Pune city. Observational study. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional survey was conducted in the urban adult population who had given the written consent. A pre-tested questionnaire was used for a face to face interview. Responses were evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used: Proportions, percentage. Results: Total 733 respondents above 18 years of age were included in the present survey. 672 (91.68% respondents commented that global climate is changing. 547 (81.40% respondents opined that human activities are contributing to climate change. 576 (85.71% respondents commented that climate changing based on their personal experiences. Commonest source of information about climate change was television (59.78%. Poor awareness about UNFCC, Kyoto Protocol and IPCC was found. 549 (74.90% respondents commented that deforestation contribute most significantly towards climate change. As per 530 (72.31% respondents water related issues are due to changing climate change. According to 529 (72.17% respondents, direct physical hazards of extreme climatic events are most important health related impact of climate change. According to 478 (65.21% respondents, life style changes (63.3% would be most effective in tackling climate change and for preventing further climate change. Conclusion: The urban general population is aware about changing global climate. Personal efforts are more important in mitigating climate change as per the urban general population. The awareness campaigns regarding mitigation activities are recommended.

  1. Phytoplankton Monitoring Network - Phytoplankton Analysis with Associated Collection Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A qualitative collection of data that includes salinity, temperature, phytoplankton counts and abundance ratios obtained from surface tows in the estuarine and...

  2. SYKE Proficiency Test 10/2014 Phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Vuorio, Kristiina; Björklöf, Katarina; Kuosa, Harri; Jokipii, Reija; JÀrvinen, Marko; Lehtinen, Sirpa; Leivuori, Mirja; NiemelÀ, Maija; VÀisÀnen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    The Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE) organized in 2014 the fourth virtual phytoplankton proficiency test based on filmed material. A total of 39 analysts from 27 organizations and eight countries took part the test. The test material represented phytoplankton that typically occurs in boreal lakes and in the northern Baltic Sea. The test included three components: 1) phytoplankton species identification test, 2) phytoplankton counting test and 3) phytoplankton measurement of cell dimens...

  3. Iron from melting glaciers fuels phytoplankton blooms in the Amundsen Sea (Southern Ocean): Phytoplankton characteristics and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderkamp, A.C.; Mills, M.M.; van Dijken, G.L.; Laan, P.; Thuróczy, C.-E.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Payne, C.D.; Visser, R.J.W.; Buma, A.G.J.; Arrigo, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    The phytoplankton community composition and productivity in waters of the Amundsen Sea and surrounding sea ice zone were characterized with respect to iron (Fe) input from melting glaciers. High Fe input from glaciers such as the Pine Island Glacier, and the Dotson and Crosson ice shelves resulted i

  4. Phytoplankton variability in relation to some environmental factors in the eastern coast of Suez Gulf, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Nassar, Mohamed Z.; El-Din, Nihal G. Shams; Gharib, Samiha M.

    2015-01-01

    Water samples were seasonally collected from 12 stations of the eastern coast of Suez Gulf during autumn of 2012 and winter, spring, and summer of 2013 in order to investigate phytoplankton community structure in relation to some physicochemical parameters. The study area harbored a diversified phytoplankton community (138 species), belonging to 67 genera. Four algal groups were represented and classified as Bacillariophyceae (90 species), Dinophyceae (28 species), Cyanophyceae (16 species), ...

  5. Identifying Phytoplankton Classes In California Reservoirs Using HPLC Pigment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S.; Peacock, M. B.; Kudela, R. M.; Negrey, K.

    2014-12-01

    Few bodies of water are routinely monitored for phytoplankton composition due to monetary and time constraints, especially the less accessible bodies of water in central and southern California. These lakes and estuaries are important for economic reasons such as tourism and fishing. This project investigated the composition of phytoplankton present using pigment analysis to identify dominant phytoplankton groups. A total of 28 different sites with a wide range of salinity (0 - 60) in central and southern California were examined. These included 13 different bodies of water in central California: 6 in the Sierras, 7 in the San Francisco Bay Estuary, and 15 from southern California. The samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid-chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the pigments present (using retention time and the spectral thumbprint). Diagnostic pigments were used to indicate the phytoplankton class composition, focusing on diatoms, dinoflagellates, cryptophytes, and cyanobacteria - all key phytoplankton groups indicative of the health of the sampled reservoir. Our results indicated that cyanobacteria dominated four of the seven bodies of central California water (Mono Lake, Bridgeport Reservoir, Steamboat Slough, and Pinto Lake); cryptophytes and nannoflagellates dominated two of the central California bodies of water (Mare Island Strait and Topaz Lake); and diatoms and dinoflagellates dominated one central California body of water, Oakland Inner Harbor, comprising more than 70% of the phytoplankton present. We expect the bodies of water from Southern California to be as disparate. Though this data is only a snapshot, it has significant implications in comparing different ecosystems across California, and it has the potential to provide valuable insight into the composition of phytoplankton communities.

  6. Stream invertebrate communities of Mongolia: current structure and expected changes due to climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Maasri, Alain; Gelhaus, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Background Mongolia’s riverine landscape is divided into three watersheds, differing in extent of permafrost, amount of precipitation and in hydrological connectivity between sub-drainages. In order to assess the vulnerability of macroinvertebrate communities to ongoing climate change, we consider the taxonomic and functional structures of stream communities in two major watersheds: The Central Asian Internal Watershed (CAIW) and the Arctic Ocean Watershed (AOW), together covering 86.1% of Mo...

  7. Changing times, changing stories: Generational differences in climate change perspectives from four remote indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Mercer, Nicole M.; Matkin, Elli; Laituri, Melinda J.; Toohey, Ryan C; Massey, Maggie; Kelly Elder; Schuster, Paul F.; Mutter, Edda A.

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities currently are facing a myriad of social and environmental changes. In response to these changes, studies concerning indigenous knowledge (IK) and climate change vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptation have increased dramatically in recent years. Risks to lives and livelihoods are often the focus of adaptation research; however, the cultural dimensions of climate change are equally important because cultural dimensions inform perceptions of risk. Furthermore, many Arctic and Subarctic IK climate change studies document observations of change and knowledge of the elders and older generations in a community, but few include the perspectives of the younger population. These observations by elders and older generations form a historical baseline record of weather and climate observations in these regions. However, many indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities are composed of primarily younger residents. We focused on the differences in the cultural dimensions of climate change found between young adults and elders. We outlined the findings from interviews conducted in four indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska. The findings revealed that (1) intergenerational observations of change were common among interview participants in all four communities, (2) older generations observed more overall change than younger generations interviewed by us, and (3) how change was perceived varied between generations. We defined “observations” as the specific examples of environmental and weather change that were described, whereas “perceptions” referred to the manner in which these observations of change were understood and contextualized by the interview participants. Understanding the differences in generational observations and perceptions of change are key issues in the development of climate change adaptation strategies.

  8. Phytoplankton Diversity and Geologically Relevant Carbon: Using metagenomics to determine phytoplankton biomarker production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodner, R. B.; Armbrust, E.

    2008-12-01

    Phytoplankton play an important role in the global carbon cycle, on short and long time scales. On long time scales, organic carbon, especially recalcitrant forms of biomass such as lipids, can be preserved and thus sequestered in sediments and rocks on geologic time scales. If the preserved lipids have some taxonomic specificity, they can be used as fossil biomarkers to characterize the community of organisms that contributed to ancient carbon sinks. Currently, it is not well understood how well the complex mixture of organic compounds preserved in geological carbon sinks represents the original community that produced those molecules or how the diversity of organism in a community is reflected in the lipid biomarkers they collectively synthesize. We have begun to investigate these questions by characterizing lipid biomarker production in modern phytoplankton communities with metagenomic data sets. Here we evaluate the information on community biomarker biosynthesis gathered from this type of data set using sterols as a case study. We have identified genes involved in sterol biosynthesis in a number of metagenomes and placed these genes in a phylogenetic context using a method designed to deal with short metagenomic sequences. The degree of taxonomic diversity of biomarker production measured with gene sequences can be more specific than lipid analysis alone.

  9. Analysis of Phytoplankton Community Composition and Water Quality Evaluation in Yanghe Reservoir%洋河水库浮游植物群落组成分析与水质评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋立钧; 郝桂玲; 杜迎欣; 李凤彬; 周云龙; 李文奇

    2011-01-01

    通过2006年和2009年对洋河水库浮游植物群落结构进行的调查,明确了洋河水库浮游植物群落组成及分布特征,利用种类多样性指数对水体营养状态进行了评价.结果表明,2006年浮游植物检出7门,43属,48种;2009年检出7门,51属,62种.两年中洋河水库共发现浮游植物7门,60属,78种.水库年均细胞密度差距较大,2006年为4 347×104 cell/L;2009年为1 331×104 cell/L.优势种群组成上基本相似,都是绿藻、蓝藻和硅藻型,其中,微囊藻是主要的优势种群.2006年微囊藻占优势时间贯穿全年,且数量多;2009年仅在7月-10月形成优势种,且数量较少.应用Margalef多样性指数法和Menkinick多样性指数法对洋河水库水质进行评价,结果显示,2006年水质为富营养型,2009年为中-富营养型.%The community structures of phytoplankton in Yanghe Reservoir were investigated in 2006 and 2009. Community composition and distribution characteristics of phytoplankton were observed in Yanghe Reservoir and the trophic status was assessed by the species diversity index. The results showed that 7 Phylums,43 genera and 48 species in 2006,and 7 Phylums,51 genera, and 62 species in 2009 were observed. In these two years, 7 Phylums,60 genera, and 78 species were observed. The difference of annual mean cell densities was high,which was 4 347X104 cell/L in 2006,but reached 1 331X104 cell/L in 2009. The dominant species were the green alga,blue alga and diatom. Among them,microcystis were dominant species. As dominant species,microcystis with more biomass lasted throughout the year of 2006,while it became dominant species only from July to October with less biomass in 2009. The results of the diversity assessment by Margalef and Menkinick indices indicated that the Yanghe Reservoir was eutrophication in 2006 and moderate-eutrophication in 2009.

  10. The seasonal variation of the phytoplankton size class in northern South China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytoplankton size class variation is a good indicator of water dynamics changes, alga blooms or ecosystem change, for it usually corresponds to different phytoplankton group composition. Remote sensing technique is a very effective method for studying phytoplankton at large scale by virtue of synoptic view and large area cover. Here we detected seasonal and annual phytoplankton size class variation using remote sensing data based on a bio-optical algorithm in northern South China Sea. Result showed that the phytoplankton size class turned to be smaller during summer time, because of the stability of the water body and lack of nutrients. While in winter, the north-east monsoon made the water dynamics become complex. Upwellings, mesoscale eddy, typhoon and a series of drifts bring underwater nutrients up to the sea surface. As a result, phytoplankton with bigger cell size began to grow and the cell size turned to be bigger. The fraction of micro-phytolankton changed from 7% to 10%, while nano-and pico-phytolankton fraction decreased from 29% to 24% and 64% to 62% respectively. Annual change of phytoplankton size classes was in a relatively slow pace, and no big difference was noticed in the normal year. Usually about 1–5 percent change for each size class. When compared 2008 with 1998, a decade variances could be monitored. All the results in this study showed that phytoplankton size class can be an effective indicator of the ecosystem or environmental change

  11. Sensitivity of winter phytoplankton communities from Andean lakes to artificial ultraviolet-B radiation Sensibilidad de comunidades fitoplanctónicas invernales de lagos andinos a la radiación ultravioleta-B artificial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. WALTER HELBLING

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available During July of 1999 sampling was carried out in five Andean lakes to determine the sensitivity of winter phytoplankton communities to ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm. The studied lakes, Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi, Gutiérrez, and Morenito, located in the Patagonia region (41° S, 71° W, 800 m of altitude, had attenuation coefficients for UV-B that ranged from 0.36 m-1 (Lake Moreno to 2.8 m-1 (Lake Morenito. The samples were inoculated with labeled carbon (NaH14CO3 and incubated in an illuminated chamber (UV-B = 0.35 W m-2, UV-A [320-400 nm] = 1.1 W m-2, and PAR [400-700 nm] = 10.8 W m-2 at 10 °C. The phytoplankton cells were exposed to UV radiation (280-400 nm + PAR (quartz tubes, and to UV-A + PAR (quartz tubes covered with Mylar-D. The total duration of the experiments was 4 h and two samples were taken from each treatment every hour. In lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi and Gutiérrez, the photosynthetic inhibition increased linearly with UV-B doses, while in Lake Morenito just a slight relationship was observed. After receiving a dose of 1.25 kJ m-2 (UV-B, phytoplankton from Lake Morenito had the highest cumulative photosynthetic inhibition (44 %, whereas in Lakes Moreno, El Trébol, Nahuel Huapi and Gutiérrez the inhibition was of 22, 11, 5, and 1 %, respectively. However, at the end of incubation period and after receiving doses of 5 kJ m-2, the most inhibited phytoplankton cells were from Lake Moreno (70 % and the most resistant (27 % was that from Lake Gutiérrez. The kinetics of inhibition was different in each lake, and transparent lakes, with higher proportion of large cells, had higher inhibition rates. The results suggest that an increase in UV-B radiation (e.g., produced by a decrease in stratospheric ozone would have a greater impact on microplankton from clear lakes, while pico- and nanoplankton from less transparent lakes will be less affectedDurante julio de 1999 se realizaron muestreos en cinco lagos

  12. Phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing in the subtropical Northeast Atlantic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cáceres

    Full Text Available Dilution experiments were performed to estimate phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates during two Lagrangian surveys in inner and eastern locations of the Eastern North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre province (NAST-E. Our design included two phytoplankton size fractions (0.2-5 µm and >5 µm and five depths, allowing us to characterize differences in growth and grazing rates between size fractions and depths, as well as to estimate vertically integrated measurements. Phytoplankton growth rates were high (0.11-1.60 d(-1, especially in the case of the large fraction. Grazing rates were also high (0.15-1.29 d(-1, suggesting high turnover rates within the phytoplankton community. The integrated balances between phytoplankton growth and grazing losses were close to zero, although deviations were detected at several depths. Also, O2 supersaturation was observed up to 110 m depth during both Lagrangian surveys. These results add up to increased evidence indicating an autotrophic metabolic balance in oceanic subtropical gyres.

  13. Changes in soil nematode communities under the impact of fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzdeva, L. I.; Matveeva, E. M.; Kovalenko, T. E.

    2007-06-01

    Changes taking place in the communities of soil nematodes of an artificially sown meadow under the impact of annually applied mineral fertilizers have been studied in a field experiment for nine years. It is shown that changes in the species composition, trophic structure, and numbers of nematodes from different genera depend on the fertilizer applied and on the competitiveness of the plant species grown. The spectra of nematode genera sensitive to the complete mineral fertilizer (NPK) and to the particular nutrients have been identified with the use of a number of parameters, including the maturity index of nematode communities, the biotope preferences of the particular nematode genera, and the general pattern of nematode habitats. The results obtained in this study can be used to assess the effect of mineral fertilizers on the soil fauna and to suggest optimum application rates of mineral fertilizers ensuring the sustainable development of meadow herbs. The use of the data on the trophic structure of nematode communities for predicting the ways of organic matter decomposition in the soil is discussed.

  14. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  15. Influence of river influx on phytoplankton community during fall inter–monsoon in the coastal waters off Kakinada, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sooria, P.M.; Reny, P.D.; Jagadeesan, L.; Nair, M.

    showed marked changes in composition and abundance between the two periods of observation. Abundance was considerably higher in October 2007 (av. 150.9 + or - 54.8 X 10 sup(3) cells l sup(-1)) compared to that of October 2006 (av.7.9 + or - 4.8 X 10 sup(3...

  16. The limit of the genetic adaptation to copper in freshwater phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouco, Mónica; López-Rodas, Victoria; González, Raquel; Huertas, I Emma; García-Sánchez, María J; Flores-Moya, Antonio; Costas, Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Copper is one of the most frequently used algaecides to control blooms of toxic cyanobacteria in water supply reservoirs. Among the negative impacts derived from the use of this substance is the increasing resistance of cyanobacteria to copper toxicity, as well as changes in the community structure of native phytoplankton. Here, we used the ratchet protocol to investigate the differential evolution and maximum adaptation capacity of selected freshwater phytoplankton species to the exposure of increasing doses of copper. Initially, a dose of 2.5 μM CuSO4·5H2O was able to completely inhibit growth in three strains of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, whereas growth of the chlorophyceans Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides and Desmodesmus intermedius (represented by two different strains) was completely abolished at 12 μM. A significant increase in resistance was achieved in all derived populations during the ratchet experiment. All the chlorophyceans were able to adapt to up to 270 μM of copper sulfate, but 10 μM was the highest concentration that M. aeruginosa strains were able to cope with, although one of the replicates adapted to 30 μM. The recurrent use and increasing doses of copper in water reservoirs could lead to the selection of copper-resistant mutants of both chlorophyceans and cyanobacteria. However, under high concentrations of copper, the composition of phytoplankton community could undergo a drastic change with cyanobacteria being replaced by copper-resistant chlorophyceans. This result stems from a distinct evolutionary potential of these species to adapt to this substance. PMID:24839094

  17. Community-based adaptation to climate change: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Jessica; Huq, Saleemul

    2009-06-15

    Over a billion people - the world's poorest and most bulnerable communities – will bear the brunt of climate change. For them, building local capacity to cope is a vital step towards resilience. Community-based adaptation (CBA) is emerging as a key response to this challenge. Tailored to local cultures and conditions, CBA supports and builds on autonomous adaptations to climate variability, such as the traditional baira or floating gardens of Bangladesh, which help small farmers' crops survive climate-driven floods. Above all, CBA is participatory – a process involving both local stakeholders, and development and disaster risk reduction practitioners. As such, it builds on existing cultural norms while addressing local development issues that contribute to climate vulnerability. CBA is now gaining ground in many regions, and is ripe for the reassessment offered here.

  18. The effect of phosphorus supply on the primary production of phytoplankton in the Stechlinsee (GDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of phosphorus supply on the primary production in phytoplankton was investigated in the Stechlinsee which is part of the tertiary cooling circuit of the nuclear power plant Rheinsberg. Measurements of the primary production (carbon 14 method), of phosphorus concentration, of light energy and of the uptake of orthophosphate were evaluated from 1970 to 1972. The quality and quantity of phytoplankton was studied in this period. The connection of primary production and supply of phosphates is described for the Stechlinsee on the basis of light energy utilization by phytoplankton in the primary production, of the orthophosphate uptake by the phytoplankton community and of the degree of saturation. The relatioship between exogeneous orthophosphate concentration and the biomass of phytoplankton regulates in connection with the orthophosphate uptake the internal energy effectiveness in the primary production. Statistical evaluations support these results

  19. Modeling the influence from ocean transport, mixing and grazing on phytoplankton diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjou, Mohamed; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Richardson, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton diversity, whether defined on the basis of functional groups or on the basis of numbers of individual species, is known to be heterogeneous throughout the global ocean. The factors regulating this diversity are generally poorly understood, although access to limiting nutrients and...... light is known to influence distributions for certain groups of phytoplankton. Here, we develop a simple box model of biomasses and a limiting nutrient to describe the composition of phytoplankton communities in the euphotic zone. In addition to analyzing the relative importance of nutrient availability...... in generating and maintaining diversity, we apply the model to quantify the potential role of zooplankton grazing and ocean transport for the coexistence of competing species and phytoplankton diversity. We analyze the sensitivity of phytoplankton biomass distributions to different types of grazing...

  20. Quantifying the response of structural complexity and community composition to environmental change in marine communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Renata; Bryson, Mitch; Bridge, Tom; Hustache, Julie; Williams, Stefan B; Byrne, Maria; Figueira, Will

    2016-05-01

    Habitat structural complexity is a key factor shaping marine communities. However, accurate methods for quantifying structural complexity underwater are currently lacking. Loss of structural complexity is linked to ecosystem declines in biodiversity and resilience. We developed new methods using underwater stereo-imagery spanning 4 years (2010-2013) to reconstruct 3D models of coral reef areas and quantified both structural complexity at two spatial resolutions (2.5 and 25 cm) and benthic community composition to characterize changes after an unprecedented thermal anomaly on the west coast of Australia in 2011. Structural complexity increased at both resolutions in quadrats (4 m(2)) that bleached, but not those that did not bleach. Changes in complexity were driven by species-specific responses to warming, highlighting the importance of identifying small-scale dynamics to disentangle ecological responses to disturbance. We demonstrate an effective, repeatable method for quantifying the relationship among community composition, structural complexity and ocean warming, improving predictions of the response of marine ecosystems to environmental change. PMID:26679689

  1. Microbial community changes in heathland soil communities along a geographical gradient: Interaction with climate change manipulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sowerby, A.; Emmett, B.; Beier, C.;

    2005-01-01

    Climate change constitutes a serious threat for European heathlands as unlike other sources of damage, such as over-grazing, local remediation is not a possibility. Within the large pan-European projects, CLIMOOR and VULCAN, the effect of periodic drought and increased temperature were investigat...... observed across all regions; however, the soils of northern Europe may be more sensitive to changes in rainfall patterns than more moisture limited Southern European soils. (c) 2005 Elsevier Lid. All rights reserved....... in four heathland ecosystems along a geographical and climatic gradient across Europe. Fluorogenically labelled substrates for four enzymes (glucosidase, sulphatase, phosphatase, leucine amino peptidase) were used to measure extra-cellular enzyme activity in soil samples from each of the CLIMOOR...... sites. Microbial extra-cellular enzyme production is linked to microbial activity as well as soil physico-chemical properties, making soil enzymes one of the more reactive components of terrestrial ecosystems and potentially excellent indicators of soil microbial functional status and diversity. Across...

  2. 2009-2011年东海陆架海域网采浮游植物群落的季节变化%Seasonal variations of netz-phytoplankton community in East China Sea continental shelf from 2009-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海娇; 傅文诚; 孙军

    2015-01-01

    根据2009年7、8月(夏季)、12月到翌年1月(冬季)、2010年11月(秋季)和2011年4、5月(春季)共4个航次在东海陆架区进行的现场多学科综合调查,报道了4个季节在整个东海海域的浮游植物的空间分布及群落结构特征,并探讨了影响其分布格局的环境因子效应。结果表明,东海浮游植物群落主要由硅藻、甲藻组成。共检出浮游植物5门88属299种(含未定种)。调查区夏季细胞丰度达最高,平均为(8659.572±28937.27)cell/L,其次是秋、冬季,春季最低,分别为(4413.726±12534.573)cell/L、(421.773±647.532)cell/L 和(218.479±265.897)cell/L。硅藻细胞丰度在夏、秋、冬3个季节占总平均丰度的95%以上,甲藻细胞丰度在春季最高,占总浮游植物细胞丰度的69%。调查海区浮游植物丰度高值区主要集中在长江口海域,并向外海呈递减趋势。不同群落间存在季节更替和演替现象。物种丰富度自春夏秋冬逐渐升高。香农指数(Shannon-Wiener index)和均匀度指数(Pielou index)分布较为一致,物种丰富度指数(Margalef index)呈现时空分布差异。Pearson 相关分析结果表明:不同季节的物种间更迭与海区特定的物理化学参数显著相关。%Multidisciplinary investigations of phytoplankton community in the continental shelf regions of East China Sea (ECS)were performed during four cruises between year 2009-2011 (summer 2009,winter 2009,autumn 2010 and spring 2011).The present study reported the phytoplankton species composition,community structure,its dis-tribution in the ECS in four seasons,and its responses to environmental factors.Phytoplankton in the ECS were mainly composed of diatoms and dinflagellates.A totally,299 taxa (including under defined species)belonging to 88 genera and 5 phyla were identified.The phytoplankton cell abundance was highest in summer

  3. Short-term changes in the mesozooplankton community and copepod gut pigment in the Chukchi Sea in autumn: reflections of a strong wind event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Nishino, S.; Inoue, J.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of atmospheric turbulence on a marine ecosystem, high-frequency samplings (two to four times per day) of a mesozooplankton community and the gut pigment of dominant copepods were performed at a fixed station in the Chukchi Sea from 10 to 25 September 2013. During the study period, a strong wind event (SWE) was observed on 18 September. After the SWE, the biomass of chlorophyll a (Chl a) increased, especially for micro-size (> 10 μm) fractions. The zooplankton abundance ranged from 23 610 to 56 809 ind. m-2 and exhibited no clear changes as a result of the SWE. In terms of abundance, calanoid copepods constituted the dominant taxa (mean: 57 %), followed by barnacle larvae (31 %). Within the calanoid copepods, small-sized Pseudocalanus spp. (65 %) and large-sized C. glacialis (30 %) dominated. In the population structure of C. glacialis, copepodid stage 5 (C5) dominated, and the mean copepodid stage did not vary with the SWE. The dominance of accumulated lipids in C5 and C6 females with immature gonads indicated that they were preparing for seasonal diapause. The gut pigment of C. glacialis C5 was higher at night and was correlated with ambient Chl a (Chl a, and a significant increase was observed after the SWE (2.6 vs. 4.5 ng pigment ind.-1). The grazing impact by C. glacialis C5 was estimated to be 4.14 mg C m-2 day-1, which corresponded to 0.5-4.6 % of the biomass of the micro-size phytoplankton. Compared with the metabolic food requirement, C. glacialis feeding on phytoplankton accounted for 12.6 % of their total food requirement. These facts suggest that C. glacialis could not maintain their population by feeding solely on phytoplankton and that other food sources (i.e., microzooplankton) must be important in autumn. As observed by the increase in gut pigment, the temporal phytoplankton bloom, which is enhanced by the atmospheric turbulence (SWE) in autumn, may have a positive effect on copepod nutrition.

  4. Analysis of the composition and community structure of phytoplankton in Xingkai Lake%兴凯湖浮游植物数量特征与群落结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建国; 于洪贤; 马成学; 曲翠

    2011-01-01

    分别于2007年7月、10月和2008年5月对黑龙江流域的兴凯湖(我国境内部分)12个采样点的浮游植物群落结构进行调查,并利用多维尺度分析(MDS)对各季节、各采样点之间浮游植物的丰度、生物量和群落关系进行了研究.结果表明:在兴凯湖12个采样点共采到浮游植物6门62种,绿藻门种数最多23种,占37.1%;硅藻门次之,为22种,占35.48%;蓝藻门12种,占19.35%;隐藻门和裸藻门均为2种;金藻门1种.浮游植物年平均丰度和生物量分别为2.2×107 ind./L和93.82 mg/L.Shannon-Weaver指数全年变化范围在0.18~4.48之间,春、夏季节水质较好,秋季水体存在轻微富营养化;兴凯湖沿岸水质较好,湖心区的水质较差.%Investigation of phytoplankton species and community structure in Xingkai Lake ( part of the territory of China) was carried out at 12 sampling sites in July, October 2007 and May 2008, respectively. The relationships among abundance , biomass and community between each season and site were studied by using multidimensional scaling ( MDS). The results showed that, a total of 6 phyla 62 species were identified, among which, the majority were Clorphyta (23) and Cyanophyta (22), followed by Bacillaroiphyta (12), Euglenophyta (2) and Cryptophyta (2), Chrysophyta (1). The annual mean abundance and biomass were 2. 2 x 107 ind. /L and 93. 82 mg/L. The Shannon-Weavers index was from 0. 18 to 4.48. The water quality is good in spring and summer, but a slight water eutrophication in autumn. In a word, the water quality was good in the lake coast, followed by the experimental area, the central area was poor.

  5. Changes in northern Gulf of Mexico sediment bacterial and archaeal communities exposed to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemical changes in marine sediments during coastal water hypoxia are well described, but less is known about underlying changes in microbial communities. Bacterial and archaeal communities in Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) hypoxic zone sediments were characterized by py...

  6. Improving Climate Change Communication Skills through Community Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, J.

    2015-12-01

    While many undergraduate Atmospheric Science departments are expanding their curriculums to focus on the science of climate change, often overlooked is the need to educate students about how this topic can be effectively communicated to others. It has become increasingly difficult for young scientists to comfortably discuss this polarizing topic with people outside of the classroom. To address this, Atmospheric Science faculty at Lyndon State College are providing undergraduate students the opportunity to practice this important skill by reaching out to the local community. Over the past year, students have been meeting regularly to discuss climate change and its impacts, and to present this information to the general public at local schools and organizations. The group was organized with the primary goal of teaching undergraduate students about effective ways to communicate basic climate science to nonscientists, but to also improve public understanding of anthropogenic climate change while starting a conversation among young people in the community. We will identify lessons learned after one year, discuss effective strategies, and summarize student feedback.

  7. Tidal Prism Modeling of Phytoplankton and Nitrogen Concentrations in Narragansett Bay and its Sub-Embayments

    Science.gov (United States)

    A tidal prism model was developed to calculate temporal changes in the spatially averaged concentration of three state variables: phytoplankton, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, and detritus. Our main objective was to develop a model to help us understand the causes of phytoplankton...

  8. Transitioning to low carbon communities-from behaviour change to systemic change: Lessons from Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transitioning to low carbon communities requires an understanding of community practices and resultant emissions, as well as the technologies, infrastructures and institutions associated with and accessed by communities. Moreover, it requires an understanding of the connections between these integrated system components, its dynamics, a defined transition and potential 'levers' involved in 'transitioning'. This paper accepts the notion that 'levers' include programmes designed to achieve practice or behaviour change in households which result in less carbon intensive lifestyles, and focuses on the factors that shape human behaviour and influence householder energy consumption. Research to date by the authors and others indicates that a comprehensive socio-technical framework that considers both individual psychological factors as well as the systems, standards and norms under which individuals operate is fundamental to the development of successful strategies to shift towards low carbon communities. A database has been compiled of over one hundred local programmes aimed at realising carbon neutral communities across Australia largely through approaches to behaviour change. This paper presents the findings of an analysis of these programmes, particularly with regard to the extent to which they take account of a socio-technical framework or understanding of domestic consumption behaviours and whether they are aware of or aim to influence changing standards and expectations around consumption practices within the home. While a number of exemplary community-based programmes adopt an integrated approach to addressing both technical and behavioural dimensions in the shift to low carbon communities, it was found that most fail to take sufficient account of the systems, standards and norms shaping consumption. Conclusions include directions for policy and programme design based on the study findings.

  9. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeala eShaked

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically-bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as spectrum rather than an absolute all or nothing. We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe compounds and environments, and for gauging the contribution of various Fe substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  10. Everglades Plant Community Response to 20th Century Hydrologic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, D. A.; Bernhardt, C. E.; Holmes, C. W.; Weimer, L. M.

    2002-05-01

    Pollen records in sediment cores from sites in the historic Everglades allowed us to document the natural variability of the ecosystem over the past 2,000 years and contrast it to 20th century changes in wetland plant communities. The natural system included extensive water-lily sloughs, sawgrass ridges, and scattered tree islands extending from Lake Okeechobee southward through Shark River Slough. Between ~1000 AD and 1200 AD, weedy species such as Amaranthus (water hemp) became more abundant, indicating decreased annual rainfall, shorter hydroperiods, and shallower water depths during this time. After ~1200 AD, vegetation returned to its pre-1000 AD composition. During the 20th century, two phases of hydrologic alteration occurred. Completed by 1930, the first phase included construction of the Hoover Dike, canals linking Lake Okeechobee to the Atlantic Ocean, and the Tamiami Trail. Reconstructions of plant communities indicate that these